WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbulent flow heat

  1. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  2. An experimental investigation of turbulent flow heat transfer through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the turbulent flow heat transfer and to determine the pressure drop characteristics of air, flowing through a tube with insert. An insert of special geometry is used inside the tube. The test section is electrically heated, and air is allowed to flow as the working fluid ...

  3. Numerical prediction of flow, heat transfer, turbulence and combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Spalding, D Brian; Pollard, Andrew; Singhal, Ashok K

    1983-01-01

    Numerical Prediction of Flow, Heat Transfer, Turbulence and Combustion: Selected Works of Professor D. Brian Spalding focuses on the many contributions of Professor Spalding on thermodynamics. This compilation of his works is done to honor the professor on the occasion of his 60th birthday. Relatively, the works contained in this book are selected to highlight the genius of Professor Spalding in this field of interest. The book presents various research on combustion, heat transfer, turbulence, and flows. His thinking on separated flows paved the way for the multi-dimensional modeling of turbu

  4. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent multiphase channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.

    2015-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to assess the importance of compressibility in turbulent channel flow of a mixture of air and water vapor with dispersed water droplets. The dispersed phase is allowed to undergo phase transition, which leads to heat and mass transfer between the phases. We

  5. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  6. Computation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slagter, W.

    1979-01-01

    This research is carried out in order to provide information on the thermohydraulic behaviour of fast reactor subassemblies. The research work involves the development of versatile computation methods and the evaluation of combined theoretical and experimental work on fluid flow and heat transfer in fuel rod bundles. The computation method described here rests on the application of the distributed parameter approach. The conditions considered cover steady, turbulent flow and heat transfer of incompressible fluids in bundles of bare rods. Throughout 1978 main efforts were given to the development of the VITESSE program and to the validation of the hydrodynamic part of the code. In its present version the VITESSE program is applicable to predict the fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer in the subchannels of a bundle with bare rods. In this paper the main features of the code are described as well as the present status of development

  7. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  8. DNS of turbulent channel flow subject to oscillatory heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukhvostova Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the heat transfer in a turbulent channel flow, which is periodically heated through its walls. We consider the flow of air and water vapor using direct numerical simulation. We consider the fluid as a compressible Newtonian gas. We focus on the heat transfer properties of the system, e.g., the temperature difference between the walls and the Nusselt number. We consider the dependence of these quantities on the frequency of the applied heat flux. We observe that the mean temperature difference is quite insensitive to the frequency and that the amplitude of its oscillations is such that its value multiplied by the square root of frequency is approximately constant. Next we add droplets to the channel, which can undergo phase transitions. The heat transfer properties of the channel in the case with droplets are found to increase by more than a factor of two, compared to the situation without droplets.

  9. Application of two-equation turbulence models to turbulent gas flow heated by a high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    Heat transfer in heated turbulent gas flow is analyzed using two-equation turbulence models. Four kinds of two-equation models are examined; that is, k-epsilon model by Jones-Launder, k-w model by Wilcox-Traci, k-kL model by Rotta, k-ω model by Saffman-Wilcox. The results are compared with more than ten experiments by seven authors. The k-kL model proposed originally by Rotta and modified by the present author is found to give relatively the best results. It well predicts the decrease in the heat transfer coefficient found in the heated turbulent gas flow; however, it fails to predict the laminarization due to a strong heating. (author)

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer in a Ribbed Coolant Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek G. Ramgadia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic and thermally fully developed turbulent flow are presented for flow through a stationary duct with periodic array of inline transverse rib turbulators. The rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio (/ℎ is 0.1 and the rib pitch to rib height ratio (/ is 10. The effect of secondary flow due to presence of rib turbulators on heat and mass transfer has been investigated. The present work reviews the use of a large eddy simulation (LES turbulence model, known as shear-improved Smagorinsky model (SISM, for predicting flow and heat transfer characteristics in the fully developed periodic flow region. The computations are performed for Reynolds number of 2,053 and the working fluid chosen to be air, the Prandtl number of which is 0.7. Instantaneous flow field, time-mean, and turbulent quantities are reported together with heat transfer and a close match with experiments has been observed.

  11. Local heat transfer coefficient for turbulent flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1983-03-01

    The correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients in heated triangular array of rod bundles, in terms of the flow hydrodynamic parameters is presented. The analysis is made first for fluid with Prandtl numbers varying from moderated to high (Pr>0.2), and then extended to fluids with low Prandtl numbers (0.004 [pt

  12. Semi-empirical model for heat transfer coefficient in liquid metal turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1982-01-01

    The heat transfer by forced convection in a metal liquid turbulent flow for circular ducts is analyzed. An analogy between the momentum and heat in the wall surface, is determined, aiming to determine an expression for heat transfer coefficient in function of the friction coefficient. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Influence of fluid-property variation on turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical annular CHANNEL FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joong Hun Bae; Jung Yul Yoo; Haecheon Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of variable fluid property on turbulent convective heat transfer is investigated using direct numerical simulations. We consider thermally-developing flows of air and supercritical-pressure CO 2 in a vertical annular channel where the inner wall is heated with a constant heat flux and the outer wall is insulated. Turbulence statistics show that the heat and momentum transport characteristics of variable-property flows are significantly different from those of constant-property flows. The difference is mainly caused by the spatial and temporal variations of fluid density. The non-uniform density distribution causes fluid particles to be accelerated either by expansion or buoyancy force, while the temporal density fluctuations change the heat and momentum transfer via transport of turbulent mass flux, ρ'u' i . Both effects of the spatial and temporal variations of density are shown to be important in the analysis of turbulent convective heat transfer for supercritical-pressure fluids. For variable-property heated air flows, however, the effect of temporal density fluctuations can be neglected at low Mach number, which is in good accordance with the Morkovin's hypothesis. (authors)

  14. Influence of geometrical parameters on turbulent flow and heat transfer characteristics in outward helically corrugated tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yaning; Li, Bingxi; Han, Huaizhi; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The outward helically corrugated tube is suitable for high pressure fluids. • The effects of corrugation height and pitch on turbulent flow are investigated. • The relationships among swirl, rotational flow and heat transfer are discussed. - Abstract: Concerning a novel outward helically corrugated tube manufactured through hydraulic forming under 290 MPa, a numerical study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of turbulent flow dynamics and heat transfer enhancement based on the Reynolds stress model (RSM) using the FLUENT software. A validation of the Reynolds stress model for turbulent flow over a wavy surface was performed, and the results were then compared with the results from a large eddy simulation (LES) model and with experimental measurements. The helically corrugated tubes with different corrugation height-to-diameter ratios and pitch-to-diameter ratios are then evaluated to explore their influence on turbulent flow and heat transfer. It was found that the intensity of swirl flow was enhanced with an increase in the corrugation height, and it increased with a decrease in the corrugation pitch, the intensification of the swirl flow strengthens the heat transfer and resistance characteristics. The intensity of rotational flow was enhanced with an increase in the corrugation height, and increased with an increase in the corrugation pitch; the enhanced rotational flow causes an inhibition effect on heat transfer and resistance. Moreover, the maximum values of the local Nusselt number and the friction factor along the walls were observed at the reattachment point, and their minimum values appeared at the core of the swirl flow. It is therefore reasonable to keep the corrugation height-to-diameter ratios be less than 0.1, and the pitch-to-diameter ratios be less than 2 to ensure that the growth rate of the heat transfer is greater than the growth rate of the flow resistance.

  15. Numerical turbulent convective heat transfer and fluid flow in complex channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, M.

    1996-04-01

    This investigation concerns numerical turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow in complex channels for fully developed periodic state. Numerical application of different turbulence models for forced convective heat transfer in three dimensional channels are presented. It also concerns prediction of secondary motions and temperature distribution in straight and corrugated ducts with different cross section area. The standard linear k-e and Speziale`s non-linear k-e models with wall functions are applied to calculate the turbulent shear stresses. SED, GGDH and WET models are used to predict the turbulent heat fluxes. The overall thermal-hydraulic performance is presented in terms of friction factor and Nu-number. Some formulas are also presented to estimate the Nu-number in various wavy channels. The numerical approach is based on the finite volume technique with non-staggered grid arrangement. Rhie-Chow interpolation with SIMPLEC-algorithm is used. The convective terms are treated by hybrid, MUSCL, van Leer and QUICK schemes while the diffusive terms are treated by central difference scheme. The fully developed turbulent state is achieved by imposing periodic conditions in the main flow direction. In general, a numerical method for calculation of turbulent convective heat transfer in complex channels is presented. 4 refs, 3 figs

  16. Simplified computational simulation of liquid metal behaviour in turbulent flow with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.B. da.

    1992-09-01

    The present work selected the available bibliography equations and empirical relationships to the development of a computer code to obtain the turbulent velocity and temperature profiles in liquid metal tube flow with heat generation. The computer code is applied to a standard problem and the results are considered satisfactory, at least from the viewpoint of qualitative behaviour. (author). 50 refs, 21 figs, 3 tabs

  17. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  18. Comparison of dns of compressible and incompressible turbulent droplet-laden heated channel flow with phase transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a turbulent channel flow with dispersed droplets is examined. The dispersed phase is allowed to have phase transition, which leads to heat and mass transfer between the phases, and correspondingly modulates turbulent flow properties. As a point of reference we examine the flow of water

  19. Estimation of boundary heat flux using experimental temperature data in turbulent forced convection flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwani, Ajit K.; Talukdar, Prabal; Subbarao, P. M. V.

    2015-03-01

    Heat flux at the boundary of a duct is estimated using the inverse technique based on conjugate gradient method (CGM) with an adjoint equation. A two-dimensional inverse forced convection hydrodynamically fully developed turbulent flow is considered. The simulations are performed with temperature data measured in the experimental test performed on a wind tunnel. The results show that the present numerical model with CGM is robust and accurate enough to estimate the strength and position of boundary heat flux.

  20. A Dual-Plane PIV Study of Turbulent Heat Transfer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Locke, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film cooling is a widely used technique in turbomachinery and rocket propulsion applications, where cool injection air protects a surface from hot combustion gases. The injected air typically has a different velocity and temperature from the free stream combustion flow, yielding a flow field with high turbulence and large temperature differences. These thin film cooling flows provide a good test case for evaluating computational model prediction capabilities. The goal of this work is to provide a database of flow field measurements for validating computational flow prediction models applied to turbulent heat transfer flows. In this work we describe the application of a Dual-Plane Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in a thin film cooling wind tunnel facility where the injection air stream velocity and temperatures are varied in order to provide benchmark turbulent heat transfer flow field measurements. The Dual-Plane PIV data collected include all three components of velocity and all three components of vorticity, spanning the width of the tunnel at multiple axial measurement planes.

  1. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer though sinusoidal ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroshan, Hamid

    2018-02-01

    Turbulent forced convection heat transfer in corrugated plate surfaces was studied by means of CFD. Flow through corrugated plates, which are sets of sinusoidal ducts, was analyzed for different inlet flow angles (0° to 50°), aspect ratios (0.1 to 10), Reynolds numbers (2000 to 40,000) and Prantdel numbers (0.7 to 5). Heat transfer is affected significantly by variation of aspect ratio. A maximum heat transfer coefficient is observed at a particular aspect ratio although the aspect ratio has a minor effect on friction factor. Enlarging inlet flow angle also leads to a higher heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss in aspect ratios close to unity. Dependency of Nusselt and friction factor on the angle and aspect ratio was interpreted by means of appearance of secondary motions and coexistence of laminar and turbulent flow in a cross section. Comparing the results with experimental data shows a maximum 12.8% difference. By evaluating the results, some correlations were proposed to calculate Nusselt number and friction factor for entrance and fully developed regions. A corrugated plate with an aspect ratio equal to 1.125 and an inlet flow angle equal to 50° gives the best heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics.

  2. Simple heat transfer correlations for turbulent tube flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taler Dawid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents three power-type correlations of a simple form, which are valid for Reynolds numbers range from 3·103 ≤ Re ≤ 106, and for three different ranges of Prandtl number: 0.1 ≤ Pr ≤ 1.0, 1.0 < Pr ≤ 3.0, and 3.0 < Pr ≤ 103. Heat transfer correlations developed in the paper were compared with experimental results available in the literature. The comparisons performed in the paper confirm the good accuracy of the proposed correlations. They are also much simpler compared with the relationship of Gnielinski, which is also widely used in the heat transfer calculations.

  3. Transient hydraulics and heat transfer in a turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.

    1975-06-01

    In a reactor transient analysis, the friction factor and the heat transfer coefficient are assumed equal to the steady state values even in a transient state. This quasi-static assumption has been examined in the present paper. (orig./TK) [de

  4. DNS of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with streamwisely varying thermal boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yohji; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) have been performed for the turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow. In the present study, effect of thermal boundary condition is examined. DNS has been carried out for streamwisely thermal boundary conditions (Re τ =180) with Pγ=0.71 to obtain statistical mean temperatures, temperature variances, budget terms and time scale ratios etc. The obtained results have indicated that the time scale ratio varies along a streamwise. (author)

  5. Numerical simulation of turbulent unsteady compressible pipe flow with heat transfer in the entrance region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Nouri-Broujerdi, Ali

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, the compressible gas flow through a pipe subjected to wall heat flux in unsteady condition in the entrance region is investigated numerically. The coupled conservation equations governing turbulent compressible viscous flow in the developing region of a pipe are solved numerically under different thermal boundary conditions. The numerical procedure is a finite-volume-based finite-element method applied to unstructured grids. The convection terms are discretized by the well-defined Roe method, whereas the diffusion terms are discretized by a Galerkin finite-element formulation. The temporal terms are evaluated based on an explicit fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme. The effect of different thermal conditions on the pressure loss of unsteady flow is investigated. The results show that increase in the inflow temperature or pipe-wall heat flux increases the pressure drop or decreases the mass flow rate in the pipe.

  6. Modelling and simulation of turbulence and heat transfer in wall-bounded flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovac, M.

    2006-01-01

    At present it is widely accepted that there is no universal turbulence model, i.e. no turbulence model can give acceptably good predictions for all turbulent flows that are found in nature or engineering. Every turbulence model is based on certain assumptions, and hence it is aimed at certain type

  7. DNS of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with a high spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozuka, Makoto [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: kozuka.makoto@gmail.com; Seki, Yohji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Kawamura, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: kawa@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp

    2009-06-15

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow are performed to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Prandtl numbers on higher-order turbulence statistics such as a turbulent Prandtl number and the budget for the dissipation rate of the temperature variance. The Reynolds numbers based on the friction velocity and the channel half width are 180 and 395, and the molecular Prandtl numbers Pr's 0.71-10.0. Careful attention is paid to ensure accuracy of the higher-order statistics through the use of a high spatial resolution comparable to Batchelor length scale. The wall-asymptotic value of the turbulent Prandtl number is mostly independent of Reynolds number for the current range of Pr's. The budget for the dissipation rate of the temperature variance has been computed, and the negligible effect of a Reynolds number on the sum of all source and sink terms in near-wall region in the current computational range is found. This result is quite similar to the one in the budget for the dissipation rate of turbulent energy. In addition, a priori test for existing models is also performed to assess the Pr dependence on the individual terms and their summations in the budget.

  8. DNS of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with a high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuka, Makoto; Seki, Yohji; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow are performed to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Prandtl numbers on higher-order turbulence statistics such as a turbulent Prandtl number and the budget for the dissipation rate of the temperature variance. The Reynolds numbers based on the friction velocity and the channel half width are 180 and 395, and the molecular Prandtl numbers Pr's 0.71-10.0. Careful attention is paid to ensure accuracy of the higher-order statistics through the use of a high spatial resolution comparable to Batchelor length scale. The wall-asymptotic value of the turbulent Prandtl number is mostly independent of Reynolds number for the current range of Pr's. The budget for the dissipation rate of the temperature variance has been computed, and the negligible effect of a Reynolds number on the sum of all source and sink terms in near-wall region in the current computational range is found. This result is quite similar to the one in the budget for the dissipation rate of turbulent energy. In addition, a priori test for existing models is also performed to assess the Pr dependence on the individual terms and their summations in the budget.

  9. The influence of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, G.J.; Sielwa, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    The study is presented of the effects of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube. One model for the turbulent Eddy viscosity and termal Eddy diffusivity developed by CEBECI; NA and HABIB was utilized. The theoretical results agree well with experimental results [pt

  10. Aerodynamics, heat and mass transfer in steam-aerosol turbulent flows in containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, B.I.; Pershukov, V.A.; Ris, V.V. [Research & Engineering Centre of Nuclear Plants Safety, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    In this report an analysis of aerodynamic and heat transfer processes at the blowdown of gas-dispersed mixture into the containment volume is presented. A few models for description of the volume averaged and local characteristics are analyzed. The mathematical model for description of the local characteristics of the turbulent gas-dispersed flows was developed. The calculation of aerodynamic, heat and mass transfer characteristics was based on the Navier-Stokes, energy and gas mass fractions conservation equations. For calculation of dynamics and deposition of the aerosols the original diffusion-inertia model is developed. The pulsating characteristics of the gaseous phase were calculated on the base (k-{xi}) model of turbulence with modification to account thermogravitational force action and influence of particle mass loading. The appropriate boundary conditions using the {open_quotes}near-wall function{close_quotes} approach was obtained. Testing of the mathematical models and boundary conditions has shown a good agreement between computation and data of comparison. The described mathematical models were applied to two- and three dimensional calculations of the turbulent flow in containment at the various stages of the accident.

  11. V-cut twisted tape insert effect on heat transfer enhancement of single phase turbulent flow heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaningsih, Indri; Wijayanta, Agung Tri; Miyazaki, Takahiko; Koyama, Shigeru

    2018-02-01

    Turbulator is recognized as a method to increase the performance of the heat exchanger. Turbulator in the form of V-cut twisted tape insert could help to increase the performance by enhancing the coefficient of the heat transfer. This paper proposes a new design of V-cut twisted tape insert (VTT) with different width ratio (w/W), which investigated on the heat transfer enhancement, in the form of Nusselt number (Nu) and friction factor (f) characteristics. Three different width ratios (w/W) 0.32; 0.38 and 0.48 are introduced in this experiment. The working fluid is the hot water in the inner tube and cold water in the annulus, the flow direction is counter-flow. The temperature inlet of hot water is kept constant at 60°C while the flow rate is in the range of Reynolds number 5400 - 17,350. The heat exchanger without insertion (plain tube) and typical twisted tape insert (TT) are examined for comparison. Results indicate that the proposed VTT increases the heat transfer, friction factor, and thermal performance of the heat exchanger. Under the similar condition, VTT provides the best performance in comparison with TT and plain tube. Decreasing width ratio (w/W) increases the heat transfer and thermal performance. However, when the heat transfer is increased, the friction factor is also increasing. The results also revealed that the use of the VTT and TT, the increase in the heat transfer and friction factor up to 97% and 3.48 times of the plain tube. The highest thermal performance is 1.4.

  12. Effects of polymer stresses on analogy between momentum and heat transfer in drag-reduced turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2018-03-01

    The effects of polymer stresses on the analogy between momentum and heat transfer are examined by using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of viscoelastic turbulent channel flows using a constant heat flux boundary condition. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half height is 125, and the Prandtl number is 5. The polymer stress is modeled using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model, and low (15%), intermediate (34%), and high drag reduction (DR) (52%) cases are examined. The Colburn analogy is found to be inapplicable for viscoelastic turbulent flows, suggesting dissimilarity between the momentum and heat transfer at the macroscopic coefficient level. The mean temperature profile also shows behaviour different from the mean velocity profile in drag-reduced flows. In contrast to the dissimilarity in the mean profiles, the turbulent Prandtl number Prt predicted by the DNS is near unity. This implies that turbulent heat transfer is still analogous to turbulent momentum transfer in drag-reduced flows, as in Newtonian flow. An increase in DR is accompanied by an increase in the correlation coefficient ρuθ between the instantaneous fluctuations in the streamwise velocity u and temperature θ. The correlation coefficient between u' and wall-normal velocity fluctuations v', ρ-u v, exhibits a profile similar to that of ρ-θ v in drag-reduced and Newtonian flows. Finally, the budget analysis of the transport equations of turbulent heat flux shows a strong similarity between the turbulent momentum and heat transfer, which is consistent with the predictions of Prt near unity.

  13. Controlling Heat Transport and Flow Structures in Thermal Turbulence Using Ratchet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchetlike roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the large scale circulation roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, biofluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.

  14. Turbulent heat transfer and nanofluid flow in a protruded ribbed square passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    Full Text Available In this article, turbulent heat transfer of nanofluid flow in square passage with protruded rib shape is numerically and experimentally studied over Reynolds number ranges of 4000–18000. Different nanoparticles (Al2O3, CuO, and ZnO, with different concentration (φ range of 1–4% and different nanoparticle diameter (dnp range of 30–45 nm are disperse in water (base fluid. Several parameters such as stream wise distance (Xs/dp range of 1.4–2.6, span wise distance (Ys/dp range of 1.4–2.6, ratio of protruded height to print diameter (ep/dp range of 0.83–1.67 also studied to find the consequence on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics. Simulations were carried out to obtain heat and fluid flow behaviour of smooth and ribbed square channel using commercial CFD software, ANSYS 15.0 (Fluent. Renormalization k-ε model was employed to assess the influence of protruded ribs on turbulent flow and velocity field. The outcome indicates that Al2O3 nanofluid has the highest value of average Nusselt number as compare to other nanofluids. The average Nusselt number increases as the concentration increases and it decreases as nanoparticle diameter increases. The thermal hydrodynamic performance parameter based on equal pumping power, average Nusselt number and average friction factor were found to be highest for Al2O3, φ = 0.04, dnp = 30 nm, Xs/dp = 1.8, Ys/dp=1.8 and ep/dp=1.0. The numerical data are compared with the corresponding experimental data. Comparison between CFD and experimental analysis results showed that good agreement as the data fell within ±7.0% error band. Keywords: Nanofluid, Turbulent heat transfer, Stream and span wise spacing, Flow channel, Protruded rib

  15. Interaction of chemical reactions and radiant heat transfer with temperature turbulent pulsations and its effect on heat traner in high-temperature gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, B.S.; Zal'tsman, I.G.; Shikov, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Methods of taking account of mutual effect of chemical transformations, radiation and turbulence in the calculations of heat transfer in gas flows are considered. Exponential functions of medium parameters are used to describe chemical sources and optical properties of media. It is shown using as an example the dissociation reaction C 2 reversible 2C that the effect of temperature and composition pulsations on recombination rates is negligibly small. It is also shown on the example of turbulent flow of hot molecular gas in a flat channel with cold walls that at moderate temperatures the effect of temperature pulsations on heat radiation flow can be significant (30-40%). The calculational results also show that there is a region in a turbulent boundary layer where the radiation greatly affects the coefficient of turbulent heat transfer

  16. Effect of wall thermal conductivity on the heat transfer process in annular turbulent gas flow for constant wall temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groshev, A.I.; Anisimov, V.V.; Kashcheev, V.M.; Khudasko, V.V.; Yur'ev, Yu.S.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of wall material on convective heat transfer of turbulent gas flow in an annular tube with account of longitudinal diffusion both in the wall and in the liquid is studied numerically. The conjugated problem is solved for P r =0.7 (Re=10 4 -10 6 ). Based on numerical calculations it is stated that thermal conductivity of the wall and gas essentially affects the degree of preliminary heating of liquid in the range of a non-heated section

  17. Evaluation of turbulence models for flow and heat transfer in fuel rod bundle geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, T.; Chun, T. H.; In, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    One of the objectives of the US-ROK collaborative I-NERI project known as the 'Numerical Reactor' is an assessment of commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis capabilities for high-fidelity thermal-hydraulic analysis of current and advanced reactor designs. More specifically, the work involves evaluation of common turbulence models in terms of their ability to calculate the flow and heat transfer for simple fuel rod bundle configurations. The evaluations have so far focused mostly on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models - including the standard k-ε model, non-linear (quadratic and cubic) k-ε models, and the renormalization-group (RNG) variant. The second-order moment closure models such as the differential Reynolds stress model (RSM) have also been considered. (authors)

  18. Comparison of DNS of compressible and incompressible turbulent droplet-laden heated channel flow with phase transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    Direct numerical simulation is used to assess the importance of compressibility in turbulent channel flow of a mixture of air and water vapor with dispersed water droplets. The dispersed phase is allowed to undergo phase transition, which leads to heat and mass transfer between the phases. We

  19. Controlling heat transport and flow structures in thermal turbulence using ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchet-like roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the Large Scale Circulation Roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. This work is financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11672156, the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW) and a VIDI Grant.

  20. Turbulent flow computation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drikakis, D; Geurts, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    ... discretization 3 A test-case: turbulent channel flow 4 Conclusions 75 75 82 93 98 4 Analysis and control of errors in the numerical simulation of turbulence Sandip Ghosal 1 Introduction 2 Source...

  1. CFD Simulation of Heat Transfer and Turbulent Fluid Flow over a Double Forward-Facing Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Togun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and turbulent water flow over a double forward-facing step were investigated numerically. The finite volume method was used to solve the corresponding continuity, momentum, and energy equations using the K-ε model. Three cases, corresponding to three different step heights, were investigated for Reynolds numbers ranging from 30,000 to 100,000 and temperatures ranging from 313 to 343 K. The bottom of the wall was heated, whereas the top was insulated. The results show that the Nusselt number increased with the Reynolds number and step height. The maximum Nusselt number was observed for case 3, with a Reynolds number of 100,000 and temperature of 343 K, occurring at the second step. The behavior of the Nusselt number was similar for all cases at a given Reynolds number and temperature. A recirculation zone was observed before and after the first and second steps in the contour maps of the velocity field. In addition, the results indicate that the coefficient pressure increased with increasing Reynolds number and step height. ANSYS FLUENT 14 (CFD software was employed to run the simulations.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent concentric annular pipe flow Part 2: Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2003-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation is performed for turbulent heat transfer in a concentric annulus at Re D h =8900 and Pr=0.71 for two radius ratios (R 1 /R 2 =0.1 and 0.5) and wall heat flux ratio q * =1.0. Main emphasis is placed on the transverse curvature effect on near-wall turbulent thermal structures. Near-wall turbulent thermal structures close to the inner and outer walls are scrutinized by computing the lower-order statistics. The fluctuating temperature variance and turbulent heat flux budgets are illustrated to confirm the results of the lower-order statistics. Probability density functions of the splat/anti-splat process are investigated to analyze the transverse curvature effect on the strong relationship between sweep and splat events. The present numerical results show that the turbulent thermal structures near the outer wall are more activated than those near the inner wall, which may be attributed to the different vortex regeneration processes between the inner and outer walls

  3. Numerical investigation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in channel with ribs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myllerup, Lisbeth; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    1999-01-01

    The performance of three different low-Reynolds number turbulence models has been explored for the benchmark test of fully developed (periodic) flow in a ribbed plane channel. Results are presented for two values of the Reynolds number (based on mean velocity and hydraulic diameter), Re = 37...

  4. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in a parallel channel. Verification of the field synergy principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Wenxi; Su, G.H.; Qiu Suizheng; Jia Dounan

    2004-01-01

    The field synergy principle was proposed by Guo(1998) which is based on 2-D boundary laminar flow and it resulted from a second look at the mechanism of convective heat transfer. Numerical verification of this principle's validity for turbulent flow has been carried out by very few researchers, and mostly commercial software such as FLUENT, CFX etc. were used in their study. In this paper, numerical simulation of turbulent flow with recirculation was developed using SIMPLE algorithm with two-equation k-ε model. Extension of computational region method and wall function method were quoted to regulate the whole computational region geometrically. Given the inlet Reynold number keeps constant: 10000, by changing the height of the solid obstacle, simulation was conducted and the result showed that the wall heat flux decreased with the angle between the velocity vector and the temperature gradient. Thus it is validated that the field synergy principle based on 2-D boundary laminar flow can also be applied to complex turbulent flow even with recirculation. (author)

  5. Numerical Predictions of Early Stage Turbulence in Oscillatory Flow across Parallel-Plate Heat Exchangers of a Thermoacoustic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah A. Z. Mohd Saat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the predictions of turbulent transition in oscillatory flow subjected to temperature gradients, which often occurs within heat exchangers of thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed in ANSYS FLUENT and validated using the earlier experimental data. Four drive ratios (defined as maximum pressure amplitude to mean pressure were investigated: 0.30%, 0.45%, 0.65% and 0.83%. It has been found that the introduction of the turbulence model at a drive ratio as low as 0.45% improves the predictions of flow structure compared to experiments, which indicates that turbulent transition may occur at much smaller flow amplitudes than previously thought. In the current investigation, the critical Reynolds number based on the thickness of Stokes’ layer falls in the range between 70 and 100. The models tested included four variants of the RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes equations: k-ε, k-ω, shear-stress-transport (SST-k-ω and transition-SST, the laminar model being used as a reference. Discussions are based on velocity profiles, vorticity plots, viscous dissipation and the resulting heat transfer and their comparison with experimental results. The SST-k-ω turbulence model and, in some cases, transition-SST provide the best fit of the velocity profile between numerical and experimental data (the value of the introduced metric measuring the deviation of the CFD velocity profiles from experiment is up to 43% lower than for the laminar model and also give the best match in terms of calculated heat flux. The viscous dissipation also increases with an increase of the drive ratio. The results suggest that turbulence should be considered when designing thermoacoustic devices even in low-amplitude regimes in order to improve the performance predictions of thermoacoustic systems.

  6. Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent flows with heat transfer; Simulation des grandes echelles d'ecoulements turbulents avec transferts de chaleur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, A.

    2004-09-15

    LES of turbulent flows with heat transfer was used within the framework of conjugate heat transfer problems. The objective of this work lies not only in identifying the various elements likely to impair temperature fluctuations estimations at the fluid/solid interface but also to introduce adequate wall modeling. The choice of a proper convection scheme for the transport of passive scalars led to the adoption of a high order upwind scheme with slope limiter. The use of classical wall models having shown some weaknesses as for the estimation of parietal temperature fluctuations, two new approaches are proposed and tested. The first one relies on a complete resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations on a refined grid close to the wall making it possible to rebuild the temperature fluctuations near the wall. The second one relies on the simultaneous and one dimensional resolution of a turbulent boundary layer equation and a variance transport equation near the wall. (author)

  7. Turbulent energy losses during orchard heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Two rapid-response drag anemometers and low time constant thermocouples, all at 4 m above a heated orchard floor, sampled wind component in the vertical direction and temperature at 30 Hz. The turbulent heat flux calculated revealed not more than 10% of the heat lost from the orchard was via turbulent transort. The observations failed to support previous estimates that at least a third of the energy applied was lost through turbulent transport. Underestimation of heat loss due to mean flow and a newly revealed flux due to spatial variations in the mean flow may explain the unaccounted for loss.

  8. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Jiahe; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations

  9. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  10. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  11. Effect on Heat Transfer Characteristics of Nanofluids Flowing under Laminar and Turbulent Flow Regime - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prince; Pandey, K. M., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Heat transfer is a most important phenomenon that influence the performance of working device. To date several attempts have been made by researchers to minimize the size of heat exchangers in order to reduce the cost. Earlier we use some conventional fluids (water, air, engine oil etc.) for cooling of automobile, refrigeration and some other industrial applications. But it is observed here that by using these fluids there is curb and hindrance in heat transfer rate because of very low thermal conductivity. From last ten-years new generation fluid introduced known as nanofluid. To increase the thermal conductivity of base fluid some amount of nanoparticles is added. Nanofluid have combined properties of nanoparticles as well as base fluid. Researcher found that heat transfer rate fully dependent of the thermal conductivity of nanoparticles as well as nanoparticle size diameter and volume concentration. This review paper summarised the recent research on enhancement of heat transfer and thermal performance of nanofluid as coolant for industrial applications.

  12. Numerical simulation of subsonic and transonic turbulent flows in turbine cascades including wall heat flux and roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louda, P.; Kozel, K.; Sváček, P.; Příhoda, J.

    2012-11-01

    The work deals with numerical simulation of transonic flow in turbine cascade including heat transfer between fluid and blades. The blades are considered either solid, with heat conduction, or with a cavity held at constant temperature above the total temperature of the fluid. The surface of blades is hydraulically smooth or rough. The mathematical model is based on Favre averaged Navier-Stokes equations with SST turbulence model. The heat transfer inside blades is governed by Laplace equation for temperature. The solution for fluid part is obtained by implicit AUMPW+ finite volume method. The solution of Laplace equation is obtained by finite element method. The coupling between the two solvers is discussed including some problems. In the discussion of results, the effects of heat conduction in the blade, internal heating of the blade and surface roughness are observed.

  13. Experimental study of the turbulent convective heat transfer of titanium oxide nanofluid flowing inside helically corrugated tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Golmohammadi, Kia; Sedaghat, Ahmad [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Campo, Antonio [The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The convective heat transfer for the turbulent flow of water/TiO{sub 2} nanofluid inside helically horizontal corrugated tubes is investigated in this paper using experimental techniques. The tube boundary condition is a uniform wall temperature. The test apparatus was designed and assembled with a test section containing 93 cm copper tubes with internal and external diameters of 7.71 mm and 9.52 mm, respectively. First, the heat transfer characteristics of the distilled water turbulent flow in a plain copper tube were measured preliminarily. Second, various test runs were performed for nanofluids with two nanoparticle concentrations (0.1% and 0.5%), two corrugation depth to diameter ratios (0.0648 and 0.103), two corrugation pitch to diameter ratios (0.917 and 1.297), and two corrugation width to diameter ratios (0.363 and 0.492) that were all within the range of turbulent Reynolds numbers (3000 < Re < 15000). The experimental results reveal that the Nusselt number augments the dual increments in corrugation depth and width and with the decrements in corrugation pitch, particularly for high Reynolds numbers. The nanoparticles have a stronger effect on the heat transfer in helically corrugated tubes with higher corrugation depths and widths as well as lower corrugation pitches. A correlation for the Nusselt number in terms of the helically corrugated tubes is introduced based on the linear regression analysis of the experimental data.

  14. Unsteady coupling of Navier-Stokes and radiative heat transfer solvers applied to an anisothermal multicomponent turbulent channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya, J.; Cabrit, O.; Poitou, D.; Cuenot, B.; El Hafi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of an anisothermal reacting turbulent channel flow with and without radiative source terms have been performed to study the influence of the radiative heat transfer on the optically non-homogeneous boundary layer structure. A methodology for the study of the emitting/absorbing turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is presented. Details on the coupling strategy and the parallelization techniques are exposed. An analysis of the first order statistics is then carried out. It is shown that, in the studied configuration, the global structure of the thermal boundary layer is not significantly modified by radiation. However, the radiative transfer mechanism is not negligible and contributes to the heat losses at the walls. The classical law-of-the-wall for temperature can thus be improved for RANS/LES simulations taking into account the radiative contribution.

  15. Study of turbulent flows loaded with particles. Application to the particulate fouling of corrugated plate heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouidri, Frederic

    1997-01-01

    This work is a numerical and experimental study of the behaviour of a turbulent flow loaded with solid particles. It involves the particulate fouling of plate heat exchangers used in industrial field. Visual observation and LDA measurements inside a mock-up show the presence of large coherent vortices and confirm the tight link between particulate deposition and flow field. The vortices participate to the creation of preferential areas where the particles are in contact with the wall, and they shape the deposit according to a precise mechanism. Two processes of deposit removal have also been shown. Hydraulic phenomena and particles behaviours pointed out in the experiment are compared to different typical samples in a bibliographic survey. The use of the a software for computational fluid dynamics (TRIO developed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) completed the experimental results by predicting the particles behaviour into the turbulent flow. The approach is based on a connection between a pseudo-direct simulation of the turbulent flow and a Lagrangian model for particles paths. The results show good agreements, qualitatively speaking, between numerical predictions and experimental measurement. The arrangement of the deposit onto the corrugated surface is globally well described by numerical simulation. The influence of some parameters on deposition process such as the flow (corresponding to Re=5000 or Re=10000), the horizontal or vertical position of the channel or the particles diameter (d p =100 μm or d p =25 μm) has been studied. (author) [fr

  16. DNS of turbulent channel flow with conjugate heat transfer: Effect of thermal boundary conditions on the second moments and budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flageul, Cédric; Benhamadouche, Sofiane; Lamballais, Éric; Laurence, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • DNS of a turbulent channel flow with a Robin boundary condition on the scalar. • Budgets of second-order moments for conjugate and non-conjugate heat-transfer. • Original theoretical analysis for compatibility conditions at the wall. - Abstract: Budgets of turbulent heat fluxes and temperature variance obtained from the Direct Numerical Simulation of an incompressible periodic channel flow with a Reynolds number of 150 (based on friction velocity) and a Prandtl number of 0.71 are presented and analysed for four cases: locally imposed temperature at the wall (constant Dirichlet), locally imposed heat flux (constant Neumann), heat exchange coefficient (Robin) and 3D conjugate heat transfer. The dissipation rate associated with the temperature variance is strongly impacted by the thermal boundary condition. For non-conjugate cases, a straightforward analytical analysis establishes the connection between the boundary condition, the temperature variance and the wall-normal part of the thermal dissipation rate at the wall. For the conjugate case, the two-point correlations of the thermal field in the solid domain confirms the existence of very large scale thermal structures.

  17. DNS of heat transfer in turbulent and transitional channel flow obstructed by rectangular prisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Fusao; Seki, Yohji; Iwamoto, Kaoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Kawamura, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Science, Noda-shi, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: kawa@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp

    2007-12-15

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of heat transfer in a channel flow obstructed by rectangular prisms has been performed for Re{sub {tau}} = 80-20, where Re{sub {tau}} is based on the friction velocity, the channel half width and the kinematic viscosity. The molecular Prandtl number is set to be 0.71. The flow remains unsteady down to Re{sub {tau}} = 40 owing to the disturbance induced by the prism. For Re{sub {tau}} = 30 and 20, the flow results in a steady laminar flow. In the vicinity of the prism, the three-dimensional complex vortices are generated and heat transfer is enhanced. The Reynolds number effect on the time-averaged vortex structure and the local Nusselt number are investigated. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement is discussed. In addition, the mean flow parameters such as the friction factor and the Nusselt number are examined in comparison with existing DNS and experimental data.

  18. Turbulent flow and heat transfer of Water/Al2O3 nanofluid inside a rectangular ribbed channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaiemehr, Mohammad; Pourfattah, Farzad; Akbari, Omid Ali; Toghraie, Davood; Sheikhzadeh, Ghanbarali

    2018-02-01

    In present study, the turbulent flow and heat transfer of Water/Al2O3 nanofluid inside a rectangular channel have been numerically simulated. The main purpose of present study is investigating the effect of attack angle of inclined rectangular rib, Reynolds number and volume fraction of nanoparticles on heat transfer enhancement. For this reason, the turbulent flow of nanofluid has been simulated at Reynolds numbers ranging from 15000 to 30000 and volume fractions of nanoparticles from 0 to 4%. The changes attack angle of ribs have been investigated ranging from 0 to 180°. The results show that, the changes of attack angle of ribs, due to the changes of flow pattern and created vortexes inside the channel, have significant effect on fluid mixing. Also, the maximum rate of heat transfer enhancement accomplishes in attack angle of 60°. In Reynolds numbers of 15000, 20000 and 30000 and attack angle of 60°, comparing to the attack angle of 0°, the amount of Nusselt number enhances to 2.37, 1.96 and 2 times, respectively. Also, it can be concluded that, in high Reynolds numbers, by using ribs and nanofluid, the performance evaluation criterion improves.

  19. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  20. Modeling of MHD turbulent heat transfer in channel flows imposed wall-normal magnetic fields under the various Prandtl number fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu, E-mail: yamamotoy@yamanashi.ac.jp [Division of Mechanical Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki, E-mail: kunugi@nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, C3-d2S06, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura, Nishikyo-Ku 615-8540, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We show the applicability to predict the heat transfer imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field by means of the zero-equation heat transfer model. • Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers with various molecular Prandtl number fluids were obtained. • Improvements of the prediction accuracy in turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate under the magnetic fields were accomplished. - Abstract: Zero-equation heat transfer models based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number are evaluated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for fully developed channel flows imposed on a uniform wall-normal magnetic field. Quasi-theoretical turbulent Prandtl numbers are estimated by DNS data of various molecular Prandtl number fluids. From the viewpoint of highly-accurate magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) heat transfer prediction, the parameters of the turbulent eddy viscosity of the k–É› model are optimized under the magnetic fields. Consequently, we use the zero-equation model based on a constant turbulent Prandtl number to demonstrate MHD heat transfer, and show the applicability of using this model to predict the heat transfer.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of the passive heat transfer in a turbulent flow with particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaszczur Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent non-isothermal fully developed channel flow with solid particles was investigated through Direct Numerical Simulation combined with the point-particle approach. The focus was on the interactions between discrete and continuous phase and their effect on the velocity and the temperature of the particles. It has been found that low momentum inertia particles have a mean temperature similar to the fluid temperature and this effect is almost independent of particle thermal inertia. For particles with larger momentum, the inertia thermal effect is more complex, particle temperature in the near-wall and buffer region is significantly lower than the fluid temperature. The difference between the fluid mean temperature and particle mean temperature increases along with the momentum response time. This may have important consequences on the chemical reactions, technological processes and on the accuracy of temperature measurement techniques based on seeding particle.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in a Ribbed Rotating Two-Pass Square Duct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liou Tong-Miin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The local turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in a rotating two-pass square duct with 19 pairs of in-line 90 ∘ ribs have been investigated computationally. A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation (RANS with a two-layer k − ϵ turbulence model was solved. The in-line 90 ∘ ribs were arranged on the leading and trailing walls with rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio and pitch-to-height ratio of 0.136 and 10, respectively. The Reynolds number, based on duct hydraulic diameter and bulk mean velocity, was fixed at 1.0 × 10 4 whereas the rotational number varied from 0 to 0.2 . Results are validated with previous measured velocity field and heat transfer coefficient distributions. The validation shows that the effect of rotation on the passage-averaged Nusselt number ratio can be predicted reasonably well; nevertheless, the transverse mean velocity and, in turn, the distribution of regional-averaged Nusselt number ratio are markedly underpredicted in the regions toward which the Coriolis force is directed. Further CFD studies are needed.

  3. Heat transfer enhancement with elliptical tube under turbulent flow TiO2-water nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Adnan M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and friction characteristics were numerically investigated, employing elliptical tube to increase the heat transfer rate with a minimum increase of pressure drop. The flow rate of the tube was in a range of Reynolds number between 10000 and 100000. FLUENT software is used to solve the governing equation of CFD (continuity, momentum and energy by means of a finite volume method (FVM. The electrical heater is connected around the elliptical tube to apply uniform heat flux (3000 W/m2 as a boundary condition. Four different volume concentrations in the range of 0.25% to 1% and different TiO2 nanoparticle diameters in the range of 27 nm to 50 nm, dispersed in water are utilized. The CFD numerical results indicate that the elliptical tube can enhance heat transfer and friction factor by approximately 9% and 6% than the circular tube respectively. The results show that the Nusselt number and friction factor increase with decreasing diameters but increasing volume concentrations of nanoparticles.

  4. Numerical simulations of heat transfer in an annular fuel channel with three-dimensional spacer ribs set up periodically under a fully developed turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki; Akino, Norio

    1996-06-01

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an annular fuel channel with spacer ribs for high temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed numerically by three-dimensional heat transfer computations under a fully developed turbulent flow. The two-equations κ-ε turbulence model was applied to the present turbulent analysis. In particular, the κ-ε turbulence model constants and the turbulent Prandtl number were improved from the previous standard values proposed by Jones and Launder in order to obtain heat transfer predictions with higher accuracy. Consequently, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel were predicted with sufficient accuracy in the range of Reynolds number exceeding 3000. It was clarified quantitatively from the present study that main mechanism for the heat transfer augmentation in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel was combined effects of the turbulence promoter effect by the spacer ribs and the velocity acceleration effect by a reduction in the channel cross-section. (author)

  5. General correlations for pressure drop and heat transfer for single-phase turbulent flow in internally ribbed tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravigururajan, T.S.; Bergles, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    General correlations for friction factors and heat transfer coefficients for single-phase turbulent flow in internally ribbed tubes are presented. Data from previous investigations are gathered for a wide range of tube parameters with e/d: 0.01 to 0.2; p/d: 0.1 to 7.0; α/90: 0.3 to 1.0, and flow parameters Re: 5000 to 250,000 and Pr: 0.66 to 37.6. The data were applied to a linear model to get normalized correlations that were then modified to fit tubes with extremely small parametric values. A shape function was included in the friction correlation to account for different rib profiles. The friction correlation predicts 96% of the data base to within +. 50% and 77% of the data base to within +. 20%. Corresponding figures for the heat transfer correlation are 99% and 69%. The present correlations are superior, for this extensive data base, to those presented by other investigators

  6. The Effect of Nanoparticles on Thermal Efficiency of Double Tube Heat Exchangers in Turbulent Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Aghayari, Reza; Madah, Heydar; Keyvani, Bahram; Moghadassi, Abdolreza; Ashori, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    This paper refers to the Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient of Nano Fluids (OHTCNF) in heat exchangers and the relevant effective parameters. An improvement in Heat Transfer (HT) and OHTCNF containing nanoaluminum oxide with ca. 20 nm particle size and particular volume fraction in the range of 0.001-0.002 has been reported. The effects of temperature and concentration of nanoparticles on HT variation as well as Overall Heat Transfer Coefficient (OHTC) in a countercurrent double tube heat exch...

  7. Effects of spatial gradients in thermophysical properties on the topology of turbulence in heated channel flow of supercritical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azih, Chukwudi; Yaras, Metin I.

    2018-01-01

    The current literature suggests that large spatial gradients of thermophysical properties, which occur in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical thermodynamic state, may result in significant variations in forced-convection heat transfer rates. Specifically, these property gradients induce inertia- and buoyancy-driven phenomena that may enhance or deteriorate the turbulence-dominated heat convection process. Through direct numerical simulations, the present study investigates the role of coherent flow structures in channel geometries for non-buoyant and buoyant flows of supercritical water, with buoyant configurations involving wall-normal oriented gravitational acceleration and downstream-oriented gravitational acceleration. This sequence of simulations enables the evaluation of the relative contributions of inertial and buoyancy phenomena to heat transfer variations. In these simulations, the state of the working fluid is in the vicinity of the pseudo-critical point. The uniform wall heat flux and the channel mass flux are specified such that the heat to mass flux ratio is 3 kJ/kg, with an inflow Reynolds number of 12 000 based on the channel hydraulic diameter, the area-averaged inflow velocity, and fluid properties evaluated at the bulk temperature and pressure of the inflow plane. In the absence of buoyancy forces, notable reductions in the density and viscosity in close proximity of the heated wall are observed to promote generation of small-scale vortices, with resultant breakdown into smaller scales as they interact with preexisting larger near-wall vortices. This interaction results in a reduction in the overall thermal mixing at particular wall-normal regions of the channel. Under the influence of wall-normal gravitational acceleration, the wall-normal density gradients are noted to enhance ejection motions due to baroclinic vorticity generation on the lower wall, thus providing additional wall-normal thermal mixing. Along the upper wall, the same mechanism

  8. Application of Rayleigh Scattering to Turbulent Flow with Heat Transfer and Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-11

    premixed conical flame produced by a Bunsen -type burner . For the most part, ethylene-air flames were chosen for the investigations. RESEARCH RESULTS The...A turbulent premixed ethylene/air conical flame in a large Bunsen type burner has been studied using a two-component laser Doppler anemometry (LDA...density function (pdf). In the oblique flame region above the burner exit, the overall characteristics of the conditioned velocity statistics are

  9. Flow laminarization and heat transfer crisis in tubes while intense heating of turbulent flow of a gas endothermically dissociating on a wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurganov, V.A.; Gladuntsov, A.I.

    1977-01-01

    Analysed are the experimental data obtained for heat transfer to gaseous dissociating ammonium (NH 3 ) under heating in round pipes (steel Kh18N10T) at developed eddying input flow and marginal condition of heat supply gsub(c) approximately equal to const in the ranges of the following parameters: p=3-10 atm; Tsub(input)=310-720 K; Tsub(c) ( 3 ; gsub(c)/-anti rho W 8.8 kJ/kg; gsub(c)/(anti rho WCsub(p) sub(input)Tsub(input)) (<=) 0.0104; 1/d (<=) 150 (where Tsub(c) is the wall temperature, gsub(c) the heat flow density on wall, and anti rho W velocity). The discussion involves phenomena of worsened heat transfer at high heat loads. The authors show the basic relationship between these phenomena and laminarization of the near-wall flow at the input site of the pipe. The regularities of heat transfer were noted to undergo substantial transformation under laminarized flow

  10. Performance Evaluation of AI2O3/Water Nanofluid as Coolant in a Double-Tube Heat Exchanger Flowing under a Turbulent Flow Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant candidate in chemical processes for water waste remediation and heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on the potential mass flowrate reduction in exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity using nanofluids. Al2O3 nanoparticles with diameters of 7 nm dispersed in water with volume concentrations up to 2% are selected as a coolant, and their performance in a horizontal double-tube counterflow heat exchanger under turbulent flow conditions is numerically studied. The results show that the flowrate of nanofluid coolant decreases with the increase of concentration of nanoparticles in the exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity. The mass flowrate of the nanofluid at a volume concentration of 2 vol.% is approximately 24.5% lower than that of pure water (base fluid for given conditions. For the pressure drop, the results show that the pressure drop of nanofluid is slightly higher than water and increases with increase of volume concentrations. In addition, the reduction of wall temperature and heat transfer area is estimated.

  11. Forced convection heat transfer with microencapsulated phase-change-material slurries. Turbulent flow in a circular tube; Microcapsuleka sohenka busshitsu slurries no kyosei tairyu netsudentatsu tokusei. Enkannai ranryu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagishi, Y.; Sugano, T. [Daido Hoxan Inc., Hokkaido (Japan); Takeuchi, H.; Pyatenko, A. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute Sapporo (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study using a slurry of micro-encapsulated phase change material (MCPCM) in water is conducted in order to investigate the increase in convection heat transfer coefficients of slurry flows as well as the increase in thermal capacity of a slurry by using the latent heat from a solid-liquid phase change material (PCM). Experiments were done for turbulent, hydrodynamically fully developed flows in a circular tube with constant wall heat flux. Local convective heat transfer coefficients were measured along the heating test section in order to study the effects of the melting phenomena inside MCPCMs. Experimental data are presented for various particle concentrations, slurry flow rates, and heating rates. Results show that an increase in the local convective heat transfer coefficient is found when the MCPCMs melted. Enhancement of heat transfer due to phase change is affected to varying degrees by Reynolds numbers of slurry flows, the fraction of PCM which is solid phase and heating rates. This paper provides and presents an explanation of the physical mechanism of the convective heat transfer enhancement due to the phase change of MCPCMs and a set of data available for the adjustments of system operating conditions for optimum heat transfer performance. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. An experimental study of flow patterns and endwall heat transfer upstream of a surface-mounted rectangular obstruction in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan

    1991-02-01

    A seven-phase experimental investigation documented the three-dimensional separation region in front of a surface-mounted rectangular obstruction. The obstruction was centered between sidewalls of a wind tunnel in a turbulent approaching boundary layer. The major feature of this flow was a horseshoe vortex system near the junction. Real-time vortex structures were visualized with a laser sheet. Interior velocity, turbulence intensity and velocity power spectrum measurements were obtained with a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) and a hot-wire anemometer. Ink dot surface flow visualizations and pressure measurements were acquired on the endwall under the vortex system. Endwall heat transfer coefficients were nonintrusively measured by an infrared imaging system. Laser sheet flow visualizations indicated a vortex system with randon oscillations. In the time-averaged sense, ink-dot flow visualizations, LDA measurements and endwall pressure measurements indicated a well defined primary vortex. The separation region was 70 percent larger, in the streamwise direction, than that in front of a cylinder with a diameter the same as the obstruction width. The time-averaged primary vortex center, where maximum values of turbulence intensity were measured, was located farther away from the obstruction leading edge at higher freestream velocities. Endwall heat transfer coefficient distribution measurements on the endwall surface revealed that the obstruction established a complex heat transfer pattern. Local heat transfer rates as much as 80 percent greater than the undisturbed two-dimensional level were recorded upstream of the obstruction along the test section centerline. A local heat transfer coefficient peak was associated with the local maximum turbulence intensity measured near the endwall by LDA.

  13. DNS of turbulent droplet-laden heated channel flow with phase transition at different initial relative humiditiesbh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a turbulent channel flow of a mixture of dry air and water vapor with water droplets is examined. Direct numerical simulation is used to quantify the importance of variations in the initial relative humidity. We focus on the droplet behavior along with the thermal properties of the

  14. Numerical methods for turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    It has generally become accepted that the Navier-Strokes equations predict the dynamic behavior of turbulent as well as laminar flows of a fluid at a point in space away form a discontinuity such as a shock wave. Turbulence is also closely related to the phenomena of non-uniqueness of solutions of the Navier-Strokes equations. These second order, nonlinear partial differential equations can be solved analytically for only a few simple flows. Turbulent flow fields are much to complex to lend themselves to these few analytical methods. Numerical methods, therefore, offer the only possibility of achieving a solution of turbulent flow equations. In spite of recent advances in computer technology, the direct solution, by discrete methods, of the Navier-Strokes equations for turbulent flow fields is today, and in the foreseeable future, impossible. Thus the only economically feasible way to solve practical turbulent flow problems numerically is to use statistically averaged equations governing mean-flow quantities. The objective is to study some recent developments relating to the use of numerical methods to study turbulent flow.

  15. Hot-wire measurement in turbulent flow behind a parallel-line heat source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Antoš, Pavel; Uruba, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2012), s. 493-494 ISSN 1617-7061. [Annual Meeting of the International Association of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics /83./. Darmstadt, 26.03.2012-30.03.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP101/10/P556; GA ČR GAP101/12/1271 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : nonisotermal flow * hot wire anemometry Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201210235/abstract

  16. Unsteady heat transfer combined with thermal radiation along with consideration of temperature-dependent properties and turbulent flow through a thermal entrance region of a concentric annulus and a circular tube

    OpenAIRE

    Kawachi, Shigehiro; Koshin, Haruo; Kurima, Junji; Murakawa, Katsuhisa

    1980-01-01

    The turbulent flow of steam moving through the thermal entrance region of a concentric annulus and a circular tube, is heated by an inner pipe wall of the annulus and the circular tube wall, respectively. An analysis of this was made so as to study unsteady heat transfer combined with thermal radiation and turbulent flow. At the time this study was carried out, we took into consideration the influence of temperature-dependent thermophysical properties, and restricted ourselves to the opticall...

  17. Flow and heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent mist gas-droplets stream over a flat plate

    CERN Document Server

    Terekhov, Victor I

    2014-01-01

    In this book the author presents selected challenges of thermal-hydraulics modeling of two-phase flows in minichannels with change of phase. These encompass the common modeling of flow boiling and flow condensation using the same expression. Approaches to model these two respective cases show, however, that experimental data show different results to those obtained by methods of calculation of heat transfer coefficient for respective cases. Partially that can be devoted to the fact that there are non-adiabatic effects present in both types of phase change phenomena which modify the pressure drop due to friction, responsible for appropriate modelling. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in case of annular flow structure may be considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter, which differentiates between these two modes of heat transfer. On the other hand, in case of bubbly flows, the generation of bubbles also modifies the friction pressur...

  18. Numerical Research on Convective Heat Transfer and Resistance Characteristics of Turbulent Duct Flow Containing Nanorod-Based Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyang Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled numerical model for nanorod-based suspension flow is constructed, and the convective heat transfer and resistance characteristics of the nanofluid duct flow are investigated. The numerical results are verified by experimental results and theoretical models. Most of nanorods are located randomly in the bulk fluid, while particles near the wall aligned with the flow direction. Friction factor of nanofluids with nanorods increases with higher particle volume concentration or aspect ratio, but the increment reduces when the Reynolds number gets larger. The relative Nusselt number is obtained to characterize the intensity of convective heat transfer. The results show that the Nusselt number of nanofluids increases when the particle volume concentration or aspect ratio becomes larger. Compared to increasing the aspect ratio of nanorods, increasing the particle volume concentration would be more effective on enhancing the convective heat transfer intensity in industrial applications although it will cause a slight increase of resistance.

  19. Topology optimization of turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilgen, Cetin B.; Dilgen, Sumer B.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a fast and viable approach for taking into account turbulence in topology optimization of complex fluid flow systems, without resorting to any simplifying assumptions in the derivation of discrete adjoints. Topology optimization is an iterative gradient...

  20. Turbulence modeling for complex hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for a range of 2D turbulent hypersonic flows using two-equation models. The baseline models and the model corrections required for good hypersonic-flow predictions will be illustrated. Three experimental data sets were chosen for comparison. They are: (1) the hypersonic flare flows of Kussoy and Horstman, (2) a 2D hypersonic compression corner flow of Coleman and Stollery, and (3) the ogive-cylinder impinging shock-expansion flows of Kussoy and Horstman. Comparisons with the experimental data have shown that baseline models under-predict the extent of flow separation but over-predict the heat transfer rate near flow reattachment. Modifications to the models are described which remove the above-mentioned deficiencies. Although we have restricted the discussion only to the selected baseline models in this paper, the modifications proposed are universal and can in principle be transferred to any existing two-equation model formulation.

  1. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefilík, Jiří; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2014-03-01

    The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k - ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  2. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  3. Heat transfer and hydraulic resistance when cooling the turbulent chemically reacting N2O4 reversible 2NO2 reversible 2NO + O2 flow in a tube at high wall temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoino, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental set up, a method and experimental results of the study of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance under conditions of cooling the dissociating coolant flow at elevated wall temperatures of the tube (Tsub(w) 2 O 4 reversible 2NO 2 reversible 2NO + O 2 chemically reacting turbulent flow in a tube are considered

  4. Turbulence introduction to theory and applications of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Westerweel, Jerry; Nieuwstadt, Frans T M

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to the topic of turbulent flows. Apart from classical topics in turbulence, attention is also paid to modern topics. After studying this work, the reader will have the basic knowledge to follow current topics on turbulence in scientific literature. The theory is illustrated with a number of examples of applications, such as closure models, numerical simulations and turbulent diffusion, and experimental findings. The work also contains a number of illustrative exercises.

  5. Numerical experiments for turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefilík, Jiří; Kozel, Karel; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the work is to explore the possibilities of modelling transonic flows in the internal and external aerodynamics. Several configurations were analyzed and calculations were performed using both inviscid and viscous models of flow. Viscous turbulent flows have been simulated using either zero equation algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model and two equation k—ω model in its basic version and improved TNT variant. The numerical solution was obtained using Lax-Wendroff scheme in the MacCormack form on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability. Achieved results are compared with experimental data.

  6. Numerical experiments for turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Příhoda Jaromír

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to explore the possibilities of modelling transonic flows in the internal and external aerodynamics. Several configurations were analyzed and calculations were performed using both inviscid and viscous models of flow. Viscous turbulent flows have been simulated using either zero equation algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model and two equation k—ω model in its basic version and improved TNT variant. The numerical solution was obtained using Lax-Wendroff scheme in the MacCormack form on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability. Achieved results are compared with experimental data.

  7. Experiments in turbulent pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbergsen, Lars Even

    1998-12-31

    This thesis reports experimental results for the mean velocity and turbulence statistics in two straight pipe sections for bulk Reynolds numbers in the range 22000 to 75000. The flow was found consistent with a fully developed state. Detailed turbulence spectra were obtained for low and moderate turbulent Reynolds number. For the pipe centre line location at R{sub {lambda}} = 112, a narrow range in the streamwise power spectrum applied to the -5/3 inertial subrange. However this range was influenced both by turbulence production and viscous dissipation, and therefore did not reflect a true inertial range. The result indicates how the intermediate range between the production and dissipative scales can be misinterpreted as an inertial range for low and moderate R{sub {lambda}}. To examine the universal behaviour of the inertial range, the inertial scaling of the streamwise power spectrum is compared to the inertial scaling of the second order longitudinal velocity structure function, which relate directly by a Fourier transform. Increasing agreement between the Kolmogorov constant C{sub K} and the second order structure function scaling constant C{sub 2} was observed with increasing R{sub {lambda}}. The result indicates that a true inertial range requires several decades of separation between the energy containing and dissipative scales. A method for examining spectral anisotropy is reported and applied to turbulence spectra in fully developed pipe flow. It is found that the spectral redistribution from the streamwise to the two lateral spectra goes primarily to the circumferential component. Experimental results are reported for an axisymmetric contraction of a fully developed pipe flow. 67 refs., 75 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Study and modelling of liquid metal turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimont, Vincent

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first reports the study of equations of a turbulent flow with heat transfer: transport equations of 2. order moments related to different fluctuations, influence of a change of referential. He analyses the structure of a non isothermal turbulent flow of liquid metal: study of the turbulent heat flow and of liquid metal temperature fluctuations, study of characteristic scales for such a flow, principle of assessment of orders of magnitude. He presents the modelling of transport equations of moments related to temperature fluctuation, and of transport equations at high Reynolds number. He finally reports the application of the developed model to the wall area of a non isothermal turbulent flow of liquid metal [fr

  9. Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Augmentation at Very High Turbulence Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    A database for stagnation region heat transfer has been extended to include heat transfer measurements acquired downstream from a new high intensity turbulence generator. This work was motivated by gas turbine industry heat transfer designers who deal with heat transfer environments with increasing Reynolds numbers and very high turbulence levels. The new mock aero-combustor turbulence generator produces turbulence levels which average 17.4%, which is 37% higher than the older turbulence generator. The increased level of turbulence is caused by the reduced contraction ratio from the liner to the exit. Heat transfer measurements were acquired on two large cylindrical leading edge test surfaces having a four to one range in leading edge diameter (40.64 cm and 10.16 cm). Gandvarapu and Ames [1] previously acquired heat transfer measurements for six turbulence conditions including three grid conditions, two lower turbulence aero-combustor conditions, and a low turbulence condition. The data are documented and tabulated for an eight to one range in Reynolds numbers for each test surface with Reynolds numbers ranging from 62,500 to 500,000 for the large leading edge and 15,625 to 125,000 for the smaller leading edge. The data show augmentation levels of up to 136% in the stagnation region for the large leading edge. This heat transfer rate is an increase over the previous aero-combustor turbulence generator which had augmentation levels up to 110%. Note, the rate of increase in heat transfer augmentation decreases for the large cylindrical leading edge inferring only a limited level of turbulence intensification in the stagnation region. The smaller cylindrical leading edge shows more consistency with earlier stagnation region heat transfer results correlated on the TRL (Turbulence, Reynolds number, Length scale) parameter. The downstream regions of both test surfaces continue to accelerate the flow but at a much lower rate than the leading edge. Bypass transition occurs

  10. Turbulent structure of stably stratified inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Oaki

    2018-04-01

    Effects of buoyancy force stabilizing disturbances are investigated on the inhomogeneous flow where disturbances are dispersed from the turbulent to non-turbulent field in the direction perpendicular to the gravity force. Attaching the fringe region, where disturbances are excited by the artificial body force, a Fourier spectral method is used for the inhomogeneous flow stirred at one side of the cuboid computational box. As a result, it is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is dispersed as layered structures elongated in the streamwise direction through the vibrating motion. A close look at the layered structures shows that they are flanked by colder fluids at the top and hotter fluids at the bottom, and hence vertically compressed and horizontally expanded by the buoyancy related to the countergradient heat flux, though they are punctuated by the vertical expansion of fluids at the forefront of the layered structures, which is related to the downgradient heat flux, indicating that the layered structures are gravity currents. However, the phase between temperature fluctuations and vertical velocity is shifted by π/2 rad, indicating that temperature fluctuations are generated by the propagation of internal gravity waves.

  11. Turbulent Flow past High Temperature Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Thangam, Siva; Carlucci, Pasquale; Buckley, Liam; Carlucci, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Flow over high-temperature surfaces subject to wall heating is analyzed with applications to projectile design. In this study, computations are performed using an anisotropic Reynolds-stress model to study flow past surfaces that are subject to radiative flux. The model utilizes a phenomenological treatment of the energy spectrum and diffusivities of momentum and heat to include the effects of wall heat transfer and radiative exchange. The radiative transport is modeled using Eddington approximation including the weighted effect of nongrayness of the fluid. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. The model is applied for available test cases to validate its predictive capabilities for capturing the effects of wall heat transfer. Computational results are compared with experimental data available in the literature. Applications involving the design of projectiles are summarized. Funded in part by U.S. Army, ARDEC.

  12. Chemical Reactions in Turbulent Mixing Flows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mimotakis, Paul

    1998-01-01

    .... New measures to characterize level sets in turbulence were developed and successfully employed to characterize experimental data of liquid-phase turbulent-jet flows as well as three-dimensional...

  13. Turbulent mixed flow applying CFD in electronic cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Chaves

    2011-01-01

    laminar and turbulent fluxes until heat flux equal 1,000 and maximum dimensionless temperature increase abruptly with heat flux to laminar and turbulent flows for injection dimensionless velocity equal 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10. The results obtained allowed identifying the highest temperature when the system is submitted to combine forced and free convection, making possible to apply control actions, avoiding thermal damages to the devices that work with this cooling process.

  14. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  15. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  16. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high-speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models, and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary-layer flows, shock-wave boundary-layer interactions, and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  17. Models for turbulent flows with variable density and combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    Models for transport processes and combustion in turbulent flows are outlined with emphasis on the situation where the fuel and air are injected separately. Attention is restricted to relatively simple flames. The flows investigated are high Reynolds number, single-phase, turbulent high-temperature flames in which radiative heat transfer can be considered negligible. Attention is given to the lower order closure models, algebraic stress and flux models, the k-epsilon turbulence model, the diffusion flame approximation, and finite rate reaction mechanisms

  18. Two-equation turbulence modeling for 3-D hypersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, J. E.; Coakley, T. J.; Marvin, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation to verify, incorporate and develop two-equation turbulence models for three-dimensional high speed flows is presented. The current design effort of hypersonic vehicles has led to an intensive study of turbulence models for compressible hypersonic flows. This research complements an extensive review of experimental data and the current development of 2D turbulence models. The review of experimental data on 2D and 3D flows includes complex hypersonic flows with pressure profiles, skin friction, wall heat transfer, and turbulence statistics data. In a parallel effort, turbulence models for high speed flows have been tested against flat plate boundary layers, and are being tested against the 2D database. In the present paper, we present the results of 3D Navier-Stokes numerical simulations with an improved k-omega two-equation turbulence model against experimental data and empirical correlations of an adiabatic flat plate boundary layer, a cold wall flat plate boundary layer, and a 3D database flow, the interaction of an oblique shock wave and a thick turbulent boundary layer with a free stream Mach number = 8.18 and Reynolds number = 5 x 10 to the 6th.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  20. Turbulent resistive heating of solar coronal arches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, G.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility that coronal heating occurs by means of anomalous Joule heating by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is examined, with consideration given to currents running from foot of a loop to the other. It is assumed that self-fields generated by the currents are absent and currents follow the direction of the magnetic field, allowing the plasma cylinder to expand radially. Ion and electron heating rates are defined within the cylinder, together with longitudinal conduction and convection, radiation and cross-field transport, all in terms of Coulomb and turbulent effects. The dominant force is identified as electrostatic ion cyclotron instability, while ion acoustic modes remain stable. Rapid heating from an initial temperature of 10 eV to 100-1000 eV levels is calculated, with plasma reaching and maintaining a temperature in the 100 eV range. Strong heating is also possible according to the turbulent Ohm's law and by resistive heating.

  1. Secondary turbulent flow in an infinte bend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H. Bo; Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The flow in an infinite circular bend is inverstigated in both the laminar and fully turbulent flow case, by use of laminar flow solver, a k-e turbulence model, and a fully Reynolds stress turbulence model. The topic of the analysis is to investigate whether a counter-rotating secondary flow cell...... is formed near the surface at the outer bank. This cell might help to stabilise the bank and hereby be an important factor for the morphology in a meandering river. In the laminar runs stability criterion related to a Dean number was estabilshed. In the simulations with the k-e model and the Reynolds stress...

  2. Comparative study on the influence of depth, number and arrangement of dimples on the flow and heat transfer characteristics at turbulent flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Saeed; Zamani, Mahdi; Moshizi, Sajad A.

    2018-03-01

    The ensuing study is dedicated to a series of numerical investigations concerning the effects of various geometric parameters of dimpled plates on the flow structure and heat transfer performance in a rectangular duct compared to the smooth plate. These parameters are the arrangement, number and depth of dimples. Two widely used staggered and square patterns in addition to a triangular arrangement, and three dimple depths (Δ = δ/d = 0.25, 0.375 and 0.5) have been chosen for this particular study. All studies have been conducted at three different Reynolds numbers Re = 25,000, 50,000 and 100,000. In order to capture the flow structures in the vicinity of dimples and contributing phenomena related to the boundary layer interactions, fully structured grids with y+ rims of dimples are the causes for improved average Nusselt number in the dimpled surface in comparison to the smooth plate. However, more pressure loss due to the higher friction drag and recirculation zones inside dimples will exist as a drawback in this system. Moreover, for all arrangements increasing dimple ratio Δ has a negative impact on the heat transfer augmentation and also deteriorates the pressure loss, which leads to this fact that Δ = 0.25 serves as the best option for the dimple depth.

  3. Heat transfer in droplet-laden turbulent channel flow with phase transition in the presence of a thin film of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of a numerical study of turbulent droplet-laden channel flow with phase transition. Previous studies of the same system did not take into account the presence of gravity. Here, we do so introducing a thin film of water at the bottom wall and permitting droplets to fall into and

  4. Electromagnetic enhancement of turbulent heat transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2008-01-01

    We performed large eddy simulations (LES) of the turbulent natural convection of an electrically conductive fluid (water with 7% Na2SO4 electrolyte solution) in a moderate (4:4:1) aspect ratio enclosure heated from below and cooled from above and subjected to external nonuniformly distributed

  5. Turbulent shear flows 6; International Symposium, 6th, Universite de Toulouse III, France, Sept. 7-9, 1987, Selected Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Jean-Claude; Cousteix, Jean; Durst, Franz; Launder, Brian E.; Schmidt, Frank W.

    1989-08-01

    The conference presents papers on scalar transport and geophysical flows, aerodynamic flows, complex flows, and numerical simulation. Particular attention is given to an eigenfunction analysis of turbulent thermal convection, turbulent diffusion behind a heated line source in a nearly homogeneous turbulent shear flow, and the evolution of axisymmetric wakes from attached and separated flows. Other topics include the vortex street and turbulent wakes behind a circular cylinder placed inside a rotating rectangular channel and a numerical study of a stably stratified mixing layer.

  6. Scalar statistics in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, A.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of fully developed, internally heated channel flows with isothermal walls is performed using the low-Mach-number approximation of Navier-Stokes equation to investigate the influence of temperature-dependent properties on turbulent scalar statistics. Different constitutive

  7. Numerical simulation of compressible, turbulent, two-phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, t. J.; Champney, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program for numerically simulating compressible, turbulent, two-phase flows is described and applied. Special attention is given to flows in which dust is ingested into the turbulent boundary layer behind shock waves moving over the earth's surface. it is assumed that the two phases are interpenetrating continua which are coupled by drag forces and heat transfer. The particle phase is assumed to be dilute, and turbulent effects are modeled by zero- and two-equation eddy viscosity models. An important feature of the turbulence modeling is the treatment of surface boundary conditions which control the ingestion of particles into the boundary layer by turbulent friction and diffusion. The numerical method uses second-order implicit upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations and second-order central differencing of the viscous terms. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency, and the transformation to a curvilinear coordinate system is accomplished by the finite volume techniques. Applications to a series of representative flows include a two-phase nozzle flow, the steady flow of air over a sand bed, and the air flow behind a normal shock wave in uniform motion over a sand bed. Results of the latter two applications are compared with experimental results.

  8. Turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Noda, Nobuaki

    2007-01-01

    The turbulent heat transfer coefficients for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 21 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.5 to 353.4 K), the inlet pressures (P in =810 to 1014 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured by the experimental water loop. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3, 6 and 9 mm), heated lengths (L=32.7 to 100 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=5.51 to 33.3) and wall thicknesses (δ=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mm) with surface roughness (Ra=0.40 to 0.78 μm) are used in this work. The turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the turbulent heat transfer. The influences of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr), Dynamic viscosity (μ) and L/d on the turbulent heat transfer are investigated into details and, the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the turbulent heat transfer coefficients obtained in this work for wide range of the temperature difference between heater inner surface temperature and average bulk liquid temperature (ΔT L =5 to 140 K) with d=3, 6 and 9 mm, L=32.7 to 100 mm and u=4.0 to 21 m/s within ±15% difference. (author)

  9. Turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Noda, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    The turbulent heat transfer coefficients for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 21 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.5 to 353.4 K), the inlet pressures (P in =810 to 1014 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured by an experimental water loop. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3, 6 and 9 mm), heated lengths (L=32.7 to 100 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=5.51 to 33.3) and wall thickness (δ=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mm) with surface roughness (Ra=0.40 to 0.78 μm) are used in this work. The turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the turbulent heat transfer. The influence of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr), Dynamic viscosity (μ) and L/d on the turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and, the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the turbulent heat transfer coefficients obtained in this work for the wide range of the temperature difference between heater inner surface temperature and average bulk liquid temperature (ΔT L =5 to 140 K) with d=3, 6 and 9 mm, L=32.7 to 100 mm and u=4.0 to 21 m/s within ±15%, difference. (author)

  10. Steady turbulent flow in curved rectangular channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vriend, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    After the study of fully developed and developing steady laminar flow in curved channels of shallow rectangular wet cross-section (see earlier reports in this series), steady turbulent flow in such channels is investigated as a next step towards a mathematical model of the flow in shallow river

  11. Analysis of Influence of the Thermal Dependence of Air Thermophysical Properties on the Accuracy of Simulation of Heat Transfer in a Turbulent Flow in Case of Applying Different Methods of Averaging Navier-Stokes Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kliukvin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is theoretically investigated the influence of thermal dependence of air thermophysical properties on accuracy of heat transfer problems solution in a turbulent flow when using different methods of averaging the Navier-Stokes equations.There is analyzed the practicability of using particular method of averaging the NavierStokes equations when it’s necessary to clarify the solution of heat transfer problem taking into account the variability of air thermophysical properties.It’s shown that Reynolds and Favre averaging (the most common methods of averaging the Navier-Stokes equations are not effective in this case because these methods inaccurately describe behavior of large scale turbulent structures which strongly depends on geometry of particular flow. Thus it’s necessary to use more universal methods of turbulent flow simulation which are not based on averaging of all turbulent scales.In the article it’s shown that instead of Reynold and Favre averaging it’s possible to use large eddy simulation whereby turbulent structures are divided into small-scale and large-scale ones with subsequent modelling of small-scale ones only. But this approach leads to the necessarity of increasing the computational power by 2-3 orders.For different methods of averaging the form of additional terms of averaged Navier-Stokes equations in case of accounting pulsation of thermophysical properties of the air is obtained.On the example of a submerged heated air jet the errors (which occur when neglecting the thermal dependence of air thermophysical properties on averaged flow temperature in determination of convectional and conductive components of heat flux and viscous stresses are evaluated. It’s shown that the greatest increase of solution accuracy can be obtained in case of the flows with high temperature gradients.Finally using infinite Teylor series it’s found that underestimation of convective and conductive components of heat flux and

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of heat transfer in a turbulent flume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant, R.; Tiselj, I.

    2001-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) can be used for the description of turbulent heat transfer in the fluid at low Reynolds numbers. DNS means precise solving of Navier-Stoke's equations without any extra turbulent models. DNS should be able to describe all relevant length scales and time scales in observed turbulent flow. The largest length scale is actually dimension of system and the smallest length and time scale is equal to Kolmogorov scale. In the present work simulations of fully developed turbulent velocity and temperature fields were performed in a turbulent flume (open channel) with pseudo-spectral approach at Reynolds number 2670 (friction Reynolds number 171) and constant Prandtl number 5.4, considering the fluid temperature as a passive scalar. Two ideal thermal boundary conditions were taken into account on the heated wall. The first one was an ideal isothermal boundary condition and the second one an ideal isoflux boundary condition. We observed different parameters like mean temperature and velocity, fluctuations of temperature and velocity, and auto-correlation functions.(author)

  13. Simulation of turbulent flows containing strong shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, Bruce; Menon, Suresh

    2008-12-01

    Simulation of turbulent flows with strong shocks is a computationally challenging problem. The requirements for a method to produce accurate results for turbulence are orthogonal to those needed to treat shocks properly. In order to prevent an unphysical rate of decay of turbulent structures, it is necessary to use a method with very low numerical dissipation. Because of this, central difference schemes are widely used. However, computing strong shocks with a central difference scheme can produce unphysical post-shock oscillations that corrupt the entire flow unless additional dissipation is added. This dissipation can be difficult to localize to the area near the shock and can lead to inaccurate treatment of the turbulence. Modern high-resolution shock-capturing methods usually use upwind algorithms to provide the dissipation necessary to stabilize shocks. However, this upwind dissipation can also lead to an unphysical rate of decay of the turbulence. This paper discusses a hybrid method for simulating turbulent flows with strong shocks that couples a high-order central difference scheme with a high-resolution shock-capturing method. The shock-capturing method is used only in the vicinity of discontinuities in the flow, whereas the central difference scheme is used in the remainder of the computational domain. Results of this new method will be shown for a variety of test problems. Preliminary results for a realistic application involving detonation in gas-particle flows will also be presented.

  14. Simulation of turbulent flows containing strong shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryxell, Bruce; Menon, Suresh

    2008-01-01

    Simulation of turbulent flows with strong shocks is a computationally challenging problem. The requirements for a method to produce accurate results for turbulence are orthogonal to those needed to treat shocks properly. In order to prevent an unphysical rate of decay of turbulent structures, it is necessary to use a method with very low numerical dissipation. Because of this, central difference schemes are widely used. However, computing strong shocks with a central difference scheme can produce unphysical post-shock oscillations that corrupt the entire flow unless additional dissipation is added. This dissipation can be difficult to localize to the area near the shock and can lead to inaccurate treatment of the turbulence. Modern high-resolution shock-capturing methods usually use upwind algorithms to provide the dissipation necessary to stabilize shocks. However, this upwind dissipation can also lead to an unphysical rate of decay of the turbulence. This paper discusses a hybrid method for simulating turbulent flows with strong shocks that couples a high-order central difference scheme with a high-resolution shock-capturing method. The shock-capturing method is used only in the vicinity of discontinuities in the flow, whereas the central difference scheme is used in the remainder of the computational domain. Results of this new method will be shown for a variety of test problems. Preliminary results for a realistic application involving detonation in gas-particle flows will also be presented.

  15. Turbulent Heat Transfer Behavior of Nanofluid in a Circular Tube Heated under Constant Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Torii

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to disclose the forced convective heat transport phenomenon of nanofluids inside a horizontal circular tube subject to a constant and uniform heat flux at the wall. Consideration is given to the effect of the inclusion of nanoparticles on heat transfer enhancement, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and pressure loss in the turbulent flow region. It is found that (i heat transfer enhancement is caused by suspending nanoparticles and becomes more pronounced with the increase of the particle volume fraction, (ii its augmentation is affected by three different nanofluids employed here, and (iii the presence of particles produces adverse effects on viscosity and pressure loss that also increases with the particle volume fraction.

  16. Turbulence modeling for high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Huang, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation of turbulence models for high speed flows is presented. The flows consist of simple 2D flows over flat plates and complex shock-wave boundary-layer interaction flows over ramps and wedges. The flows are typical of those encountered by high speed vehicles such as the NASP. The turbulence models investigated include various two-equation models which, as a class, are considered to be well suited to the design of high speed vehicles. A description and discussion of the specific models is given and includes both baseline or uncorrected models, and model corrections which are needed to improve predictions of complex flows. It is found that most of the models studied are able to give good predictions of the flat plate flows, and some of the models are able to predict some of the complex flows, but none of them are able to accurately predict all of the complex flows. Recommendations for future model improvements are discussed.

  17. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  18. Turbulence Modeling of Torsional Couette Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Haddadi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study considers the numerical modeling of the turbulent flow inside a rotor-stator cavity subjected or not to a superimposed throughflow. Extensive numerical predictions based on one-point statistical modeling using a low Reynolds number second-order full stress transport closure (RSM model are performed mainly in the case of turbulent flows with merged boundary layers known as turbulent torsional Couette flows and belonging to regime III of Daily and Nece (1960. The RSM model has already shown its capability of predicting accurately the mean and turbulent fields in various rotating disk configurations (Poncet, 2005; Poncet et al., 2005, 2007, 2008. For the first time, a detailed mapping of the hydrodynamic flow over a wide range of rotational Reynolds numbers (180 000≤Re≤10 000 000, aspect ratios of the cavity (0.02≤G≤0.05, and flow rate coefficients (−10000≤Cw≤10000 is here provided in the turbulent torsional Couette flow regime.

  19. Turbulent Mixing in Stably Stratified Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Turbulent fluid motions are typically characterized by several features including randomness in both space and time, vorticity, an energy cascade ...drawback of this method is that the portion of the flow identified as a turbulent structure is dependent on the type of wavelet filter used (e.g., Haar ...the mesoscale variability of the atmosphere. J. Atmos. Sci., 40:749-761, 1983. E. Lindborg. The energy cascade in a strongly stratified fluid. J

  20. Surface roughness effects on turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Mo; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent Couette flow with two-dimensional (2-D) rod roughness is performed to examine the effects of the surface roughness. The Reynolds number based on the channel centerline laminar velocity (Uco) and channel half height (h) is Re =7200. The 2-D rods are periodically arranged with a streamwise pitch of λ = 8 k on the bottom wall, and the roughness height is k = 0.12 h. It is shown that the wall-normal extent for the logarithmic layer is significantly shortened in the rough-wall turbulent Couette flow, compared to a turbulent Couette flow with smooth wall. Although the Reynolds stresses are increased in a turbulent channel flow with surface roughness in the outer layer due to large-scale ejection motions produced by the 2-D rods, those of the rough-wall Couette flow are decreased. Isosurfaces of the u-structures averaged in time suggest that the decrease of the turbulent activity near the centerline is associated with weakened large-scale counter-rotating roll modes by the surface roughness. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2017R1D1A1A09000537) and the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2017R1A5A1015311).

  1. Tackling turbulent flows in engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Dewan, Anupam

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the engineering aspects of fluid turbulence, this volume offers solutions to the problem in a number of settings. Emphasizing real-world applications rather than mathematics, it will be a must-read text in both industrial and academic environments.

  2. Features of convective heat transfer in heated helium channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Slobodtchouk, V. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to choose an optimal method for thermohydraulic calculation of the gas flow in channels with intense heating at the flow Reynolds number below 10,000. These conditions are typical of the cooling channels of the High-Flux-Test Module of the International-Fusion-Materials-Irradiation-Facility (IFMIF/HFTM). A low Reynolds number and a high heating rate can result in partial relaminarization of the initially turbulent flow, and hence in a decrease in the heat transfer. A number of turbulence models offered by the commercial STAR-CD code were tested on the basis of the comparison of the numerical predictions with experimental data. This comparison showed that the low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence models predict the heat transfer characteristics close to the experimental data. The {kappa}-{epsilon} linear low Reynolds number turbulence model of Lien was applied as more appropriate fore the thermohydraulic analysis of the IFMIF high flux test module. (author)

  3. Characteristics of turbulent velocity and temperature in a wall channel of a heated rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, T.; Meyer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent air flow in a wall sub-channel of a heated 37-rod bundle (P/D = 1.12, W/D = 1.06) was investigated. measurements were performed with hot-wire probe with X-wires and a temperature wire. The mean velocity, the mean fluid temperature, the wall shear stress and wall temperature, the turbulent quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy, the Reynolds-stresses and the turbulent heat fluxes were measured and are discussed with respect to data from isothermal flow in a wall channel and heated flow in a central channel of the same rod bundle. Also, data on the power spectral densities of the velocity and temperature fluctuations are presented. These data show the existence of large scale periodic fluctuations are responsible for the high intersubchannel heat and momentum exchange.

  4. An algebraic stress/flux model for two-phase turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.

    1995-12-01

    An algebraic stress model (ASM) for turbulent Reynolds stress and a flux model for turbulent heat flux are proposed for two-phase bubbly and slug flows. These mathematical models are derived from the two-phase transport equations for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, and provide C μ , a turbulent constant which defines the level of eddy viscosity, as a function of the interfacial terms. These models also include the effect of heat transfer. When the interfacial drag terms and the interfacial momentum transfer terms are absent, the model reduces to a single-phase model used in the literature

  5. Scour monitoring via turbulent open channel flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M; Khan, A; Atamturktur, S

    2013-01-01

    Scour is the leading cause of bridge failure in the United States. It can result in the loss of lives and costs millions to repair the damage. A novel method is proposed for monitoring scour that exploits the turbulence in natural channels. The method utilizes the dynamic pressure associated with the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the flow to excite a flexible plate. A semi-empirical model is developed to describe the interaction of turbulent open channel flow with the plate. The model describes the variation of turbulent velocity fluctuations across the flow depth in an open channel resulting in a method for determining the average dynamic pressure on the flexible plate. The dynamic response of the plate is then modeled by superimposing the response of multiple modes of the disk to the random, turbulent dynamic pressure spectrum. The model is verified considering the pressure integration across the plate surface to ensure converged solutions. Due to the uncertainties in the material properties of the plate, the experimentally determined natural frequencies and vibration measurements are used to calibrate the model. The calibrated model predictions are then compared against an independent dataset for validation. In addition to describing the physical operation of the device, the semi-empirical model is also employed to optimize the field device. Measurements made using the field device also confirmed the model results, even in a non-design, misaligned flow condition. (paper)

  6. Correlations for heat transfer coefficient and friction factor for turbulent flow of air through square and hexagonal ducts with twisted tape insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupesh J.; Kore, Sandeep S.; Joshi, Prathamesh S.

    2017-12-01

    The experimental and numerical Nusselt number and friction factor investigation for turbulent flow through a non-circular duct with twisted-tape inserts have been presented. The non-circular ducts include square, hexagonal duct. The results of non-circular ducts are compared with circular duct. All the ducts have same equivalent diameter. The twist ratios used for the experiment are Y = 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5. Experiments were carried out on square duct, hexagonal duct and circular duct. The Reynolds number lied between 10,000 and 1, 05,000. The present study is restricted to the flow of air at Pr = 0.7 only and within a narrow temperature range of 40 to 75 ΟC, within which the compressible nature of air can be neglected. The results reveal that, both Nusselt number and friction factor increases as the side of non-circular duct increases. Maximum Nusselt number and friction factor is obtained in case of circular duct with twisted tape. Further the correlations of Nu and f are given for different non circular duct with twisted tape insert for engineering applications for the turbulent regime. Since the thermal performance factor (η) is observed to be within the range of 0.8 to 1.13 for both circular and noncircular ducts, the overall benefit of using twisted tape in the flow field shall nevertheless be marginal.

  7. Correlations for heat transfer coefficient and friction factor for turbulent flow of air through square and hexagonal ducts with twisted tape insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupesh J.; Kore, Sandeep S.; Joshi, Prathamesh S.

    2018-05-01

    The experimental and numerical Nusselt number and friction factor investigation for turbulent flow through a non-circular duct with twisted-tape inserts have been presented. The non-circular ducts include square, hexagonal duct. The results of non-circular ducts are compared with circular duct. All the ducts have same equivalent diameter. The twist ratios used for the experiment are Y = 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 and 6.5. Experiments were carried out on square duct, hexagonal duct and circular duct. The Reynolds number lied between 10,000 and 1, 05,000. The present study is restricted to the flow of air at Pr = 0.7 only and within a narrow temperature range of 40 to 75 ΟC, within which the compressible nature of air can be neglected. The results reveal that, both Nusselt number and friction factor increases as the side of non-circular duct increases. Maximum Nusselt number and friction factor is obtained in case of circular duct with twisted tape. Further the correlations of Nu and f are given for different non circular duct with twisted tape insert for engineering applications for the turbulent regime. Since the thermal performance factor (η) is observed to be within the range of 0.8 to 1.13 for both circular and noncircular ducts, the overall benefit of using twisted tape in the flow field shall nevertheless be marginal.

  8. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  9. BROWNIAN HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN THE TURBULENT REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chandrasekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents convection heat transfer of a turbulent flow Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular duct. The duct is a under constant and uniform heat flux. The paper computationally investigates the system’s thermal behavior in a wide range of Reynolds number and also volume concentration up to 6%. To obtain the nanofluid thermophysical properties, the Hamilton-Crosser model along with the Brownian motion effect are utilized. Then the thermal performance of the system with the nanofluid is compared to the conventional systems which use water as the working fluid. The results indicate that the use of nanofluid of 6% improves the heat transfer rate up to 36.8% with respect to pure water. Therefore, using the Al2O3/water nanofluid instead of water can be a great choice when better heat transfer is needed.

  10. Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent flows at supercritical pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunik, C.; Otic, I.; Schulenberg, T., E-mail: claus.kunik@kit.edu, E-mail: ivan.otic@kit.edu, E-mail: thomas.schulenberg@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech. (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method is used to investigate turbulent heat transfer to CO{sub 2} at supercritical pressure for upward flows. At those pressure conditions the fluid undergoes strong variations of fluid properties in a certain temperature range, which can lead to a deterioration of heat transfer (DHT). In this analysis, the LES method is applied on turbulent forced convection conditions to investigate the influence of several subgrid scale models (SGS-model). At first, only velocity profiles of the so-called inflow generator are considered, whereas in the second part temperature profiles of the heated section are investigated in detail. The results are statistically analyzed and compared with DNS data from the literature. (author)

  11. A High Order Accuracy Computational Tool for Unsteady Turbulent Flows and Acoustics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate simulations of unsteady turbulent flows for aerodynamics applications, such as accurate computation of heat loads on space vehicles as well the interactions...

  12. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    The mean behaviour of horizontal turbulent buoyant jets in co-flowing currents is investigated experimentally and numerically, in terms of jet trajectory, dilution and centerline density deficit and velocity decay. It is demonstrated in the paper that the laboratory data on the jet trajectory and...

  13. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  14. Rough flows and homogenization in stochastic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul, I.; Catellier, R.

    2017-10-01

    We provide in this work a tool-kit for the study of homogenisation of random ordinary differential equations, under the form of a friendly-user black box based on the technology of rough flows. We illustrate the use of this setting on the example of stochastic turbulence.

  15. Data-parallel DNS of turbulent flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Veldman, A.E.P.; Emerson, DR; Ecer, A; Periaux, J; Satofuka, N

    1998-01-01

    This contribution deals with direct numerical simulation (DNS) of incompressible turbulent flows on parallel computers. We make use of the data-parallel model on shared memory systems as well as on a distributed memory machine. The combination of fast parallel computers and efficient numerical

  16. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  17. Convective heat flow probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  18. Computation of supersonic turbulent flow past a spinning cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Computational results are presented for supersonic laminar and turbulent flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flowfield resulting from spinning motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation, and vortex structure. The Magnus force and moments are also computed. Comparisons are made with other analyses based on boundary-layer equations. For certain laminar flow conditions, an anomaly is discovered in the displacement thickness contribution to the Magnus force when compared with boundary-layer results. For turbulent flow, at small angles of attack, good agreement is obtained with the experimental data and other theoretical results.

  19. Turbulence modeling of shock separated boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.; Viegas, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Computations of transonic and hypersonic shock-separated boundary-layer flows using zero-equation (algebraic), one-equation (kinetic energy), and two-equation (kinetic energy plus length scale) turbulence eddy viscosity models are described and compared with measurements. The computations make use of a new Navier-Stokes computer algorithm that has reduced computing times by one to two orders of magnitude. The algorithm, and how the turbulence models are incorporated into it, are described. Results for the transonic flow show that the unmodified one-equation model is superior to the zero-equation model in skin-friction predictions. For the hypersonic flow, a highly modified one-equation model that accurately predicts surface pressure and heat transfer is described. Preliminary two-equation model results are also presented.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  1. Laminar turbulent transition in heated free jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejci, L.; Marsik, F.; Nenicka, V.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of heat and mass transfer in the initial region of a transitional plasma plume is investigated and discussed. The results show that these transport processes are controlled and limited by the plume shear layer instability. The process of laminar-turbulent transition is consecutively controlled by the plume core shear layer instability where interrelation of the effective thickness of the shear temperature and density layers play decisive role. When the absolute instability occurs the resonances in the jet and arc chamber must be taken into account. These processes are manifested in three events. Between the first and second phase, there is a maximum of arc heater exit average enthalpy. The other two thresholds occur at maximum and minimum stagnation heat flux from the plume core. It seems that these processes also influence the thermal energy production in the arc chamber cavity. (author)

  2. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND HEATING BY TURBULENT RECONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-52124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Anastasiadis, Anastasios [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece)

    2016-08-10

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  3. A turbulent two-phase flow model for nebula flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champney, J.M.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1990-01-01

    A new and very efficient turbulent two-phase flow numericaly model is described to analyze the environment of a protoplanetary nebula at a stage prior to the formation of planets. Focus is on settling processes of dust particles in flattened gaseous nebulae. The model employs a perturbation technique to improve the accuracy of the numerical simulations of such flows where small variations of physical quantities occur over large distance ranges. The particles are allowed to be diffused by gas turbulence in addition to settling under gravity. Their diffusion coefficients is related to the gas turbulent viscosity by the non-dimensional Schmidt number. The gas turbulent viscosity is determined by the means of the eddy viscosity hypothesis that assumes the Reynolds stress tensor proportional to the mean strain rate tensor. Zero- and two-equation turbulence models are employed. Modeling assumptions are detailed and discussed. The numerical model is shown to reproduce an existing analytical solution for the settling process of particles in an inviscid nebula. Results of nebula flows are presented taking into account turbulence effects of nebula flows. Diffusion processes are found to control the settling of particles. 24 refs

  4. Characterization of Fuego for laminar and turbulent natural convection heat transfer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr. (,; .)

    2005-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is conducted for internal natural convection heat transfer using the low Mach number code Fuego. The flow conditions under investigation are primarily laminar, transitional, or low-intensity level turbulent flows. In the case of turbulent boundary layers at low-level turbulence or transitional Reynolds numbers, the use of standard wall functions no longer applies, in general, for wall-bounded flows. One must integrate all the way to the wall in order to account for gradients in the dependent variables in the viscous sublayer. Fuego provides two turbulence models in which resolution of the near-wall region is appropriate. These models are the v2-f turbulence model and a Launder-Sharma, low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Two standard geometries are considered: the annulus formed between horizontal concentric cylinders and a square enclosure. Each geometry emphasizes wall shear flow and complexities associated with turbulent or near turbulent boundary layers in contact with a motionless core fluid. Overall, the Fuego simulations for both laminar and turbulent flows compared well to measured data, for both geometries under investigation, and to a widely accepted commercial CFD code (FLUENT).

  5. The lagRST Model: A Turbulence Model for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Olsen, Michael E.; Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new class of turbulence model designed for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows with separation. The model addresses deficiencies seen in the modeling of nonequilibrium turbulent flows. These flows generally have variable adverse pressure gradients which cause the turbulent quantities to react at a finite rate to changes in the mean flow quantities. This "lag" in the response of the turbulent quantities can t be modeled by most standard turbulence models, which are designed to model equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. The model presented uses a standard 2-equation model as the baseline for turbulent equilibrium calculations, but adds transport equations to account directly for non-equilibrium effects in the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) that are seen in large pressure gradients involving shock waves and separation. Comparisons are made to several standard turbulence modeling validation cases, including an incompressible boundary layer (both neutral and adverse pressure gradients), an incompressible mixing layer and a transonic bump flow. In addition, a hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with separation is assessed along with a transonic capsule flow. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWTBLI flows assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  6. Radial flow heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  7. Modeling turbulence structure. Chemical kinetics interaction in turbulent reactive flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, B.F. [The Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The challenge of the mathematical modelling is to transfer basic physical knowledge into a mathematical formulation such that this knowledge can be utilized in computational simulation of practical problems. The combustion phenomena can be subdivided into a large set of interconnected phenomena like flow, turbulence, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, radiation, extinction, ignition etc. Combustion in one application differs from combustion in another area by the relative importance of the various phenomena. The difference in fuel, geometry and operational conditions often causes the differences. The computer offers the opportunity to treat the individual phenomena and their interactions by models with wide operational domains. The relative magnitude of the various phenomena therefore becomes the consequence of operational conditions and geometry and need not to be specified on the basis of experience for the given problem. In mathematical modelling of turbulent combustion, one of the big challenges is how to treat the interaction between the chemical reactions and the fluid flow i.e. the turbulence. Different scientists adhere to different concepts like the laminar flamelet approach, the pdf approach of the Eddy Dissipation Concept. Each of these approaches offers different opportunities and problems. All these models are based on a sound physical basis, however none of these have general validity in taking into consideration all detail of the physical chemical interaction. The merits of the models can only be judged by their ability to reproduce physical reality and consequences of operational and geometric conditions in a combustion system. The presentation demonstrates and discusses the development of a coherent combustion technology for energy conversion and safety based on the Eddy Dissipation Concept by Magnussen. (author) 30 refs.

  8. Numerical analysis of hypersonic turbulent film cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. S.; Chen, C. P.; Wei, H.

    1992-01-01

    As a building block, numerical capabilities for predicting heat flux and turbulent flowfields of hypersonic vehicles require extensive model validations. Computational procedures for calculating turbulent flows and heat fluxes for supersonic film cooling with parallel slot injections are described in this study. Two injectant mass flow rates with matched and unmatched pressure conditions using the database of Holden et al. (1990) are considered. To avoid uncertainties associated with the boundary conditions in testing turbulence models, detailed three-dimensional flowfields of the injection nozzle were calculated. Two computational fluid dynamics codes, GASP and FDNS, with the algebraic Baldwin-Lomax and k-epsilon models with compressibility corrections were used. It was found that the B-L model which resolves near-wall viscous sublayer is very sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions at the nozzle exit face. The k-epsilon models with improved wall functions are less sensitive to the inlet boundary conditions. The testings show that compressibility corrections are necessary for the k-epsilon model to realistically predict the heat fluxes of the hypersonic film cooling problems.

  9. Transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Kai, Naoto; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Masuzaki, Suguru

    2011-01-01

    The transient turbulent heat transfer coefficients in a short vertical Platinum test tube were systematically measured for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.6 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.93 to 304.81 K), the inlet pressures (P in =794.39 to 858.27 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), exponential periods, τ, of 18.6 ms to 25.7 s) by an experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L=66.5 and 69.6 mm), effective lengths (L eff =56.7 and 59.2 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=22.16 and 11.6), ratios of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d=18.9 and 9.87) and wall thickness (δ=0.5 and 0.4 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra=0.40 and 0.45 μm) were used in this work. The surface heat fluxes between the two potential taps were given the difference between the heat generation rate per unit surface area and the rate of change of energy storage in the test tube obtained from the faired average temperature versus time curve. The heater inner surface temperature between the two potential taps was also obtained by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation in the test tube under the conditions of measured average temperature and heat generation rate per unit surface area of the test tube. The transient turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by authors' correlation for the steady state turbulent heat transfer. The influence of inner diameter (d), ratio of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d), flow velocity (u) and exponential period (τ) on the transient turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data and authors' studies for the

  10. Turbulent Mechanical Energy Budget in Stably Stratified Baroclinic Flows over Sloping Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łobocki, Lech

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of second-moment budget equations in a slope-oriented coordinate frame exhibits the pathways of exchange between the potential energy of mean flow and the total turbulent mechanical energy. It is shown that this process is controlled by the inclination of the potential temperature gradient. Hence, this parameter should be considered in studies of turbulence in slope flows as well as the slope inclination. The concept of turbulent potential energy is generalized to include baroclinicity, and is used to explain the role of along-slope turbulent heat flux in energy conversions. A generalization of static stability criteria for baroclinic conditions is also proposed. In addition, the presence of feedback between the turbulent heat flux and the temperature variance in stably-stratified flows is identified, which implies the existence of oscillatory modes characterized by the Brunt-Väisäla frequency.

  11. Turbulent flow in a partially filled pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Henry; Cregan, Hope; Dodds, Jonathan; Poole, Robert; Dennis, David

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent flow in a pressure driven pipe running partially full has been investigated using high-speed 2D-3C Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry. With the field-of-view spanning the entire pipe cross section we are able to reconstruct the full three dimensional quasi-instantaneous flow field by invoking Taylor's hypothesis. The measurements were carried out over a range of flow depths at a constant Reynolds number based on hydraulic diameter and bulk velocity of Re = 32 , 000 . In agreement with previous studies, the ``velocity dip'' phenomenon, whereby the location of the maximum streamwise velocity occurs below the free surface was observed. A mean flow secondary current is observed near the free surface with each of the counter-rotating rollers filling the half-width of the pipe. Unlike fully turbulent flow in a rectangular open channel or pressurized square duct flow where the secondary flow cells appear in pairs about a corner bisector, the mean secondary motion observed here manifests only as a single pair of vortices mirrored about the pipe vertical centreline.

  12. Combined Influence of Strain and Heat Loss on Turbulent Premixed Flame Stabilization

    KAUST Repository

    Tay-Wo-Chong, Luis

    2015-11-16

    The present paper argues that the prediction of turbulent premixed flames under non-adiabatic conditions can be improved by considering the combined effects of strain and heat loss on reaction rates. The effect of strain in the presence of heat loss on the consumption speed of laminar premixed flames was quantified by calculations of asymmetric counterflow configurations (“fresh-to-burnt”) with detailed chemistry. Heat losses were introduced by setting the temperature of the incoming stream of products on the “burnt” side to values below those corresponding to adiabatic conditions. The consumption speed decreased in a roughly exponential manner with increasing strain rate, and this tendency became more pronounced in the presence of heat losses. An empirical relation in terms of Markstein number, Karlovitz Number and a non-dimensional heat loss parameter was proposed for the combined influence of strain and heat losses on the consumption speed. Combining this empirical relation with a presumed probability density function for strain in turbulent flows, an attenuation factor that accounts for the effect of strain and heat loss on the reaction rate in turbulent flows was deduced and implemented into a turbulent combustion model. URANS simulations of a premixed swirl burner were carried out and validated against flow field and OH chemiluminescence measurements. Introducing the effects of strain and heat loss into the combustion model, the flame topology observed experimentally was correctly reproduced, with good agreement between experiment and simulation for flow field and flame length.

  13. Assessment of CFD Hypersonic Turbulent Heating Rates for Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.; Oliver, A. Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent CFD codes are assessed for the prediction of convective heat transfer rates at turbulent, hypersonic conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes. The benchmark heat transfer rates are derived from thermocouple measurements of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery windward tiles during the STS-119 and STS-128 entries. The thermocouples were located underneath the reaction-cured glass coating on the thermal protection tiles. Boundary layer transition flight experiments conducted during both of those entries promoted turbulent flow at unusually high Mach numbers, with the present analysis considering Mach 10{15. Similar prior comparisons of CFD predictions directly to the flight temperature measurements were unsatisfactory, showing diverging trends between prediction and measurement for Mach numbers greater than 11. In the prior work, surface temperatures and convective heat transfer rates had been assumed to be in radiative equilibrium. The present work employs a one-dimensional time-accurate conduction analysis to relate measured temperatures to surface heat transfer rates, removing heat soak lag from the flight data, in order to better assess the predictive accuracy of the numerical models. The turbulent CFD shows good agreement for turbulent fuselage flow up to Mach 13. But on the wing in the wake of the boundary layer trip, the inclusion of tile conduction effects does not explain the prior observed discrepancy in trends between simulation and experiment; the flight heat transfer measurements are roughly constant over Mach 11-15, versus an increasing trend with Mach number from the CFD.

  14. Transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Kai, Naoto; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Masuzaki, Suguru

    2011-01-01

    The transient turbulent heat transfer coefficients in a short vertical Platinum test tube were systematically measured for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.6 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.93 to 304.81 K), the inlet pressures (P in =794.39 to 858.27 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), exponential periods, τ, of 18.6 ms to 25.7 s) by an experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L=66.5 and 69.6 mm), effective lengths (L eff =56.7 and 59.2 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=22.16 and 11.6), ratios of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d=18.9 and 9.87) and wall thickness (δ=0.5 and 0.4 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra=0.40 and 0.45 μm) were used in this work. The surface heat fluxes between the two potential taps were given the difference between the heat generation rate per unit surface area and the rate of change of energy storage in the test tube obtained from the faired average temperature versus time curve. The heater inner surface temperature between the two potential taps was also obtained by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation in the test tube under the conditions of measured average temperature and heat generation rate per unit surface area of the test tube. The transient turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by authors' correlation for the steady state turbulent heat transfer. The influence of inner diameter (d), ratio of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d), flow velocity (u) and exponential period (τ) on the transient turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data and authors' studies for the

  15. 3-D numerical study of the effect of Reynolds number and baffle angle on heat transfer and pressure drop of turbulent flow of air through rectangular duct of very small height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Paul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Present article illustrates a computational study of three-dimensional steady state heat transfer and high turbulent flow characteristics through a rectangular duct with constant heat fluxed upper wall and single rectangular cross-sectioned baffle insertion at different angles. RNG k–ɛ model along with standard wall function based computations has been accomplished applying the finite volume method, and SIMPLE algorithm has been executed for solving the governing equations. For a Reynolds number, Re of 10,000 to 50,000, Prandtl Number, Pr of 0.707 and baffle angle, α of 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°, computational studies are executed, centred onto the hydraulic diameter, Dh, test section and hydrodynamic entry length of the duct. Flow field has been solved using Ansys Fluent 14.0 software. Study exposes that baffled rectangular duct has a higher average Nusselt number, Nu and Darcy friction factor, f compared to a smooth rectangular duct. Nu as well as f are found to be maximum at 90° baffle angle. Results illustrate that both α and Re play a significant role in heat transfer as well as flow characteristics and also effects TEF. The correctness of the results attained in this study is corroborated by comparing the results with those existing in the literature for smooth rectangular duct within a precision of ±2% for f and ±4% for Nu.

  16. Redistribution of Kinetic Energy in Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pumir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In statistically homogeneous turbulent flows, pressure forces provide the main mechanism to redistribute kinetic energy among fluid elements, without net contribution to the overall energy budget. This holds true in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D flows, which show fundamentally different physics. As we demonstrate here, pressure forces act on fluid elements very differently in these two cases. We find in numerical simulations that in 3D pressure forces strongly accelerate the fastest fluid elements, and that in 2D this effect is absent. In 3D turbulence, our findings put forward a mechanism for a possibly singular buildup of energy, and thus may shed new light on the smoothness problem of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in 3D.

  17. Instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Norihiro; Naito, Kensuke; Yokokawa, Miwa

    2015-04-01

    It is known that plane water-ice interface becomes unstable to evolve into a train of waves. The underside of ice formed on the water surface of rivers are often observed to be covered with ice ripples. Relatively steep channels which discharge melting water from glaciers are characterized by beds covered with a series of steps. Though the flowing agent inducing instability is not water but gas including water vapor, a similar train of steps have been recently observed on the Polar Ice Caps on Mars (Spiral Troughs). They are expected to be caused by the instability of water-ice interface induced by flowing fluid on ice. There have been some studies on this instability in terms of linear stability analysis. Recently, Caporeale and Ridolfi (2012) have proposed a complete linear stability analysis in the case of laminar flow, and found that plane water-ice interface is unstable in the range of sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, and that the important parameters are the Reynolds number, the slope angle, and the water surface temperature. However, the flow inducing instability on water-ice interface in the field should be in the turbulent regime. Extension of the analysis to the case of fully developed turbulent flow with larger Reynolds numbers is needed. We have performed a linear stability analysis on the instability of water-ice interface under turbulent flow conditions with the use of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the mixing length turbulent model, the continuity equation of flow, the diffusion/dispersion equation of heat, and the Stefan equation. In order to reproduce the accurate velocity distribution and the heat transfer in the vicinity of smooth walls with the use of the mixing length model, it is important to take into account of the rapid decrease in the mixing length in the viscous sublayer. We employ the Driest model (1956) to the formulation. In addition, as the thermal boundary condition at the water surface, we describe the

  18. Turbulent heat/mass transfer at oceanic interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enstad, Lars Inge

    2005-07-01

    The thesis studies heat/mass transfer and uses various simulation techniques. A numerical method has been developed. 4 papers which describes the work, are included. In the first paper we look at such flow configuration where the flow is driven by a constant pressure gradient and the interface is cooled from above. Papers 2 and 3. 2: The effect of stable density stratification on turbulent vortical structures near an atmosphere-ocean interface driven by low wind shear. 3: Low shear turbulence structures beneath a gas-liquid interface under neutral and stable stratified conditions. A well known feature of the upper layer of the ocean is the presence of counter-rotating streamwise vorticity, so called Langmuir circulation. Earlier numerical investigations show that similar vortex structures appear on small scale induced by shear instability only. Short wave solar radiation may create a stable situation which affects the turbulence near the interface. In these papers we investigate such a flow situation by employing a uniform and constant shear stress at the interface together with a similar heat flux into the interface. In both articles we also use a two-point correlation to give a statistical representation of the streamwise vorticity. The spatial extent and intensity are decreased by stable stratification. In addition, in article 3, we find that the Reynolds stress is damped by stable stratification. This leads to an increased mean velocity since decreased Reynolds stress is compensated by a larger mean velocity gradient. The cospectra of the Reynolds stress in the spanwise direction show that the production of Reynolds stress is decreased at lower wave numbers and thus shifted to higher wave numbers in the presence of stable stratification. The streak structure created by the streamwise vorticity is disorganized by stable stratification. Article 4: A numerical study of a density interface using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) coupled with a Navier Stokes

  19. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of κ-ε modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy κ, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation ε, for each material. Hence a set of κ and ε equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both κ and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe

  20. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence...

  1. Fractal flow design how to design bespoke turbulence and why

    CERN Document Server

    Vassilicos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on turbulent flows generated and/or influenced by multiscale/fractal structures. It consists of six chapters which demonstrate, each one in its own way, how such structures and objects can be used to design bespoke turbulence for particular applications and also how they can be used for fundamental studies of turbulent flows.

  2. Turbulence structure in a diabatically heated forest canopy composed of fractal Pythagoras trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröttle, Josef; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the turbulent flow through a heterogeneous forest canopy by high-resolution numerical modeling. For this purpose, a novel approach to model individual trees is implemented in our large-eddy simulation (LES). A group of sixteen fractal Pythagoras trees is placed in the computational domain and the tree elements are numerically treated as immersed boundaries. Our objective is to resolve the multiscale flow response starting at the diameter of individual tree elements up to the depth of the atmospheric surface layer. A reference run, conducted for the forest flow under neutral thermal stratification, produces physically meaningful turbulence statistics. Our numerical results agree quantitatively with data obtained from former field-scale LESs and wind tunnel experiments. Furthermore, the numerical simulations resolve vortex shedding behind individual branches and trunks as well as the integral response of the turbulent flow through the heterogeneous forest canopy. A focus is the investigation of the turbulence structure of the flow under stable thermal stratification and in response to the heating of the fractal tree crowns. For the stratified flows, statistical quantities, e.g. turbulent kinetic energy and vorticity, are presented and the turbulent exchange processes of momentum and heat are considered in detail. The onset and formation of coherent structures such as elevated shear layers above the diabatically heated forest canopy are analyzed. For the stably stratified flow, temperature ramps above the forest canopy were simulated in agreement with previous observations. Thermally driven vortices with a typical diameter of the canopy height were simulated when the tree crowns were diabatically heated. The impact of the coherent flow structures on the heat flux is investigated.

  3. Superhydrophobic Drag Reduction in Various Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have been studied exhaustively in laminar flow applications while interest in SHS drag reduction in turbulent flow applications has been increasing steadily. In this discussion, we will highlight recent advances of SHS applications in various high-Reynolds number flows. We will address the application of mechanically robust and scalable spray SHSs in three cases: fully-developed internal flow; a near-zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer; and an axisymmetric DARPA SUBOFF model. The model will be towed in the University of Michigan's Physical Model Basin. Experimental measurements of streamwise pressure drop and the near-wall flow via Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry will be discussed where applicable. Moreover, integral measurement of the total resistance of the SUBOFF model, with and without SHS application, will be examined. The SUBOFF model extends 2.6 m and is 0.3 m in diameter, and will be tested at water depths of three to six model diameters. Previous investigation of these SHSs have proven that skin-friction savings of 20% or more can be attained for friction Reynolds numbers greater than of 1,000. This project was carried out as part of the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) MURI (Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives) program (Grant No. N00014-12-1-0874) managed by Dr. Ki-Han Kim and led by Dr. Steven L. Ceccio.

  4. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans

    2017-01-01

    Within the lowest kilometer of the Earth's atmosphere, in the so-called atmospheric boundary layer, winds are often gusty and turbulent. Nearest to the ground, the turbulence is predominately generated by mechanical wall-bounded wind shear, whereas at higher altitudes turbulent mixing of heat......) their generation; (2) the cascade of energy across the spectrum from large- to small-scale; and (3) the eventual decay of turbulence into heat owing to viscosity effects on the Kolmogorov microscale, in which the eddy size is only a fraction of a millimeter. This paper addresses atmospheric turbulence spectra...... in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer—the so-called surface layer—where the wind shear is strong owing to the nonslip condition at the ground. Theoretical results dating back to Tchen's early work in 1953 'on the spectrum of energy in turbulent shear flow' led Tchen to predict a shear production...

  5. Turbulent heat flux measurements in thermally stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J.; van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable turbulent boundary layers are prevalent in the polar regions and nocturnal atmospheric surface layer but heat and momentum flux measurements in such flow are often difficult. Here, a new method is employed using a nanoscale cold-wire (T-NSTAP) adjacent to a 2D PIV light sheet to measure these fluxes within rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. This method combines the advantages of fast thermal frequency response with measurement of the spatial variation of the velocity field. Resolution is limited solely by the separation of the probe and the light sheet. The new technique is used to examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity over a range of Richardson numbers from weak to strongly stable. In addition, the velocity fields are conditionally averaged subject to strong deviations of temperature above and below the local average in an effort to determine the relationship between the coherent turbulent motions and the fluctuating temperature field. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  6. Multigrid acceleration of turbulent reacting flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Mark

    The study at hand is motivated by the ever growing complexity of turbulent combustion CFD simulations, imposing severe demands on computational resources. Such demands often render the simulation of practical, supersonic reacting flows about complex geometries unaffordable. As standard numerical methods are inefficient in solving the highly stiff, reacting Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations that govern turbulent combustion, there is a need for methods that accelerate the iterative convergence to a steady-state. This work investigates the applicability of the multigrid (MG) approach as a means to accelerate convergence by alleviating the inherent numerical stiffness present in the RANS equations, especially when coupled with turbulence and finite-rate chemical kinetics models. A survey of previous attempts at implementing multigrid for the problems at hand indicated extensive use of artificial stabilization to overcome numerical instability arising from non-linearity of source-terms, small-scale physics of combustion, and loss of positivity. To maximize the acceleration offered by multigrid, this work is aimed at developing a robust and stable multigrid method and an implicit solver for turbulent combustion, that do not rely on extensive artificial stabilization. The unconditionally positive-convergent (UPC) time integration implicit scheme, originally developed for turbulence model equations is adopted in this work, and successfully extended for use with chemical kinetics models, in a fully-coupled multigrid (FC-MG) framework. Several modifications aimed at improving the efficiency of the scheme are also proposed. To tackle the degraded performance of multigrid methods for chemically reacting flows, two major modifications are introduced with respect to the basic Full Approximation Storage (FAS) multigrid method. First, a novel prolongation operator that is based on logarithmic variables is proposed. The new operator prevents loss of positivity due to

  7. Mathematical model for the calculation of internal turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, V. de P.; Valle Pereira Filho, H. do

    1981-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes and the turbulent kinetic energy equations for the incompressible, turbulent and fully developed pipe flow, were solved by a finite difference procedure. The distributions of the mean velocity, turbulent shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy were obtained at different Reynolds numbers. Those numerical results were compared with experimental data and the agreement was good in whole cross section of the flow. (Author) [pt

  8. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic

  9. Simulation analysis of air flow and turbulence statistics in a rib grit roughened duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, I I; Denizopoulou, A C; Ntinas, G K; Fragos, V P

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations.

  10. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  11. Pipe Flow and Wall Turbulence Using a Modified Navier-Stokes Equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirkovsky, L.; Muriel, A.

    2012-01-01

    We use a derived incompressible modified Navier-Stokes equation to model pipe flow and wall turbulence. We reproduce the observed flattened paraboloid velocity profiles of turbulence that cannot be obtained directly using standard incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. The solutions found are in harmony with multi-valued velocity fields as a definition of turbulence. Repeating the procedure for the flow of turbulent fluid between two parallel flat plates we find similar flattened velocity profiles. We extend the analysis to the turbulent flow along a single wall and compare the results with experimental data and the established controversial von Karman logarithmic law of the wall. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Heat flow in He II in microbore channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helvensteijn, B.P.M.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reports measurements of the pressure and temperature differences as a function of heat flux over the length of glass microbore tubing containing He II. The aim is to investigate the heat transport mechanisms in the intermediate region between laminar and turbulent flow. At low heat fluxes the fluid shows a laminar flow behavior distinguished by linear relations in temperature and pressure gradients with heat flux. An attempt is made to determine whether the transition is reversible or hysteretic and whether the onset of turbulence may be prohibited in small diameter tubing. The results indicate that there is no onset of turbulence up to the lambda point. The maximum heat flux obtainable is approximately 6 W cm -2 , which is almost independent of the bath temperature below 1.9 K. The maximum pressure rise is also independent of the bath temperature and prohibits a liquid-vapor transition

  13. Instantaneous aerosol dynamics in a turbulent flow

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Dibutyl phthalate aerosol particles evolution dynamics in a turbulent mixing layer is simulated by means of direct numerical simulation for the flow field and the direct quadrature method of moments for the aerosol evolution. Most par-ticles are nucleated in a thin layer region corresponding to a specific narrow temperature range near the cool stream side. However, particles undergo high growth rate on the hot stream side due to condensation. Coagulation decreases the total particle number density at a rate which is highly correlated to the in-stantaneous number density.

  14. CISM-IUTAM School on Advanced Turbulent Flow Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Egon

    2000-01-01

    This book collects the lecture notes concerning the IUTAM School on Advanced Turbulent Flow Computations held at CISM in Udine September 7–11, 1998. The course was intended for scientists, engineers and post-graduate students interested in the application of advanced numerical techniques for simulating turbulent flows. The topic comprises two closely connected main subjects: modelling and computation, mesh pionts necessary to simulate complex turbulent flow.

  15. Effect of droplet interaction on droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Vreman, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of heat transfer and droplet concentration in turbulent flow of a mixture of dry air, water vapor, and water droplets in a differentially heated channel. In particular, we study the effects of droplet collisions by comparing results of simulations

  16. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM (Heat Transfer and Turbulence Mechanics)-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment. Volume 2. Taxonomies, Reporters’ Summaries, Evaluation, and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    to calculate the reattachment length correctly, One of the Boussineaq modelo which uses a mixing-length formulation (BILK 30) predicted the...throughout a computation; we know where we will - ead to - A r . match. The various cases of complex strains and turbulent-turbulent interactions can be

  17. Numerical investigation of turbulence models for shock separated boundary-layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, J. R.; Coakley, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for shock separated turbulent boundary-layer flows are presented. Several turbulence models are investigated and assessed by their ability to predict the physical phenomena associated with two extensively documented experiments. The experimental flows consist of shock-wave boundary-layer interactions in axisymmetric internal and external geometries at Mach numbers of 1.5 and 7, respectively. Algebraic and one-equation eddy viscosity models are used to describe the Reynolds shear stress. Calculated values of skin friction, wall pressure distribution, kinetic energy of turbulence, and heat transfer are compared with measurements.

  18. Turbulent ion heating in TCV Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatter, Ch.

    2009-08-01

    charge exchange measurements, by doping the plasma with ion neutralisation targets injected with the diagnostic neutral beam (DNBI), were used to absolutely calibrate the NPA. Advanced modelling of the measured hydrogenic charge exchange spectra with the neutralisation and neutral transport codes KN1D and DOUBLE-TCV permitted a calculation of the absolute neutral density profiles of the plasma species.The energisation and the properties of fast ions were studied in dedicated, low density, cold ion, hot electron plasmas, resonantly heated at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The ion acceleration occurs on a characteristic timescale in the sub-millisecond range and comprises up to 20 % of the plasma ions. The number of fast ions n i s and their effective temperature T i s are found to depend strongly on the bulk and suprathermal electron parameters, in particular T i s ≥ T e b (electron bulk) and n i s ∼ v de (toroidal electron drift speed). The suprathermal electrons, abundantly generated in plasmas subjected to ECCD, are diagnosed with perpendicular and oblique viewing electron cyclotron emission (ECE) antennas and the measured frequency spectra are reconstructed with the relativistic ECE radiation balance code NOTEC-TCV. With steady-state ECRH and ECCD, the fast ion population reaches an equilibrium state. The spatial fast ion temperature profile is broad, of similar shape compared to the bulk ion temperature profile. The hottest suprathermal temperature observed is T i s ≥ 6 keV. Various potential ion acceleration mechanisms were examined for relevance in the TCV parameter range. The simultaneous wave-electron and wave-ion resonances of ion acoustic turbulence (IAT) show the best correlation with the available experimental knowledge. Ion acoustic waves are emitted by the weakly relativistic circulating electrons and are mainly Landau damped onto the ions. Destabilisation of IAT is markedly facilitated by the important degree of

  19. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  20. Turbulent heat transport in two- and three-dimensional temperature fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaraweera, Don Sarath Abesiri [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1978-03-01

    A fundamental numerical study of turbulent heat and mass transport processes in two- and three-dimensional convective flows is presented. The model of turbulence employed is the type referred to as a second-order closure. In this scheme transport equations for all nonzero components of the Reynolds stress tensor, for the isotropic dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, for all nonzero scalar flux tensor components and for the mean square scalar fluctuations are solved by a finite difference method along with the mean momentum and mean enthalpy (or concentration) equations. The model used for the stresses was developed earlier. Parallel ideas were utilised in obtaining a model for turbulent heat and mass transfer processes. The study has focused especially on the problem of nonaxisymmetric convective heat and mass transport in pipes, which arises when the boundary conditions are not axisymmetric. The few available experimental data on such situations have indicated anisotropy in effective diffusivities. To expand the available data base an experiment was conducted to obtain heat transfer measurements in strong three-dimensional heating conditions. Numerical procedures especially suitable for incorporation of second-order turbulent closure models have been developed. The effect of circumferential conduction in the tube material, which is influential in the asymmetric heating data currently available, was accounted for directly by extending the finite difference calculations into the pipe wall. The principal goal of predicting three-dimensional scalar transfer has been achieved.

  1. Near-wall turbulence model and its application to fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1990-01-01

    A near-wall turbulence model and its incorporation into a multiple-timescale turbulence model are presented. The near-wall turbulence model is obtained from a k-equation turbulence model and a near-wall analysis. In the method, the equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and turbulent kinetic energy are integrated up to the wall, and the energy transfer and the dissipation rates inside the near-wall layer are obtained from algebraic equations. Fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows are solved using a finite element method. The computational results compare favorably with experimental data. It is also shown that the turbulence model can resolve the overshoot phenomena of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall.

  2. Experimental studies of occupation times in turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, J.; Ott, Søren; Pécseli, H.L.

    2003-01-01

    as the difference between entrance and exit times of surrounding particles convected through the sphere by the turbulent motions. Simple, and seemingly universal, scaling laws are obtained for the probability density of the occupation times in terms of the basic properties for the turbulent flow and the geometry......The motion of passively convected particles in turbulent flows is studied experimentally in approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows, generated in water by two moving grids. The simultaneous trajectories of many small passively convected, neutrally buoyant, polystyrene particles...

  3. Applications of URANS on predicting unsteady turbulent separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Ma, Huiyang

    2009-06-01

    Accurate prediction of unsteady separated turbulent flows remains one of the toughest tasks and a practical challenge for turbulence modeling. In this paper, a 2D flow past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3,900 is numerically investigated by using the technique of unsteady RANS (URANS). Some typical linear and nonlinear eddy viscosity turbulence models (LEVM and NLEVM) and a quadratic explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) are evaluated. Numerical results have shown that a high-performance cubic NLEVM, such as CLS, are superior to the others in simulating turbulent separated flows with unsteady vortex shedding.

  4. Self-consistent viscous heating of rapidly compressed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alejandro; Morgan, Brandon

    2017-11-01

    Given turbulence subjected to infinitely rapid deformations, linear terms representing interactions between the mean flow and the turbulence dictate the evolution of the flow, whereas non-linear terms corresponding to turbulence-turbulence interactions are safely ignored. For rapidly deformed flows where the turbulence Reynolds number is not sufficiently large, viscous effects can't be neglected and tend to play a prominent role, as shown in the study of Davidovits & Fisch (2016). For such a case, the rapid increase of viscosity in a plasma-as compared to the weaker scaling of viscosity in a fluid-leads to the sudden viscous dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. As shown in Davidovits & Fisch, increases in temperature caused by the direct compression of the plasma drive sufficiently large values of viscosity. We report on numerical simulations of turbulence where the increase in temperature is the result of both the direct compression (an inviscid mechanism) and the self-consistent viscous transfer of energy from the turbulent scales towards the thermal energy. A comparison between implicit large-eddy simulations against well-resolved direct numerical simulations is included to asses the effect of the numerical and subgrid-scale dissipation on the self-consistent viscous This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Investigation of particle-laden turbulent flow in free shear turbulent combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Ellzey, J.; Daily, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit numerical mixed phase simulations are described which couple random gasdynamic motions to inertiallly interactive gas borne particles. Theses simulations are numerical experiments intended to provide data for investigating the interaction between a developing turbulent free shear layer and gas borne solid particles it entrains. The simulations predict most probable distributions of dispersed phase trajectories, standard deviations, and gas phase mixing dynamics which include the concomitant back-influences of the particle phase on the carrier gas flow. Data for refinement of the computational scheme and physical verification are provided by experiment. The experimental evidence is developed in a splitter plate divided, two-channel free shear mixing combustion tube. A variety of particle concentrations and particle size distributions are admitted into non-combusting or combusting flows with selected heat release levels. The computations, in turn, provide guidance on design and selection of new experiments

  6. Fast linear solvers for variable density turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouransari, Hadi; Mani, Ali; Darve, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Variable density flows are ubiquitous in variety of natural and industrial systems. Two-phase and multi-phase flows in natural and industrial processes, astrophysical flows, and flows involved in combustion processes are such examples. For an ideal gas subject to low-Mach approximation, variations in temperature can lead to a non-uniform density field. In this work, we consider radiatively heated particle-laden turbulent flows as an example application in which density variability is resulted from inhomogeneities in the heat absorption by an inhomogeneous particle field. Under such conditions, the divergence constraint of the fluid is enforced through a variable coefficient Poisson equation. Inversion of the discretized variable coefficient Poisson operator is difficult using the conventional linear solvers as the size of the problem grows. We apply a novel hierarchical linear solve algorithm based on low-rank approximations. The proposed linear solver could be applied to variety of linear systems arising from discretized partial differential equations. It can be used as a standalone direct-solver with tunable accuracy and linear complexity, or as a high-accuracy pre-conditioner in conjunction with other iterative methods.

  7. accurate, explicit pipe sizing formula for turbulent flows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    ABSTRACT. This paper develops an explicit formula for computing the diameter of pipes, which is applicable to all turbulent flows. The formula not only avoids iteration but still estimates pipe diameters over the entire range of turbulent flows with an error of less than 4% in the worst cases. This is superior to (without ...

  8. Particle Entrainment under Turbulent Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplas, Panayiotis

    2009-11-01

    Erosion, transportation and deposition of sediments and pollutants influence the hydrosphere, pedosphere, biosphere and atmosphere in profound ways. The global amount of sediment eroded annually over the continental surface of the earth via the action of water and wind is estimated to be around 80 billion metric tons, with 20 of them delivered by rivers to the oceans. This redistribution of material over the surface of the earth affects most of its physical, chemical and biological processes in ways that are exceedingly difficult to comprehend. The criterion currently in use for predicting particle entrainment, originally proposed by Shields in 1936, emphasizes the time-averaged boundary shear stress and therefore is incapable of accounting for the fluctuating forces encountered in turbulent flows. A new criterion that was developed recently in an effort to overcome the limitations of the previous approach will be presented. It is hypothesized that not only the magnitude, but also the duration of energetic near bed turbulent events is relevant in predicting grain removal from the bed surface. It is therefore proposed that the product of force and its duration, or impulse, is a more appropriate and universal criterion for identifying conditions suitable for particle dislodgement. Analytical formulation of the problem and experimental data are used to examine the validity of the new criterion.

  9. Capturing inertial particle transport in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Harry; Lawrie, Andrew; Szalai, Robert

    2017-11-01

    The natural world is replete with examples of particle advection; mankind is both a beneficiary from and sufferer of the consequences. As such, the study of inertial particle dynamics, both aerosol and bubble, is vitally important. In many interesting examples such as cloud microphysics, sedimentation, or sewage transport, many millions of particles are advected in a relatively small volume of fluid. It is impossible to model these processes computationally and simulate every particle. Instead, we advect the probability density field of particle positions allowing unbiased sampling of particle behaviour across the domain. Given a 3-dimensional space discretised into cubes, we construct a transport operator that encodes the flow of particles through the faces of the cubes. By assuming that the dynamics of the particles lie close to an inertial manifold, it is possible to preserve the majority of the inertial properties of the particles between the time steps. We demonstrate the practical use of this method in a pair of instances: the first is an analogue to cloud microphysics- the turbulent breakdown of Taylor Green vortices; the second example is the case of a turbulent jet which has application both in sewage pipe outflow and pesticide spray dynamics. EPSRC.

  10. Strongly-Heated Gas Flow in Parallel Tube Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Torii

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis is performed to study thermal transport phenomena in gas flow through a strongly heated tube whose axis is in parallel with the rotational axis. The velocity and temperature fields prevail when fluid flows in a rotating tube with uniform heat flux on the tube wall. The two-equation k-ω turbulence and t2¯-εt heat transfer models are employed to determine turbulent viscosity and eddy diffusivity for heat, respectively. The governing boundary-layer equations are discritized by means of a control volume finitedifference techniques. It is found that the Coriolis and centrifugal (or centripetal forces cause fluid flow and heat transfer performance in the parallel-rotation system to be drastically different from those in the stationary case. Consequently, even if a tube rotating around a parallel axis is heated with high heat flux whose level causes a laminarizing flow in the stationary tube case, both the turbulent kinetic energy and the temperature variance remain over the pipe cross section, resulting in the suppression of an attenuation in heat transfer performance. In other words, an increase in tube rotation suppresses laminarization of gas flow.

  11. Numerical simulation of shell-side heat transfer and flow of natural circulation heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Ruojun; Deng Chengcheng; Li Chaojun; Wang Mingyuan

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze the influence on the heat transfer and flow characteristics of the heat exchanger model of different solving models and structures, a variety of transformation to the model equivalent for the heat exchanger was studied. In this paper, Fluent software was used to simulate the temperature-field and flow-field of the equivalent model, and investigate its heat-transferring and flow characteristics. Through comparative analysis of the distribution of temperature-field and flow-field for different models, the heat-transferring process and natural convection situation of heat exchanger were deeply understood. The results show that the temperature difference between the inside and outside of the natural circulation heat exchanger tubes is larger and the flow is more complex, so the turbulence model is the more reasonable choice. Asymmetry of tubes position makes the flow and heat transfer of the fluid on both sides to be dissymmetrical and makes the fluid interaction, and increases the role of natural convection. The complex structure of heat exchanger makes the flow and heat transfer of the fluid on both sides to be irregular to some extent when straight tubes into C-bent are transformed, and all these make the turbulence intensity increase and improve the effect of heat transfer. (authors)

  12. Turbulent Boyant Jets and Plumes in Flowing Ambient Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo

    Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in flowing ambient environments have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in flowing ambients have been discussed. Dimensional analysis was employed to investigate the mean behaviour of the turbulent....... Comprehensive laboratory experiments were conducted to study the mean behaviour of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes in a flowing ambient by using both fresh and salt receiving waters. The experimental data on the jet trajectories and dilutions, for a horizontal jet in a coflowing ambient and for a vertical jet......, the available field observated data on the initial dilutions for a horizontal jet issuing into a perpendicular crossflowing ambient have been presented and discussed. Mathematical modelling of the turbulent buoyant jets and plumes has been carried out by using both an integral model and a turbulence model...

  13. Modelling asphaltene deposition in turbulent pipeline flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskin, D.; Ratulowski, J.; Akbarzadeh, K.; Pan, S. [Schlumberg DBR Technology Center (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Asphaltene deposition is one of the important problems of oil production that requires accurate predictive modeling. A model of asphaltene deposition in a turbulent pipe flow is introduced in this paper. A Couette device is employed to perform experiments. There are two major modules in this model. (1) A model of particle size distribution evolution along a pipe - the concept of 'critical particle size' is introduced. Only particles smaller than the critical particle size may deposit. (2) A model of particle transport to the wall. The major mechanism of particle transport to the wall is the Brownian motion. The model developed contains three major tuning parameters that are determined experimentally using a Couette device: particle-particle collision efficiency, particle-wall sticking efficiency, and particle critical size. Performance of the deposition model for a pipeline with the coefficients obtained using a laboratory Couette device is also illustrated in this paper.

  14. Inception of supraglacial channelization under turbulent flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantelli, E.; Camporeale, C.; Ridolfi, L.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier surfaces exhibit an amazing variety of meltwater-induced morphologies, ranging from small scale ripples and dunes on the bed of supraglacial channels to meandering patterns, till to large scale drainage networks. Even though the structure and geometry of these morphologies play a key role in the glacier melting processes, the physical-based modeling of such spatial patterns have attracted less attention than englacial and subglacial channels. In order to partially fill this gap, our work concerns the large scale channelization occurring on the ice slopes and focuses on the role of turbulence on the wavelength selection processes during the channelization inception. In a recent study[1], two of us showed that the morphological instability induced by a laminar film flowing over an ice bed is characterized by transversal length scales of order of centimeters. Being these scales much smaller than the spacing observed in the channelization of supraglacial drainage networks (that are of order of meters) and considering that the water films flowing on glaciers can exhibit Reynolds numbers larger than 104, we investigated the role of turbulence in the inception of channelization. The flow-field is modeled by means of two-dimensional shallow water equations, where Reynolds stresses are also considered. In the depth-averaged heat balance equation an incoming heat flux from air is assumed and forced convection heat exchange with the wall is taken into account, in addition to convection and diffusion in the liquid. The temperature profile in the ice is finally coupled to the liquid through Stefan equation. We then perform a linear stability analysis and, under the assumption of small Stefan number, we solve the differential eigenvalue problem analytically. As main outcome of such an analysis, the morphological instability of the ice-water interface is detected and investigated in a wide range of the independent parameters: longitudinal and transversal wavenumbers

  15. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  16. Intermittent heating of the solar corona by MHD turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Buchlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available As the dissipation mechanisms considered for the heating of the solar corona would be sufficiently efficient only in the presence of small scales, turbulence is thought to be a key player in the coronal heating processes: it allows indeed to transfer energy from the large scales to these small scales. While Direct numerical simulations which have been performed to investigate the properties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the corona have provided interesting results, they are limited to small Reynolds numbers. We present here a model of coronal loop turbulence involving shell-models and Alfvén waves propagation, allowing the much faster computation of spectra and turbulence statistics at higher Reynolds numbers. We also present first results of the forward-modelling of spectroscopic observables in the UV.

  17. Experimental investigation of turbulent heat transfer in straight and curved rectangular ducts

    OpenAIRE

    Daughety, Steven Floyd

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited An experimental investigation was conducted to examine the convective heat transfer in straight and curved ducts of rectangular cross-section. The experimental configuration was modeled as infinite parallel plates with one wall at a constant temperature and the opposite wall adiabatic. The experiments were conducted at steady states for turbulent flow. Average Nusselt numbers were used to compare the heat transfer characteristics of...

  18. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I.; Benz, P.; Schaeren, R.; Bombach, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  19. The radiated noise from isotropic turbulence and heated jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    prevented the full deployment of Lighthill's theory from being achieved. However, the growth of the supercomputer and its applications in the study of the structure of turbulent shear flows in both unbounded and wall bounded flows, which complements and in certain cases extends the work of the few dedicated experimental groups working in this field for the past forty years, provides an opportunity and challenge to accurately predict the noise from jets. Moreover a combination of numerical and laboratory experiments offers the hope that in the not too distant future the physics of noise generation and flow interaction will be better understood and it will then be possible to not only improve the accuracy of noise prediction but also to explore and optimize schemes for noise reduction. The present challenge is to provide time and space accurate numerical databases for heated subsonic and supersonic jets to provide information on the fourth-order space-time covariance of Lighthill's equivalent stress tensor, T(ij), which governs the characteristics of the farfield radiated noise and the total acoustic power. Validation with available experimental databases will establish how close Lighthill's theory is to the accurate prediction of the directivity and spectrum of jet noise and the total acoustic power, and the need, in the applications of the theory, to include the effects of flow-acoustic interaction.

  20. A Numerically and Experimentally Investigated Structure of the Turbulent Flow Past a Trench with a Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Afanasiev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the convective heat exchange intensification due to two-dimensional depressions formed on the initially flat surface. This problem is of interest for engineering applications because many different convective surfaces have cavities and depressions of constructive or random occurrence. During flow around a depression the boundary layer separation and its reattachment result in occurring specific phenomena, which have a significant impact on drag and heat exchange.The work involved an experimental study of hydrodynamic and heat characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer formed when there was an external airflow of the flat surface with a single transversal separation trench.The experimental part used an open subsonic low-turbulence wind tunnel operating in suction mode. A numerical simulation involves hydrodynamics and heat exchange parameters analysis via solution of the system of differential equations, which describe momentum and heat transport processes using ANSYS Fluent solver.The experimental data of this study are compared with numerical simulation results obtained by solving the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS with a two-parametrical Menter k-ω (MSST turbulence model.The comparison shows that simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data, heat exchange surface profiling by a transversal trench system with or without flow separation does not lead to increasing surface drag and, moreover, at the certain ratios of geometrical parameters (cylindrical trenches with h/S£ 0.5 it can decrease the surface drag. Surface conjugations in these depressions should be smooth without any sharp curves and transitions, which can lead to forming stagnation regions.The reason for raising heat exchange is a spatial non-uniformity of the generated turbulence field. During flow analysis there were two sources of turbulence generation found out, namely a wall (heat exchange surface and a mixing

  1. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  2. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  3. THE DENSITY DISTRIBUTION IN TURBULENT BISTABLE FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazol, Adriana; Kim, Jongsoo

    2013-01-01

    We numerically study the volume density probability distribution function (n-PDF) and the column density probability distribution function (Σ-PDF) resulting from thermally bistable turbulent flows. We analyze three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in periodic boxes of 100 pc by side, where turbulence is driven in the Fourier space at a wavenumber corresponding to 50 pc. At low densities (n ∼ –3 ), the n-PDF is well described by a lognormal distribution for an average local Mach number ranging from ∼0.2 to ∼5.5. As a consequence of the nonlinear development of thermal instability (TI), the logarithmic variance of the distribution of the diffuse gas increases with M faster than in the well-known isothermal case. The average local Mach number for the dense gas (n ∼> 7.1 cm –3 ) goes from ∼1.1 to ∼16.9 and the shape of the high-density zone of the n-PDF changes from a power law at low Mach numbers to a lognormal at high M values. In the latter case, the width of the distribution is smaller than in the isothermal case and grows slower with M. At high column densities, the Σ-PDF is well described by a lognormal for all of the Mach numbers we consider and, due to the presence of TI, the width of the distribution is systematically larger than in the isothermal case but follows a qualitatively similar behavior as M increases. Although a relationship between the width of the distribution and M can be found for each one of the cases mentioned above, these relations are different from those of the isothermal case.

  4. On Developments of k-τ and k-ω Models for Near-Wall Turbulence of Engineering Duct Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud; Sundén, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a modified k-tau model is assessed in predicting the turbulent flow and forced convective heat transfer in ducts with arbitrary cross-sections, under fully developed conditions. The presented model is based on more physical grounds using bounded time-scale, local turbulent...

  5. A compressible Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite volume code for solving two dimensional, compressible turbulent flows is described. Second order upwind differencing of the inviscid terms of the equations is used to enhance stability and accuracy. A diagonal form of the implicit algorithm is used to improve efficiency. Several zero and two equation turbulence models are incorporated to study their impact on overall flow modeling accuracy. Applications to external and internal flows are discussed.

  6. An implicit Navier-Stokes code for turbulent flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical approach to calculating turbulent flows employing advanced turbulence models. The main features include a line-by-line Gauss-Seidel algorithm using Roe's approximate Riemann solver, TVD numerical schemes, implicit boundary conditions and a decoupled turbulence-model solver. Based on the problems tested so far, the method has consistently demonstrated its ability in offering accuracy, boundedness and a fast rate of convergence to steady-state solution.

  7. Turbulence structure and CO2 transfer at the air-sea interface and turbulent diffusion in thermally-stratified flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, S.

    1996-01-01

    A supercomputer is a nice tool for simulating environmental flows. The Center for Global Environmental Research (CGER) of the National Institute for Environmental Studies purchased a supercomputer SX-3 of CGER about three years ago, and it has been used for various environmental simulations since. Although one of the main purposes for which the supercomputer was used was to simulate global warming with a general circulation model (GCM), our research organization used the supercomputer for more fundamental work to investigate heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows. Our motivations for this work was the fact that GCMs involve a number of uncertain submodels related to heat and mass transfer in turbulent atmospheric and oceanic flows. It may be easy to write research reports by running GCMs which were developed in western countries, but it is difficult for numerical scientists to do original work with such second-hand GCMs. In this sense, we thought that it would be more original to study the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer mechanisms in environmental flows rather than to run a GCM. Therefore, we tried to numerically investigate turbulence structure and scalar transfer both at the air-sea interface and in thermally stratified flows, neither of which were well modeled by GCMs. We also employed laboratory experiments to clarify the turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanism, since numerical simulations are not sufficiently powerful to clarify all aspects of turbulence structure and scalar transfer mechanisms. A numerical technique is a promising tool to complement measurements of processes that cannot be clarified by turbulence measurements in environmental flows. It should also be noted that most of the interesting phenomena in environmental flows can be elucidated by laboratory or field measurements but not by numerical simulations alone. Thus, it is of importance to combine laboratory or field measurements with numerical simulations

  8. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Rectangular Heated Pipe for Turbulent Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Yarmand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal characteristics of turbulent nanofluid flow in a rectangular pipe have been investigated numerically. The continuity, momentum, and energy equations were solved by means of a finite volume method (FVM. The symmetrical rectangular channel is heated at the top and bottom at a constant heat flux while the sides walls are insulated. Four different types of nanoparticles Al2O3, ZnO, CuO, and SiO2 at different volume fractions of nanofluids in the range of 1% to 5% are considered in the present investigation. In this paper, effect of different Reynolds numbers in the range of 5000 < Re < 25000 on heat transfer characteristics of nanofluids flowing through the channel is investigated. The numerical results indicate that SiO2-water has the highest Nusselt number compared to other nanofluids while it has the lowest heat transfer coefficient due to low thermal conductivity. The Nusselt number increases with the increase of the Reynolds number and the volume fraction of nanoparticles. The results of simulation show a good agreement with the existing experimental correlations.

  9. Experimental investigation on turbulent heat transfer in liquid metal along a heated rod in a vertical annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loges, A.; Baumann, T.; Marocco, L.; Wetzel, T.; Stieglitz, R.

    2011-01-01

    In a couple of European research centres, Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are investigated for the transmutation of radioactive waste. In one of these concept lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) is applied as coolant. In different experiments covering forced and mixed convection in turbulent LBE flow in a concentric annulus the local velocity and temperature fields were investigated at prototypical power levels and dimensions. Local heat transfer properties were extracted and compared with literature data. A new empirical correlation for the Nusselt number for the thermal entry region for turbulent forced convection in liquid metals is introduced and the transition from forced to mixed convection in LBE is characterized. (author)

  10. Large-scale turbulence structures in shallow separating flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talstra, H.

    2011-01-01

    The Ph.D. thesis “Large-scale turbulence structures in shallow separating flows” by Harmen Talstra is the result of a Ph.D. research project on large-scale shallow-flow turbulence, which has been performed in the Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Delft University of Technology. The

  11. Turbulent Reacting Flows at High Speed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Garry

    2001-01-01

    .... To accomplish this goal, expertise in chemical kinetics, experimental fluid mechanics and combustion, and computational fluid mechanics were brought together to make a systematic attack on turbulent...

  12. Numerical study on turbulent heat transfer and pressure drop of nanofluid in coiled tube-in-tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Wael I.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The performance of helically coiled tube heat exchanger using nanofluid is modeled. • The 3D turbulent flow and conjugate heat transfer of CTITHE are solved using FVM. • The effects of nanoparticle concentration and curvature ratio are investigated. • The Gnielinski correlation for Nu for turbulent flow in helical tubes can be used for water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluid. - Abstract: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been carried out to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluid flowing inside coiled tube-in-tube heat exchangers. The 3D realizable k–ε turbulent model with enhanced wall treatment was used. Temperature dependent thermophysical properties of nanofluid and water were used and heat exchangers were analyzed considering conjugate heat transfer from hot fluid in the inner-coiled tube to cold fluid in the annulus region. The overall performance of the tested heat exchangers was assessed based on the thermo-hydrodynamic performance index. Design parameters were in the range of; nanoparticles volume concentrations 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0%, coil diameters 0.18, 0.24 and 0.30 m, inner tube and annulus sides flow rates from 2 to 5 LPM and 10 to 25 LPM, respectively. Nanofluid flows inside inner tube side or annular side. The results obtained showed a different behavior depending on the parameter selected for the comparison with the base fluid. Moreover, when compared at the same Re or Dn, the heat transfer coefficient increases by increasing the coil diameter and nanoparticles volume concentration. Also, the friction factor increases with the increase in curvature ratio and pressure drop penalty is negligible with increasing the nanoparticles volume concentration. Conventional correlations for predicting average heat transfer and friction factor in turbulent flow regime such as Gnielinski correlation and Mishra and Gupta correlation, respectively, for helical tubes are also valid for

  13. Large-eddy simulations for turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husson, S.

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the impact of thermal gradients on a turbulent channel flow with imposed wall temperatures and friction Reynolds numbers of 180 and 395. In this configuration, temperature variations can be strong and induce significant variations of the fluid properties. We consider the low Mach number equations and carry out large eddy simulations. We first validate our simulations thanks to comparisons of some of our LES results with DNS data. Then, we investigate the influence of the variations of the conductivity and the viscosity and show that we can assume these properties constant only for weak temperature gradients. We also study the thermal sub-grid-scale modelling and find no difference when the sub-grid-scale Prandtl number is taken constant or dynamically calculated. The analysis of the effects of strongly increasing the temperature ratio mainly shows a dissymmetry of the profiles. The physical mechanism responsible of these modifications is explained. Finally, we use semi-local scaling and the Van Driest transformation and we show that they lead to a better correspondence of the low and high temperature ratios profiles. (author)

  14. Heat transfer by liquids in suspension in a turbulent gas stream (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, E.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    The introduction of a small volume of liquid into a turbulent gas stream used as cooling agent improves considerably the heat transfer coefficient of the gas. When the turbulent regime is established, one observes in a cylindrical tube two types of flow whether the liquid wets or does not wet the wall. In the first case, one gets on the wall an annular liquid film and droplets in suspension are in the gas stream. In the second case, a fog of droplets is formed without any liquid film on the wall. Experiments were performed with the following mixtures: water-hydrogen, water-nitrogen, ethanol-nitrogen (wetting liquids) introduced into a stainless steel tube of 4 mm ID, electrically heated on 320 mm of length. We varied the gas flow rate (Reynolds until 50000), the rate of the liquid flow rate to gas flow rate (until 15), the pressure (until 10 kg/cm 2 ), the temperature (until the boiling point) and the heat flux (until 250 W/cm 2 ). Two types of burnout were observed. A formula of correlation of the burnout heat flux is given. Making use of the analogy between mass transfer and heat transfer, a dimensionless formula of correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is established. (author) [fr

  15. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  16. Numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennes, L.; Bodnar, T.; Kozel, K.; Sladek, I. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Technical Mathematics; Fraunie, P. [Universite Toulon et du Var, La Garde (France). Lab. de Sondages Electromagnetiques de l' Environment Terrestre

    2001-07-01

    The work deals with the numerical solution of viscous turbulent steady flows in the atmospheric boundary layer including pollution propagation. For its description we use two different mathematical models: - a model based on the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows - a model based on a system of boundary layer equations. These systems are completed by two transport equations for the concentration of passive pollutants and the potential temperature in conservative form, respectively, and by an algebraic turbulence model. (orig.)

  17. Modeling of turbulent bubbly flows; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents a bulles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellakhal, Ghazi

    2005-03-15

    The two-phase flows involve interfacial interactions which modify significantly the structure of the mean and fluctuating flow fields. The design of the two-fluid models adapted to industrial flows requires the taking into account of the effect of these interactions in the closure relations adopted. The work developed in this thesis concerns the development of first order two-fluid models deduced by reduction of second order closures. The adopted reasoning, based on the principle of decomposition of the Reynolds stress tensor into two statistically independent contributions turbulent and pseudo-turbulent parts, allows to preserve the physical contents of the second order relations closure. Analysis of the turbulence structure in two basic flows: homogeneous bubbly flows uniform and with a constant shear allows to deduce a formulation of the two-phase turbulent viscosity involving the characteristic scales of bubbly turbulence, as well as an analytical description of modification of the homogeneous turbulence structure induced by the bubbles presence. The Eulerian two-fluid model was then generalized with the case of the inhomogeneous flows with low void fractions. The numerical results obtained by the application of this model integrated in the computer code MELODIF in the case of free sheared turbulent bubbly flow of wake showed a satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and made it possible to analyze the modification of the characteristic scales of such flow by the interfacial interactions. The two-fluid first order model is generalized finally with the case of high void fractions bubbly flows where the hydrodynamic interactions between the bubbles are not negligible any more. (author)

  18. Flow Separation and Turbulence in Jet Pumps for Thermoacoustic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhuis, Joris; Verbeek, Antonie Alex; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    The effect of flow separation and turbulence on the performance of a jet pump in oscillatory flows is investigated. A jet pump is a static device whose shape induces asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects when placed in an oscillatory flow. This will result in a time-averaged pressure drop which can be

  19. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  20. The ion cyclotron turbulence generated by a low frequency kinetic Alfvén wave and turbulent heating of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. S.; Mikhailenko, V. V.; Lee, Hae June

    2018-01-01

    The ion cyclotron instability driven by a strong kinetic Alfvén wave is investigated as a possible source of anisotropic heating of ions in the sun's corona. We present a novel model of a plasma with coupled inhomogeneous current and shearing flow, which results from the particle's motion in the electric field of the kinetic Alfvén wave of finite wavelength. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal kinetic theory grounded on the shearing mode approach. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the flow velocity shear, which for the corona conditions may be above the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability in the plasma with steady current, changes the exponential growth of the ion cyclotron potential on the power function of time, that impedes the growth of the unstable ion cyclotron wave and reduces the turbulent heating rate of ions across the magnetic field.

  1. Stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows

    CERN Document Server

    Grigoryev, Yurii N

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an in-depth systematic investigation of a dissipative effect which manifests itself as the growth of hydrodynamic stability and suppression of turbulence in relaxing molecular gas flows. The work describes the theoretical foundations of a new way to control stability and laminar turbulent transitions in aerodynamic flows. It develops hydrodynamic models for describing thermal nonequilibrium gas flows which allow the consideration of suppression of inviscid acoustic waves in 2D shear flows. Then, nonlinear evolution of large-scale vortices and Kelvin-Helmholtz waves in relaxing shear flows are studied. Critical Reynolds numbers in supersonic Couette flows are calculated analytically and numerically within the framework of both linear and nonlinear classical energy hydrodynamic stability theories. The calculations clearly show that the relaxation process can appreciably delay the laminar-turbulent transition. The aim of the book is to show the new dissipative effect, which can be used for flo...

  2. Turbulent pipe flow at extreme Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, M; Vallikivi, M; Bailey, S C C; Smits, A J

    2012-03-02

    Both the inherent intractability and complex beauty of turbulence reside in its large range of physical and temporal scales. This range of scales is captured by the Reynolds number, which in nature and in many engineering applications can be as large as 10(5)-10(6). Here, we report turbulence measurements over an unprecedented range of Reynolds numbers using a unique combination of a high-pressure air facility and a new nanoscale anemometry probe. The results reveal previously unknown universal scaling behavior for the turbulent velocity fluctuations, which is remarkably similar to the well-known scaling behavior of the mean velocity distribution.

  3. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C. [Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Sung, C.H. [David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  4. Heat Pinches in Electron-Heated Tokamak Plasmas: Theoretical Turbulence Models versus Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, P.; Thyagaraja, A.; Weiland, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Knight, P. J.

    2005-10-01

    Two fluid turbulence models, the drift wave based quasilinear 1.5D Weiland model and the electromagnetic global 3D nonlinear model cutie, have been used to account for heat pinch evidence in off-axis modulated electron cyclotron heating experiments in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project. Both models reproduce the main features indicating inward heat convection in mildly off-axis cases. In far-off-axis cases with hollow electron temperature profiles, the existence of outward convection was reproduced only by cutie. Turbulence mechanisms driving heat convection in the two models are discussed.

  5. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM (Heat Transfer and Turbulence Mechanics)-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment. Volume 1. Objectives, Evaluation of Data, Specifications of Test Cases, Discussion, and Position Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    research community on provision for accu- racy and oil the difficulties of laboratory control of fluid flow been brought to bear in a timely manner...numbnr)I. 2. Constitutive (e.g., polymers) 3. Energy release (e.g., chemical reactions) 4.Surface tension (e.g., oil -slick calming) 5.Cryogenic...thp following flows: a. In "thin shear layer" flows, i.e., having small d6/dx and negligible ;p/3y, the equations are essencially parabolic, and the

  6. Validating modeled turbulent heat fluxes across large freshwater surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Fujisaki-Manome, A.; Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Blanken, P.; Spence, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Xiao, C.; Charusambot, U.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat are important physical processes that influence the energy and water budgets of the Great Lakes. Validation and improvement of bulk flux algorithms to simulate these turbulent heat fluxes are critical for accurate prediction of hydrodynamics, water levels, weather, and climate over the region. Here we consider five heat flux algorithms from several model systems; the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model, and the Large Lake Thermodynamics Model, which are used in research and operational environments and concentrate on different aspects of the Great Lakes' physical system, but interface at the lake surface. The heat flux algorithms were isolated from each model and driven by meteorological data from over-lake stations in the Great Lakes Evaporation Network. The simulation results were compared with eddy covariance flux measurements at the same stations. All models show the capacity to the seasonal cycle of the turbulent heat fluxes. Overall, the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment algorithm in FVCOM has the best agreement with eddy covariance measurements. Simulations with the other four algorithms are overall improved by updating the parameterization of roughness length scales of temperature and humidity. Agreement between modelled and observed fluxes notably varied with geographical locations of the stations. For example, at the Long Point station in Lake Erie, observed fluxes are likely influenced by the upwind land surface while the simulations do not take account of the land surface influence, and therefore the agreement is worse in general.

  7. The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, I A; Sharma, R N; Flay, R G J

    2017-08-01

    The structure of turbulence in a rapid tidal flow is characterized through new observations of fundamental statistical properties at a site in the UK which has a simple geometry and sedate surface wave action. The mean flow at the Sound of Islay exceeded 2.5 m s -1 and the turbulent boundary layer occupied the majority of the water column, with an approximately logarithmic mean velocity profile identifiable close to the seabed. The anisotropic ratios, spectral scales and higher-order statistics of the turbulence generally agree well with values reported for two-dimensional open channels in the laboratory and other tidal channels, therefore providing further support for the application of universal models. The results of the study can assist in developing numerical models of turbulence in rapid tidal flows such as those proposed for tidal energy generation.

  8. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  9. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  10. Demonstration of the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Xu, Y.H.; Luo, J.R.; Mao, J.S.; Liu, B.H.; Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Wan, Y.X.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition induced by a turbulent heating pulse on the HT-6M tokamak. It is found that the poloidal flow υ θ plays a key role in developing the electric field E r and triggering the transition. The acceleration of υ θ across the transition is clearly correlated with the enhancement of the Reynolds stress gradient. (author)

  11. DNSLab: A gateway to turbulent flow simulation in Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen, V.; Keskinen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research is increasingly much focused towards computationally intensive, eddy resolving simulation techniques of turbulent flows such as large-eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS). Here, we present a compact educational software package called DNSLab, tailored for learning partial differential equations of turbulence from the perspective of DNS in Matlab environment. Based on educational experiences and course feedback from tens of engineering post-graduate students and industrial engineers, DNSLab can offer a major gateway to turbulence simulation with minimal prerequisites. Matlab implementation of two common fractional step projection methods is considered: the 2d Fourier pseudo-spectral method, and the 3d finite difference method with 2nd order spatial accuracy. Both methods are based on vectorization in Matlab and the slow for-loops are thus avoided. DNSLab is tested on two basic problems which we have noted to be of high educational value: 2d periodic array of decaying vortices, and 3d turbulent channel flow at Reτ = 180. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is possibly the first to investigate efficiency of a 3d turbulent, wall bounded flow in Matlab. The accuracy and efficiency of DNSLab is compared with a customized OpenFOAM solver called rk4projectionFoam. Based on our experiences and course feedback, the main contribution of DNSLab consists of the following features. (i) The very compact Matlab implementation of present Navier-Stokes solvers provides a gateway to efficient learning of both, physics of turbulent flows, and simulation of turbulence. (ii) Only relatively minor prerequisites on fluid dynamics and numerical methods are required for using DNSLab. (iii) In 2d, interactive results for turbulent flow cases can be obtained. Even for a 3d channel flow, the solver is fast enough for nearly interactive educational use. (iv) DNSLab is made openly available and thus contributing to

  12. Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argyris G. Panaras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there.

  13. Numerical simulation of random stresses on an annular turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marti-Moreno, Marta

    2000-01-01

    The flow along a circular cylinder may induce structural vibrations. For the predictive analysis of such vibrations, the turbulent forcing spectrum needs to be characterized. The aim of this work is to study the turbulent fluid forces acting on a single tube in axial flow. More precisely we have performed numerical simulations of an annular flow. These simulations were carried out on a cylindrical staggered mesh by a finite difference method. We consider turbulent flow with Reynolds number up to 10 6 . The Large Eddy Simulation Method has been used. A survey of existent experiments showed that hydraulic diameter acts as an important parameter. We first showed the accuracy of the numerical code by reproducing the experiments of Mulcahy. The agreement between pressure spectra from computations and from experiments is good. Then, we applied this code to simulate new numerical experiments varying the hydraulic diameter and the flow velocity. (author) [fr

  14. Numerical Study of Wavy Film Flow on Vertical Plate Using Different Turbulent Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, June Kee; Park, Il Seouk

    2014-01-01

    Film flows applied to shell-and-tube heat exchangers in various industrial fields have been studied for a long time. One boundary of the film flow interfaces with a fixed wall, and the other boundary interfaces with a gaseous region. Thus, the flows become so unstable that wavy behaviors are generated on free surfaces as the film Reynolds number increases. First, high-amplitude solitary waves are detected in a low Reynolds number laminar region; then, the waves transit to a low-amplitude, high frequency ripple in a turbulent region. Film thickness is the most significant factor governing heat transfer. Since the wave accompanied in the film flow results in temporal and spatial variations in film thickness, it can be of importance for numerically predicting the film's wavy behavior. In this study, various turbulent models are applied for predicting low-amplitude ripple flows in turbulent regions. The results are compared with existing experimental results, and finally, the applied turbulent models are appraised in from the viewpoint of wavy behaviors

  15. Drag Reduction for Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows Using an Oscillating Wall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogard, David

    2000-01-01

    This research program used experimental measurements and computational simulations to study the drag reduction, and the resulting effects on turbulence structure, for a turbulent wall flow subjected...

  16. Effect of Twisted-Tape Turbulators and Nanofluid on Heat Transfer in a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydar Maddah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and overall heat transfer in a double pipe heat exchanger fitted with twisted-tape elements and titanium dioxide nanofluid were studied experimentally. The inner and outer diameters of the inner tube were 8 and 16 mm, respectively, and cold and hot water were used as working fluids in shell side and tube side. The twisted tapes were made from aluminum sheet with tape thickness (d of 1 mm, width (W of 5 mm, and length of 120 cm. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm and a volume concentration of 0.01% (v/v were prepared. The effects of temperature, mass flow rate, and concentration of nanoparticles on the overall heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer changes in the turbulent flow regime Re≥2300, and counter current flow were investigated. When using twisted tape and nanofluid, heat transfer coefficient was about 10 to 25 percent higher than when they were not used. It was also observed that the heat transfer coefficient increases with operating temperature and mass flow rate. The experimental results also showed that 0.01% TiO2/water nanofluid with twisted tape has slightly higher friction factor and pressure drop when compared to 0.01% TiO2/water nanofluid without twisted tape. The empirical correlations proposed for friction factor are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolleau, FCGA; Redondo, J-M

    2012-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the main contributions from the first five workshops held by Ercoftac Special Interest Group on Synthetic Turbulence Models (SIG42. It is intended as an illustration of the sig's activities and of the latest developments in the field. This volume investigates the use of Kinematic Simulation (KS) and other synthetic turbulence models for the particular application to environmental flows. This volume offers the best syntheses on the research status in KS, which is widely used in various domains, including Lagrangian aspects in turbulence mixing/stirring, partic

  18. Sediment Resuspension and Bed Morphology in Highly Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Motivated by environmental flows where turbulence levels are set by processes other than mean shear (e.g., breaking surface and internal waves and bores) we choose to study turbulent boundary layers and sediment resuspension in the absence of mean shear using a recently-developed facility designed to generate homogeneous isotropic turbulence with low mean flows. Similar investigations have been performed with grid-stirred tanks (GSTs), though significant mean flows were found to exist in these tanks, altering the balance of fluid forces present. Significantly, we find that the interaction of turbulence with a permeable sediment boundary results in the formation of ripple patterns. Our facility uses a Randomly Actuated Synthetic Jet Array (RASJA) and allows us to control the turbulent forcing while ensuring significantly less mean flow relative to prior facilities. We performed measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), first with a solid bottom boundary, to examine the turbulent structures and nature of the flow at the bed. We measured vertical profiles of statistical metrics such as turbulence intensity, turbulent kinetic energy, spectra, and Reynolds stresses. We then replaced the solid boundary with a layer of narrowly graded sand that has a median grain size (D50) of about 250 μm and made direct comparisons to the solid boundary measurements. Finally, in an effort to verify the ability to measure such flows in the field, we used a Nortek Aquadopp HR Profiler to measure vertical profiles over the depth of the tank and examine the Profiler’s ability to record accurate measurements at the fluid-sediment interface. Our analysis includes the determination of critical turbulent stresses responsible for sediment resuspension from the sand bed from which we develop a non-dimensional Shields-like parameter that captures incipient particle motion. We also make comparisons between simultaneous PIV and HR Profiler measurements to improve our understanding of

  19. Toward large eddy simulation of turbulent flow over an airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    1993-01-01

    The flow field over an airfoil contains several distinct flow characteristics, e.g. laminar, transitional, turbulent boundary layer flow, flow separation, unstable free shear layers, and a wake. This diversity of flow regimes taxes the presently available Reynolds averaged turbulence models. Such models are generally tuned to predict a particular flow regime, and adjustments are necessary for the prediction of a different flow regime. Similar difficulties are likely to emerge when the large eddy simulation technique is applied with the widely used Smagorinsky model. This model has not been successful in correctly representing different turbulent flow fields with a single universal constant and has an incorrect near-wall behavior. Germano et al. (1991) and Ghosal, Lund & Moin have developed a new subgrid-scale model, the dynamic model, which is very promising in alleviating many of the persistent inadequacies of the Smagorinsky model: the model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model has been remarkably successful in prediction of several turbulent and transitional flows. We plan to simulate turbulent flow over a '2D' airfoil using the large eddy simulation technique. Our primary objective is to assess the performance of the newly developed dynamic subgrid-scale model for computation of complex flows about aircraft components and to compare the results with those obtained using the Reynolds average approach and experiments. The present computation represents the first application of large eddy simulation to a flow of aeronautical interest and a key demonstration of the capabilities of the large eddy simulation technique.

  20. Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows Below and Above the Wind-Speed Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey A.; Leo, Laura S.; Sabatino, Silvana Di; Fernando, Harindra J. S.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Fairall, Christopher W.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of small-scale turbulence made in the atmospheric boundary layer over complex terrain during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured on four towers deployed along the east lower slope (2-4°) of Granite Mountain near Salt Lake City in Utah, USA. The multi-level (up to seven) observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed the study of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence statistics (e.g., fluxes, variances, spectra, and cospectra) and their variations in katabatic flow. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along-slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The momentum flux is directed downward (upward) whereas the along-slope heat flux is downslope (upslope) below (above) the wind maximum. This suggests that the position of the jet-speed maximum can be obtained by linear interpolation between positive and negative values of the momentum flux (or the along-slope heat flux) to derive the height where the flux becomes zero. It is shown that the standard deviations of all wind-speed components (and therefore of the turbulent kinetic energy) and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy have a local minimum, whereas the standard deviation of air temperature has an absolute maximum at the height of wind-speed maximum. We report several cases when the destructive effect of vertical heat flux is completely cancelled by the generation of turbulence due to the along-slope heat flux. Turbulence above the wind

  1. Coronal heating in coupled photosphere-chromosphere-coronal systems: turbulence and leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdini, A.; Grappin, R.; Velli, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Coronal loops act as resonant cavities for low-frequency fluctuations that are transmitted from the deeper layers of the solar atmosphere. These fluctuations are amplified in the corona and lead to the development of turbulence that in turn is able to dissipate the accumulated energy, thus heating the corona. However, trapping is not perfect, because some energy leaks down to the chromosphere on a long timescale, limiting the turbulent heating. Aims: We consider the combined effects of turbulence and energy leakage from the corona to the photosphere in determining the turbulent energy level and associated heating rate in models of coronal loops, which include the chromosphere and transition region. Methods: We use a piece-wise constant model for the Alfvén speed in loops and a reduced MHD-shell model to describe the interplay between turbulent dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the mean field and propagation along the field. Turbulence is sustained by incoming fluctuations that are equivalent, in the line-tied case, to forcing by the photospheric shear flows. While varying the turbulence strength, we systematically compare the average coronal energy level and dissipation in three models with increasing complexity: the classical closed model, the open corona, and the open corona including chromosphere (or three-layer model), with the last two models allowing energy leakage. Results: We find that (i) leakage always plays a role. Even for strong turbulence, the dissipation time never becomes much lower than the leakage time, at least in the three-layer model; therefore, both the energy and the dissipation levels are systematically lower than in the line-tied model; (ii) in all models, the energy level is close to the resonant prediction, i.e., assuming an effective turbulent correlation time longer than the Alfvén coronal crossing time; (iii) the heating rate is close to the value given by the ratio of photospheric energy divided by the Alfv

  2. Turbulent flow through a wall subchannel of a rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehme, K.

    1978-04-01

    The turbulent flow through a wall subchannel of a rod bundle was investigated experimentally by means of hotwires und Pitot-tubes. The aim of this investigation was to get experimental information on the transport properties of turbulent flow especially on the momentum transport. Detailed data were measured of the distributions of the time-mean velocity, the turbulence intensities and, hence the kinetic of turbulence, of the shear stresses in the directions normal and parallel to the walls, and of the wall shear stresses. The pitch-to-diameter ratio of the rods equal to the wall-to-diameter ratio was 1.15, the Reynolds number of this investigation was Re = 1.23.10 5 . On the basis of the measurements the eddy viscosities normal and parallel to the walls were calculated. The eddy viscosities observed showed a considerable deviation from the data known up-to-now and from the assumptions introduced in the codes. (orig.) [de

  3. Energy fluxes and spectra for turbulent and laminar flows

    KAUST Repository

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-05-14

    Two well-known turbulence models to describe the inertial and dissipative ranges simultaneously are by Pao~[Phys. Fluids {\\\\bf 8}, 1063 (1965)] and Pope~[{\\\\em Turbulent Flows.} Cambridge University Press, 2000]. In this paper, we compute energy spectrum $E(k)$ and energy flux $\\\\Pi(k)$ using spectral simulations on grids up to $4096^3$, and show consistency between the numerical results and predictions by the aforementioned models. We also construct a model for laminar flows that predicts $E(k)$ and $\\\\Pi(k)$ to be of the form $\\\\exp(-k)$, and verify the model predictions using numerical simulations. The shell-to-shell energy transfers for the turbulent flows are {\\\\em forward and local} for both inertial and dissipative range, but those for the laminar flows are {\\\\em forward and nonlocal}.

  4. Specific aspects of turbulent flow in rectangular ducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Branislav D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential ideas of investigations of turbulent flow in a straight rectangular duct are chronologically presented. Fundamentally significant experimental and theoretical studies for mathematical modeling and numerical computations of this flow configuration are analyzed. An important physical aspect of this type of flow is presence of secondary motion in the plane perpendicular to the streamwise direction, which is of interest from both the engineering and the scientific viewpoints. The key facts for a task of turbulence modeling and optimal choice of the turbulence model are obtained through careful examination of physical mechanisms that generate secondary flows. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no.TR-33018: Increase in Energy and Ecology Efficiency of Processes in Pulverized Coal-Fired Furnace and Optimization of Utility Steam Boiler Air Pre-heater by Using In-House Developed Software Tools

  5. Temperature-Corrected Model of Turbulence in Hot Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Pao, S. Paul; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2007-01-01

    An improved correction has been developed to increase the accuracy with which certain formulations of computational fluid dynamics predict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The CFD formulations in question are those derived from the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations closed by means of a two-equation model of turbulence, known as the k-epsilon model, wherein effects of turbulence are summarized by means of an eddy viscosity. The need for a correction arises because it is well known among specialists in CFD that two-equation turbulence models, which were developed and calibrated for room-temperature, low Mach-number, plane-mixing-layer flows, underpredict mixing in shear layers of hot jet flows. The present correction represents an attempt to account for increased mixing that takes place in jet flows characterized by high gradients of total temperature. This correction also incorporates a commonly accepted, previously developed correction for the effect of compressibility on mixing.

  6. Shear flow generation and energetics in electromagnetic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Kendl, A.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    acoustic mode (GAM) transfer in drift-Alfvén turbulence is investigated. By means of numerical computations the energy transfer into zonal flows owing to each of these effects is quantified. The importance of the three driving ingredients in electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence for conditions...... relevant to the edge of fusion devices is revealed for a broad range of parameters. The Reynolds stress is found to provide a flow drive, while the electromagnetic Maxwell stress is in the cases considered a sink for the flow energy. In the limit of high plasma β, where electromagnetic effects and Alfvén...

  7. Turbulent Mixing Parameterizations for Oceanic Flows and Student Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    shear layer stability analysis (Miles 1961) and has been shown to be a criterion for stationarity in homogeneous shear flows (e.g. Rohr et al. 1988...Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 10, 496- 508. Pope, S., 2000: Turbulent Flows. Cambridge University Press. Rohr , J. J., E. C. Itsweire, K. N. Helland

  8. Three-dimensional flow and turbulence structure in electrostatic precipitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullum, Thorvald Uhrskov; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Özcan, Oktay

    2002-01-01

    and bulk velocity U0 on secondary flows and turbulence levels and structures due to the action of the three-dimensional electrostatic field on the charged gas. At constant bulk velocity (U0 = 1 m/s) and current density (Jm = 0.4 mA/m2), secondary flows in the form of rolls of axial vorticity with swirl...

  9. Numerical modeling of fine particle fractal aggregates in turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Feifeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for prediction of fine particle transport in a turbulent flow is proposed, the interaction between particles and fluid is studied numerically, and fractal agglomerate of fine particles is analyzed using Taylor-expansion moment method. The paper provides a better understanding of fine particle dynamics in the evolved flows.

  10. Flow instability and turbulence - ONERA water tunnel visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, H.

    The experimental technique used for visualizing laminar-turbulent transition phenomena, developed in previous tests in ONERA's small TH1 water tunnel, has been successfully applied in the new TH2 tunnel. With its very extensive Reynold's number domain (10 to the 4th - 10 to the 6th), this tunnel has shown itself to be well adapted to the study of turbulence and of the flow instabilities related to its appearance.

  11. Investigation of turbulence models with compressibility corrections for hypersonic boundary flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The applications of pressure work, pressure-dilatation, and dilatation-dissipation (Sarkar, Zeman, and Wilcox models to hypersonic boundary flows are investigated. The flat plate boundary layer flows of Mach number 5–11 and shock wave/boundary layer interactions of compression corners are simulated numerically. For the flat plate boundary layer flows, original turbulence models overestimate the heat flux with Mach number high up to 10, and compressibility corrections applied to turbulence models lead to a decrease in friction coefficients and heating rates. The pressure work and pressure-dilatation models yield the better results. Among the three dilatation-dissipation models, Sarkar and Wilcox corrections present larger deviations from the experiment measurement, while Zeman correction can achieve acceptable results. For hypersonic compression corner flows, due to the evident increase of turbulence Mach number in separation zone, compressibility corrections make the separation areas larger, thus cannot improve the accuracy of calculated results. It is unreasonable that compressibility corrections take effect in separation zone. Density-corrected model by Catris and Aupoix is suitable for shock wave/boundary layer interaction flows which can improve the simulation accuracy of the peak heating and have a little influence on separation zone.

  12. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds

  13. Numerical computation of compressible, turbulent high-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzen, Yildirim Bora

    Separated flows and subsequent formation of shear layers are important fluid processes which play a dominant role in numerous engineering applications. Accurate prediction of this fluid process is an important element in the design and analysis of high speed vehicles and, ultimately, in performance and trajectory analysis. In this study, a two-dimensional/axisymmetric Navier-Stokes flow solver using Steger-Warming flux vector splitting technique is developed for the accurate simulation of high speed turbulent flows. Computations are performed for an underexpanded, supersonic, turbulent, axisymmetric jet and a two-stream supersonic turbulent wake flowfield behind a two-dimensional thick base as representative of high speed, compressible shear flows. Baldwin-Barth and Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence models and Baseline version of Menter's zonal k - omega/k - varepsilon two-equation turbulence models are used to investigate their performance for the applications considered. Modifications to these models are incorporated in order to improve their prediction capabilities for the types of flows considered. For two-equation models, modifications to include compressibility correction terms are considered and a modeled version of Menter's models including compressible dissipation and pressure dilatation terms is developed. Axisymmetric correction is incorporated to all models by means of coefficient changes. The computational results are compared to available experimental data. Results show that the modifications improve the computed solutions for all models.

  14. A near-wall turbulence model and its application to fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1988-01-01

    A near wall turbulence model and its incorporation into a multiple-time-scale turbulence model are presented. In the method, the conservation of mass, momentum, and the turbulent kinetic energy equations are integrated up to the wall; and the energy transfer rate and the dissipation rate inside the near wall layer are obtained from algebraic equations. The algebraic equations for the energy transfer rate and the dissipation rate inside the near wall layer were obtained from a k-equation turbulence model and the near wall analysis. A fully developed turbulent channel flow and fully developed turbulent pipe flows were solved using a finite element method to test the predictive capability of the turbulence model. The computational results compared favorably with experimental data. It is also shown that the present turbulence model could resolve the over shoot phenomena of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall.

  15. Turbulent mixing in nonreactive and reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    1975-01-01

    Turbulence, mixing and the mutual interaction of turbulence and chemistry continue to remain perplexing and impregnable in the fron­ tiers of fluid mechanics. The past ten years have brought enormous advances in computers and computational techniques on the one hand and in measurements and data processing on the other. The impact of such capabilities has led to a revolution both in the understanding of the structure of turbulence as well as in the predictive methods for application in technology. The early ideas on turbulence being an array of complicated phenomena and having some form of reasonably strong coherent struc­ ture have become well substantiated in recent experimental work. We are still at the very beginning of understanding all of the aspects of such coherence and of the possibilities of incorporating such structure into the analytical models for even those cases where the thin shear layer approximation may be valid. Nevertheless a distinguished body of "eddy chasers" has come into existence. T...

  16. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, heat transport and thermal waves in laminar and turbulent superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongiovì, Maria Stella; Jou, David; Sciacca, Michele

    2018-01-01

    This review paper puts together some results concerning non equilibrium thermodynamics and heat transport properties of superfluid He II. A one-fluid extended model of superfluid helium, which considers heat flux as an additional independent variable, is presented, its microscopic bases are analyzed, and compared with the well known two-fluid model. In laminar situations, the fundamental fields are density, velocity, absolute temperature, and heat flux. Such a theory is able to describe the thermomechanical phenomena, the propagation of two sounds in liquid helium, and of fourth sound in superleak. It also leads in a natural way to a two-fluid model on purely macroscopical grounds and allows a small amount of entropy associated with the superfluid component. Other important features of liquid He II arise in rotating situations and in superfluid turbulence, both characterized by the presence of quantized vortices (thin vortex lines whose circulation is restricted by a quantum condition). Such vortices have a deep influence on the transport properties of superfluid helium, as they increase very much its thermal resistance. Thus, heat flux influences the vortices which, in turn, modify the heat flux. The dynamics of vortex lines is the central topic in turbulent superfluid helium. The model is generalized to take into account the vortices in different cases of physical interest: rotating superfluids, counterflow superfluid turbulence, combined counterflow and rotation, and mass flow in addition to heat flow. To do this, the averaged vortex line density per unit volume L, is introduced and its dynamical equations are considered. Linear and non-linear evolution equations for L are written for homogeneous and inhomogeneous, isotropic and anisotropic situations. Several physical experiments are analyzed and the influence of vortices on the effective thermal conductivity of turbulent superfluid helium is found. Transitions from laminar to turbulent flows, from diffusive to

  17. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or 'particles', can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general results

  18. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  19. Two-dimensional turbulence in three-dimensional flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H.; Francois, N.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a review of experiments performed in three-dimensional flows that show behaviour associated with two-dimensional turbulence. Experiments reveal the presence of the inverse energy cascade in two different systems, namely, flows in thick fluid layers driven electromagnetically and the Faraday wave driven flows. In thick fluid layers, large-scale coherent structures can shear off the vertical eddies and reinforce the planarity of the flow. Such structures are either self-generated or externally imposed. In the Faraday wave driven flows, a seemingly three-dimensional flow is shown to be actually two-dimensional when it is averaged over several Faraday wave periods. In this system, a coupling between the wave motion and 2D hydrodynamic turbulence is uncovered.

  20. Effects of polymers on the spatial structure of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Ballouz, Joseph G.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that the addition of minor amounts of polymers to a turbulent water flow can significantly change its properties. One of the most prominent effects is the observed drastic reduction of drag in wall-bounded flows that is utilized in many engineering applications. Much of the research on polymers in turbulence has focused on their influence on the turbulent energy cascade and their interaction with the energy transfer processes. Much less investigated are their effects on the spatial structure of turbulent flows. In a classical von-Kárman swirling flow setup, we used Lagrangian particle tracking to obtain three-dimensional particle trajectories, velocities, and accelerations and find that polymers have a significant effect on Lagrangian measures of the turbulence structure such as radial distribution functions and the curvature of particle trajectories. We find that not only do the statistical distributions change, but also that polymers appear to affect the spatial statistics well beyond the size of the polymers themselves.

  1. Study on the turbulence model sensitivity for various cross-corrugated surfaces applied to matrix type heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Myung; Ha, Man Yeong; Son, Chang Min; Doo, Jeong Hoon; Min, June Kee [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Diverse cross-corrugated surface geometries were considered to estimate the sensitivity of four variants of k-ε turbulence models (Low Reynolds, standard, RNG and realizable models). The cross-corrugated surfaces considered in this study are a conventional sinusoidal shape and two different asymmetric shapes. The numerical simulations using the steady incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations were carried out to obtain the steady solutions of the flow and thermal fields in the unitary cell of the heat exchanger matrix. In addition, the experimental test for the measurement of local convective heat transfer coefficients on the heat transfer surfaces was performed by means of the Transient liquid crystal (TLC) technique in order to compare the numerical results with the measured data. The features on detailed flow structure and corresponding heat transfer in the unitary cell of the matrix type heat exchanger are compared and analyzed against four different turbulence models considered in this study.

  2. Turbulent Mixing and Flow Resistance over Dunes and Scours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Arfaie, A.; Burns, A. D.; Eggenhuisen, J. T.; Ingham, D. B.; McCaffrey, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Flows in both submarine and fluvial channels are subject to lower boundary roughness. Lower boundary roughness occurs as frictional roughness suffered by the flow as it moves over the bed (skin friction) or drag suffered by the flow as it moves past a large obstacle (form drag). Critically, to overcome such roughness the flow must expend (lose) energy and momentum. However, whilst overcoming bed roughness the degree of turbulent mixing in the flow may be enhanced increasing the potential energy of the flow. This is of key importance to density driven flows as the balance between kinetic energy lost and potential energy gained (through turbulent diffusion of suspended particulate material) may critically affect the criterion for autosuspension. Moreover, this effect of lower boundary roughness may go as far as helping to explain why, even on shallow slopes, channelized submarine density currents can run out over ultra long distances. Such effects are also important in fluvial systems, where they will be responsible for maximizing or minimizing sediment capacity and competence in different flow environments. Numerical simulations are performed at a high Reynolds number (O (106)) for a series of crestal length to height ratio (c/h) at a fixed width to height ratio (w/h). Here, we present key findings of shear flow over a range of idealized bedform shapes. We show how the total basal shear stress is split into skin friction and form drag and identify how the respective magnitudes vary as a function of bedform shape and scale. Moreover we demonstrate how said bedforms affect the balance of energy lost (frictional) and energy gained (turbulent mixing). Overall, results demonstrate a slow reduction in turbulent mixing and flow resistance with decreasing bedform side slope angle. This suggests that both capacity and competence of the flow may be reduced through decrease in of the potential energy of the flow as a result of change in slope angles.

  3. New Turbulent Multiphase Flow Facilities for Simulation Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Chee Hau; Salibindla, Ashwanth; Masuk, Ashik Ullah Mohammad; Ni, Rui

    2017-11-01

    The Fluid Transport Lab at Penn State has devoted last few years on developing new experimental facilities to unveil the underlying physics of coupling between solid-gas and gas-liquid multiphase flow in a turbulent environment. In this poster, I will introduce one bubbly flow facility and one dusty flow facility for validating and verifying simulation results. Financial support for this project was provided by National Science Foundation under Grant Number: 1653389 and 1705246.

  4. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  5. The role of zonal flows in disc gravito-turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanon, R.

    2018-04-01

    The work presented here focuses on the role of zonal flows in the self-sustenance of gravito-turbulence in accretion discs. The numerical analysis is conducted using a bespoke pseudo-spectral code in fully compressible, non-linear conditions. The disc in question, which is modelled using the shearing sheet approximation, is assumed to be self-gravitating, viscous, and thermally diffusive; a constant cooling timescale is also considered. Zonal flows are found to emerge at the onset of gravito-turbulence and they remain closely linked to the turbulent state. A cycle of zonal flow formation and destruction is established, mediated by a slow mode instability (which allows zonal flows to grow) and a non-axisymmetric instability (which disrupts the zonal flow), which is found to repeat numerous times. It is in fact the disruptive action of the non-axisymmetric instability to form new leading and trailing shearing waves, allowing energy to be extracted from the background flow and ensuring the self-sustenance of the gravito-turbulent regime.

  6. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  7. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media; Modelisation a l'echelle macroscopique d'un ecoulement turbulent au sein d'un milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinson, F

    2006-03-15

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - {epsilon} RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - <{epsilon}>f - <{epsilon}{sub w}>f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then

  8. Computational Investigation of Soot and Radiation in Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalit, Harshad

    This study delves into computational modeling of soot and infrared radiation for turbulent reacting flows, detailed understanding of both of which is paramount in the design of cleaner engines and pollution control. In the first part of the study, the concept of Stochastic Time and Space Series Analysis (STASS) as a numerical tool to compute time dependent statistics of radiation intensity is introduced for a turbulent premixed flame. In the absence of high fidelity codes for large eddy simulation or direct numerical simulation of turbulent flames, the utility of STASS for radiation imaging of reacting flows to understand the flame structure is assessed by generating images of infrared radiation in spectral bands dominated by radiation from gas phase carbon dioxide and water vapor using an assumed PDF method. The study elucidates the need for time dependent computation of radiation intensity for validation with experiments and the need for accounting for turbulence radiation interactions for correctly predicting radiation intensity and consequently the flame temperature and NOx in a reacting fluid flow. Comparison of single point statistics of infrared radiation intensity with measurements show that STASS can not only predict the flame structure but also estimate the dynamics of thermochemical scalars in the flame with reasonable accuracy. While a time series is used to generate realizations of thermochemical scalars in the first part of the study, in the second part, instantaneous realizations of resolved scale temperature, CO2 and H2O mole fractions and soot volume fractions are extracted from a large eddy simulation (LES) to carry out quantitative imaging of radiation intensity (QIRI) for a turbulent soot generating ethylene diffusion flame. A primary motivation of the study is to establish QIRI as a computational tool for validation of soot models, especially in the absence of conventional flow field and measured scalar data for sooting flames. Realizations of

  9. Study on turbulence characteristics of free surface flow for cooling of fusion reactors, accelerator targets and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuke, Ishii; Atsuhiro, Nishino; Minoru, Takahashi

    2001-01-01

    For the development of innovative fusion reactors, we examine the film flow along the first wall to simplify blanket and reduce the cost. A film flow is formed in primary cooling circuits of the light water reactors (LWR) when the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) occurs and a cold water is injected into the primary systems. In order to estimate the interfacial condensation rate at the developing region, it is required to have the knowledge about interfacial turbulent thermal diffusion of a thick film flow. Therefore, these systems have the same problem of heat transfer and transport inside the film flows. It is necessary to investigate the velocity and turbulence characteristics that have a close relation to the heat transfer and transport. Although there have been performed various studies on turbulence structure having free surface in a fully developed flow region, the turbulence properties of the film flows in a developing flow region has not been investigated sufficiently. Thus, we measure the velocity profiles and velocity fluctuations in a developing flow region using Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Then, experimental data are compared with analytical result that is obtained using the k-ε model of turbulence. (author)

  10. Mean Flow and Turbulence Near a Series of Dikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaeger, M. A.; Duan, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Scour around various structures obstructing flow in an open channel is a common problem faced by river engineers. To better understand why this occurs, two questions must be answered: what are the mean flow and turbulence distributions around these structures and how do these two fields affect sediment transport? In addition, are the mean flow or turbulence properties more important in predicting the local transport rate? To answer these questions, a near-bed turbulence and shear stress study was conducted in a flat, fixed bed laboratory flume. Three dikes were placed on the left wall at right angles to the flow, extending partway into the flow, and remaining fully emerged throughout the experiment. A micro acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) was used to measure velocities near the bed in the x, y, and z directions and then the turbulence intensities and Reynolds stresses were calculated from these measurements. Preliminary results showed that mean velocity has no relation to the formation of scour near the tips of the dikes but that Reynolds stresses and turbulence intensities do. It was shown that the horizontal component of the Reynolds stress near the bed contributed the most to the formation of scour. The maximum value of this component was over 200 times that of the mean bed shear stress of the incoming flow, whereas in a single dike field, the same Reynolds stress is about 60 times that of the incoming flow. The magnitudes of the other two components of the Reynolds stress were less than that of the horizontal component, with magnitudes about 20 times that of the incoming flow. This may be attributed to the very small contribution of the vertical velocity in these components. Turbulence intensity magnitudes were about 3 to 5 times that of the incoming flow, with the largest being u'. The largest values for both Reynolds stresses and turbulence intensities were seen at the tip of the second dike in the series. Better understanding of these flow processes will

  11. Combined forced and natural convection heat transfer for upward flow in a uniformly heated vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Hatano, Shunichi; Maruyama, Shigeo.

    1986-01-01

    For predicting the fully developed upward flow in a uniformly heated vertical pipe by taking account of the buoyancy force, the k-ε models of turbulence for low Reynolds number flows were adopted. The regime map for forced, mixed and natural convections as well as for laminar and turbulent flows was plotted from the numerical calculations. At the same time, an experiment was carried out at Reynolds numbers of 3000 and 5000 with the Grashof number varied over a wide range by using pressurized nitrogen gas as a test fluid. In agreement with the prediction, buoyancy-induced impairment of heat transfer was measured right in the mixed convection region. Further, from hot-wire measurement, complete laminarization was demonstrated in the mixed convection region at a Reynolds number of 3000. (author)

  12. CFD SIMULATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER PROCESS IN A CHEVRON PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER USING THE SST TURBULENCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Skočilas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation of the heat transfer process during turbulent hot water flow between two chevron plates in a plate heat exchanger. A three-dimensional model with the simplified geometry of two cross-corrugated channels provided by chevron plates, taking into account the inlet and outlet ports, has been designed for the numerical study. The numerical model was based on the shear-stress transport (SST k-! model. The basic characteristics of the heat exchanger, as values of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop, have been investigated. A comparative analysis of analytical calculation results, based on experimental data obtained from literature, and of the results obtained by numerical simulation, has been carried out. The coefficients and the exponents in the design equations for the considered plates have been arranged by using simulation results. The influence on the main flow parameters of the corrugation inclination angle relative to the flow direction has been taken into account. An analysis of the temperature distribution across the plates has been carried out, and it has shown the presence of zones with higher heat losses and low fluid flow intensity.

  13. Dissipation and heating in solar wind turbulence: from the macro to the micro and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Khurom H; Osman, Kareem T; Chapman, Sandra C

    2015-05-13

    The past decade has seen a flurry of research activity focused on discerning the physics of kinetic scale turbulence in high-speed astrophysical plasma flows. By 'kinetic' we mean spatial scales on the order of or, in particular, smaller than the ion inertial length or the ion gyro-radius--the spatial scales at which the ion and electron bulk velocities decouple and considerable change can be seen in the ion distribution functions. The motivation behind most of these studies is to find the ultimate fate of the energy cascade of plasma turbulence, and thereby the channels by which the energy in the system is dissipated. This brief Introduction motivates the case for a themed issue on this topic and introduces the topic of turbulent dissipation and heating in the solar wind. The theme issue covers the full breadth of studies: from theory and models, massive simulations of these models and observational studies from the highly rich and vast amount of data collected from scores of heliospheric space missions since the dawn of the space age. A synopsis of the theme issue is provided, where a brief description of all the contributions is discussed and how they fit together to provide an over-arching picture on the highly topical subject of dissipation and heating in turbulent collisionless plasmas in general and in the solar wind in particular. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Laminar-turbulent transition in Taylor-Dean flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aider, A Ait [Departement de Mecanique, Universite de Tizi Ouzou, B.P. 17 R.P. 15000, Algerie (Algeria); Skali, S [LEMTA, INPL, 2 Avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France); Brancher, J P [LEMTA, INPL, 2 Avenue de la Foret de Haye, 54504 Vandoeuvre Cedex (France)

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study is reported of flows produced in a moderate Taylor-Couette system, {gamma} {approx} 15, closed or azimuthally opened. In the last case, the flow is bounded by {theta} = 0 and (2{pi} - {theta}{sub 1}) where {theta}{sub 1} = 30 deg. represents the region cut-off by a diaphragm. The basic flow is a combination of a flow caused by the rotation of the inner cylinder and a flow provided azimuthally in the gap by external pumping. Our observations of the laminar-turbulent transition for a wide range of {tau}, the ratio of pumping and rotation flow rates, reveals competition between the Taylor-Dean flow due to rotation and the Dean flow due to pumping leading to new flow regimes which have not counterpart in the closed Taylor-Couette flow.

  15. Diffusive separation of particles by diffusion in swirled turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, V.N.; Shiliaev, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of turbulent flow and diffusive separation of solid particles in a centrifugal air separator (consisting of two flat disks rotating at the same angular velocity) is presented. A closed set of balances for all the components of the tensor of turbulent stresses, extended to the entire flow region, is employed in the numerical analysis of transition and turbulent air flows between the rotating disks. The analytical relationships obtained for the case of the mixed flow for the various components of the average velocity, energy of fluctuations, and turbulence level in the circumferential direction agreed well with the theoretical and experimental distributions of Bakke, et al. (1973). It is shown that at high Reynolds numbers the flow is isotropic, the dependence of the circumferential component of the average velocity obeys a power law, and the generation of the radial component is controlled by the local centrifugal field. The sharpness of particle separation was calculated by the eddy diffusion equation and was found to depend on the geometry and the operating conditions. 8 references

  16. STRUCTURES OF TURBULENT VORTICES AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON FLOW PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsas Rimkus

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the many investigations that have been conducted on turbulent flows, the generation and development of turbulent vortices has not been investigated sufficiently yet. This prevents to understand well the processes involved in the flow. That is unfavorable for the further investigations. The developing vortex structures are interacting, and this needs to be estimated. Physical summing of velocities, formed by all structures, can be unfavorable for investigations, therefore they must be separated; otherwise bias errors can occur. The difficulty for investigations is that the widely employed Particle Image Velocity (PIV method, when a detailed picture of velocity field picture is necessary, can provide photos covering only a short interval of flow, which can’t include the largest flow structures, i.e. macro whirlpools. Consequently, action of these structures could not be investigated. Therefore, in this study it is tried to obtain the necessary data about the flow structure by analyzing the instantaneous velocity measurements by 3D means, which lasts for several minutes, therefore the existence and interaction of these structures become visible in measurement data. The investigations conducted in this way have been already discussed in the article, published earlier. Mostly the generation and development of bottom vortices was analyzed. In this article, the analysis of these turbulent velocity measurements is continued and the additional data about the structure of turbulent vortices is obtained.

  17. Semi-local scaling and turbulence modulation in variable property turbulent channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, A.; Peeters, J.W.R.; Boersma, B.J.; Pecnik, R.

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the effect of temperature dependent density and viscosity on turbulence in channel flows. First, a mathematical framework is developed to support the validity of the semi-local scaling as proposed based on heuristic arguments by Huang, Coleman, and

  18. Phenomenological friction equation for turbulent flow of Bingham fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarlooei, H R; Cruz, D O A; Ramos, F; Santos, Cecilia M M; Silva Freire, A P

    2017-08-01

    Most discussions in the literature on the friction coefficient of turbulent flows of fluids with complex rheology are empirical. As a rule, theoretical frameworks are not available even for some relatively simple constitutive models. In the present work, a formula is proposed for the evaluation of the friction coefficient of turbulent flows of Bingham fluids. The developments combine a fresh analysis for the description of the microscales of Kolmogorov and the phenomenological turbulence model of Gioia and Chakraborty [G. Gioia and P. Chakraborty, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044502 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.044502]. The resulting Blasius-type friction equation is tested against some experimental data and shows good agreement over a significant range of Hedstrom and Reynolds numbers. Comments on pressure measurements in yielding fluids are made. The limits of the proposed model are also discussed.

  19. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milici, Barbara [Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Cittadella Universitaria - 94100 - Enna (Italy)

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  20. Numerical prediction of turbulent heat transfer augmentation in an annular fuel channel with two-dimensional square ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1996-01-01

    The square-ribbed fuel rod for high temperature gas-cooled reactors was developed in order to enhance the turbulent heat transfer in comparison with the standard fuel rod. To evaluate the heat transfer performance of the square-ribbed fuel rod, the turbulent heat transfer coefficients in an annular fuel channel with repeated two-dimensional square ribs were analyzed numerically on a fully developed incompressible flow using the k - ε turbulence model and the two-dimensional axisymmetrical coordinate system. Numerical analyses were carried out for a range of Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 20000 and ratios of square-rib pitch to height of 10, 20 and 40, respectively. The predicted values of the heat transfer coefficients agreed within an error of 10% for the square-rib pitch to height ratio of 10, 20% for 20 and 25% for 40, respectively, with the heat transfer empirical correlations obtained from the experimental data. It was concluded by the present study that the effect of the heat transfer augmentation by square ribs could be predicted sufficiently by the present numerical simulations and also a part of its mechanism could be explained by means of the change in the turbulence kinematic energy distribution along the flow direction. (author)

  1. Wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent heat transfer in a T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2017-11-01

    In this talk we report on wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent heat transfer between a cold crossflow and a hot incoming jet in a T-junction. Due to their high efficiency in mixing and heat transfer, T-junctions are encountered in numerous industrial applications. Our study is motivated by the need to assess phenomena related to thermal fatigue that are often encountered at their walls. We first describe the important features of the flow with emphasis on the shear layers that are formed at the entry of the jet and the recirculation regions. We also show results for first- and second-order statistics of the flow and compare our predictions with previous experimental data. Lastly, we present results from the spectral analysis of the temperature signal that we performed in order to assess the oscillating mechanisms that dominate the flow and the risk of thermal fatigue at the walls of the T-junction.

  2. Rossby wave, drift wave and zonal flow turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobinsky, Demian G.

    An extensive qualitative and quantitative study of Rossby wave, drift wave and zonal flow turbulence in the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model is presented. This includes details of two generation mechanisms of the zonal flows, evidence of the nonlocal nature of this turbulence and of the energy exchange between the small and large scales. The modulational instability study shows that for strong primary waves the most unstable modes are perpendicular to the primary wave, which corresponds to the generation of a zonal flow if the primary wave is purely meridional. For weak waves, the maximum growth occurs for off-zonal modulations that are close to being in three-wave resonance with the primary wave. Nonlinear jet pinching is observed for all nonlinearity levels but the subsequent dynamics differ between strong and weak primary waves. The jets of the former further roll up into Karman-like vortex streets and saturate, while for the latter, the growth of the unstable mode reverses and the system oscillates between a dominant jet and a dominant primary wave. A critical level of nonlinearity is defined which separates the two regimes. Some of these characteristics are captured by truncated models. Numerical proof of the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence is presented. While the theoretical derivations of this invariant stem from the wave kinetic equation which assumes weak wave amplitudes, it is shown to be relatively-well conserved for higher nonlinearities also. Together with the energy and enstrophy, these three invariants cascade into anisotropic sectors in the k-space as predicted by the Fjortoft argument. The cascades are characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model has demonstrated the wellknown drift wave - zonal flow feedback loop. The drift wave turbulence is generated from this primary instability. The zonal flows are then excited by either one of the generation

  3. Flow induced vibration in shell and tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, B.M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Assessing heat exchanger designs, from the standpoint of flow induced vibration, is becoming increasingly important as shell side flow velocities are increased in a quest for better thermal performance. This paper reviews the state of the art concerning the main sources of vibration excitation, i.e. vortex shedding resonance, turbulent buffeting, fluidelastic instability and acoustic resonance, as well as the structural dynamics of the tubes. It is concluded that there are many areas which require further investigation but there are sufficient data available at present to design, with reasonable confidence, units that will be free from flow induced vibration. Topics which are considered to be key areas for further work are listed

  4. Drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Roberta; Mollicone, Jean-Paul; Battista, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated in a turbulent pipe flow. Wetted superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to trap gas bubbles in their asperities. This stops the liquid from coming in direct contact with the wall in that location, allowing the flow to slip over the air bubbles. We consider a well-defined texture with streamwise grooves at the walls in which the gas is expected to be entrapped. This configuration is modeled with alternating no-slip and shear-free boundary conditions at the wall. With respect to the classical turbulent pipe flow, a substantial drag reduction is observed which strongly depends on the grooves' dimension and on the solid fraction, i.e., the ratio between the solid wall surface and the total surface of the pipe's circumference. The drag reduction is due to the mean slip velocity at the wall which increases the flow rate at a fixed pressure drop. The enforced boundary conditions also produce peculiar turbulent structures which on the contrary decrease the flow rate. The two concurrent effects provide an overall flow rate increase as demonstrated by means of the mean axial momentum balance. This equation provides the balance between the mean pressure gradient, the Reynolds stress, the mean flow rate, and the mean slip velocity contributions.

  5. Settling and collision between small ice crystals in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucha, Jennifer; Naso, Aurore; Lévêque, Emmanuel; Pumir, Alain

    2018-01-01

    Ice crystals are present in a variety of clouds, at sufficiently low temperature. We consider here mixed-phase clouds which, at temperature ≳-20 ∘C , contain ice crystals, shaped approximately as thin oblate ellipsoids. We investigate the motion of these particles transported by an isotropic turbulent flow and, in particular, the collision between these crystals, a key process in the formation of graupels. Using fully resolved direct numerical simulations, and neglecting the effects of fluid inertia on the particle motion, we determine the influence of the turbulence intensity and of gravitational settling, in a realistic range of parameters. At small turbulent energy dissipation rate, collisions are induced mainly by differential gravitational settling between particles with different orientations. The effect has a clear signature on the relative orientation of colliding ellipsoids. As the turbulent energy dissipation rate increases, however, the influence of the turbulent velocity fluctuations becomes the dominant effect determining the collision rate. Using simple estimates, we propose an elementary understanding of the relative importance of gravitational settling and turbulent fluctuations.

  6. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-09-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model.

  7. Tempered fractional time series model for turbulence in geophysical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Sabzikar, Farzad; Phanikumar, Mantha S; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new time series model for velocity data in turbulent flows. The new model employs tempered fractional calculus to extend the classical 5/3 spectral model of Kolmogorov. Application to wind speed and water velocity in a large lake are presented, to demonstrate the practical utility of the model. (paper)

  8. Mass transfer from smooth alabaster surfaces in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, Bradley N.; Gust, Giselher; Ledwell, James R.

    1987-11-01

    The mass transfer velocity for alabaster plates in smooth-wall turbulent flow is found to vary with the friction velocity according to an analytic solution of the advective diffusion equation. Deployment of alabaster plates on the sea floor can perhaps be used to estimate the viscous stress, and transfer velocities for other species.

  9. Turbulence characteristics of open channel flow over non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The considerable magnitudes of transverse velocities over mobile bedforms necessitate measurement of 3-D velocity components to analyze the flow field. Computed turbulence intensities are found to be maximum in the region consisting of the trough and the reattachment point of the dunes. It is observed that streamwise ...

  10. Transport of suspended particles in turbulent open channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugem, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments are performed in order to investigate suspended sediment transport in a turbulent open channel flow. The first experiment used particle image velocimetry (PIV) to measure the fluid velocity with a high spatial resolution, while particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used to measure

  11. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Vibrations Induced by Turbulent Flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Sváček, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2015), s. 146-188 ISSN 1815-2406 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0207 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fluid-structure interaction * flow induced vibrations * turbulence models * finite element method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.778, year: 2015

  12. Numerical modelling of turbulent flow over rough walls

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Louda, P.; Kozel, K.; Příhoda, Jaromír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2008), s. 4100011-4100012 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/06/0461 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulence modelling * rough wall * decelerated flow Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  13. accurate, explicit pipe sizing formula for turbulent flows

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DEPT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

    White Formula. Friction loss in turbulent pipe flow is best esti- ... the friction factor f is. Ranga Raju and Garde's method. RangaRaju and Garde (1971) proposed the fol- lowing equations for pipe sizing a) For e3gSf/n2. 10-2. 54.0. 2. 3. 633.2. 39.3.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent flow in a driven cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Cazemier, W.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 2 and 3D turbulent flows in a lid-driven cavity have been performed. DNS are numerical solutions of the unsteady (here: incompressible) Navier-Stokes equations that compute the evolution of all dynamically significant scales of motion. In view of the large

  15. Instantaneous planar pressure determination from PIV in turbulent flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kat, R.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the determination of instantaneous planar pressure fields from velocity data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) in turbulent flow. The operating principles of pressure determination using a Eulerian or a Lagrangian approach are described together with theoretical

  16. Numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; McLaughlin, J.B.; Kontomaris, K.; Portela, L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results for the behavior of particle-laden gases in a small Reynolds number vertical channel down flow. Results will be presented for the effects of particle feedback on the gas-phase turbulence and for the concentration profile of the particles. The effects of density ratio,

  17. Dynamics of prolate ellipsoidal particles in a turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.; Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of tiny elongated particles in a directly simulated turbulent flow field is investigated. The ellipsoidal particles are affected both by inertia and hydrodynamic forces and torques. The time evolution of the particle orientation and translational and rotational motions in a

  18. Water droplet condensation and evaporation in turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in the turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapour. We adopt an Euler–Lagrangian formulation based on conservation laws for the mass, momentum and energy of the continuous phase and on empirical

  19. Universal intermittent properties of particle trajectories in highly turbulent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnèodo, A.; Benzi, R.; Berg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    We present a collection of eight data sets from state-of-the-art experiments and numerical simulations on turbulent velocity statistics along particle trajectories obtained in different flows with Reynolds numbers in the range R-lambda is an element of [120740]. Lagrangian structure functions fro...

  20. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Arévalo, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2014-11-01

    The hot (107 to 108 kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius--it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies.

  1. Confinement-induced heat-transport enhancement in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Di; Kaczorowski, Matthias; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2013-09-06

    We report an experimental and numerical study of the effect of spatial confinement in turbulent thermal convection. It is found that when the width of the convection cell is narrowed, the heat-transfer efficiency increases significantly despite the fact that the overall flow is slowed down by the increased drag force from the sidewalls. Detailed experimental and numerical studies show that this enhancement is brought about by the changes in the dynamics and morphology of the thermal plumes in the boundary layers and in the large-scale flow structures in the bulk. It is found that the confined geometry produces more coherent and energetic hot and cold plume clusters that go up and down in random locations, resulting in more uniform and thinner thermal boundary layers. The study demonstrates how changes in turbulent bulk flow can influence the boundary layer dynamics and shows that the prevalent mode of heat transfer existing in larger aspect ratio convection cells, in which hot and cold thermal plumes are carried by the large-scale circulation along opposite sides of the sidewall, is not the most efficient way for heat transport.

  2. Finite element analysis of turbulent flow in fast reactor fuel subassembly elementary flow cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    1987-03-01

    The method is described of calculating fully developed longitudinal steady-state turbulent flow of an incompressible fluid through an infinite bundle of parallel smooth rods, based on the finite element method and one-equation turbulence model. Theoretical calculation results are compared with experimental results. (author). 5 figs., 3 refs

  3. Turbulent conductivity in parallel with iso-velocities in a planar established flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jullien, F.

    1968-02-01

    In this thesis are presented the experimental results obtained during the study of the turbulent diffusion of heat using a wire source in a flat air flow. The Taylor statistical theory laws are well respected in the domain studied. The experiments have made it possible to evaluate the influence of the Reynolds number and of the distance from the wall on the quadratic values of velocity fluctuations and on the Lagrange turbulence scales. In particular, the author has found a correlation between the Lagrange scales and the friction coefficient when the Reynolds number varies. A diffusion law is derived from the Taylor theory; it makes it possible to explain more clearly the idea of turbulent conductivity. (author) [fr

  4. Experimental study of MHD effects on turbulent flow of flibe simulant fluid in a circular pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Junichi; Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A.; Satake, Shin-ichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2007-01-01

    Experimental studies of MHD turbulent pipe flow of Flibe simulant fluid have been conducted as a part of US-Japan JUPITER-II collaboration. Flibe is considered as a promising candidate for coolant and tritium breeder in some fusion reactor design concepts because of its low electrical conductivity compared to liquid metals. This reduces the MHD pressure drop to a negligible level; however, turbulence can be significantly suppressed by MHD effects in fusion reactor magnetic field conditions. Heat transfer in the Flibe coolant is characterized by its high Prandtl number. In order to achieve sufficient heat transfer and to prevent localized heat concentration in a high Prandtl number coolant, high turbulence is essential. Even though accurate prediction of the MHD effects on heat transfer for high Prandtl number fluids in the fusion environment is very important, reliable data is not available. In these experiments, an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide is used as a simulant fluid for Flibe. This paper presents the experimental results obtained by flow field measurement using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The PIV measurements provide 2-dimensional 2-velocity component information on the MHD flow field. The test section is a circular pipe with 89 mm inner diameter and 7.0 m in length, which is 79 times pipe diameter. This relatively large diameter pipe is selected in order to maximize the MHD effects measured by Hartmann number (Ha=BL(sigma/mu)1/2), and to allow better resolution of the flow in the near-wall region. The test section is placed under maximum 2 Tesla magnetic fields for 1.4m of the axial length. The hydrodynamic developing length under the magnetic field is expected to be 1.2 m. In order to apply PIV technique in the magnetic field condition, special optical devices and visualization sections were created. PIV measurements are performed for Re = 11600 with variable Hartmann numbers. The turbulence statistics of the MHD turbulent flow

  5. Experimental investigation of convective heat transfer in a narrow rectangular channel for upward and downward flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Dae Seong; Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Al-Yahia, Omar; Altamimi, Raga' I M [Advanced Nuclear Engineering System Department, University of Science and Technology, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Heat transfer characteristics in a narrow rectangular channel are experimentally investigated for upward and downward flows. The experimental data obtained are compared with existing data and predictions by many correlations. Based on the observations, there are differences from others: (1) there are no different heat transfer characteristics between upward and downward flows, (2) most of the existing correlations under-estimate heat transfer characteristics, and (3) existing correlations do not predict the high heat transfer in the entrance region for a wide range of Re. In addition, there are a few heat transfer correlations applicable to narrow rectangular channels. Therefore, a new set of correlations is proposed with and without consideration of the entrance region. Without consideration of the entrance region, heat transfer characteristics are expressed as a function of Re and Pr for turbulent flows, and as a function of Gz for laminar flows. The correlation proposed for turbulent and laminar flows has errors of ±18.25 and ±13.62%, respectively. With consideration of the entrance region, the heat transfer characteristics are expressed as a function of Re, Pr, and z{sup 2} for both laminar and turbulent flows. The correlation for turbulent and laminar flows has errors of ±19.5 and ±22.0%, respectively.

  6. Horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifan; Li, Yuguo; Bejan, Adrian; Wang, Yi; Yang, Xinyan

    2017-09-15

    Urban heat dome flow, which is also referred to as urban heat island circulation, is important for urban ventilation and pollutant transport between adjacent cities when the background wind is weak or absent. A "dome-shaped" profile can form at the upper boundary of the urban heat island circulation. The horizontal extent of the heat dome is an important parameter for estimating the size of the area it influences. This study reviews the existing data on the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow, as determined by using either field measurements or numerical simulations. A simple energy balance model is applied to obtain the maximum horizontal extent of a single heat dome over the urban area, which is found to be approximately 1.5 to 3.5 times the diameter of the city's urban area at night. A linearized model is also re-analysed to calculate the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow. This analysis supports the results from the energy balance model. During daytime, the horizontal extent of the urban heat dome flow is found to be about 2.0 to 3.3 times the urban area's diameter, as influenced by the convective turbulent plumes in the rural area.

  7. A finite-elements method for turbulent flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autret, A.

    1986-03-01

    The work discussed here covers turbulent flow calculations using GALERKIN's finite-element method. In our specific case, we have to deal with monophasic incompressible flow in Boussinesq approximation in the normal operating conditions of a primary circuit of nuclear power plant. Turbulence effects on the mean field are taken into account by the k-epsilon model with two evolution equations: one for the kinetic energy of the turbulence, and one for the energy dissipation rate. The wall zone is covered by wall laws, and by REICHARDT's law in particular. A Law is advanced for the epsilon input profile, and a numerical solution is proposed for the physically aberrant values of k and epsilon generated by the model. Single-equation models are reviewed comparatively with the k-epsilon model. A comparison between calculated and analytical solutions or calculated and experimental results is presented for decreasing turbulence behind a grid, for the flow between parallel flat plates with three REYNOLDS numbers, and for backward facing step [fr

  8. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  9. Heat transfer in tube bundles of heat exchangers with flow baffles induced forced mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbuRomia, M.M.; Chu, A.W.; Cho, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers is being investigated through geometric modeling of the unit configuration in addition to considering the heat transfer processes taking place within the tube bundle. The governing equations that characterize the heat transfer from the shell side fluid to the tube side fluid across the heat transfer tubewalls are indicated. The equations account for the heat transfer due to molecular conduction, turbulent thermal diffusion, and forced fluid mixing among various shell side fluid channels. The analysis, though general in principle, is being applied to the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant-Intermediate Heat Exchanger, which utilizes flow baffles appropriately designed for induced forced fluid mixing in the tube bundle. The results of the analysis are presented in terms of the fluid and tube wall temperature distributions of a non-baffled and baffled tube bundle geometry. The former case yields axial flow in the main bundle region while the latter is associated with axial/cross flow in the bundle. The radial components of the axial/cross flow yield the necessary fluid mixing that results in reducing the thermal unbalance among the heat transfer to the allowable limits. The effect of flow maldistribution, present on the tube or shell sides of the heat exchangers, in altering the temperature field of tube bundles is also noted

  10. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  11. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S. C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sale, M. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  12. Turbulent flow with suction in smooth and rough pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdier, Andre.

    1977-11-01

    It concerns an experimental study of turbulent flow inside a pipe with rough and porous wall and suction applied through it. The first part recall the basic knowledge concerning the turbulent flow with roughness. In second part statistical equations of fluid wall stress are written in the case of a permeable rough wall, in order to underline the respective role played by viscosity and pressure terms. In the third part the dynamic equilibrium of the flow is experimentally undertaken in the smooth and rough range with and without wall suction. Some empirical formulae are proposed for the mean velocity profiles in the inertial range and for friction velocity with suction. In the case of the sand roughness used, it does not seem that critical Reynolds number of transition from smooth to rough range is varied [fr

  13. Tracking coherent structures in massively-separated and turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Coherent vortex structures are tracked in simulations of massively-separated and turbulent flows. Topological Lagrangian saddle points are found using intersections of the positive and negative finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges, and these points are then followed in order to track individual coherent structure motion both in a complex interacting three-dimensional flow (turbulent channel) and during vortex formation (two-dimensional bluff body shedding). For a simulation of wall-bounded turbulence in a channel flow, tracking Lagrangian saddles shows that the average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a previously published result based on velocity and pressure correlations, giving validity to the method. When this tracking method is applied in a study of a circular cylinder in cross-flow it shows that Lagrangian saddles rapidly accelerate away from the cylinder surface as the vortex sheds. This saddle behavior is compared with the time-resolved static pressure distribution on the circular cylinder, yielding locations on a cylinder surface where common sensors could detect this phenomenon, which is not available from force measurements or vortex circulation calculations. The current method of tracking coherent structures yields insight into the behavior of the coherent structures in both of the diverse flows presented, highlighting the breadth of its potential application.

  14. Energy amplification in turbulent flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Many boundary layer flows in natural and manmade systems are characterized by the presence of complex walls (e.g. porous, rough, or patterned) that can substantially alter the near-wall turbulence. For example, the streaks and streamwise vortices prevalent in smooth-walled flows are often replaced by structures resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices in flows over porous media and vegetation canopies. While stability analyses can reproduce some of these observations, they are limited in their ability to generate predictions for spectra and coherent structure in fully turbulent flows. The present effort seeks to address this limitation by extending the resolvent formulation to account for complex walls. Under the resolvent formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a linear superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. The presence of the complex substrate is modeled as a distributed body force, which alters the gain (i.e. energy amplification) and structure of the modes. Preliminary results show that this approach reproduces key observations from previous simulations and experiments of flow over porous media, vegetation canopies, as well as riblets with minimal computation.

  15. A driving mechanism of a turbulent puff in pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masaki; Kida, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    A turbulent puff is numerically realized in a circular pipe flow driven by a constant uniform external force. The periodic boundary condition is imposed in the axial direction with a period of 16π pipe radius. The Reynolds number based on the pipe radius, the centerline velocity of the Hagen-Poiseuille flow corresponding to the external force, is 3000. Starting with the Hagen-Poiseuille flow superposed by a disturbance of finite amplitude, an equilibrium puff of about 11π pipe radius in length emerges and advects with nearly the mean flow velocity. Turbulence in the puff generates a number of low-speed streaks accompanied by streamwise vortices along the pipe wall. These low-speed streaks move upstream relative to the puff, across the trailing edge and create strong thin vortex layers, arched above the streaks, together with the laminar flow coming from upstream. The vortex layers, whose thickness is typically a few times smaller than the width, are unstable to roll up, through the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and induce velocity fluctuations that propagate downstream faster than the puff itself and enhance the turbulent activity in it. This self-sustenance cycle of an equilibrium puff is numerically verified.

  16. Turbulence and Heating in the Flank and Wake Regions of a Coronal Mass Ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Siteng; He, Jiansen; Yan, Limei; Tomczyk, Steven; Tian, Hui; Song, Hongqiang; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Lei

    2018-01-01

    As a coronal mass ejection (CME) passes, the flank and wake regions are typically strongly disturbed. Various instruments, including the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO), the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP), observed a CME close to the east limb on 26 October 2013. A hot ({≈} 10 MK) rising blob was detected on the east limb, with an initial ejection flow speed of {≈} 330 km s^{-1}. The magnetic structures on both sides and in the wake of the CME were strongly distorted, showing initiation of turbulent motions with Doppler-shift oscillations enhanced from {≈} ± 3 km s^{-1} to {≈} ± 15 km s^{-1} and effective thermal velocities from {≈} 30 km s^{-1} to {≈} 60 km s^{-1}, according to the CoMP observations at the Fe xiii line. The CoMP Doppler-shift maps suggest that the turbulence behaved differently at various heights; it showed clear wave-like torsional oscillations at lower altitudes, which are interpreted as the antiphase oscillation of an alternating red/blue Doppler shift across the strands at the flank. The turbulence seems to appear differently in the channels of different temperatures. Its turnover time was {≈} 1000 seconds for the Fe 171 Å channel, while it was {≈} 500 seconds for the Fe 193 Å channel. Mainly horizontal swaying rotations were observed in the Fe 171 Å channel, while more vertical vortices were seen in the Fe 193 Å channel. The differential-emission-measure profiles in the flank and wake regions have two components that evolve differently: the cool component decreased over time, evidently indicating a drop-out of cool materials due to ejection, while the hot component increased dramatically, probably because of the heating process, which is suspected to be a result of magnetic reconnection and turbulence dissipation. These results suggest a new turbulence-heating scenario of the solar corona and solar wind.

  17. Wall pressure signatures of turbulent flow over longitudinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Hayder A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Five triangular riblets longitudinal in the streamwise direction have been studied experimentally. The riblets have pick to pick spaced (s equal to 1000 μm and with groove height to space ratio (h/s 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1. The tests were conducted in a full turbulence water channel on a flat plate for Reynolds numbers 13000 to 53000 based on channel hydraulic diameter. Pressure drop was measured using pressure transmitter gauge with pressure tap points of 12.7 mm in diameter were provided at the bottom of the channel. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the response of turbulent flow to longitudinal grooves of triangular shaped riblets and compare the effect of the turbulence structure over smoothed and grooved surfaces with pressure drop measurements. 10.20 was the maximum drag reduction appear at h/s equal to (1.

  18. Constrained dynamics of an inertial particle in a turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obligado, M; Baudet, C; Gagne, Y; Bourgoin, M

    2011-01-01

    Most of theoretical and numerical works for free advected particles in a turbulent flow, which only consider the drag force acting on the particles, fails to predict recent experimental results for the transport of finite size particles. These questions have motivated a series of experiments trying to emphasize the actual role of the drag force by imposing this one as an unambiguous leading forcing term acting on a particle in a turbulent background. This is achieved by considering the constrained dynamics of towed particles in a turbulent environment. In the present work, we focus on the influence of particles inertia on its velocity and acceleration Lagrangian statistics and energy spectral density. Our results are consistent with a filtering scenario resulting from the viscous response time of an inertial particle whose dynamics is coupled to the surrounding fluid via strong contribution of drag.

  19. Applied research in hydraulics and heat flow

    CERN Document Server

    Asli, Kaveh Hariri; Asli, Hossein Hariri; Motlaghzadeh, Kasra

    2014-01-01

    PrefaceModeling for Heat Flow ProcessFluid and Fluid MechanicsTwo Phases Flow and Vapor BubbleDynamic Modeling for Heat and Mass TransferVapor Pressure and Saturation TemperatureFinite Difference and Method of Characteristics for Transitional FlowLagrangian and Eulerian Transitional FlowDynamic Modeling for Water FlowModeling for Flow ProcessDynamic Modeling for Mass and Momentum TransportIndex

  20. High-Speed Turbulent Reacting Flows: Intrinsic Flame Instability and its Effects on the Turbulent Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludnenko, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent reacting flows are pervasive both in our daily lives on Earth and in the Universe. They power modern society being at the heart of many energy generation and propulsion systems, such as gas turbines, internal combustion and jet engines. On astronomical scales, thermonuclear turbulent flames are the driver of some of the most powerful explosions in the Universe, knows as Type Ia supernovae. Despite this ubiquity in Nature, turbulent reacting flows still pose a number of fundamental questions often exhibiting surprising and unexpected behavior. In this talk, we will discuss several such phenomena observed in direct numerical simulations of high-speed, premixed, turbulent flames. We show that turbulent flames in certain regimes are intrinsically unstable even in the absence of the surrounding combustor walls or obstacles, which can support the thermoacoustic feedback. Such instability can fundamentally change the structure and dynamics of the turbulent cascade, resulting in a significant (and anisotropic) redistribution of kinetic energy from small to large scales. In particular, three effects are observed. 1) The turbulent burning velocity can develop pulsations with significant peak-to-peak amplitudes. 2) Unstable burning can result in pressure build-up and the formation of pressure waves or shocks when the flame speed approaches or exceeds the speed of a Chapman-Jouguet deflagration. 3) Coupling of pressure and density gradients across the flame can lead to the anisotropic generation of turbulence inside the flame volume and flame acceleration. We extend our earlier analysis, which relied on a simplified single-step reaction model, by demonstrating existence of these effects in realistic chemical flames (hydrogen and methane) and in thermonuclear flames in degenerate, relativistic plasmas found in stellar interiors. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results for subgrid-scale LES combustion models. This work was supported by the Air Force

  1. Numerical Simulation of Air-Sea Turbulent Flow of A Progressive Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianyun

    2013-04-01

    The turbulence flow in the coupled water and air of a progressive wave is simulated. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stockes equations are used to produce the turbulence velocity and pressure distributions in the water and air. The turbulence Reynolds stress is modelled by the turbulence RNG (Re-Normalization Group) model. The numerical simulation is compared with the laboratory wave.

  2. Mean and Turbulent Flow Statistics in a Trellised Agricultural Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan E.; Stoll, Rob; Mahaffee, Walter F.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2017-10-01

    Flow physics is investigated in a two-dimensional trellised agricultural canopy to examine that architecture's unique signature on turbulent transport. Analysis of meteorological data from an Oregon vineyard demonstrates that the canopy strongly influences the flow by channelling the mean flow into the vine-row direction regardless of the above-canopy wind direction. Additionally, other flow statistics in the canopy sub-layer show a dependance on the difference between the above-canopy wind direction and the vine-row direction. This includes an increase in the canopy displacement height and a decrease in the canopy-top shear length scale as the above-canopy flow rotates from row-parallel towards row-orthogonal. Distinct wind-direction-based variations are also observed in the components of the stress tensor, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and the energy spectra. Although spectral results suggest that sonic anemometry is insufficient for resolving all of the important scales of motion within the canopy, the energy spectra peaks still exhibit dependencies on the canopy and the wind direction. These variations demonstrate that the trellised-canopy's effect on the flow during periods when the flow is row-aligned is similar to that seen by sparse canopies, and during periods when the flow is row-orthogonal, the effect is similar to that seen by dense canopies.

  3. Combustion characteristics and turbulence modeling of swirling reacting flow in solid fuel ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Omer; Xiong, Chen; Changsheng, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews the historical studies have been done on the solid-fuel ramjet engine and difficulties associated with numerical modeling of swirling flow with combustible gases. A literature survey about works related to numerical and experimental investigations on solid-fuel ramjet as well as using swirling flow and different numerical approaches has been provided. An overview of turbulence modeling of swirling flow and the behavior of turbulence at streamline curvature and system rotation are presented. A new and simple curvature/correction factor is proposed in order to reduce the programming complexity of SST-CC turbulence model. Finally, numerical and experimental investigations on the impact of swirling flow on SFRJ have been carried out. For that regard, a multi-physics coupling code is developed to solve the problems of multi-physics coupling of fluid mechanics, solid pyrolysis, heat transfer, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. The connected-pipe test facility is used to carry out the experiments. The results showed a positive impact of swirling flow on SFRJ along with, three correlations are proposed.

  4. Modelling turbulent fluid flows in nuclear and fossil-fired power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viollet, P.L.

    1995-06-01

    The turbulent flows encountered in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic studies or fossil-fired plant thermo-aerodynamic analyses feature widely varying characteristics, frequently entailing heat transfers and two-phase flows so that modelling these phenomena tends more and more to involve coupling between several branches of engineering. Multi-scale geometries are often encountered, with complex wall shapes, such as a PWR vessel, a reactor coolant pump impeller or a circulating fluidized bed combustion chamber. When it comes to validating physical models of these flows, the analytical process highlights the main descriptive parameters of local flow conditions: tensor characterizing the turbulence anisotropy, characteristic time scales for turbulent flow particle dynamics. Cooperative procedures implemented between national or international working parties can accelerate validation by sharing and exchanging results obtained by the various organizations involved. With this principle accepted, we still have to validate the products themselves, i.e. the software used for the studies. In this context, the ESTET, ASTRID and N3S codes have been subjected to a battery of test cases covering their respective fields of application. These test cases are re-run for each new version, so that the sets of test cases systematically benefit from the gradually upgraded functionalities of the codes. (author). refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  5. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow in a square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Asmund

    A study for generating an accurate description of fully developed, low Reynolds number, anisotropic turbulent flow in a square duct is presented. The present numerical scheme employs a time-splitting method to integrate the three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using spectral/finite difference discretization on a staggered mesh. The new numerical code resulting from this work is tailored to the solution of the square duct flow and optimized for operation on the Cray Y-MP supercomputer. Time averaged results from the fully developed turbulent field are compared with available experimental and numerical results and show good qualitative agreement. The existence of two inhomogeneous directions in the transverse plane results in an anisotropic primary shear stress distribution; this is shown to result in convection of mean velocity. By investigating the equations for the mean secondary velocity and streamwise vorticity, it is demonstrated that the mechanisms responsible for the anisotropic secondary Reynolds stresses result in the production of secondary flow. Higher order correlations are presented with emphasis on the behavior of the Reynolds stress and the dissipation rate budgets along the two intersecting walls. These results are used to investigate the dynamics of the Reynolds stress transport equations where it is demonstrated how the anisotropic pressure velocity interactions redistributes energy and shear stresses between the turbulent stresses, promoting the distorted isotachs and the mean secondary flow. The dissipation processes are studied by identifying small-scale topological patterns and show little influence of the corner outside the viscous sublayer. The transport equations for the turbulent dissipation rate and the turbulent enstrophy are evaluated and it is shown that these budgets have the same dynamics near the wall except for two production terms acting in the viscous sub-layer. The effect of the corner inside the viscous sub

  7. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Differentially Heated Enclosure Using Nanofluids-Turbulent Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nada, E.; Dinkelacker, F.; Alatabi, A.; Manickam, B.; Jollet, S.

    2010-05-01

    Heat Transfer enhancement in turbulent natural convection using nanofluids is investigated numerically. The problem used for studying natural convection is a differentially heated square enclosure. The Bousinessq model is used to model density variation in the nanofluid. The transport equations are solved numerically using a second-order finite volume technique by implementing the k-ω model. The numerical solution is benchmarked against the experimental results of Ampofo and Karayiannis [10]. The Prandtl number and the Rayleigh number of the base fluid are set equal to 6.57 and 1010 respectively. The presence of nanoparticles is found to enhance the heat transfer in the enclosure.

  8. The ion cyclotron turbulence generated by a low frequency kinetic Alfven wave, and the related turbulent heating of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr S.; Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr V.; Lee, Hae June

    2017-10-01

    The ion cyclotron instability driven by the strong kinetic Alfven wave is investigated as a possible source of the anisotropic heating of ions in the coronal holes and solar wind. We present a novel model of a plasma with coupled inhomogeneous current and the sheared flow, which follows from the studies of the particles motion in the electric field of the kinetic Alfven wave of the finite wavelength. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal kinetic theory grounded on the shearing modes approach. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the flow velocity shear, which for the corona conditions may be above the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability in plasma with steady current, changes the exponential growth of the ion cyclotron potential on the power function of time, that impedes the growth of the unstable ion cyclotron wave and reduces the turbulent heating rate of ions across the magnetic field. This work was funded by National R&D Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grant No. NRF-2015R1D1A1A01061160).

  9. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    is reduced by the presence of particles,and in spite of the additional heat exchange between the carrier fluid and the particles, the total heattransfer rate stays always lower for particle-laden flows. To further clarify this issue, the total Nusseltnumber is split into a turbulence contribution...... Eulerian–Lagrangianapproach is adopted to solve the carrier flow field and the motion of dispersed particles. Three differentparticle Stokes numbers of St = 24, 60, 192, at a constant particle mass loading of φm = 0:54, are considered.The mean and rms profiles of velocity and temperature for fluid...

  10. Slip velocity of large neutrally buoyant particles in turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellani, G; Variano, E A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss possible definitions for a stochastic slip velocity that describes the relative motion between large particles and a turbulent flow. This definition is necessary because the slip velocity used in the standard drag model fails when particle size falls within the inertial subrange of ambient turbulence. We propose two definitions, selected in part due to their simplicity: they do not require filtration of the fluid phase velocity field, nor do they require the construction of conditional averages on particle locations. A key benefit of this simplicity is that the stochastic slip velocity proposed here can be calculated equally well for laboratory, field and numerical experiments. The stochastic slip velocity allows the definition of a Reynolds number that should indicate whether large particles in turbulent flow behave (a) as passive tracers; (b) as a linear filter of the velocity field; or (c) as a nonlinear filter to the velocity field. We calculate the value of stochastic slip for ellipsoidal and spherical particles (the size of the Taylor microscale) measured in laboratory homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The resulting Reynolds number is significantly higher than 1 for both particle shapes, and velocity statistics show that particle motion is a complex nonlinear function of the fluid velocity. We further investigate the nonlinear relationship by comparing the probability distribution of fluctuating velocities for particle and fluid phases. (paper)

  11. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Cheong, Cheolung; Park, Warn-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k - ɛ turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  12. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k − ε turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  13. Numerical simulation of two phase flows in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandotto Biettoli, M.

    2006-04-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activity since 1981. He first gives a detailed presentation of properties and equations of two-phase flows in heat exchangers, and of their mathematical and numerical investigation: semi-local equations (mass conservation, momentum conservation and energy conservation), homogenized conservation equations (mass, momentum and enthalpy conservation, boundary conditions), equation closures, discretization, resolution algorithm, computational aspects and applications. Then, he reports the works performed in the field of turbulent flows, hyperbolic methods, low Mach methods, the Neptune project, and parallel computing

  14. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  15. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  16. Turbulence Model Evaluation Study for a Secondary Flow and a Flow Pulsation in the Sub-Channels of an 18-Finned Rod Bundle by Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heon Il

    2008-09-15

    Since the heat flux of the rod type fuel used in the HANARO, a research reactor being operated in the KAERI, is substantially higher than the heat flux of power reactors, the HANARO fuel has 8 longitudinal fins for enhancing the heat release from the fuel rod surface. This unique shape of a nuclear fuel led us to study the flows and thermal hydraulic characteristics of it. Especially because the flows through the narrow channels built up by these finned rod fuels would be different from the flow characteristics in the coolant channels formed by bare rod fuels, some experimental studies to investigate the flow behaviors and structures in a finned rod bundle were done by other researchers. But because of the very complex geometries of the flow channels in the finned rod bundle only allowed us to obtain limited information about the flow characteristics, a numerical study by a computational fluid dynamics technique has been adopted to elucidate more about such a complicated flow in a finned rod bundle. In this study, for the development of an adequate computational model to simulate such a complex geometry, a mesh sensitivity study and the effects of various turbulence models were examined. The CFD analysis results were compared with the experimental results. Some of them have a good agreement with the experimental results. All linear eddy viscosity turbulence models could hardly predict the secondary flows near the fuel surfaces and in the sub-channel, but the RSM (Reynolds Stress Model) revealed very different results from the eddy viscosity turbulence models. In the transient analysis all turbulence model predicted flow pulsation at the center of a subchannel as well as at the gap between rods in spite of large P/D. The flow pulsation showed different results with turbulence models and the location in the sub-channels.

  17. Heating and Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Parallel Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas; Emslie, A. Gordon; Horne, Duncan; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2018-01-01

    Using the “enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops” (EBTEL) model, we investigate the hydrodynamics of the plasma in a flaring coronal loop in which heat conduction is limited by turbulent scattering of the electrons that transport the thermal heat flux. The EBTEL equations are solved analytically in each of the two (conduction-dominated and radiation-dominated) cooling phases. Comparison of the results with typical observed cooling times in solar flares shows that the turbulent mean free path {λ }T lies in a range corresponding to a regime in which classical (collision-dominated) conduction plays at most a limited role. We also consider the magnitude and duration of the heat input that is necessary to account for the enhanced values of temperature and density at the beginning of the cooling phase and for the observed cooling times. We find through numerical modeling that in order to produce a peak temperature ≃ 1.5× {10}7 K and a 200 s cooling time consistent with observations, the flare-heating profile must extend over a significant period of time; in particular, its lingering role must be taken into consideration in any description of the cooling phase. Comparison with observationally inferred values of post-flare loop temperatures, densities, and cooling times thus leads to useful constraints on both the magnitude and duration of the magnetic energy release in the loop, as well as on the value of the turbulent mean free path {λ }T.

  18. Heating and Cooling of Coronal Loops with Turbulent Suppression of Parallel Heat Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Nicolas; Emslie, A Gordon; Horne, Duncan; Kontar, Eduard P

    2018-01-10

    Using the "enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops" (EBTEL) model, we investigate the hydrodynamics of the plasma in a flaring coronal loop in which heat conduction is limited by turbulent scattering of the electrons that transport the thermal heat flux. The EBTEL equations are solved analytically in each of the two (conduction-dominated and radiation-dominated) cooling phases. Comparison of the results with typical observed cooling times in solar flares shows that the turbulent mean free path λ T lies in a range corresponding to a regime in which classical (collision-dominated) conduction plays at most a limited role. We also consider the magnitude and duration of the heat input that is necessary to account for the enhanced values of temperature and density at the beginning of the cooling phase and for the observed cooling times. We find through numerical modeling that in order to produce a peak temperature ≃1.5 × 10 7 K and a 200 s cooling time consistent with observations, the flare-heating profile must extend over a significant period of time; in particular, its lingering role must be taken into consideration in any description of the cooling phase. Comparison with observationally inferred values of post-flare loop temperatures, densities, and cooling times thus leads to useful constraints on both the magnitude and duration of the magnetic energy release in the loop, as well as on the value of the turbulent mean free path λ T .

  19. Finite element simulation of internal flows with heat transfer using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    heat exchanger is chosen as one of the problems for investigation. Flow past tube banks with a .... investigations have been undertaken by Ökajima (1982, 1990) to study the problem of vortex shedding behind ..... and doughnut baffled heat exchanger are analysed with the aid of turbulence models in high Reynolds number ...

  20. Neural network modeling for near wall turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milano, Michele; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2002-01-01

    A neural network methodology is developed in order to reconstruct the near wall field in a turbulent flow by exploiting flow fields provided by direct numerical simulations. The results obtained from the neural network methodology are compared with the results obtained from prediction and reconstruction using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Using the property that the POD is equivalent to a specific linear neural network, a nonlinear neural network extension is presented. It is shown that for a relatively small additional computational cost nonlinear neural networks provide us with improved reconstruction and prediction capabilities for the near wall velocity fields. Based on these results advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed with an outlook toward the development of near wall models for turbulence modeling and control

  1. Density Weighted FDF Equations for Simulations of Turbulent Reacting Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we briefly revisit the formulation of density weighted filtered density function (DW-FDF) for large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent reacting flows, which was proposed by Jaberi et al. (Jaberi, F.A., Colucci, P.J., James, S., Givi, P. and Pope, S.B., Filtered mass density function for Large-eddy simulation of turbulent reacting flows, J. Fluid Mech., vol. 401, pp. 85-121, 1999). At first, we proceed the traditional derivation of the DW-FDF equations by using the fine grained probability density function (FG-PDF), then we explore another way of constructing the DW-FDF equations by starting directly from the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. We observe that the terms which are unclosed in the traditional DW-FDF equations are now closed in the newly constructed DW-FDF equations. This significant difference and its practical impact on the computational simulations may deserve further studies.

  2. Spectral modeling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerenzung, J; Politano, H; Ponty, Y; Pouquet, A

    2008-08-01

    We present a dynamical spectral model for large-eddy simulation of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian approximation. This model extends classical spectral large-eddy simulations for the Navier-Stokes equations to incorporate general (non-Kolmogorovian) spectra as well as eddy noise. We derive the model for MHD flows and show that the introduction of an eddy damping time for the dynamics of spectral tensors, in the absence of equipartition between the velocity and magnetic fields, leads to better agreement with direct numerical simulations, an important point for dynamo computations.

  3. Heat transfer in vapour-liquid flow of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade a number of studies of boiling heat transfer in carbon dioxide notably increase. As a field of CO 2 practical using corresponds to high reduced pressures, and a majority of available experimental data on CO 2 flow boiling even in submillimetric channels relate to turbulent liquid flow regimes, a possibility arises to develop sufficiently general method for HTC predicting. Under the above conditions nucleate boiling occurs up to rather high flow quality, even in annular flow regime due to extremely small size of an equilibrium vapour bubble. This conclusion is in agreement with the available experimental data. The predicting equation for nucleate boiling heat transfer developed by the present author in 1988 is valid for any nonmetallic liquid. A contribution of forced convection in heat transfer is calculated according to the Petukhov et al. equation with correction factor, which accounted for an effect of velocity increase due to evaporation. This effect can be essential at relatively small heat fluxes and rather high mass flow rates. The Reynolds analogy and homogeneous model are used in order to account for the convective heat transfer augmentation in two-phase flow. Due to low ratio of liquid and vapour densities at high reduced pressures the homogeneous approximation of two-phase flow seems to be warranted. A total heat transfer coefficient is calculated as an interpolated value of boiling and convective HTCs. The experimental data on CO 2 flow boiling related to regimes before heated wall dryout incipience are in rather good agreement with the calculations. (author)

  4. Homogeneous internal wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Erc Fludyco Team

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel investigation of the stability of strongly stratified planetary fluid layers undergoing periodic tidal distortion in the limit where rotational effects are negligible compared to buoyancy. With the help of a local model focusing on a small fluid area compared to the global layer, we find that periodic tidal distortion drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of internal. This instability saturates into an homogeneous internal wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid interior: the energy is injected in the unstable waves which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. As the timescale separation between the forcing and Brunt-Väisälä is increased, the temporal spectrum of this turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans (Garett & Munk 1979). Moreover, in this state consisting of a superposition of waves in weak non-linear interaction, the mixing efficiency is increased compared to classical, Kolmogorov-like stratified turbulence. This study is of wide interest in geophysical fluid dynamics ranging from oceanic turbulence and tidal heating in icy satellites to dynamo action in partially stratified planetary cores as it could be the case in the Earth. We acknowledge support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Grant Agreement No. 681835-FLUDYCO-ERC-2015-CoG).

  5. Processes of Turbulent Liquid Flows in Pipelines and Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Yesman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a methodology for an analysis and calculation of processes pertaining to turbulent liquid flows in pipes and channels. Various modes of liquid motion in pipelines of thermal power devices and equipment have been considered in the paper.The presented dependences can be used while making practical calculations of losses due to friction in case of transportation of various energy carriers.

  6. PDF modeling of turbulent flows on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.

    2010-06-01

    In probability density function (PDF) methods of turbulent flows, the joint PDF of several flow variables is computed by numerically integrating a system of stochastic differential equations for Lagrangian particles. A mathematically exact treatment of advection, viscous effects and arbitrarily complex chemical reactions is possible; these processes are treated without closure assumptions. A set of algorithms is proposed to provide an efficient solution of the PDF transport equation modeling the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and concentration of a passive scalar in geometrically complex configurations. An unstructured Eulerian grid is employed to extract Eulerian statistics, to solve for quantities represented at fixed locations of the domain and to track particles. All three aspects regarding the grid make use of the finite element method. Compared to hybrid methods, the current methodology is stand-alone, therefore it is consistent both numerically and at the level of turbulence closure without the use of consistency conditions. Several newly developed algorithms are described that facilitate the numerical solution in complex flow geometries, including a stabilized mean-pressure projection scheme, the estimation of conditional and unconditional Eulerian statistics and their derivatives from stochastic particle fields, particle tracking through unstructured grids, an efficient particle redistribution procedure and techniques related to efficient random number generation. The solver has been parallelized and optimized for shared memory and multi-core architectures using the OpenMP standard. Relevant aspects of performance and parallelism on cache-based shared memory machines are discussed and presented in detail. The methodology shows great promise in the simulation of high-Reynolds-number incompressible inert or reactive turbulent flows in realistic configurations.

  7. A local sensor for joint temperature and velocity measurements in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salort, Julien; Rusaouën, Éléonore; Robert, Laurent; du Puits, Ronald; Loesch, Alice; Pirotte, Olivier; Roche, Philippe-E.; Castaing, Bernard; Chillà, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    We present the principle for a micro-sensor aimed at measuring local correlations of turbulent velocity and temperature. The operating principle is versatile and can be adapted for various types of flow. It is based on a micro-machined cantilever, on the tip of which a platinum resistor is patterned. The deflection of the cantilever yields an estimate for the local velocity, and the impedance of the platinum yields an estimate for the local temperature. The velocity measurement is tested in two turbulent jets: one with air at room temperature which allows us to compare with well-known calibrated reference anemometers, and another one in the GReC jet at CERN with cryogenic gaseous helium which allows a much larger range of resolved turbulent scales. The recording of temperature fluctuations is tested in the Barrel of Ilmenau which provides a controlled turbulent thermal flow in air. Measurements in the wake of a heated or cooled cylinder demonstrate the capability of the sensor to display the cross correlation between temperature and velocity correctly.

  8. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  9. PIV measurement of turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, T; Guo, F; Chen, B; Zhang, X

    2009-01-01

    Turbulent mixing layer flow with polymer additives was experimentally investigated by PIV in present paper. The velocity ratio between high and low speed is 4:1 and the Reynolds number for pure water case based on the velocity differences of two steams and hydraulic diameter of the channel ranges from 14667∼73333. Flow field and turbulent quantities of turbulent mixing layer with 200ppm polymer additives were measured and compared with pure water mixing layer flow. It is shown that the dynamic development of mixing layer is greatly influenced by polymer addictives. The smaller vortices are eliminated and the coherent structure is much clearer. Similar with pure water case, Reynolds stress and vorticity still concentrate in a coniform area of central part of mixing layer and the width will increase with the Reynolds number increasing. However, compared with pure water case, the coniform width of polymer additives case is larger, which means the polymer additives will lead to the diffusion of coherent structure. The peak value of vorticity in different cross section will decrease with the development of mixing layer. Compared with pure water case, the vorticity is larger at the beginning of the mixing layer but decreases faster in the case with polymer additives.

  10. Flow enhancement due to elastic turbulence in channel flows of shear thinning fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodiguel, Hugues; Beaumont, Julien; Machado, Anaïs; Martinie, Laetitia; Kellay, Hamid; Colin, Annie

    2015-01-16

    We explore the flow of highly shear thinning polymer solutions in straight geometry. The strong variations of the normal forces close to the wall give rise to an elastic instability. We evidence a periodic motion close the onset of the instability, which then evolves towards a turbulentlike flow at higher flow rates. Strikingly, we point out that this instability induces genuine drag reduction due to the homogenization of the viscosity profile by the turbulent flow.

  11. Creating Turbulent Flow Realizations with Generative Adversarial Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ryan; Graf, Peter; Chertkov, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Generating valid inflow conditions is a crucial, yet computationally expensive, step in unsteady turbulent flow simulations. We demonstrate a new technique for rapid generation of turbulent inflow realizations that leverages recent advances in machine learning for image generation using a deep convolutional generative adversarial network (DCGAN). The DCGAN is an unsupervised machine learning technique consisting of two competing neural networks that are trained against each other using backpropagation. One network, the generator, tries to produce samples from the true distribution of states, while the discriminator tries to distinguish between true and synthetic samples. We present results from a fully-trained DCGAN that is able to rapidly draw random samples from the full distribution of possible inflow states without needing to solve the Navier-Stokes equations, eliminating the costly process of spinning up inflow turbulence. This suggests a new paradigm in physics informed machine learning where the turbulence physics can be encoded in either the discriminator or generator. Finally, we also propose additional applications such as feature identification and subgrid scale modeling.

  12. Description and detection of burst events in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. J.; García-Gutierrez, A.; Jiménez, J.

    2018-04-01

    A mathematical and computational framework is developed for the detection and identification of coherent structures in turbulent wall-bounded shear flows. In a first step, this data-based technique will use an embedding methodology to formulate the fluid motion as a phase-space trajectory, from which state-transition probabilities can be computed. Within this formalism, a second step then applies repeated clustering and graph-community techniques to determine a hierarchy of coherent structures ranked by their persistencies. This latter information will be used to detect highly transitory states that act as precursors to violent and intermittent events in turbulent fluid motion (e.g., bursts). Used as an analysis tool, this technique allows the objective identification of intermittent (but important) events in turbulent fluid motion; however, it also lays the foundation for advanced control strategies for their manipulation. The techniques are applied to low-dimensional model equations for turbulent transport, such as the self-sustaining process (SSP), for varying levels of complexity.

  13. On soft stability loss in rotating turbulent MHD flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, Arkady; Mikhailovich, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the stability of turbulent flows of liquid metal in a cylindrical cavity against small velocity disturbances under the action of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) has been studied. The flow is considered in the induction-free approximation using the ‘external’ friction model. A system of dimensionless equations is examined in cylindrical coordinates. The results of computations performed on the basis of this mathematical model using the exchange of stabilities principle have shown a good consistency between the critical values of computed and experimental Reynolds numbers. (paper)

  14. Characterization of zonal flow generation in weak electrostatic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrea, M; Petrisor, I [Department of Physics, Association Euratom-MEdC, Romania, University of Craiova, 13 A.I. Cuza Street, 200585 Craiova (Romania); Weyssow, B [Physique Statistique-Plasmas, Association Euratom-Etat Belge, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bd. du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)], E-mail: mnegrea@yahoo.com

    2008-05-15

    The influence of the diamagnetic Kubo number, which is proportional to the diamagnetic drift velocity, on the zonal flow generation by an anisotropic stochastic electrostatic potential is considered from a semi-analytic point of view. The analysis is performed in the weak turbulence limit and as an analytical tool the decorrelation trajectory method is used. It is shown that the fragmentation of the drift wave structures (a signature of the zonal flow generation) is influenced not only by the anisotropy parameter and the electrostatic Kubo number as expected, but also by the diamagnetic Kubo number. Global Lagrangian averages of characteristic quantities are calculated and interpreted.

  15. Decreasing turbulent helium flow in hard disk drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawinprai, Supitcha; Suriyawanakul, Jarupol; Tangchaichit, Kiatfa

    2018-02-01

    A spoiler installed in a hard disk drive is helpful for reducing the flow which strikes the Head Gimbals Assembly (HGA) causing positioning errors and vibration. Filling a hard disk drive, with an installed spoiler, with helium gas was simulated by ANSYS Fluent software by using a realizable k – ε model to carry out the turbulence calculation of helium flow. The results show that the pressure fluctuation in a hard disk drive with a spoiler installed is lower than in a hard disk drive without, and accordingly the lower pressure fluctuation can reduce the force caused by pressure on the platter disks and reduce vibration in the hard disk drive.

  16. On the measurement of lateral velocity derivatives in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Zhu, Y.; Kim, J.

    1993-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation data for the lateral velocity derivative delta(u)/delta(y) at the centerline of a fully developed turbulent channel flow provide reasonable support for Wyngaard's analysis of the error involved in measuring this quantity using parallel hot wires. Numerical data in the wall region of the channel flow also provide a useful indication of how to select the separation between the wires. Justification for this choice is obtained by comparing several measured statistics of delta(u)/delta(y) with the corresponding numerical data.

  17. Numerical simulation of turbulent liquid metal flows in plane channels and annuli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, G.

    1980-06-01

    The method of direct numerical simulation is used to study heat transfer and statistical data for fully developed turbulent liquid metal flows in plane channels and annuli. Subgrid scale models using one transport equation account for the high wave-number turbulence not resolved by the finite difference grid. A special subgrid-scale heat flux model is deduced together with an approximative theory to calculate all model coefficients. This model can be applied on the total Peclet number range of technical liquid metal flows. Especially it can be used for very small Peclet numbers, where the results are independent on model parameters. A verification of the numerical results for liquid sodium and mercury flows is undertaken by the Nusselt number in plane channels and radial temperature and eddy conductivity profiles for annuli. The numerically determined Nusselt numbers for annuli indicate that many empirical correlations overestimate the influence of the ratio of radii. The numerical results for the eddy conductivity profiles may be used to remove these problems. The statistical properties of the simulated temperature fluctuations are within the wide scatter-band of experimental data. The numerical results give reasonable heat flux correlation coefficients which depend only weakly on the problem marking parameters. (orig.) [de

  18. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  19. Turbulent penetration in T-junction branch lines with leakage flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickhofel, John, E-mail: kickhofel@lke.mavt.ethz.ch; Valori, Valentina, E-mail: v.valori@tudelft.nl; Prasser, H.-M., E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • New T-junction facility designed for adiabatic high velocity ratio mixing studies. • Trends in scalar mixing RMS and average in branch line presented and discussed. • Turbulent penetration has unique power spectrum relevant to thermal fatigue. • Forced flow oscillations translate to peaks in power spectrum in branch line. - Abstract: While the study of T-junction mixing with branch velocity ratios of near 1, so called cross flow mixing, is well advanced, to the point of realistic reactor environment fluid–structure interaction experiments and CFD benchmarking, turbulent penetration studies remain an under-researched threat to primary circuit piping. A new facility has been constructed for the express purpose of studying turbulent penetration in branch lines of T-junctions in the context of the high cycle thermal fatigue problem in NPPs. Turbulent penetration, which may be the result of a leaking valve in a branch line or an unisolable branch with heat losses, induces a thermal cycling region which may result in high cycle fatigue damage and failures. Leakage flow experiments have been performed in a perpendicular T-junction in a horizontal orientation with 50 mm diameter main pipe and branch pipe at velocity ratios (main/branch) up to 400. Wire mesh sensors are used as a means of measuring the mixing scalar in adiabatic tests with deionized and tap water. The near-wall region of highest scalar fluctuations is seen to vary circumferentially and in depth in the branch a great deal depending on the velocity ratio. The power spectra of the mixing scalar in the region of turbulent penetration are found to be dominated by high amplitude fluctuations at low frequencies, of particular interest to thermal fatigue. Artificial velocity oscillations in the main pipe manifest in the mixing spectra in the branch line in the form of a peak, the magnitude of which grows with increasing local RMS.

  20. Lunar Heat Flow Probe, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To accurately determine endogenic heat flow, both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity measurements are needed. The thermal gradient measurement can be achieved...

  1. Anisotropic particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhuis, Dennis; Verschoof, Ruben A.; Mathai, Varghese; Huisman, Sander G.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2017-11-01

    In industry and nature, particle-laden turbulent flows consist mostly, if not always, of anisotropic particles. Examples of such flows are plankton distributions in the oceans, and pumping of concrete. In these flows, the suspended particles often distribute inhomogeneously, thereby affecting the drag and the flow properties significantly. Despite their widespread occurrence, a good understanding of how such particles affect the flow is still missing. Here we performed Particle Tracking Velocimetry and global torque measurements for a suspension of rigid fibers (or rods) in the Twente Turbulent Taylor-Couette facility. The fibers are density matched with the fluid, and we used particle volume fractions up to α = 2 % of fibers with aspect ratio λ = L / d = 5 , where L = 5 mm is the length and d = 1 mm the diameter. The global torque measurements were performed for Reynolds numbers up to 2.5 ×105 and showed similar values of drag reduction as was obtained for spherical particles (λ = 1). Using PTV we have extracted the orientation, the rotation rate, and the translation velocity and acceleration for the fibers. The fibers do not show a clear alignment with the main velocity gradient. We do, however, observe occasional large rotation rates for the fibers. This work is financially supported by Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) by VIDI Grant Number 13477.

  2. Randomness Representation of Turbulence in Canopy Flows Using Kolmogorov Complexity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragutin Mihailović

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence is often expressed in terms of either irregular or random fluid flows, without quantification. In this paper, a methodology to evaluate the randomness of the turbulence using measures based on the Kolmogorov complexity (KC is proposed. This methodology is applied to experimental data from a turbulent flow developing in a laboratory channel with canopy of three different densities. The methodology is even compared with the traditional approach based on classical turbulence statistics.

  3. Age-Related Vascular Changes Affect Turbulence in Aortic Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Ziegler, Magnus; Welander, Martin; Bjarnegård, Niclas; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste; Ebbers, Tino; Dyverfeldt, Petter

    2018-01-01

    Turbulent blood flow is implicated in the pathogenesis of several aortic diseases but the extent and degree of turbulent blood flow in the normal aorta is unknown. We aimed to quantify the extent and degree of turbulece in the normal aorta and to assess whether age impacts the degree of turbulence. 22 young normal males (23.7 ± 3.0 y.o.) and 20 old normal males (70.9 ± 3.5 y.o.) were examined using four dimensional flow magnetic resonance imaging (4D Flow MRI) to quantify the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), a measure of the intensity of turbulence, in the aorta. All healthy subjects developed turbulent flow in the aorta, with total TKE of 3-19 mJ. The overall degree of turbulence in the entire aorta was similar between the groups, although the old subjects had about 73% more total TKE in the ascending aorta compared to the young subjects (young = 3.7 ± 1.8 mJ, old = 6.4 ± 2.4 mJ, p flow velocity and suppressed the development of turbulence. In conclusion, turbulent blood flow develops in the aorta of normal subjects and is impacted by age-related geometric changes. Non-invasive assessment enables the determination of normal levels of turbulent flow in the aorta which is a prerequisite for understanding the role of turbulence in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Motion estimation under location uncertainty for turbulent fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengze; Mémin, Etienne; Dérian, Pierre; Xu, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel optical flow formulation for estimating two-dimensional velocity fields from an image sequence depicting the evolution of a passive scalar transported by a fluid flow. This motion estimator relies on a stochastic representation of the flow allowing to incorporate naturally a notion of uncertainty in the flow measurement. In this context, the Eulerian fluid flow velocity field is decomposed into two components: a large-scale motion field and a small-scale uncertainty component. We define the small-scale component as a random field. Subsequently, the data term of the optical flow formulation is based on a stochastic transport equation, derived from the formalism under location uncertainty proposed in Mémin (Geophys Astrophys Fluid Dyn 108(2):119-146, 2014) and Resseguier et al. (Geophys Astrophys Fluid Dyn 111(3):149-176, 2017a). In addition, a specific regularization term built from the assumption of constant kinetic energy involves the very same diffusion tensor as the one appearing in the data transport term. Opposite to the classical motion estimators, this enables us to devise an optical flow method dedicated to fluid flows in which the regularization parameter has now a clear physical interpretation and can be easily estimated. Experimental evaluations are presented on both synthetic and real world image sequences. Results and comparisons indicate very good performance of the proposed formulation for turbulent flow motion estimation.

  5. Augmented of turbulent heat transfer in an annular pipe with abrupt expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togun Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of heat transfer to turbulent air flow in the abrupt axisymmetric expansion of an annular pipe. The experimental investigations were performed in the Reynolds number range from 5000 to 30000, the heat flux varied from 1000 to 4000 W/m2, and the expansion ratio was maintained at D/d=1, 1.25, 1.67 and 2. The sudden expansion was created by changing the inner diameter of the entrance pipe to an annular passage. The outer diameter of the inner pipe and the inner diameter of the outer pipe are 2.5 and 10 cm, respectively, where both of the pipes are subjected to uniform heat flux. The distribution of the surface temperature of the test pipe and the local Nusselt number are presented in this investigation. Due to sudden expansion in the cross section of the annular pipe, a separation flow was created, which enhanced the heat transfer. The reduction of the surface temperature on the outer and inner pipes increased with the increase of the expansion ratio and the Reynolds number, and increased with the decrease of the heat flux to the annular pipe. The peak of the local Nusselt number was between 1.64 and 1.7 of the outer and inner pipes for Reynolds numbers varied from 5000 to 30000, and the increase of the local Nusselt number represented the augmentation of the heat transfer rate in the sudden expansion of the annular pipe. This research also showed a maximum heat transfer enhancement of 63-78% for the outer and inner pipes at an expansion ratio of D/d=2 at a Re=30000 and a heat flux of 4000W/m2.

  6. A Method for Measuring Sludge Settling Characteristics in Turbulent Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Larsen, Torben

    1996-01-01

    distribution occurs in the middle of the column. This eliminates time scale effects such as flocculation from the measurements, as the resulting settling velocity only can be found at steady state and uniform conditions. The method assumes that flocculated sludge settles faster than disintegratedsludge to make......A method for the determination of the settlilng velocity for sludge as a funktion of turbulence intensity and sludge concentration has been developed. The principle of the method is to continuously feed the top of a settling column with sludge so that a steady state and uniform concentration...... a mass balance involving concentration at the top and the middle of the column as well as the inlet sludge flow. The resulting mass balance is used to calculate a lokal settling velocity. The turbulence is introduced by an oscillating grid in the whole depth of the settling column. Settling velocities...

  7. A computational technique for turbulent flow of wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Tom B

    2005-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique applied to the turbulent flow of wastewater sludge in horizontal, smooth-wall, circular pipes is presented. The technique uses the Crank-Nicolson finite difference method in conjunction with the variable secant method, an algorithm for determining the pressure gradient of the flow. A simple algebraic turbulence model is used. A Bingham-plastic rheological model is used to describe the shear stress/shear rate relationship for the wastewater sludge. The method computes velocity gradient and head loss, given a fixed volumetric flow, pipe size, and solids concentration. Solids concentrations ranging from 3 to 10% (by weight) and nominal pipe sizes from 0.15 m (6 in.) to 0.36 m (14 in.) are studied. Comparison of the CFD results for water to established values serves to validate the numerical method. The head loss results are presented in terms of a head loss ratio, R(hl), which is the ratio of sludge head loss to water head loss. An empirical equation relating R(hl) to pipe velocity and solids concentration, derived from the results of the CFD calculations, is presented. The results are compared with published values of Rhl for solids concentrations of 3 and 6%. A new expression for the Fanning friction factor for wastewater sludge flow is also presented.

  8. Velocity distribution in a turbulent flow near a rough wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, A. S.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Kreps, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    Velocity distribution in the zone of developed wall turbulence, regardless of the conditions on the wall, is described by the well-known Prandtl logarithmic profile. In this distribution, the constant, that determines the value of the velocity, is determined by the nature of the interaction of the flow with the wall and depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the dynamic velocity, and the parameters of the wall roughness.In extreme cases depending on the ratio between the thickness of the viscous sublayer and the size of the roughness the constant takes on a value that does not depend on viscosity, or leads to a ratio for a smooth wall.It is essential that this logarithmic profile is the result not only of the Prandtl theory, but can be derived from general considerations of the theory of dimensions, and also follows from the condition of local equilibrium of generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in the wall area. This allows us to consider the profile as a universal law of velocity distribution in the wall area of a turbulent flow.The profile approximation up to the maximum speed line with subsequent integration makes possible to obtain the resistance law for channels of simple shape. For channels of complex shape with rough walls, the universal profile can be used to formulate the boundary condition when applied to the calculation of turbulence models.This paper presents an empirical model for determining the constant of the universal logarithmic profile. The zone of roughness is described by a set of parameters and is considered as a porous structure with variable porosity.

  9. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  10. Effect of mean flow on the interaction between turbulence and zonal flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzawa, Ken; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Li Jiquan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of an external mean flow on the generation of zonal flow in drift wave turbulence are theoretically studied in terms of a modulational instability analysis. A dispersion relation for the zonal flow instability having complex frequency ω q =Ω q +iγ q is derived, which depends on the external mean flow's amplitude |φ f | and radial wave number k f . As an example, we chose an ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence-driven zonal flow as the mean flow acting on an electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence-zonal flow system. The growth rate of the zonal flow γ q is found to be suppressed, showing a relation γ q =γ q0 (1 - α|φ f | 2 k f 2 ), where γ q0 is the growth rate in the absence of mean flow and α is a positive numerical constant. This formula is applicable to a strong shearing regime where the zonal flow instability is stabilized at α|φ f 2 |k f 2 ≅ 1. Meanwhile, the suppression is accompanied by an increase of the real frequency |Ω q |. The underlying physical mechanism of the suppression is discussed. (author)

  11. Stereoscopic measurements of particle dispersion in microgravity turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Daniel Eduardo

    2001-08-01

    The presence of particles in turbulent flows adds complexity to an already difficult subject. The work described in this research dissertation was intended to characterize the effects of inertia, isolated from gravity, on the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent air flow. The experiment consisted of releasing particles of various sizes in an enclosed box of fan- generated, homogenous, isotropic, and stationary turbulent airflow and examining the particle behavior in a microgravity environment. The turbulence box was characterized in ground-based experiments using laser Doppler velocimetry techniques. Microgravity was established by free-floating the experiment apparatus during the parabolic trajectory of NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The microgravity generally lasted about 20 seconds, with about fifty parabolas per flight and one flight per day over a testing period of four days. To cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest, particles with Stokes numbers (St) of 1 to 300 were released in the turbulence box. The three- dimensional measurements of particle motion were made using a three-camera stereo imaging system with a particle-tracking algorithm. Digital photogrammetric techniques were used to determine the particle locations in three-dimensional space from the calibrated camera images. The epipolar geometry constraint was used to identify matching particles from the three different views and a direct spatial intersection scheme determined the coordinates of particles in three-dimensional space. Using velocity and acceleration constraints, particles in a sequence of frames were matched resulting in particle tracks and dispersion measurements. The goal was to compare the dispersion of different Stokes number particles in zero gravity and decouple the effects of inertia and gravity on the dispersion. Results show that higher inertia particles disperse less in zero gravity, in agreement with current models. Particles with St ~ 200

  12. Turbulent intermittent structure in non-homogeneous non-local flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, O. B.; Castilla, R.; Vindel, J. M.; Redondo, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    Data from SABLES98 experimental campaign have been used in order to study the influence of stability (from weak to strong stratification) on intermittency [1]. Standard instrumentation, 14 thermocouples and 3 sonic anemometers at three levels (5.8, 13.5 and 32 m) were available in September 1998 and calculations are done in order to evaluate structure functions and the scale to scale characteristics. Using BDF [2-4] as well as other models of cascades, the spectral equilibrium values were used to calculate fluxes of momentum and heat as well as non-homogeneous models and the turbulent mixing produced. The differences in structure and higher order moments between stable, convective and neutral turbulence were used to identify differences in turbulent intermittent mixing and velocity PDF's. The intermittency of atmospheric turbulence in strongly stable situations affected by buoyancy and internal waves are seen to modify the structure functions exponents and intermittency, depending on the modulus of the Richardson's number,Ri, as well as of the Monin-Obukhov and Ozmidov lengthscales. The topological aspects of the turbulence affected by stratification reduce the vertical length-scales to a maximum described by the Thorpe and the Ozmidov lenth-scales, but intermittency, Kurtosis and other higher order descriptors of the turbulence based on spectral wavelet analysis are also affected in a complex way [5,6]. The relationship between stratification, intermittency, µ(Ri) and the fractal dimension of the stable flows and between the dispersion, the fractal dimension are discussed. The data analyzed is from the campaign SABLES-98 at the north-west Iberian Peninsula plateau.(Cuxart et al. 2000). Conditional statistics of the relationship between µ(Ri) are confirmed as in (Vindel et al 2008)[4] and compared with laboratory experiments and with 2D-3D aspects of the turbulence cascade. The use of BDF [3] model comparing the corresponding relative scaling exponents which are

  13. Stability of model flocks in turbulent-like flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurana, Nidhi; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2013-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of a simple model of flocking particles in the presence of an uncertain background environment. We consider two types of environmental perturbations: random noise applied separately to each particle, and spatiotemporally correlated ‘noise’ provided by a turbulent-like flow field. The effects of these two types of noise are very different; surprisingly, the applied flow field tends to destroy the global order of the flocking model even for vanishingly small flow amplitudes. Local order, however, is preserved in smaller sub-flocks, although their composition changes dynamically. Our results suggest that realistic perturbations must be considered in assessing the stability of models of collective animal behavior, and that random noise is not a sufficient proxy. (paper)

  14. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak

    Reynolds numbers, and thereafter, the fully-developed infinite wind farm boundary later simulations are performed. Sources of inaccuracy in the simulations are investigated and it is found that high Reynolds number flows are more sensitive to the choice of the SGS model than their low Reynolds number......This research is devoted to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and to lesser extent, wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows in wind energy. It starts with an introduction to the LES technique associated with the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, discretized using a finite...... volume method. The study is followed by a detailed investigation of the Sub-Grid Scale (SGS) modeling. New SGS models are implemented into the computing code, and the effect of SGS models are examined for different applications. Fully developed boundary layer flows are investigated at low and high...

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of dense particle-laden turbulent flows using immersed boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Desjardins, Olivier

    2009-11-01

    Dense particle-laden turbulent flows play an important role in many engineering applications, ranging from pharmaceutical coating and chemical synthesis to fluidized bed reactors. Because of the complexity of the physics involved in these flows, current computational models for gas-particle processes, such as drag and heat transfer, rely on empirical correlations and have been shown to lack accuracy. In this work, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of dense particle-laden flows are conducted, using immersed boundaries (IB) to resolve the flow around each particle. First, the accuracy of the proposed approach is tested on a range of 2D and 3D flows at various Reynolds numbers, and resolution requirements are discussed. Then, various particle arrangements and number densities are simulated, the impact on particle wake interaction is assessed, and existing drag models are evaluated in the case of fixed particles. In addition, the impact of the particles on turbulence dissipation is investigated. Finally, a strategy for handling moving and colliding particles is discussed.

  16. Entropic multirelaxation lattice Boltzmann models for turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösch, Fabian; Chikatamarla, Shyam S; Karlin, Ilya V

    2015-10-01

    We present three-dimensional realizations of a class of lattice Boltzmann models introduced recently by the authors [I. V. Karlin, F. Bösch, and S. S. Chikatamarla, Phys. Rev. E 90, 031302(R) (2014)] and review the role of the entropic stabilizer. Both coarse- and fine-grid simulations are addressed for the Kida vortex flow benchmark. We show that the outstanding numerical stability and performance is independent of a particular choice of the moment representation for high-Reynolds-number flows. We report accurate results for low-order moments for homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence and second-order grid convergence for most assessed statistical quantities. It is demonstrated that all the three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann realizations considered herein converge to the familiar lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model when the resolution is increased. Moreover, thanks to the dynamic nature of the entropic stabilizer, the present model features less compressibility effects and maintains correct energy and enstrophy dissipation. The explicit and efficient nature of the present lattice Boltzmann method renders it a promising candidate for both engineering and scientific purposes for highly turbulent flows.

  17. Measurement of heat and momentum eddy diffusivities in recirculating LMFBR outlet plenum flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, V.P.; Golay, M.W.

    1978-06-01

    An optical technique has been developed for the measurement of the eddy diffusivity of heat in a transparent flowing medium. The method uses a combination of two established measurement tools: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for the monitoring of turbulently fluctuating temperature and a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for the measurement of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The technique is applied to the investigation of flow fields characteristic of the LMFBR outlet plenum. The study is accomplished using air as the working fluid in a small scale Plexiglas test section. Lows are introduced into both the 1 / 15 scale FFTF outlet plenum and the 3 / 80 scale CRBR geometry plenum at inlet Reynolds numbers of 22,000. Measurements of the eddy diffusivity of heat and the eddy diffusivity of momentum are performed at a total of 11 measurement stations. Significant differences of the turbulence parameters are found between the two geometries, and the higher chimney structure of the CRBR case is found to be the major cause of the distinction. Spectral intensity studies of the fluctuating electronic analog signals of velocity and temperature are also performed. Error analysis of the overall technique indicates an experimental error of 10% in the determination of the eddy diffusivity of heat and 6% in the evaluation of turbulent momentum viscosity. In general it is seen that the turbulence in the cases observed is not isotropic, and use of isotropic turbulent heat and momentum diffusivities in transport modelling would not be a valid procedure

  18. Measurement of heat and momentum eddy diffusivities in recirculating LMFBR outlet plenum flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manno, V.P.; Golay, M.W.

    1978-06-01

    An optical technique has been developed for the measurement of the eddy diffusivity of heat in a transparent flowing medium. The method uses a combination of two established measurement tools: a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for the monitoring of turbulently fluctuating temperature and a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for the measurement of turbulent velocity fluctuations. The technique is applied to the investigation of flow fields characteristic of the LMFBR outlet plenum. The study is accomplished using air as the working fluid in a small scale Plexiglas test section. Lows are introduced into both the /sup 1///sub 15/ scale FFTF outlet plenum and the /sup 3///sub 80/ scale CRBR geometry plenum at inlet Reynolds numbers of 22,000. Measurements of the eddy diffusivity of heat and the eddy diffusivity of momentum are performed at a total of 11 measurement stations. Significant differences of the turbulence parameters are found between the two geometries, and the higher chimney structure of the CRBR case is found to be the major cause of the distinction. Spectral intensity studies of the fluctuating electronic analog signals of velocity and temperature are also performed. Error analysis of the overall technique indicates an experimental error of 10% in the determination of the eddy diffusivity of heat and 6% in the evaluation of turbulent momentum viscosity. In general it is seen that the turbulence in the cases observed is not isotropic, and use of isotropic turbulent heat and momentum diffusivities in transport modelling would not be a valid procedure.

  19. Visualization of turbulent reacting flow in a microscale nanoprecipitation reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanxiang; Vishwanat, Somashekar; Olsen, Michael; Fox, Rodney

    2009-11-01

    A flow visualization technique using the pH sensitive dye phenolphthalein was used to visualize and quantify turbulent reacting mixing in a microscale nanoprecipitation reactor. Phenolphthalein is colorless at pH lower than 8, but turns pink at higher pH, making it useful for visualizing acid-base reactions. Using this dye, turbulent reactive mixing in a confined impinging jets reactor (CIJR) was investigated. The reactor has two inlet streams, one at a pH of 3, and the other at a pH of 11. Phenolphthalein is also dissolved in both streams. A flash lamp with a extremely short pulse duration is used to freeze the turbulent motion of the fluids, and images are captured using a video camera. Quantitative mixing data are obtained by using a thresholding technique where local image intensities are transformed to binary signals which represent the local pH: 0 stands for pH lower than 8 and 1 for pH higher than 8. For each Reynolds number under consideration, thousands of realizations are acquired. Using this thresholding technique, probability density functions are obtained, allowing comparison to numerical simulations.

  20. Turbulent mixed convection in vertical and inclined flat channels with aiding flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, P.; Vilemas, J.; Adomaitis, J.E.; Bartkus, G.

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of turbulent mixed convection heat transfer for aiding flows in a vertical ({phi}=90{degrees}), inclined ({phi}=60{degrees},30{degrees}), and horizontal ({phi}=0{degrees}) flat channels with symmetrical heating and a ratio of height h to width b of about 1:10 and with length about 4 m (x/2h about 44). The study covered Re from 4x10{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 4} and Gr{sub q} from 5x10{sup 7}to 3x10{sup 10}. For the upper wall, a region of impaired heat transfer was found for all angular positions (from vertical to horizontal) and for bottom wall the augmentation of heat transfer in comparison to forced convection was revealed in the region of {phi}=0{degrees}-60{degrees}. Different characteristic buoyancy parameters were found for regions of impaired and enhanced heat transfer. General relations are suggested to predict the heat transfer for fully-developed-flow conditions and different angular positions.

  1. Efficient Parallel Algorithm For Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Stuti; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1997-01-01

    A distributed algorithm for a high-order-accurate finite-difference approach to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transition and turbulence in compressible flows is described. This work has two major objectives. The first objective is to demonstrate that parallel and distributed-memory machines can be successfully and efficiently used to solve computationally intensive and input/output intensive algorithms of the DNS class. The second objective is to show that the computational complexity involved in solving the tridiagonal systems inherent in the DNS algorithm can be reduced by algorithm innovations that obviate the need to use a parallelized tridiagonal solver.

  2. Turbulent Flow Validation in the Helios Strand Solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-07

    of streamwise velocity and turbulent viscosity profiles for flow over a flat plate atM = 0.2 and Re = 5×106. Figure 20. 137×97 NACA 0012 strand grid 22...6. AUTHORS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 15. SUBJECT TERMS b. ABSTRACT 2. REPORT TYPE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 15. NUMBER OF...facilitates data exchange between the two mesh types as well as enables relative motion between the mesh systems - i.e. the near-body unstructured rotor

  3. Numerical investigation of a spatially developing turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Keisuke; Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-eddy simulation of a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer is conducted. • First- and second-order moments of the heat and momentum showed a reasonable agreement with past experiments. • Coherent structure of turbulent vortex inherent in this boundary layer is discussed. - Abstract: Large-eddy simulation (LES) on a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate was conducted. The heat transfer rate, friction velocity, mean velocity and temperature, and second-order turbulent properties both in the wall-normal and the stream-wise direction showed reasonable agreement with the findings of past experiments. The spectrum of velocity and temperature fluctuation showed a -2/3-power decay slope and -2-power decay slope respectively. Quadrant analysis revealed the inclination on Q1 and Q3 in the Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, changing their contribution along the distance from the plate surface. Following the convention, we defined the threshold region where the stream-wise mean velocity takes local maximum, the inner layer which is closer to the plate than the threshold region, the outer layer which is farther to the plate than the threshold region. The space correlation of stream-wise velocity tilted the head toward the wall in the propagating direction in the outer layer; on the other hand, the correlated motion had little inclination in the threshold region. The time history of the second invariant of gradient tensor Q revealed that the vortex strength oscillates both in the inner and the outer layers in between the laminar and the transition region. In the turbulent region, the vortex was often dominant in the outer layer. Instantaneous three-dimensional visualization of Q revealed the existence of high-speed fluid parcels associated with arch-shape vortices. These results were considered as an intrinsic structure in the outer layer, which is symmetrical to the structure of

  4. Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-06-01

    This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

  5. Radiative Heat Transfer in Combustion Applications: Parallel Efficiencies of Two Gas Models, Turbulent Radiation Interactions in Particulate Laden Flows, and Coarse Mesh Finite Difference Acceleration for Improved Temporal Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Mathew A.

    initialization. The TRI effects are very sensitive to the initialization of the turbulence in the system. The TRI parameters are somewhat sensitive to the treatment of particulate temperature and the particulate optical thickness, and this effect are amplified by increased particulate loading. Monte Carlo radiative heat transfer simulations of time-dependent combustion processes generally involve an explicit evaluation of emission source because of the expense of the transport solver. Recently, Park et al. [5] have applied quasi-diffusion with Monte Carlo in high energy density radiative transfer applications. We employ a Crank-Nicholson temporal integration scheme in conjunction with the coarse mesh finite difference (CMFD) method, in an effort to improve the temporal accuracy of the Monte Carlo solver. Our results show that this CMFD-CN method is an improvement over Monte Carlo with CMFD time-differenced via Backward Euler, and Implicit Monte Carlo [6] (IMC). The increase in accuracy involves very little increase in computational cost, and the figure of merit for the CMFD-CN scheme is greater than IMC.

  6. Double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent swirling annular jet flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanierschot, M.; Perçin, M.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and dynamics of double helix vortex breakdown in a turbulent annular swirling jet. Double helix breakdown has been reported previously for the laminar flow regime, but this structure has rarely been observed in turbulent flow. The flow field is

  7. Flow and Turbulence at Rubble-Mound Breakwater Armor Layers under Solitary Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the flow and turbulence at the armor layer of rubble-mound breakwaters during wave action. The study focused on the details of the flow and turbulence in the armor layer and on the effect of the porous core on flow and stability....

  8. Turbulence modeling needs of commercial CFD codes: Complex flows in the aerospace and automotive industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befrui, Bizhan A.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: STAR-CD computational features; STAR-CD turbulence models; common features of industrial complex flows; industry-specific CFD development requirements; applications and experiences of industrial complex flows, including flow in rotating disc cavities, diffusion hole film cooling, internal blade cooling, and external car aerodynamics; and conclusions on turbulence modeling needs.

  9. Proposed method for measurement of flow rate in turbulent periodic pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werzner, E; Ray, S; Trimis, D

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation deals with a previously proposed flow metering technique for laminar, fully-developed, time-periodic pipe flow. Employing knowledge of the pulsation frequency-dependent relationship between the mass flow rate and the pressure gradient, the method allows reconstruction of the instantaneous mass flow rate on the basis of a recorded pressure gradient time series. In order to explore if the procedure can be extended for turbulent flows, numerical simulations for turbulent, fully-developed, sinusoidally pulsating pipe flow with low pulse amplitude have been carried out using a ν 2 -f turbulence model. The study covers pulsation frequencies, ranging from the quasi-steady up to the inertia-dominated frequency regime, and three cycle-averaged Reynolds numbers of 4360, 9750 and 15400. After providing the theoretical background of the flow rate reconstruction principle, the numerical model and an experimental facility for the verification of simulations are explained. The obtained results, presented in time and frequency domain, show good agreement with each other and indicate a frequency dependence, similar to that used for the signal reconstruction for laminar flows. A modified dimensionless frequency definition has been introduced, which allows a generalised representation of the results considering the influence of Reynolds number.

  10. Experimental study of circle grid fractal pattern on turbulent intensity in pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manshoor, B; Zaman, I; Othman, M F; Khalid, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Fractal turbulence is deemed much more efficient than grid turbulence in terms of a turbulence generation. In this paper, the hotwire experimental results for the circle grids fractal pattern as a turbulent generator will be presented. The self-similar edge characteristic of the circle grid fractal pattern is thought to play a vital role in the enhancement of turbulent intensity. Three different beta ratios of perforated plates based on circle grids fractal pattern were used in the experimental work and each paired with standard circle grids with similar porosity. The objectives were to study the fractal scaling influence on the flow and also to explore the potential of the circle grids fractal pattern in enhancing the turbulent intensity. The results provided an excellent insight of the fractal generated turbulence and the fractal flow physics. Across the circle grids fractal pattern, the pressure drop was lower but the turbulent intensity was higher than those across the paired standard circle grids

  11. Experimental study of circle grid fractal pattern on turbulent intensity in pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshoor, B.; Zaman, I.; Othman, M. F.; Khalid, Amir

    2013-12-01

    Fractal turbulence is deemed much more efficient than grid turbulence in terms of a turbulence generation. In this paper, the hotwire experimental results for the circle grids fractal pattern as a turbulent generator will be presented. The self-similar edge characteristic of the circle grid fractal pattern is thought to play a vital role in the enhancement of turbulent intensity. Three different beta ratios of perforated plates based on circle grids fractal pattern were used in the experimental work and each paired with standard circle grids with similar porosity. The objectives were to study the fractal scaling influence on the flow and also to explore the potential of the circle grids fractal pattern in enhancing the turbulent intensity. The results provided an excellent insight of the fractal generated turbulence and the fractal flow physics. Across the circle grids fractal pattern, the pressure drop was lower but the turbulent intensity was higher than those across the paired standard circle grids.

  12. Stable low-dissipation schemes for turbulent compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbareddy, Pramod Kumar V.

    Shock capturing schemes, which are commonly used in compressible flow simulations, introduce excessive amounts of numerical viscosity which smears out small scale flow features. A few low-dissipation methods have been proposed in the recent literature. They are more selective in the sense that they explicitly identify the portion of the numerical flux that is diffusive and damp its effect in 'smooth' regions of the flow. This work employs flux vector splitting methods; the dissipative portions of the Steger-Warming schemes are explicitly identified and various shock detection switches are explored. For high Reynolds number flows, especially when the energetic scales are close to the Nyquist limits of the grids used, aliasing errors become noticeable. These high frequency oscillations that arise due to the nonlinear nature of the Navier-Stokes equations cause solutions to become unstable. When dissipative methods are used, these errors are suppressed; however when using low-dissipation schemes, they can be prominent and need to be addressed by some other means. In this thesis, we focus on methods that enhance stability by enforcing 'secondary conservation' - the fluxes are constrained in such a way that a conservation law for a secondary, positive quantity is also satisified. In particular, we focus on kinetic energy, and a fully discrete (in time and space) 'kinetic energy consistent' scheme is derived and tested. Hybrid RAMS-LES methods such as Detached Eddy Simulations are necessary in order to make simulations of high speed flows with attached boundary layers affordable. A popular DES model is based on the Spalart-Allmaras RANS equation; a minor modification to the length scale makes the model behave in a hybrid manner. The S-A model itself was constructed using mostly empirical arguments by the authors. This model is analyzed and its connection to other turbulence models, in particular, the ksgs equation, is explored. A dynamic version of the model is proposed

  13. Flow Control for Unsteady and Separated Flows and Turbulent Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-31

    conditions from surface pressure measurements complemented by advanced flow visulalization and the use of this information to provide active control of the...frequencies and phases were scheduled as functions of the measured jet speed. This was easily done since the information for the schedule had been well...points around the circumference of the jet exit using hot wire anemometers. If this does not give sufficient information for control, other sensors

  14. Anisotropic Characteristics of Turbulence Dissipation in Swirling Flow: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anisotropic characteristics of turbulent energy dissipation rate in a rotating jet flow via direct numerical simulation. The turbulent energy dissipation tensor, including its eigenvalues in the swirling flows with different rotating velocities, is analyzed to investigate the anisotropic characteristics of turbulence and dissipation. In addition, the probability density function of the eigenvalues of turbulence dissipation tensor is presented. The isotropic subrange of PDF always exists in swirling flows relevant to small-scale vortex structure. Thus, with remarkable large-scale vortex breakdown, the isotropic subrange of PDF is reduced in strongly swirling flows, and anisotropic energy dissipation is proven to exist in the core region of the vortex breakdown. More specifically, strong anisotropic turbulence dissipation occurs concentratively in the vortex breakdown region, whereas nearly isotropic turbulence dissipation occurs dispersively in the peripheral region of the strong swirling flows.

  15. Turbulent transition modification in dispersed two-phase pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Kyle; Longmire, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    In a pipe flow, transition to turbulence occurs at some critical Reynolds number, Rec , and transition is associated with intermittent swirling structures extending over the pipe cross section. Depending on the magnitude of Rec , these structures are known either as puffs or slugs. When a dispersed second liquid phase is added to a liquid pipe flow, Rec can be modified. To explore the mechanism for this modification, an experiment was designed to track and measure these transitional structures. The facility is a pump-driven circuit with a 9m development and test section of diameter 44mm. Static mixers are placed upstream to generate an even dispersion of silicone oil in a water-glycerine flow. Pressure signals were used to identify transitional structures and trigger a high repetition rate stereo-PIV system downstream. Stereo-PIV measurements were obtained in planes normal to the flow, and Taylor's Hypothesis was employed to infer details of the volumetric flow structure. The presentation will describe the sensing and imaging methods along with preliminary results for the single and two-phase flows. Supported by Nanodispersions Technology.

  16. Experimental study on gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow in a large square duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haomin; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow exists in many industrial areas. Therefore, many experiments for gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow have been carried out in circular pipes for bubbly turbulent flow model. However, the cross-section of many flow passages are not the circular shape. Since the secondary flow of 2nd kind for single phase turbulent flow in a non-circular duct is well-known, the interaction between the secondary flow of 2nd kind and bubbles in gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow in the non-circular duct could play an important role. In this study, in order to validate gas-liquid bubbly turbulent flow model in the non-circular duct, measurements were performed in a large square (136 mm × 136 mm) duct with duct length of 2.8m. The distributions of primary velocity, void fraction and turbulent Reynolds stresses were measured by a hot film probe. It is well-known that the primary velocity distribution of the bubbly flow in a circular pipe has a peak in the pipe center. In contrast, it was found that the primary velocity peaked near the corner of the square duct. In addition, primary velocity distribution changes under various flow conditions were discussed by measuring data of the void fraction and turbulent Reynolds stresses. Financially Supported by JSPS and G-COE Program(J-051).

  17. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent heat transfer up to Reτ = 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyas, Sergio; Pérez-Quiles, Jezabel; Lluesma-Rodríguez, Federico

    2017-11-01

    We present a new set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow for a Prandtl number of 0.71 and a friction Reynolds number of 2000. Mixed boundary conditions, i.e., wall temperature is time independent and varies linearly along streamwise component, have been used as boundary conditions for the thermal field. The effect of the size of the box in the one point statistics of the thermal field, and the kinetic energy, dissipation and turbulent budgets has been studied, showing that a domain with streamwise and spanwise sizes of 4 πh and 2 πh, where h is the channel half-height, is large enough to reproduce the one point statistics of larger boxes. The scaling of the previous quantities with respect to the Reynolds number has been also studied using a new dataset of simulations at smaller Reynolds number, finding two different scales for the inner and outer layers of the flow. Funded by project ENE2015-71333-R of the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad.

  18. Characteristics of turbulent heat transfer in an annulus at supercritical pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.W.R.; Pecnik, R.; Rohde, M.; van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure is different from heat transfer at lower pressures due to strong variations of the thermophysical properties with the temperature. We present and analyze results of direct numerical simulations of heat transfer to turbulent CO2 at 8 MPa in an

  19. Study on the relationship between turbulent normal stresses in the fully developed bare rod bundle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Bock; Lee, Byung Jin

    1995-01-01

    The turbulence structure for fully developed flow through the subchannels formed by the bare rod array depends on the pitch to rod diameter ratio. For fairly open spaced bare rod arrays, the distributions of the three components of the turbulent normal stresses are similar to those measured in circular pipe. However, for more closely spaced arrays, the turbulence structure, especially in the gap region, departs markedly from the pipe flow distribution. A linear relationship between turbulent normal stresses and turbulent kinetic energy for fully developed turbulent flow through regularly spaced bare rod arrays has been developed. This correlation can be used in connection with various theoretical analyses applied in turbulence research. 9 figs., 10 refs. (Author)

  20. Control of wave-driven turbulence and surface heating on the mixing of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Proskurowski, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    Buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) is a pollutant in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL) that is submerged by turbulent transport processes. Langmuir circulation (LC) is a turbulent process driven by wind and surface waves that enhances mixing in the OSBL. Sea surface cooling also contributes to OSBL turbulence by driving convection. On the other hand, sea surface heating stratifies and stabilizes the water column to reduce turbulent motion. We analyze observed MPMD surface concentrations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to reveal a significant increase in MPMD concentrations during surface heating and a decrease during surface cooling. Turbulence resolving large eddy simulations of the OSBL for an idealized diurnal heating cycle suggest that turbulent downward fluxes of buoyant tracers are enhanced at night, facilitating deep submergence of plastics, and suppressed in heating conditions, resulting in surface trapped MPMD. Simulations agree with observations if enhanced mixing due to LC is included. Our results demonstrate the controlling influence of surface heat fluxes and LC on turbulent transport in the OSBL and on vertical distributions of buoyant marine particles.

  1. Turbulent Flows Over Three-Dimensional Shark Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Wen, Li; Lauder, George; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-11-01

    Shark skin is covered with thousands of small tooth-like structures called denticles. It has long been hypothesized that denticles act as riblets do in a turbulent boundary layer and help reduce friction drag and enhance shark swimming efficiency. We employ the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method (Ge and Sotiropoulos, J. Comp. Physics, 2008) to carry out high-resolution large eddy simulations of turbulent flow past a series of anatomically realistic shark denticles mounted on a flat plate. The denticle shapes used in our simulations were obtained by scanning Mako Short Fin shark skin with micro-CT. The computed results are analyzed to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of the flow past the denticles and identify possible drag reduction mechanics. Drag measurements obtained in a laboratory flume for various denticle spacings and arrangements are also reported and analyzed in tandem with the LES results to explore similarities between shark skin and engineered riblets. Computational Resources were provided by the University of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  2. Reinvestigation on mixing length in an open channel turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Snehasis; Kumbhakar, Manotosh; Ghoshal, Koeli

    2018-02-01

    The present study proposes a model on vertical distribution of streamwise velocity in an open channel turbulent flow through a newly proposed mixing length, which is derived for both clear water and sediment-laden turbulent flows. The analysis is based on a theoretical consideration which explores the effect of density stratification on the streamwise velocity profile. The derivation of mixing length makes use of the diffusion equation where both the sediment diffusivity and momentum diffusivity are taken as a function of height from the channel bed. The damping factor present in the mixing length of sediment-fluid mixture contains velocity and concentration gradients. This factor is capable of describing the dip-phenomenon of velocity distribution. From the existing experimental data of velocity, the mixing length data are calculated. The pattern shows that mixing length increases from bed to the dip-position, having a larger value at dip-position and then decreases up to the water surface with a zero value thereat. The present model agrees well with these data sets and this behavior cannot be described by any other existing model. Finally, the proposed mixing length model is applied to find the velocity distribution in wide and narrow open channels. The derived velocity distribution is compared with laboratory channel data of velocity, and the comparison shows good agreement.

  3. Image analysis techniques for the study of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Simone

    In this paper, a brief review of Digital Image Analysis techniques employed in Fluid Mechanics for the study of turbulent flows is given. Particularly the focus is on the techniques developed by the research teams the Author worked in, that can be considered relatively "low cost" techniques. Digital Image Analysis techniques have the advantage, when compared to the traditional techniques employing physical point probes, to be non-intrusive and quasi-continuous in space, as every pixel on the camera sensor works as a single probe: consequently, they allow to obtain two-dimensional or three-dimensional fields of the measured quantity in less time. Traditionally, the disadvantages are related to the frequency of acquisition, but modern high-speed cameras are typically able to acquire at frequencies from the order of 1 KHz to the order of 1 MHz. Digital Image Analysis techniques can be employed to measure concentration, temperature, position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and pressure fields with similar equipment and setups, and can be consequently considered as a flexible and powerful tool for measurements on turbulent flows.

  4. Image analysis techniques for the study of turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Simone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a brief review of Digital Image Analysis techniques employed in Fluid Mechanics for the study of turbulent flows is given. Particularly the focus is on the techniques developed by the research teams the Author worked in, that can be considered relatively “low cost” techniques. Digital Image Analysis techniques have the advantage, when compared to the traditional techniques employing physical point probes, to be non-intrusive and quasi-continuous in space, as every pixel on the camera sensor works as a single probe: consequently, they allow to obtain two-dimensional or three-dimensional fields of the measured quantity in less time. Traditionally, the disadvantages are related to the frequency of acquisition, but modern high-speed cameras are typically able to acquire at frequencies from the order of 1 KHz to the order of 1 MHz. Digital Image Analysis techniques can be employed to measure concentration, temperature, position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and pressure fields with similar equipment and setups, and can be consequently considered as a flexible and powerful tool for measurements on turbulent flows.

  5. 2ND EF Conference in Turbulent Heat Transfer, Manchester, UK 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    interpolated onto the 128 x 193 x 128 grid. A time of about 800 vfx &r was required to reach a stationary state and the averaging time was 715 v/u2r...number fully into turbulence (smooth spec- trum and PDF ) while retaining some coherence related to the flow geometry, (vertical dimension) and...containing the main part of the turbulence energy. The pdf s of turbulent fluctuations become essentially non-gaussian under the effects of inter- mittency

  6. Turbulent behaviour of non-cohesive sediment gravity flows at unexpectedly high flow density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Megan; Baas, Jaco H.; Malarkey, Jonathan; Kane, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Experimental lock exchange-type turbidity currents laden with non-cohesive silica-flour were found to be highly dynamic at remarkably high suspended sediment concentrations. These experiments were conducted to produce sediment gravity flows of volumetric concentrations ranging from 1% to 52%, to study how changes in suspended sediment concentration affects the head velocities and run-out distances of these flows, in natural seawater. Increasing the volumetric concentration of suspended silica-flour, C, up to C = 46%, within the flows led to a progressive increase in the maximum head velocity. This relationship suggests that suspended sediment concentration intensifies the density difference between the turbulent suspension and the ambient water, which drives the flow, even if almost half of the available space is occupied by sediment particles. However, from C = 46% to C = 52% a rapid reduction in the maximum head velocity was measured. It is inferred that at C = 46%, friction from grain-to-grain interactions begins to attenuate turbulence within the flows. At C > 46%, the frictional stresses become progressively more dominant over the turbulent forces and excess density, thus producing lower maximum head velocities. This grain interaction process started to rapidly reduce the run-out distance of the silica-flour flows at equally high concentrations of C ≥ 47%. All flows with C 9%. Yet, the critical flow concentration at which turbulence modulation commenced for these silica-flour laden flows appeared to be much higher. We suggest that Bagnold's 9% criterion cannot be applied to flows that carry fine-grained sediment, because turbulent forces are more important than dispersive forces, and frictional forces start to affect the flows only at concentrations just below the cubic packing density of spheres of C = 52%. These experimental results also imply that natural flows may be able to transport vast volumes of non-cohesive sediment with relative ease, especially

  7. Distributed Roughness Effects on Blunt-Body Transition and Turbulent Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to obtain data on the effects of surface roughness on blunt bodies at laminar, transitional, and turbulent conditions. Wind tunnel models with distributed surface roughness heights from 0.06 mm to 1.75 mm were tested and heating data were obtained using global surface thermography. Heating rates of up to 85% higher than predicted, smooth-surface turbulent levels were measured.

  8. A Numerical Study on Heat Transfer and Flow Characteristics of a Finned Downhole Coaxial Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chun Dong; Lee, Dong Hyun; Park, Byung-Sik; Choi, Jaejoon [Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the finned annular passage were investigated numerically. The annular passage simulates co-axial geothermal heat exchanger, and fins are installed on its inner wall to reduce heat loss from the production passage (annulus) to injection passage (inner pipe). A commercial CFD program, Ansys Fluent, was used with SST k-ω turbulence model. The effects of the geometric parameters of the fin on the inner tube were analyzed under the periodic boundary condition. The result indicated that most parameters had a tendency to increase with an increase in the height and angle of the fin. However, it was confirmed that the Nusselt number of the inner tube on the coaxial 15, 5, 0.3 was lower than that of the smooth tube. Additionally, the Nusselt number of the inner tube exhibited a tendency of decreasing with a decrease in the spacing in Coaxial 15, S{sub f}, 0.3.

  9. Large-eddy simulation of unidirectional turbulent flow over dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    We performed large eddy simulation of the flow over a series of two- and three-dimensional dune geometries at laboratory scale using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. First, we studied the flow over a standard 2D transverse dune geometry, then bedform three-dimensionality was imposed. Finally, we investigated the turbulent flow over barchan dunes. The results are validated by comparison with simulations and experiments for the 2D dune case, while the results of the 3D dunes are validated qualitatively against experiments. The flow over transverse dunes separates at the dune crest, generating a shear layer that plays a crucial role in the transport of momentum and energy, as well as the generation of coherent structures. Spanwise vortices are generated in the separated shear; as they are advected, they undergo lateral instabilities and develop into horseshoe-like structures and finally reach the surface. The ejection that occurs between the legs of the vortex creates the upwelling and downdrafting events on the free surface known as "boils". The three-dimensional separation of flow at the crestline alters the distribution of wall pressure, which may cause secondary flow across the stream. The mean flow is characterized by a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, with core radii of the order of the flow depth. Staggering the crestlines alters the secondary motion; two pairs of streamwise vortices appear (a strong one, centred about the lobe, and a weaker one, coming from the previous dune, centred around the saddle). The flow over barchan dunes presents significant differences to that over transverse dunes. The flow near the bed, upstream of the dune, diverges from the centerline plane; the flow close to the centerline plane separates at the crest and reattaches on the bed. Away from the centerline plane and along the horns, flow separation occurs intermittently. The flow in the separation bubble is routed towards the horns and leaves

  10. Simulation of Turbulent, Obstructed and Thermaly Coupled flow by the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantero, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    In the present work we develop a numerical methodology to deal with natural and free convection, in laminar or turbulent regimes, and in the presence of flow obstructions. The mathematical formulations allows the use of moderate-size meshes (104 106 grid points) to model big thermal hydraulic components with affordable computing costs. The main idea is the introduction of two hierarchy levels in the geometric modeling, a macroscopic one that is incorporated in the mesh design, and a microscopic one that is replaced by an equivalent ''porous'' medium. This is done in such a way that the main quantities (head loss, net fluid mass, net solid mass, heat and mass exchanges) are conserved, by means of three free parameters to be defined pointwise:The distributed friction coefficient, the fluid volume fraction,and the distributed heat exchange coefficient between fluid and solid. Many numerical tests were carried out to tune the numerical algorithm so as to obtain stable and physically realistic results.The final code implementing this methodology, PARFEMCO, also incorporates buoyancy forces, Smagorinsky's algebraic turbulence model, and fluid-structure thermal interaction.We also report on two applications of the code, one in computational hemodynamics and, the most important one that motivated most of the development, in the simulation of the pre-heating (non-nuclear) transient of a compact nuclear reactor, CAREM, under development by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica

  11. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat Flow Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The heat flow probe directly answers requirements in the topic: S1.11 Lunar Science Instruments and Technology: "Geophysical Measurements: Systems, subsystems, and...

  12. Critical heat-flux experiments under low-flow conditions in a vertical annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Ishii, M.

    1982-03-01

    An experimental study was performed on critical heat flux (CHF) at low flow conditions for low pressure steam-water upward flow in an annulus. The test section was transparent, therefore, visual observations of dryout as well as various instrumentations were made. The data indicated that a premature CHF occurred due to flow regime transition from churn-turbulent to annular flow. It is shown that the critical heat flux observed in the experiment is essentially similar to a flooding-limited burnout and the critical heat flux can be well reproduced by a nondimensional correlation derived from the previously obtained criterion for flow regime transition. The observed CHF values are much smaller than the standard high quality CHF criteria at low flow, corresponding to the annular flow film dryout. This result is very significant, because the coolability of a heater surface at low flow rates can be drastically reduced by the occurrence of this mode of CHF

  13. Turbulent convective heat and mass transfer in the developing region of elliptical ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinagre, H.T.M.; Mendes, P.R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Mass transfer experiments were performed to determine local heat and mass transfer coefficients for the turbulent flow in a duct with elliptical cross section. The naphthalene sublimation technique was employed to obtain the experimental results. Both entrance-region and fully-developed results were obtained. The Reynolds number was varied in the overall range of 7000-60,000, whereas values of 0,12, 0,25 and 0,5 for the aspect ratio were investigated. The fully developed transport coefficients obtained were compared with the ones available in the open literature for parallel plates and circular tubes, and it was found that the coefficients are quite insensitive to aspect ratio variations. (author)

  14. Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    WORDS (Conllnum on rtvmf tldm II nocfmry Td Idmnllly by block number) Turbulent boundary layers Skin friction, heat transfer and pressure High... tD t{> • y rp < J -o ill ... |i| ;| ilh |I ti i llii ffPtffin i ini I ! til. ;■ ; ’ ! ’ : in •■•: \\1’. T ill j i i i...III [lii 5 ft" t H "H— im BJITT i’i 1 i Mt- B ianj ii ( !l!l Mi IF Ii ig| M»-H J , ■*« J J j 1JJ J 4^ Ul CD S D Z V) D -I O z > Ul QC

  15. Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flow Over Complex Bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, L.; Hsu, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is regarded as a powerful tool in the investigation of turbulent flow featured with a wide range of time and spatial scales. With the application of coordinate transformation in a pseudo-spectral scheme, a parallelized numerical modeling system was created aiming at simulating flow over complex bathymetry with high numerical accuracy and efficiency. The transformed governing equations were integrated in time using a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta method. For spatial discretization, the discrete Fourier expansion was adopted in the streamwise and spanwise direction, enforcing the periodic boundary condition in both directions. The Chebyshev expansion on Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto points was used in the wall-normal direction, assuming there is no-slip on top and bottom walls. The diffusion terms were discretized with a Crank-Nicolson scheme, while the advection terms dealiased with the 2/3 rule were discretized with an Adams-Bashforth scheme. In the prediction step, the velocity was calculated in physical domain by solving the resulting linear equation directly. However, the extra terms introduced by coordinate transformation impose a strict limitation to time step and an iteration method was applied to overcome this restriction in the correction step for pressure by solving the Helmholtz equation. The numerical solver is written in object-oriented C++ programing language utilizing Armadillo linear algebra library for matrix computation. Several benchmarking cases in laminar and turbulent flow were carried out to verify/validate the numerical model and very good agreements are achieved. Ongoing work focuses on implementing sediment transport capability for multiple sediment classes and parameterizations for flocculation processes.

  16. Conjugate Heat Transfer Study in Hypersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Niranjan; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Peetala, Ravi Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Coupled and decoupled conjugate heat transfer (CHT) studies are carried out to imitate experimental studies for heat transfer measurement in hypersonic flow regime. The finite volume based solvers are used for analyzing the heat interaction between fluid and solid domains. Temperature and surface heat flux signals are predicted by both coupled and decoupled CHT analysis techniques for hypersonic Mach numbers. These two methodologies are also used to study the effect of different wall materials on surface parameters. Effectiveness of these CHT solvers has been verified for the inverse problem of wall heat flux recovery using various techniques reported in the literature. Both coupled and decoupled CHT techniques are seen to be equally useful for prediction of local temperature and heat flux signals prior to the experiments in hypersonic flows.

  17. Understanding turbulent free-surface vortex flows using a Taylor-Couette flow analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Sean; De Cesare, Giovanni; Casserly, John; Sherlock, Richard

    2018-01-16

    Free-surface vortices have long been studied to develop an understanding of similar rotating flow phenomena observed in nature and technology. However, a complete description of its turbulent three-dimensional flow field still remains elusive. In contrast, the related Taylor-Couette flow system has been well explicated which classically exhibits successive instability phases manifested in so-called Taylor vortices. In this study, observations made on the turbulent free-surface vortex revealed distinguishable, time-dependent "Taylor-like" vortices in the secondary flow field similar to the Taylor-Couette flow system. The observations were enabled by an original application of 2D ultrasonic Doppler velocity profiling complemented with laser induced fluorescence dye observations. Additional confirmation was provided by three-dimensional numerical simulations. Using Rayleigh's stability criterion, we analytically show that a wall bounded free-surface vortex can indeed become unstable due to a centrifugal driving force in a similar manner to the Taylor-Couette flow. Consequently, it is proposed that the free-surface vortex can be treated analogously to the Taylor-Couette flow permitting advanced conclusions to be drawn on its flow structure and the various states of free-surface vortex flow stability.

  18. Numerical simulation of turbine cascade flow with blade-fluid heat exchange

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Louda, Petr; Sváček, P.; Fořt, J.; Fürst, J.; Halama, J.; Kozel, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 219, č. 13 (2013), s. 7206-7214 ISSN 0096-3003 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/10/1329 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : turbomachinery * heat exchange * turbulent flow * coupled problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.600, year: 2013

  19. Organized Oscillations of Initially-Turbulent Flow Past a Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2002-09-17

    Flow past an open cavity is known to give rise to self-sustained oscillations in a wide variety of configurations, including slotted-wall, wind and water tunnels, slotted flumes, bellows-type pipe geometries, high-head gates and gate slots, aircraft components and internal piping systems. These cavity-type oscillations are the origin of coherent and broadband sources of noise and, if the structure is sufficiently flexible, flow-induced vibration as well. Moreover, depending upon the state of the cavity oscillation, substantial alterations of the mean drag may be induced. In the following, the state of knowledge of flow past cavities, based primarily on laminar inflow conditions, is described within a framework based on the flow physics. Then, the major unresolved issues for this class of flows will be delineated. Self-excited cavity oscillations have generic features, which are assessed in detail in the reviews of Rockwell and Naudascher, Rockwell, Howe and Rockwell. These features, which are illustrated in the schematic of Figure 1, are: (i) interaction of a vorticity concentration(s) with the downstream corner, (ii) upstream influence from this corner interaction to the sensitive region of the shear layer formed from the upstream corner of the cavity; (iii) conversion of the upstream influence arriving at this location to a fluctuation in the separating shear layer; and (iv) amplification of this fluctuation in the shear layer as it develops in the streamwise direction. In view of the fact that inflow shear-layer in the present investigation is fully turbulent, item (iv) is of particular interest. It is generally recognized, at least for laminar conditions at separation from the leading-corner of the cavity, that the disturbance growth in the shear layer can be described using concepts of linearized, inviscid stability theory, as shown by Rockwell, Sarohia, and Knisely and Rockwell. As demonstrated by Knisely and Rockwell, on the basis of experiments interpreted

  20. Flow in a circular expansion pipe flow: effect of a vortex perturbation on localised turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Kamal; Peixinho, Jorge; Willis, Ashley P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of three-dimensional direct numerical simulations for incompressible viscous fluid in a circular pipe flow with a sudden expansion. At the inlet, a parabolic velocity profile is applied together with a finite amplitude perturbation in the form of a vortex with its axis parallel to the axis of the pipe. At sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the recirculation region breaks into a turbulent patch that changes position axially, depending on the strength of the perturbation. This vortex perturbation is believed to produce a less abrupt transition than in previous studies, which applied a tilt perturbation, as the localised turbulence is observed via the formation of a wavy structure at a low order azimuthal mode, which resembles an optimally amplified perturbation. For large vortex amplitude, the localised turbulence remains at a constant axial position. It is further investigated using proper orthogonal decomposition, which indicates that the centre region close to the expansion is highly energetic.

  1. Universality of local dissipation scales in turbulent boundary layer flows with and without free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamdi, Sabah F. H.; Bailey, Sean C. C.

    2017-11-01

    Measurements of the small-scale dissipation statistics of turbulent boundary layer flows with and without free-stream turbulence are reported for Reτ ≈ 1000 (Reθ ≈ 2000). The scaling of the dissipation scale distribution is examined in these two boundary conditions. Results demonstrated that the local large-scale Reynolds number based on the measured longitudinal integral length scale fails to properly normalize the dissipation scale distribution near the wall in these two free-stream conditions due to the imperfect characterization of the upper bound of the inertial cascade by the integral length scale. A surrogate found from turbulent kinetic energy and mean dissipation rate only moderately improved the scaling of the dissipation scales, relative to the measured integral length scale. When a length scale based on the distance from the wall [as suggested by Bailey and Witte, "On the universality of local dissipation scales in turbulent channel flow," J. Fluid Mech. 786, 234-252 (2015)] was utilized to scale the dissipation scale distribution, in the region near the wall, there was a noticeable improvement in the collapse of the normalized distribution of dissipation scales. In addition, unlike in channel flows, in the outer layer of the turbulent boundary layer, the normalized distributions of the local dissipation scales were observed to be dependent on the wall-normal position. This was found to be attributable to the presence of external intermittency in the outer layer as the presence of free-stream turbulence was found to restore the scaling behavior by replacing the intermittent laminar flow with turbulent flow.

  2. Understanding the sub-critical transition to turbulence in wall flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In contrast with free shear flows presenting velocity profiles with injection points which cascade to turbulence in a relatively mild way, wall bounded flows are deprived of (inertial) instability modes at low Reynolds numbers and become turbulent in a much wilder way, most often marked by the coexistence of laminar and ...

  3. Numerical Simulations of Competitive-Consecutive Reactions in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with mixing of passive scalars in a turbulent flow. The passive scalars are released in a turbulent plane channel flow and interpreted as either non-reactive components or reactive components that are involved in a competitive-consecutive reaction system. The evolution of these

  4. Understanding the sub-critical transition to turbulence in wall flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In contrast with free shear flows presenting velocity profiles with inflection points which cascade to turbulence in a relatively mild way, wall bounded flows are de- prived of (inertial) instability modes at low Reynolds numbers and become turbulent in a much wilder way, most often marked by the coexistence of ...

  5. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  6. Scaling of turbulence spectra measured in strong shear flow near the Earth’s surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, T.; Larsen, S. E.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Astrup, P.; Larsén, X. G.

    2017-12-01

    Within the lowest kilometer of the Earth’s atmosphere, in the so-called atmospheric boundary layer, winds are often gusty and turbulent. Nearest to the ground, the turbulence is predominately generated by mechanical wall-bounded wind shear, whereas at higher altitudes turbulent mixing of heat and moisture also play a role. The variance (square of the standard deviation) of the fluctuation around the mean wind speed is a measure of the kinetic energy content of the turbulence. This kinetic energy can be resolved into the spectral distributions, or spectra, as functions of eddy size, wavenumber, or frequency. Spectra are derived from Fourier transforms of wind records as functions of space or time corresponding to wavenumber and frequency spectra, respectively. Atmospheric spectra often exhibit different subranges that can be distinguished and scaled by the physical parameters responsible for: (1) their generation; (2) the cascade of energy across the spectrum from large- to small-scale; and (3) the eventual decay of turbulence into heat owing to viscosity effects on the Kolmogorov microscale, in which the eddy size is only a fraction of a millimeter. This paper addresses atmospheric turbulence spectra in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer—the so-called surface layer—where the wind shear is strong owing to the nonslip condition at the ground. Theoretical results dating back to Tchen’s early work in 1953 ‘on the spectrum of energy in turbulent shear flow’ led Tchen to predict a shear production subrange with a distinct inverse-linear power law for turbulence in a strongly sheared high-Reynolds number wall-bounded flow, as is encountered in the lowest sheared part of the atmospheric boundary layer, also known as the eddy surface layer. This paper presents observations of spectra measured in a meteorological mast at Høvsøre, Denmark, that support Tchen’s prediction of a shear production subrange following a distinct power law of degree

  7. Turbulent flow field structure of initially asymmetric jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Kim, Bong Whan; Kim, Suk Woo

    2000-01-01

    The near field structure of round turbulent jets with initially asymmetric velocity distributions is investigated experimentally. Experiments are carried out using a constant temperature hot-wire anemomentry system to measure streamwise velocity in the jets. The measurements are undertaken across the jet at various streamwise stations in a range starting from the jet exit plane and up to a downstream location of twelve diameters. The experimental results include the distributions of mean and instantaneous velocities, vorticity field, turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds shear stresses. The asymmetry of the jet exit plane was obtained by using circular cross-section pipes with a bend upstream of the exit. Three pipes used here include a straight pipe, and 90 and 160 degree-bend pipes. Therefore, at the upstream of the pipe exit, secondary flow through the bend and mean streamwise velocity distribution could be controlled by changing the curvature of pipes. The jets into the atmosphere have two levels of initial velocity skewness in addition to an axisymmetric jet from a straight pipe. In case of the curved pipe, a six diameterlong straight pipe section follows the bend upstream of the exit. The Reynolds number based on the exit bulk velocity is 13,400. The results indicate that the near field structure is considerably modified by the skewness of an initial mean velocity distribution. As the skewness increases, the decay rate of mean velocity at the centerline also increases

  8. Bead resuspension and saltation in a turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hout, Rene

    2013-11-01

    Resuspension and saltation of near neutrally buoyant, polystyrene beads in a turbulent boundary layer was studied using TR-PIV and PTV in a horizontal, water channel facility (Re = 7353). Near wall coherent structures were visualized using spatial distributions of vorticity and swirling strength in combination with instantaneous u1u2 correlations and u1. Two case studies, (i) on resuspension and (ii) on saltation showed that lift-off coincided with vortex core passage creating an ejection-sweep cycle. In all cases, beads left the wall when immersed in near-wall ejections and exposed to positive shear. A high shear induced lift force coincided with bead lift-off while the Magnus force and translation induced lift were negligible. The wall-normal component of the drag force mostly opposed lift-off. The difference between resuspension and saltation was governed by the type of coherent structures the beads encountered when lifted out of the viscous sublayer. Resuspension occurred when beads were carried upwards by a combination of a strong, spatially coherent upstream fast moving flow structure and a downstream ejection. On the other hand, saltation was accompanied by similar albeit weaker and spatially less coherent near-wall turbulence structures.

  9. Turbulent interchange in simulated rod bundle geometries for Genetron-12 flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunik, K.

    1973-01-01

    Turbulent interchange data between subchannel arrays simulating an infinite triangular array in a rod bundle fuel cluster were obtained for two-phase Genetron-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane), single phase subcooled Genetron-12 and single phase water flows at gap spacings of 0.025, 0.052 and 0.100 inches. Single phase turbulent interchange rates were relatively independent of the pitch to diameter ratio for the larger two gaps studied but increased for the smallest gap spacing. Two-phase Genetron-12 interchange data were obtained under conditions of unequal qualities and mass fluxes and essentially zero radial pressure gradient along the interconnection region between subchannels. Vapour transport occurred primarily by a diffusional type mechanism and was qualitatively similar to single phase behaviour. For annular flow conditions liquid interchange occurred through a dual mechanism via the film flow and entrained droplets. Vapour interchange was significantly suppressed at the smallest gap spacing due to the presence of the liquid film. Liquid interchange under two-phase conditions increased with gap spacing from 0.025 to 0.052 inches and levelled off slightly at 0.100 inches. Data obtained with heat addition in one test channel indicated negligible effects on the vapour transfer rates but a slight reduction in the magnitude of liquid interchange. (O.T.)

  10. Characteristics of heat flow in recuperative heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalović Milisav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model of heat flow in cross-flow tube recuperative heat exchangers (recuperators was presented in this paper. One of the purposes of this investigation was to analyze changes in the values of some parameters of heat transfer in recuperators during combustion air preheating. The logarithmic mean temperature (Atm and overall heat transfer coefficient (U, are two basic parameters of heat flow, while the total heated area surface (A is assumed to be constant. The results, presented as graphs and in the form of mathematical expressions, were obtained by analytical methods and using experimental data. The conditions of gaseous fuel combustions were defined by the heat value of gaseous fuel Qd = 9263.894 J.m-3, excess air ratio λ= 1.10, content of oxygen in combustion air ν(O2 = 26%Vol, the preheating temperature of combustion air (cold fluid outlet temperature tco = 100-500°C, the inlet temperature of combustion products (hot fluid inlet temperature thi = 600-1100°C.

  11. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  12. Coupled equations for transient water flow, heat flow, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    presented on coupled equations from a perspective of energy optimization. 1. Introduction. Given an appropriate time scale, all earth systems are transient. The evolution of the earth's crust ... tem, in combination with transient heat flow and three-dimensional deformation. .... hydraulic capacity by analogy with heat capacity.

  13. Rapid plasma heating by collective interactions, using strong turbulence and relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    A multi-kilovolt, moderate density plasma was generated in a magnetic mirror confinement system by two methods: turbulent heating and relativistic electron beam. Extensive diagnostic development permitted the measurement of important plasma characteristics, leading to interesting and novel conclusions regarding heating and loss mechanisms. Electron and ion heating mechanisms were categorized, and parameter studies made to establish ranges of importance. Nonthermal ion and electron energy distributions were measured. Beam propagation and energy deposition studies yielded the spatial dependence of plasma heating

  14. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slouka Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  15. Numerical solution of inviscid and viscous laminar and turbulent flow around the airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slouka, Martin; Kozel, Karel

    2016-03-01

    This work deals with the 2D numerical solution of inviscid compressible flow and viscous compressible laminar and turbulent flow around the profile. In a case of turbulent flow algebraic Baldwin-Lomax model is used and compared with Wilcox k-omega model. Calculations are done for NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoil profile for the different angles of upstream flow. Numerical results are compared and discussed with experimental data.

  16. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow - An alternative view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P. S.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if a residual vortex stretching term is maintained in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are presented for a k-epsilon model modified to account for net vortex stretching.

  17. Considerations for the application of cars to turbulent reacting flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckbreth, A.C.; Stufflebeam, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Laser diagnostic techniques have certain advantages for an employment in combustion-related studies. In this connection, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has received much attention, taking into account the improvement of the capabilities of CARS for studies regarding reacting flow. This paper is concerned with areas in which improvements would be desirable and with approaches for achieving them. Factors affecting single pulse CARS spectral quality are reviewed, and techniques for improving single pulse measurements are suggested.Attention is given to the physics of single pulse CARS generation, referencing, improved broadband dye laser profiles, temporally-smooth pump laser pulses, spatial mode effects, and single pulse averaging. The effects of turbulence and extinction on the viability of the various CARS concentration measurement approaches are discussed, and a mobile CARS instrument is considered. 47 references

  18. Considerations for the application of CARS to turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckbreth, A. C.; Stufflebeam, J. H.

    1985-11-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) has matured considerably over recent years and is experiencing widespread application in fundamental and practical combustion situations. Its utilization in turbulent reacting flows is far from routine, however, and several problem areas need to be addressed and refined. This paper reviews these problems and assesses the status of current and proposed solution approaches. Due to its highly nonlinear dependence on temperature and species concentration, CARS measurements in time-varying environments necessitate assembly of “instantaneous” single-pulse measurement histograms, even to extract time-averaged properties. A number of factors contribute to distortion of single pulse CARS spectra and, thus, measurement inaccuracy; various improvement strategies will be evaluated. The problem of absolute concentration measurements at low and high Mach numbers in refracting and attenuating media will be discussed. The paper concludes with a description of an approach to permit CARS measurements of several species simultaneously in a single laser pulse.

  19. Drift-wave turbulence and zonal flow generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.

    2003-01-01

    Drift-wave turbulence in a plasma is analyzed on the basis of the wave Liouville equation, describing the evolution of the distribution function of wave packets (quasiparticles) characterized by position x and wave vector k. A closed kinetic equation is derived for the ensemble-averaged part of this function by the methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. It has the form of a non-Markovian advection-diffusion equation describing coupled diffusion processes in x and k spaces. General forms of the diffusion coefficients are obtained in terms of Lagrangian velocity correlations. The latter are calculated in the decorrelation trajectory approximation, a method recently developed for an accurate measure of the important trapping phenomena of particles in the rugged electrostatic potential. The analysis of individual decorrelation trajectories provides an illustration of the fragmentation of drift-wave structures in the radial direction and the generation of long-wavelength structures in the poloidal direction that are identified as zonal flows

  20. Assessment of closure coefficients for compressible-flow turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. G.; Bradshaw, P.; Coakley, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    A critical assessment is made of the closure coefficients used for turbulence length scale in existing models of the transport equation, with reference to the extension of these models to compressible flow. It is shown that to satisfy the compressible 'law of the wall', the model coefficients must actually be functions of density gradients. The magnitude of the errors that result from neglecting this dependence on density varies with the variable used to specify the length scale. Among the models investigated, the k-omega model yields the best performance, although it is not completely free from errors associated with density terms. Models designed to reduce the density-gradient effect to an insignificant level are proposed.

  1. Burnout heat flux in natural flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, M.M.; Darwish, M.A.; Mahmoud, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty runs of experiments were conducted to determine the critical heat flux for natural flow boiling with water flowing upwards through annuli of centrally heated stainless steel tube. The test section has concentric heated tube of 14mm diameter and heated lengthes of 15 and 25 cm. The outside surface of the annulus was formed by various glass tubes of 17.25, 20 and 25.9mm diameter. System pressure is atmospheric. Inlet subcooling varied from 18 to 5 0 C. Obtained critical heat flux varied from 24.46 to 62.9 watts/cm 2 . A number of parameters having dominant influence on the critical heat flux and hydrodynamic instability (flow and pressure oscillations) preceeding the burnout have been studied. These parameters are mass flow rate, mass velocity, throttling, channel geometry (diameters ratio, length to diameter ratio, and test section length), and inlet subcooling. Flow regimes before and at the moments of burnout were observed, discussed, and compared with the existing physical model of burnout

  2. On the calculation of flow and heat transfer characteristics for CANDU-type 19-rod fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh-Shan Yueh; Ching-Chang Chieng

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study is reported of flow and heat transfer in a CANDU-type 19 rod fuel bundle. The flow domain of interest includes combinations of trangular, square, and peripheral subchannels. The basic equations of momentum and energy are solved with the standard k--ε model of turbulence. Isotropic turbulent viscosity is assumed and no secondary flow is considered for this steady-state, fully developed flow. Detailed velocity and temperature distributions with wall shear stress and Nusselt number distributions are obtained for turbulent flow of Re = 4.35 x 10 4 , 10 5 , 2 x 10 5 , and for laminar flow of Re--2400. Friction factor and heat transfer ceofficients of various subchannels inside the full bundle are compared with those of infinite rod arrays of triangular or square arrangements. The calculated velocity contours of peripheral subchannel agreed reasonably with measured data

  3. Anisotropic Stochastic Vortex Structure Method for Simulating Particle Collision in Turbulent Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizaji, Farzad; Marshall, Jeffrey; Grant, John; Jin, Xing

    2017-11-01

    Accounting for the effect of subgrid-scale turbulence on interacting particles remains a challenge when using Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) or Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches for simulation of turbulent particulate flows. The standard stochastic Lagrangian method for introducing turbulence into particulate flow computations is not effective when the particles interact via collisions, contact electrification, etc., since this method is not intended to accurately model relative motion between particles. We have recently developed the stochastic vortex structure (SVS) method and demonstrated its use for accurate simulation of particle collision in homogeneous turbulence; the current work presents an extension of the SVS method to turbulent shear flows. The SVS method simulates subgrid-scale turbulence using a set of randomly-positioned, finite-length vortices to generate a synthetic fluctuating velocity field. It has been shown to accurately reproduce the turbulence inertial-range spectrum and the probability density functions for the velocity and acceleration fields. In order to extend SVS to turbulent shear flows, a new inversion method has been developed to orient the vortices in order to generate a specified Reynolds stress field. The extended SVS method is validated in the present study with comparison to direct numerical simulations for a planar turbulent jet flow. This research was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1332472.

  4. Coupled equations for transient water flow, heat flow, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogeological systems are earth systems influenced by water. Their behaviors are governed by interacting processes, including flow of fluids, deformation of porous materials, chemical reactions, and transport of matter and energy. Here, coupling among three of these processes is considered: flow of water, heat, and ...

  5. Complexity analysis of the turbulent environmental fluid flow time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, D. T.; Nikolić-Đorić, E.; Drešković, N.; Mimić, G.

    2014-02-01

    We have used the Kolmogorov complexities, sample and permutation entropies to quantify the randomness degree in river flow time series of two mountain rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the turbulent environmental fluid, for the period 1926-1990. In particular, we have examined the monthly river flow time series from two rivers (the Miljacka and the Bosnia) in the mountain part of their flow and then calculated the Kolmogorov complexity (KL) based on the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm (LZA) (lower-KLL and upper-KLU), sample entropy (SE) and permutation entropy (PE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values in two rivers are close to each other regardless of the amplitude differences in their monthly flow rates. We have illustrated the changes in mountain river flow complexity by experiments using (i) the data set for the Bosnia River and (ii) anticipated human activities and projected climate changes. We have explored the sensitivity of considered measures in dependence on the length of time series. In addition, we have divided the period 1926-1990 into three subintervals: (a) 1926-1945, (b) 1946-1965, (c) 1966-1990, and calculated the KLL, KLU, SE, PE values for the various time series in these subintervals. It is found that during the period 1946-1965, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE and PE, in comparison to the period 1926-1990. This complexity loss may be primarily attributed to (i) human interventions, after the Second World War, on these two rivers because of their use for water consumption and (ii) climate change in recent times.

  6. Modeling of turbulent flows in cooling channels of turbo-machineries; Modelisation des ecoulements turbulents dans des canaux de refroidissement de turbomachines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidart, A.; Caltagirone, J.P.; Parneix, S. [Laboratoire MASTER-ENSCPB, 33 - Talence (France)

    1997-12-31

    The MASTER laboratory has been involved since several years in the creation and utilization of modeling tools for the prediction of 3-D turbulent flows and heat transfers in turbine blades in order to optimize the cooling systems of turbo-machineries. This paper describes one of the test-cases that has been used for the validation of the `Aquilon` calculation code developed in this aim. Then, the modeling performed with the `Fluent` industrial code in order to evaluate the possible improvements of the Aquilon code, is presented. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  7. Highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow: direct numerical simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is all around us. Even if we are familiar with every day instances of turbulence, like the smoke coming out of a chimney, it remains a not-well-understood phenomenum. As it is impossible to fully simulate turbulence to precisely take into account its effect, models must be used. These

  8. Turbulence-driven shear flow and self-regulating drift wave turbulence in a cylindrical plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    This dissertation provides an experimental test of the basic theory of the self-regulating drift wave turbulence (DWT)/sheared zonal flow (ZF) system in a cylindrical plasma device. The work is carried out from three approaches: the first explores the statistical properties of the turbulent Reynolds stress and its link to the ZF generation, the second investigates the dynamical behavior of the DWT/ZF system and the third investigates the variation of the DWT driven ZF verses magnetic field strength and ion-neutral drag. A radially sheared azimuthally symmetric plasma flow is generated by the DWT turbulent Reynolds stress which is directly measured by a multi-tip Langmuir probe. A statistical analysis shows that the cross-phase between the turbulent radial and azimuthal velocity components is the key factor determining the detailed Reynolds stress profile. The coincidence of the radial location of the non-Gaussian distribution of the turbulent Reynolds stress and the ion saturation current, as well as the properties of the joint probability distribution function (PDF) between the radial particle flux and turbulent Reynolds stress suggest that the bursts of the particle transport appear to be associated with radial transport of azimuthal momentum as well. The results link the behavior of the Reynolds stress, its statistical properties, generation of bursty radially going azimuthal momentum transport events, and the formation of the large-scale ZF. From both Langmuir probe and fast-faming imaging measurements this shear flow is found to evolve with low frequency (˜250-300Hz). The envelope of the higher frequency (above 5kHz) floating potential fluctuations associated with the DWT, the density gradient, and the turbulent radial particle flux are all modulated out of phase with the strength of the ZF. The divergence of the turbulent Reynolds stress is also modulated at the same slow time scale in a phase-coherent manner consistent with a turbulence-driven shear flow

  9. Effect of droplet interaction on droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerten, J. G. M.; Vreman, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of heat transfer and droplet concentration in turbulent flow of a mixture of dry air, water vapor, and water droplets in a differentially heated channel. In particular, we study the effects of droplet collisions by comparing results of simulations with and without droplet collision model for several overall droplet volume fractions. The results show that droplet collisions have a large influence on droplet concentration. Maximum local concentrations, which occur close to the walls of the channel, are reduced by almost an order of magnitude for the case with the highest overall volume fraction. In addition, the positive skewness of the local volume fraction is reduced by a factor of two near the walls. These findings show the importance of including four-way coupling, even in cases where the overall droplet volume fraction is only on the order of 10-4 and the Stokes number in wall units is only about 10. In spite of this large effect of droplet collisions on droplet concentration, the effect on the overall heat transfer between the walls of the channel is not more than approximately 17%. That the effect on the overall heat transfer is relatively small can be explained by the lower heat exchange area between droplets and gas in the near-wall areas, which results in a higher temperature difference between droplets and surrounding gas.

  10. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  11. Flow rate estimation using acoustic field distortions caused by turbulent flows: time-reversal approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, A L; Perez, N; Adamowski, J C, E-mail: zimmer09@gmail.com [Department of Mechatronics and Mechanical Systems Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, 05508-10 (Brazil)

    2011-05-01

    A new acoustic technique for flow rate estimation is proposed here. This technique is based on the traditional ultrasonic cross-correlation flow meter, but instead of using a continuous wave or pulse trains in each transmitter-receiver pair, the acoustic time-reversal technique is applied. The system relies on the principle that a turbulent flow with multiple vortices will cause random distortions in a given acoustic field; hence, analyzing this noise caused in the ultrasound signal by the turbulence over time allows a 'signature' or 'tag' of the flow to be defined. In other words, the vortices modify the frequency response function of the flowing system uniquely, since the distortion is assumed to be random. The use of the time-reversal procedure in the cross-correlation flow meter provides improvements in several aspects: it simplifies the signal processing needed after the reception of the signals, avoiding the use of a demodulator to obtain the signature of the vortex; the signal is focused at the position of the reception transducer and; the sensitivity is also increased because the wave travels twice in the acoustic channel. The method is theoretically discussed showing its limitations and improvements. Experimental results in a laboratory water tank are also presented.

  12. Modeling and computation of boundary-layer flows laminar, turbulent and transitional boundary layers in incompressible and compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of our book extends the modeling and calculation of boundary-layer flows to include compressible flows. The subjects cover laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers for two- and three-dimensional incompressible and compressible flows. The viscous-inviscid coupling between the boundary layer and the inviscid flow is also addressed. The book has a large number of homework problems.

  13. Adiabatic wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient influenced by separated supersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontiev Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of supersonic air flow around plane surface behind a rib perpendicular to the flow direction are performed. Research was carried out for free stream Mach number 2.25 and turbulent flow regime - Rex>2·107. Rib height was varied in range from 2 to 8 mm while boundary layer thickness at the nozzle exit section was about 6 mm. As a result adiabatic wall temperature and heat transfer coefficient are obtained for flow around plane surface behind a rib incontrast with the flow around plane surface without any disturbances.

  14. Effect of flow obstacles with various leading and trailing edges on critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioro, I.L.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Cheng, S.C.; Antoshko, Y.V.

    2001-01-01

    A joint investigation has been performed by the University of Ottawa and Chalk River Laboratories that examined the effect of the shape of the leading and trailing edges of the turbulence enhancing devices ('flow obstacles') on critical heat flux (CHF). The objective of this study was to gain a better overall understanding of the limit of CHF improvement for various obstacle designs and the impact of flow conditions on the improvements. (author)

  15. Simulation and measurement of enhanced turbulent heat transfer in a channel with periodic ribs on one principal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tongmin Liou; Jennjiang Hwang; Shihhui Chen

    1993-01-01

    This paper performs a numerical and experimental analysis to investigate the heat transfer and fluid flow behaviour in a rectangular channel flow with streamwise-periodic ribs mounted on one of the principal walls. The k --A PDM turbulence model together with a smoothed hybrid central/skew upstream difference scheme (SCSUDS) and the PISO pressure-velocity coupling algorithm was applied to solving the accelerated, separated and recirculating flows. The real-time holographic interferometry technique was adopted to measure the time-dependent temperature field in the ribbed duct. The predicted fluid flow and temperature field were tested by previous laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements and present holographic interferometry data, and reasonable agreement was achieved. By the examination of the local wall temperature distribution for the uniform wall heat flux (UHF) boundary condition the regions susceptible to the hot spots are identified. Moreover, the study provided the numerical solution to investigate the effect of geometry and flow parameters on the local as well as average heat transfer coefficients. The compact correlation of the average heat transfer coefficient was further developed and accounted for the rib height, rib spacing, and Reynolds number. (Author)

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of clustering in particle-laden turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaily, Mahdi; Mani, Ali

    2017-11-01

    Heavy inertial particles in spatially and temporally varying flows can form clusters if their relaxation time is on the order of the dissipation time scale of the flow. This regime, identified by St = O (1) , is investigated in this study using analytical tools. We show that the nonlinear variation of segregation versus St can be explained by considering a one-dimensional canonical setting where particles are subjected to an oscillatory velocity gradient that is constant in space. Our analysis shows that the Lyapunov exponent, as a measure of particle segregation, reaches a minimum at St = O (1) and becomes positive at St >> 1 and approaches zero as St -> 0 or ∞. These predictions, which are corroborated by the numerical results, are directly linked and compared against measurements of the dispersion and segregation in three-dimensional turbulence. Our analysis reveals a strongly nonlinear behavior of the Lyapunov exponents in the straining regimes of strong oscillations. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program 2 (PSAAP2) at Stanford University.

  17. Effects of traveling waves on flow separation and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Amir Mahdi; Borazjani, Iman; scientific computing; biofluids laboratory Team

    2017-11-01

    Stable leading edge vortex (LEV) is observed in many flying, hovering and also some aquatic creatures. However, the LEV stability in aquatic animal, in contrast to hovering ones, is not well understood. Here, we study the flow over an inclined plate with an undulatory motion inspired from aquatic swimmers using our immersed boundary, large-eddy simulations (LES). The angle of attack is five degrees and Reynolds number (Re) is 20,000. The undulation is a traveling wave, which has a constant amplitude of 0.01 with respect to chord length and a different wavelength and Strouhal number (St =fA/U, f: frequency, A: amplitude, and U: free stream velocity) for each case. Over a fixed plate the LEV becomes unstable as it reaches the trailing edge and sheds to the wake, whereas over the undulating plate with St =0.2 the LEV becomes stable. The visualization of time average results shows there is a favorable pressure gradient along the tangential direction in cases the LEV becomes stable, which we explain analytically by showing the correlation between the average pressure gradient, St, and wavelength. Finally, the effects of undulatory moving walls of a channel flow on the turbulent statistics is shown. This work was partly supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Grant CBET 1453982, and the Center of Computational Research (CCR) of University at Buffalo.

  18. Maximal mixing rate in turbulent stably stratified Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, C. P.; Kerswell, R. R.

    2001-11-01

    A rigorous upper bound on the long-time-averaged vertical buoyancy flux is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations for a Boussinesq fluid confined between two parallel horizontal plates a distance d apart, maintained at a constant statically stabilizing temperature difference Δ T and driven at a constant relative velocity Δ U. The upper bound on the volume and long-time-averaged vertical buoyancy flux \\cal B := limt arrow ∞ 1/t int^t0 g/ρ0 dtildet is \\cal B <= \\cal B_max=(1-16√2/Re) (Δ U)^3 /(64 √2d) where Re=Δ Ud/ν and ρ0 is some reference density. Significantly, \\cal B_max is independent of the bulk Richardson number of the flow and is achieved by an optimal solution with a mixing efficiency (or flux Richardson number) which approaches 0.5 as the Reynolds number becomes large. The time-averaged turbulent dissipation of kinetic energy and the time-averaged vertical buoyancy flux are then in equipartition for the optimising flow.

  19. Isothermal and Reactive Turbulent Jets in Cross-Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Bush, Scott; Ibrahim, Irene

    2004-11-01

    Jets in cross flow have numerous applications including vertical/short takeoff/landing (V/STOL) aircraft, cooling jets for gas turbine blades and combustion air supply inlets in gas turbine engine. The properties exhibited by these jets are dictated by complex three dimensional turbulence structures which form due to the interaction of the jet with the freestream. The isothermal tests are conducted in a wind tunnel measuring the characteristics of air jets injected perpendicular into an otherwise undisturbed air stream. Different nozzle exit geometries of the air jets were tested including circular, triangular and elongated configurations. Jets are injected in single and paired combinations with other jets to measure the effect of mutual interaction on the parameters mentioned. Quantitative velocity fields are obtained using PIV. The data obtained allows the extraction of flow parameters such as jet structure, penetration and mixing. The reacting tests include separate and combined jets of fuel/air mixture utilized to explore the stabilization of combustion at various operating conditions. Different geometrical configurations of transverse jets are tested to determine the shape and combination of jets that will optimize the jets ability to successfully stabilize a flame.

  20. Sensible Heat Flux Related to Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FLUX RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH by Jessica S. Koscinski June 2017 Thesis Advisor...KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jessica S. Koscinski 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...Sensible heat flux, turbulence kinetic energy , surf zone 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT

  1. The Effects of Land Surface Heating And Roughness Elements on the Structure and Scaling Laws of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khaled

    The atmospheric boundary-layer is the lowest 500-2000 m of the Earth's atmosphere where much of human life and ecosystem services reside. This layer responds to land surface (e.g. buoyancy and roughness elements) and slowly evolving free tropospheric (e.g. temperature and humidity lapse rates) conditions that arguably mediate and modulate biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Such response often results in spatially- and temporally-rich turbulence scales that continue to be the subject of inquiry given their significance to a plethora of applications in environmental sciences and engineering. The work here addresses key aspects of boundary layer turbulence with a focus on the role of roughness elements (vegetation canopies) and buoyancy (surface heating) in modifying the well-studied picture of shear-dominated wall-bounded turbulence. A combination of laboratory channel experiments, field experiments, and numerical simulations are used to explore three distinct aspects of boundary layer turbulence. These are: • The concept of ergodicity in turbulence statistics within canopies: It has been long-recognized that homogeneous and stationary turbulence is ergodic, but less is known about the effects of inhomogeneity introduced by the presence of canopies on the turbulence statistics. A high resolution (temporal and spatial) flume experiment is used here to test the convergence of the time statistics of turbulent scalar concentrations to their ensemble (spatio-temporal) counterpart. The findings indicate that within-canopy scalar statistics have a tendency to be ergodic, mostly in shallow layers (close to canopy top) where the sweeping flow events appear to randomize the statistics. Deeper layers within the canopy are dominated by low-dimensional (quasi-deterministic) von Karman vortices that tend to break ergodicity. • Scaling laws of turbulent velocity spectra and structure functions in near-surface atmospheric turbulence: the existence of a logarithmic scaling in the

  2. Asymptotic structure of low frequency supersonic heated jet noise using LES data to re-construct a turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian; Sassanis, Vasileios; Bres, Guillaume; Towne, Aaron; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The Goldstein-Sescu-Afsar asymptotic theory postulated that the appropriate distinguished limit in which non-parallel mean flow effects introduces a leading order change in the 'propagator' (which is related adjoint linearized Euler Green's function) within Goldstein's acoustic analogy must be when the jet spread rate is the same order as Strouhal number. We analyze the low frequency structure of the acoustic spectrum using Large-eddy simulations of two axi-symmetric jets (heated & unheated) at constant supersonic jet Mach number to obtain the mean flow for the asymptotic theory. This approach provides excellent quantitative agreement for the peak jet noise when the coefficients of the turbulence model are tuned for good agreement with the far-field acoustic data. Our aim in this talk, however, is to show the predictive capability of the asymptotics when the turbulence model in the acoustic analogy is 'exactly' re-constructed by numerically matching the length scale coefficients of an algebraic-exponential model for the 1212-component of the Reynolds stress auto-covariance tensor (1 is streamwise & 2 is radial direction) with LES data at any spatial location and temporal frequency. In this way, all information is obtained from local unsteady flow. We thank Professor Parviz Moin for supporting this work as part of the Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program 2016.

  3. Particles in wall-bounded turbulent flows deposition, re-suspension and agglomeration

    CERN Document Server

    Pozorski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The book presents an up-to-date review of turbulent two-phase flows with the dispersed phase, with an emphasis on the dynamics in the near-wall region. New insights to the flow physics are provided by direct numerical simuation and by fine experimental techniques. Also included are models of particle dynamics in wall-bounded turbulent flows, and a description of particle surface interactions including muti-layer deposition and re-suspension.

  4. Incompressible Turbulent Flow Simulation Using the κ-ɛ Model and Upwind Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the computation of turbulent flows via turbulence modeling, the treatment of the convective terms is a key issue. In the present work, we present a numerical technique for simulating two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows. In particular, the performance of the high Reynolds κ-ɛ model and a new high-order upwind scheme (adaptative QUICKEST by Kaibara et al. (2005 is assessed for 2D confined and free-surface incompressible turbulent flows. The model equations are solved with the fractional-step projection method in primitive variables. Solutions are obtained by using an adaptation of the front tracking GENSMAC (Tomé and McKee (1994 methodology for calculating fluid flows at high Reynolds numbers. The calculations are performed by using the 2D version of the Freeflow simulation system (Castello et al. (2000. A specific way of implementing wall functions is also tested and assessed. The numerical procedure is tested by solving three fluid flow problems, namely, turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate under zero-pressure gradients, and a turbulent free jet impinging onto a flat surface. The numerical method is then applied to solve the flow of a horizontal jet penetrating a quiescent fluid from an entry port beneath the free surface.

  5. Characteristic analysis of turbulent heat diffusion in a multi-compartment structure; Takukakuka kukan kozo ni okeru ranryunetsu kakusan gensho no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, C.; Fukuchi, N. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    An analysis was made on turbulent heat diffusion in a multi-compartment structure necessary for designing calorific power and environment for functional systems used in marine vessels and off-shore structures. In a multi-compartment structure, the diffusion phenomenon is complex because of movement of air flow in turbulence and buoyancy resulted from non-isothermal condition. The phenomenon is largely affected by space shapes and walls, and the conditions in heat diffusion field is governed also by shapes of opening connecting the compartments. An analysis was made by using the SIMPLE method on turbulent heat diffusion in a multi-compartment space with high Raleigh number in which natural convection is dominant. If the opening is small, the Coanda effect appears, in which air flow passing through the opening rises along the wall, wherein a high-temperature layer is formed near the ceiling, making the heat diffusion inactive. If the opening is large, a jetting flow from the opening and a large circulating flow are created, which cause active advection mixture, making temperature gradient smaller in the upper layer. Heat transfer intensity in an opening on a partition wall decays in proportion with 1/4th power of the opening ratio. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Modeling turbulent compressible flows - The mass fluctuating velocity and squared density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taulbee, D.; Vanosdol, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with single-point closure theory for compressible turbulent flow, including the effects of compressibility on the turbulence. In particular, the combination of the pressure dilatation and the dilatation dissipation, terms which appear on the turbulent kinetic energy equation, are modeled. Model parameters in these transport equations are determined by comparing predictions with boundary layer measurements. Finally, predictions with a k-epsilon model, including the new formulations, are presented for the compressible shear layer.

  7. Effects of Schmidt number on near-wall turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Woo; Yang, Kyung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Large Eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow has been performed to investigate the characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in the near-wall region. We consider a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow with a constant wall concentration. The Reynolds number under consideration is Re r = 500 based on the friction velocity and the pipe radius, and the selected Schmidt numbers (Sc) are 0.71, 5, 10, 20 and 100. Dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) models for the turbulent SGS stresses and turbulent mass fluxes were employed to close the governing equations. The current paper reports a comprehensive characterization of turbulent mass transfer in circular-pipe flow, focusing on its near-wall characteristics and Sc dependency. We start with mean fields by presenting mean velocity and concentration profiles, mean Sherwood numbers and mean mass transfer coefficients for the selected values of the parameters. After that, we present the characteristics of fluctuations including root-mean-square (rms) profiles of velocity, concentration, and mass transfer coefficient fluctuations. Turbulent mass fluxes and correlations between velocity and concentration fluctuations are also discussed. The near-wall behaviour of turbulent diffusivity and turbulent Schmidt number is shown, and other authors' correlations on their limiting behaviour towards the pipe wall are evaluated based on our LES results. The intermittent characteristics of turbulent mass transfer in pipe flow are depicted by probability density functions (pdf) of velocity and concentration fluctuations; joint pdfs between them are also presented. Instantaneous snapshots of velocity and concentration fluctuations are shown to supplement our discussion on the turbulence statistics. Finally, we report the results of octant analysis and budget calculation of concentration variance to clarify Sc-dependency of the correlation between near-wall turbulence structures and concentration fluctuation in the

  8. Post-dryout heat transfer and entrained droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.Y.; No, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that the most probable flow regime near dryout or quench front is not annular flow but churn-turbulent flow when the mass flux is low. A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is not applicable when the vapor superficial velocity is very low. This is explained by the change of main entrainment mechanism with the change of flow regime. In bubbly or slug flow a number of tiny droplets generated from bubble burst become important in the heat transfer after dryout. Therefore, the suggested correlation is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (j g * = 0.5∼4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 25%, respectively

  9. Ice slurry flow and heat transfer during flow through tubes of rectangular and slit cross-sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko Beata

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry during its flow through tubes of rectangular and slit cross-sections. Moreover, the work discusses the influence of solid particles, type of motion and cross-section on the changes in the pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient. The analysis presented in the paper allows for identification of the criterial relations used to calculate the Fanning factor and the Nusselt number for laminar and turbulent flow, taking into account elements such as phase change, which accompanies the heat transfer process. Ice slurry flow is treated as a generalized flow of a non-Newtonian fluid.

  10. A generalized sound extrapolation method for turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Siyang; Zhang, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Sound extrapolation methods are often used to compute acoustic far-field directivities using near-field flow data in aeroacoustics applications. The results may be erroneous if the volume integrals are neglected (to save computational cost), while non-acoustic fluctuations are collected on the integration surfaces. In this work, we develop a new sound extrapolation method based on an acoustic analogy using Taylor's hypothesis (Taylor 1938 Proc. R. Soc. Lon. A 164, 476-490. (doi:10.1098/rspa.1938.0032)). Typically, a convection operator is used to filter out the acoustically inefficient components in the turbulent flows, and an acoustics dominant indirect variable Dcp‧ is solved. The sound pressure p' at the far field is computed from Dcp‧ based on the asymptotic properties of the Green's function. Validations results for benchmark problems with well-defined sources match well with the exact solutions. For aeroacoustics applications: the sound predictions by the aerofoil-gust interaction are close to those by an earlier method specially developed to remove the effect of vortical fluctuations (Zhong & Zhang 2017 J. Fluid Mech. 820, 424-450. (doi:10.1017/jfm.2017.219)); for the case of vortex shedding noise from a cylinder, the off-body predictions by the proposed method match well with the on-body Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings result; different integration surfaces yield close predictions (of both spectra and far-field directivities) for a co-flowing jet case using an established direct numerical simulation database. The results suggest that the method may be a potential candidate for sound projection in aeroacoustics applications.

  11. Estimation of Several Turbulent Fluctuation Quantities Using an Approximate Pulsatile Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent fluctuation behavior is approximately modeled using a pulsatile flow model analogy.. This model follows as an extension to the turbulent laminar sublayer model developed by Sternberg (1962) to be valid for a fully turbulent flow domain. Here unsteady turbulent behavior is modeled via a sinusoidal pulsatile approach. While the individual modes of the turbulent flow fluctuation behavior are rather crudely modeled, approximate temporal integration yields plausible estimates for Root Mean Square (RMS) velocity fluctuations. RMS pressure fluctuations and spectra are of particular interest and are estimated via the pressure Poisson expression. Both RMS and Power Spectral Density (PSD), i.e. spectra are developed. Comparison with available measurements suggests reasonable agreement. An additional fluctuating quantity, i.e. RMS wall shear fluctuation is also estimated, yielding reasonable agreement with measurement.

  12. Effect of Reynolds Number in Turbulent-Flow Range on Flame Speeds of Bunsen Burner Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Lowell M; Williams, David T

    1949-01-01

    The effect of flow conditions on the geometry of the turbulent Bunsen flame was investigated. Turbulent flame speed is defined in terms of flame geometry and data are presented showing the effect of Reynolds number of flow in the range of 3000 to 35,000 on flame speed for burner diameters from 1/4 to 1 1/8 inches and three fuels -- acetylene, ethylene, and propane. The normal flame speed of an explosive mixture was shown to be an important factor in determining its turbulent flame speed, and it was deduced from the data that turbulent flame speed is a function of both the Reynolds number of the turbulent flow in the burner tube and of the tube diameter.

  13. Heating of the Solar Wind Beyond 1 AU by Turbulent Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles

    The deposition of energy into the solar wind is argued to result from the dissipation of low frequency magnetohydrodynamic turbulence via kinetic processes at spatial scales comparable to the ion gyroradius. We present a theory for heating the solar wind that relies on uid processes such as wind shear inside about 10 AU and the pickup of interstellar ions and the associated generation of waves and turbulence beyond the ionization cavity to serve as energy sources for the heating. We compare the predictions of this theory to the observed magnetic turbulence levels and solar wind temperature measured by Voyager 2 beyond 1 AU. The contribution to the heating of the solar wind provided by interstellar pickup ions is a key feature of this theory and is chie y responsible for the excellent agreement between theory and observation that is seen beyond 10 AU.

  14. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 4 Turbulence, Gas Adsorption and Release, Diesel Fuel Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    The present Volume 4 of the successful monograh package “Multiphase Flow Dynamics”is devoted to selected Chapters of the multiphase fluid dynamics that are important for practical applications but did not find place in the previous volumes. The state of the art of the turbulence modeling in multiphase flows is presented. As introduction, some basics of the single phase boundary layer theory including some important scales and flow oscillation characteristics in pipes and rod bundles are presented. Then the scales characterizing the dispersed flow systems are presented. The description of the turbulence is provided at different level of complexity: simple algebraic models for eddy viscosity, simple algebraic models based on the Boussinesq hypothesis, modification of the boundary layer share due to modification of the bulk turbulence, modification of the boundary layer share due to nucleate boiling. The role of the following forces on the mathematical description of turbulent flows is discussed: the lift fo...

  15. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  16. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii; Beus, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  17. An empirical solution to turbulent natural convection and radiation heat transfer in square and rectangular enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shati, A.K.A.; Blakey, S.G.; Beck, S.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of natural turbulent convection with the interaction of surface radiation in a rectangular enclosure have previously been numerically and theoretically studied. The analyses were carried out over a wide range of enclosure aspect ratios ranging from 0.0625 to 16, different enclosure sizes, with cold wall temperatures ranging from 283 to 373 K, and temperature ratios ranging from 1.02 to 2.61. The work was carried out using four fluids (Argon, Air, Helium and Hydrogen; whose properties vary with temperature). These can be used to calculate Nusselt number for pure natural convection and also to calculate the ratio between convection to radiation heat transfer for both square and rectangular enclosures. This work extends these results by providing an empirical solution for the case of radiation and natural convection in square and rectangular enclosures and also provides a correlation equation to calculate the total Nusselt number for these cases. This method allows the simple calculation of either the total heat transfer rate, given the fluid, the geometry and the temperatures of the hot and cold walls, or via a straightforward iterative technique, the temperature of one wall given the other wall temperature and the total heat transfer. -- Highlights: ► Previous work has non-dimensionalised flow in enclosures with and without radiation. ► This extends the work by enabling a simple iterative technique to work out temperatures for total heat transfer rate. ► The provided solution has a maximum deviation of 7.7%. ► The method works for a variety of enclosures sizes, aspect ratios, temperatures and gases

  18. The role of zonal flows in the saturation of multi-scale gyrokinetic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Howard, N. T. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The 2D spectrum of the saturated electric potential from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that include both ion and electron scales (multi-scale) in axisymmetric tokamak geometry is analyzed. The paradigm that the turbulence is saturated when the zonal (axisymmetic) ExB flow shearing rate competes with linear growth is shown to not apply to the electron scale turbulence. Instead, it is the mixing rate by the zonal ExB velocity spectrum with the turbulent distribution function that competes with linear growth. A model of this mechanism is shown to be able to capture the suppression of electron-scale turbulence by ion-scale turbulence and the threshold for the increase in electron scale turbulence when the ion-scale turbulence is reduced. The model computes the strength of the zonal flow velocity and the saturated potential spectrum from the linear growth rate spectrum. The model for the saturated electric potential spectrum is applied to a quasilinear transport model and shown to accurately reproduce the electron and ion energy fluxes of the non-linear gyrokinetic multi-scale simulations. The zonal flow mixing saturation model is also shown to reproduce the non-linear upshift in the critical temperature gradient caused by zonal flows in ion-scale gyrokinetic simulations.

  19. Advances in universal scaling for broadband turbulent noise in internal flow devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Violato, D.; Jong, A.T. de; Golliard, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the scalability of broadband turbulent noise in internal pipe flows. It discusses a universal scaling approach for broadband turbulent noise that is based on surface acoustic power modeled by ANSYS Fluent. This investigation proposes a strategy for amplitude scaling at

  20. The Lag Model, a Turbulence Model for Wall Bounded Flows Including Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new class of turbulence model is described for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows. A specific turbulence model is demonstrated, with results for favorable and adverse pressure gradient flowfields. Separation predictions are as good or better than either Spalart Almaras or SST models, do not require specification of wall distance, and have similar or reduced computational effort compared with these models.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulence induced secondary flows in stationary and rotating straight square ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudjai, W.; Juntasaro, V.; Juttijudata, V.

    2018-01-01

    The accuracy of predicting turbulence induced secondary flows is crucially important in many industrial applications such as turbine blade internal cooling passages in a gas turbine and fuel rod bundles in a nuclear reactor. A straight square duct is popularly used to reveal the characteristic of turbulence induced secondary flows which consists of two counter rotating vortices distributed in each corner of the duct. For a rotating duct, the flow can be divided into the pressure side and the suction side. The turbulence induced secondary flows are converted to the Coriolis force driven two large circulations with a pair of additional vortices on the pressure wall due to the rotational effect. In this paper, the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulence induced secondary flows in a straight square duct is performed using the ANSYS FLUENT CFD software. A dynamic kinetic energy subgrid-scale model is used to describe the three-dimensional incompressible turbulent flows in the stationary and the rotating straight square ducts. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and the hydraulic diameter is 300 with the various rotation numbers for the rotating cases. The flow is assumed fully developed by imposing the constant pressure gradient in the streamwise direction. For the rotating cases, the rotational axis is placed perpendicular to the streamwise direction. The simulation results on the secondary flows and the turbulent statistics are found to be in good agreement with the available Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data. Finally, the details of the Coriolis effects are discussed.

  2. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re D = 18 100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data

  3. Vibration of heat exchange components in liquid and two-phase cross-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, M.J.

    1978-05-01

    Heat exchange components must be analysed at the design stage to avoid flow-induced vibration problems. This paper presents information required to formulate flow-induced vibration excitation mechanisms in liquid and two-phase cross-flow. Three basic excitation mechanisms are considered, namely: 1) fluidelastic instability, 2) periodic wake shedding, and 3) response to random flow turbulence. The vibration excitation information is deduced from vibration response data for various types of tube bundles. Sources of information are: 1) fundamental studies on tube bundles, 2) model testing, 3) field measurements, and 4) operating experiences. Fluidelastic instability is formulated in terms of dimensionless flow velocity and dimensionless damping; periodic wake shedding in terms of Strouhal number and lift coefficient; and random turbulence excitation in terms of statistical parameters of random forces. Guidelines are recommended for design purposes. (author)

  4. Predictions for heat transfer characteristics in a natural draft reactor cooling system using a second moment closure turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, M.; Maekawa, I.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical study is performed on the natural draft reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). In the cooling system, buoyancy driven heated upward flow could be in the mixed convection regime that is accompanied by heat transfer impairment. Also, the heating wall condition is asymmetric with regard to the channel cross section. These flow regime and thermal boundary conditions may invalidate the use of design correlation. To precisely simulate the flow and thermal fields within the RCCS, the second moment closure turbulence model is applied. Two types of the RCCS channel geometry are selected to make a comparison: an annular duct with fins on the outer surface of the inner circular wall, and a multi-rectangular duct. The prediction shows that the local heat transfer coefficient on the RCCS with finned annular duct is less than 1/6 of that estimated with Dittus-Boelter correlation. Much portion of the natural draft airflow does not contribute cooling at all because mainstream escapes from the narrow gaps between the fins. This result and thus the finned annulus design are unacceptable from the viewpoint for structural integrity of the RCCS wall boundary. The performance of the multi-rectangular duct design is acceptable that the RCCS maximum temperature is less than 400 degree centigrade even when the flow rate is halved from the designed condition. (author)

  5. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF CAVITY FLOW AND FLOW OVER AIRCRAFT COMPARTMENT USING SEMI-EMPIRICAL TURBULENCE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the validation and application of CFD code for turbulent flows. Two-dimensional un- steady flows in the cavities and compartments and three-dimensional flow in the compartment of complex geometry have been considered. Two turbulence parameter oriented models are used.Numerical simulation of unsteady transonic flow (Mоо=0.74 in a narrow channel with a cavity inside has been conducted. The dependence of the static pressure on time at fixed points in space has been obtained. The fast Fourier trans- form has been applied for processing data of static pressure. The difference of 6-10% between the numerical and experi-mental data has been obtained.The computations of unsteady transonic cavity flow with Mach number Mоо=0.85 have been performed. Low fre- quency oscillations of the static pressure in several fixed points in space have been obtained. Power spectrum of oscilla- tions at the center of the cavity is compared with experimental data and Rossiter modes. An acceptable agreement between experimental and computed data has been achieved. The influence of geometrical factors on the frequency characteristics of the flow has been investigated. For this purpose two round flaps have been added to the cavity. The most low-frequency oscillation modes changed by the presence of the flaps. The first mode was gone, the second mode amplitude decreased and the third mode amplitude significantly decreased. The changes in height of protruding part of the geometry to the external flow have led to changes in pressure pulsation amplitude without changing the frequency. The spectral functions obtained while using the two considered models of turbulence have been compared for this case. It is found that the frequency values are only slightly different; the main difference is present at the amplitude of pulsations.The effect of deflection of flat flap on the non-stationary subsonic flow parameters in a cylindrical body with an inner

  6. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2018-01-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  7. Free convection film flows and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Shang, Deyi

    2010-01-01

    Presents development of systematic studies for hydrodynamics and heat and mass transfer in laminar free convection, accelerating film boiling and condensation of Newtonian fluids, and accelerating film flow of non-Newtonian power-law fluids. This book provides a system of analysis models with a developed velocity component method.

  8. Editorial to "Heat flow: recent advances"

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Vladimír; Huang, S.; Ravat, D.; Verdoya, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-3 ISSN 1437-3254 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : geothermics * climate change * terrestrial heat flow Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: Volcanology Impact factor: 2.283, year: 2016

  9. Coherent structures in high Reynolds number turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Armin; Nichols, Joseph; Jovanovic, Mihailo

    2017-11-01

    Spatio-temporal frequency response analysis of stochastically-forced linearized Navier-Stokes equations enables efficient computation of the energy amplification as well as estimation of the convection velocity and spatial structure of fluctuations. For a turbulent channel flow with Rτ = 2003 , we build on recent work by Zare, Jovanovic, and Georgiou (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 812, 2017) to determine the forcing statistics to the linearized model that provide consistency with the result of nonlinear simulations in matching one-point velocity correlations. The frequency response of the resulting model can be used to estimate the convection velocity for various spatial length scales as a function of the wall-normal distance. We examine two-point correlations of the fluctuating velocity field and the wall-normal support of the most amplified spatial structures. Our results provide insight into the validity of Taylor's hypothesis as well as the functional forms of two-point correlations that result from Townsend's attached-eddy hypothesis.

  10. Flow, turbulence, and pollutant dispersion in urban atmospheresa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, H. J. S.; Zajic, D.; Di Sabatino, S.; Dimitrova, R.; Hedquist, B.; Dallman, A.

    2010-05-01

    The past half century has seen an unprecedented growth of the world's urban population. While urban areas proffer the highest quality of life, they also inflict environmental degradation that pervades a multitude of space-time scales. In the atmospheric context, stressors of human (anthropogenic) origin are mainly imparted on the lower urban atmosphere and communicated to regional, global, and smaller scales via transport and turbulence processes. Conversely, changes in all scales are transmitted to urban regions through the atmosphere. The fluid dynamics of the urban atmospheric boundary layer and its prediction is the theme of this overview paper, where it is advocated that decision and policymaking in urban atmospheric management must be based on integrated models that incorporate cumulative effects of anthropogenic forcing, atmospheric dynamics, and social implications (e.g., health outcomes). An integrated modeling system juxtaposes a suite of submodels, each covering a particular range of scales while communicating with models of neighboring scales. Unresolved scales of these models need to be parametrized based on flow physics, for which developments in fluid dynamics play an indispensible role. Illustrations of how controlled laboratory, outdoor (field), and numerical experiments can be used to understand and parametrize urban atmospheric processes are presented, and the utility of predictive models is exemplified. Field experiments in real urban areas are central to urban atmospheric research, as validation of predictive models requires data that encapsulate four-dimensional complexities of nature.

  11. Rigid spherical particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhuis, Dennis; Verschoof, Ruben A.; Mathai, Varghese; Huisman, Sander G.; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2016-11-01

    Many industrial and maritime processes are subject to enormous frictional losses. Reducing these losses even slightly will already lead to large financial and environmental benefits. The understanding of the underlying physical mechanism of frictional drag reduction is still limited, for example, in bubbly drag reduction there is an ongoing debate whether deformability and bubble size are the key parameters. In this experimental study we report high precision torque measurements using rigid non-deformable spherical particles in highly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow with Reynolds numbers up to 2 ×106 . The particles are made of polystyrene with an average density of 1.036 g cm-3 and three different diameters: 8mm, 4mm, and 1.5mm. Particle volume fractions of up to 6% were used. By varying the particle diameter, density ratio of the particles and the working fluid, and volume fraction of the particles, the effect on the torque is compared to the single phase case. These systematic measurements show that adding rigid spherical particles only results in very minor drag reduction. This work is financially supported by Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) by VIDI Grant Number 13477.

  12. An experimental study of turbulent two-phase flow in hydraulic jumps and application of a triple decomposition technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hang; Felder, Stefan; Chanson, Hubert

    2014-07-01

    Intense turbulence develops in the two-phase flow region of hydraulic jump, with a broad range of turbulent length and time scales. Detailed air-water flow measurements using intrusive phase-detection probes enabled turbulence characterisation of the bubbly flow, although the phenomenon is not a truly random process because of the existence of low-frequency, pseudo-periodic fluctuating motion in the jump roller. This paper presents new measurements of turbulent properties in hydraulic jumps, including turbulence intensity, longitudinal and transverse integral length and time scales. The results characterised very high turbulent levels and reflected a combination of both fast and slow turbulent components. The respective contributions of the fast and slow motions were quantified using a triple decomposition technique. The decomposition of air-water detection signal revealed "true" turbulent characteristics linked with the fast, microscopic velocity turbulence of hydraulic jumps. The high-frequency turbulence intensities were between 0.5 and 1.5 close to the jump toe, and maximum integral turbulent length scales were found next to the bottom. Both decreased in the flow direction with longitudinal turbulence dissipation. The results highlighted the considerable influence of hydrodynamic instabilities of the flow on the turbulence characterisation. The successful application of triple decomposition technique provided the means for the true turbulence properties of hydraulic jumps.

  13. Turbulent flow and temperature noise simulation by a multiparticle Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.; Overton, R.S.

    1980-10-01

    A statistical method of simulating real-time temperature fluctuations in liquid sodium pipe flow, for potential application to the estimation of temperature signals generated by subassembly blockages in LMFBRs is described. The method is based on the empirical characterisation of the flow by turbulence intensity and macroscale, radial velocity correlations and spectral form. These are used to produce realisations of the correlated motion of successive batches of representative 'marker particles' released at discrete time intervals into the flow. Temperature noise is generated by the radial mixing of the particles as they move downstream from an assumed mean temperature profile, where they acquire defined temperatures. By employing multi-particle batches, it is possible to perform radial heat transfer calculations, resulting in axial dissipation of the temperature noise levels. A simulated temperature-time signal is built up by recording the temperature at a given point in the flow as each batch of particles reaches the radial measurement plane. This is an advantage over conventional techniques which can usually only predict time-averaged parameters. (U.K.)

  14. Numerical investigation of flow over a sphere using LES and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Jackson, P.L.; Ackerman, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of forced convection of air for flow over a sphere are presented. The primary aim is to determine if FLUENT, a commercial computational fluid dynamics software package, is capable of providing the solution for heat transfer in a three dimensional massively separating flow. Spalart-Allmaras, a one-equation turbulence model and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) are used in the present study. Simulations are performed in the range of Reynolds numbers from 10 3 to 1.5 x 10 5 with a Prandtl number of 0.71. The mean Nusselt number over the sphere predicted by both models are in good agreement with both measurements and empirical correlations. For Reynolds number of 10 4 , the mean Nusselt number over the sphere predicted by LES is 92.92 and predicted by the Spalart-Allmaras model is 94.55 on a coarse grid and 92.94 on a finer grid. The differences between the predicted values and one of the well-established empirical corrections is 0%, 1.7% and 0.02% respectively. In addition, the agreement with previous observations is reasonable for pressure coefficients and skin friction coefficients along the sphere. The present study has established that commercially-available software like FLUENT can provide a reasonable good solution of complicated flow structures, including flow with separation. (author)

  15. PIV and DNS analyses of viscoelastic turbulent flows behind a rectangular orifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Takahiro; Motozawa, Masaaki; Tsurumi, Daisei; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Viscoelastic fluid turbulence in relaxing and non-equilibrium flow is investigated. • Numerical and experimental results of viscoelastic turbulent orifice flow are provided. • DNS result using Giesekus model agrees well with the experimental one by surfactant solution. • Formation of Kelvin–Helmholtz vortices behind the orifice weakens in viscoelastic flows. • Highly viscoelastic flow reduces the form drag, but increases the skin friction due to extra stress. -- Abstract: We performed PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements and DNS (direct numerical simulations) on turbulent orifice flows for the Newtonian fluid and viscoelastic fluids, and compared their results with emphasis on turbulence statistics and vortical motions just behind the orifice rib. In the experiment, a cationic surfactant solution of CTAC (cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) was chosen as the viscoelastic fluid that is known to provide substantial drag reduction in the case of smooth-wall turbulence. In the viscoelastic flows, the formation of the Kelvin–Helmholtz vortices emanating from the orifice edge was found to be attenuated compared to the Newtonian case, resulting in the suppression of turbulent eddies and Reynolds shear stress behind the orifice. However, the variation of the drag depended on the Reynolds number and the surfactant concentration (or the Weissenberg number): that is, the drag-reducing effect can be achieved only in limited conditions or low Reynolds-number flows. Although DNS results was found to be in qualitative agreement with the experimental data, we discussed also inconsistency between the experimental and DNS results

  16. Numerical study of an impinging jet to a turbulent channel flow in a T-Junction configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we report on Large Eddy Simulations of an impinging planar jet to a turbulent channel flow in a T-Junction configuration. Due to its capacity for mixing and heat transfer enhancement, this type of flow is encountered in various industrial applications. In particular, our work is related to the emergency cooling systems of pressurized water reactors. As is well known, this type of flow is dominated by a large separation bubble downstream the jet impingement location. Secondary regions of flow separation are predicted both upstream and downstream the impinging jet. We describe how these separation regions interact with the shear layer that is formed by the injection of the jet to the crossflow, and how they affect the mixing process. In our talk we further examine the influence of the jet's velocity to characteristic quantities of the jet, such as penetration length and expansion angle, as well as to the first and second-order statistics of the flow.

  17. Interaction between sheared flows and turbulent transport in magnetized fusion-grade plasmas; Interaction entre ecoulements cisailles et transport turbulent dans les plasmas de fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M.

    2008-11-15

    The H confinement regime is set when the heating power reaches a threshold value P{sub c} and is linked to the formation of a transport barrier in the edge region of the plasma. Such a barrier is characterized by a high pressure gradient and is submitted to ELM (edge localized mode) instabilities. ELM instabilities trigger violent quasi-periodical ejections of matter and heat that induce quasi-periodical relaxations of the transport barrier called relaxation oscillations. In this work we studied the interaction between sheared flows and turbulence in fusion plasmas. In particular, we studied the complex dynamics of a transport barrier and we show through a simulation that resonant magnetic perturbations could control relaxation oscillations without a significant loss of confinement

  18. Turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting flows: Theory and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, T; Kleeorin, N; Liberman, M; Lipatnikov, A N; Rogachevskii, I; Yu, R

    2017-11-01

    The theory of turbulent diffusion of chemically reacting gaseous admixtures developed previously [T. Elperin et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 053001 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.90.053001] is generalized for large yet finite Reynolds numbers and the dependence of turbulent diffusion coefficient on two parameters, the Reynolds number and Damköhler number (which characterizes a ratio of turbulent and reaction time scales), is obtained. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a finite-thickness reaction wave for the first-order chemical reactions propagating in forced, homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible turbulence are performed to validate the theoretically predicted effect of chemical reactions on turbulent diffusion. It is shown that the obtained DNS results are in good agreement with the developed theory.

  19. Angular momentum transport and turbulence in laboratory models of Keplerian flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paoletti, M.S.; van Gils, Dennis Paulus Maria; Dubrulle, B.; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present angular momentum transport (torque) measurements in two recent experimental studies of the turbulent flow between independently rotating cylinders. In addition to these studies, we reanalyze prior torque measurements to expand the range of control parameters for the experimental

  20. A High Order Accuracy Computational Tool for Unsteady Turbulent Flows and Acoustics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of this research effort is to develop a higher order unsteady turbulent flow solver based on the FDV method, and to exploit its attributes of...