WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbulent energy reductions

  1. An error reduction algorithm to improve lidar turbulence estimates for wind energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Newman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Remote-sensing devices such as lidars are currently being investigated as alternatives to cup anemometers on meteorological towers for the measurement of wind speed and direction. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds at heights spanning an entire turbine rotor disk and can be easily moved from one location to another, they measure different values of turbulence than an instrument on a tower. Current methods for improving lidar turbulence estimates include the use of analytical turbulence models and expensive scanning lidars. While these methods provide accurate results in a research setting, they cannot be easily applied to smaller, vertically profiling lidars in locations where high-resolution sonic anemometer data are not available. Thus, there is clearly a need for a turbulence error reduction model that is simpler and more easily applicable to lidars that are used in the wind energy industry. In this work, a new turbulence error reduction algorithm for lidars is described. The Lidar Turbulence Error Reduction Algorithm, L-TERRA, can be applied using only data from a stand-alone vertically profiling lidar and requires minimal training with meteorological tower data. The basis of L-TERRA is a series of physics-based corrections that are applied to the lidar data to mitigate errors from instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination. These corrections are applied in conjunction with a trained machine-learning model to improve turbulence estimates from a vertically profiling WINDCUBE v2 lidar. The lessons learned from creating the L-TERRA model for a WINDCUBE v2 lidar can also be applied to other lidar devices. L-TERRA was tested on data from two sites in the Southern Plains region of the United States. The physics-based corrections in L-TERRA brought regression line slopes much closer to 1 at both sites and significantly reduced the sensitivity of lidar turbulence errors to atmospheric stability. The accuracy of machine

  2. An Error-Reduction Algorithm to Improve Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Clifton, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Currently, cup anemometers on meteorological (met) towers are used to measure wind speeds and turbulence intensity to make decisions about wind turbine class and site suitability. However, as modern turbine hub heights increase and wind energy expands to complex and remote sites, it becomes more difficult and costly to install met towers at potential sites. As a result, remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are now commonly used by wind farm managers and researchers to estimate the flow field at heights spanned by a turbine. While lidars can accurately estimate mean wind speeds and wind directions, there is still a large amount of uncertainty surrounding the measurement of turbulence with lidars. This uncertainty in lidar turbulence measurements is one of the key roadblocks that must be overcome in order to replace met towers with lidars for wind energy applications. In this talk, a model for reducing errors in lidar turbulence estimates is presented. Techniques for reducing errors from instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination are combined in the model to produce a corrected value of the turbulence intensity (TI), a commonly used parameter in wind energy. In the next step of the model, machine learning techniques are used to further decrease the error in lidar TI estimates.

  3. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  4. Wind energy impact of turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hölling, Michae; Ivanell, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the results of the seminar ""Wind Energy and the Impact of Turbulence on the Conversion Process"" which was supported from three societies, namely the EUROMech, EAWE and ERCOFATC and took place in Oldenburg, Germany in spring 2012.The seminar was one of the first scientific meetings devoted to the common topic of wind energy and basic turbulence. The established community of researchers working on the challenging puzzle of turbulence for decades met the quite young community of researchers, who face the upcoming challenges in the fast growing field of wind energy application

  5. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  6. Solution of functional equations and reduction of dimension in the local energy transfer theory of incompressible, three-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlack, M.; McComb, W. D.; Quinn, A. P.

    2001-02-01

    It is shown that the set of integrodifferential and algebraic functional equations of the local energy transfer theory may be considerably reduced in dimension for the case of isotropic turbulence. This is achieved without restricting the solution space. The basis for this is a complete analytical solution to the functional equations Q(kt,t')=H(kt,t')Q(kt',t') and H(kt,s)H(ks,t')=H(kt,t'). The solution is proved to depend only on a single function φ(kt) solely determining Q and H. Hence the dimension of both the dependent and the independent variables is reduced by one. From the latter, the corresponding two integrodifferential equations are lowered to a single integrodifferential equation for φ(kt), extended by an integral side condition on the k dependence of φ(kt). In the limit ν-->0, a partial solution to the reduced set of equations is presented in the Appendix.

  7. Analysis of Drag Reduction Methods and Mechanisms of Turbulent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yunqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent flow is a difficult issue in fluid dynamics, the rules of which have not been totally revealed up to now. Fluid in turbulent state will result in a greater frictional force, which must consume great energy. Therefore, it is not only an important influence in saving energy and improving energy utilization rate but also an extensive application prospect in many fields, such as ship domain and aerospace. Firstly, bionic drag reduction technology is reviewed and is a hot research issue now, the drag reduction mechanism of body surface structure is analyzed, such as sharks, earthworms, and dolphins. Besides, we make a thorough study of drag reduction characteristics and mechanisms of microgrooved surface and compliant wall. Then, the relevant drag reduction technologies and mechanisms are discussed, focusing on the microbubbles, the vibrant flexible wall, the coating, the polymer drag reduction additives, superhydrophobic surface, jet surface, traveling wave surface drag reduction, and the composite drag reduction methods. Finally, applications and advancements of the drag reduction technology in turbulence are prospected.

  8. Turbulent drag reduction by additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulmatova, D.

    2013-01-01

    Drag reduction involves many subjects of interest such as polymer science, fluid mechanics and applied mathematics. The use of additives to enhance flow in petroleum pipelines has received the greatest attention due to a significant commercial success. In this study, we study the effect of the

  9. Superhydrophobic Drag Reduction in Various Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, James W.; Tuteja, Anish; Perlin, Marc; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHSs) have been studied exhaustively in laminar flow applications while interest in SHS drag reduction in turbulent flow applications has been increasing steadily. In this discussion, we will highlight recent advances of SHS applications in various high-Reynolds number flows. We will address the application of mechanically robust and scalable spray SHSs in three cases: fully-developed internal flow; a near-zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer; and an axisymmetric DARPA SUBOFF model. The model will be towed in the University of Michigan's Physical Model Basin. Experimental measurements of streamwise pressure drop and the near-wall flow via Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry will be discussed where applicable. Moreover, integral measurement of the total resistance of the SUBOFF model, with and without SHS application, will be examined. The SUBOFF model extends 2.6 m and is 0.3 m in diameter, and will be tested at water depths of three to six model diameters. Previous investigation of these SHSs have proven that skin-friction savings of 20% or more can be attained for friction Reynolds numbers greater than of 1,000. This project was carried out as part of the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) MURI (Multidisciplinary University Research Initiatives) program (Grant No. N00014-12-1-0874) managed by Dr. Ki-Han Kim and led by Dr. Steven L. Ceccio.

  10. Turbulent energy generated by accelerations and shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, K.O.

    1986-01-01

    The turbulent energy generated at the interface between two fluids undergoing a constant acceleration or a shock is calculated. Assuming linear density profiles in the mixed region we find E/sub turbulent//E/sub directed/ = 2.3A 2 % (constant acceleration) and 9.3A 2 % (shock), where A is the Atwood number. Diffusion models predict somewhat less turbulent energy and a density profile with a tail extending into the lower density fluid. Eddy sizes are approximately 27% (constant acceleration) and 17% (shock) of the mixing depth into the heavier fluid. 6 refs., 3 figs

  11. Turbulent energy losses during orchard heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Two rapid-response drag anemometers and low time constant thermocouples, all at 4 m above a heated orchard floor, sampled wind component in the vertical direction and temperature at 30 Hz. The turbulent heat flux calculated revealed not more than 10% of the heat lost from the orchard was via turbulent transort. The observations failed to support previous estimates that at least a third of the energy applied was lost through turbulent transport. Underestimation of heat loss due to mean flow and a newly revealed flux due to spatial variations in the mean flow may explain the unaccounted for loss.

  12. Spectral Reduction of Two and Three-Dimensional Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, John; Shadwick, B. A.; Morrison, P. J.

    2000-10-01

    The method of spectral reduction(J. C. Bowman et al. Phys. Rev. Lett.) 83, 5491 (1999) performs a coarse-graining in wavenumber space to greatly reduce the number of modes required to simulate incompressible homogeneous turbulence. It has recently been extended from two to three dimensions. A Liouville theorem for the inviscid dynamics leads to statistical equipartition solutions. However, if the wavenumber bins are of nonuniform size (as is desirable for efficiency), an additional bin-dependent rescaling of time by the bin size must be introduced to obtain the correct equipartition of modal (rather than bin) energies. Unfortunately, a practical numerical method has not yet been developed to solve the rescaled spectrally reduced equations. However, for the two dimensional enstrophy cascade, this rescaling is shown not to be necessary to obtain the correct small-scale nonlinear relaxation. Spectral reduction in its present form may thus be ideally suited to certain two-dimensional plasma turbulence problems (e.g. as a subgrid model).

  13. Drag Reduction for Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows Using an Oscillating Wall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogard, David

    2000-01-01

    This research program used experimental measurements and computational simulations to study the drag reduction, and the resulting effects on turbulence structure, for a turbulent wall flow subjected...

  14. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grete, Philipp; O'Shea, Brian W.; Beckwith, Kris; Schmidt, Wolfram; Christlieb, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields, compressibility, and turbulence are important factors in many terrestrial and astrophysical processes. While energy dynamics, i.e., how energy is transferred within and between kinetic and magnetic reservoirs, has been previously studied in the context of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, we extend shell-to-shell energy transfer analysis to the compressible regime. We derive four new transfer functions specifically capturing compressibility effects in the kinetic and magnetic cascade, and capturing energy exchange via magnetic pressure. To illustrate their viability, we perform and analyze four simulations of driven isothermal MHD turbulence in the sub- and supersonic regime with two different codes. On the one hand, our analysis reveals robust characteristics across regime and numerical method. For example, energy transfer between individual scales is local and forward for both cascades with the magnetic cascade being stronger than the kinetic one. Magnetic tension and magnetic pressure related transfers are less local and weaker than the cascades. We find no evidence for significant nonlocal transfer. On the other hand, we show that certain functions, e.g., the compressive component of the magnetic energy cascade, exhibit a more complex behavior that varies both with regime and numerical method. Having established a basis for the analysis in the compressible regime, the method can now be applied to study a broader parameter space.

  15. Redistribution of Kinetic Energy in Turbulent Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pumir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In statistically homogeneous turbulent flows, pressure forces provide the main mechanism to redistribute kinetic energy among fluid elements, without net contribution to the overall energy budget. This holds true in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D flows, which show fundamentally different physics. As we demonstrate here, pressure forces act on fluid elements very differently in these two cases. We find in numerical simulations that in 3D pressure forces strongly accelerate the fastest fluid elements, and that in 2D this effect is absent. In 3D turbulence, our findings put forward a mechanism for a possibly singular buildup of energy, and thus may shed new light on the smoothness problem of the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in 3D.

  16. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  17. Influence of polymer additives on turbulent energy cascading in forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence studied by direct numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Feng-Chen; Cai Wei-Hua; Zhang Hong-Na; Wang Yue

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) were performed for the forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence (FHIT) with/without polymer additives in order to elaborate the characteristics of the turbulent energy cascading influenced by drag-reducing effects. The finite elastic non-linear extensibility-Peterlin model (FENE-P) was used as the conformation tensor equation for the viscoelastic polymer solution. Detailed analyses of DNS data were carried out in this paper for the turbulence scaling law and the topological dynamics of FHIT as well as the important turbulent parameters, including turbulent kinetic energy spectra, enstrophy and strain, velocity structure function, small-scale intermittency, etc. A natural and straightforward definition for the drag reduction rate was also proposed for the drag-reducing FHIT based on the decrease degree of the turbulent kinetic energy. It was found that the turbulent energy cascading in the FHIT was greatly modified by the drag-reducing polymer additives. The enstrophy and the strain fields in the FHIT of the polymer solution were remarkably weakened as compared with their Newtonian counterparts. The small-scale vortices and the small-scale intermittency were all inhibited by the viscoelastic effects in the FHIT of the polymer solution. However, the scaling law in a fashion of extended self-similarity for the FHIT of the polymer solution, within the presently simulated range of Weissenberg numbers, had no distinct differences compared with that of the Newtonian fluid case

  18. Improving Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer F.; Clifton, Andrew; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Klein, Petra

    2016-10-06

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. This presentation primarily focuses on the physics-based corrections, which include corrections for instrument noise, volume averaging, and variance contamination. As different factors affect TI under different stability conditions, the combination of physical corrections applied in L-TERRA changes depending on the atmospheric stability during each 10-minute time period. This stability-dependent version of L-TERRA performed well at both sites, reducing TI error and bringing lidar TI estimates closer to estimates from instruments on towers. However, there is still scatter evident in the lidar TI estimates, indicating that there are physics that are not being captured in the current version of L-TERRA. Two options are discussed for modeling the remainder of the TI error physics in L-TERRA: machine learning and lidar simulations. Lidar simulations appear to be a better approach, as they can help improve understanding of atmospheric effects on TI error and do not require a large training data set.

  19. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  20. Drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces in turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Roberta; Mollicone, Jean-Paul; Battista, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    The drag reduction induced by superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated in a turbulent pipe flow. Wetted superhydrophobic surfaces are shown to trap gas bubbles in their asperities. This stops the liquid from coming in direct contact with the wall in that location, allowing the flow to slip over the air bubbles. We consider a well-defined texture with streamwise grooves at the walls in which the gas is expected to be entrapped. This configuration is modeled with alternating no-slip and shear-free boundary conditions at the wall. With respect to the classical turbulent pipe flow, a substantial drag reduction is observed which strongly depends on the grooves' dimension and on the solid fraction, i.e., the ratio between the solid wall surface and the total surface of the pipe's circumference. The drag reduction is due to the mean slip velocity at the wall which increases the flow rate at a fixed pressure drop. The enforced boundary conditions also produce peculiar turbulent structures which on the contrary decrease the flow rate. The two concurrent effects provide an overall flow rate increase as demonstrated by means of the mean axial momentum balance. This equation provides the balance between the mean pressure gradient, the Reynolds stress, the mean flow rate, and the mean slip velocity contributions.

  1. Energy transfer in turbulence under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzicotti, Michele; Aluie, Hussein; Biferale, Luca; Linkmann, Moritz

    2018-03-01

    It is known that rapidly rotating turbulent flows are characterized by the emergence of simultaneous upscale and downscale energy transfer. Indeed, both numerics and experiments show the formation of large-scale anisotropic vortices together with the development of small-scale dissipative structures. However the organization of interactions leading to this complex dynamics remains unclear. Two different mechanisms are known to be able to transfer energy upscale in a turbulent flow. The first is characterized by two-dimensional interactions among triads lying on the two-dimensional, three-component (2D3C)/slow manifold, namely on the Fourier plane perpendicular to the rotation axis. The second mechanism is three-dimensional and consists of interactions between triads with the same sign of helicity (homochiral). Here, we present a detailed numerical study of rotating flows using a suite of high-Reynolds-number direct numerical simulations (DNS) within different parameter regimes to analyze both upscale and downscale cascade ranges. We find that the upscale cascade at wave numbers close to the forcing scale is generated by increasingly dominant homochiral interactions which couple the three-dimensional bulk and the 2D3C plane. This coupling produces an accumulation of energy in the 2D3C plane, which then transfers energy to smaller wave numbers thanks to the two-dimensional mechanism. In the forward cascade range, we find that the energy transfer is dominated by heterochiral triads and is dominated primarily by interaction within the fast manifold where kz≠0 . We further analyze the energy transfer in different regions in the real-space domain. In particular, we distinguish high-strain from high-vorticity regions and we uncover that while the mean transfer is produced inside regions of strain, the rare but extreme events of energy transfer occur primarily inside the large-scale column vortices.

  2. Similarity reduction of a three-dimensional model of the far turbulent wake behind a towed body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexey

    2011-12-01

    Semi-empirical three-dimensional model of turbulence in the approximation of the far turbulent wake behind a towed body in a passively stratified medium is considered. The sought-for quantities of the model are the velocity defect, kinetic turbulent energy, kinetic energy dissipation rate, averaged density defect and density fluctuation variance. The full group of transformations admitted by this model is found. The governing equations are reduced into ordinary differential equations by similarity reduction and method of the B-determining equations (BDE method). System of ordinary differential equations was solved numerically. The obtained solutions agree with experimental data.

  3. Intermittency exponent of the turbulent energy cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleve, J.; Greiner, M.; Pearson, B.R.; Sreenivasan, K.R.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the turbulent energy dissipation from one-dimensional records in experiments using air and gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures, and obtain the intermittency exponent via the two-point correlation function of the energy dissipation. The air data are obtained in a number of flows in a wind tunnel and the atmospheric boundary layer at a height of about 35 m above the ground. The helium data correspond to the centerline of a jet exhausting into a container. The air data on the intermittency exponent are consistent with each other and with a trend that increases with the Taylor microscale Reynolds number, R λ , of up to about 1000 and saturates thereafter. On the other hand, the helium data cluster around a constant value at nearly all R λ , this being about half of the asymptotic value for the air data. Some possible explanation is offered for this anomaly. (author)

  4. Resolvent-based feedback control for turbulent friction drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Aika; Nakashima, Satoshi; Luhar, Mitul; Fukagata, Koji

    2017-11-01

    Suboptimal control for turbulent friction drag reduction has been studied extensively. Nakashima et al. (accepted) extended resolvent analysis to suboptimal control, and for the control where the streamwise wall shear stress is used as an input (Case ST), they revealed the control effect across spectral space is mixed: there are regions of drag increase as well as reduction. This suggests that control performance may be improved if the control is applied for selective wavelengths, or if a new law is designed to suppress the spectral region leading to drag increase. In the present study, we first assess the effect of suboptimal control for selective wavelengths via DNS. The friction Reynolds number is set at 180. For Case ST, resolvent analysis predicts drag reduction at long streamwise wavelengths. DNS with control applied only for this spectral region, however, did not result in drag reduction. Then, we seek an effective control law using resolvent analysis and propose a new law. DNS results for this law are consistent with predictions from resolvent analysis, and about 10% drag reduction is attained. Further, we discuss how this law reduces the drag from a dynamical and theoretical point of view. This work was supported through Grant-in-Aid for Scientic Research (C) (No. 25420129) by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS).

  5. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    No. 97-62 ANNIVERSARY Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence F. Bataille INSA, Centre for Thermique de Lyon, France Ye...19480 November 1997 1997112 ENERGY TRANSFER AND TRIADIC INTERACTIONS IN COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE* F. BATAILLE t , YE ZHOU1 , AND JEAN-PIERRE BERTOGLIO...Abstract. Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer

  6. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  7. Pseudospectral reduction of incompressible two-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, John C.; Roberts, Malcolm

    2012-05-01

    Spectral reduction was originally formulated entirely in the wavenumber domain as a coarse-grained wavenumber convolution in which bins of modes interact with enhanced coupling coefficients. A Liouville theorem leads to inviscid equipartition solutions when each bin contains the same number of modes. A pseudospectral implementation of spectral reduction which enjoys the efficiency of the fast Fourier transform is described. The model compares well with full pseudospectral simulations of the two-dimensional forced-dissipative energy and enstrophy cascades.

  8. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  9. Drag reduction capability of uniform blowing in supersonic wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kametani, Yukinori; Kotake, Ayane; Fukagata, Koji; Tokugawa, Naoko

    2017-12-01

    Drag reduction capability of uniform blowing in supersonic turbulent boundary layers is investigated by means of direct numerical simulation of channel flows with uniform blowing on one side and suction on the other. The bulk Reynolds number based on the bulk density, the bulk mean velocity, the channel half-width, and the viscosity on the wall is set to Reb=3000 . The bulk Mach number is set at 0.8 and 1.5 to investigate a subsonic and a supersonic condition, respectively. The amplitude of the blowing or suction is set to be 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% of the bulk mass flow rate. At both Mach numbers, modifications of the mean streamwise velocity profiles with blowing and suction are found to be similar to those in an incompressible turbulent channel flow: The skin friction is reduced on the blowing side, while it is increased on the suction side. As for the drag reducing effect of blowing, the drag reduction rate and net-energy saving rate are hardly affected by the Mach number, while the control gain is increased with the increase of Mach number due to the increased density near the wall. The compressibility effect of drag reduction and enhancement is also examined using the physical decomposition of the skin friction drag. A noticeable Mach number effect is found only for the contribution terms containing the viscosity, which is increased by the increased temperature.

  10. Energy fluxes and spectra for turbulent and laminar flows

    KAUST Repository

    Verma, Mahendra K.

    2017-05-14

    Two well-known turbulence models to describe the inertial and dissipative ranges simultaneously are by Pao~[Phys. Fluids {\\\\bf 8}, 1063 (1965)] and Pope~[{\\\\em Turbulent Flows.} Cambridge University Press, 2000]. In this paper, we compute energy spectrum $E(k)$ and energy flux $\\\\Pi(k)$ using spectral simulations on grids up to $4096^3$, and show consistency between the numerical results and predictions by the aforementioned models. We also construct a model for laminar flows that predicts $E(k)$ and $\\\\Pi(k)$ to be of the form $\\\\exp(-k)$, and verify the model predictions using numerical simulations. The shell-to-shell energy transfers for the turbulent flows are {\\\\em forward and local} for both inertial and dissipative range, but those for the laminar flows are {\\\\em forward and nonlocal}.

  11. A New Paradigm for Turbulence Control for Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    Reynolds stresses , turbulent heat fluxes and higher-order moments of velocity and temperature. Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Models (EARSM...obtained the Reynolds stress distributions in best agreement with DNS data for rotational flows and turbulent heat flux distributions obtained from two...flows. Results from this seed grant have appeared in three journal articles and have been accepted for presentation at national conferences 16

  12. Morphing continuum analysis of energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Mohamad Ibrahim; Wonnell, Louis B.; Chen, James

    2018-02-01

    A shock-preserving finite volume solver with the generalized Lax-Friedrichs splitting flux for morphing continuum theory (MCT) is presented and verified. The numerical MCT solver is showcased in a supersonic turbulent flow with Mach 2.93 over an 8∘ compression ramp. The simulation results validated MCT with experiments as an alternative for modeling compressible turbulence. The required size of the smallest mesh cell for the MCT simulation is shown to be almost an order larger than that in a similar direct numerical simulation study. The comparison shows MCT is a much more computationally friendly theory than the classical Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamics of energy cascade at the length scale of individual eddies is illuminated through the subscale rotation introduced by MCT. In this regard, MCT provides a statistical averaging procedure for capturing energy transfer in compressible turbulence, not found in classical fluid theories. Analysis of the MCT results show the existence of a statistical coupling of the internal and translational kinetic energy fluctuations with the corresponding eddy rotational energy fluctuations, indicating a multiscale transfer of energy. In conclusion, MCT gives a new characterization of the energy cascade within compressible turbulence without the use of excessive computational resources.

  13. Prediction of Turbulent Jet Mixing Noise Reduction by Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2008-01-01

    A one-dimensional control volume formulation is developed for the determination of jet mixing noise reduction due to water injection. The analysis starts from the conservation of mass, momentum and energy for the confrol volume, and introduces the concept of effective jet parameters (jet temperature, jet velocity and jet Mach number). It is shown that the water to jet mass flow rate ratio is an important parameter characterizing the jet noise reduction on account of gas-to-droplet momentum and heat transfer. Two independent dimensionless invariant groups are postulated, and provide the necessary relations for the droplet size and droplet Reynolds number. Results are presented illustrating the effect of mass flow rate ratio on the jet mixing noise reduction for a range of jet Mach number and jet Reynolds number. Predictions from the model show satisfactory comparison with available test data on perfectly expanded hot supersonic jets. The results suggest that significant noise reductions can be achieved at increased flow rate ratios.

  14. Turbulence generation through intense localized sources of energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqui, Agustin; Donzis, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms to generate turbulence in controlled conditions have been studied for nearly a century. Most common methods include passive and active grids with a focus on incompressible turbulence. However, little attention has been given to compressible flows, and even less to hypersonic flows, where phenomena such as thermal non-equilibrium can be present. Using intense energy from lasers, extreme molecule velocities can be generated from photo-dissociation. This creates strong localized changes in both the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the flow, which may perturb the flow in a way similar to an active grid to generate turbulence in hypersonic flows. A large database of direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to study the feasibility of such an approach. An extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics is used to characterize the evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Local measures of enstrophy and dissipation are studied to diagnose the main mechanisms for energy exchange. As commonly done in compressible flows, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Further results for cases that assimilate laboratory conditions will be discussed. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of AFOSR.

  15. Drag reduction in a turbulent boundary layer on a flexible sheet undergoing a spanwise traveling wave motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Motoyuki; Tamano, Shinji; Yokota, Kazuhiko; Taniguchi, Shinya

    The effect of a spanwise traveling-wave motion on a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer over a flexible sheet was investigated at low Reynolds numbers using a single hot-wire anemometer for turbulence statistics and two laser displacement sensors for displacements of the flexible sheet. It was found that the log-law region of the mean velocity on the flexible sheet was slightly narrower compared with a rigid wall. The energy spectra of streamwise velocity fluctuations on the flexible sheet undergoing the spanwise traveling-wave motion were smaller in a region of frequency which corresponded to the bursting frequency in the canonical wall turbulence. This indicates that the bursting event near the flexible sheet was directly affected by the surface wave motion. It was revealed that a drag reduction of up to 7.5% could be obtained by the spanwise traveling-wave motion, estimating the friction coefficients through the growth rate of the momentum thickness.

  16. Investigating the Interdependencies of the Energy Balance Closure and the Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, T.; Zeeman, M. J.; De Roo, F.; Brugger, P.; Mauder, M.

    2016-12-01

    The energy balance residual (EBR), defined as the difference between the available energy (sum of net radiation and ground heat flux) and the turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat, is often found to have a large positive value. Several land surface experiments and flux networks report an average energy balance closure of approximately 80%. Although different factors can influence the energy balance closure across measurement campaigns, a significant EBR even when sites are horizontally with short canopies indicates of a systematic bias resulting from the general underestimation of the aerodynamic transport of energy, especially horizontal divergence of the mean advective fluxes and transport by low-frequency motions generally called `secondary circulations'. These low frequency local transports can occur from various processes such as coherent large scale organized motions, convective cells and even significant transient changes. Thus, we decided to study the budget of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in conjunction with the energy balance closure. In the current work, this interdependency has been investigated using surface flux (Eddy Covariance) and remote sensing based measurements (triple 3d Doppler LiDAR, thermal imagery) from the ScaleX campaigns at the TERENO pre-alpine observatory Fendt in Southern Germany (with gentle topography), coupled with large eddy simulations (LES). Statistical methods ranging from dimensional reduction techniques to information theory has been used to extract the effects and significance of aforementioned processes towards explaining the observed annual average EBR of about 50 Wm-2. Initial results indicate a high correlation between EBR and the TKE dissipation rate, as well as the skewness of vertical velocity, confirming the role of secondary circulations. The role of transport and the advection terms will also be investigated. Overall, improved understanding of such connections between the fundamental mechanisms of TKE

  17. Split energy cascade in turbulent thin fluid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Stefano; Boffetta, Guido

    2017-11-01

    We discuss the phenomenology of the split energy cascade in a three-dimensional thin fluid layer by means of high resolution numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. We observe the presence of both an inverse energy cascade at large scales, as predicted for two-dimensional turbulence, and a direct energy cascade at small scales, as in three-dimensional turbulence. The inverse energy cascade is associated with a direct cascade of enstrophy in the intermediate range of scales. Notably, we find that the inverse cascade of energy in this system is not a purely 2D phenomenon, as the coupling with the 3D velocity field is necessary to guarantee the constancy of fluxes.

  18. Improving Lidar Turbulence Estimates for Wind Energy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Jennifer; Clifton, Andrew; Churchfield, Matthew; Klein, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing devices (e.g., lidars) are quickly becoming a cost-effective and reliable alternative to meteorological towers for wind energy applications. Although lidars can measure mean wind speeds accurately, these devices measure different values of turbulence intensity (TI) than an instrument on a tower. In response to these issues, a lidar TI error reduction model was recently developed for commercially available lidars. The TI error model first applies physics-based corrections to the lidar measurements, then uses machine-learning techniques to further reduce errors in lidar TI estimates. The model was tested at two sites in the Southern Plains where vertically profiling lidars were collocated with meteorological towers. Results indicate that the model works well under stable conditions but cannot fully mitigate the effects of variance contamination under unstable conditions. To understand how variance contamination affects lidar TI estimates, a new set of equations was derived in previous work to characterize the actual variance measured by a lidar. Terms in these equations were quantified using a lidar simulator and modeled wind field, and the new equations were then implemented into the TI error model.

  19. JOINT INVERSE CASCADE OF MAGNETIC ENERGY AND MAGNETIC HELICITY IN MHD TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanov, R.; Frick, P.; Mizeva, I.

    2015-01-01

    We show that oppositely directed fluxes of energy and magnetic helicity coexist in the inertial range in fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence with small-scale sources of magnetic helicity. Using a helical shell model of MHD turbulence, we study the high Reynolds number MHD turbulence for helicity injection at a scale that is much smaller than the scale of energy injection. In a short range of scales larger than the forcing scale of magnetic helicity, a bottleneck-like effect appears, which results in a local reduction of the spectral slope. The slope changes in a domain with a high level of relative magnetic helicity, which determines that part of the magnetic energy is related to the helical modes at a given scale. If the relative helicity approaches unity, the spectral slope tends to –3/2. We show that this energy pileup is caused by an inverse cascade of magnetic energy associated with the magnetic helicity. This negative energy flux is the contribution of the pure magnetic-to-magnetic energy transfer, which vanishes in the non-helical limit. In the context of astrophysical dynamos, our results indicate that a large-scale dynamo can be affected by the magnetic helicity generated at small scales. The kinetic helicity, in particular, is not involved in the process at all. An interesting finding is that an inverse cascade of magnetic energy can be provided by a small-scale source of magnetic helicity fluctuations without a mean injection of magnetic helicity

  20. Turbulence and energy confinement in TORE SUPRA ohmic discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Payan, J.; Laviron, C.; Devynck, P.; Saha, S.K.; Capes, H.; Chen, X.P.; Coulon, J.P.; Gil, C.; Harris, G.; Hutter, T.; Pecquet, A.L.

    1992-06-01

    Results on confinement and turbulence from a set of ohmic discharges in Tore Supra are discussed. The attention is focused on the saturation of the energy confinement time and it is emphasized that this saturation could be explained by a saturation of the electron heat diffusivity. Ion behaviour is indeed governed by dilution and equipartition effects. Although the ion heat transport is never neoclassical, there is no enhanced degradation at the saturation. This behaviour is confirmed by turbulence measurements given by CO 2 laser coherent scattering. The density fluctuations level follows the electron heat diffusivity variations with the average density. Waves propagating in the ion diamagnetic direction are always present in turbulence frequency spectra. Thus, the saturation cannot be explained by the onset of an ion turbulence. The existence of an ion turbulence at the edge at all densities cannot be excluded. However, this ion feature in scattering spectra could be explained by a Doppler shift associated to an inversion point of the radial electric field at the edge

  1. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  2. Scintillation reduction for laser beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G P; Gorshkov, V N; Torous, S V

    2011-01-01

    We numerically examine the spatial evolution of the structure of coherent and partially coherent laser beams, including the optical vortices, propagating in turbulent atmospheres. The influence of beam fragmentation and wandering relative to the axis of propagation (z-axis) on the value of the scintillation index (SI) of the signal at the detector is analysed. These studies were performed for different dimensions of the detector, distances of propagation, and strengths of the atmospheric turbulence. Methods for significantly reducing the SI are described. These methods utilize averaging of the signal at the detector over a set of partially coherent beams (PCBs). It is demonstrated that the most effective approach is using a set of PCBs with definite initial directions of propagation relative to the z-axis. This approach results in a significant compensation of the beam wandering which in many cases is the main contributor to the SI. A novel method is to generate the PCBs by combining two laser beams-Gaussian and vortex beams, with different frequencies (the difference between these two frequencies being significantly smaller than the frequencies themselves). In this case, the effective suppression of the SI does not require high-frequency modulators. This result is important for achieving gigabit data rates in long-distance laser communication through turbulent atmospheres.

  3. Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) Budgets Using 5-beam Doppler Profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M. A.; Thomson, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Field observations of turbulence parameters are important for the development of hydrodynamic models, understanding contaminant mixing, and predicting sediment transport. The turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget quantifies where turbulence is being produced, dissipated or transported at a specific site. The Nortek Signature 5-beam AD2CP was used to measure velocities at high sampling rates (up to 8 Hz) at Admiralty Inlet and Rich Passage in Puget Sound, WA, USA. Raw along-beam velocity data is quality controlled and is used to estimate TKE spectra, spatial structure functions, and Reynolds stress tensors. Exceptionally low Doppler noise in the data enables clear observations of the inertial sub-range of isotropic turbulence in both the frequency TKE spectra and the spatial structure functions. From these, TKE dissipation rates are estimated following Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The TKE production rates are estimated using Reynolds stress tensors together with the vertical shear in the mean flow. The Reynolds stress tensors are estimated following the methodology of Dewey and Stinger (2007), which is significantly improved by inclusion of the 5th beam (as opposed to the conventional 4). These turbulence parameters are used to study the TKE budget along the water column at the two sites. Ebb and flood production and dissipation rates are compared through the water column at both sites. At Admiralty Inlet, dissipation exceeds production during ebb while the opposite occurs during flood because the proximity to a lateral headland. At Rich Passage, production exceeds dissipation through the water column for all tidal conditions due to a vertical sill in the vicinity of the measurement site.

  4. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau : surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Zhang, Ting; Ma, Yaoming; Jia, Li; Wen, Jun

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  5. Energy and water cycle over the Tibetan Plateau: surface energy balance and turbulent heat fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Y.; Jia, L.; Wen, J.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents an overview and an outlook of studies on energy and water cycle over the Tibetan plateau with focuses on the estimation of energy balance terms and turbulent heat fluxes. On the basis of the surface energy balance calculations, we show that the phenomena of the energy

  6. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, F.; Zhou, Ye; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer process and triadic interactions of compressible turbulence. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the Helmholtz decomposition is used. The following issues were addressed: (1) What is the mechanism of energy exchange between the solenoidal and compressible modes, and (2) Is there an energy cascade in the compressible energy transfer process? It is concluded that the compressible energy is transferred locally from the solenoidal part to the compressible part. It is also found that there is an energy cascade of the compressible mode for high turbulent Mach number (M(sub t) greater than or equal to 0.5). Since we assume that the compressibility is weak, the magnitude of the compressible (radiative or cascade) transfer is much smaller than that of solenoidal cascade. These results are further confirmed by studying the triadic energy transfer function, the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer.

  7. Surface energy budget and turbulent fluxes at Arctic terrestrial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey; Persson, Ola; Uttal, Taneil; Konopleva-Akish, Elena; Crepinsek, Sara; Cox, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Makshtas, Alexander; Repina, Irina

    2017-04-01

    Determination of the surface energy budget (SEB) and all SEB components at the air-surface interface are required in a wide variety of applications including atmosphere-land/snow simulations and validation of the surface fluxes predicted by numerical models over different spatial and temporal scales. Here, comparisons of net surface energy budgets at two Arctic sites are made using long-term near-continuous measurements of hourly averaged surface fluxes (turbulent, radiation, and soil conduction). One site, Eureka (80.0 N; Nunavut, Canada), is located in complex topography near a fjord about 200 km from the Arctic Ocean. The other site, Tiksi (71.6 N; Russian East Siberia), is located on a relatively flat coastal plain less than 1 km from the shore of Tiksi Bay, a branch of the Arctic Ocean. We first analyzed diurnal and annual cycles of basic meteorological parameters and key SEB components at these locations. Although Eureka and Tiksi are located on different continents and at different latitudes, the annual course of the surface meteorology and SEB components are qualitatively similar. Surface energy balance closure is a formulation of the conservation of energy principle. Our direct measurements of energy balance for both Arctic sites show that the sum of the turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes and the ground (conductive) heat flux systematically underestimate the net radiation by about 25-30%. This lack of energy balance closure is a fundamental and pervasive problem in micrometeorology. We discuss a variety of factors which may be responsible for the lack of SEB closure. In particular, various storage terms (e.g., air column energy storage due to radiative and/or sensible heat flux divergence, ground heat storage above the soil flux plate, energy used in photosynthesis, canopy biomass heat storage). For example, our observations show that the photosynthesis storage term is relatively small (about 1-2% of the net radiation), but about 8-12% of the

  8. Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Energy Balance of a Solar Flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Perez, J E; Harra, L K; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Jeffrey, N L S; Bian, N H; Dennis, B R

    2017-04-14

    The energy released in solar flares derives from a reconfiguration of magnetic fields to a lower energy state, and is manifested in several forms, including bulk kinetic energy of the coronal mass ejection, acceleration of electrons and ions, and enhanced thermal energy that is ultimately radiated away across the electromagnetic spectrum from optical to x rays. Using an unprecedented set of coordinated observations, from a suite of instruments, we here report on a hitherto largely overlooked energy component-the kinetic energy associated with small-scale turbulent mass motions. We show that the spatial location of, and timing of the peak in, turbulent kinetic energy together provide persuasive evidence that turbulent energy may play a key role in the transfer of energy in solar flares. Although the kinetic energy of turbulent motions accounts, at any given time, for only ∼(0.5-1)% of the energy released, its relatively rapid (∼1-10  s) energization and dissipation causes the associated throughput of energy (i.e., power) to rival that of major components of the released energy in solar flares, and thus presumably in other astrophysical acceleration sites.

  9. Energy extraction from atmospheric turbulence to improve flight vehicle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chinmay Karsandas

    Small 'bird-sized' Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have now become practical due to technological advances in embedded electronics, miniature sensors and actuators, and propulsion systems. Birds are known to take advantage of wind currents to conserve energy and fly long distances without flapping their wings. This dissertation explores the possibility of improving the performance of small UAVs by extracting the energy available in atmospheric turbulence. An aircraft can gain energy from vertical gusts by increasing its lift in regions of updraft and reducing its lift in downdrafts - a concept that has been known for decades. Starting with a simple model of a glider flying through a sinusoidal gust, a parametric optimization approach is used to compute the minimum gust amplitude and optimal control input required for the glider to sustain flight without losing energy. For small UAVs using optimal control inputs, sinusoidal gusts with amplitude of 10--15% of the cruise speed are sufficient to keep the aircraft aloft. The method is then modified and extended to include random gusts that are representative of natural turbulence. A procedure to design optimal control laws for energy extraction from realistic gust profiles is developed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). A feedback control law is designed to perform well over a variety of random gusts, and not be tailored for one particular gust. A small UAV flying in vertical turbulence is shown to obtain average energy savings of 35--40% with the use of a simple control law. The design procedure is also extended to determine optimal control laws for sinusoidal as well as turbulent lateral gusts. The theoretical work is complemented by experimental validation using a small autonomous UAV. The development of a lightweight autopilot and UAV platform is presented. Flight test results show that active control of the lift of an autonomous glider resulted in approximately 46% average energy savings compared to glides with fixed

  10. On the Energy Spectrum of Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Perez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^{3} mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state magnetohydrodynamics turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfvén modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^{+}(k_{⊥} and E^{-}(k_{⊥}, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, which is consistent with phenomenological models that include scale-dependent dynamic alignment. For the imbalanced case, with E^{+}>E^{-}, the simulations show that E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2} for all Reynolds numbers considered, while E^{+} has a slightly steeper spectrum at small Re. As the Reynolds number increases, E^{+} flattens. Since E^{±} are pinned at the dissipation scale and anchored at the driving scales, we postulate that at sufficiently high Re the spectra will become parallel in the inertial range and scale as E^{+}∝E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2}. Questions regarding the universality of the spectrum and the value of the “Kolmogorov constant” are discussed.

  11. Optimization and Modeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamimonjezi, Sara

    This project relates to the development of next-generation high-speed aircraft that are efficient and environmentally compliant. The emphasis of the research is on reducing noise from high-performance engines that will power these aircraft. A strong component of engine noise is jet mixing noise that comes from the turbulent mixing process between the high-speed exhaust flow of the engine and the atmosphere. The fan flow deflection method (FFD) suppresses jet noise by deflecting the fan stream downward, by a few degrees, with respect to the core stream. This reduces the convective Mach number of the primary shear layer and turbulent kinetic energy in the downward direction and therefore reduces the noise emitted towards the ground. The redistribution of the fan stream is achieved with inserting airfoil-shaped vanes inside the fan duct. Aerodynamic optimization of FFD has been done by Dr. Juntao Xiong using a computational fluid dynamics code to maximize reduction of noise perceived by the community while minimizing aerodynamic losses. The optimal vane airfoils are used in a parametric experimental study of 50 4-vane deflector configurations. The vane chord length, angle of attack, and azimuthal location are the parameters studied in acoustic optimization. The best vane configuration yields a reduction in cumulative (downward + sideline) effective perceived noise level (EPNL) of 5.3 dB. The optimization study underscores the sensitivity of FFD to deflector parameters and the need for careful design in the practical implementation of this noise reduction approach. An analytical model based on Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and acoustic analogy is developed to predict the spectral changes from a known baseline in the direction of peak emission. A generalized form for space-time correlation is introduced that allows shapes beyond the traditional exponential forms. Azimuthal directivity based on the wavepacket model of jet noise is integrated with the acoustic

  12. Energy amplification in turbulent flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Many boundary layer flows in natural and manmade systems are characterized by the presence of complex walls (e.g. porous, rough, or patterned) that can substantially alter the near-wall turbulence. For example, the streaks and streamwise vortices prevalent in smooth-walled flows are often replaced by structures resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices in flows over porous media and vegetation canopies. While stability analyses can reproduce some of these observations, they are limited in their ability to generate predictions for spectra and coherent structure in fully turbulent flows. The present effort seeks to address this limitation by extending the resolvent formulation to account for complex walls. Under the resolvent formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a linear superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. The presence of the complex substrate is modeled as a distributed body force, which alters the gain (i.e. energy amplification) and structure of the modes. Preliminary results show that this approach reproduces key observations from previous simulations and experiments of flow over porous media, vegetation canopies, as well as riblets with minimal computation.

  13. Bounded energy states in homogeneous turbulent shear flow - An alternative view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, P. S.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of homogeneous turbulent shear flow is investigated from a theoretical standpoint. Existing turbulence models, in apparent agreement with physical and numerical experiments, predict an unbounded exponential time growth of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate; only the anisotropy tensor and turbulent time scale reach a structural equilibrium. It is shown that if a residual vortex stretching term is maintained in the dissipation rate transport equation, then there can exist equilibrium solutions, with bounded energy states, where the turbulence production is balanced by its dissipation. Illustrative calculations are presented for a k-epsilon model modified to account for net vortex stretching.

  14. Energy partitioning constraints at kinetic scales in low-β turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Daniel J.; F.-Viñas, Adolfo; Dorelli, John C.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Shuster, Jason; Avanov, Levon A.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Stawarz, Julia E.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Schiff, Conrad; Lavraud, Benoit; Saito, Yoshifumi; Paterson, William R.; Giles, Barbara L.; Pollock, Craig J.; Strangeway, Robert J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Moore, Thomas E.; Burch, James L.

    2018-02-01

    Turbulence is a fundamental physical process through which energy injected into a system at large scales cascades to smaller scales. In collisionless plasmas, turbulence provides a critical mechanism for dissipating electromagnetic energy. Here, we present observations of plasma fluctuations in low-β turbulence using data from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in Earth's magnetosheath. We provide constraints on the partitioning of turbulent energy density in the fluid, ion-kinetic, and electron-kinetic ranges. Magnetic field fluctuations dominated the energy density spectrum throughout the fluid and ion-kinetic ranges, consistent with previous observations of turbulence in similar plasma regimes. However, at scales shorter than the electron inertial length, fluctuation power in electron kinetic energy significantly exceeded that of the magnetic field, resulting in an electron-motion-regulated cascade at small scales. This dominance is highly relevant for the study of turbulence in highly magnetized laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  15. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Skin Friction Reduction in Supersonic Flow Using a Microblowing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Danny P.

    1999-01-01

    A new turbulent skin friction reduction technology, called the microblowing technique has been tested in supersonic flow (Mach number of 1.9) on specially designed porous plates with microholes. The skin friction was measured directly by a force balance and the boundary layer development was measured by a total pressure rake at the tailing edge of a test plate. The free stream Reynolds number was 1.0(10 exp 6) per meter. The turbulent skin friction coefficient ratios (C(sub f)/C(sub f0)) of seven porous plates are given in this report. Test results showed that the microblowing technique could reduce the turbulent skin friction in supersonic flow (up to 90 percent below a solid flat plate value, which was even greater than in subsonic flow).

  16. Superhydrophobic and polymer drag reduction in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajappan, Anoop; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2017-11-01

    We use a custom-built Taylor-Couette apparatus (radius ratio η = 0.75) to study frictional drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions and superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces in turbulent flows for 15000 performance of the coating and calculate the effective slip length in turbulent flow using a suitably modified Prandtl-von Kármán analysis. We also investigate drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions, and show that natural biopolymers from plant mucilage can be an inexpensive and effective alternative to synthetic polymers in drag reduction applications, approaching the same maximum drag reduction asymptote. Finally we explore combinations of the two methods - one arising from wall slip and the other due to changes in turbulence dynamics in the bulk flow - and find that the two effects are not additive; interestingly, the effectiveness of polymer drag reduction is drastically reduced in the presence of an SH coating on the wall. This study was financially supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through Contract No. 3002453814.

  17. Modelling turbulent energy dissipation in the high-latitude mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C. M.; Brekke, A.; Martynenko, O. V.; Namgaladze, A. A.

    1998-02-01

    The global numerical model of the Earth's thermosphere, ionosphere and protonosphere constructed at the Kaliningrad Observatory of IZMIRAN and Polar Geophysical Institute in Murmansk, (Namgaladze et al., 1991), hereafter referred to as PGI97, is being extended to encompass modelling of the mesosphere. Here we report the first predictions of turbulent intensities in the height regime 80 to 90 km. Recently, Hall (1997) reported estimates of the turbulent energy dissipation rate, ɛ, using the EISCAT VHF radar located in Northern Norway (69°N, 19°E), which has, in turn, been compared to in situ measurements. Thus initial testing of PGI97 has concentrated on the same region. The agreements between PGI97 and EISCAT results for summer and winter solstice mesospheres are good. The general seasonal variation has been investigated, again showing good agreement with the EISCAT results. However, when examining the average energy dissipation in the 80-90 km height regime, the model shows less variability than the observations.

  18. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  19. Turbulent drag reduction by nonplanar surfaces - A survey on the research at TU/DLR Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.; Bartenwerfer, M.; Hoppe, G.

    The use of riblets for drag reduction is examined theoretically. For various riblet shapes, the anisotropic properties of the viscous flow over the riblets are determined. The results obtained can be used for riblet optimization and as input data for computer simulations of the complete turbulent flow field. Attention is also given to other concepts, such as hypothetical mechanisms derived from observations of the shark skin. The experimental facilities that would be required to test these new concepts are discussed.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak

    Reynolds numbers, and thereafter, the fully-developed infinite wind farm boundary later simulations are performed. Sources of inaccuracy in the simulations are investigated and it is found that high Reynolds number flows are more sensitive to the choice of the SGS model than their low Reynolds number......This research is devoted to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and to lesser extent, wind tunnel measurements of turbulent flows in wind energy. It starts with an introduction to the LES technique associated with the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, discretized using a finite...... volume method. The study is followed by a detailed investigation of the Sub-Grid Scale (SGS) modeling. New SGS models are implemented into the computing code, and the effect of SGS models are examined for different applications. Fully developed boundary layer flows are investigated at low and high...

  1. Influence of twisted tape turbulence promoter on fouling reduction in microfiltration of milk proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Svetlana S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane filtration has become one of the major technologies in the food industry. It is widely applied in the dairy industry, and it is mostly used for the concentration and fractionation of milk proteins and for the whey processing. Of all pressure driven membrane processes, ultrafiltration is the most widely used. The major disadvantage of pressure driven membrane processes is severe fouling of membrane during filtration particularly when the fluids containing proteins are processed. Fouling with proteins is complex phenomenon because it occurs at the membrane surface as well as in the pores of membrane, and depends on the operating conditions and on the interactions of proteins and membrane material. In order to reduce fouling of the membrane different techniques have been developed, and one of them relies on the changing of the hydrodynamic conditions in the membrane or module. In this study, influence of twisted tape turbulence promoters on the fouling reduction in cross-flow microfiltration of skim milk was investigated. Twisted tapes with tree characteristic ratios of helix element length to the tape diameter (aspect ratio were studied. It was shown that twisted tapes with different aspect ratios reduce fouling of membrane by a factor of three or more. The presence of twisted tape induces changes in the flow patterns from straight to helicoidally thus producing turbulence flow at the lower cross-flow rates. Turbulence intensification prevents accumulation of proteins at membrane surface enabling reduction in reversible fouling what results in the reduction of overall membrane fouling. The best performance was achieved using a twisted tape with the lowest aspect ratio of 1.0. This promoter reduces fouling seven times at low transmembrane pressure and low cross-flow velocity. The twisted tape with aspect ratio 1.0 induces the most intensive turbulence, the longest helicoidal flow path, and appearance of vortices near the membrane surfaces

  2. Ambient and Wake Turbulence Measurements at Marine Energy Sites from a Five Beam AD2CP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M. A.; Thomson, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ambient turbulence at hydrokinetic energy sites is a key input for turbine design and for their performance determination. Added turbulence from rotating blades to the flow affects the environment surrounding the turbine and has an impact in turbine array distribution. We present two approaches of turbulence measurements: stationary and drifting. Stationary measurements allow for time and frequency analysis of turbulent velocities, while drifting measurements give a spatial characterization of turbulence. For both approaches we used the new five beam Nortek Signature AD2CP. This instrument captures turbulent flow along the water column at high sampling rates (8 Hz) with low Doppler noise level; the use of five beams also makes it possible to fully calculate the Reynolds Stresses. Both sets of measurements require Doppler noise removal for consistent results. Stationary measurements of ambient turbulence were carried out in Admiralty Inlet, WA, in May 2015. The Signature was deployed up looking on a sea spider tripod in a 50 m depth tidal channel during two tidal cycles. This data set allowed us to characterize the turbulence in terms of spectra and Reynolds Stresses in order to evaluate the turbulent kinetic energy balance along the water column and to compare results to other tidal energy sites with similar characteristics where turbulence measurements were taken as well. Drifting measurements of ambient and wake turbulence were conducted in the vicinity of the ORPC RivGen® turbine deployed on the Kvichak River in Alaska in July 2015. The Signature was mounted down looking onboard an anchor buoy equipped with two GPS data receivers for georefference. The cross-sectional river span was covered by releasing the drifter at different positions across the river. More than 300 drifts were performed to spatially characterize turbulence before and after turbine's deployment and grid connection. Results indicate an increased turbulent wake extending up to 75 m downstream

  3. Equiparatition of energy for turbulent astrophysical fluids: Accounting for the unseen energy in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1995-01-01

    Molecular clouds are observed to be partially supported by turbulent pressure. The kinetic energy of the turbulence is directly measurable, but the potential energy, which consists of magnetic, thermal, and gravitational potential energy, is largly unseen. We have extended previous results on equipartition between kinetic and potential energy to show that it is likely to be a very good approximation in molecular clouds. We have used two separate approaches to demonstrate this result: For small-amplitude perturbations of a static equilibrium, we have used the energy principle analysis of Bernstein et al. (1958); this derivation applies to perturbations of arbitary wavelength. To treat perturbations of a nonstatic equilibrium, we have used the Lagrangian analysis of Dewar (1970); this analysis applies only to short-wavelength perturbations. Both analysis assume conservation of energy. Wave damping has only a small effect on equipartition if the wave frequency is small compared to the neutral-ion collision frequency; for the particular case we considered, radiative losses have no effect on equipartition. These results are then incorporated in a simple way into analyses of cloud equilibrium and global stability. We discuss the effect of Alfvenic turbulence on the Jeans mass and show that it has little effect on the magnetic critical mass.

  4. Turbulent Mechanical Energy Budget in Stably Stratified Baroclinic Flows over Sloping Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łobocki, Lech

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of second-moment budget equations in a slope-oriented coordinate frame exhibits the pathways of exchange between the potential energy of mean flow and the total turbulent mechanical energy. It is shown that this process is controlled by the inclination of the potential temperature gradient. Hence, this parameter should be considered in studies of turbulence in slope flows as well as the slope inclination. The concept of turbulent potential energy is generalized to include baroclinicity, and is used to explain the role of along-slope turbulent heat flux in energy conversions. A generalization of static stability criteria for baroclinic conditions is also proposed. In addition, the presence of feedback between the turbulent heat flux and the temperature variance in stably-stratified flows is identified, which implies the existence of oscillatory modes characterized by the Brunt-Väisäla frequency.

  5. Unlocking potential for energy reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, John

    2013-05-01

    In the latest of our series of articles designed to provide healthcare engineers with sound technical guidance on equipment or technology-related topics, John O'Leary, key account manager at Trend Controls (who in April's HEJ discussed the benefits of natural ventilation in healthcare settings), explains the functions of a building energy management system (BEMS), and the vital that role such equipment can play in helping healthcare estates teams reduce carbon emissions and save money, as well as ensuring the most comfortable environment for patients, staff, and visitors.

  6. Low-energy control of electrical turbulence in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Stefan; Fenton, Flavio H.; Kornreich, Bruce G.; Squires, Amgad; Bittihn, Philip; Hornung, Daniel; Zabel, Markus; Flanders, James; Gladuli, Andrea; Campoy, Luis; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Luther, Gisa; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Krinsky, Valentin I.; Pumir, Alain; Gilmour, Robert F.; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-07-01

    Controlling the complex spatio-temporal dynamics underlying life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as fibrillation is extremely difficult, because of the nonlinear interaction of excitation waves in a heterogeneous anatomical substrate. In the absence of a better strategy, strong, globally resetting electrical shocks remain the only reliable treatment for cardiac fibrillation. Here we establish the relationship between the response of the tissue to an electric field and the spatial distribution of heterogeneities in the scale-free coronary vascular structure. We show that in response to a pulsed electric field, E, these heterogeneities serve as nucleation sites for the generation of intramural electrical waves with a source density ρ(E) and a characteristic time, τ, for tissue depolarization that obeys the power law τ~Eα. These intramural wave sources permit targeting of electrical turbulence near the cores of the vortices of electrical activity that drive complex fibrillatory dynamics. We show in vitro that simultaneous and direct access to multiple vortex cores results in rapid synchronization of cardiac tissue and therefore, efficient termination of fibrillation. Using this control strategy, we demonstrate low-energy termination of fibrillation in vivo. Our results give new insights into the mechanisms and dynamics underlying the control of spatio-temporal chaos in heterogeneous excitable media and provide new research perspectives towards alternative, life-saving low-energy defibrillation techniques.

  7. Local Turbulent Energy Dissipation Rate in a Vessel Agitated by a Rushton Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulc Radek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The scaling of turbulence characteristics such as turbulent fluctuation velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent energy dissipation rate was investigated in a mechanically agitated vessel 300 mm in inner diameter stirred by a Rushton turbine at high Reynolds numbers in the range 50 000 < Re < 100 000. The hydrodynamics and flow field was measured using 2-D TR PIV. The convective velocity formulas proposed by Antonia et al. (1980 and Van Doorn (1981 were tested. The turbulent energy dissipation rate estimated independently in both radial and axial directions using the one-dimensional approach was not found to be the same in each direction. Using the proposed correction, the values in both directions were found to be close to each other. The relation ε/(N3·D2 ∞ const. was not conclusively confirmed.

  8. Transition between inverse and direct energy cascades in multiscale optical turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.

    2018-03-01

    Multiscale turbulence naturally develops and plays an important role in many fluid, gas, and plasma phenomena. Statistical models of multiscale turbulence usually employ Kolmogorov hypotheses of spectral locality of interactions (meaning that interactions primarily occur between pulsations of comparable scales) and scale-invariance of turbulent pulsations. However, optical turbulence described by the nonlinear Schrodinger equation exhibits breaking of both the Kolmogorov locality and scale-invariance. A weaker form of spectral locality that holds for multi-scale optical turbulence enables a derivation of simplified evolution equations that reduce the problem to a single scale modeling. We present the derivation of these equations for Kerr media with random inhomogeneities. Then, we find the analytical solution that exhibits a transition between inverse and direct energy cascades in optical turbulence.

  9. Sensible Heat Flux Related to Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    FLUX RELATED TO VARIATIONS IN ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH by Jessica S. Koscinski June 2017 Thesis Advisor...KINETIC ENERGY ON A SANDY BEACH 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Jessica S. Koscinski 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval...Sensible heat flux, turbulence kinetic energy , surf zone 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 57 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT

  10. Shark-skin surfaces for fluid-drag reduction in turbulent flow: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-10-28

    The skin of fast-swimming sharks exhibits riblet structures aligned in the direction of flow that are known to reduce skin friction drag in the turbulent-flow regime. Structures have been fabricated for study and application that replicate and improve upon the natural shape of the shark-skin riblets, providing a maximum drag reduction of nearly 10 per cent. Mechanisms of fluid drag in turbulent flow and riblet-drag reduction theories from experiment and simulation are discussed. A review of riblet-performance studies is given, and optimal riblet geometries are defined. A survey of studies experimenting with riblet-topped shark-scale replicas is also given. A method for selecting optimal riblet dimensions based on fluid-flow characteristics is detailed, and current manufacturing techniques are outlined. Due to the presence of small amounts of mucus on the skin of a shark, it is expected that the localized application of hydrophobic materials will alter the flow field around the riblets in some way beneficial to the goals of increased drag reduction.

  11. Bubble deformability is crucial for strong drag reduction in turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Narezo Guzman, Daniela; van Gils, Dennis P. M.; Lohse, Detlef

    2011-11-01

    Bubbly Taylor-Couette flow in the turbulent regime is studied both globally and locally at Reynolds numbers of 5 . 1 ×105 - 2 . 0 ×106 for pure inner cylinder rotation. We measure the drag reduction (DR) based on the global torque for global gas volume fractions (αglobal) up to 4 %, and observe a moderate DR for Re = 5 . 1 ×105 , and a strong DR for Re = 1 . 0 ×106 and 2 . 0 ×106 . Remarkably, more than 40 % of DR is achieved for αglobal = 4 % at Re = 2 . 0 ×106 . We investigate the statistics of the liquid flow velocity, and directly measure the local bubble concentration and Weber number for two Reynolds numbers in different drag reduction regimes, i.e. Re = 1 . 0 ×106 (strong DR) and 5 . 1 ×105 (moderate DR). By combining global and local measurements we reveal that bubble deformability is crucial for strong drag reduction in bubbly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow. This work was financially supported by technology foundation STW in The Netherlands.

  12. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  13. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  14. Wall Turbulence with Designer Properties: Identification, Characterization and Manipulation of Energy Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Wall turbulence with designer properties: Identification, characterization & manipulation of energy pathways 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... University of Texas) Sheplak, M. ( University of Florida) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...identification, characterization and manipulation of energy pathways in wall turbulence. The objectives were pursued separately and collaboratively by the

  15. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat, E-mail: Bhushan.2@osu.ed [Nanoprobe Laboratory for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics (NLB2), Ohio State University, 201 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210-1142 (United States)

    2010-01-27

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  16. Onset and universality of turbulent drag reduction in von Karman swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnishev, Yuri; Steinberg, Victor

    2012-10-01

    We report the results of experiments on turbulent drag reduction (TDR) in swirling flow of water and water-sucrose polymer solutions, where Re and Wi as well as polymer concentration ϕ are varied. The friction coefficients Cf and Cp defined through average torque \\bar {\\Gamma } and rms of pressure fluctuations prms for different elasticity El = Wi/Re and ϕ vs. Re/Rec collapse onto universal curves in accord with theory, where Rec is Re at TDR onset. The transition lines to the TDR state, Rec - El and Rec - ϕ, are measured and relevant physics is discussed. Power spectra for Γ and p at Re/Rec > 1 show a drastic reduction of low-frequency noise and the emergence of a peak corresponding to the main vortex frequency in accord with TDR.

  17. Biomimetic structures for fluid drag reduction in laminar and turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetics allows one to mimic nature to develop materials and devices of commercial interest for engineers. Drag reduction in fluid flow is one of the examples found in nature. In this study, nano, micro, and hierarchical structures found in lotus plant surfaces, as well as shark skin replica and a rib patterned surface to simulate shark skin structure were fabricated. Drag reduction efficiency studies on the surfaces were systematically carried out using water flow. An experimental flow channel was used to measure the pressure drop in laminar and turbulent flows, and the trends were explained in terms of the measured and predicted values by using fluid dynamics models. The slip length for various surfaces in laminar flow was also investigated based on the measured pressure drop. For comparison, the pressure drop for various surfaces was also measured using air flow.

  18. Turbulent energy dissipation rate in a tilting flume with a highly rough bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscarella, F.; Servidio, S.; Ferraro, D.; Carbone, V.; Gaudio, R.

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent flows on highly rough beds, such as those occurring in natural watercourses, represent a longstanding and fascinating problem of hydraulics, motivating in the past few decades huge research on new models of turbulence. In this work, laboratory experiments are presented on a stream flowing on a heterogeneous pebble bed with varying slope. The analysis of the flow speed puts in evidence a clear inertial range, where the Kolmogorov 4/5-law for the streamwise velocity spatial increments holds. The law is used for a systematic estimation of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate 𝜖 , here measured for three different bed slopes and hence for three different shear Reynolds numbers. The experiments presented here suggest that small scale turbulence has properties similar to the classical picture of homogeneous universal turbulence invoked by the Kolmogorov theory.

  19. Turbulent viscosity and Jupiter's tidal Q. [energy dissipation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Nicholson, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A recent estimate of tidal dissipation by turbulent viscosity in Jupiter's convective interior predicts that the current value of the planet's tidal Q is roughly 5 million. We point out a fundamental error in this calculation, and show that turbulent dissipation alone implies that at present Q is about 50 trillion. Our reduced estimate for the rate of tidal dissipation shows conclusively that tidal torques have produced only negligible modifications of the orbits of the Galilean satellites over the age of the solar system.

  20. Phase space reduction and the instanton crossover in (1+1)-dimensional turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, L.; Dias, G. S.

    2001-09-01

    We study (1+1)-dimensional turbulence in the framework of the Martin-Siggia-Rose field theory formalism. The analysis is focused on the asymptotic behaviour at the right tail of the probability distribution function (pdf) of velocity differences, where shock waves do not contribute. A BRS-preserving scheme of phase space reduction, based on the smoothness of the relevant velocity fields, leads to an effective theory for a few degrees of freedom. The sum over fluctuations around the instanton solution is written as the expectation value of a functional of the time-dependent physical fields, which evolve according to a set of Langevin equations. A natural regularization of the fluctuation determinant is provided from the fact that the instanton dominates the action for a finite time interval. The transition from the turbulent to the instanton dominated regime is related to logarithmic corrections to the saddle-point action, manifested on their turn as multiplicative power law corrections to the velocity differences pdf.

  1. Budget of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in a Shock Wave Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Waindim, Mbu; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2016-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Quantities present in the exact equation of the turbulent kinetic energy transport were accumulated and used to calculate terms like production, dissipation, molecular diffusion, and turbulent transport. The present results for a turbulent boundary layer were validated by comparison with direct numerical simulation data. It was found that a longer development domain was necessary for the boundary layer to reach an equilibrium state and a finer mesh resolution would improve the predictions. In spite of these findings, trends of the present budget match closely with that of the direct numerical simulation. Budgets for the SBLI region are presented at key axial stations. These budgets showed interesting dynamics as the incoming boundary layer transforms and the terms of the turbulent kinetic energy budget change behavior within the interaction region.

  2. Large-scale control strategy for drag reduction in turbulent channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jie; Chen, Xi; Thomas, Flint; Hussain, Fazle

    2017-06-01

    In a recent article, Canton et al. [J. Canton et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 1, 081501(R) (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.081501] reported significant drag reduction in turbulent channel flow by using large-scale, near-wall streamwise swirls following the control strategy of Schoppa and Hussain [W. Schoppa and F. Hussain, Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] for low Reynolds numbers only, but found no drag reduction at high friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ=550 ). Here we show that the lack of drag reduction at high Re observed by Canton et al. is remedied by the proper choice of the large-scale control flow. In this study, we apply near-wall opposed wall-jet forcing to achieve drag reduction at the same (high) Reynolds number where Canton et al. found no drag reduction. The steady excitation is characterized by three control parameters, namely, the wall-jet-forcing amplitude A+, the spanwise spacing Λ+, and the wall jet height yc+ (+ indicates viscous scaling); the primary difference between Schoppa and Hussain's work (also that of Canton et al.) and this Rapid Communication is the emphasis on the explicit choice of yc+ here. We show as an example that with a choice of A+≈0.015 ,Λ+≈1200 , and yc+≈30 the flow control definitely suppresses the wall shear stress at a series of Reynolds numbers, namely, 19 %,14 % , and 12 % drag reductions at Reτ=180 , 395, and 550, respectively. Further study should explore optimization of these parameter values.

  3. Mass Transfer to Clean Bubbles at Low Turbulent Energy Dissipation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alves, S. S.; Vasconcelos, J.M.T.; Orvalho, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, 4 (2006) , s. 1334-1337 ISSN 0009-2509 Grant - others:FEDER(PT) POCTI/EQU/47689/2002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : bubble * mass tranfer * turbulence Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.629, year: 2006

  4. Energy cost reduction in oil pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limeira, Fabio Machado; Correa, Joao Luiz Lavoura; Costa, Luciano Macedo Josino da; Silva, Jose Luiz da; Henriques, Fausto Metzger Pessanha [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    One of the key questions of modern society consists on the rational use of the planet's natural resources and energy. Due to the lack of energy, many companies are forced to reduce their workload, especially during peak hours, because residential demand reaches its top and there is not enough energy to fulfill the needs of all users, which affects major industries. Therefore, using energy more wisely has become a strategic issue for any company, due to the limited supply and also for the excessive cost it represents. With the objective of saving energy and reducing costs for oil pipelines, it has been identified that the increase in energy consumption is primordially related to pumping stations and also by the way many facilities are operated, that is, differently from what was originally designed. Realizing this opportunity, in order to optimize the process, this article intends to examine the possibility of gains evaluating alternatives regarding changes in the pump scheme configuration and non-use of pump stations at peak hours. Initially, an oil pipeline with potential to reduce energy costs was chosen being followed by a history analysis, in order to confirm if there was sufficient room to change the operation mode. After confirming the pipeline choice, the system is briefly described and the literature is reviewed, explaining how the energy cost is calculated and also the main characteristics of a pumping system in series and in parallel. In that sequence, technically feasible alternatives are studied in order to operate and also to negotiate the energy demand contract. Finally, costs are calculated to identify the most economical alternative, that is, for a scenario with no increase in the actual transported volume of the pipeline and for another scenario that considers an increase of about 20%. The conclusion of this study indicates that the chosen pipeline can achieve a reduction on energy costs of up to 25% without the need for investments in new

  5. Balance of liquid-phase turbulence kinetic energy equation for bubble-train flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Milica; Woerner, Martin; Cacuci, Dan Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the investigation of bubble-induced turbulence using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of bubbly two-phase flow is reported. DNS computations are performed for a bubble-driven liquid motion induced by a regular train of ellipsoidal bubbles rising through an initially stagnant liquid within a plane vertical channel. DNS data are used to evaluate balance terms in the balance equation for the liquid phase turbulence kinetic energy. The evaluation comprises single-phase-like terms (diffusion, dissipation and production) as well as the interfacial term. Special emphasis is placed on the procedure for evaluation of interfacial quantities. Quantitative analysis of the balance equation for the liquid phase turbulence kinetic energy shows the importance of the interfacial term which is the only source term. The DNS results are further used to validate closure assumptions employed in modelling of the liquid phase turbulence kinetic energy transport in gas-liquid bubbly flows. In this context, the performance of respective closure relations in the transport equation for liquid turbulence kinetic energy within the two-phase k-ε and the two-phase k-l model is evaluated. (author)

  6. Effective Jet Properties for the Prediction of Turbulent Mixing Noise Reduction by Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Lonergan, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A one-dimensional control volume formulation is developed for the determination of jet mixing noise reduction due to water injection. The analysis starts from the conservation of mass, momentum and energy for the control volume, and introduces the concept of effective jet parameters (jet temperature, jet velocity and jet Mach number). It is shown that the water to jet mass flow rate ratio is an important parameter characterizing the jet noise reduction on account of gas-to-droplet momentum and heat transfer. Two independent dimensionless invariant groups are postulated, and provide the necessary relations for the droplet size and droplet Reynolds number. Results are presented illustrating the effect of mass flow rate ratio on the jet mixing noise reduction for a range of jet Mach number and jet Reynolds number. Predictions from the model show satisfactory comparison with available test data on supersonic jets. The results suggest that significant noise reductions can be achieved at increased flow rate ratios.

  7. Anisotropic third-moment estimates of the energy cascade in solar wind turbulence using multispacecraft data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Weygand, J M; Dasso, S

    2011-10-14

    The first direct determination of the inertial range energy cascade rate, using an anisotropic form of Yaglom's law for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, is obtained in the solar wind with multispacecraft measurements. The two-point mixed third-order structure functions of Elsässer fluctuations are integrated over a sphere in magnetic field-aligned coordinates, and the result is consistent with a linear scaling. Therefore, volume integrated heating and cascade rates are obtained that, unlike previous studies, make only limited assumptions about the underlying spectral geometry of solar wind turbulence. These results confirm the turbulent nature of magnetic and velocity field fluctuations in the low frequency limit, and could supply the energy necessary to account for the nonadiabatic heating of the solar wind.

  8. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence for isothermal self-gravitating fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Kritsuk, Alexei G.

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional, compressible, magnetohydrodynamic turbulence of an isothermal, self-gravitating fluid is analyzed using two-point statistics in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers (both kinetic and magnetic). Following an alternative formulation proposed by Banerjee and Galtier [Phys. Rev. E 93, 033120 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.033120; J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 50, 015501 (2017), 10.1088/1751-8113/50/1/015501], an exact relation has been derived for the total energy transfer. This approach results in a simpler relation expressed entirely in terms of mixed second-order structure functions. The kinetic, thermodynamic, magnetic, and gravitational contributions to the energy transfer rate can be easily separated in the present form. By construction, the new formalism includes such additional effects as global rotation, the Hall term in the induction equation, etc. The analysis shows that solid-body rotation cannot alter the energy flux rate of compressible turbulence. However, the contribution of a uniform background magnetic field to the flux is shown to be nontrivial unlike in the incompressible case. Finally, the compressible, turbulent energy flux rate does not vanish completely due to simple alignments, which leads to a zero turbulent energy flux rate in the incompressible case.

  9. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1981-01-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time). (author)

  10. Sustained drag reduction in a turbulent flow using a low-temperature Leidenfrost surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranadhi, Dhananjai; Chen, Dayong; Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-10-01

    Skin friction drag contributes a major portion of the total drag for small and large water vehicles at high Reynolds number ( Re ). One emerging approach to reducing drag is to use superhydrophobic surfaces to promote slip boundary conditions. However, the air layer or "plastron" trapped on submerged superhydrophobic surfaces often diminishes quickly under hydrostatic pressure and/or turbulent pressure fluctuations. We use active heating on a superhydrophobic surface to establish a stable vapor layer or "Leidenfrost" state at a relatively low superheat temperature. The continuous film of water vapor lubricates the interface, and the resulting slip boundary condition leads to skin friction drag reduction on the inner rotor of a custom Taylor-Couette apparatus. We find that skin friction can be reduced by 80 to 90% relative to an unheated superhydrophobic surface for Re in the range 26,100 ≤ Re ≤ 52,000. We derive a boundary layer and slip theory to describe the hydrodynamics in the system and show that the plastron thickness is h = 44 ± 11 μm, in agreement with expectations for a Leidenfrost surface.

  11. Skin friction drag reduction on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer using synthetic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Randy; Boom, Pieter D.; Hanson, Ronald E.; Lavoie, Philippe; Zingg, David W.

    2017-11-01

    In these studies, we investigate the effect of mild synthetic jet actuation on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer with the goal of interacting with the large scales in the log region of the boundary layer and manipulating the overall skin friction. Results will be presented from both large eddy simulations (LES) and wind tunnel experiments. In the experiments, a large parameter space of synthetic jet frequency and amplitude was studied with hot film sensors at select locations behind a pair of synthetic jets to identify the parameters that produce the greatest changes in the skin friction. The LES simulations were performed for a selected set of parameters and provide a more complete evaluation of the interaction between the boundary layer and synthetic jets. Five boundary layer thicknesses downstream, the skin friction between the actuators is generally found to increase, while regions of reduced skin friction persist downstream of the actuators. This pattern is reversed for forcing at low frequency. Overall, the spanwise-averaged skin friction is increased by the forcing, except when forcing at high frequency and low amplitude, for which a net skin friction reduction persists downstream. The physical interpretation of these results will be discussed. The financial support of Airbus is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Interphasial energy transfer and particle dissipation in particle-laden wall turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, L.; Andersson, H.I.; Gillissen, J.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of mechanical energy between solid spherical particles and a Newtonian carrier fluid has been explored in two-way coupled direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow. The inertial particles have been treated as individual point particles in a Lagrangian framework and their

  13. Bispectral experimental estimation of the nonlinear energy transfer in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.

    2008-01-01

    -wave turbulence. The density fluctuations, which at the realistic collisionality are advected as a passive scalar with the vorticity, show power transfer from large to small scales, while the spectral power in potential fluctuations, which represents the energy, is transferred as an inverse cascade to larger...

  14. Estimation of turbulent energy dissipation in the boundary layer using Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Saushin, I. I.; Dushina, O. A.

    2017-08-01

    Turbulent energy dissipation in the turbulent boundary layer has been estimated experimentally. Dissipation has been derived from dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by an optical method. Smoke Image Velocimetry technique based on digital processing of smoke visualization of flow and adapted to relatively large smoke displacement between two consecutive video frames has been employed. The obtained dissipation profiles have been compared with measurements by multi-sensor hot-wire anemometers, stereo PIV, Tomo-3D-PTV with VIC+, and DNS results.

  15. Inverse energy cascade and emergence of large coherent vortices in turbulence driven by Faraday waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2013-05-10

    We report the generation of large coherent vortices via inverse energy cascade in Faraday wave driven turbulence. The motion of floaters in the Faraday waves is three dimensional, but its horizontal velocity fluctuations show unexpected similarity with two-dimensional turbulence. The inverse cascade is detected by measuring frequency spectra of the Lagrangian velocity, and it is confirmed by computing the third moment of the horizontal velocity fluctuations. This is observed in deep water in a broad range of wavelengths and vertical accelerations. The results broaden the scope of recent findings on Faraday waves in thin layers [A. von Kameke et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 074502 (2011)].

  16. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  17. Exact relations for energy transfer in self-gravitating isothermal turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Supratik; Kritsuk, Alexei G

    2017-11-01

    Self-gravitating isothermal supersonic turbulence is analyzed in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers. Based on the inviscid invariance of total energy, an exact relation is derived for homogeneous (not necessarily isotropic) turbulence. A modified definition for the two-point energy correlation functions is used to comply with the requirement of detailed energy equipartition in the acoustic limit. In contrast to the previous relations (S. Galtier and S. Banerjee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 134501 (2011)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.134501; S. Banerjee and S. Galtier, Phys. Rev. E 87, 013019 (2013)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.87.013019), the current exact relation shows that the pressure dilatation terms play practically no role in the energy cascade. Both the flux and source terms are written in terms of two-point differences. Sources enter the relation in a form of mixed second-order structure functions. Unlike the kinetic and thermodynamic potential energies, the gravitational contribution is absent from the flux term. An estimate shows that, for the isotropic case, the correlation between density and gravitational acceleration may play an important role in modifying the energy transfer in self-gravitating turbulence. The exact relation is also written in an alternative form in terms of two-point correlation functions, which is then used to describe scale-by-scale energy budget in spectral space.

  18. Nonlocal interaction of inverse magnetic energy transfer in hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Keisuke; Miura, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    A detailed analysis of forward and inverse energy transfer processes due to the Hall term effect in freely decaying, homogeneous, isotropic Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD) turbulence is performed through Fourier and wavelet analyses. We analyzed three snapshot datasets that were taken from such a period to allow the turbulence to develop sufficiently with a nearly constant magnetic Reynolds number. Because the Fourier energy spectra in these snapshots show remarkable agreement after the normalization in terms of the dissipation rates and the diffusion coefficients, they are considered as a universal equilibrium state. By analyzing the numerical solutions that are generated without any external forcing, it is confirmed that the inverse energy transfer due to the Hall term effect is intrinsic to HMHD dynamics. Orthonormal divergence-free wavelet analysis reveals that nonlinear mode interactions contributing to the inverse energy transfer exhibit a nonlocal feature, while those for the forward transfer are dominated by a local feature. (author)

  19. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S.

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS / ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  20. Energy Cascade Rate in Compressible Fast and Slow Solar Wind Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadid, L. Z.; Sahraoui, F.; Galtier, S., E-mail: lina.hadid@lpp.polytechnique.fr [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ. Paris-Sud, Observatoire de Paris, Université Paris-Saclay, Sorbonne Universités, PSL Research University, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2017-03-20

    Estimation of the energy cascade rate in the inertial range of solar wind turbulence has been done so far mostly within incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) theory. Here, we go beyond that approximation to include plasma compressibility using a reduced form of a recently derived exact law for compressible, isothermal MHD turbulence. Using in situ data from the THEMIS / ARTEMIS spacecraft in the fast and slow solar wind, we investigate in detail the role of the compressible fluctuations in modifying the energy cascade rate with respect to the prediction of the incompressible MHD model. In particular, we found that the energy cascade rate (1) is amplified particularly in the slow solar wind; (2) exhibits weaker fluctuations in spatial scales, which leads to a broader inertial range than the previous reported ones; (3) has a power-law scaling with the turbulent Mach number; (4) has a lower level of spatial anisotropy. Other features of solar wind turbulence are discussed along with their comparison with previous studies that used incompressible or heuristic (nonexact) compressible MHD models.

  1. Effects of spatially varying slip length on friction drag reduction in wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yosuke; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Kasagi, Nobuhide

    2011-01-01

    A series of direct numerical simulation has been made of turbulent flow over hydrophobic surfaces, which are characterized by streamwise periodic micro-grooves. By assuming that the size of micro-grooves is much smaller than the typical length-scale of near-wall turbulent structures, the dynamical boundary condition is expressed by a mobility tensor, which relates the slip velocity and the surface shear stress. Based on the derived mathematical relationship between the friction drag and different dynamical contributions, it is shown how the turbulence contribution can be extracted and analyzed.

  2. Enhanced Turbulence During the Energy Quench of Disruptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remkes, G. J. J.; Schüller, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    Enhanced electron density fluctuation levels with frequencies in the megahertz range have been observed during the energy quench phase of minor disruptions in the TORTUR Tokamak. The high frequencies of the phenomena indicate that the enhanced transport during the energy quench is caused by

  3. On the Statistical Properties of Turbulent Energy Transfer Rate in the Inner Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Perri, Silvia; Greco, Antonella; Marino, Raffaele; Bruno, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    The transfer of energy from large to small scales in solar wind turbulence is an important ingredient of the long-standing question of the mechanism of the interplanetary plasma heating. Previous studies have shown that magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is statistically compatible with the observed solar wind heating as it expands in the heliosphere. However, in order to understand which processes contribute to the plasma heating, it is necessary to have a local description of the energy flux across scales. To this aim, it is customary to use indicators such as the magnetic field partial variance of increments (PVI), which is associated with the local, relative, scale-dependent magnetic energy. A more complete evaluation of the energy transfer should also include other terms, related to velocity and cross-helicity. This is achieved here by introducing a proxy for the local, scale-dependent turbulent energy transfer rate ɛ_{Δ t}(t), based on the third-order moment scaling law for MHD turbulence. Data from Helios 2 are used to determine the statistical properties of such a proxy in comparison with the magnetic and velocity fields PVI, and the correlation with local solar wind heating is computed. PVI and ɛ_{Δ t}(t) are generally well correlated; however, ɛ_{Δ t}(t) is a very sensitive proxy that can exhibit large amplitude values, both positive and negative, even for low amplitude peaks in the PVI. Furthermore, ɛ_{Δ t}(t) is very well correlated with local increases of the temperature when large amplitude bursts of energy transfer are localized, thus suggesting an important role played by this proxy in the study of plasma energy dissipation.

  4. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  5. Momentum and energy transport in the accelerated fully rough turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, H.W.

    1976-06-01

    The behavior of the fully rough turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable pressure gradients was investigated experimentally using a porous test surface composed of densely packed spheres of uniform size. Measurements of profiles of mean velocity, mean temperature and the components of the Reynolds stress tensor are reported for both unblown and blown layers. Stanton numbers were determined from energy balances on the test surface and skin friction coefficients from measurements of the Reynolds shear stress and mean velocity. A new acceleration parameter, K/sub r/, for fully rough layers is defined and shown to be dependent on a characteristic roughness dimension but independent of molecular viscosity. For fully rough turbulent flow, acceleration causes an increase in Stanton number compared to zero pressure gradient values at the same enthalpy thickness, Reynold number, or position. The fully rough Stanton number behavior observed in this study is contrary to that previously reported for unblown accelerated smooth wall layers. Acceleration of a fully rough layer decreases the normalized turbulent kinetic energy and makes the turbulence field much less isotropic in the inner region (for F equal zero) compared to zero pressure gradient fully rough layers. Increasing values of roughness Reynolds number with acceleration indicate that the fully rough layer does not tend toward the transitionally rough or smooth wall state when accelerated.

  6. Turbulent energy dissipation in coronal loops: statistical analysis of dissipative structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D. O.; Morales, L. F.; Dmitruk, P.

    2017-12-01

    The power law energy distribution observed in dissipation events ranging from flares down to nanoflares, has been associated either to intermittent turbulence or to self-organized criticality. In spite of the many studies conducted in recent years, it is unclear whether these two paradigms are mutually exclusive or whether they are complementary manifestations of the complexity of the system.We numericaly integrate the magnetohydrodynamic equations to simulate the dynamics of coronal loops driven at their bases by footpoint motions. After a few photospheric turnover times, a stationary turbulent regime is reached, displaying a broadband power spectrum and a dissipation rate consistent with the cooling rates of the plasma confined in these loops. Our main goal is to determine whether the intermittent features observed in this turbulent flow can also be regarded as manifestations of self-organized criticality. A statistical analysis of the energy, area and lifetime of the dissipative structures observed in these simulations display robust scaling laws.In a preliminary study, we calculated the critical exponents characterizing the avalanche dynamics, andthe spreading exponents that quantify the growth of these structures over time. In this work we also calculate the remaining critical exponents for several activity thresholds and verify that they satisfy the conservation relations predicted for SOC systems. These results can therefore be regarded as a bona fide test supporting that the stationary turbulent regimes characterizing coronal loops, also correspond to states of self organized cricality.

  7. Climatic variability of near-surface turbulent kinetic energy over the United States: implications for fire-weather predications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bain

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that high levels of ambient near-surface atmospheric turbulence are often associated with rapid and sometimes erratic wildland fire spread that may eventually lead to large burn areas. Previous research has also examined the feasibility of using near-surface atmospheric turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) alone or in...

  8. Extensive strain along gradient trajectories in the turbulent kinetic energy field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampert, Markus; Goebbert, Jens Henrik; Schaefer, Philip; Gauding, Michael; Peters, Norbert; Aldudak, Fettah; Oberlack, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Based on direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence, shear turbulence, decaying turbulence, a turbulent channel flow as well as a Kolmogorov flow with Taylor-based Reynolds numbers Reλ between 69 and 295, the normalized probability density function of the length distribution \\skew3\\tilde{P}(\\tilde{l}) of dissipation elements, the conditional mean scalar difference langΔkmidlrang at the extreme points as well as the scaling of the two-point velocity difference along gradient trajectories langΔunrang are studied. Using the field of the instantaneous turbulent kinetic energy k as a scalar, we find good agreement between the model equation for \\skew3\\tilde{P}(\\tilde{l}) as proposed by Wang and Peters (2008 J. Fluid Mech. 608 113-38) and the results obtained in the different direct numerical simulation cases. This confirms the independence of the model solution from both the Reynolds number and the type of turbulent flow, so that it can be considered universally valid. In addition, we show a 2/3 scaling for the mean conditional scalar difference. In the second part of the paper, we examine the scaling of the conditional two-point velocity difference along gradient trajectories. In particular, we compare the linear s/τ scaling, where τ denotes an integral time scale and s the separation arclength along a gradient trajectory in the inertial range as derived by Wang (2009 Phys. Rev. E 79 046325) with the s·a∞ scaling, where a∞ denotes the asymptotic value of the conditional mean strain rate of large dissipation elements.

  9. Wind turbine power production and annual energy production depend on atmospheric stability and turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. St. Martin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Using detailed upwind and nacelle-based measurements from a General Electric (GE 1.5sle model with a 77 m rotor diameter, we calculate power curves and annual energy production (AEP and explore their sensitivity to different atmospheric parameters to provide guidelines for the use of stability and turbulence filters in segregating power curves. The wind measurements upwind of the turbine include anemometers mounted on a 135 m meteorological tower as well as profiles from a lidar. We calculate power curves for different regimes based on turbulence parameters such as turbulence intensity (TI as well as atmospheric stability parameters such as the bulk Richardson number (RB. We also calculate AEP with and without these atmospheric filters and highlight differences between the results of these calculations. The power curves for different TI regimes reveal that increased TI undermines power production at wind speeds near rated, but TI increases power production at lower wind speeds at this site, the US Department of Energy (DOE National Wind Technology Center (NWTC. Similarly, power curves for different RB regimes reveal that periods of stable conditions produce more power at wind speeds near rated and periods of unstable conditions produce more power at lower wind speeds. AEP results suggest that calculations without filtering for these atmospheric regimes may overestimate the AEP. Because of statistically significant differences between power curves and AEP calculated with these turbulence and stability filters for this turbine at this site, we suggest implementing an additional step in analyzing power performance data to incorporate effects of atmospheric stability and turbulence across the rotor disk.

  10. Energy balance in turbulent weakly ionized ionospheric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyatko, N.A.; Mishin, E.V.; Telegin, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    On the base of numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation are determined the electron distribution function and energy balance in the case if the longitudinal current exceeds the critical one and the resistance becames anomalously high one. In the equation are accounted for both electron scattering by plasma density fluctuations and electron elastic and inelastic collisions with atoms and molecules and electron-electron collisions

  11. Energy dissipation by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ouliang, E-mail: ouliang@usc.edu [Oracle Corporation, Redwood City, California 94065 (United States); Peter Gary, S., E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Wang, Joseph, E-mail: josephjw@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma model. The simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes and follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into a broadband, anisotropic, turbulent spectrum at shorter wavelengths. For relatively small levels of the initial fluctuation energy ϵ{sub e}, linear collisionless damping provides most of the dissipation of the turbulence. But as ϵ{sub e} and the total dissipation increase, linear damping becomes less important and, especially at β{sub e} ≪ 1, nonlinear processes become stronger. The PDFs and kurtoses of the magnetic field increments in the simulations suggest that intermittency in whistler turbulence generally increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}. Correlation coefficient calculations imply that the current structure dissipation also increases with increasing ϵ{sub e} and β{sub e}, and that the nonlinear dissipation processes in these simulations are primarily associated with regions of localized current structures.

  12. Energy dissipation by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ouliang; Peter Gary, S.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized plasma model. The simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes and follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into a broadband, anisotropic, turbulent spectrum at shorter wavelengths. For relatively small levels of the initial fluctuation energy ϵ e , linear collisionless damping provides most of the dissipation of the turbulence. But as ϵ e and the total dissipation increase, linear damping becomes less important and, especially at β e ≪ 1, nonlinear processes become stronger. The PDFs and kurtoses of the magnetic field increments in the simulations suggest that intermittency in whistler turbulence generally increases with increasing ϵ e and β e . Correlation coefficient calculations imply that the current structure dissipation also increases with increasing ϵ e and β e , and that the nonlinear dissipation processes in these simulations are primarily associated with regions of localized current structures

  13. Coherent Structure Dynamics and Turbulent Effects of Horizontal Axis Marine Energy Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajardo, D. I.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Ingram, D.

    2016-12-01

    Harnessing the energy available in the oceans constitutes one of the most promising alternatives for generating clean electricity. There are vast amounts of energy present both in waves and tidal currents so it is anticipated that marine energy will have a major role in non-conventional renewable energy generation in the near to mid future. Nevertheless, before marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices can be installed in large numbers a better understanding of the physical, social and environmental implications of their operation is needed. This includes understanding the: hydrodynamic processes, interaction with bathymetry, and the local flow characteristics. This study is focused on the effects horizontal axis MHK devices have on flow turbulence and coherent structures. This is especially relevant considering that sites with favourable conditions for MHK devices are tidal channels where a delicate balance exists between the strong tidal currents and the ecosystems. Understanding how MHK devices influence flow conditions, turbulence and energy flux is essential for predicting and assessing the environmental implications of deploying MHK technologies. We couple a Blade Element Momentum Actuator Disk (BEM-AD) model to a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) flow solver in order to study flow conditions for different configurations of horizontal axis MHK turbines. In this study, we contribute to the understanding of the hydrodynamic behaviour of MHK technologies, and give insights into the effects devices will have on their environment, with emphasis in ambient turbulence and flow characteristics, while keeping in mind that these effects can alter electricity quality and device performance. Work supported by CONICYT grant 80160084, Fondecyt grant 1130940, Chile's Marine Energy Research & Innovation Center (MERIC) CORFO project 14CEI2-28228, and the collaboration between the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and the University of Edinburgh, UK, partially supported by the RC

  14. Localness of energy cascade in a hydrodynamic turbulence, I. Smooth coarse-graining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to scale-decomposition of the fluid kinetic energy (or other quadratic integrals) into band-pass contributions from a series of length-scales. Our decomposition is based on a multiscale generalization of the 'Germano identity' for smooth, graded filter kernels. We employ this method to derive a budget equation that describes the transfers of turbulent kinetic energy both in space and in scale. It is shown that the inter-scale energy transfer is dominated by local triadic interactions, assuming only the scaling properties expected in a turbulent inertial-range. We derive rigorous upper bounds on the contributions of non-local triads, extending the work of Eyink (2005) for low-pass filtering. We also propose a physical explanation of the differing exponents for our rigorous upper bounds and for the scaling predictions of Kraichnan (1966,1971). The faster decay predicted by Kraichnan is argued to be the consequence of additional cancellations in the signed contributions to transfer from non-local triads, after averaging over space. This picture is supported by data from a 512 pseudospectral simulation of Navier-Stokes turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing.

  15. Localness of energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence, II. Sharp spectral filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scale-locality of subgrid-scale (SGS) energy flux and interband energy transfers defined by the sharp spectral filter. We show by rigorous bounds, physical arguments, and numerical simulations that the spectral SGS flux is dominated by local triadic interactions in an extended turbulent inertial range. Interband energy transfers are also shown to be dominated by local triads if the spectral bands have constant width on a logarithmic scale. We disprove in particular an alternative picture of 'local transfer by nonlocal triads,' with the advecting wavenumber mode at the energy peak. Although such triads have the largest transfer rates of all individual wavenumber triads, we show rigorously that, due to their restricted number, they make an asymptotically negligible contribution to energy flux and log-banded energy transfers at high wavenumbers in the inertial range. We show that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain an energy cascade to small scales. Furthermore, nonlocal triads are argued to contribute even less to the space-average energy flux than is implied by our rigorous bounds, because of additional cancellations from scale-decorrelation effects. We can thus recover the -4/3 scaling of nonlocal contributions to spectral energy flux predicted by Kraichnan's abridged Lagrangian-history direct-interaction approximation and test-field model closures. We support our results with numerical data from a 512{sup 3} pseudospectral simulation of isotropic turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing. We also discuss a rigorous counterexample of Eyink [Physica D 78, 222 (1994)], which showed that nonlocal wavenumber triads may dominate in the sharp spectral flux (but not in the SGS energy flux for graded filters). We show that this mathematical counter example fails to satisfy reasonable physical requirements for a turbulent velocity field, which are employed in our

  16. Energy cost reduction for retail florists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-15

    This handbook shows retail florists how to recognize and act on energy waste in lighting, heating, refrigeration, delivery, and greenhouse operations. The following are included: a summary of savings, energy management, greenhouse, assessing energy needs, economic projections, and record monthly use and expenditures. Twenty-one methods of saving money in the retail florist business are presented. (MHR)

  17. Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    FINAL REPORT Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER) ESTCP Project EW-201349 DECEMBER 2016 Dr. Girija...SUBTITLE Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-13-C-0058 Final Report 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Buildings being served by the central plant Hypothesis We tested the hypothesis that the optimized operation reduces wasted energy and energy costs by

  18. Energy Spectra of Vortex Distributions in Two-Dimensional Quantum Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashton S. Bradley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically explore key concepts of two-dimensional turbulence in a homogeneous compressible superfluid described by a dissipative two-dimensional Gross-Pitaeveskii equation. Such a fluid supports quantized vortices that have a size characterized by the healing length ξ. We show that, for the divergence-free portion of the superfluid velocity field, the kinetic-energy spectrum over wave number k may be decomposed into an ultraviolet regime (k≫ξ^{-1} having a universal k^{-3} scaling arising from the vortex core structure, and an infrared regime (k≪ξ^{-1} with a spectrum that arises purely from the configuration of the vortices. The Novikov power-law distribution of intervortex distances with exponent -1/3 for vortices of the same sign of circulation leads to an infrared kinetic-energy spectrum with a Kolmogorov k^{-5/3} power law, which is consistent with the existence of an inertial range. The presence of these k^{-3} and k^{-5/3} power laws, together with the constraint of continuity at the smallest configurational scale k≈ξ^{-1}, allows us to derive a new analytical expression for the Kolmogorov constant that we test against a numerical simulation of a forced homogeneous, compressible, two-dimensional superfluid. The numerical simulation corroborates our analysis of the spectral features of the kinetic-energy distribution, once we introduce the concept of a clustered fraction consisting of the fraction of vortices that have the same sign of circulation as their nearest neighboring vortices. Our analysis presents a new approach to understanding two-dimensional quantum turbulence and interpreting similarities and differences with classical two-dimensional turbulence, and suggests new methods to characterize vortex turbulence in two-dimensional quantum fluids via vortex position and circulation measurements.

  19. Influence of tall vegetation canopy on turbulence kinetic energy budget in the stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Karmen; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2017-04-01

    While a considerable amount of research has been done on turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget studies in the surface layer over horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surfaces, little research focused on budgets above heterogeneous and rough surfaces. Only few studies have investigated TKE budgets above fetch-limited forest focusing on statically neutral conditions, while studies in the stable boundary layer (SBL) are still scarce in the literature. Therefore, we present turbulence characteristics above tall, deciduous forest in the wintertime SBL and make a comparison with a well-known results of HHF terrain. Turbulence measurements performed at five levels above the canopy height (approximately h = 18 m) allowed the investigation of combined influence of the roughness sublayer (RSL) found above tall vegetation and the internal boundary layer (IBL) on the TKE budget terms. Each term of the TKE budget is investigated within the framework of local similarity theory. Kolomogorov's similarity hypothesis assumes local isotropy within the inertial subrange. Testing the local isotropy hypothesis more thoroughly resulted in a ratio of the horizontal spectral densities (Sv/Su) approaching the 4/3, while the ratio of the vertical to the longitudinal spectral density (Sw/Su) was less than 1 for all levels indicating an anisotropic turbulence above the canopy. As a consequence, estimated values of TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) for the vertical component (ɛw) were smaller (underestimated) compared to the ɛ estimates obtained from the horizontal velocity components. This finding has a direct influence on the applicability of classical Kansas spectral models valid for HHF terrain as well as on the budget of wind variances. Additionally, the dimensionless wind shear function associated with "Kolmogorov turbulence" (existence of a well-defined inertial subrange with -5/3 slopes) was found to depart from linear prediction suggesting that the stability is a stronger determinant of

  20. Modeling Transport of Turbulent Fluxes in a Heterogeneous Urban Canopy Using a Spatially Explicit Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, M.; Bailey, B.; Stoll, R., II

    2017-12-01

    Understanding how changes in the microclimate near individual plants affects the surface energy budget is integral to modeling land-atmosphere interactions and a wide range of near surface atmospheric boundary layer phenomena. In urban areas, the complex geometry of the urban canopy layer results in large spatial deviations of turbulent fluxes further complicating the development of models. Accurately accounting for this heterogeneity in order to model urban energy and water use requires a sub-plant level understanding of microclimate variables. We present analysis of new experimental field data taken in and around two Blue Spruce (Picea pungens) trees at the University of Utah in 2015. The test sites were chosen in order study the effects of heterogeneity in an urban environment. An array of sensors were placed in and around the conifers to quantify transport in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum: radiative fluxes, temperature, sap fluxes, etc. A spatial array of LEMS (Local Energy Measurement Systems) were deployed to obtain pressure, surrounding air temperature and relative humidity. These quantities are used to calculate the radiative and turbulent fluxes. Relying on measurements alone is insufficient to capture the complexity of microclimate distribution as one reaches sub-plant scales. A spatially-explicit radiation and energy balance model previously developed for deciduous trees was extended to include conifers. The model discretizes the tree into isothermal sub-volumes on which energy balances are performed and utilizes incoming radiation as the primary forcing input. The radiative transfer component of the model yields good agreement between measured and modeled upward longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes. Ultimately, the model was validated through an examination of the full energy budget including radiative and turbulent fluxes through isolated Picea pungens in an urban environment.

  1. The anisotropic redistribution of free energy for gyrokinetic plasma turbulence in a Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Jenko, Frank; Teaca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    For a Z-pinch geometry, we report on the nonlinear redistribution of free energy across scales perpendicular to the magnetic guide field, for a turbulent plasma described in the framework of gyrokinetics. The analysis is performed using a local flux-surface approximation, in a regime dominated by electrostatic fluctuations driven by the entropy mode, with both ion and electron species being treated kinetically. To explore the anisotropic nature of the free energy redistribution caused by the emergence of zonal flows, we use a polar coordinate representation for the field-perpendicular directions and define an angular density for the scale flux. Positive values for the classically defined (angle integrated) scale flux, which denote a direct energy cascade, are shown to be also composed of negative angular sections, a fact that impacts our understanding of the backscatter of energy and the way in which it enters the modeling of sub-grid scales for turbulence. A definition for the flux of free energy across each perpendicular direction is introduced as well, which shows that the redistribution of energy in the presence of zonal flows is highly anisotropic.

  2. Sustained Drag Reduction in Turbulent Taylor-Couette Flows Enabled by Low-Temperature Leidenfrost Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranadhi, Dhananjai; Chen, Dayong; Kleingartner, Justin; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Cohen, Robert; McKinley, Gareth

    2015-11-01

    A submerged body can be heated past its Leidenfrost temperature to form a thick, continuous film of steam between itself and the water. Here we employ a superhydrophobic surface to drastically reduce the energy input required to create and sustain such a boiling film, and use the resulting slip boundary condition to achieve skin friction drag reduction on the inner rotor of a bespoke Taylor-Couette apparatus. We find that skin friction can be reduced by over 90% relative to an unheated superhydrophobic surface at Re = 19,200, and derive a boundary layer and slip theory to fit the data to a model that calculates a slip length of 3.12 +/- 0.4 mm. This indicates that the boiling film has a thickness of 112 μm, which is consistent with literature.

  3. Energy spectrum scaling in an agent-based model for bacterial turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel-Stites, Maxwell; Staples, Anne

    2017-11-01

    Numerous models have been developed to examine the behavior of dense bacterial swarms and to explore the visually striking phenomena of bacterial turbulence. Most models directly impose fluid dynamics physics, either by modeling the active matter as a fluid or by including interactions between the bacteria and a fluid. In this work, however, the `turbulence' is solely an emergent property of the collective behavior of the bacterial population, rather than a consequence of imposed fluid dynamics physical modeling. The system is simulated using a two dimensional Vicsek-style model, with the addition of individual repulsion to simulate bacterial collisions and physical interactions, and without the common flocking or sensing behaviors. Initial results indicate the presence of k-1 scaling in a portion of the kinetic energy spectrum that can be considered analogous to the inertial subrange in turbulent energy spectra. This result suggests that the interaction of large numbers of individual active bacteria may also be a contributing factor in the emergence of fluid dynamics phenomena, in addition to the physical interactions between bacteria and their fluid environment.

  4. Momentum-energy transport from turbulence driven by parallel flow shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Horton, W.; Bengtson, R.D.; Li, G.X.

    1994-04-01

    The low frequency E x B turbulence driven by the shear in the mass flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is studied using the fluid theory in a slab configuration with magnetic shear. Ion temperature gradient effects are taken into account. The eigenfunctions of the linear instability are asymmetric about the mode rational surfaces. Quasilinear Reynolds stress induced by such asymmetric fluctuations produces momentum and energy transport across the magnetic field. Analytic formulas for the parallel and perpendicular Reynolds stress, viscosity and energy transport coefficients are given. Experimental observations of the parallel and poloidal plasma flows on TEXT-U are presented and compared with the theoretical models

  5. Energy use reduction potential of passenger transport in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, ME; Moll, HC

    2000-01-01

    To contribute to a sustainable society, considerable reduction in energy use and CO2 emissions should be achieved. This paper presents the results of calculations exploring the energy use reduction potential of passenger transport for Western Europe (OECD Europe minus Turkey). For these

  6. Two-dimensional dynamics of elasto-inertial turbulence and its role in polymer drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, S.; Terrapon, V. E.; Dubief, Y.

    2018-02-01

    The goal of the present study is threefold: (i) to demonstrate the two-dimensional nature of the elasto-inertial instability in elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT), (ii) to identify the role of the bidimensional instability in three-dimensional EIT flows, and (iii) to establish the role of the small elastic scales in the mechanism of self-sustained EIT. Direct numerical simulations of viscoelastic fluid flows are performed in both two- and three-dimensional straight periodic channels using the Peterlin finitely extensible nonlinear elastic model (FENE-P). The Reynolds number is set to Reτ=85 , which is subcritical for two-dimensional flows but beyond the transition for three-dimensional ones. The polymer properties selected correspond to those of typical dilute polymer solutions, and two moderate Weissenberg numbers, Wiτ=40 ,100 , are considered. The simulation results show that sustained turbulence can be observed in two-dimensional subcritical flows, confirming the existence of a bidimensional elasto-inertial instability. The same type of instability is also observed in three-dimensional simulations where both Newtonian and elasto-inertial turbulent structures coexist. Depending on the Wi number, one type of structure can dominate and drive the flow. For large Wi values, the elasto-inertial instability tends to prevail over the Newtonian turbulence. This statement is supported by (i) the absence of typical Newtonian near-wall vortices and (ii) strong similarities between two- and three-dimensional flows when considering larger Wi numbers. The role of small elastic scales is investigated by introducing global artificial diffusion (GAD) in the hyperbolic transport equation for polymers. The aim is to measure how the flow reacts when the smallest elastic scales are progressively filtered out. The study results show that the introduction of large polymer diffusion in the system strongly damps a significant part of the elastic scales that are necessary to feed

  7. Reduction of Climate Gases by Energy Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, N.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide cannot be depolluted in practice. However, there are two areas where measures can be taken to avoid CO 2 emissions: 1. Energy-efficiency. 2. Use of sustainable energy sources in energy production. It is characteristic that many measures which are good for the environment are also good from the point of view of cost efficiency, preparedness and employment. This is tru, for instance, of the greater use of biofuels instead of fossil fuels, collective heating systems as opposed to individual ones and economy measures - especially more efficient use of electricity. It is a question of thinking of the system as a whole. Methane is another factor which contributes to the greenhouse effect. Methane emissions can also be avoided, or reduced, by system-thinking. System-thinking is, for instance, not ro deposit combustible waste but to use it as an energy source. And why not produce electricity by using methane from existing landfill sites. Electrical energy is the most useful form of energy. Therefore, electricity should not, as a principal rule, be used for heating, or as process energy. The fact that energy-efficiency and emission of greenhouse gases are interrelated is shown in the following two examples. 1. Only about 25% of the energy content in extracted coal will reach the consumers as electricity when the production takes place in an ordinary, coal-fires condensing power station. 2. When district heating (room-heating and hot water) is produced in a modern heat-production plant by flue-gas condensation, about 90% of the energy is utilised for heating purposes. To obtain an overall picture of the amount of energy used for a purpose, e.g. heating or electricity, you must view the entire process from extraction to final use. Such a picture can show the energy efficiency and what losses arise. Efficiency measures can reduce the energy bill. They can also reduce pollution, greenhouse gases among other things. Examples will be given in this paper of energy

  8. Reduction of the renewable energy incentives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigaud, Ch.

    2010-01-01

    In order to reduce the state deficit the French government plans to reduce the financial incentives in all sectors and particularly in the sector of renewable energies. The photovoltaic sector is the most hit with a tax credit rate dropping from 50% (in 2009) to 22.5% (in 2011). For the other renewable energy sectors the tax credit rate will be reduced by 10% in 2011. The French government wants the cost of the tax credit on the renewable energies to drop from 2.8*10 9 euros in 2009 to 2.0*10 9 euros in 2011. (A.C.)

  9. Turbulent water vapor exchanges and two source energy balance model estimated fluxes of heterogeneous vineyard canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, S.; Hipps, L.; Alfieri, J. G.; Prueger, J. H.; Kustas, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    Agriculture in semi-arid regions is globally facing increasing stress on water resources. Hence, knowledge of water used in irrigated crops is essential for water resource management. However, quantifying spatial and temporal distribution of evapotranspiration (ET) has proven difficult because of the inherent complexities involved. Understanding of the complex biophysical relationships that govern ET is incomplete, particularly for heterogeneous vegetation. The USDA-ARS is developing a remotely-sensed ET modeling system that utilizes a two-source energy balance (TSEB) model capable of simulating turbulent water and energy exchange from measurements of radiometric land surface temperature. The modeling system has been tested over a number of vegetated surfaces and is currently being validated for vineyard sites in the Central Valley of California through the Grape Remote sensing Atmospheric Profiling & Evapotranspiration eXperiment (GRAPEX). The highly variable, elevated canopy structure and semi-arid climatic conditions of these sites give the opportunity to gain knowledge of both turbulent exchange processes and the TSEB model's ability to simulate turbulent fluxes for heterogeneous vegetation. Analyzed are fast-response (20 Hz) 3-D velocity, temperature, and humidity measurements gathered over 4 years at two vineyard sites. These data were collected at a height of 5 m, within the surface layer but above the canopy, and at 1.5 m, below the canopy top. Power spectra and cross-spectra are used to study behavior of turbulent water vapor exchanges and coupling between the canopy layer and surface layer under various atmospheric conditions. Frequent light winds and unstable daytime conditions, combined with the complicated canopy structure, often induce intermittent and episodic turbulence transport. This resulted in a modal behavior alternating between periods of more continuous canopy venting and periods where water vapor fluxes are dominated by transient, low

  10. Energy cost reduction for retail florists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-15

    Recommendations are made to help retail florists cut the cost of energy in their business operations. It shows how to recognize and act on energy waste in lighting, heating, refrigeration, delivery, and greenhouse operations. Recommendations describe a condition and what techniques to implement in order to achieve savings. An example with qualified savings is given, and suggested follow-up procedures are delineated. The examples are case histories.

  11. Heavy Bearings Exploitation Energy and Reduction Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, V. G.; Cioară, R.

    2016-11-01

    The global trend of resource conservation so as “not to compromise the ability of future generation's development” is the fundamental basis of the concept of sustainable development. Concordant with this, the energy efficiency of products is increasingly discussed and frequently taken into account in the design stage. In more cases a product is more appreciated and more attractive as the energy consumption and its associated materials are lower. In the production stage, said consumption advantages primarily the manufacturer, particularly through low consumption thereof. In the operational phase, low energy and materials consumption represents an user advantage and it's a major argument in the decision to purchase and use a particular product. Heavy bearings are frequent products used in wind turbines that are producing non-conventional “clean” energy, as windmills. An enhanced energy efficiency bearing contributes to the enhancement of the overall efficiency of the wind turbines. Based on a suitable mathematical model, this paper identifies and recommends courses of action to reduce the operating energy of heavy bearing through the “cage” - which is the subject of a much larger research - with the highest priority. The identified actions may constitute from a set of requirements for the design stage of the heavy bearing predominantly oriented towards innovation-invention.

  12. Do inertial wave interactions control the rate of energy dissipation of rotating turbulence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Campagne, Antoine; Machicoane, Nathanael; Gallet, Basile; Moisy, Frederic

    2015-11-01

    The scaling law of the energy dissipation rate, ɛ ~U3 / L (with U and L the characteristic velocity and lengthscale), is one of the most robust features of fully developed turbulence. How this scaling is affected by a background rotation is still a controversial issue with importance for geo and astrophysical flows. At asymptotically small Rossby numbers Ro = U / ΩL , i.e. in the weakly nonlinear limit, wave-turbulence arguments suggest that ɛ should be reduced by a factor Ro . Such scaling has however never been evidenced directly, neither experimentally nor numerically. We report here direct measurements of the injected power, and therefore of ɛ, in an experiment where a propeller is rotating at a constant rate in a large volume of fluid rotating at Ω. In co-rotation, we find a transition between the wave-turbulence scaling at small Ro and the classical Kolmogorov law at large Ro . The transition between these two regimes is characterized from experiments varying the propeller and tank dimensions. In counter-rotation, the scenario is much richer with the observation of an additional peak of dissipation, similar to the one found in Taylor-Couette experiments.

  13. Energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in foundry industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuanyuan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Current energy conservation and emissions reduction strategies in iron and steel industry were reviewed. Since foundry industry is one of the major source of energy consumption and pollution emission (especially CO2, issues concerning energy-saving and emission-reduction have been raised by governments and the industry. Specialists from around the world carried out multidimensional analyses and evaluation on the potentials in energy conservation and emissions reduction in iron and steel industry, and proposed various kinds of analyzing models. The primary measures mainly focus on the targeted policies formulation and also on clean and high-efficient technologies development. The differences and similarities in energy conservation and emission reduction in foundry industry between China and other countries were discussed, while, the future development trend was also pointed out.

  14. Case Study: Energy Reduction through Lighting Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center in North Chicago, Illinois, reduced its energy consumption by 15 percent in one year.One key project was replacing fluorescent lighting in many areas of campus with more efficient LED bulbs.

  15. CO2 Emission Reduction in Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bole, A.; Sustersic, A.; Voncina, R.

    2013-01-01

    Due to human activities, concentrations of the greenhouse gases increase in the atmosphere much quicker than they naturally would. Today it is clear that climate change is the result of human activities. With the purpose of preventing, reducing and mitigating of climate change, the EU, whose member is also Slovenia, set ambitious goals. In order to keep rise of the global atmosphere temperature below 2 degrees of C, the European Council set an objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80 - 95 % by 2050 compared to 1990. It is important that every single individual is included in achieving of these goals. Certainly, the most important role is assumed by individual sectors especially Public Electricity and Heat Production sector as one of the greatest emitters of the greenhouse gases. As a possible solution of radical reduction of the greenhouse gases emission from mentioned sector Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology is implemented. In the article the range of CO 2 reduction possibilities, technology demands and environmental side effects of CCS technology are described. Evaluation of CCS implementation possibilities in Slovenia is also included.(author)

  16. Observations of turbulent energy dissipation rate in the upper ocean of the central South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of turbulent energy dissipation rate, velocity, temperature, and salinity were obtained in the upper ocean of the central South China Sea (14.5˚N, 117.0˚E) during an experimental campaign from May 11th to 13th 2010. Dissipation rate was elevated ( 10-7 Wkg-1) at night by convection mixing and was weakened ( 10-9 Wkg-1) in daytime due to the warming stratification. Thermocline dissipation rate varied with time ( 10-9 Wkg-1 to 10-8 Wkg-1) under the influence of internal waves. Energy was transferred from the diurnal internal tides to high frequency internal waves through nonlinear wave-wave interactions. This energy cascade process was accompanied by elevated shear and enhanced dissipation, which played an important role in the turbulent mixing in thermocline. Compare with the thermocline dissipation, dissipation below the thermocline was more stable and weak ( 10-10 Wkg-1). The observed dissipation rate during the measurement was well parameterized by the MacKinnon-Gregg parameterization (a model based on a reinterpretation of wave-wave interaction theory), whereas the Gregg-Henyey parameterization was not in good agreement with the observed dissipation rate.

  17. Energy and enstrophy spectra of geostrophic turbulent flows derived from a maximum entropy principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkley, W. T. M.; Lynch, P.

    2009-04-01

    The principle of maximum entropy is used to obtain energy and enstrophy spectra as well as average vorticity fields in the context of geostrophic turbulence on a rotating sphere. In the unforced-undamped (inviscid) case the maximization of entropy is constrained by the (constant) energy and enstrophy of the system, leading to the familiar results of absolute statistical equilibrium. In the damped (freely decaying) and forced-damped case the maximization of entropy is constrained by either the decay rates of energy and enstrophy or by the energy and enstrophy in combination with their decay rates. Integrations with a numerical spectral model are used to check the theoretical results for the different cases. Maximizing the entropy, constrained by the energy and enstrophy, gives a very good description of the energy and enstrophy spectra in the inviscid case, in accordance with known results. Maximizing the entropy, constrained by the energy and enstrophy in combination with their decay rates, also leads to very good descriptions of the energy and enstrophy spectra in the freely decaying case, not too long after the damping has set in. In the forced-damped case, maximizing the entropy with the energy and enstrophy in combination with their (zero) decay rates as constraints, gives a reasonable description of the spectra although discrepancies remain.

  18. Coherent Structures and Spectral Energy Transfer in Turbulent Plasma: A Space-Filter Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Califano, F.; Retinò, A.

    2018-03-01

    Plasma turbulence at scales of the order of the ion inertial length is mediated by several mechanisms, including linear wave damping, magnetic reconnection, the formation and dissipation of thin current sheets, and stochastic heating. It is now understood that the presence of localized coherent structures enhances the dissipation channels and the kinetic features of the plasma. However, no formal way of quantifying the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer and the presence of spatial structures has been presented so far. In the Letter we quantify such a relationship analyzing the results of a two-dimensional high-resolution Hall magnetohydrodynamic simulation. In particular, we employ the technique of space filtering to derive a spectral energy flux term which defines, in any point of the computational domain, the signed flux of spectral energy across a given wave number. The characterization of coherent structures is performed by means of a traditional two-dimensional wavelet transformation. By studying the correlation between the spectral energy flux and the wavelet amplitude, we demonstrate the strong relationship between scale-to-scale transfer and coherent structures. Furthermore, by conditioning one quantity with respect to the other, we are able for the first time to quantify the inhomogeneity of the turbulence cascade induced by topological structures in the magnetic field. Taking into account the low space-filling factor of coherent structures (i.e., they cover a small portion of space), it emerges that 80% of the spectral energy transfer (both in the direct and inverse cascade directions) is localized in about 50% of space, and 50% of the energy transfer is localized in only 25% of space.

  19. The cascade of energy in homogeneous turbulence: a 5D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardesa-Duenas, Jose; Vela-Martin, Alberto; Jimenez, Javier

    2017-11-01

    The inherent multi-dimensional nature of the turbulent cascade is a major challenge to its study. In order to characterize a process occurring in space, time and scale, we present a new approach where we track coherent structures representing energy in different scales from a time-resolved simulation of isotropic turbulence lasting 66 large-eddy turnovers. We couple the dynamics at different scales by computing the geometric intersection between individual coherent structures from any two scales. Statistically, we find that eddies at scale r intersect those at scales 2 r and r / 2 preferentially at the beginning and at the end of their life, respectively. With our simulation at Reλ = 315 , we could check this trend to hold for r values spanning a ratio of 8. We thus report on 4 generations of eddies that trace the transfer of energy from scale 8 r to scale r via intermediate steps through a scale-local, spatially-localized process. We found the geometric intersection between scales separated by ratios of 4 or larger to be of the same order of magnitude as the random intersection levels found for those scale combinations. Funded by the ERC project COTURB.

  20. Effect of Polymer Type and Mixing of Polymers on Drag Reduction in Turbulent Pipe Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salam Hadi Hussein

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on studies on effect of the type of polymer on drag reduction. The study conducted through circular pipe using Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC, Xanthan gum (XG and their mixing in equal ratios as additives in pipe of diameter 0.0381m. The study covered range of parameters like concentration, mean velocity and angle of inclination of pipe. The maximum drag reduction observed was about 58%, 46% and 46% for the three polymers respectively. It is found that the drag reduction for the mixture is close to the drag reduction for XG polymer. The SPSS program has been used for correlate the data that have been obtained. The drag reduction percentage is correlated in terms of Reynolds number Re, additive concentration C (ppm and angle of inclination of pipe (deg, and the relations obtained is mentioned.

  1. On the energy economics of air lubrication drag reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo A. Mäkiharju

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Air lubrication techniques for frictional drag reduction on ships have been proposed by numerous researchers since the 19th century. However, these techniques have not been widely adopted as questions persist about their drag reduction performance beyond the laboratory, as well as energy and economic cost-benefit. This paper draws on data from the literature to consider the suitability of air lubrication for large ocean going and U.S. Great Lakes ships, by establishing the basic energy economic calculations and presenting results for a hypothetical air lubricated ship. All the assumptions made in the course of the analysis are clearly stated so that they can be refined when considering application of air lubrication to a specific ship. The analysis suggests that, if successfully implemented, both air layer and partial cavity drag reduction could lead to net energy savings of 10 to 20%, with corresponding reductions in emissions.

  2. E-SMARRT: Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-11-01

    This factsheet describes the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) program developed by Advanced Technology Institute (ATI). E-SMARRT is a balanced portfolio of projects to address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry.

  3. Wind Turbine Control with Active Damage Reduction through Energy Dissipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Wisniewski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an active damage reduction control strategy for wind turbines based on dissipated energy. To this end we rely on the equivalences relating both damage in the rainflow counting sense and dissipated energy to the variations of Preisach hysteresis operators. Since dissipation

  4. Drag reduction by microbubbles in turbulent flows: the limit of minute bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor S; Pomyalov, Anna; Procaccia, Itamar; Tiberkevich, Vasil

    2005-05-06

    Drag reduction by microbubbles is a promising engineering method for improving ship performance. A fundamental theory of the phenomenon is lacking, however, making actual design quite haphazard. We offer here a theory of drag reduction by microbubbles in the limit of very small bubbles, when the effect of the bubbles is mainly to normalize the density and the viscosity of the carrier fluid. The theory culminates with a prediction of the degree of drag reduction given the concentration profile of the bubbles. Comparisons with experiments are discussed and the road ahead is sketched.

  5. New strategies for optimization of compliant tensegrity surfaces for drag reduction in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, H.; Bewley, T. R.

    2002-11-01

    The present project is inspired by two observations from nature: 1) the incredible strength of spider fibers (derived essentially from a tensegrity-based configuration of proteins), and 2) the efficient swimming motion of dolphins (perhaps derived in part from the compliant nature of their skin). Motivated by such observations, we are exploring a new design for a tensegrity-based ``fabric'' consisting of a weave of both members in tension and members designed to support compressive loads. In particular, we are attempting to optimize the surface compliance of such a fabric, that is, the response of the surface of the fabric to externally-applied friction and pressure forces, in order to reduce the drag induced by an overlying turbulent flow at the flow/structure interface. As the first stage of the research, we developed the software simulating the interaction of the two-part system. Direct numerical simulations are used to model the dynamics of the flow part. To account for the moving walls, we use an immersed-boundary technique which simulates the presence of a moving boundary. In collaboration with another research group, we developed object-oriented software for computation of the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric part. The two codes written in two different languages run in parallel and communicate data at each time step. In this presentation, we will outline the numerical method used, present recent simulation results demonstrating the flow/surface interaction, and outline our ongoing efforts to optimize the compliance properties of the tensegrity fabric.

  6. Observations of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the upper central South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chang-Rong; Chen, Gui-Ying; Shang, Xiao-Dong

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate ( ɛ), velocity, temperature, and salinity were obtained for the upper ocean of the central South China Sea (14.5° N, 117.0° E) during an experimental campaign from May 11 to 13, 2010. Dissipation in the diurnal mixed layer showed a diurnal variability that was strongly affected by the surface buoyancy flux. Dissipation was enhanced ( ɛ ˜ 10-7 W kg-1) at night due to the convective mixing and was weakened ( ɛ ˜ 10-9 W kg-1) in daytime due to the stratification. Dissipation in the thermocline varied with time under the influence of internal waves. Shear from high-frequency internal waves (period ˜8 h) played an important role in enhancing the turbulent mixing in the thermocline. In the period of strong high-frequency internal waves, the shear from high-frequency internal waves became strong and the depth-averaged ɛ in the thermocline was elevated by almost one order of magnitude. Compared with the dissipation in the thermocline, dissipation below was weaker (the time-averaged ɛ ˜ 10-10 W kg-1). The observation indicates that the dissipation rates during the measurements can be parameterized by the MacKinnon-Gregg model that is widely used in the continental shelf but are not in agreement with the Gregg-Henyey model used for the open ocean.

  7. Measurement of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum - Part 2: Convection record measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Buchhave, Preben; Hodzic, Azur

    2017-01-01

    A novel exact temporal to spatial mapping for point measurements in turbulence has been applied to various flow conditions existing in a round turbulent jet. The conditions range between equilibrium and non-equilibrium as well as mid to high turbulence intensities. The exact mapping applies to al...

  8. Forward and inverse kinetic energy cascades in Jupiter’s turbulent weather layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roland M. B.; Read, Peter L.

    2017-11-01

    Jupiter’s turbulent weather layer contains phenomena of many different sizes, from local storms up to the Great Red Spot and banded jets. The global circulation is driven by complex interactions with (as yet uncertain) small-scale processes. We have calculated structure functions and kinetic energy spectral fluxes from Cassini observations over a wide range of length scales in Jupiter’s atmosphere. We found evidence for an inverse cascade of kinetic energy from length scales comparable to the first baroclinic Rossby deformation radius up to the global jet scale, but also a forward cascade of kinetic energy from the deformation radius to smaller scales. This second result disagrees with the traditional picture of Jupiter’s atmospheric dynamics, but has some similarities with mesoscale phenomena in the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans. We conclude that the inverse cascade driving Jupiter’s jets may have a dominant energy source at scales close to the deformation radius, such as baroclinic instability.

  9. Peak reduction for commercial buildings using energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K. H.; Lim, Y. S.; Morris, S.

    2017-11-01

    Battery-based energy storage has emerged as a cost-effective solution for peak reduction due to the decrement of battery’s price. In this study, a battery-based energy storage system is developed and implemented to achieve an optimal peak reduction for commercial customers with the limited energy capacity of the energy storage. The energy storage system is formed by three bi-directional power converter rated at 5 kVA and a battery bank with capacity of 64 kWh. Three control algorithms, namely fixed-threshold, adaptive-threshold, and fuzzy-based control algorithms have been developed and implemented into the energy storage system in a campus building. The control algorithms are evaluated and compared under different load conditions. The overall experimental results show that the fuzzy-based controller is the most effective algorithm among the three controllers in peak reduction. The fuzzy-based control algorithm is capable of incorporating a priori qualitative knowledge and expertise about the load characteristic of the buildings as well as the useable energy without over-discharging the batteries.

  10. Climatic variability of a fire-weather index based on turbulent kinetic energy and the Haines Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi Bian

    2010-01-01

    Combining the Haines Index (HI) with near-surface turbulent kinetic energy (TKEs) through a product of the two values (HITKEs) has shown promise as an indicator of the atmospheric potential for extreme and erratic fire behavior in the U.S. Numerical simulations of fire-weather evolution during past wildland fire episodes in...

  11. Analysis on energy saving and emission reduction of clean energy technology in ports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Qin, Cuihong; Peng, Chuansheng

    2018-02-01

    This paper discusses the application of clean energy technology in ports. Using Ningbo port Co. Ltd. Beilun second container terminal branch as an example, we analyze the effect of energy saving and emission reduction of CO2 and SO2 by clean energy alternative to fuel oil, and conclude that the application of clean energy technology in the container terminal is mature, and can achieve effect of energy-saving and emission reduction of CO2 and SO2. This paper can provide as a reference for the promotion and application of clean energy in ports.

  12. Potential reduction of energy consumption in public university library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noranai, Z.; Azman, ADF

    2017-09-01

    Efficient electrical energy usage has been recognized as one of the important factor to reduce cost of electrical energy consumption. Various parties have been emphasized about the importance of using electrical energy efficiently. Inefficient usage of electrical energy usage lead to biggest factor increasing of administration cost in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia. With this in view, a project the investigate potential reduction electrical energy consumption in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia was carried out. In this project, a case study involving electrical energy consumption of Perpustakaan Tunku Tun Aminah was conducted. The scopes of this project are to identify energy consumption in selected building and to find the factors that contributing to wastage of electrical energy. The MS1525:2001, Malaysian Standard - Code of practice on energy efficiency and use of renewable energy for non-residential buildings was used as reference. From the result, 4 saving measure had been proposed which is change type of the lamp, install sensor, decrease the number of lamp and improve shading coefficient on glass. This saving measure is suggested to improve the efficiency of electrical energy consumption. Improve of human behaviour toward saving energy measure can reduce 10% from the total of saving cost while on building technical measure can reduce 90% from total saving cost.

  13. Linking quality improvement and energy efficiency/waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, R.E.; Moore, N.L.

    1995-04-01

    For some time industry has recognized the importance of both energy efficiency/waste reduction (ee/wr) and quality/manufacturing improvement. However, industry has not particularly recognized that manufacturing efficiency is, in part, the result of a more efficient use of energy. For that reason, the energy efficiency efforts of most companies have involved admonishing employees to save energy. Few organizations have invested resources in training programs aimed at increasing energy efficiency and reducing waste. This describes a program to demonstrate how existing utility and government training and incentive programs can be leveraged to increase ee/wr and benefit both industry and consumers. Fortunately, there are a variety of training tools and resources that can be applied to educating workers on the benefits of energy efficiency and waste reduction. What is lacking is a method of integrating ee/wr training with other important organizational needs. The key, therefore, is to leverage ee/wr investments with other organizational improvement programs. There are significant strides to be made by training industry to recognize fully the contribution that energy efficiency gains make to the bottom line. The federal government stands in the unique position of being able to leverage the investments already made by states, utilities, and manufacturing associations by coordinating training programs and defining the contribution of energy-efficiency practices. These aims can be accomplished by: developing better measures of energy efficiency and waste reduction; promoting methods of leveraging manufacturing efficiency programs with energy efficiency concepts; helping industry understand how ee/wr investments can increase profits; promoting research on the needs of, and most effective ways to, reach the small and medium-sized businesses that so often lack the time, information, and finances to effectively use the hardware and training technologies available.

  14. Annual Energy Usage Reduction and Cost Savings of a School: End-Use Energy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghoul, M. A.; Bakhtyar, B.; Asim, Nilofar; Sopian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Buildings are among the largest consumers of energy. Part of the energy is wasted due to the habits of users and equipment conditions. A solution to this problem is efficient energy usage. To this end, an energy audit can be conducted to assess the energy efficiency. This study aims to analyze the energy usage of a primary school and identify the potential energy reductions and cost savings. A preliminary audit was conducted, and several energy conservation measures were proposed. The energy conservation measures, with reference to the MS1525:2007 standard, were modelled to identify the potential energy reduction and cost savings. It was found that the school's usage of electricity exceeded its need, incurring an excess expenditure of RM 2947.42. From the lighting system alone, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction of 5489.06 kWh, which gives a cost saving of RM 2282.52 via the improvement of lighting system design and its operating hours. Overall, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction and cost saving of 20.7% when the energy conservation measures are earnestly implemented. The previous energy intensity of the school was found to be 50.6 kWh/m2/year, but can theoretically be reduced to 40.19 kWh/mm2/year. PMID:25485294

  15. Annual Energy Usage Reduction and Cost Savings of a School: End-Use Energy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman Roslizar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are among the largest consumers of energy. Part of the energy is wasted due to the habits of users and equipment conditions. A solution to this problem is efficient energy usage. To this end, an energy audit can be conducted to assess the energy efficiency. This study aims to analyze the energy usage of a primary school and identify the potential energy reductions and cost savings. A preliminary audit was conducted, and several energy conservation measures were proposed. The energy conservation measures, with reference to the MS1525:2007 standard, were modelled to identify the potential energy reduction and cost savings. It was found that the school’s usage of electricity exceeded its need, incurring an excess expenditure of RM 2947.42. From the lighting system alone, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction of 5489.06 kWh, which gives a cost saving of RM 2282.52 via the improvement of lighting system design and its operating hours. Overall, it was found that there is a potential energy reduction and cost saving of 20.7% when the energy conservation measures are earnestly implemented. The previous energy intensity of the school was found to be 50.6 kWh/m2/year, but can theoretically be reduced to 40.19 kWh/mm2/year.

  16. Heavy inertial particles in turbulent flows gain energy slowly but lose it rapidly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Akshay; Gupta, Anupam; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Pandit, Rahul

    2018-03-01

    We present an extensive numerical study of the time irreversibility of the dynamics of heavy inertial particles in three-dimensional, statistically homogeneous, and isotropic turbulent flows. We show that the probability density function (PDF) of the increment, W (τ ) , of a particle's energy over a time scale τ is non-Gaussian, and skewed toward negative values. This implies that, on average, particles gain energy over a period of time that is longer than the duration over which they lose energy. We call this slow gain and fast loss. We find that the third moment of W (τ ) scales as τ3 for small values of τ . We show that the PDF of power-input p is negatively skewed too; we use this skewness Ir as a measure of the time irreversibility and we demonstrate that it increases sharply with the Stokes number St for small St; this increase slows down at St≃1 . Furthermore, we obtain the PDFs of t+ and t-, the times over which p has, respectively, positive or negative signs, i.e., the particle gains or loses energy. We obtain from these PDFs a direct and natural quantification of the slow gain and fast loss of the energy of the particles, because these PDFs possess exponential tails from which we infer the characteristic loss and gain times tloss and tgain, respectively, and we obtain tlossprobability in the strain-dominated region than in the vortical one; in contrast, the slow gain in the energy of the particles is equally likely in vortical or strain-dominated regions of the flow.

  17. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in u...

  18. Turbulent friction drag reduction using electroactive polymer and electromagnetically driven surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouder, Kevin; Potter, Mark; Morrison, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    This work reports aerodynamic testing of two spanwise-oscillating surfaces fabricated out of electroactive polymers (EAPs) in the dielectric form of actuation, and of an electromagnetic-driven linear motor. Hot-wire and PIV measurements of velocity and direct measurement of friction drag using a drag balance are presented. A maximum of 16 % surface friction reduction, as calculated by the diminution of the wall-normal streamwise velocity gradient, was obtained. Among other quantities, the spatial dependence of the drag reduction was investigated. When this spatial transient and portions which are static are accounted for, the direct drag measurements complement the hot-wire data. PIV measurements, where the laser beam was parallel to the oscillating surface at y + ≈ 15, support the hot-wire data. The two actuators are original in design, and significant contributions have been made to the development of EAPs. This experiment is the first to aerodynamically test EAP actuators at such a large scale and at a relatively moderate Re.

  19. Achieving CO2 Emissions Reduction Goals with Energy Infrastructure Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlinc, M.; Medved, K.; Simic, J.

    2013-01-01

    The EU has set its short-term goals in the Europe 2020 Strategy (20% of CO 2 emissions reduction, 20% increase in energy efficiency, 20% share of renewables in final energy). The analyses show that the EU Member States in general are on the right track of achieving these goals; they are even ahead (including Slovenia). But setting long-term goals by 2050 is a tougher challenge. Achieving CO 2 emissions reduction goes hand in hand with increasing the share of renewables and strategically planning the projects, which include exploiting the potential of renewable sources of energy (e.g. hydropower). In Slovenia, the expected share of hydropower in electricity production from large HPPs in the share of renewables by 2030 is 1/3. The paper includes a presentation of a hydro power plants project on the middle Sava river in Slovenia and its specifics (influenced by the expansion of the Natura 2000 protected sites and on the other hand by the changes in the Environment Protection Law, which implements the EU Industrial Emissions Directive and the ETS Directive). Studies show the importance of the HPPs in terms of CO 2 emissions reduction. The main conclusion of the paper shows the importance of energy infrastructure projects, which contribute to on the one hand the CO 2 emissions reduction and on the other the increase of renewables.(author)

  20. Moab, Utah: Using Energy Data to Target Carbon Reductions from Building Energy Efficiency (City Energy: From Data to Decisions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team, Office of Strategic Programs

    2017-11-01

    This fact sheet "Moab, Utah: Using Energy Data to Target Carbon Reductions from Building Energy Efficiency" explains how the City of Moab used data from the U.S. Department of Energy's Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning (Cities-LEAP) and the State and Local Energy Data (SLED) programs to inform its city energy planning. It is one of ten fact sheets in the "City Energy: From Data to Decisions" series.

  1. Wind Energy and Air Emission Reduction Benefits: A Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.; High, C.

    2008-02-01

    This document provides a summary of the impact of wind energy development on various air pollutants for a general audience. The core document addresses the key facts relating to the analysis of emission reductions from wind energy development. It is intended for use by a wide variety of parties with an interest in this issue, ranging from state environmental officials to renewable energy stakeholders. The appendices provide basic background information for the general reader, as well as detailed information for those seeking a more in-depth discussion of various topics.

  2. Carbon footprint reductions via grid energy storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Trevor S. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, 1100 23rd Avenue, Port Huenem, CA 93043 (United States); Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration, University of Houston - Downtown, Houston, Texas (United States); Weeks, Kelly [Department of Maritime Administration, Texas A and M University at Galveston, Galveston, TX 77553 (United States); Tucker, Coleman [Department of Management, Marketing, and Business Administration, University of Houston - Downtown, Houston, Texas 77002 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This effort presents a framework for reducing carbon emissions through the use of large-scale grid-energy-storage (GES) systems. The specific questions under investigation herein are as follows: Is it economically sound to invest in a GES system and is the system at least carbon footprint neutral? This research will show the answer to both questions is in the affirmative. Scilicet, when utilized judiciously, grid energy storage systems can be both net present value positive as well as be total carbon footprint negative. The significant contribution herein is a necessary and sufficient condition for achieving carbon footprint reductions via grid energy storage systems.

  3. Potential energy consumption reduction of automotive climate control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Filip; Uddheim, Åsa; Dalenbäck, Jan-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Twenty-on energy saving measures for vehicle interior climate were evaluated. • Few single energy saving measures could reduce the energy use significantly. • The operation of the system in intermediate conditions determines the energy use. • Required heating/cooling of passenger compartment had small effect on energy use. - Abstract: In recent years fuel consumption of passenger vehicles has received increased attention by customers, the automotive industry, regulatory agencies and academia. One area which affect the fuel consumption is climate control systems. Twenty-one energy saving measures were evaluated regarding the total energy use for vehicle interior climate using simulation. Evaluated properties were heat flow into the passenger compartment, electrical and mechanical work. The simulation model included sub models of the passenger compartment, air-handling unit, Air Conditioning (AC) system, engine and engine cooling system. A real-world representative test cycle, which included tests in cold, intermediate and warm conditions, was used for evaluation. In general, few single energy saving measures could reduce the energy use significantly. The measures with most potential were increased blower efficiency with a reduction of 46% of the electrical work and increased AC-system disengage temperature with a reduction of 27% of the mechanical work. These results show that the operation of the climate control system had a large effect on the energy use, especially compared to the required heating and cooling of the passenger compartment. As a result energy saving measures need to address how heating and cooling is generated before reducing the heat flow into the passenger compartment.

  4. Biomass to energy : GHG reduction quantification protocols and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reusing, G.; Taylor, C.; Nolan, W.; Kerr, G.

    2009-01-01

    With the growing concerns over greenhouses gases and their contribution to climate change, it is necessary to find ways of reducing environmental impacts by diversifying energy sources to include non-fossil fuel energy sources. Among the fastest growing green energy sources is energy from waste facilities that use biomass that would otherwise be landfilled or stockpiled. The quantification of greenhouse gas reductions through the use of biomass to energy systems can be calculated using various protocols and methodologies. This paper described each of these methodologies and presented a case study comparing some of these quantification methodologies. A summary and comparison of biomass to energy greenhouse gas reduction protocols in use or under development by the United Nations, the European Union, the Province of Alberta and Environment Canada was presented. It was concluded that regulatory, environmental pressures, and public policy will continue to impact the practices associated with biomass processing or landfill operations, such as composting, or in the case of landfills, gas collection systems, thus reducing the amount of potential credit available for biomass to energy facility offset projects. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  5. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  6. Drag reduction in numerical two-phase Taylor–Couette turbulence using an Euler–Lagrange approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arza, Vamsi Spandan; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Two-phase turbulent Taylor–Couette (TC) flow is simulated using an Euler–Lagrange approach to study the effects of a secondary phase dispersed into a turbulent carrier phase (here bubbles dispersed into water). The dynamics of the carrier phase is computed using direct numerical simulations (DNS) in

  7. Transformation by design: nursing workforce innovation and reduction strategies in turbulent times of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Mary O

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of care delivery from an acute care and inpatient standard to the outpatient setting and health promotion model is generating the need for innovative workforce and infrastructure adjustments to meet the new paradigm of population health management. Successful transformation of the nursing workforce necessitates a positive style of thinking that addresses rational concerns during times of difficult transition. Nurse leaders are called to recognize and appreciate the strengths of the nursing workforce by involving them in the course of change through collaboration, planning, and discussion. One unique way to plan and develop new care delivery models is to adopt the framework used in health facility planning and design for new services, units, or hospitals. This framework is flexible and can be adjusted easily to meet the objectives of a small nursing workforce innovation project or expanded to encompass the needs of a large-scale hospital transformation. Structured questioning further helps the team to identify barriers to care and allows for the development of new concepts that are objective and in accord with evidence-based practice and data. This article explores the advantages and disadvantages of implementing innovative workforce redesign and workforce reduction strategies.

  8. MMS observation of energy conversion and collisionless plasma dissipation channels in the turbulent magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, T.; Yang, Y.; Chasapis, A.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    High resolution Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) plasma and magnetic field data obtained in the inhomogeneous turbulent magnetosheath directly reveals the exchanges of energy between electromagnetic, flow and random kinetic energy. The parameters that quantify these exchanges are based on standard manipulations of the collisionless Vlasov model of plasma dynamics [1], without appeal to viscous or other closures. No analysis of heat transport or heat conduction is carried out. Several intervals of burst mode data in the magnetosheath are considered. Time series of the work done by the electromagnetic field, and the pressure-stress interaction enable description of the pathways to dissipation in this low collisionality plasma. Using these examples we demonstrate that the pressure-stress interaction provides important information not readily revealed in other diagnostics concerning the physical processes that are observed. This method does not require any specific mechanism for its application such as reconnection or a selected mode, although with increased experience it will be useful in distinguishing among proposed possibilities. [1] Y. Yang et al, Phys. Plasmas 24, 072306 (2017); doi: 10.1063/1.4990421.

  9. Two-scale correlation and energy cascade in three-dimensional turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y X; Schmitt, F G; Gagne, Y

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a high-order harmonic-free methodology, namely arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis, to estimate the two-scale correlation (TSC). When applied to fully developed turbulent velocity, we find that the scale-dependent Hilbert energy satisfies a lognormal distribution on both the inertial and dissipation ranges. The maximum probability density function of the logarithm of the Hilbert energy obeys a power law with a scaling exponent γ ≃ 0.33 in the inertial range. For the measured TSC, we observe a logarithmic correlation law with an experimental exponent α ≃ 0.37 on both the inertial and dissipation ranges. The correlation itself is found to be self-similar with respect to the distance between the two considered scales and a central frequency ω c in the logarithm space. An empirical nonlinear and nonlocal triad-scale interaction formula is proposed to describe the observed TSC. This triadic interaction can be interpreted as experimental evidence of a small-scale nonlinear and nonlocal coupling inside the self-similarity of the Richardson–Kolmogorov phenomenological cascade picture. (paper)

  10. Designing building energy efficiency programs for greenhouse gas reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackhurst, Michael; Lima Azevedo, Ines; Scott Matthews, H.; Hendrickson, Chris T.

    2011-01-01

    Costs and benefits of building energy efficiency are estimated as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Pittsburgh, PA and Austin, TX. The analysis includes electricity and natural gas consumption, covering 75% of building energy consumption in Pittsburgh and 85% in Austin. Two policy objectives were evaluated: maximize GHG reductions given initial budget constraints or maximize social savings given target GHG reductions. This approach evaluates the trade-offs between three primary and often conflicting program design parameters: initial capital constraints, social savings, and GHG reductions. Results suggest uncertainty in local stocks, demands, and efficiency significantly impacts anticipated outcomes. Annual GHG reductions of 1 ton CO 2 eq/capita/yr in Pittsburgh could cost near nothing or over $20 per capita annually. Capital-constrained policies generate slightly less social savings (a present value of a few hundred dollars per capita) than policies that maximize social savings. However, sectors and end uses targeted for intervention vary depending on policy objectives and constraints. Optimal efficiency investment strategies for some end uses vary significantly (in excess of 100%) between Pittsburgh and Austin, suggesting that resources and guidance conducted at the national scale may mislead state and local decision-makers. Results are used to provide recommendations for efficiency program administrators. - Highlights: → We use public data to estimate local building energy costs, benefits and greenhouse gas reductions. → We use optimization to evaluate trade-offs between program objectives and capital constraints. → Local energy market conditions significantly influence efficiency expectations. → Different program objectives can lead to different effective investment strategies. → We reflect on the implications of our results for efficiency program design.

  11. Energy saving and emission reduction of China's urban district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xia; Wang, Li; Tong, Lige; Sun, Shufeng; Yue, Xianfang; Yin, Shaowu; Zheng, Lifang

    2013-01-01

    China's carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission ranks highest in the world. China is committed to reduce its CO 2 emission by 40% to 45% from the 2005 levels by 2020. To fulfill the target, China's CO 2 emission reduction must exceed 6995 million tons. Energy consumption and CO 2 emission of China's urban district heating (UDH) are increasing. The current policy implemented to improve UDH focuses on replacing coal with natural gas to reduce energy consumption and CO 2 emission to some extent. This paper proposes that heat pump heating (HPH) could serve as a replacement for UDH to help realize energy-saving and emission-reduction goals to a greater extent. The paper also analyzes the impact of this replacement on the heating and power generation sectors. The results show that replacing coal-based UDH with HPH decreases energy consumption and CO 2 emission by 43% in the heating sector. In the power generation sector, the efficiency of power generation at the valley electricity time increases by 0.512%, and the ratio of peak–valley difference decreases by 16.5%. The decreases in CO 2 emission from the heating and power generation sectors cumulatively account for 5.55% of China's total CO 2 emission reduction target in 2020. - Highlights: ► Replacing urban district heating with heat pump heating. ► Impact of heat pump heating on heating and power generation sectors. ► Potential of energy saving and emission reduction for heat pump heating. ► China should adjust current urban heating strategy

  12. Nonlinear energy transfer and current sheet development in localized Alfvén wavepacket collisions in the strong turbulence limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verniero, J. L.; Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.

    2018-02-01

    In space and astrophysical plasmas, turbulence is responsible for transferring energy from large scales driven by violent events or instabilities, to smaller scales where turbulent energy is ultimately converted into plasma heat by dissipative mechanisms. The nonlinear interaction between counterpropagating Alfvén waves, denoted Alfvén wave collisions, drives this turbulent energy cascade, as recognized by early work with incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. Recent work employing analytical calculations and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of Alfvén wave collisions in an idealized periodic initial state have demonstrated the key properties that strong Alfvén wave collisions mediate effectively the transfer of energy to smaller perpendicular scales and self-consistently generate current sheets. For the more realistic case of the collision between two initially separated Alfvén wavepackets, we use a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation to show here that these key properties persist: strong Alfvén wavepacket collisions indeed facilitate the perpendicular cascade of energy and give rise to current sheets. Furthermore, the evolution shows that nonlinear interactions occur only while the wavepackets overlap, followed by a clean separation of the wavepackets with straight uniform magnetic fields and the cessation of nonlinear evolution in between collisions, even in the gyrokinetic simulation presented here which resolves dispersive and kinetic effects beyond the reach of the MHD theory.

  13. Turbulent kinetic energy during wildfires in the north central and north-eastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren E. Heilman; Xindi. Bian

    2010-01-01

    The suite of operational fire-weather indices available for assessing the atmospheric potential for extreme fire behaviour typically does not include indices that account for atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence or wind gustiness that can increase the erratic behaviour of fires. As a first step in testing the feasibility of using a quantitative measure of turbulence...

  14. Emissions reduction scenarios in the Argentinean Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sbroiavacca, Nicolás; Nadal, Gustavo; Lallana, Francisco; Falzon, James; Calvin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the LEAP, TIAM-ECN, and GCAM models were applied to evaluate the impact of a variety of climate change control policies (including carbon pricing and emission constraints relative to a base year) on primary energy consumption, final energy consumption, electricity sector development, and CO 2 emission savings of the energy sector in Argentina over the 2010–2050 period. The LEAP model results indicate that if Argentina fully implements the most feasible mitigation measures currently under consideration by official bodies and key academic institutions on energy supply and demand, such as the ProBiomass program, a cumulative incremental economic cost of 22.8 billion US$(2005) to 2050 is expected, resulting in a 16% reduction in GHG emissions compared to a business-as-usual scenario. These measures also bring economic co-benefits, such as a reduction of energy imports improving the balance of trade. A Low CO 2 price scenario in LEAP results in the replacement of coal by nuclear and wind energy in electricity expansion. A High CO 2 price leverages additional investments in hydropower. By way of cross-model comparison with the TIAM-ECN and GCAM global integrated assessment models, significant variation in projected emissions reductions in the carbon price scenarios was observed, which illustrates the inherent uncertainties associated with such long-term projections. These models predict approximately 37% and 94% reductions under the High CO 2 price scenario, respectively. By comparison, the LEAP model, using an approach based on the assessment of a limited set of mitigation options, predicts an 11.3% reduction. The main reasons for this difference include varying assumptions about technology cost and availability, CO 2 storage capacity, and the ability to import bioenergy. An emission cap scenario (2050 emissions 20% lower than 2010 emissions) is feasible by including such measures as CCS and Bio CCS, but at a significant cost. In terms of technology

  15. Energy reduction through voltage scaling and lightweight checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadric, Edin

    As the semiconductor roadmap reaches smaller feature sizes and the end of Dennard Scaling, design goals change, and managing the power envelope often dominates delay minimization. Voltage scaling remains a powerful tool to reduce energy. We find that it results in about 60% geomean energy reduction on top of other common low-energy optimizations with 22nm CMOS technology. However, when voltage is reduced, it becomes easier for noise and particle strikes to upset a node, potentially causing Silent Data Corruption (SDC). The 60% energy reduction, therefore, comes with a significant drop in reliability. Duplication with checking and triple-modular redundancy are traditional approaches used to combat transient errors, but spending 2--3x the energy for redundant computation can diminish or reverse the benefits of voltage scaling. As an alternative, we explore the opportunity to use checking operations that are cheaper than the base computation they are guarding. We devise a classification system for applications and their lightweight checking characteristics. In particular, we identify and evaluate the effectiveness of lightweight checks in a broad set of common tasks in scientific computing and signal processing. We find that the lightweight checks cost only a fraction of the base computation (0-25%) and allow us to recover the reliability losses from voltage scaling. Overall, we show about 50% net energy reduction without compromising reliability compared to operation at the nominal voltage. We use FPGAs (Field-Programmable Gate Arrays) in our work, although the same ideas can be applied to different systems. On top of voltage scaling, we explore other common low-energy techniques for FPGAs: transmission gates, gate boosting, power gating, low-leakage (high-Vth) processes, and dual-V dd architectures. We do not scale voltage for memories, so lower voltages help us reduce logic and interconnect energy, but not memory energy. At lower voltages, memories become dominant

  16. Direct measures of mechanical energy for knife mill size reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    Lengthy straw/stalk of biomass may not be directly fed into grinders such as hammer mills and disc refiners. Hence, biomass needs to be preprocessed using coarse grinders like a knife mill to allow for efficient feeding in refiner mills without bridging and choking. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented knife mill. Direct power inputs were determined for different knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. Overall accuracy of power measurement was calculated to be 0.003 kW. Total specific energy (kWh/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate mill with biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy that can be assumed to reach the biomass. The difference is parasitic or no-load energy of mill. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopping increased with knife mill speed, whereas, effective specific energy decreased marginally for switchgrass and increased for wheat straw and corn stover. Total and effective specific energy decreased with an increase in screen size for all the crops studied. Total specific energy decreased with increase in mass feed rate, but effective specific energy increased for switchgrass and wheat straw, and decreased for corn stover at increased feed rate. For knife mill screen size of 25.4 mm and optimum speed of 250 rpm, optimum feed rates were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively, and the corresponding total specific energies were 7.57, 10.53, and 8.87 kWh/Mg and effective specific energies were 1.27, 1.50, and 0.24 kWh/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Energy utilization ratios were calculated as 16.8%, 14.3%, and 2.8% for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These

  17. The energy requirement of holidays and household reduction options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Berg, M.; Vringer, K.

    1999-12-01

    Like all consumer products and services, holidays require energy. The aim of this study is to give insight to the energy consumption for holidays of Dutch households and to suggest options to reduce this energy demand. To examine the energy consumption for holidays, nine holiday packages are composed, each representing a large group of Dutch vacationers. The packages describe the destination, means of transport, duration, accommodation and number of vacationers. The average energy requirement for the accommodation and transport for long summer holidays is 12.5 GJ per Dutch household, excluding the energy requirement for food and activities. About 10% of the Dutch households, the ones that travel by plane to their holiday destination, consume 70% of the total amount of energy all households require for holiday purposes. This is mainly due to the distance travelled, rather than to the chosen means of transport. If the travelled distances will be reduced by 50% and all nights are spent in a tent, the average household energy requirement would be 6.1 GJ, a reduction of more than 50%. 36 refs

  18. Technology Roadmap for Energy Reduction in Automotive Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2008-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), in collaboration with the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR), hosted a technology roadmap workshop in Troy, Michigan in May 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to explore opportunities for energy reduction, discuss the challenges and barriers that might need to be overcome, and identify priorities for future R&D. The results of the workshop are presented in this report.

  19. Technology Roadmap. Energy Loss Reduction and Recovery in Industrial Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-11-01

    To help guide R&D decision-making and gain industry insights on the top opportunities for improved energy systems, ITP sponsored the Energy Loss Reduction and Recoveryin Energy Systems Roadmapping Workshopin April 2004 in Baltimore, Maryland. This Technology Roadmapis based largely on the results of the workshop and additional industrial energy studies supported by ITP and EERE. It summarizes industry feedback on the top opportunities for R&D investments in energy systems, and the potential for national impacts on energy use and the environment.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, James

    2005-10-01

    K-epsilon models find wide application as approximate models of fluid turbulence. The models couple equations for the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate to the usual fluid equations, where the turbulence is driven by Reynolds stress or buoyancy source terms. We generalize to the case with magnetic forces in a Z-pinch geometry (azimuthal fields), using simple energy arguments to derive the turbulent source terms. The field is presumed strong enough that 3 dimensional twisting or bending of the field can be ignored, i.e. the flow is of the interchange type. The generalized source terms show the familiar correspondence between magnetic curvature and acceleration as drive terms for Rayleigh-Taylor and sausage instability. The source terms lead naturally to a modification of Ohm's law including a turbulent electric field that allows magnetic field to diffuse through material. The turbulent magnetic diffusion parallels a corresponding ohmic heating term in the equation for the turbulent kinetic energy.

  1. Resolution and Energy Dissipation Characteristics of Implicit LES and Explicit Filtering Models for Compressible Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romit Maulik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Solving two-dimensional compressible turbulence problems up to a resolution of 16, 384^2, this paper investigates the characteristics of two promising computational approaches: (i an implicit or numerical large eddy simulation (ILES framework using an upwind-biased fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO reconstruction algorithm equipped with several Riemann solvers, and (ii a central sixth-order reconstruction framework combined with various linear and nonlinear explicit low-pass spatial filtering processes. Our primary aim is to quantify the dissipative behavior, resolution characteristics, shock capturing ability and computational expenditure for each approach utilizing a systematic analysis with respect to its modeling parameters or parameterizations. The relative advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are addressed for solving a stratified Kelvin-Helmholtz instability shear layer problem as well as a canonical Riemann problem with the interaction of four shocks. The comparisons are both qualitative and quantitative, using visualizations of the spatial structure of the flow and energy spectra, respectively. We observe that the central scheme, with relaxation filtering, offers a competitive approach to ILES and is much more computationally efficient than WENO-based schemes.

  2. A formal derivation of the local energy transfer (LET) theory of homogeneous turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, W. D.; Yoffe, S. R.

    2017-09-01

    A statistical closure of the Navier-Stokes hierarchy which leads to equations for the two-point, two-time covariance of the velocity field for stationary, homogeneous isotropic turbulence is presented. It is a generalisation of the self-consistent field method due to Edwards (1964) for the stationary, single-time velocity covariance. The probability distribution functional P≤ft[\\mathbf{u},t\\right] is obtained, in the form of a series, from the Liouville equation by means of a perturbation expansion about a Gaussian distribution, which is chosen to give the exact two-point, two-time covariance. The triple moment is calculated in terms of an ensemble-averaged infinitesimal velocity-field propagator, and shown to yield the Edwards result as a special case. The use of a Gaussian zero-order distribution has been found to justify the introduction of a fluctuation-response relation, which is in accord with modern dynamical theories. In a sense this work completes the analogy drawn by Edwards between turbulence and Brownian motion. Originally Edwards had shown that the noise input was determined by the correlation of the velocity field with the externally applied stirring forces but was unable to determine the system response. Now we find that the system response is determined by the correlation of the velocity field with internal quasi-entropic forces. This analysis is valid to all orders of perturbation theory, and allows the recovery of the local energy transfer (LET) theory, which had previously been derived by more heuristical methods. The LET theory is known to be in good agreement with experimental results. It is also unique among two-point statistical closures in displaying an acceptable (i.e. non-Markovian) relationship between the transfer spectrum and the system response, in accordance with experimental results. As a result of the latter property, it is compatible with the Kolmogorov (K41) spectral phenomenology. In memory of Professor Sir Sam Edwards F

  3. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...... are access to the instantaneous velocity magnitude, in addition to the desired flow quantity, and a high temporal resolution in comparison to the relevant time scales of the flow. We map, without distortion and bias, notoriously difficult developing turbulent high intensity flows using three main aspects...

  4. Turbulent kinetic energy of the ocean winds over the Kuroshio Extension from QuikSCAT winds (1999-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Dong, Changming; King, Gregory P.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate mesoscale turbulence (10-1000 km) in the ocean winds over the Kuroshio Extension (28°N-40°N, 140°E-180°E) using the QuikSCAT data set (November 1999 to October 2009). We calculate the second (Djj) and third-order structure functions (Djjj) and the spatial variance (Vj) as a function of scale r (j=L,T denotes, respectively, the longitudinal (divergent) and transverse (vortical) component). The most interesting results of the analysis follow. Although both Vj>(r>) and Djj>(r>) measure the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), we find that Vj>(r>) is the more robust measure. The spatial variance density (dVj/dr) has a broad peak near 450 km (close to the midlatitude Rossby radius of deformation). On interannual time scales, TKE correlates well with the El Niño 3.4 index. According to turbulence theory, the kinetic energy cascades downscale (upscale) if DLLL>(r>) (also skewness SL=DLLL/DLL3/2) is negative (positive). Our results for the Kuroshio Extension are consistent with a downscale cascade (indicating convergence dominates). Furthermore, classical turbulence theory predicts that SL=-0.3 and independent of r; however, we find SL varies strongly with r, from -4 at small scales to -0.3 at large scales. This nonclassical behavior implies strong-scale interaction, which we attribute to the rapid, and sometimes explosive, growth of storms in the region through baroclinic instability. Finally, we find that ST (a measure of cyclonic/anticyclonic asymmetry) is positive (cyclonic) and also varies strongly with r, from 4 at small scales to 0.5 at large scales. New turbulence models are needed to explain these results, and that will benefit Weather Prediction and climate modeling.Plain Language SummaryThe turbulent winds near the ocean surface give rise to air-sea heat and momentum exchange. The turbulence is caused by convective processes - processes generated at weather fronts, in squalls, tropical disturbances and extra-tropical cyclones. In order to improve

  5. Assesment of Energy Options for CO2 Emission Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavlina, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, global anthropogenic CO 2 emissions grew by 52% which caused an increase in 10.8% in the CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere, and it tipped the 400 ppm mark in May 2013. The Fifth Assessment Report on climate impacts from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirmed earlier warnings that climate change is already stressing human communities, agriculture, and natural ecosystems, and the effects are likely to increase in the future. While European Union has long been committed to lowering carbon emissions, this places additional pressure on current EU goals for energy sector that includes significant reduction of CO 2 emissions. Current EU commitment has been formalized in so-called '20-20-20' plan, reducing carbon emissions, increasing energy efficiency and increasing energy production from renewables by 20% by 2020. Some EU member states are even more ambitious, like United Kingdom, planning to reduce carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. Bulk of carbon reduction will have to be achived in energy sector. In the power industry, most popular solution is use of solar and wind power. Since their production varies significantly during the day, for the purpose of base-load production they can be paired with gas-fired power plant. Other possible CO 2 -free solution is nuclear power plant. In this invited lecture, predicted cost of energy production for newly bulit nuclear power plant and newly built combination of wind or solar and gas-fired power plant are compared. Comparison was done using Levelized Unit of Energy Cost (LUEC). Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo method. For input parameters that have biggest uncertainty (gas cost, CO 2 emission fee) those uncertainties were addressed not only through probability distribution around predicted value, but also through different scenarious. (author)

  6. ION KINETIC ENERGY CONSERVATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH CONSTANCY IN MULTI-FLUID SOLAR WIND ALFVÉNIC TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Horbury, T. S.; Schwartz, S. J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Pantellini, F. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universit Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Velli, M. [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, UCLA, California (United States)

    2015-03-20

    We investigate the properties of plasma fluid motion in the large-amplitude, low-frequency fluctuations of highly Alfvénic fast solar wind. We show that protons locally conserve total kinetic energy when observed from an effective frame of reference comoving with the fluctuations. For typical properties of the fast wind, this frame can be reasonably identified by alpha particles which, due to their drift with respect to protons at about the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, do not partake in the fluid low-frequency fluctuations. Using their velocity to transform the proton velocity into the frame of Alfvénic turbulence, we demonstrate that the resulting plasma motion is characterized by a constant absolute value of the velocity, zero electric fields, and aligned velocity and magnetic field vectors as expected for unidirectional Alfvénic fluctuations in equilibrium. We propose that this constraint, via the correlation between velocity and magnetic field in Alfvénic turbulence, is the origin of the observed constancy of the magnetic field; while the constant velocity corresponding to constant energy can only be observed in the frame of the fluctuations, the corresponding constant total magnetic field, invariant for Galilean transformations, remains the observational signature in the spacecraft frame of the constant total energy in the Alfvén turbulence frame.

  7. Technical analysis on energy conservation and emission reduction of new energy electric vehicle in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-10-01

    With the global environmental problems and energy crisis continuously emerging, all countries are taking active measures to achieve the benign development of domestic economy and society. Vehicle, as a large oil consumption and emissions of carbon dioxide, nend to be a revolutionary change. Therefore, the development of new energy electric vehicle has become the consensus of the world. On this background, this paper has sorted out the current state and the related development planning of new energy electric vehicles in different countries to predict the car ownership of the new energy electric vehicles using elastic coefficient method and setting different path of development, conclude that under the consideration of energy conservation and emissions reduction factors, our country should mainly promote the BEV to realize the maximum energy conservation and emissions reduction.

  8. The effect of the polymer relaxation time on the nonlinear energy cas- cade and dissipation of statistically steady and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Pedro C.; da Silva, Carlos B.; Pinho, Fernando T.

    2013-11-01

    We report a numerical study of statistically steady and decaying turbulence of FENE-P fluids for varying polymer relaxation times ranging from the Kolmogorov dissipation time-scale to the eddy turnover time. The total turbulent kinetic energy dissipation is shown to increase with the polymer relaxation time in both steady and decaying turbulence, implying a ``drag increase.'' If the total power input in the statistically steady case is kept equal in the Newtonian and the viscoelastic simulations the increase in the turbulence-polymer energy transfer naturally lead to the previously reported depletion of the Newtonian, but not the overall, kinetic energy dissipation. The modifications to the nonlinear energy cascade with varying Deborah/Weissenberg numbers are quantified and their origins investigated. The authors acknowledge the financial support from Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia under grant PTDC/EME-MFE/113589/2009.

  9. Analysis of intercomponent energy transfer in the interaction of oscillating-grid turbulence with an impermeable boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorquodale, Mark W.; Munro, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    New experimental results are presented that investigate the nature of the intercomponent energy transfer that occurs in the interaction between oscillating-grid turbulence and a solid impermeable boundary, using instantaneous velocity measurements obtained from two-dimensional particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Estimates of the pressure-strain correlation term (Πij s) of the transport equation of the Reynolds stress tensor, which represents intercomponent energy transfer, are obtained using the PIV data from a balance of the remaining terms of the transport equation. The influence of Πij s on the flow is examined by computing the energy spectra and conditional turbulent statistics associated with events in which intercomponent energy transfer is thought to be concentrated. Data reported here are in support of viscous and "return-to-isotropy" mechanisms governing the intercomponent energy transfer previously proposed, respectively, by Perot and Moin [J. Fluid Mech. 295, 199-227 (1995)] and Walker et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 320, 19-51 (1996)]. However, the data reported also indicate the presence of a weak net intercomponent energy transfer from the boundary-normal velocity components to the boundary-tangential velocity components over a thin region outside the viscous sublayer which is not captured within existing models of intercomponent energy transfer at the boundary.

  10. Measuring Turbulence from Moored Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters. A Manual to Quantifying Inflow at Tidal Energy Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilcher, Levi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thomson, Jim [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Talbert, Joe [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); DeKlerk, Alex [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology for measuring hub height inflow turbulence using moored acoustic Doppler velocimiters (ADVs). This approach is motivated by the shortcomings of alternatives. For example, remote velocity measurements (i.e., from acoustic Doppler profilers) lack sufficient precision for device simulation, and rigid tower-mounted measurements are very expensive and technically challenging in the tidal environment. Moorings offer a low-cost, site-adaptable and robust deployment platform, and ADVs provide the necessary precision to accurately quantify turbulence.

  11. Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2008-11-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

  12. Green-house gasses reduction in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovski, Mirko; Markovska, Natasha; Boshevski, Tome; Pop-Jordanov, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    As a follow-up activity of the Macedonian First National Communication under the UNFC-CC, Technology Needs Assessment is conducted, evaluating by GACMO model the measures related mainly to energy efficient and renewable energy technologies. An abatement cost curve is constructed and used as an illustrative tool for recognizing priorities in GHG abatement policy. About half of the measures are shown to be of 'win-win' type, reducing 3% of the baseline GHG emissions, while the total reduction which can be achieved by all measures amounts to 20%. For each measure difficulties for implementation are identified, being the highest for the measures with largest GHG abatement potential. Generally, these difficulties include lack of financing and low prospects for attracting foreign investments as well as legislative and administrative barriers. It must be recognized that climate change issues could not be of high priority in a country with economy in transition. Consequently, in our case the main issues which should be integrated within the framework of ongoing transition reforms, in an effort to implement a GHG emission reduction policy, would be: institutional capacity building, attracting foreign investment, emphasis on energy efficiency and considering the switch toward less carbon intensive fuels. (Author)

  13. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wacławczyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983. The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  14. Novel approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from low- and moderate-resolution velocity fluctuation time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławczyk, Marta; Ma, Yong-Feng; Kopeć, Jacek M.; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we propose two approaches to estimating the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate, based on the zero-crossing method by Sreenivasan et al. (1983). The original formulation requires a fine resolution of the measured signal, down to the smallest dissipative scales. However, due to finite sampling frequency, as well as measurement errors, velocity time series obtained from airborne experiments are characterized by the presence of effective spectral cutoffs. In contrast to the original formulation the new approaches are suitable for use with signals originating from airborne experiments. The suitability of the new approaches is tested using measurement data obtained during the Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) airborne research campaign as well as synthetic turbulence data. They appear useful and complementary to existing methods. We show the number-of-crossings-based approaches respond differently to errors due to finite sampling and finite averaging than the classical power spectral method. Hence, their application for the case of short signals and small sampling frequencies is particularly interesting, as it can increase the robustness of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate retrieval.

  15. Urban sound energy reduction by means of sound barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Vlad; Ionita, Mihai Vlad

    2018-02-01

    In urban environment, various heating ventilation and air conditioning appliances designed to maintain indoor comfort become urban acoustic pollution vectors due to the sound energy produced by these equipment. The acoustic barriers are the recommended method for the sound energy reduction in urban environment. The current sizing method of these acoustic barriers is too difficult and it is not practical for any 3D location of the noisy equipment and reception point. In this study we will develop based on the same method a new simplified tool for acoustic barriers sizing, maintaining the same precision characteristic to the classical method. Abacuses for acoustic barriers sizing are built that can be used for different 3D locations of the source and the reception points, for several frequencies and several acoustic barrier heights. The study case presented in the article represents a confirmation for the rapidity and ease of use of these abacuses in the design of the acoustic barriers.

  16. High energy modifications of blackbody radiation and dimensional reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Viqar; Seahra, Sanjeev S.; Webster, Eric J.

    2013-07-01

    Quantization prescriptions that realize generalized uncertainty relations are motivated by quantum gravity arguments that incorporate a fundamental length scale. We apply two such methods, polymer and deformed Heisenberg quantization, to scalar field theory in Fourier space. These alternative quantizations modify the oscillator spectrum for each mode, which in turn affects the blackbody distribution. We find that for a large class of modifications, the equation of state relating pressure P and energy density ρ interpolates between P=ρ/3 at low T and P=2ρ/3 at high T, where T is the temperature. Furthermore, the Stefan-Boltzman law gets modified from ρ∝T4 to ρ∝T5/2 at high temperature. This suggests an effective reduction to 2.5 spacetime dimensions at high energy.

  17. Urban sound energy reduction by means of sound barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iordache Vlad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In urban environment, various heating ventilation and air conditioning appliances designed to maintain indoor comfort become urban acoustic pollution vectors due to the sound energy produced by these equipment. The acoustic barriers are the recommended method for the sound energy reduction in urban environment. The current sizing method of these acoustic barriers is too difficult and it is not practical for any 3D location of the noisy equipment and reception point. In this study we will develop based on the same method a new simplified tool for acoustic barriers sizing, maintaining the same precision characteristic to the classical method. Abacuses for acoustic barriers sizing are built that can be used for different 3D locations of the source and the reception points, for several frequencies and several acoustic barrier heights. The study case presented in the article represents a confirmation for the rapidity and ease of use of these abacuses in the design of the acoustic barriers.

  18. Robust energy storage scheduling for imbalance reduction of strategically formed energy balancing groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Shantanu; Okabe, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance (on-line energy gap between contracted supply and actual demand, and associated cost) reduction is going to be a crucial service for a Power Producer and Supplier (PPS) in the deregulated energy market. PPS requires forward market interactions to procure energy as precisely as possible in order to reduce imbalance energy. This paper presents, 1) (off-line) an effective demand aggregation based strategy for creating a number of balancing groups that leads to higher predictability of group-wise aggregated demand, 2) (on-line) a robust energy storage scheduling that minimizes the imbalance energy and cost of a particular balancing group considering the demand prediction uncertainty. The group formation is performed by a Probabilistic Programming approach using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method after applied on the historical demand statistics. Apart from the group formation, the aggregation strategy (with the help of Bayesian Inference) also clears out the upper-limit of the required storage capacity for a formed group, fraction of which is to be utilized in on-line operation. For on-line operation, a robust energy storage scheduling method is proposed that minimizes expected imbalance energy and cost (a non-linear function of imbalance energy) while incorporating the demand uncertainty of a particular group. The proposed methods are applied on the real apartment buildings' demand data in Tokyo, Japan. Simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods. - Highlights: • Strategic method for intelligent energy balancing group formation using Bayesian MCMC. • Stochastic programming based robust and online energy storage (battery) scheduling. • Imbalance cost (regulation) and energy reduction of a balancing group. • Imbalance cost reduction of 80% attainable by considerably lower battery capacity.

  19. On the feasibility of tomographic-PIV with low pulse energy illumination in a lifted turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxx, I.; Carter, C. D.; Meier, W.

    2014-08-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomographic-PIV) is a recently developed measurement technique used to acquire volumetric velocity field data in liquid and gaseous flows. The technique relies on line-of-sight reconstruction of the rays between a 3D particle distribution and a multi-camera imaging system. In a turbulent flame, however, index-of-refraction variations resulting from local heat-release may inhibit reconstruction and thereby render the technique infeasible. The objective of this study was to test the efficacy of tomographic-PIV in a turbulent flame. An additional goal was to determine the feasibility of acquiring usable tomographic-PIV measurements in a turbulent flame at multi-kHz acquisition rates with current-generation laser and camera technology. To this end, a setup consisting of four complementary metal oxide semiconductor cameras and a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser was implemented to test the technique in a lifted turbulent jet flame. While the cameras were capable of kHz-rate image acquisition, the laser operated at a pulse repetition rate of only 10 Hz. However, use of this laser allowed exploration of the required pulse energy and thus power for a kHz-rate system. The imaged region was 29 × 28 × 2.7 mm in size. The tomographic reconstruction of the 3D particle distributions was accomplished using the multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique. The results indicate that volumetric velocimetry via tomographic-PIV is feasible with pulse energies of 25 mJ, which is within the capability of current-generation kHz-rate diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

  20. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  1. 75 FR 66008 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... the fossil fuel- generated energy consumption [[Page 66009

  2. Reduction of peak energy demand based on smart appliances energy consumption adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powroźnik, P.; Szulim, R.

    2017-08-01

    In the paper the concept of elastic model of energy management for smart grid and micro smart grid is presented. For the proposed model a method for reducing peak demand in micro smart grid has been defined. The idea of peak demand reduction in elastic model of energy management is to introduce a balance between demand and supply of current power for the given Micro Smart Grid in the given moment. The results of the simulations studies were presented. They were carried out on real household data available on UCI Machine Learning Repository. The results may have practical application in the smart grid networks, where there is a need for smart appliances energy consumption adjustment. The article presents a proposal to implement the elastic model of energy management as the cloud computing solution. This approach of peak demand reduction might have application particularly in a large smart grid.

  3. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...... is developed and compressibility of this mapping appears as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. In the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k −3 at large k, which appear to take the same form...

  4. Energy use, emissions and air pollution reduction strategies in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foell, W.; Green, C.; Amann, M.; Bhattacharya, S.; Carmichael, G.; Chadwick, M.; Cinderby, S.; Haugland, T.; Hettelingh, J.-P.; Hordijk, L.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Shah, J.; Shrestha, R.; Streets, D.; Zhao, D.

    1995-01-01

    In contrast to Europe and North America, air pollution in Asia is increasing rapidly, resulting in both local air quality problems and higher acidic depositions. In 1989, an east-west group of scientists initiated a multi-institutional research project on Acid Rain and Emissions Reduction in Asia, funded for the past two years by the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. Phase I, covering 23 countries of Asia, focused on the development of PC-based software called the Regional Air Pollution Information and Simulation Model (RAINS-ASIA). A 94-region Regional Energy Scenario Generator was developed to create alternative energy/emission scenarios through the year 2020. A long-range atmospheric transport model was developed to calculate dispersion and deposition of sulfur, based upon emissions from area and large point sources, on a one-degree grid of Asia. The resulting impacts of acidic deposition on a variety of vegetation types were analyzed using the critical loads approach to test different emissions management strategies, including both energy conservation measures and sulfur abatement technologies. 14 refs., 7 figs

  5. Significant thermal energy reduction in lactic acid production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujtaba, Iqbal M.; Edreder, Elmahboub A.; Emtir, Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid is widely used as a raw material for the production of biodegradable polymers and in food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The global market for lactic acid is expected to reach 259 thousand metric tons by the year 2012. For batch production of lactic acid, the traditional process includes the following steps: (i) esterification of impure lactic acid with methanol in a batch reactor to obtain methyl lactate (ester), (ii) separation of the ester in a batch distillation, (iii) hydrolysis of the ester with water in a batch reactor to produce lactic acid and (iv) separation of lactic acid (in high purity) in a batch distillation. Batch reactive distillation combines the benefit of both batch reactor and batch distillation and enhances conversion and productivity (Taylor and Krishna, 2000 ; Mujtaba and Macchietto, 1997 ). Therefore, the first and the last two steps of the lactic acid production process can be combined together in batch reactive distillation () processes. However, distillation (batch or continuous) is an energy intensive process and consumes large amount of thermal energy (via steam). This paper highlights how significant (over 50%) reduction in thermal energy consumption can be achieved for lactic acid production process by carefully controlling the reflux ratio but without compromising the product specification. In this paper, only the simultaneous hydrolysis of methyl lactate ester and the separation of lactic acid using batch reactive distillation is considered.

  6. The effect of vortex merging and non-merging on the transfer of modal turbulent kinetic energy content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground, Cody; Vergine, Fabrizio; Maddalena, Luca

    2016-08-01

    A defining feature of the turbulent free shear layer is that its growth is hindered by compressibility effects, thus limiting its potential to sufficiently mix the injected fuel and surrounding airstream at the supersonic Mach numbers intrinsic to the combustor of air-breathing hypersonic vehicles. The introduction of streamwise vorticity is often proposed in an attempt to counteract these undesired effects. This fact makes the strategy of introducing multiple streamwise vortices and imposing upon them certain modes of mutual interaction in order to potentially enhance mixing an intriguing concept. However, many underlying fundamental characteristics of the flowfields in the presence such interactions are not yet well understood; therefore, the fundamental physics of these flowfields should be independently investigated before the explicit mixing performance is characterized. In this work, experimental measurements are taken with the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique on two specifically targeted modes of vortex interaction—the merging and non-merging of two corotating vortices. The fluctuating velocity fields are analyzed utilizing the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to identify the content, organization, and distribution of the modal turbulent kinetic energy content of the fluctuating velocity eigenmodes. The effects of the two modes of vortex interaction are revealed by the POD analysis which shows distinct differences in the modal features of the two cases. When comparing the low-order eigenmodes of the two cases, the size of the structures contained within the first ten modes is seen to increase as the flow progresses downstream for the merging case, whereas the opposite is true for the non-merging case. Additionally, the relative modal energy contribution of the first ten eigenmodes increases as the vortices evolve downstream for the merging case, whereas in the non-merging case the relative modal energy contribution decreases

  7. Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER). ESTCP Cost and Performance Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    EW-201349) Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER) December 2016 This document has been cleared for public release...Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER) Girija Parthasarathy Honeywell Honeywell - 1985 Douglas Drive North, Golden Valley, MN 55422 ERDC...technology that commands all equipment in a central plant. Central Plant Optimization for Waste Energy Reduction (CPOWER), Building Automation System (BAS

  8. On the energy transfer between flows and turbulence in the plasma boundary of fusion devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sánchez, E.; Hidalgo, C.; Goncalves, B.; Silva, C.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hron, Martin; Erents, K.

    337-339, - (2005), s. 296-300 ISSN 0022-3115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : radial electric fields * turbulence * fluctuations * Langmuir probe * JET Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.414, year: 2005

  9. Turbulence statistics and energy budget in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    The strongly-modified turbulence statistics of Rayleigh–Bénard convection subject to various rotation rates is addressed by numerical investigations. The flow is simulated in a domain with periodic boundary conditions in the horizontal directions, and confined vertically by parallel no-slip

  10. Output Current Ripple Reduction Algorithms for Home Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyuk Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an output current ripple reduction algorithm using a proportional-integral (PI controller for an energy storage system (ESS. In single-phase systems, the DC/AC inverter has a second-order harmonic at twice the grid frequency of a DC-link voltage caused by pulsation of the DC-link voltage. The output current of a DC/DC converter has a ripple component because of the ripple of the DC-link voltage. The second-order harmonic adversely affects the battery lifetime. The proposed algorithm has an advantage of reducing the second-order harmonic of the output current in the variable frequency system. The proposed algorithm is verified from the PSIM simulation and experiment with the 3 kW ESS model.

  11. Thermal and Mechanical Non-Equilibrium Effects on Turbulent Flows: Fundamental Studies of Energy Exchanges Through Direct Numerical Simulations, Molecular Simulations and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0104 Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent flows:fundamental studies of energy exchanges through direct...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15-09-2012 to 14-11-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Thermal and mechanical non- equilibrium effects on turbulent...work on the subject suggest strong interactions between thermal non- equilibrium (TNE) and tur- bulence. This project aimed at both advancing our

  12. Evaluating the risk-reduction benefits of wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, M.C. [Brower & Company, Andover, MA (United States); Bell, K. [Convergence Research, Seattle, WA (United States); Bernow, S.; Duckworth, M. [Tellus Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Spinney P. [Charles River Associates, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents preliminary results of a study to evaluate the risk-reduction benefits of wind power for a case study utility system using decision analysis techniques. The costs and risks of two alternative decisions-whether to build a 400 MW gas-fired combined cycle plant or a 1600 MW wind plant in 2003-were compared through computer simulations as fuel prices, environmental regulatory costs, wind and conventional power plant availability, and load growth were allowed to vary. Three different market scenarios were examined: traditional regulation, a short-term power pool, and fixed-price contracts of varying duration. The study concludes that, from the perspective of ratepayers, wind energy provides a net levelized risk-reduction benefit of $3.4 to $7.8/MWh under traditional regulation, and less in the other scenarios. From the perspective of the utility plant owners, wind provides a significant risk benefit in the unregulated market scenarios but none in a regulated market. The methodology and findings should help inform utility resource planning and industry restructuring efforts. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. A parametrization of two-dimensional turbulence based on a maximum entropy production principle with a local conservation of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavanis, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: chavanis@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Université Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-12-01

    In the context of two-dimensional (2D) turbulence, we apply the maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) by enforcing a local conservation of energy. This leads to an equation for the vorticity distribution that conserves all the Casimirs, the energy, and that increases monotonically the mixing entropy (H-theorem). Furthermore, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity dissipates monotonically all the generalized enstrophies. These equations may provide a parametrization of 2D turbulence. They do not generally relax towards the maximum entropy state. The vorticity current vanishes for any steady state of the 2D Euler equation. Interestingly, the equation for the coarse-grained vorticity obtained from the MEPP turns out to coincide, after some algebraic manipulations, with the one obtained with the anticipated vorticity method. This shows a connection between these two approaches when the conservation of energy is treated locally. Furthermore, the newly derived equation, which incorporates a diffusion term and a drift term, has a nice physical interpretation in terms of a selective decay principle. This sheds new light on both the MEPP and the anticipated vorticity method. (paper)

  14. Reduction in Energy Consumption & Variability in Steel Foundry Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Peters

    2005-05-04

    This project worked to improve the efficiency of the steel casting industry by reducing the variability that occurs because of process and product variation. The project focused on the post shakeout operations since roughly half of the production costs are in this area. These improvements will reduce the amount of variability, making it easier to manage the operation and improve the competitiveness. The reduction in variability will also reduce the need for many rework operations, which will result in a direct reduction of energy usage, particularly by the reduction of repeated heat treatment operations. Further energy savings will be realized from the reduction of scrap and reduced handling. Field studies were conducted at ten steel foundries that represented the U.S. steel casting industry, for a total of over 100 weeks of production observation. These studies quantified the amount of variability, and looked toward determining the source. A focus of the data collected was the grinding operations since this is a major effort in the cleaning room, and it represents the overall casting quality. The grinding was divided into two categories, expected and unexpected. Expected grinding is that in which the location of the effort is known prior to making the casting, such as smoothing parting lines, gates, and riser contacts. Unexpected grinding, which was approximately 80% of the effort, was done to improve the surfaces at weld repair locations, to rectify burnt on sand, and other surface anomalies at random locations. Unexpected grinding represents about 80% of the grinding effort. By quantifying this effort, the project raised awareness within the industry and the industry is continuing to make improvements. The field studies showed that the amount of variation of grinding operations (normalized because of the diverse set of parts studied) was very consistent across the industry. The field studies identified several specific sources that individually contributed to

  15. Turbulent kinetic energy budget in the boundary layer developing over an urban-like rough wall using PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Karin; Perret, Laurent; Calmet, Isabelle; Rivet, Cédric

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, a boundary layer developing over a rough-wall consisting of staggered cubes with a plan area packing density λp = 25% is studied within the wind tunnel using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to investigate the Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) budget. To access the full TKE budget, an estimation of the dissipation (ɛ) using both the transport equation of the resolved-scale kinetic energy and Large-Eddy (LE) PIV models based on the use of a subgrid-scale model following the methodology used in large-eddy simulations is employed. A low-pass filter, larger than the Taylor microscale, is applied to the data prior to the computation of the velocity gradients ensuring a clear cutoff in the inertial range where the models are valid. The presence of the cube roughness elements has a significant influence on the TKE budget due to the region of strong shear that develops over the cubes. The shear layer is shown to produce and dissipate energy, as well as transport energy through advection, turbulent transport, and pressure transport. The recirculation region that forms through the interaction of the shear layer and the canopy layer, which is the region below the height of the cube roughness, creates rapid longitudinal evolution of the mean flow thereby inducing weak production. Finally, through stochastic estimation of the conditional average, it is shown that localized regions of backscatter (energy transfer from unresolved to resolved scales) and forward scatter (energy transfer from resolved to unresolved scales) occur as a result of coherent vortical structures.

  16. The Multiscale Interaction of Vibrational Energy Transfer and Turbulent Combustion in Supersonic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    jet and coflow issue into open air, and the coflow velocity is less than 1 m/s. The jet gas is provided by compressed gas cylinders and the coflow...probability distribution function (pdf) of the turbulent fluctuations. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nonequillibrium and aerothermodynamic, hypersonic and gas ...diameter was installed and a conical shroud reduced the coflow diameter to 100 mm. The reacting-flow configuration is illustrated below in Fig. 1b

  17. MULTIPLE CURRENT SHEET SYSTEMS IN THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE: ENERGY RELEASE AND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, D.; Gingell, P. W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Matteini, L. [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    In the outer heliosphere, beyond the solar wind termination shock, it is expected that the warped heliospheric current sheet forms a region of closely packed, multiple, thin current sheets. Such a system may be subject to the ion-kinetic tearing instability, and hence may generate magnetic islands and hot populations of ions associated with magnetic reconnection. Reconnection processes in this environment have important implications for local particle transport, and for particle acceleration at reconnection sites and in turbulence. We study this complex environment by means of three-dimensional hybrid simulations over long timescales, in order to capture the evolution from linear growth of the tearing instability to a fully developed turbulent state at late times. The final state develops from the highly ordered initial state via both forward and inverse cascades. Component and spectral anisotropy in the magnetic fluctuations is present when a guide field is included. The inclusion of a population of newborn interstellar pickup protons does not strongly affect these results. Finally, we conclude that reconnection between multiple current sheets can act as an important source of turbulence in the outer heliosphere, with implications for energetic particle acceleration and propagation.

  18. Turbulent Burning Velocities and Flame Straining in Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gayed, R. G.; Al-Khishali, K. J.; Bradley, D.

    1984-02-01

    Turbulent burning velocities have been measured in an explosion bomb equipped with four high speed fans. Turbulent parameters were measured by laser doppler anemometry. The turbulent Reynolds numbers were significantly higher than in most previous measurements and high rates of strain were achieved until, ultimately, several of the flames quenched. Results are presented in terms of previously used dimensionless parameters plus a Lewis number and a dimensionless activation energy. The two-eddy theory of burning can allow for flame straining reductions in laminar burning velocity and experimental values of u_t/u_1 were compared with those from such a theory.

  19. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Bradford E. [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Murphy, Neil [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 180-600, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Nuno, Raquel G., E-mail: bc13h@my.fsu.edu, E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu, E-mail: Phil.Isenberg@unh.edu, E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu, E-mail: cjl46@wildcats.unh.edu, E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: raquel.nuno@asu.edu [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  20. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.

    2014-01-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  1. Energy Reductions Using Next-Generation Remanufacturing Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sordelet, Daniel; Racek, Ondrej

    2012-02-24

    The goal of this project was to develop a radically new surface coating approach that greatly enhances the performance of thermal spray coatings. Rather than relying on a roughened grit blasted substrate surface for developing a mechanical bond between the coating and substrate, which is the normal practice with conventional thermal spraying, a hybrid approach of combining a focused laser beam to thermally treat the substrate surface in the vicinity of the rapidly approaching thermally-sprayed powder particles was developed. This new surface coating process is targeted primarily at enabling remanufacturing of components used in engines, drive trains and undercarriage systems; thereby providing a substantial global opportunity for increasing the magnitude and breadth of parts that are remanufactured through their life cycle, as opposed to simply being replaced by new components. The projected benefits of a new remanufacturing process that increases the quantity of components that are salvaged and reused compared to being fabricated from raw materials will clearly vary based on the specific industry and range of candidate components that are considered. At the outset of this project two different metal processing routes were considered, castings and forgings, and the prototypical components for each process were liners and crankshafts, respectively. The quantities of parts used in the analysis are based on our internal production of approximately 158,000 diesel engines in 2007. This leads to roughly 1,000,000 liners (assuming a mixture of 6- and 8-cylinder engines) and 158,000 crankshafts. Using energy intensity factors for casting and forgings, respectively, of 4450 and 5970 Btu-hr/lb along with the energy-induced CO2 generation factor of 0.00038 lbs CO2/Btu, energy savings of over 17 trillion BTUs and CO2 reductions of over 6.5 million lbs could potentially be realized by remanufacturing the above mentioned quantities of crankshafts and liners. This project

  2. Experiments on the turbulent boundary layer on a thin cylinder rotating in an axial flow. 3rd Report. Turbulent energy budget for each velocity component and cross-spectrum; Jikuryuchu no saicho kaiten entojo no ranryu kyokaiso no jikken. 3. Hendo seibun energy no shushi to cross supekutoru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, S.; Inoue, Y. [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yano, H. [Daido Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    1998-10-25

    This study is concerned with the turbulent structure of three-dimensional boundary layer on a thin cylinder rotating in a uniform stream. A ratio of the turbulent shear-stress to the turbulent intensity, that is, a structure parameter, is significantly larger than the turbulent boundary layer on a stationary cylinder which has nearly the same value as in two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Terms appearing in the equations for the turbulent energy of each component of fluctuating velocities are estimated, and their roles in the energy budgets in this boundary layer are clarified. Particularly, the importance of redistribution terms and exchange terms between v- and w-energy is reconfirmed. Cross-spectra between u*- and w-fluctuating velocities are examined across the boundary layer. The distribution of co-spectra and quad-spectra (i.e., the real and imaginary parts of the cross-spectra respectively) shows the existence of large-scale organized structure in this turbulent boundary layer. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  3. On turbulent heat flux contributions to the energy balance at the Opabin Glacier, Yoho National Park, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losic, Mira

    Turbulent heat flux and its contribution to energy balance is investigated at two glaciers in the Canadian Rockies. Detailed profile measurements of wind, temperature, and humidity in the lower boundary layer above the Opabin Glacier reveal a predominantly stable boundary layer regime. Wind speeds generally increase with height and temperature profiles are predominantly logarithmic in nature, however humidity profiles do not exhibit the archetypal shape. Roughness lengths derived using the profile method are used to calculate energy balance in fifteen unique models per site. The models perform best at both sites when a constant roughness value is used; however, the median value of all found roughness lengths performs better than mean value which is typically used in current literature. Model results improve when melt is restricted to periods when surface temperature is above 0°C, and when atmospheric stability corrections are applied.

  4. Sources of nonadiabaticity in tokamak turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Haas, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    The two-fluid equations governing the nonlinear evolution and saturation of drift wave-like turbulence and transport in tokamaks under quasi-neutral conditions in periodic cylinder geometry are investigated. Using experiment as guide and employing appropriate orderings, two non-adiabaticity parameters, Υ es and Υ em are derived as functions of the reduced frequency ωa/v thi and wave number ρ i k r characteristic of the turbulent fluctuation spectrum. These parameters correspond respectively to the electrostatic limit and the general electromagnetic case. It is shown that they must be O(1) if significant particle and ion energy transport are to be expected from the turbulence. In other words, they are measures of the departure from neo-classical particle and ion energy transport due to the turbulence. These analytic results are complementary to, and serve as guidelines for, any future direct numerical simulations of the set of seven nonlinear partial differential equations which must be solved with suitable sources of particles, momentum and energy to determine the turbulence evolution and resultant saturated power spectra of density, pressure, electrostatic potential and magnetic field. The nonadiabaticity parameters discussed suggest possible qualitative explanations of the isotope effect and reduction of anomalous transport noted in H-mode tokamak discharges. (orig.)

  5. How plasmas dissipate: cascade and the production of internal energy and entropy in weakly collisional plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Yang, Y.; Servidio, S.; Parashar, T.; Chasapis, A.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence cascade transfers energy from large scale to small scale but what happens once kinetic scales are reached? In a collisional medium, viscosity and resistivity remove fluctuation energy in favor of heat. In the weakly collisional solar wind, (or corona, m-sheath, etc.), the sequence of events must be different. Heating occurs, but through what mechanisms? In standard approaches, dissipation occurs though linear wave modes or instabilities and one seeks to identify them. A complementary view is that cascade leads to several channels of energy conversion, interchange and spatial rearrangement that collectively leads to production of internal energy. Channels may be described using compressible MHD & multispecies Vlasov Maxwell formulations. Key steps are: Conservative rearrangement of energy in space; Parallel incompressible and compressible cascades - conservative rearrangment in scale; electromagnetic work on particles that drives flows, both macroscopic and microscopic; and pressure-stress interactions, both compressive and shear-like, that produces internal energy. Examples given from MHD, PIC simulations and MMS observations. A more subtle issue is how entropy is related to this degeneration (or, "dissipation") of macroscopic, fluid-scale fluctuations. We discuss this in terms of Boltzmann and thermodynamic entropies, and velocity space effects of collisions.

  6. The role of energy-service demand reduction in global climate change mitigation: Combining energy modelling and decomposition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesicki, Fabian; Anandarajah, Gabrial

    2011-01-01

    In order to reduce energy-related CO 2 emissions different options have been considered: energy efficiency improvements, structural changes to low carbon or zero carbon fuel/technologies, carbon sequestration, and reduction in energy-service demands (useful energy). While efficiency and technology options have been extensively studied within the context of climate change mitigation, this paper addresses the possible role of price-related energy-service demand reduction. For this analysis, the elastic demand version of the TIAM-UCL global energy system model is used in combination with decomposition analysis. The results of the CO 2 emission decomposition indicate that a reduction in energy-service demand can play a limited role, contributing around 5% to global emission reduction in the 21st century. A look at the sectoral level reveals that the demand reduction can play a greater role in selected sectors like transport contributing around 16% at a global level. The societal welfare loss is found to be high when the price elasticity of demand is low. - Highlights: → A reduction in global energy-service demand can contribute around 5% to global emission reduction in the 21st century. → The role of demand is a lot higher in transport than in the residential sector. → Contribution of demand reduction is higher in early periods of the 21st century. → Societal welfare loss is found to be high when the price elasticity of demand is low. → Regional shares in residual emissions vary under different elasticity scenarios.

  7. Energy demand modelling and GHG emission reduction: case study Croatia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pukšec, Tomislav; Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Novosel, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    and develop new energy policy towards energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, in order to comply with all of the presented tasks. Planning future energy demand, considering various policy options like regulation, fiscal and financial measures, becomes one of the crucial issues of future national...... energy strategy. This paper analyses Croatian long term energy demand and its effect on the future national GHG emissions. For that purpose the national energy demand model was constructed (NeD model). The model is comprised out of six modules each representing one sector, following Croatian national...... energy balance; industry, transport, households, services, agriculture and construction. For three of the modules (industry, transport and households) previously developed long term energy demand models were used, while for the remaining three new models were constructed. As an additional feature, new...

  8. Spatiotemporal Variability of Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budgets in the Convective Boundary Layer over Both Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Raj K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Pekour, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Kosovic, Branko [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado; Mirocha, Jeffrey D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California; Ennis, Brandon L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    2017-12-01

    The assumption of sub-grid scale (SGS) horizontal homogeneity within a model grid cell, which forms the basis of SGS turbulence closures used by mesoscale models, becomes increasingly tenuous as grid spacing is reduced to a few kilometers or less, such as in many emerging high-resolution applications. Herein, we use the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget equation to study the spatio-temporal variability in two types of terrain—complex (Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study [CBWES] site, north-eastern Oregon) and flat (ScaledWind Farm Technologies [SWiFT] site, west Texas) using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In each case six-nested domains (three domains each for mesoscale and large-eddy simulation [LES]) are used to downscale the horizontal grid spacing from 10 km to 10 m using the WRF model framework. The model output was used to calculate the values of the TKE budget terms in vertical and horizontal planes as well as the averages of grid cells contained in the four quadrants (a quarter area) of the LES domain. The budget terms calculated along the planes and the mean profile of budget terms show larger spatial variability at CBWES site than at the SWiFT site. The contribution of the horizontal derivative of the shear production term to the total production shear was found to be 45% and 15% of the total shear, at the CBWES and SWiFT sites, respectively, indicating that the horizontal derivatives applied in the budget equation should not be ignored in mesoscale model parameterizations, especially for cases with complex terrain with <10 km scale.

  9. Tsallis Extended Thermodynamics Applied to 2-d Turbulence: Lévy Statistics and q-Fractional Generalized Kraichnanian Energy and Enstrophy Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Egolf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The extended thermodynamics of Tsallis is reviewed in detail and applied to turbulence. It is based on a generalization of the exponential and logarithmic functions with a parameter q. By applying this nonequilibrium thermodynamics, the Boltzmann-Gibbs thermodynamic approach of Kraichnan to 2-d turbulence is generalized. This physical modeling implies fractional calculus methods, obeying anomalous diffusion, described by Lévy statistics with q < 5/3 (sub diffusion, q = 5/3 (normal or Brownian diffusion and q > 5/3 (super diffusion. The generalized energy spectrum of Kraichnan, occurring at small wave numbers k, now reveals the more general and precise result k−q. This corresponds well for q = 5/3 with the Kolmogorov-Oboukov energy spectrum and for q > 5/3 to turbulence with intermittency. The enstrophy spectrum, occurring at large wave numbers k, leads to a k−3q power law, suggesting that large wave-number eddies are in thermodynamic equilibrium, which is characterized by q = 1, finally resulting in Kraichnan’s correct k−3 enstrophy spectrum. The theory reveals in a natural manner a generalized temperature of turbulence, which in the non-equilibrium energy transfer domain decreases with wave number and shows an energy equipartition law with a constant generalized temperature in the equilibrium enstrophy transfer domain. The article contains numerous new results; some are stated in form of eight new (proven propositions.

  10. A Romanian energy system model and a nuclear reduction strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gota, Dan-Ioan; Lund, Henrik; Miclea, Liviu

    2011-01-01

    energy system are compared to the actual data of Romania of year 2008. First, a comparison is made between the 2008 model and the 2013 strategy scenario corresponding to the grid of the Romanian transmission system operator (TSO) Transelectrica. Then, a comparison is made to a second strategy scenario......This paper presents a model of the Romanian energy system with the purpose of providing a tool for the analysis of future sustainable energy strategies. The model represents the total national energy system and is detailed to the level of hourly demand and production in order to be able to analyse...... the consequences of adding fluctuating renewable energy sources to the system. The model has been implemented into the EnergyPLAN tool and has been validated in order to determine if it can be used as a reference model for other simulations. In EnergyPLAN, two different future strategy scenarios for the Romanian...

  11. Coherence in Turbulence: New Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levich, Eugene

    2009-07-01

    It is claimed that turbulence in fluids is inherently coherent phenomenon. The coherence shows up clearly as strongly correlated helicity fluctuations of opposite sign. The helicity fluctuations have cellular structure forming clusters that are actually observed as vorticity bands and coherent structures in laboratory turbulence, direct numerical simulations and most obviously in atmospheric turbulence. The clusters are named BCC - Beltrami Cellular Clusters - because of the observed nearly total alignment of the velocity and vorticity fields in each particular cell, and hence nearly maximal possible helicity in each cell; although when averaged over all the cells the residual mean helicity in general is small and does not play active dynamical role. The Beltrami like fluctuations are short-lived and stabilize only in small and generally contiguous sub-domains that are tending to a (multi)fractal in the asymptotic limit of large Reynolds numbers, Re → ∞. For the model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence the theory predicts the leading fractal dimension of BCC to be: DF = 2.5. This particular BCC is responsible for generating the Kolmogorov -5/3 power law energy spectrum. The most obvious role that BCC play dynamically is that the nonlinear interactions in them are relatively reduced, due to strong spatial alignment between the velocity field v(r, t) and the vorticity field ω(r, t) = curlv(r, t), while the physical quantities typically best characterizing turbulence intermittency, such as entrophy, vorticity stretching and generation, and energy dissipation are maximized in and near them. The theory quantitatively relates the reduction of nonlinear inter-actions to the BCC fractal dimension DF and subsequent turbulence intermittency. It is further asserted that BCC is a fundamental feature of all turbulent flows, e.g., wall bounded turbulent flows, atmospheric and oceanic flows, and their leading fractal dimension remains invariant and universal in these flows

  12. In the field of energy cost reduction, what is the potential?; En matiere de reduction des depenses d`energie: quel est le gisement?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, B. [Departement Industrie, CEREN (France)

    1996-12-31

    Through a segmentation of the fuel and electric power consumptions in the various industrial sectors and energy consumption process types in France in 1990, the energy conservation potential in the French metalworking and mechanical industry is analyzed and its evolution up to 2005 is assessed. It is shown that the reduction potential amounts to 450 kTep or 20 percent of the metalworking and metallic construction industry energy consumption, with an important part for the out-of-process sector (space heating, compressed air production, lighting). In the process sector, important reductions could be realized in thermal treatments and metal heating prior forming

  13. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks. PMID:27152220

  14. Applying the energy productivity index that considers maximized energy reduction on SADC (Southern Africa Development Community) members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ming-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Under the trend of global energy prices continuously going up, this paper considers the concept of maximized energy reduction to model the energy productivity index by decomposing it into energy technical change and energy efficiency change. The paper takes the eight SADC (Southern Africa Development Community ) members as an example to estimate their energy efficiency, energy productivity change, energy technical change, energy efficiency change, and rebound effect on energy use, as well as to test the Jevons Paradox. The time period of the data spans 2005 to 2009. The empirical result shows large energy performance differences among the eight SADC members. Not one country among the eight members is an energy technology innovator. After calculating the rebound effect and testing the Jevons Paradox, the result shows that there seems to be no obvious Jevons Paradox in this economic region. - Highlights: • This paper discusses the concept of maximized energy reduction. • The method is applied towards the Southern Africa Development Community members. • This paper also investigates the rebound effect of energy use. • We offer suggestions on energy use and CO 2 emission reductions.

  15. Energy efficiency policy: CO2 reduction in Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caikovska, M.; Zeltins, N.

    1999-01-01

    The paper considers the energy efficiency policy of Latvia in connection with the actual greenhouse gas limitation problem. The authors analyse the situation in energy consumption and the tendencies of main characteristic parameters in the energy sector. They discuss some measures for limiting emissions in Latvia. In the paper the latest inventory data for most important emissions in Latvia are given and the government activities meant for decreasing the detrimental impact on the environment are examined. (author)

  16. Documenting success of energy management cost reduction initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, A.

    1993-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to offer methods to document energy saving projects. The examples used are based on actual industrial facilities. I will define concepts to be used in the analysis of the industrial work place energy consumption. With the concepts defined we can begin to apply the documentation strategy for some specific examples. Why should we be interested in auditing the results of energy projects? Nearly every industrial facility has embarked on the road to energy efficiency. As one of my plant engineer associates relates open-quotes If all our energy saving programs were working as stated the power company would be paying us.close quotes The underlying principles in this statement are true. Does it mean we as technicians, engineers and managers of energy projects have failed? No, we have however failed to finish the job and document there results. My experience has shown there is good support and enthusiasm for those energy projects we begin. It is also my experience that a well documented successful project provides many levels of satisfaction. Large energy management projects involve a major financial commitment. Documenting the results provides all those who supported the project from finance, management and the technical staff the positive reinforcement to support your future projects. We should begin by defining what an energy audit is and what is the expected result of an audit

  17. Turbulent energy dissipation rates observed by Doppler MST Radar and by rocket-borne instruments during the MIDAS/MaCWAVE campaign 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Engler

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available During the MIDAS/MaCWAVE campaign in summer 2002 we have observed turbulence using Doppler beam steering measurements obtained from the ALWIN VHF radar at Andøya/Northern Norway. This radar was operated in the Doppler beam steering mode for turbulence investigations during the campaign, as well as in spaced antenna mode, for continuously measuring the background wind field. The real-time data analysis of the Doppler radar backscattering provided the launch conditions for the sounding rockets. The spectral width data observed during the occurrence of PMSE were corrected for beam and shear broadening caused by the background wind field to obtain the turbulent part of the spectral width. The turbulent energy dissipation rates determined from the turbulent spectral width vary between 5 and 100mW kg-1 in the altitude range of 80-92km and increase with altitude. These estimations agree well with the in-situ measurements using the CONE sensor which was launched on 3 sounding rockets during the campaign.

  18. Turbulent energy dissipation rates observed by Doppler MST Radar and by rocket-borne instruments during the MIDAS/MaCWAVE campaign 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Engler

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available During the MIDAS/MaCWAVE campaign in summer 2002 we have observed turbulence using Doppler beam steering measurements obtained from the ALWIN VHF radar at Andøya/Northern Norway. This radar was operated in the Doppler beam steering mode for turbulence investigations during the campaign, as well as in spaced antenna mode, for continuously measuring the background wind field. The real-time data analysis of the Doppler radar backscattering provided the launch conditions for the sounding rockets. The spectral width data observed during the occurrence of PMSE were corrected for beam and shear broadening caused by the background wind field to obtain the turbulent part of the spectral width. The turbulent energy dissipation rates determined from the turbulent spectral width vary between 5 and 100mW kg-1 in the altitude range of 80-92km and increase with altitude. These estimations agree well with the in-situ measurements using the CONE sensor which was launched on 3 sounding rockets during the campaign.

  19. Role of nuclear energy in CO2 emissions reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1995-01-01

    Between 1675 and 1992 worldwide primary energy consumption has been multiplied by about 100 and has reached about 11 billions of tons of equivalent weight of coal, while human population has been multiplied by 8 and will probably reach 9 billions in 2030. The increase of atmospheric CO 2 production due to fossil fuel burn up will become a critical pollution and climatic problem which can be significantly reduced by a more widely use of nuclear energy in replacement of primary energies. However, perspectives of nuclear energy depend principally on the safety improvements of nuclear plants and on the solutions found to solve the management of radioactive waste. Renewable energies sources such as photovoltaic plants, wind engines, hydraulic plants have not yet been used at a large scale because they require large surfaces for their installation. To avoid any monolithic solution to solve the energy and environmental problems, a combination of renewable and nuclear energies seems to be a good compromise. For instance, the conception of a safety non-refueling nuclear reactor with an overheating hybrid system combining solar and fossil fuel energies should be conceivable. (J.S.)

  20. Evaluation of Scaling Approaches for the Oceanic Dissipation Rate of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in the Surface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, L. T.; Ward, B.; Sutherland, G.; Ten Doeschate, A.; Landwehr, S.; Bell, T. G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2016-02-01

    The air-sea exchange of heat, gas and momentum plays an important role for the Earth's weather and global climate. The exchange processes between ocean and atmosphere are influenced by the prevailing surface ocean dynamics. This surface ocean is a highly turbulent region where there is enhanced production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The dissipation rate of TKE (ɛ) in the surface ocean is an important process for governing the depth of both the mixing and mixed layers, which are important length-scales for many aspects of ocean research. However, there exist very limited observations of ɛ under open ocean conditions and consequently our understanding of how to model the dissipation profile is very limited. The approaches to model profiles of ɛ that exist, differ by orders of magnitude depending on their underlying theoretical assumption and included physical processes. Therefore, scaling ɛ is not straight forward and requires open ocean measurements of ɛ to validate the respective scaling laws. This validated scaling of ɛ, is for example required to produce accurate mixed layer depths in global climate models. Errors in the depth of the ocean surface boundary layer can lead to biases in sea surface temperature. Here, we present open ocean measurements of ɛ from the Air-Sea Interaction Profiler (ASIP) collected during several cruises in different ocean basins. ASIP is an autonomous upwardly rising microstructure profiler allowing undisturbed profiling up to the ocean surface. These direct measurements of ɛ under various types of atmospheric and oceanic conditions along with measurements of atmospheric fluxes and wave conditions allow us to make a unique assessment of several scaling approaches based on wind, wave and buoyancy forcing. This will allow us to best assess the most appropriate ɛ-based parameterisation for air-sea exchange.

  1. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  2. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  3. Energy Storage/Conservation and Carbon Emissions Reduction Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Erik [Center For Transportation And The Environment, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Center for Transportation and the Environment (CTE) federal assistance for the management of a project to develop and test a prototype flywheel-based energy recovery and storage system in partnership with Test Devices, Inc. (TDI). TDI specializes in the testing of jet engine and power generation turbines, which uses a great deal of electrical power for long periods of time. In fact, in 2007, the company consumed 3,498,500 kW-­hr of electricity in their operations, which is equivalent to the electricity of 328 households. For this project, CTE and TDI developed and tested a prototype flywheel-based energy recovery and storage system. This technology is being developed at TDI’s facilities to capture and reuse the energy necessary for the company’s core process. The new technology and equipment is expected to save approximately 80% of the energy used in the TDI process, reducing total annual consumption of power by approximately 60%, saving approximately two million kilowatt-hours annually. Additionally, the energy recycling system will allow TDI and other end users to lower their peak power demand and reduce associated utility demand charges. The use of flywheels in this application is novel and requires significant development work from TDI. Flywheels combine low maintenance costs with very high cycle life with little to no degradation over time, resulting in lifetimes measured in decades. All of these features make flywheels a very attractive option compared to other forms of energy storage, including batteries. Development and deployment of this energy recycling technology will reduce energy consumption during jet engine and stationary turbine development. By reengineering the current inefficient testing process, TDI will reduce risk and time to market of efficiency upgrades of gas turbines across the entire spectrum of applications. Once in place the results from this program will also help other US industries

  4. Surface Energy Balance Closure and Turbulent Flux Parameterization on a Mid-Latitude Mountain Glacier, Purcell Mountains, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Fitzpatrick

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the majority of glacier surface energy balance studies, parameterization rather than direct measurement is used to estimate one or more of the individual heat fluxes, with others, such as the rain and ground heat fluxes, often deemed negligible. Turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat are commonly parameterized using the bulk aerodynamic technique. This method was developed for horizontal, uniform surfaces rather than sloped, inhomogeneous glacier terrain, and significant uncertainty remains regarding the selection of appropriate roughness length values, and the validity of the atmospheric stability functions employed. A customized weather station, designed to measure all relevant heat fluxes, was installed on an alpine glacier over the 2014 melt season. Eddy covariance techniques were used to observe the turbulent heat fluxes, and to calculate site-specific roughness values. The obtained dataset was used to drive a point ablation model, and to evaluate the most commonly used bulk methods and roughness length schemes in the literature. Modeled ablation showed good agreement with observed rates at seasonal, daily, and sub-daily timescales, effectively closing the surface energy balance, and giving a high level of confidence in the flux observation method. Net radiation was the dominant contributor to melt energy over the season (65.2%, followed by the sensible heat flux (29.7%, while the rain heat flux was observed to be a significant contributor on daily timescales during periods of persistent heavy rain (up to 20% day−1. Momentum roughness lengths observed for the study surface (snow: 10−3.8 m; ice: 10−2.2 m showed general agreement with previous findings, while the scalar values (temperature: 10−4.6 m; water vapor: 10−6 m differed significantly from those for momentum, disagreeing with the assumption of equal roughness lengths. Of the three bulk method stability schemes tested, the functions based on the Monin-Obukhov length

  5. Reduction of energy sweep of the ETA-II beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W.E.; Allen, S.L.; Chambers, F.W.; Jong, R.A.; Paul, A.C.; Sampayan, S.E.; Turner, W.C.

    1991-05-01

    The ETA-2 electron beam will be used to drive a high power microwave frequency FEL for plasma heating experiments. For maximum FEL output power the beam energy at the entrance to the wiggler should be within ±1% of the wiggler resonance value. In initial operations the ETA-2 beam energy stayed within this range for a maximum time of less than 13 ns, Much of the energy variation was due to the design of the pulsed power feeds to the of the pulsed power feeds to the accelerator induction cells. A new multicable pulsed power feed design was tested in a shortened version of ETA-2 where it extended the time during which the beam energy stayed within the ±1% limits to greater than 40 ns. These design changes are now being incorporated into the full accelerator. 9 refs., 4 figs

  6. Reduction of Annealing Times for Energy Conservation in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony D. Rollett; Hasso Weiland; Mohammed Alvi; Abhijit Brahme

    2005-08-31

    Carnegie Mellon University was teamed with the Alcoa Technical Center with support from the US Dept. of Energy (Office of Industrial Technology) and the Pennsylvania Technology Investment Authority (PTIA) to make processing of aluminum less costly and more energy efficient. Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have investigated how annealing processes in the early stages of aluminum processing affect the structure and properties of the material. Annealing at high temperatures consumes significant amounts of time and energy. By making detailed measurements of the crystallography and morphology of internal structural changes they have generated new information that will provide a scientific basis for shortening processing times and consuming less energy during annealing.

  7. Drag Reduction by Off-Body Energy Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — What are the key technical challenges? Implementation of non-equilibrium thermochemistry; Accurate energy balance; Dynamic impulse measurements at Mach 2 What is...

  8. Turbulence Generation Using Localized Sources of Energy: Direct Numerical Simulations and the Effects of Thermal Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqui, Agustin Francisco

    Turbulence in high-speed flows is an important problem in aerospace applications, yet extremely difficult from a theoretical, computational and experimental perspective. A main reason for the lack of complete understanding is the difficulty of generating turbulence in the lab at a range of speeds which can also include hypersonic effects such as thermal non-equilibrium. This work studies the feasibility of a new approach to generate turbulence based on laser-induced photo-excitation/dissociation of seeded molecules. A large database of incompressible and compressible direct numerical simulations (DNS) has been generated to systematically study the development and evolution of the flow towards realistic turbulence. Governing parameters and the conditions necessary for the establishment of turbulence, as well as the length and time scales associated with such process, are identified. For both the compressible and incompressible experiments a minimum Reynolds number is found to be needed for the flow to evolve towards fully developed turbulence. Additionally, for incompressible cases a minimum time scale is required, while for compressible cases a minimum distance from the grid and limit on the maximum temperature introduced are required. Through an extensive analysis of single and two point statistics, as well as spectral dynamics, the primary mechanisms leading to turbulence are shown. As commonly done in compressible turbulence, dilatational and solenoidal components are separated to understand the effect of acoustics on the development of turbulence. Finally, a large database of forced isotropic turbulence has been generated to study the effect of internal degrees of freedom on the evolution of turbulence.

  9. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  10. Turbulent baker's maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors formulate and study an elementary one-dimensional model mimicking some of the features of fluid turbulence. The underlying vorticity field corresponds to a parallel flow. Structure on all scales down to the numerical resolution is generated by the action of baker's maps acting on the vorticity of the flow. These transformations conserve kinetic energy locally in the Euler model, while viscous diffusion of vorticity occurs in the Navier-Stokes case. The authors apply the model to the study of homogeneous fully, developed turbulence, and to turbulent channel flow

  11. Continued growth expected for wood energy despite turbulence of the economic crisis : wood energy markets, 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens Hartkamp; Bengt Hillring; Warren Mabee; Olle Olsson; Kenneth Skog; Henry Spelter; Johan Vinterback; Antje Wahl

    2009-01-01

    The economic crisis has not reduced the demand for wood energy, which is expected to continue to grow. The downturn in sawmill production caused a shortage of raw material supply for wood pellet producers. With decreased demand for pulpwood-quality roundwood for wood and paper products in 2009, some pulpwood is being converted into wood energy. Economies of scale are...

  12. CO2 emissions and energy intensity reduction allocation over provincial industrial sectors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jie; Zhu, Qingyuan; Liang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • DEA is used to evaluate the energy and environmental efficiency of 30 provincial industrial sector in China. • A new DEA-based model is proposed to allocate the CO 2 emissions and energy intensity reduction targets. • The context-dependent DEA is used to characterize the production plans. - Abstract: High energy consumption by the industry of developing countries has led to the problems of increasing emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) (primarily CO 2 ) and worsening energy shortages. To address these problems, many mitigation measures have been utilized. One major measure is to mandate fixed reductions of GHG emission and energy consumption. Therefore, it is important for each developing country to disaggregate their national reduction targets into targets for various geographical parts of the country. In this paper, we propose a DEA-based approach to allocate China’s national CO 2 emissions and energy intensity reduction targets over Chinese provincial industrial sectors. We firstly evaluate the energy and environmental efficiency of Chinese industry considering energy consumption and GHG emissions. Then, considering the necessity of mitigating GHG emission and energy consumption, we develop a context-dependent DEA technique which can better characterize the changeable production with reductions of CO 2 emission and energy intensity, to help allocate the national reduction targets over provincial industrial sectors. Our empirical study of 30 Chinese regions for the period 2005–2010 shows that the industry of China had poor energy and environmental efficiency. Considering three major geographical areas, eastern China’s industrial sector had the highest efficiency scores while in this aspect central and western China were similar to each other at a lower level. Our study shows that the most effective allocation of the national reduction target requires most of the 30 regional industrial to reduce CO 2 emission and energy intensity, while a

  13. Reduction in energy dissipation rate with increased effective applied field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janů, Zdeněk; Soukup, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 8 (2015), "085016-1"-"085016-5" ISSN 0953-2048 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : critical state * hysteresis * energy dissipation rate * field waveform Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.717, year: 2015

  14. CFD simulation for reduced energy costs in tubular photobioreactors using wall turbulence promoters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Perez, Cesar; Espinosa, J.; Montenegro Ruiz, L.C.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tubular photobioreactors (PBR) have great potential for microalgae cultivation due to its high productivity compared with open ponds. However, the energy uptake for fluid circulation and mixing is significant, impacting the operation and production costs. In this work, we investigate by CFD

  15. Turbulent exchange of energy, momentum, and reactive gases between high vegetation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with the representation of the exchange of energy, momentum and chemically reactive compounds between the land, covered by high vegetation, and the lowest part of the atmosphere, named as atmospheric boundary layer (ABL).

    The study presented in this thesis introduces the

  16. Reduction of erythroid progenitors in protein-energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Primavera; Blatt, Solange; Pereira, Juliana; de Maurino, Beatriz Beutler; Tsujita, Maristela; de Souza, Ana Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme; Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio

    2007-02-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is a syndrome in which anaemia together with multivitamin and mineral deficiency may be present. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved have not, however, yet been completely elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pathophysiological processes that occur in this anaemia in animals that were submitted to protein-energy malnutrition, in particular with respect to Fe concentration and the proliferative activity of haemopoietic cells. For this, histological, histochemical, cell culture and immunophenotyping techniques were used. Two-month-old male Swiss mice were submitted to protein-energy malnutrition with a low-protein diet (20 g/kg) compared with control diet (400 g/kg). When the experimental group had attained a 20 % loss of their original body weight, the animals from both groups received, intravenously, 20 IU erythropoietin every other day for 14 d. Malnourished animals showed a decrease in red blood cells, Hb concentration and reticulocytopenia, as well as severe bone marrow and splenic atrophy. The results for serum Fe, total Fe-binding capacity, transferrin and erythropoietin in malnourished animals were no different from those of the control animals. Fe reserves in the spleen, liver and bone marrow were found to be greater in the malnourished animals. The mixed colony-forming unit assays revealed a smaller production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units, erythroid burst-forming units, erythroid colony-forming units and CD45, CD117, CD119 and CD71 expression in the bone marrow and spleen cells of malnourished animals. These findings suggest that, in this protein-energy malnutrition model, anaemia is not caused by Fe deficiency or erythropoietin deficiency, but is a result of ineffective erythropoiesis.

  17. Energy optimization and reduction of carbon footprint in cement manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallestey, Eduardo; Crosley, Gabriela; Wilson, Andrew; Maier, Urs; Hoppler, Rolf; Boerrnert, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    Cement producers are large consumers of thermal and electrical energy, which are only available at steadily increasing costs. Efforts to reduce demands by using higher efficiency equipment and substituting -fuels and raw materials to lower production costs have been addressed in recent years. Under the Kyoto Protocol industrialised countries agreed to reduce their collective greenhouse gas emissions. Cement producers as some of the largest emitters of CO2 have been especially challenged to find new and innovative ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper summarise some ABB technologies developed to assist the cement industry to meet these goals.

  18. Transit investments for greenhouse gas and energy reduction program : second assessment report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This report is the second assessment of the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Transit Administrations Transit Investments for : Greenhouse Gas and Energy Reduction (TIGGER) Program. The TIGGER Program provides capital funds to transit age...

  19. Effects from the Reduction of Air Leakage on Energy and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Desjarlais, Andre Omer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Buildings are responsible for approximately 40% of the energy used in the US. Codes have been increasing building envelope requirements, and in particular those related to improving airtightness, in order to reduce energy consumption. The main goal of this research was to evaluate the effects from reductions in air leakage on energy loads and material durability. To this end, we focused on the airtightness and thermal resistance criteria set by the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).

  20. Frequency of feeding, weight reduction and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboeket-van de Venne, W P; Westerterp, K R

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of feeding frequency on the rate and composition of weight loss and 24 h energy metabolism in moderately obese women on a 1000 kcal/day diet. During four consecutive weeks fourteen female adults (age 20-58 years, BMI 25.4-34.9 kg/m2) restricted their food intake to 1000 kcal/day. Seven subjects consumed the diet in two meals daily (gorging pattern), the others consumed the diet in three to five meals (nibbling pattern). Body mass and body composition, obtained by deuterium dilution, were measured at the start of the experiment and after two and four weeks of dieting. Sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) was measured at the same time intervals using a respiration chamber. At the end of the experiment 24 h energy expenditure (24 h EE) and diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) were assessed by a 36 h stay in the respiration chamber. There was no significant effect of the feeding frequency on the rate of weight loss, fat mass loss or fat-free mass loss. Furthermore, fat mass and fat-free mass contributed equally to weight loss in subjects on both gorging and nibbling diet. Feeding frequency had no significant effect on SMR after two or four weeks of dieting. The decrease in SMR after four weeks was significantly greater in subjects on the nibbling diet. 24 h EE and DIT were not significantly different between the two feeding regimens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Enzymatic versus Inorganic Oxygen Reduction Catalysts: Comparison of the Energy Levels in a Free-Energy Scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Christian Hauge; Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2010-01-01

    levels of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) models obtained at physiological pH = 7 to the energy levels at pH = 0, which allows for comparison. Furthermore, we illustrate how different bias voltages will affect the free-energy landscapes of the catalysts. This allows us to determine the so-called theoretical......In this paper, we present a method to directly compare the energy levels of intermediates in enzymatic and inorganic oxygen reduction catalysts. We initially describe how the energy levels of a Pt(111) catalyst, operating at pH = 0, are obtained. By a simple procedure, we then convert the energy...

  2. Utilizing ultrasonic energy for reduction of free fatty acids in crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonic energy was used for the reduction of FFA in CPO. FFA content was measured at different sonication intervals, and the optimum time was determined. Hydrochloric acid showed the highest catalytic activity in the reduction of FFA content in CPO, as well as in converting FFA to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME).

  3. Surface and bulk-loss reduction research by low-energy hydrogen doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonash, S.

    1985-01-01

    Surface and bulk loss reduction by low energy hydrogen doping of silicon solar cells was examined. Hydrogen ions provided a suppression of space charge recombination currents. Implantation of hydrogen followed by the anneal cycle caused more redistribution of boron than the anneal which could complicate processing. It was demonstrated that passivation leads to space charge current reduction.

  4. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  5. Imprint reduction in rotating heavy ions beam energy deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A., E-mail: antoineclaude.bret@uclm.es [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Piriz, A.R., E-mail: Roberto.Piriz@uclm.es [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A., E-mail: n.tahir@gsi.de [GSI Darmstadt, Plankstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The compression of a cylindrical target by a rotating heavy ions beam is contemplated in certain inertial fusion schemes or in heavy density matter experiments. Because the beam has its proper temporal profile, the energy deposition is asymmetric and leaves an imprint which can have important consequences for the rest of the process. In this paper, the Fourier components of the deposited ion density are computed exactly in terms of the beam temporal profile and its rotation frequency Ω. We show that for any beam profile of duration T, there exist an infinite number of values of ΩT canceling exactly any given harmonic. For the particular case of a parabolic profile, we find possible to cancel exactly the first harmonic and nearly cancel every other odd harmonics. In such case, the imprint amplitude is divided by 4 without any increase of Ω.

  6. Application research on big data in energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bingdong; Chen, Jing; Wang, Mei; Yao, Jingjing

    2017-06-01

    In the context of big data age, the energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation is a natural big data industry. The planning, management, decision-making of energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation and other aspects should be supported by the analysis and forecasting of large amounts of data. Now, with the development of information technology, such as intelligent city, sensor road and so on, information collection technology in the direction of the Internet of things gradually become popular. The 3G/4G network transmission technology develop rapidly, and a large number of energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation data is growing into a series with different ways. The government not only should be able to make good use of big data to solve the problem of energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation, but also to explore and use a large amount of data behind the hidden value. Based on the analysis of the basic characteristics and application technology of energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation data, this paper carries out its application research in energy conservation and emission reduction of transportation industry, so as to provide theoretical basis and reference value for low carbon management.

  7. Turbulent Kinetic Energy Measurement Using Phase Contrast MRI for Estimating the Post-Stenotic Pressure Drop: In Vitro Validation and Clinical Application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin Ha

    Full Text Available Although the measurement of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been introduced as an alternative index for quantifying energy loss through the cardiac valve, experimental verification and clinical application of this parameter are still required.The goal of this study is to verify MRI measurements of TKE by using a phantom stenosis with particle image velocimetry (PIV as the reference standard. In addition, the feasibility of measuring TKE with MRI is explored.MRI measurements of TKE through a phantom stenosis was performed by using clinical 3T MRI scanner. The MRI measurements were verified experimentally by using PIV as the reference standard. In vivo application of MRI-driven TKE was explored in seven patients with aortic valve disease and one healthy volunteer. Transvalvular gradients measured by MRI and echocardiography were compared.MRI and PIV measurements of TKE are consistent for turbulent flow (0.666 400. The turbulence pressure drop correlates strongly with total TKE (R2 = 0.986. However, in vivo measurements of TKE are not consistent with the transvalvular pressure gradient estimated by echocardiography.These results suggest that TKE measurement via MRI may provide a potential benefit as an energy-loss index to characterize blood flow through the aortic valve. However, further clinical studies are necessary to reach definitive conclusions regarding this technique.

  8. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang; Chen, Shiji

    2017-07-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ˜0.128 and 0.47 m, and ˜0.223 and 0.01 m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47 × 10-2 and 7.13 × 10-3, and 2.91 × 10-3 and 1.96 × 10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively.

  9. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littleton, Harry; Griffin, John

    2011-07-31

    This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU's/year and 6.46 trillion BTU's/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  10. Turbulence closure: turbulence, waves and the wave-turbulence transition – Part 1: Vanishing mean shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Baumert

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper extends a turbulence closure-like model for stably stratified flows into a new dynamic domain in which turbulence is generated by internal gravity waves rather than mean shear. The model turbulent kinetic energy (TKE, K balance, its first equation, incorporates a term for the energy transfer from internal waves to turbulence. This energy source is in addition to the traditional shear production. The second variable of the new two-equation model is the turbulent enstrophy (Ω. Compared to the traditional shear-only case, the Ω-equation is modified to account for the effect of the waves on the turbulence time and space scales. This modification is based on the assumption of a non-zero constant flux Richardson number in the limit of vanishing mean shear when turbulence is produced exclusively by internal waves. This paper is part 1 of a continuing theoretical development. It accounts for mean shear- and internal wave-driven mixing only in the two limits of mean shear and no waves and waves but no mean shear, respectively.

    The new model reproduces the wave-turbulence transition analyzed by D'Asaro and Lien (2000b. At small energy density E of the internal wave field, the turbulent dissipation rate (ε scales like ε~E2. This is what is observed in the deep sea. With increasing E, after the wave-turbulence transition has been passed, the scaling changes to ε~E1. This is observed, for example, in the highly energetic tidal flow near a sill in Knight Inlet. The new model further exhibits a turbulent length scale proportional to the Ozmidov scale, as observed in the ocean, and predicts the ratio between the turbulent Thorpe and Ozmidov length scales well within the range observed in the ocean.

  11. Capacitor voltage ripple reduction and arm energy balancing in MMC-HVDC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parikh, Harsh; Martin-Loeches, Ruben Sánches; Tsolaridis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    variations is utilized in order to achieve better performance. By injecting a second order harmonic component into the circulating current, the energy variation and consequently the capacitor voltage ripple is reduced allowing for a capacitor size reduction. At the same time, an arm energy balancing...

  12. Metal artefact reduction in gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy CT with and without metal artefact reduction software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun; Suh, Jin-Suck; Park, Kwan Kyu

    2012-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy CT (DECT) with/without metal artefact reduction software (MARs). The DECTs were performed using fast kV-switching GSI between 80 and 140 kV. The CT data were retro-reconstructed with/without MARs, by different displayed fields-of-view (DFOV), and with synthesised monochromatic energy in the range 40-140 keV. A phantom study of size and CT numbers was performed in a titanium plate and a stainless steel plate. A clinical study was performed in 26 patients with metallic hardware. All images were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the visualisation of periprosthetic regions and the severity of beam-hardening artefacts by using a five-point scale. The GSI-MARs reconstruction can markedly reduce the metal-related artefacts, and the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition and DFOV. The spectral CT numbers of the prosthesis and periprosthetic regions showed different patterns on stainless steel and titanium plates. Dual-energy CT with GSI-MARs can reduce metal-related artefacts and improve the delineation of the prosthesis and periprosthetic region. We should be cautious when using GSI-MARs because the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition, energy (in keV) and DFOV. The metallic composition and size should be considered in metallic imaging with GSI-MARs reconstruction. circle Metal-related artefacts can be troublesome on musculoskeletal computed tomography (CT). circle Gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) with dual-energy CT (DECT) offers a novel solution circle GSI and metallic artefact reduction software (GSI-MAR) can markedly reduce these artefacts. circle However image quality is influenced by the prosthesis composition and other parameters. circle We should be aware about potential overcorrection when using GSI-MARs. (orig.)

  13. Energy reduction in buildings in temperate and tropic regions utilizing a heat loss measuring device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2012-01-01

    for heating up, and cooling down our houses. There is a huge energy saving potential on this area reducing both the World climate problems and economy challenges as well. Heating of buildings in Denmark counts for approximately 40% of the entire national energy consume. Of this reason a reduction of heat...... to ACMV in the "warm countries" contribute to an enormous energy consumption and corresponding CO2 emission. In order to establish the best basis for energy renovation, it is important to have measures of the heat losses on a building façade, for optimizing the energy renovation. This paper will present......There exist two ordinary ways to obtain global energy efficiency. One way is to make improvements on the energy production and supply side, and the other way is, in general, to reduce the consume of energy in the society. This paper has focus on the latter and especially the consume of energy...

  14. Towards Energy Demand Reduction in Social Housing Buildings: Envelope System Optimization Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Esquivias

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the potential for the reduction of energy demand in residential buildings by acting on the exterior envelope, both in newly constructed buildings and in the retrofitting of existing stock. It focuses on analysing social housing buildings in Mediterranean areas and on quantifying the scope of that reduction in the application of different envelope design strategies, with the purpose of prioritizing their application based on their energy efficiency. The analyses and quantifications were made by means of the generation of energy models with the TRNSYS tool for simple or combined solutions, identifying possible potentials for reduction of the energy demand from 20% to 25%, basically by acting on the windows. The case study was a newly built social housing building of a closed block type located in Seville (Spain. Its constructive techniques and the insulation level of its envelope are standardized for current buildings widespread across Mediterranean Europe.

  15. Late-time mixing and turbulent behavior in high-energy-density shear experiments at high Atwood numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kirk

    2017-10-01

    The LANL Shear experiments on the NIF are designed to study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which is the predominate mechanism for generating vorticity, leading to turbulence and mixing at high Reynolds numbers. The KHI is pervasive, as velocity sheared and density-stratified flows abound, from accretion disks of a black holes to the fuel capsule in an ICF implosion. The NIF laser has opened up a new class of long-lived planar HED fluid instability experiments that can scale fluid experiments over impressive orders of magnitude in pressure (up to > Mbar), temperature (>105 K) and space (histories of 4 tracer materials and 3 surface finishes spanning dynamic Atwood numbers from 0.63 to 0.88 and developed Reynolds numbers around 106. When the shocks cross, the layer is exposed to extreme shear forces and evolves into KHI rollers from an unseeded (but naturally broadband) surface. Two sets of data are acquired for each material type: an edge-view and a plan-view, through the plane of the material. The results hint at plasma physics effects in the layer. The edge-view is compared to BHR calculations, to understand mixing and layer growth. The BHR model matches the evolution and asymptotic behavior of the layer, and the initial scale-length used for the model correlates well to initial surface roughness, even when the surface is artificially roughened, forcing the layer's evolution from coherent to disordered. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. Environmental Protection, Energy Policy and Poverty Reduction – Synergies of an Integrated Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Renate Schubert; Julia Blasch; Kristin Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanisms that link poverty reduction with climate and energy policy. First, there is a brief analysis of the relationship between ongoing climate change, energy use and poverty. This analysis is followed by an overview of different policy options that have the potential to fight poverty while simultaneously limiting global warming and environmental degradation. Mitigating climate change, transforming the energy systems in developing countries and financing adaptatio...

  17. High Turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    EuHIT, Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the EuHIT (European High-Performance Infrastructures in Turbulence - see here) consortium, CERN is participating in fundamental research on turbulence phenomena. To this end, the Laboratory provides European researchers with a cryogenic research infrastructure (see here), where the first tests have just been performed.

  18. Plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates

  19. A Surface-Layer Study of the Transport and Dissipation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and the Variances of Temperature, Humidity and CO_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackerott, João A.; Bakhoday Paskyabi, Mostafa; Reuder, Joachim; de Oliveira, Amauri P.; Kral, Stephan T.; Marques Filho, Edson P.; Mesquita, Michel dos Santos; de Camargo, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    We discuss scalar similarities and dissimilarities based on analysis of the dissipation terms in the variance budget equations, considering the turbulent kinetic energy and the variances of temperature, specific humidity and specific CO_2 content. For this purpose, 124 high-frequency sampled segments are selected from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence experiment. The consequences of dissipation similarity in the variance transport are also discussed and quantified. The results show that, for the convective atmospheric surface layer, the non-dimensional dissipation terms can be expressed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and are independent of whether the variable is temperature or moisture. The scalar similarity in the dissipation term implies that the characteristic scales of the atmospheric surface layer can be estimated from the respective rate of variance dissipation, the characteristic scale of temperature, and the dissipation rate of temperature variance.

  20. MULTIFLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, T. P.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation that occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512 3 resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity, and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingly we find that, at least at these resolutions, the majority of the physics of multifluid turbulence can be captured by simply introducing fixed (in time and space) resistive terms into the induction equation without the need for a full multifluid MHD treatment. The velocity dispersion is also examined and, in common with previously published results, it is found not to be power law in nature.

  1. Turbulence in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview of solar wind turbulence from both the theoretical and observational perspective. It argues that the interplanetary medium offers the best opportunity to directly study turbulent fluctuations in collisionless plasmas. In fact, during expansion, the solar wind evolves towards a state characterized by large-amplitude fluctuations in all observed parameters, which resembles, at least at large scales, the well-known hydrodynamic turbulence. This text starts with historical references to past observations and experiments on turbulent flows. It then introduces the Navier-Stokes equations for a magnetized plasma whose low-frequency turbulence evolution is described within the framework of the MHD approximation. It also considers the scaling of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations and the study of nonlinear energy cascades within the same framework. It reports observations of turbulence in the ecliptic and at high latitude, treating Alfvénic and compressive fluctuations separately in...

  2. Reduction of firewood consumption by households in south-central Chile associated with energy efficiency programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueftan, Alejandra; González, Alejandro D.

    2013-01-01

    Cities in the central-southern area of Chile face serious environmental pollution due to extensive use of firewood for heating. Low energy efficiency of constructions and cold climate increase the problem, which also affects native forests. The aims of this study are to characterize energy consumption in dwellings of this region, investigate the reduction potential, and study social and environmental consequences of high consumption of firewood. Actual energy consumption is studied with information from surveys, potential for reduction is modeled with software and other consequences are analyzed from previous studies. Results for the city of Valdivia show high firewood consumption per household, with a media bulk volume near 12 m 3 /year. Thermal regulations are softer compared with other countries. Moreover, around 85% of buildings were built before enforcing codes in 2007, and has almost no thermal protection. The reduction potential due to thermal improvements is found to be very high (62%) if buildings are refurbished to comply with the present Chilean Norm of 2007, but it reaches a 77% reduction if refurbished according to stricter foreign regulations. Therefore, an energy efficiency program strongly addressing existing buildings has the largest potential for reducing firewood use, and therefore mitigate environmental and health impacts. - Highlights: • High firewood consumption and environmental pollution in cities of south-central Chile. • High use of firewood due to inefficient constructions and soft thermal regulations. • Potential reduction of energy consumption up to 77% with more demanding regulations. • Policies should address building stock before thermal regulation, corresponding to 85%

  3. Peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement with the superconducting flywheel energy storage in electric railway system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hansang; Jung, Seungmin; Cho, Yoonsung; Yoon, Donghee; Jang, Gilsoo

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an application of the 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems to reduce the peak power of the electric railway system. The electric railway systems have high-power characteristics and large amount of regenerative energy during vehicles’ braking. The high-power characteristic makes operating cost high as the system should guarantee the secure capacity of electrical equipment and the low utilization rate of regenerative energy limits the significant energy efficiency improvement. In this paper, it had been proved that the peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement can be achieved by using 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems with the optimally controlled charging or discharging operations. Also, economic benefits had been assessed.

  4. Personalized Energy Reduction Cyber-Physical System (PERCS): A gamified end-user platform for energy efficiency and demand response.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sintov, Nicole; Orosz, Michael; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the Personalized Energy Reduction Cyber-physical System (PERCS) is to create new possibilities for improving building operating efficiency, enhancing grid reliability, avoiding costly power interruptions, and mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. PERCS proposes to achieve these outcomes by engaging building occupants as partners in a user-centered smart service platform. Using a non-intrusive load monitoring approach, PERCS uses a single sensing point in each home to capture smart electric meter data in real time. The household energy signal is disaggregated into individual load signatures of common appliances (e.g., air conditioners), yielding near real-time appliance-level energy information. Users interact with PERCS via a mobile phone platform that provides household- and appliance-level energy feedback, tailored recommendations, and a competitive game tied to energy use and behavioral changes. PERCS challenges traditional energy management approaches by directly engaging occupant as key elements in a technological system.

  5. Hypersonic wave drag reduction performance of cylinders with repetitive laser energy depositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, J; Hong, Y J; Li, Q; Huang, H

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely research that wave drag reduction on hypersonic vehicle by laser energy depositions. Using laser energy to reduce wave drag can improve vehicle performance. A second order accurate scheme based on finite-difference method and domain decomposition of structural grid is used to compute the drag performance of cylinders in a hypersonic flow of Mach number 2 at altitude of 15km with repetitive energy depositions. The effects of frequency on drag reduction are studied. The calculated results show: the recirculation zone is generated due to the interaction between bow shock over the cylinder and blast wave produced by energy deposition, and a virtual spike which is supported by an axis-symmetric recirculation, is formed in front of the cylinder. By increasing the repetitive frequency, the drag is reduced and the oscillation of the drag is decreased; however, the energy efficiency decreases by increasing the frequency.

  6. Equating Efficiency with Reduction: A Self-Deception in Energy Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhite, Harold; Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    results from India and China, with more than one third of the world population, to show how there is likely to be dramatic increases in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in those countries over the next half-century. Much of this increase will be in conjunction with the development of basic services...... efficiency alone will offset continued growth in energy services to the extent that deep reductions in energy use are possible. Many researchers and environmentalists seem to have, partly for strategic reasons, adapted to this view and thereby supported politicians in the self-deception. In this paper we use...... and infrastructure for homes, businesses, transport, health and public services, so that it is neither ethical nor even practical to argue for restrictions in overall energy growth in these and other developing countries. This places the onus for deep reductions in energy use on Europe, North America and the other...

  7. Children, parents and home energy use: Exploring motivations and limits to energy demand reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, Michael J.; Chiu, Lai Fong

    2014-01-01

    While almost 30% of UK households include children, little research has attempted to present children's perspectives on home energy use. This study used focus groups with children and parents at two primary (elementary) schools in London, UK, to explore home energy use and energy feedback. Energy was found to be a little-discussed subject at home. Children derived more motivation to save energy from responsibility conferred by school activities than other (e.g. environmental) concerns, and some connected energy saving with dangers of using electricity (e.g. fire). Material and social constraints (e.g. access to outside space, parents' environmental attitudes) meant that it was sometimes difficult for children to save energy even when motivated. However, parents showed greater inclination to pay attention to energy saving when framed as supporting their child's learning than as a financial or environmental concern. Children were disinclined to reduce energy-consuming activities such as watching television, and while parents complained about children's energy use most saw it as a low priority issue. Policy implications of these findings are considered, and the approach employed is argued to be an effective way of investigating children's perceptions around energy use. - Highlights: • Separate focus groups were conducted with children and parents on home energy use. • Children were motivated to save energy by being given responsibility. • Parents viewed saving energy more positively when framed as educating their child. • Material and social factors limit children's ability to save energy. • The method may encourage openness by decreasing power imbalances

  8. Turbulent pressure fluctuations measured during CHATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven P. Oncley; William J. Massman; Edward G. Patton

    2008-01-01

    Fast-response pressure fluctuations were included in the Canopy Horizontal Array of Turbulence Study (CHATS) at several heights within and just above the canopy in a walnut orchard. Two independent systems were intercompared and then separated. We present an evaluation of turbulence statistics - including the pressure transport term in the turbulence kinetic energy...

  9. Intervention Study of Women Wrestler on the Energy Consumption and Food Supplement in Weight Reduction Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Li

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to explore the influence of energy consumption on wrestler in weight reduction phase and the intervention of food supplement on athletes. Twenty wrestlers were divided into intervention group and control group and went through weight reduction phase and food supplement by using the methods of slow weight training and weighing method to meet the entry requirements of the athlete’s weight and improve exercise capacity at the same time.

  10. REDUCTION OF POLLUTION EMISSION BY USING SOLAR ENERGY IN EASTERN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Dragan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presented work is devoted to the analysis of electric energy production in photovoltaic power plant located in east part of Poland and estimation of pollution avoided due to the usage of solar radiation energy. Photovoltaic power plant consists mainly of silicon polycrystalline modules but in its experimental part thin film modules of three different technologies are also installed giving the entire power equal to 1.4 MWp. In 2015 the PV plant produced above 1.5 MWh of electric energy. Benefits of renewable energy use result in significant reduction of emissions that are harmful to people and other living species too.

  11. Interaction of carbon reduction and green energy promotion in a small fossil-fuel importing economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethig, Ruediger; Wittlich, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study the incidence of carbon-reduction and green-energy promotion policies in an open fossil-fuel importing general equilibrium economy. The focus is on mixed price-based or quantity-based policies. Instruments directed toward promoting green energy are shown to reduce also carbon emissions and vice versa. Their direct effects are stronger than their side effects, the more so, the greater is the elasticity of substitution in consumption between energy and the consumption good. We calculate the effects of variations in individual policy parameters, especially on energy prices and welfare costs, and determine the impact of exogenous fossil-fuel price shocks on the economy. (orig.)

  12. Fundamental research on sintering technology with super deep bed achieving energy saving and reduction of emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongliang Han; Shengli Wu; Gensheng Feng; Luowen Ma; Weizhong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    In the general frame of energy saving, environment protection and the concept of circular economy, the fundamental research on the sintering technology with super deep bed, achieving energy saving and emission reduction, was carried out. At first, the characteristics of the process and exhaust emission in the sintering with super deep bed was mastered through the study of the influence of different bed depths on the sintering process. Then, considering the bed permeability and the fuel combustion, their influence on the sinter yield and quality, their potential for energy saving and emission reduction was studied. The results show that the improvement of the bed permeability and of the fuel combustibility respectively and simultaneously, leads to an improvement of the sintering technical indices, to energy saving and emission reduction in the condition of super deep bed. At 1000 mm bed depth, and taking the appropriate countermeasure, it is possible to decrease the solid fuel consumption and the emission of CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x by 10.08%, 11.20%, 22.62% and 25.86% respectively; and at 700 mm bed depth, it is possible to reduce the solid fuel consumption and the emission of CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x by 20.71%, 22.01%, 58.86% and 13.13% respectively. This research provides the theoretical and technical basis for the new technology of sintering with super deep bed, achieving energy saving and reduction of emission. (authors)

  13. Concentrated energy addition for active drag reduction in hypersonic flow regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin Ganesh, M.; John, Bibin

    2018-01-01

    Numerical optimization of hypersonic drag reduction technique based on concentrated energy addition is presented in this study. A reduction in wave drag is realized through concentrated energy addition in the hypersonic flowfield upstream of the blunt body. For the exhaustive optimization presented in this study, an in-house high precision inviscid flow solver has been developed. Studies focused on the identification of "optimum energy addition location" have revealed the existence of multiple minimum drag points. The wave drag coefficient is observed to drop from 0.85 to 0.45 when 50 Watts of energy is added to an energy bubble of 1 mm radius located at 74.7 mm upstream of the stagnation point. A direct proportionality has been identified between energy bubble size and wave drag coefficient. Dependence of drag coefficient on the upstream added energy magnitude is also revealed. Of the observed multiple minimum drag points, the energy deposition point (EDP) that offers minimum wave drag just after a sharp drop in drag is proposed as the most optimum energy addition location.

  14. Stochastic modelling of turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Hedevang Lohse

    previously been shown to be closely connected to the energy dissipation. The incorporation of the small scale dynamics into the spatial model opens the door to a fully fledged stochastic model of turbulence. Concerning the interaction of wind and wind turbine, a new method is proposed to extract wind turbine...

  15. A Few Examples of Novel Behavior of Turbulence in the Presence of Waves: Intermittency, Helicity and Dual Energy Cascades in Geophysical Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouquet, A.; Herbert, C.; Marino, R.; Mininni, P. D.; Rorai, C.; Rosenberg, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean and the atmosphere, and hence the climate, are governed by multi-scale interactions between turbulent eddies and waves. Turbulence in the presence of such waves proves to be richer and more complex than for homogeneous isotropic (HIT) flows, both for fluids and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). Several examples will be reviewed in this talk and some cases will be illustrated with concepts using phenomenology, and with results stemming from recent high-resolution direct numerical simulations using the Navier-Stokes or Boussinesq equations. The role of anisotropy will be emphasized, and the context is that of geophysical or astrophysical fluid dynamics. For example, turbulence has been shown to display strong intermittency, with fat wings in the probability distribution function (PDF) of the vertical velocity for stratified flows, when for HIT the PDFs of the velocity are Gaussian. This takes place in the so-called saturated regime where a balance between nonlinearities and waves occur. These localized patches of turbulence lead to enhanced mixing in the atmosphere and the ocean, and such a bursty behavior has also been observed in the planetary boundary layer and in the stratosphere. Furthermore, helicity (velocity-vorticity correlation), which is an ideal invariant in HIT, can be generated in rotating stratified flows in which it can lead to the creation of large-scale magnetic fields. Helicity is also used as an indicator of hurricane activity, and it develops at river confluences, inducing mixing and erosion. Finally, turbulence allows for an inverse cascade of energy to large scales, and a direct cascade to small scales, either of enstrophy in quasi-two-dimensional fluids, or of helicity in three dimensions, because of the anisotropy which is imposed by the boundaries or due to external agents. It has also been shown to lead to a dual transfer of energy to both large and small scales, each with a constant flux, e.g. for rotating stratified flows

  16. Passive energy jitter reduction in the cascaded third harmonic generation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, L; Du, Y; You, Y; Sun, X; Wang, D; Hua, J; Shi, J; Lu, W; Huang, W; Chen, H; Tang, C; Huang, Z

    2014-01-01

    In free electron laser (FEL) systems with ultraviolet (UV) laser driven injectors, a highly stable UV source generated through cascaded third harmonic generation (THG) from an infrared (IR) source is a key element in guaranteeing the acceptable current jitter at the undulator. In this letter, the negative slope of the THG efficiency for high intensity ultrashort IR pulses is revealed to be a passive stabilization mechanism for energy jitter reduction in UV. A reduction of 2.5 times the energy jitter in UV is demonstrated in the experiment and simulations show that the energy jitter in UV can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude if the energy jitter in IR is less than 3%, with proper design of the THG efficiency curve, fulfilling the challenging requirement for UV laser stability in a broad scope of applications such as the photoinjector of x-ray FELs. (letter)

  17. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  18. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW EVOLUTION IN TURBULENT ENVIRONMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Andrew J.; Frank, Adam; Carroll, Jonathan; Blackman, Eric G.; Quillen, Alice C.

    2009-01-01

    The link between turbulence in star-forming environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows, we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers'-type turbulence and produces a driving scale length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star-forming environments. In the last section, we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets cannot be the source of turbulence.

  19. Cryogenic turbulence

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2005-01-01

    Understanding turbulence is vital in astrophysics, geophysics and many engineering applications, with thermal convection playing a central role. I shall describe progress that has recently been made in understanding this ubiquitous phenomenon by making controlled experiments using low-temperature helium, and a brief account of the frontier topic of superfluid turbulence will also be given. CERN might be able to play a unique role in experiments to probe these two problems.

  20. The Evaluation of Costs and Greenhouse Gas Reduction Using Technologies for Energy from Sewage Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Futoshi Kakuta; Takashi Ishida

    2015-01-01

    Sewage sludge is a biomass resource that can create a solid fuel and electricity. Utilizing sewage sludge as a renewable energy can contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases. In Japan, the "National Plan for the Promotion of Biomass Utilization" and the "Priority Plan for Social Infrastructure Development" were approved at cabinet meetings in December 2010 and August 2012, respectively, to promote the energy utilization of sewage sludge. This study investigated cost...

  1. A coarse grained description of time evolution: Irreversible state reduction and time-energy relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifacio, R.; Milan Univ.

    1983-05-01

    We show that a proper coarse-grained description of time evolution leads to a finite difference equation with step tau for the density operator. This implies state reduction to the diagonal form in the energy representation and a quasi ergodic behaviour of quantum mechanical ensemble averages. An intrinsic time-energy relation tauΔE>=(h/2π)/2 is proposed, and its equivalence to a time quantization is discussed. (author)

  2. Energy Management in Smart Cities Based on Internet of Things: Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Moharana, Akshaya Kumar; Leung, Victor C M

    2017-12-05

    Around the globe, innovation with integrating information and communication technologies (ICT) with physical infrastructure is a top priority for governments in pursuing smart, green living to improve energy efficiency, protect the environment, improve the quality of life, and bolster economy competitiveness. Cities today faces multifarious challenges, among which energy efficiency of homes and residential dwellings is a key requirement. Achieving it successfully with the help of intelligent sensors and contextual systems would help build smart cities of the future. In a Smart home environment Home Energy Management plays a critical role in finding a suitable and reliable solution to curtail the peak demand and achieve energy conservation. In this paper, a new method named as Home Energy Management as a Service (HEMaaS) is proposed which is based on neural network based Q -learning algorithm. Although several attempts have been made in the past to address similar problems, the models developed do not cater to maximize the user convenience and robustness of the system. In this paper, authors have proposed an advanced Neural Fitted Q -learning method which is self-learning and adaptive. The proposed method provides an agile, flexible and energy efficient decision making system for home energy management. A typical Canadian residential dwelling model has been used in this paper to test the proposed method. Based on analysis, it was found that the proposed method offers a fast and viable solution to reduce the demand and conserve energy during peak period. It also helps reducing the carbon footprint of residential dwellings. Once adopted, city blocks with significant residential dwellings can significantly reduce the total energy consumption by reducing or shifting their energy demand during peak period. This would definitely help local power distribution companies to optimize their resources and keep the tariff low due to curtailment of peak demand.

  3. Energy Management in Smart Cities Based on Internet of Things: Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Savings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinmaya Mahapatra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Around the globe, innovation with integrating information and communication technologies (ICT with physical infrastructure is a top priority for governments in pursuing smart, green living to improve energy efficiency, protect the environment, improve the quality of life, and bolster economy competitiveness. Cities today faces multifarious challenges, among which energy efficiency of homes and residential dwellings is a key requirement. Achieving it successfully with the help of intelligent sensors and contextual systems would help build smart cities of the future. In a Smart home environment Home Energy Management plays a critical role in finding a suitable and reliable solution to curtail the peak demand and achieve energy conservation. In this paper, a new method named as Home Energy Management as a Service (HEMaaS is proposed which is based on neural network based Q-learning algorithm. Although several attempts have been made in the past to address similar problems, the models developed do not cater to maximize the user convenience and robustness of the system. In this paper, authors have proposed an advanced Neural Fitted Q-learning method which is self-learning and adaptive. The proposed method provides an agile, flexible and energy efficient decision making system for home energy management. A typical Canadian residential dwelling model has been used in this paper to test the proposed method. Based on analysis, it was found that the proposed method offers a fast and viable solution to reduce the demand and conserve energy during peak period. It also helps reducing the carbon footprint of residential dwellings. Once adopted, city blocks with significant residential dwellings can significantly reduce the total energy consumption by reducing or shifting their energy demand during peak period. This would definitely help local power distribution companies to optimize their resources and keep the tariff low due to curtailment of peak demand.

  4. Management Methods of Energy Efficiency and reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actina, G.; Grackova, L.; Zebergs, V.; Zeltins, N.

    2007-01-01

    The management methods of energy efficiency and reduction of GHG emissions and their introduction depend on the financing possibilities and the management structures. Analysis is made of the following methods for the management of the process of raising energy efficiency: an energy audit and certification; the third-party financing; networks for energy efficiency and services of raising energy efficiency. In Latvia more than a half of all the energy resources are consumed for heating and the supply of hot water. The thermal parameters of buildings are poor therefore wide introduction of buildings certification, based on energy audit is of particular importance. The third-party financing would allow resolving the justified problems of audit and certification in order to hasten the heating process of buildings, particularly, owing to the appearance of respective foreign third-party financing companies, although the privatisation of dwelling houses and reorganisation of their management is not yet completed. The networks for energy efficiency have not found supporters in Latvia, however, great importance is attached to the thermal parameters of industrial premises, which are as poor as in the other buildings of the country, and here is a considerable potential of energy economy. Concerning the services of raising energy efficiency, the management method of this process is supposed to reach maximum energy economy after thermo and technical renovation of buildings at their various stages. It is connected with general organisational and financial adjustment of the management of buildings, as well as with the development of the energy service company.(author)

  5. Study on Laws, Regulations and Standards on Energy Efficiency, Energy Conserving and Emission Reduction of Industrial Boilers in EU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ren; Zhao, Yuejin; Chen, Haihong; Liang, Xiuying; Yang, Ming

    2017-12-01

    Industrial boilers are widely applied in such fields as factory power, building heating, and people’s lives; China is the world’s largest producer and user of industrial boilers, with very high annual energy consumption; clear requirements have been put forward by China on the energy efficiency since the “11th Five-year Plan” with the hope to save energy and reduce emission by means of energy efficiency standards and regulations on the supervision and control of various special equipment. So far, the energy efficiency of industrial boilers in China has been improved significantly but there is still a gap with the EU states. This paper analyzes the policies of energy efficiency, implementation models and methods of supervision and implementation at the EU level from laws, regulations, directives as well as standards; the paper also puts forward suggestions of energy conserving and emission reduction on the improvement of energy conserving capacity of industrial boilers in China through studying the legislations and measures of the developed countries in energy conserving of boilers.

  6. Near-wall turbulence model and its application to fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1990-01-01

    A near-wall turbulence model and its incorporation into a multiple-timescale turbulence model are presented. The near-wall turbulence model is obtained from a k-equation turbulence model and a near-wall analysis. In the method, the equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and turbulent kinetic energy are integrated up to the wall, and the energy transfer and the dissipation rates inside the near-wall layer are obtained from algebraic equations. Fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows are solved using a finite element method. The computational results compare favorably with experimental data. It is also shown that the turbulence model can resolve the overshoot phenomena of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall.

  7. Effects of polymers on the spatial structure of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Ballouz, Joseph G.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that the addition of minor amounts of polymers to a turbulent water flow can significantly change its properties. One of the most prominent effects is the observed drastic reduction of drag in wall-bounded flows that is utilized in many engineering applications. Much of the research on polymers in turbulence has focused on their influence on the turbulent energy cascade and their interaction with the energy transfer processes. Much less investigated are their effects on the spatial structure of turbulent flows. In a classical von-Kárman swirling flow setup, we used Lagrangian particle tracking to obtain three-dimensional particle trajectories, velocities, and accelerations and find that polymers have a significant effect on Lagrangian measures of the turbulence structure such as radial distribution functions and the curvature of particle trajectories. We find that not only do the statistical distributions change, but also that polymers appear to affect the spatial statistics well beyond the size of the polymers themselves.

  8. Potency of energy saving and emission reduction from lighting system in residential sector of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, H.

    2018-03-01

    The Government of Indonesia (GoI) has a strong commitment to the target of decreasing energy intensity and reducing Greenhouse gas emissions. One of the significant solutions to reach the target is increasing energy efficiency in the lighting system in the residential sector. The objective of this paper is twofold, to estimate the potency of energy saving and emission reduction from lighting in the residential sector. Literature related to the lighting system in Indonesia has been reviewed to provide sufficient data for the estimation of the energy saving and emission reduction. The results show that the in the year 2016, a total of 95.33 TWh of nationally produced electricity is used in the residential sector. This is equal to 44% of total produced electricity. The number of costumers is 64.78 million houses. The average number of lamps and average wattage of lamps used in Indonesia are 8.35 points and 13.8 W, respectively. The number of lighting and percentage of electricity used for lighting in the residential sector in Indonesia are 20.03 TWh (21.02 %) and 497 million lamps, respectively. The projection shows that in the year 2026 the total energy for lighting and number of lamps in the residential sector are 25.05 TWh and 619 million, respectively. By promoting the present technology of high efficient lamps (LED), the potency of energy saving and emission reduction in 2026 are 2.6 TWh and 2.1 million tons CO2eq, respectively.

  9. Free energy calculation of water addition coupled to reduction of aqueous RuO4-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Blumberger, Jochen; Ohno, Takahisa; Sprik, Michiel

    2007-01-01

    Free energy calculations were carried out for water addition coupled reduction of aqueous ruthenate, RuO 4 - +H 2 O+e - →[RuO 3 (OH) 2 ] 2- , using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. The full reaction is divided into the reduction of the tetrahedral monoanion, RuO 4 - +e - →RuO 4 2- , followed by water addition, RuO 4 2- +H 2 O→[RuO 3 (OH) 2 ] 2- . The free energy of reduction is computed from the fluctuations of the vertical energy gap using the MnO 4 - +e - →MnO 4 2- reaction as reference. The free energy for water addition is estimated using constrained molecular dynamics methods. While the description of this complex reaction, in principle, involves multiple reaction coordinates, we found that reversible transformation of the reactant into the product can be achieved by control of a single reaction coordinate consisting of a suitable linear combination of atomic distances. The free energy difference of the full reaction is computed to be -0.62 eV relative to the normal hydrogen electrode. This is in good agreement with the experimental value of -0.59 eV, lending further support to the hypothesis that, contrary to the ruthenate monoanion, the dianion is not tetrahedral but forms a trigonal-bipyramidal dihydroxo complex in aqueous solution. We construct an approximate two-dimensional free energy surface using the coupling parameter for reduction and the mechanical constraint for water addition as variables. Analyzing this surface we find that in the most favorable reaction pathway the reduction reaction precedes water addition. The latter takes place via the protonated complex [RuO 3 (OH)] - and subsequent transport of the created hydroxide ion to the fifth coordination site of Ru

  10. Impact of International Oil Price on Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of “new normal” economy and frequent “haze”, the strategy of energy conservation and emission reduction aiming to lower costs and reduce pollution is currently still a major strategic direction in China and the world, and will remain so for some time in the future. This paper uses the annual data of West Texas Intermediate (WTI crude oil price in 1987–2014 as samples. We firstly present the direction and mechanism of the influence of oil price change on total consumption of every kind of energy by path analysis, and then consider establishing a Structural Vector Autoregression model of energy conservation and emission reduction in three statuses. Research shows that if the international oil price increases by 1%, the energy consumption per GDP and carbon dioxide emission increase by 0.092% and 0.053% respectively in the corresponding period. In the status of high energy consumption and high emission, if the international oil price increases by 1%, the energy consumption per GDP and carbon dioxide emission increase by 0.043% and 0.065% respectively in the corresponding period. In the status of low energy consumption and low emission, if the international oil price increases by 1%, the energy consumption per GDP per unit increases by 0.067% and carbon dioxide emission decreases by 0.085% in the corresponding period.

  11. Carbon Reduction Measures-Based LCA of Prefabricated Temporary Housing with Renewable Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Dong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temporary housing plays an important role in providing secure, hygienic, private, and comfortable shelter in the aftermath of disaster (such as flood, fire, earthquake, etc.. Additionally, temporary housing can also be used as a sustainable form of on-site residences for construction workers. While most of the building components used in temporary housing can be manufactured in a plant, prefabrication technology improves the production efficiency of temporary housing; furthermore, integrated renewable energy systems, for example, solar photovoltaic (PV system, offer benefits for temporary housing operations. In order to assess the environmental impacts of prefabricated temporary housing equipped with renewable energy systems, this study first divides the life cycle of temporary housing into six stages, and then establishes a life cycle assessment (LCA model for each stage. Furthermore, with the aim of reducing the environmental impacts, life cycle carbon reduction measures are proposed for each stage of temporary housing. The proposed methodology is demonstrated using a case study in China. Based on the proposed carbon reduction measures, the LCA of a prefabricated temporary housing case study building equipped with renewable energy systems indicates a carbon emissions intensity of 35.7 kg/m2·per year, as well as a reduction in material embodied emissions of 18%, assembly emissions of 17.5%, and operational emissions of 91.5%. This research proposes a carbon reduction-driven LCA of temporary housing and contributes to promoting sustainable development of prefabricated temporary housing equipped with renewable energy systems.

  12. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1–5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists...

  13. Energy efficient reduction of fine and ultra-fine dust in a nursery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Phaff, J.C.; Voogt, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    An intervention study with a decentral electrostatic filter has been carried out in a nursery. The field study shows that it is possible to reach a reduction up to 80% of ultra-fine (<0.1 μm) and up to 68% for the PM1 and PM2,5-PM1 fractions at a relatively low energy consumption. These particle

  14. Technical evaluation of Aerojet Energy Conversion Company's topical report on a mobile volume reduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henscheid, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes EG and G Idaho's review of Aerojet Energy Conversion Company's (AECC's) topical report on a Mobile Volume Reduction System. The review evaluated compliance with pertinent codes, standards and regulations. The initial review was discussed with AECC by EG and G Idaho and the NRC, and all outstanding issues resolved before this final evaluation was made

  15. Reduction potentials of energy demand and GHG emissions in China's road transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Xiaoyu; Crookes, Roy J.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid growth of road vehicles, private vehicles in particular, has resulted in continuing growth in China's oil demand and imports, which has been widely accepted as a major factor effecting future oil availability and prices, and a major contributor to China's GHG emission increase. This paper is intended to analyze the future trends of energy demand and GHG emissions in China's road transport sector and to assess the effectiveness of possible reduction measures. A detailed model has been developed to derive a reliable historical trend of energy demand and GHG emissions in China's road transport sector between 2000 and 2005 and to project future trends. Two scenarios have been designed to describe the future strategies relating to the development of China's road transport sector. The 'Business as Usual' scenario is used as a baseline reference scenario, in which the government is assumed to do nothing to influence the long-term trends of road transport energy demand. The 'Best Case' scenario is considered to be the most optimized case where a series of available reduction measures such as private vehicle control, fuel economy regulation, promoting diesel and gas vehicles, fuel tax and biofuel promotion, are assumed to be implemented. Energy demand and GHG emissions in China's road transport sector up to 2030 are estimated in these two scenarios. The total reduction potentials in the 'Best Case' scenario and the relative reduction potentials of each measure have been estimated

  16. Technology Roadmap: Energy and GHG reductions in the chemical industry via catalytic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The chemical industry is a large energy user; but chemical products and technologies also are used in a wide array of energy saving and/or renewable energy applications so the industry has also an energy saving role. The chemical and petrochemical sector is by far the largest industrial energy user, accounting for roughly 10% of total worldwide final energy demand and 7% of global GHG emissions. The International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) has partnered with the IEA and DECHEMA (Society for Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology) to describe the path toward further improvements in energy efficiency and GHG reductions in the chemical sector. The roadmap looks at measures needed from the chemical industry, policymakers, investors and academia to press on with catalysis technology and unleash its potential around the globe. The report uncovers findings and best practice opportunities that illustrate how continuous improvements and breakthrough technology options can cut energy use and bring down greenhouse gas (GHG) emission rates. Around 90% of chemical processes involve the use of catalysts – such as added substances that increase the rate of reaction without being consumed by it – and related processes to enhance production efficiency and reduce energy use, thereby curtailing GHG emission levels. This work shows an energy savings potential approaching 13 exajoules (EJ) by 2050 – equivalent to the current annual primary energy use of Germany.

  17. Advanced Chemical Modeling for Turbulent Combustion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Bunsen flame. Proc. Comb. Inst., 31:1291–1298, 2007. [48] J.-H. Chen, A. Choudhary, B. De Supinski, M. DeVries, E. R. Hawkes, S. Klasky, W. K. Liao...turbulent combustion. Combust. Flame, 143:587–598, 2005. [50] J. A. van Oijen, F. A. Lammers, and L. P. H. de Goey. Modeling of complex premixed burner ... bunsen flames using flamelet-generated manifold reduction. Int. J. of Hydrogen Energy, 34:2778–2788, 2009. [53] K.-J. Nogenmyr, P. Petersson, X. S. Bai

  18. Energy savings, emission reductions, and health co-benefits of the green building movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P, MacNaughton; X, Cao; J, Buonocore; J, Cedeno-Laurent; J, Spengler; A, Bernstein; J, Allen

    2018-01-30

    Buildings consume nearly 40% of primary energy production globally. Certified green buildings substantially reduce energy consumption on a per square foot basis and they also focus on indoor environmental quality. However, the co-benefits to health through reductions in energy and concomitant reductions in air pollution have not been examined.We calculated year by year LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification rates in six countries (the United States, China, India, Brazil, Germany, and Turkey) and then used data from the Green Building Information Gateway (GBIG) to estimate energy savings in each country each year. Of the green building rating schemes, LEED accounts for 32% of green-certified floor space and publically reports energy efficiency data. We employed Harvard's Co-BE Calculator to determine pollutant emissions reductions by country accounting for transient energy mixes and baseline energy use intensities. Co-BE applies the social cost of carbon and the social cost of atmospheric release to translate these reductions into health benefits. Based on modeled energy use, LEED-certified buildings saved $7.5B in energy costs and averted 33MT of CO 2 , 51 kt of SO 2 , 38 kt of NO x , and 10 kt of PM 2.5 from entering the atmosphere, which amounts to $5.8B (lower limit = $2.3B, upper limit = $9.1B) in climate and health co-benefits from 2000 to 2016 in the six countries investigated. The U.S. health benefits derive from avoiding an estimated 172-405 premature deaths, 171 hospital admissions, 11,000 asthma exacerbations, 54,000 respiratory symptoms, 21,000 lost days of work, and 16,000 lost days of school. Because the climate and health benefits are nearly equivalent to the energy savings for green buildings in the United States, and up to 10 times higher in developing countries, they provide an important and previously unquantified societal value. Future analyses should consider these co-benefits when weighing policy

  19. Uncertainty-averse TRANSCO planning for accommodating renewable energy in CO2 reduction environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Ding, Yi; Wang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The concern of the environment and energy sustainability requests a crucial target of CO2 abatement and results in a relatively high penetration of renewable energy generation in the transmission system. For maintaining system reliability and security, the transmission company (TRANSCO) has to make......, demand-side variations, market price volatility, and transmission configuration. Three objectives, i.e. social CO2 reduction benefit, energy purchase and network expansion cost and power delivery profit, are optimized simultaneously by a developed two-phase multi-objective particle swarm optimization...

  20. Energy saving and emission reduction: A project of coal-resource integration in Shanxi Province, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianjun; Fu Meichen; Geng Yuhuan; Tao Jin

    2011-01-01

    The small or middle coal mines with illegal operations in developing countries or regions can cause bad energy waste and environmental disruption. The project of coal-resource integration in Shanxi Province of China gives a new idea or an approach to energy saving and emission reduction. It is a social- and economic-ecological project. The paper shows the targets of energy saving and emission reduction in Shanxi Province, and analyses the aims, significance, design process and implementation of the integration project. Based on that, the paper discusses the challenges and opportunities the project brings. The analysis shows that the project of coal-resource integration in developing countries or regions can effectively improve mining technologies, collect capital and impel international cooperation and exchange. Finally, the paper analyses the concerns about the future, including the possible problems of implementation period, industrial updating, environmental impact and re-employment. However, the successful integration of coal resources can mitigate energy crisis and climate crisis and promote cleaner production effectively. - Highlights: → Coal-resource integration gives a new idea or an approach to energy saving and emission reduction. → Coal-resource integration mitigates climate crisis and promotes cleaner production. → Coal-resource integration brings challenges and opportunities to traditional mining industries.

  1. Energy Saving and GHG Emission Reduction in a Micro-CCHP System by Use of Solar Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Ion, I; Ciocea, G; Popescu, F

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the reduction of greenhouse gas emission, and the energy saving by integrating solar collectors and photovoltaic panels in a Stirling engine based microcombined cooling, heating and power (mCCHP) system are studied. The mCCHP system consists of a natural gas Stirling CHP and an adsorber chiller. When the thermal outputs of the Stirling CHP and solar collectors are not sufficient to cover the heat demand for domestic hot water (DHW), heating/cooling, an au...

  2. Energy and environmental implications of carbon emission reduction targets: Case of Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Ram M.; Rajbhandari, Salony

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sectoral energy consumption pattern and emissions of CO 2 and local air pollutants in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. It also discusses the evolution of energy service demands, structure of energy supply system and emissions from various sectors under the base case scenario during 2005-2050. A long term energy system planning model of the Kathmandu Valley based on the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) framework is used for the analyses. Furthermore, the paper analyzes the least cost options to achieve CO 2 emission reduction targets of 10%, 20% and 30% below the cumulative emission level in the base case and also discusses their implications for total cost, technology-mix, energy-mix and local pollutant emissions. The paper shows that a major switch in energy use pattern from oil and gas to electricity would be needed in the Valley to achieve the cumulative CO 2 emission reduction target of 30% (ER30). Further, the share of electricity in the cumulative energy consumption of the transport sector would increase from 12% in the base case to 24% in the ER30 case.

  3. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO 2 TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed

  4. Reduction of energy use in mushroom cultivation; Reductie energiegebruik in de champignonteelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baar, J.; Amsing, J.G.M.; Rutjens, A.J.

    2005-01-15

    The aim of this project was to examine options for reducing energy use in mushroom cultivation. The project focused particularly on the reduction of energy use in making the mushrooms disease-free through use of steam prior to the next cultivation round. To this end, various methods were examined that could lead to a 50% energy use reduction for mushroom cultivation, or higher [Dutch] Het doel van dit project was om te onderzoeken welke mogelijkheden er zijn om het energiegebruik in de teelt van champignons te verminderen. Met name richtte het project zich op de reductie van het energiegebruik bij het ziektevrij maken van de teeltcellen door stomen voorafgaande aan de volgende teelt. Hiertoe werden diverse methoden onderzocht die kunnen leiden tot een reductie van het energieverbruik van 50% of meer voor de champignonteelt.

  5. Multiphase turbulence mechanisms identification from consistent analysis of direct numerical simulation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Magolan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS serves as an irreplaceable tool to probe the complexities of multiphase flow and identify turbulent mechanisms that elude conventional experimental measurement techniques. The insights unlocked via its careful analysis can be used to guide the formulation and development of turbulence models used in multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulations of nuclear reactor applications. Here, we perform statistical analyses of DNS bubbly flow data generated by Bolotnov (Reτ = 400 and Lu–Tryggvason (Reτ = 150, examining single-point statistics of mean and turbulent liquid properties, turbulent kinetic energy budgets, and two-point correlations in space and time. Deformability of the bubble interface is shown to have a dramatic impact on the liquid turbulent stresses and energy budgets. A reduction in temporal and spatial correlations for the streamwise turbulent stress (uu is also observed at wall-normal distances of y+ = 15, y/δ = 0.5, and y/δ = 1.0. These observations motivate the need for adaptation of length and time scales for bubble-induced turbulence models and serve as guidelines for future analyses of DNS bubbly flow data.

  6. Coexistence and interplay of quantum and classical turbulence in superfluid 4He: Decay, velocity decoupling, and counterflow energy spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babuin, Simone; L'vov, V.S.; Pomyalov, A.; Skrbek, L.; Varga, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 17 (2016), s. 1-18, č. článku 174504. ISSN 2469-9950 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : liquid helium-ii * 3-dimensional vortex dynamics * mutual friction * heat current * hydrodynamic turbulence * 2-fluid flow Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  7. The effects of utility cost reduction on residential energy consumption in Hungary – a decomposition analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekla Sebestyén Szép

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The residential energy consumption is influenced by a lot of factors. Understanding and calculating these factors is essential to making conscious energy policy decisions and feedbacks. Since 2013 the energy prices for households have been controlled by the government in Hungary and as a result of the utility cost reduction program a sharp decline can be observed in residential electricity, district heating and natural gas prices. This paper applies the LMDI (~Logarithmic Mean Division Index method to decompose the absolute change of the residential energy consumption during the period of 2010-2015. We calculate the price, the intensive structure (it means the change of energy expenditure share on energy sources, the extensive structure (it is in connection with the change of energy expenditure share in total expenditure, expenditure (it is the change of per capita total expenditure and population effect. All of that shows the impact of the specific factor on the residential energy consumption by income deciles. Our results have verified the preliminary expectations: the decreasing energy prices for households have a positive impact on energy use and it has been strengthened by the expenditure effect as well. However, the intensive structure, the extensive structure and the population effect have largely offset it.

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  9. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation. Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, C. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States); Brown, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States); DeFlorio, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States); McKenzie, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States); Tao, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL) and Cambridge Systematics, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  10. Potential reduction of carbon emissions from Crude Palm Oil production based on energy and carbon balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patthanaissaranukool, Withida; Polprasert, Chongchin; Englande, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate energy and carbon equivalence from CPO production based on a CBM. ► Energy spent and produced via carbon movement from palm oil mill was determined. ► Scenarios were formulated to evaluate the potential reduction of carbon emission. ► Utilization of biomass from palm oil mill shows the high potential of C-reduction. -- Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate energy and carbon equivalences (CE) associated with palm oil milling and to evaluate sustainability alternatives for energy consumption. Appropriate ways to reduce carbon emissions were also evaluated. A field survey was carried out to quantify the input and output of energy and materials following the conceptual framework of a carbon-balanced model (CBM), which exclude other non-CO 2 greenhouse gases. Survey results indicate that the electrical energy consumption for daily mill start-up averaged 18.7 ± 5.4 kWh/ton Fresh Fruit Bunches (FFBs). This energy is equivalent to 114.4 ± 33.2 kWh/ton Crude Palm Oil (CPO) which was found to be offset by that generated in the mills using palm fiber as a solid fuel. Currently, organic residues contained in the wastewater are anaerobically converted to methane. The methane is used as fuel to generate electricity and sold to an outside grid network at a generation rate of 8.1 ± 2.1 kWh/ton FFB. Based on the CBM approach, carbon emissions observed from the use of fossil energy in palm oil milling were very small; however, total carbon emission from oil palm plantation and palm oil milling were found to be 12.3 kg CE/ton FFB, resulting in the net carbon reduction in CPO production of 2.8 kg CE/ton FFB or 53.7 kg CE/ha-y. Overall, the sum of C-reduction was found 1.2 times greater than that of C-emission. This figure can be increased up to 5.5, if all biomass by-products are used as fuel to generate electricity only. The full potential for carbon reduction from palm oil milling is estimated at 0.94 kW of electric power for every hectare of

  11. Solar Energy as an Alternative to Energy Saving and Pollutant Emissions Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina Negoițescu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the paper is analyzed thermal solar systems efficiency from the point of view of energy savings and pollutant emissions concentrations exhausted during these installations operation. For this purpose were taking into account four versions of solar panel systems combined with different types of conventional heating sources, for which were simulated the operation conditions. As a result of the simulation, there were obtained the values of energy savings and pollutant emissions during the four systems operation. By analyzing these values, the combined thermal system optimum solution was selected.

  12. DNS of viscoelastic turbulent channel flow with rectangular orifice at low Reynolds number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Takahiro; Kawase, Tomohiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent viscoelastic-fluid flow in a channel with a rectangular orifice were performed to investigate the influence of viscoelasticity on turbulence statistics and turbulent structures downstream of the orifice. The geometry considered is periodic rectangular orifices with 1:2 expansion. The constitutive equation follows the Giesekus model, valid for polymer (or surfactant) solutions, which are generally capable of reducing the turbulent frictional drag in a smooth channel. The friction Reynolds number and the Weissenberg number were set to 100 and 20-30, respectively. A drag reduction of about 20% was achieved in the viscoelastic flows. The onset Reynolds number for the transition from a symmetric to an asymmetric state was found to be shifted to higher values than that for the Newtonian flow. In the viscoelastic flow, the turbulent kinetic energy was decreased and fewer turbulent eddies were observed, as the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices were quickly damped. Away from the orifice, quasi-streamwise vortices in the viscoelastic flow were sustained for a longer period, accompanied by energy exchange from elastic energy of the viscoelastic fluid to kinetic energy.

  13. Comparison of Direct Solar Energy to Resistance Heating for Carbothermal Reduction of Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Anthony C.; Gustafson, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of two methods of delivering thermal energy to regolith for the carbo thermal reduction process has been performed. The comparison concludes that electrical resistance heating is superior to direct solar energy via solar concentrators for the following reasons: (1) the resistance heating method can process approximately 12 times as much regolith using the same amount of thermal energy as the direct solar energy method because of superior thermal insulation; (2) the resistance heating method is more adaptable to nearer-term robotic exploration precursor missions because it does not require a solar concentrator system; (3) crucible-based methods are more easily adapted to separation of iron metal and glass by-products than direct solar energy because the melt can be poured directly after processing instead of being remelted; and (4) even with projected improvements in the mass of solar concentrators, projected photovoltaic system masses are expected to be even lower.

  14. Soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  15. Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal Artefact Reduction using Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) Algorithm and Dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguda, Edcer Jerecho

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the standard diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of a patient's medical condition. In comparison to other imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT is a fast acquisition imaging device with higher spatial resolution and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for bony structures. CT images are presented through a gray scale of independent values in Hounsfield units (HU). High HU-valued materials represent higher density. High density materials, such as metal, tend to erroneously increase the HU values around it due to reconstruction software limitations. This problem of increased HU values due to metal presence is referred to as metal artefacts. Hip prostheses, dental fillings, aneurysm clips, and spinal clips are a few examples of metal objects that are of clinical relevance. These implants create artefacts such as beam hardening and photon starvation that distort CT images and degrade image quality. This is of great significance because the distortions may cause improper evaluation of images and inaccurate dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Different algorithms are being developed to reduce these artefacts for better image quality for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, very limited information is available about the effect of artefact correction on dose calculation accuracy. This research study evaluates the dosimetric effect of metal artefact reduction algorithms on severe artefacts on CT images. This study uses Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based MAR algorithm, projection-based Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithm, and the Dual-Energy method. Materials and Methods: The Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based and SMART Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithms are metal artefact reduction protocols embedded in two different CT scanner models by General Electric (GE), and the Dual-Energy Imaging Method was developed at Duke University. All three

  16. Sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Compression of a turbulent plasma or fluid can cause amplification of the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the turnover and viscous dissipation times of the turbulent eddies. The consideration of compressing turbulent flows in inviscid fluids has been motivated by the suggestion that amplification of turbulent kinetic energy occurred on experiments at the Weizmann Institute of Science Z-Pinch. We demonstrate a sudden viscous dissipation mechanism whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, which further increases the temperature, feeding back to further enhance the dissipation. Application of this mechanism in compression experiments may be advantageous, if the plasma can be kept comparatively cold during much of the compression, reducing radiation and conduction losses, until the plasma suddenly becomes hot. This work was supported by DOE through contract 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836) and by the DTRA.

  17. The question of energy reduction: The problem(s) with feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, Kathryn; Russo, Riccardo; Anderson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    With smart metering initiatives gaining increasing global popularity, the present paper seeks to challenge the increasingly entrenched view that providing householders with feedback about their energy usage, via an in-home-display, will lead them to substantially reduce their energy consumption. Specifically, we draw on existing quantitative and qualitative evidence to outline three key problems with feedback, namely: (a) the limited evidence of efficacy, (b) the need for user engagement, and (c) the potential for unintended consequences. We conclude by noting that, in their current form, existing in-home-displays may not induce the desired energy-reduction response anticipated by smart metering initiatives. Instead, if smart metering is to effectively reduce energy consumption there is a clear need to develop and test innovative new feedback devices that have been designed with user engagement in mind. - Highlights: • We provide a comprehensive critique of feedback and in-home-displays (IHDs). • We find limited evidence of the efficacy of feedback in reducing energy consumption. • Problematically the success of IHDs depends entirely on user engagement. • The unintended consequence of IHDs may undermine their energy reduction capabilities. • We call for new IHDs to be developed and evaluated with user engagement in mind

  18. Turbulence modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction course in modelling turbulent thermohydraulics, aimed at computational fluid dynamics users. No specific knowledge other than the Navier Stokes equations is required beforehand. Chapter I (which those who are not beginners can skip) provides basic ideas on turbulence physics and is taken up in a textbook prepared by the teaching team of the ENPC (Benque, Viollet). Chapter II describes turbulent viscosity type modelling and the 2k-ε two equations model. It provides details of the channel flow case and the boundary conditions. Chapter III describes the 'standard' (R ij -ε) Reynolds tensions transport model and introduces more recent models called 'feasible'. A second paper deals with heat transfer and the effects of gravity, and returns to the Reynolds stress transport model. (author)

  19. Energy conservation and emission reduction policies for the electric power industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Tan Zhongfu; Wang Jianhui; Xu Jun; Cai Chengkai; Hou Yong

    2011-01-01

    Because of China's increasingly limited energy supplies and serious environmental pollution, much attention has been paid to conserving energy and reducing emissions to help the country's economy achieve sustainable development. As the electric power industry is the largest consumer of coal resources in China and also emits high levels of air pollutants each year, the Chinese government has enacted many technical and economic policies for energy conservation and emission reduction in the last few years. These policies are summarized in this paper, along with relevant laws and medium- and long-term plans, all of which address ideas such as adjusting the power generation mix, promoting demand-side management, introducing energy-efficient scheduling, and installing desulfurization units. The paper also assesses the results of these policies by analyzing several key indicators of energy consumption and emissions. The analysis shows that although some progress has been made in conserving energy and reducing emissions, substantial work is still required for China to catch up with developed countries. Some suggestions for future work are provided. - Highlights: → China has made many policies for reducing the power industries' energy consumption and emissions. → Progress has been made in conserving energy and reducing emission of the electric power industry. → Substantial works need to be done for China to catch up with the level of developed country. → Market mechanisms for conserving energy and reducing emission should be constructed in the future.

  20. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Energy Efficiency Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Frank [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Frank, Matthew [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    As with any manufacturing operation, the metalcasting processes have several sources of variation. Additionally, the metalcasting industry routinely produces a wide variety of complex shaped components, which often exacerbates the problem of determining the source of variation. The goals of this project were to develop better tools and strategies to collect and manage process and product information. Based on industry feedback, five areas were selected based on the amount of variation caused by this source or the potential for improvement in terms of energy, emissions and competitiveness. These five areas were: 1. Heat Treatment Control Strategies 2. Semi-Automated Grinding 3. Surface Mapping Software 4. Study of Impact of Repairs via Weld Gouges 5. Rapid Pattern Making Machine. This project collectively looked at areas of the steel casting production process which could help reduce the rework, scrap and energy consumption required. Through these efforts, casting producers are better equipped to control their processes and specify processes that better meet their customers’ needs.

  1. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  2. Energy Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.

    2000-03-01

    In 1997, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ''Heat Island Reduction Initiative'', to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., shade trees, reflective roofs, reflective pavements and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling energy use in buildings, lower the ambient air temperature and improve urban air quality in cities, and reduce CO2 emissions from power plants. Under this initiative, the Urban Heat Island Pilot Project (UHIPP) was created with the objective to investigate the potential of HIR strategies in residential and commercial buildings in three initial UHIPP cities: Baton Rouge, Sacramento and Salt Lake City. This paper summarizes our efforts to calculate the annual energy savings, peak power avoidance and annual C02 reduction of HIR strategies in the three initial cities. In this analysis, we focused on three building types that offer most savings potential: single-family residence, office and retail store. Each building type was characterized in detail by old or new construction and with a gas furnace or an electric heat pump. We defined prototypical building characteristics for each building type and simulated the impact of HIR strategies on building cooling and heating energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.IE model. Our simulations included the impact of (1) strategically-placed shade trees near buildings [direct effect], (2) use of high-albedo roofing material on building [direct effect], (3) combined strategies I and 2 [direct effect], (4) urban reforestation with high-albedo pavements and building surfaces [indirect effect] and (5) combined strategies 1, 2 and 4 [direct and indirect effects]. We then estimated the total roof area of air-conditioned buildings in each city using readily obtainable data to calculate the metropolitan-wide impact of HIR strategies. The results show, that in Baton Rouge, potential annual energy savings of $15M could be realized by

  3. A near-wall turbulence model and its application to fully developed turbulent channel and pipe flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1988-01-01

    A near wall turbulence model and its incorporation into a multiple-time-scale turbulence model are presented. In the method, the conservation of mass, momentum, and the turbulent kinetic energy equations are integrated up to the wall; and the energy transfer rate and the dissipation rate inside the near wall layer are obtained from algebraic equations. The algebraic equations for the energy transfer rate and the dissipation rate inside the near wall layer were obtained from a k-equation turbulence model and the near wall analysis. A fully developed turbulent channel flow and fully developed turbulent pipe flows were solved using a finite element method to test the predictive capability of the turbulence model. The computational results compared favorably with experimental data. It is also shown that the present turbulence model could resolve the over shoot phenomena of the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall.

  4. Storage of Renewable Energy by Reduction of CO2 with Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Mauron, Philippe; Kato, Shunsuke; Callini, Elsa; Holzer, Marco; Huang, Jianmei

    2015-01-01

    The main difference between the past energy economy during the industrialization period which was mainly based on mining of fossil fuels, e.g. coal, oil and methane and the future energy economy based on renewable energy is the requirement for storage of the energy fluxes. Renewable energy, except biomass, appears in time- and location-dependent energy fluxes as heat or electricity upon conversion. Storage and transport of energy requires a high energy density and has to be realized in a closed materials cycle. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines, is a closed cycle. However, the hydrogen density in a storage system is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which limits the energy density to about half of the energy density in fossil fuels. Introducing CO(2) into the cycle and storing hydrogen by the reduction of CO(2) to hydrocarbons allows renewable energy to be converted into synthetic fuels with the same energy density as fossil fuels. The resulting cycle is a closed cycle (CO(2) neutral) if CO(2) is extracted from the atmosphere. Today's technology allows CO(2) to be reduced either by the Sabatier reaction to methane, by the reversed water gas shift reaction to CO and further reduction of CO by the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to hydrocarbons or over methanol to gasoline. The overall process can only be realized on a very large scale, because the large number of by-products of FTS requires the use of a refinery. Therefore, a well-controlled reaction to a specific product is required for the efficient conversion of renewable energy (electricity) into an easy to store liquid hydrocarbon (fuel). In order to realize a closed hydrocarbon cycle the two major challenges are to extract CO(2) from the atmosphere close to the thermodynamic limit and to reduce CO(2) with hydrogen in a controlled reaction to a specific hydrocarbon. Nanomaterials with

  5. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Design Support for Tooling Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dongtao

    2011-09-23

    High pressure die casting is an intrinsically efficient net shape process and improvements in energy efficiency are strongly dependent on design and process improvements that reduce scrap rates so that more of the total consumed energy goes into acceptable, usable castings. Computer simulation has become widely used within the industry but use is not universal. Further, many key design decisions must be made before the simulation can be run and expense in terms of money and time often limits the number of decision iterations that can be explored. This work continues several years of work creating simple, very fast, design tools that can assist with the early stage design decisions so that the benefits of simulation can be maximized and, more importantly, so that the chances of first shot success are maximized. First shot success and better running processes contributes to less scrap and significantly better energy utilization by the process. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.83 trillion BTUs/year over a 10 year period. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates over a ten year period, based on commercial introduction in 2012, a market penetration of 30% by 2015 is 1.89 trillion BTUs/year by 2022. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2022 is 0.037 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

  6. A least cost energy analysis of US CO sub 2 reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Lee, J.; Goldstein, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Solomon, B.D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (USA)); Hill, D. (Hill (Douglas), Huntington, NY (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Public policy debate on global climate change is increasingly focused on the cost of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Discussion in the US has centered on national energy policy and the desirability and cost of increased energy conversion efficiency and end-use conservation, and on shifting from high greenhouse gas emitting fuels to natural gas, renewable and nuclear-based energy sources. This paper overviews the US MARKAL model, a dynamic linear programming (LP) model of US energy supply and demand. Useful energy projections are specified exogenously to the model, which then determines the optimal energy supply that can meet the demand. We have updated MARKAL with currently available energy technology cost and market penetration data and have applied it to the CO{sub 2} reduction problem for the US. In addition, we have varied some key inputs to the model to test the sensitivity of the energy system to alternative assumptions and to overcome some of the key limitations of the input data. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Reduction efficiency prediction of CENIBRA's recovery boiler by direct minimization of gibbs free energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. Silva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The reduction efficiency is an important variable during the black liquor burning process in the Kraft recovery boiler. This variable value is obtained by slow experimental routines and the delay of this measure disturbs the pulp and paper industry customary control. This paper describes an optimization approach for the reduction efficiency determination in the furnace bottom of the recovery boiler based on the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The industrial data used in this study were directly obtained from CENIBRA's data acquisition system. The resulting approach is able to predict the steady state behavior of the chemical composition of the furnace recovery boiler, - especially the reduction efficiency when different operational conditions are used. This result confirms the potential of this approach in the analysis of the daily operation of the recovery boiler.

  8. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  9. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  10. Energy Spectrum CT Image Detection Based Dimensionality Reduction with Phase Congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingzhen; Li, Miao; Li, Min; Liu, Shuai

    2018-01-27

    The image feature detection is widely used in image registration, image stitching and object recognition. The feature detection algorithm can be applied to the detection of artificial images, and can be used to detect the energy spectrum CT image. A new algorithm of phase consistency detection based on dimensionality reduction is proposed in this paper. We mainly focus on the phase congruency of the spectral CT images in the paper and try to use dimensionality reduction to integrate the information of phase congruency detected in the image. The experimental results show that the algorithm can detect the energy spectrum CT image with clear edge and contour, which is beneficial to the subsequent processing. Meanwhile, the algorithm presented is more effective in diagnosis of disease for medical professionals.

  11. Low-dimensional, free-energy landscapes of protein-folding reactions by nonlinear dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Payel; Moll, Mark; Stamati, Hernán; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    The definition of reaction coordinates for the characterization of a protein-folding reaction has long been a controversial issue, even for the “simple” case in which one single free-energy barrier separates the folded and unfolded ensemble. We propose a general approach to this problem to obtain a few collective coordinates by using nonlinear dimensionality reduction. We validate the usefulness of this method by characterizing the folding landscape associated with a coarse-grained protein model of src homology 3 as sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The folding free-energy landscape projected on the few relevant coordinates emerging from the dimensionality reduction can correctly identify the transition-state ensemble of the reaction. The first embedding dimension efficiently captures the evolution of the folding process along the main folding route. These results clearly show that the proposed method can efficiently find a low-dimensional representation of a complex process such as protein folding. PMID:16785435

  12. Energy reduction potential from the shift to electric vehicles: The Flores island case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, André; Baptista, Patrícia; Silva, Carlos; Ferrão, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    The increase of fossil fuel demand raises concerns on availability of resources for future energy demand and on potential environmental impacts. Electric vehicles (EVs) appear as one alternative to shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy resources. This research work analyzes the benefits of the introduction of EVs in a small energy system, the Flores island, Azores, in terms of primary energy and CO 2 emissions. Four scenarios were designed considering different penetration rates of EVs (Low and High) and different time of recharging strategies (Fixed and Flexible). The high shares of RES in the electricity production system (60–62%) did not guarantee a significant use of RES for the recharging of EVs (10–40%), as the additional electricity required had to be produced mainly from the diesel generators. The flexible recharging strategies allowed doubling the share of RES in the recharging of the EVs when compared to fixed recharging, and consequently double the impact on the reduction of primary energy consumption and fossil fuels imports. While the reduction of primary energy ranged between 0.2% and 1.1%, for CO 2 emissions there was a decrease between 0.3 and 1.7%, proving that EVs can help improve the sustainability of energy systems. - highlights: • High shares of RES in electricity do not guarantee a low energy use by EVs. • The introduction of EVs can help reduce CO 2 emissions by 11% in 2030. • Flexible time of recharging strategies allows a 2.5 times higher share of RES

  13. Optimization of Power Generation Rights Under the Requirements of Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu-ping, YANY; Chong-wei, ZHONG; Fei-fei, YAN; Cheng-yi, TANG

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, the energy crisis and greenhouse effect problem have caused wide public concern, if these issues cannot be resolved quickly, they will bring troubles to people’s lives.In response, many countries around the world have implemented policies to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In our country, the electric power industry has made great contribution to the daily life of people and the development of industry, but it is also an industry of high consumption and high emission.In order to realize the sustainable development of society, it is necessary to make energy conservation and emission reduction in the power industry as an important part of the realization of this goal.In this context, power generation trade has become a hot topic in energy conservation and emission reduction.Through the electricity consumption of the units with different power efficiency and coal consumption rate,it can achieve the target of reducing coal consumption, reducing network loss, reducing greenhouse gas emission, and increasing social benefit,and so on. This article put forward a optimal energy model on the basis of guaranteeing safety and environmental protection.In this paper, they used the IEEE30, IEEE39, IEEE57 and IEEE118 node system as an example, and set up the control groups to prove the practicality of the presented model.The solving method of this model was interior-point method.

  14. Determining the Spatial Coherence of Turbulence at MHK Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kilcher, Levi F.; Thomson, Jim; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Although turbulence is thought to be a key variable in the performance and survivability of Marine Hydrokinetic turbines, it has not been fully characterized at sites where they will be deployed. In particular, the conventional metrics of turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy spectra only describe the turbulence at a point. Spatial information is required to estimate the loading across a rotor, for example, and to understand the short-term evolution of turbulence in the vicinity o...

  15. Observation of nuclear dechanneling length reduction for high energy protons in a short bent crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Scandale

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Deflection of 400 GeV/c protons by a short bent silicon crystal was studied at the CERN SPS. It was shown that the dechanneling probability increases while the dechanneling length decreases with an increase of incident angles of particles relative to the crystal planes. The observation of the dechanneling length reduction provides evidence of the particle population increase at the top levels of transverse energies in the potential well of the planar channels.

  16. Low-dimensional, free-energy landscapes of protein-folding reactions by nonlinear dimensionality reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Payel; Moll, Mark; Stamati, Hernán; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    The definition of reaction coordinates for the characterization of a protein-folding reaction has long been a controversial issue, even for the “simple” case in which one single free-energy barrier separates the folded and unfolded ensemble. We propose a general approach to this problem to obtain a few collective coordinates by using nonlinear dimensionality reduction. We validate the usefulness of this method by characterizing the folding landscape associated with a coarse-grained protein mo...

  17. Turbulence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Peter; Shui, Wan; Johansson, Jens

    2011-01-01

    term with stresses depending linearly on the strain rates. This term takes into account the transfer of linear momentum from one part of the fluid to another. Besides there is another term, which takes into account the transfer of angular momentum. Thus the model implies a new definition of turbulence...

  18. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  19. Reduction of energy cost and CO2 emission for the furnace using energy recovered from waste tail-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, Chih-Ju G.; Wu, Chung-Rung; Lee, Chien-Li

    2010-01-01

    In this research, the waste tail gas emitted from petrochemical processes, e.g. catalytic reforming unit, catalytic cracking unit and residue desulfurization unit, was recovered and reused as a replacement of natural gas (NG). On-site experimental results show that both the flame length and orange-yellowish brightness decrease with more proportion of waste gas fuel added to the natural gas, and that the adiabatic temperature of the mixed fuel is greater than 1800 o C. A complete replacement of natural gas by the recovered waste gas fuel will save 5.8 x 10 6 m 3 of natural gas consumption, and 3.5 x 10 4 tons of CO 2 emission annually. In addition, the reduction of residual O 2 concentration in flue gases from 4% to 3% will save 1.1 x 10 6 m 3 of natural gas consumption, reduce 43.0% of NO x emission, and 1.3 x 10 3 tons of CO 2 emission annually. Thus, from the viewpoint of the overall economics and sustainable energy policy, recovering the waste tail gas energy as an independent fuel source to replace natural gas is of great importance for saving energy, reducing CO 2 emission reduction, and lowering environmental impact.

  20. Behavioral Initiatives for Energy Efficiency: Large-Scale Energy Reductions through Sensors, Feedback & Information Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-12

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: A team of researchers from more than 10 departments at Stanford University is collaborating to transform the way Americans interact with our energy-use data. The team built a web-based platform that collects historical electricity data which it uses to perform a variety of experiments to learn what triggers people to respond. Experiments include new financial incentives, a calculator to understand the potential savings of efficient appliances, new Facebook interface designs, communication studies using Twitter, and educational programs with the Girl Scouts. Economic modeling is underway to better understand how results from the San Francisco Bay Area can be broadened to other parts of the country.

  1. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  2. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Jack W; Edic, Peter M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Torres, Andrew S; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration.

  3. Challenges for China's energy conservation and emission reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Chang, Rui-Dong; Zillante, George

    2014-01-01

    China has become the world's largest CO 2 emitter since 2006, and will continue to keep a rapid economic expansion with increasing energy consumption and emissions. China is facing the increasingly worse environment and rising pressure of emission reduction from home and abroad. Recent years have seen the gradual emergence of several problems that pose fundamental challenges for China's long-term energy conservation and emission reduction strategies. This study discusses these problems and challenges, as well as the latest state policies and plans to address them. Loop holes of the latest policies are found and further reforms and recommendations are suggested to better deal with the challenges. The lessons learnt from China will provide valuable reference and useful inputs for other emerging economies. - Highlights: • China faces a dilemma between economic growth and reducing emissions. • Challenges for China's energy conservation and emission reduction are discussed. • Find some flaws in the latest policies and give suggestions and recommendations

  4. Papers of the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association's 7. annual climate change workshop : energy efficiency and greenhouse gas reduction opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This conference focused on the role that Canadian pipeline companies will play in addressing greenhouse gas emissions. Ninety-five per cent of Canada's oil and gas is transported by pipeline. The Canadian Energy Pipeline Association (CEPA) is a national association representing all the major crude oil and natural gas transportation companies in Canada which operate 100,000 kilometres of pipeline in the country. CEPA's ongoing commitment to climate change includes a commitment to participate in the climate change process, share best management practices, develop energy efficient technology, and position Canadian companies so that they can be part of the solution. It was emphasized that a strong commitment to an effective innovation strategy will be crucial to a successful long term energy policy that meets both economic and environmental objectives. One of the key messages at the conference was that Canada's climate change policies should be consistent with those of the United States, its major trading partner, to ensure that Canada is not placed at a competitive disadvantage within North American and world energy markets. It was also noted that greenhouse gas emissions should be reduced in all consuming and producing sectors of the economy through energy efficiency practices and not through reductions in Canadian industry output for domestic or export markets. Five presentations were indexed separately for inclusion in the database. tabs., figs

  5. Profile of the horizontal wind variance near the ground in near neutral flow – K-theory and the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yahaya

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characteristics of the atmospheric turbulent flow in the vicinity of the ground, and particularly with the profile of the horizontal wind variance. The study is based on experimental measurements performed with fast cup anemometers located near the ground at 5 different levels (from 0.25 to 4 m and sampled at 1 Hz. The experiment was carried over two agricultural plots with various tillage treatments in a fallow semiarid area (Central Aragon, Spain. The results of this study reveal that near the ground surface and under moderate wind, the horizontal wind variance logarithmically increases with height, in direct relationship with the friction velocity and the roughness length scale. A theoretical development has allowed us to link this behaviour to the modeling of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE transport through the eddy diffusivity. Thus, the study proposes a formulation of the similarity universal function of the horizontal wind variance. Besides, the formulation offers a new method for the determination of the friction velocity and the roughness length scale and can be used for the evaluation of the TKE transport rate.

  6. Limited emission reductions from fuel subsidy removal except in energy-exporting regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Jessica; McCollum, David; Emmerling, Johannes; Bertram, Christoph; Gernaat, David E. H. J.; Krey, Volker; Paroussos, Leonidas; Berger, Loïc; Fragkiadakis, Kostas; Keppo, Ilkka; Saadi, Nawfal; Tavoni, Massimo; van Vuuren, Detlef; Vinichenko, Vadim; Riahi, Keywan

    2018-02-01

    Hopes are high that removing fossil fuel subsidies could help to mitigate climate change by discouraging inefficient energy consumption and levelling the playing field for renewable energy. In September 2016, the G20 countries re-affirmed their 2009 commitment (at the G20 Leaders’ Summit) to phase out fossil fuel subsidies and many national governments are using today’s low oil prices as an opportunity to do so. In practical terms, this means abandoning policies that decrease the price of fossil fuels and electricity generated from fossil fuels to below normal market prices. However, whether the removal of subsidies, even if implemented worldwide, would have a large impact on climate change mitigation has not been systematically explored. Here we show that removing fossil fuel subsidies would have an unexpectedly small impact on global energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions and would not increase renewable energy use by 2030. Subsidy removal would reduce the carbon price necessary to stabilize greenhouse gas concentration at 550 parts per million by only 2-12 per cent under low oil prices. Removing subsidies in most regions would deliver smaller emission reductions than the Paris Agreement (2015) climate pledges and in some regions global subsidy removal may actually lead to an increase in emissions, owing to either coal replacing subsidized oil and natural gas or natural-gas use shifting from subsidizing, energy-exporting regions to non-subsidizing, importing regions. Our results show that subsidy removal would result in the largest CO2 emission reductions in high-income oil- and gas-exporting regions, where the reductions would exceed the climate pledges of these regions and where subsidy removal would affect fewer people living below the poverty line than in lower-income regions.

  7. Limited emission reductions from fuel subsidy removal except in energy-exporting regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Jessica; McCollum, David; Emmerling, Johannes; Bertram, Christoph; Gernaat, David E H J; Krey, Volker; Paroussos, Leonidas; Berger, Loïc; Fragkiadakis, Kostas; Keppo, Ilkka; Saadi, Nawfal; Tavoni, Massimo; van Vuuren, Detlef; Vinichenko, Vadim; Riahi, Keywan

    2018-02-07

    Hopes are high that removing fossil fuel subsidies could help to mitigate climate change by discouraging inefficient energy consumption and levelling the playing field for renewable energy. In September 2016, the G20 countries re-affirmed their 2009 commitment (at the G20 Leaders' Summit) to phase out fossil fuel subsidies and many national governments are using today's low oil prices as an opportunity to do so. In practical terms, this means abandoning policies that decrease the price of fossil fuels and electricity generated from fossil fuels to below normal market prices. However, whether the removal of subsidies, even if implemented worldwide, would have a large impact on climate change mitigation has not been systematically explored. Here we show that removing fossil fuel subsidies would have an unexpectedly small impact on global energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions and would not increase renewable energy use by 2030. Subsidy removal would reduce the carbon price necessary to stabilize greenhouse gas concentration at 550 parts per million by only 2-12 per cent under low oil prices. Removing subsidies in most regions would deliver smaller emission reductions than the Paris Agreement (2015) climate pledges and in some regions global subsidy removal may actually lead to an increase in emissions, owing to either coal replacing subsidized oil and natural gas or natural-gas use shifting from subsidizing, energy-exporting regions to non-subsidizing, importing regions. Our results show that subsidy removal would result in the largest CO 2 emission reductions in high-income oil- and gas-exporting regions, where the reductions would exceed the climate pledges of these regions and where subsidy removal would affect fewer people living below the poverty line than in lower-income regions.

  8. Strategic research on CO2 emission reduction for China. Application of MARKAL to China energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yongping

    1995-09-01

    MARKAL was applied to the energy system for analyzing the CO 2 emission reduction in China over the time period from 1990 to 2050. First the Chinese Reference Energy System (CRES) was established based on the framework of MARKAL model. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study. When shifting from scenario LH (low useful energy demand and high import fuel prices) to HL (high demand and low prices), another 33 EJ of primary energy will be consumed and another 2.31 billion tons of CO 2 will be emitted in 2050. Detailed analyses on the disaggregation of CO 2 emissions by Kaya Formula show. The energy intensity (primary energy/GDP) decreases much faster in scenario HL, but the higher growth rate of GDP per capita is the overwhelming factor that results in higher CO 2 emission per capita in the baseline case of scenario HL in comparison with LH. When the carbon taxes are imposed on CO 2 emissions, the residential sector will make the biggest contribution to CO 2 emission abatement from a long-term point of view. However, it's difficult to stabilize CO 2 emission per capita before 2030 in both scenarios even with heavy carbon taxes. When nuclear moratorium occurs, more 560 million tons of CO 2 will be emitted to the atmosphere in 2050 under the same CO 2 tax regime. From the analysis of value flow, CO 2 emission reduction depends largely on new or advanced technologies particularly in the field of electricity generation. The competent technologies switch to those CO 2 less-emitting technologies when surcharging CO 2 emissions. Nuclear power shows significant potential in saving fossil energy resources and reducing CO 2 emissions. (J.P.N.)

  9. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  10. The uncertain but critical role of demand reduction in meeting long-term energy decarbonisation targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pye, Steve; Usher, Will; Strachan, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous demand responses for energy services, resulting from changing prices, have long been characterised in energy systems models. However, the uncertainty associated with such demand responses, modelled through the use of price elasticities, has often been ignored. This is problematic for two key reasons – elasticity factors used in models are highly uncertain due to the limited evidence base, while at the same time, demand response has been observed as a critical mechanism for meeting long term climate mitigation targets. This paper makes two important contributions for improving the understanding of the role of price-induced demand response. Firstly, it attempts to address the problem of unsatisfactory elasticity input assumptions by undertaking an up-to-date review of the literature. Secondly, the role of demand response under uncertainty is assessed using a probabilistic approach, focusing on its contribution to mitigation. The paper highlights that demand response does play a critical role in mitigation, ensuring a more cost-effective transition to a low carbon energy system. Crucially, the uncertainties associated with price elasticities do not weaken this finding. The transport sector is the driver of this demand response leading to important implications for policy and the focus of demand side interventions. - Highlights: • Price driven demand reductions are a critical mitigation option. • Such options are crucial for cost-effective transition to a low carbon energy system. • Uncertainty does not fundamentally undermine this conclusion. • Focus of demand reduction should particularly be on transport sector

  11. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Thornton C [SCRA Appiled R& D

    2014-03-31

    Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) is a balanced portfolio of R&D tasks that address energy-saving opportunities in the metalcasting industry. E-SMARRT was created to: • Improve important capabilities of castings • Reduce carbon footprint of the foundry industry • Develop new job opportunities in manufacturing • Significantly reduce metalcasting process energy consumption and includes R&D in the areas of: • Improvements in Melting Efficiency • Innovative Casting Processes for Yield Improvement/Revert Reduction • Instrumentation and Control Improvement • Material properties for Casting or Tooling Design Improvement The energy savings and process improvements developed under E-SMARRT have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the E-SMARRT partnership. The E-SMARRT team consisted of DOE’s Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical associations in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders’ Society of America; and SCRA Applied R&D, doing business as the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. This team provided collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,000 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, these new processes and technologies that enable energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements would have been slow to develop and had trouble obtaining a broad application. The E-SMARRT R&D tasks featured low-threshold energy efficiency improvements that are attractive to the domestic industry because they do not require major capital investment. The results of this portfolio of projects are significantly reducing metalcasting process energy consumption while improving the important capabilities of metalcastings. Through June

  12. Oceanic turbulence - Big bangs or continuous creation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning the turbulence characteristics of 'microstructure' patches in the ocean is proposed in which a turbulence field is driven at the same time and scale at which it is observed. The driving energy is converted into turbulence kinetic energy in such a way that the observed overturning thickness scale is linearly related to the length scale. This hypothesis is contrasted with that of Gibson (1982), in which the 'patches' are produced by rare, powerful turbulence generators that have 'fossilized' prior to their observation. Careful attention is given to the sampling process and its assumptions.

  13. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk [CanmetMATERIALS; Li, Delin [CanmetMATERIALS

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using

  14. Energy efficiency improvement and CO2 emission reduction opportunities in the cement industry in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, William; Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant; Xu, Tengfang

    2013-01-01

    China's annual cement production (i.e., 1868 Mt) in 2010 accounted for nearly half of the world's annual cement production in the same year. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in China's cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using bottom–up CSC models, the cumulative cost-effective and technical electricity and fuel savings, as well as the CO 2 emission reduction potentials for the Chinese cement industry for 2010–2030 are estimated. By comparison, the total final energy saving achieved by the implementation of these 23 efficiency measures in the Chinese cement industry over 20 years (2010–2030) is equal to 30% of the total primary energy supply of Latin America or Middle East or around 71% of primary energy supply of Brazil in 2007. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate is conducted to assess its effect on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost. - Highlights: ► Estimation of energy saving potential in the entire Chinese cement industry. ► Development of the bottom–up technology-rich Conservation Supply Curve models. ► Discussion of different approaches for developing conservation supply curves. ► Primary energy saving over 20 years equal to 33% of primary energy of Latin America

  15. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  16. Talking with consumers about energy reductions: Recommendations from a Motivational Interviewing perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Erik Klonek

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduction of energy costs has become a concern for many organizations. First, we review energy-saving studies in organizations in which consumers showed resistance to change their behavior. Second, we relate resistance to change to the psycholinguistic construct ‘sustain talk’ that describes verbal arguments against behavior change (e.g., Work processes have priority here. Third, we argue how Motivational Interviewing (MI – an interaction-approach to facilitate behavior change – might be helpful in dealing with this behavior. We transfer MI to interactions about energy-savings in organizations and demonstrate how qualification in MI for energy managers may affect these interactions. Therefore, we present three short case scenarios (i.e., video vignettes that demonstrate socio-interactional mechanisms underlying energy-relevant decisions and behaviors. Consumer’ verbal responses are graphed as one single time-variant index of readiness versus resistance (R-index in order to illustrate interactional dynamics. In sum, we combine theoretical and empirical perspectives from multiple disciplines and discuss an innovative socio-interaction approach that may facilitate energy-efficient behavior in organizations.

  17. Talking with consumers about energy reductions: recommendations from a motivational interviewing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonek, Florian E; Kauffeld, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of energy costs has become a concern for many organizations. First, we review energy-saving studies in organizations in which consumers showed resistance to change their behavior. Second, we relate resistance to change to the psycholinguistic construct "sustain talk" that describes verbal arguments against behavior change (e.g., "Work processes have priority here"). Third, we argue how Motivational Interviewing (MI)-an interaction-approach to facilitate behavior change-might be helpful in dealing with this behavior. We transfer MI to interactions about energy-savings in organizations and demonstrate how qualification in MI for energy managers may affect these interactions. Therefore, we present three short case scenarios (i.e., video vignettes) that demonstrate socio-interactional mechanisms underlying energy-relevant decisions and behaviors. Consumer' verbal responses are graphed as one single time-variant index of readiness versus resistance (R-index) in order to illustrate interactional dynamics. In sum, we combine theoretical and empirical perspectives from multiple disciplines and discuss an innovative socio-interaction approach that may facilitate energy-efficient behavior in organizations.

  18. New business models of green energy supply on the energy market with the effects of reduction of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozdanic, I.; Pokrovac, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, new business models for renewables, which found their way to market competitiveness and which become more present on energy markets in EU will be shown. This transition, beside transition to ecological and, in the long-term, more sustainable production of energy , brought another change which has far more importance for society. New business models for investments in renewables which bring energy industry closer to citizens are being developed. Entrepreneurs, energy cooperatives and public grouped in various forms of associations in Germany own over 50 percent of renewables. Such investment models are important for society because of the development of more sustainable and just society in which citizens are included in production of electricity. Also, through these models, price of electricity is lower for end users. Besides direct collective fund investments from citizens, these types of projects are financially supported through financial instruments of the EU, but also through special bank types, such as environmental and ethical banks. These business models are long-term acceptable because of increasing involvement of renewables which results in reduction of CO2. In this paper, european models and possible models which could be used in Croatia are shown. (author).

  19. Combination of aquifer thermal energy storage and enhanced bioremediation: resilience of reductive dechlorination to redox changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhuobiao; van Gaans, Pauline; Smit, Martijn; Rijnaarts, Huub; Grotenhuis, Tim

    2016-04-01

    To meet the demand for sustainable energy, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is widely used in the subsurface in urban areas. However, contamination of groundwater, especially with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), is often being encountered. This is commonly seen as an impediment to ATES implementation, although more recently, combining ATES and enhanced bioremediation of CVOCs has been proposed. Issues to be addressed are the high water flow velocities and potential periodic redox fluctuation that accompany ATES. A column study was performed, at a high water flow velocity of 2 m/h, simulating possible changes in subsurface redox conditions due to ATES operation by serial additions of lactate and nitrate. The impacts of redox changes on reductive dechlorination as well as the microbial response of Dehalococcoides (DHC) were evaluated. The results showed that, upon lactate addition, reductive dechlorination proceeded well and complete dechlorination from cis-DCE to ethene was achieved. Upon subsequent nitrate addition, reductive dechlorination immediately ceased. Disruption of microorganisms' retention was also immediate and possibly detached DHC which preferred attaching to the soil matrix under biostimulation conditions. Initially, recovery of dechlorination was possible but required bioaugmentation and nutrient amendment in addition to lactate dosing. Repeated interruption of dechlorination and DHC activity by nitrate dosing appeared to be less easily reversible requiring more efforts for regenerating dechlorination. Overall, our results indicate that the microbial resilience of DHC in biosimulated ATES conditions is sensitive to redox fluctuations. Hence, combining ATES with bioremediation requires dedicated operation and monitoring on the aquifer geochemical conditions.

  20. The evaluation of breast tissues removed during reductive mammaplasty with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzo, Antonino; Gravante, Gianpiero; Sorge, Roberto; Nicoli, Fabio; Caruso, Riccardo; Araco, Antonino; Servidio, Michele; Orlandi, Augusto; Cervelli, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a case-control study in which patients were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) before and after breast reduction surgery, and results were correlated with the histological examination. Our goal was to confirm the DEXA as a precise technique for the measurement of breast composition, in order to propose it for the preoperative evaluation of plastic surgery patients. Materials and methods: We prospectively recruited all women that underwent reduction mammaplasty and excluded patients with contraindications to the operation or those that previously underwent bariatric surgery to reduce their weight. Patients were evaluated with DEXA 1 week before and after surgery. Results: From February to October 2006 we recruited 25 patients. The statistical analysis found a significant reduction of weight, BMI, regional fat free mass and fat mass after the operation. The comparison between DEXA and the histological analysis produced a correlation r = 0.989 (r 2 = 0.978), with a predictivity of 98% and a percentage of error 8.3% (95% confidence intervals -252.6, 273.7; 95% limits of agreements of Bland and Altman -436.0, 457.1). Similar results were obtained with the analysis of fat. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that conventional segmental DEXA is a very precise technique to measure the amount of tissue removed in breast reductions and could open future application in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing such operations.

  1. The evaluation of breast tissues removed during reductive mammaplasty with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lorenzo, Antonino [Division of Human Nutrition, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Gravante, Gianpiero [Division of Human Nutrition, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Department of Surgery, Whipps Cross University Hospital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ggravante@hotmail.com; Sorge, Roberto [Laboratory of Biometry, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Nicoli, Fabio; Caruso, Riccardo; Araco, Antonino [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Servidio, Michele [Division of Human Nutrition, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Orlandi, Augusto [Department of Biopathology, Anatomic Pathology Institute, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy); Cervelli, Valerio [Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Tor Vergata in Rome (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: We conducted a case-control study in which patients were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) before and after breast reduction surgery, and results were correlated with the histological examination. Our goal was to confirm the DEXA as a precise technique for the measurement of breast composition, in order to propose it for the preoperative evaluation of plastic surgery patients. Materials and methods: We prospectively recruited all women that underwent reduction mammaplasty and excluded patients with contraindications to the operation or those that previously underwent bariatric surgery to reduce their weight. Patients were evaluated with DEXA 1 week before and after surgery. Results: From February to October 2006 we recruited 25 patients. The statistical analysis found a significant reduction of weight, BMI, regional fat free mass and fat mass after the operation. The comparison between DEXA and the histological analysis produced a correlation r = 0.989 (r{sup 2} = 0.978), with a predictivity of 98% and a percentage of error 8.3% (95% confidence intervals -252.6, 273.7; 95% limits of agreements of Bland and Altman -436.0, 457.1). Similar results were obtained with the analysis of fat. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that conventional segmental DEXA is a very precise technique to measure the amount of tissue removed in breast reductions and could open future application in the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing such operations.

  2. Reduction of lighting energy consumption in office buildings through improved daylight design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadouri, Maria Violeta Prado

    This study aims to investigate the lighting energy consumption in office buildings and the options for its reduction. One way to reduce lighting energy consumption is by improving the daylight design. A better use of daylight in buildings might be an outcome from the effort made in different directions. Like the improvement of a building's fabric and layout, the materials, even the furniture in a space influences the daylight quality considerably. Also very important role in lighting energy consumption has the development of more efficient lighting technology like the electric lighting control systems, such as photo sensors and occupancy sensors. Both systems are responsible so that the electric light is not used without reason. As the focusing area of this study, is to find ways to improve the daylight use in buildings, a consequent question is which are the methods provided in order to achieve this The accuracy of the methodology used is also an important issue in order to achieve reliable results. The methodology applied in this study includes the analysis of a case study by taking field measurements and computer simulations. The first stage included gathering information about the lighting design of the building and monitoring the light levels, both from natural and from the electric lighting. The second stage involved testing with computer simulations, different parameters that were expected to improve the daylight exploitation of the specific area. The results of the field measurements showed that the main problems of the space were the low natural light levels and the poor daylight distribution. The annual electric lighting energy consumption, as it was calculated with the use of computer simulations, represented the annual energy consumption of a typical air-conditioned prestige office building (energy consumption guide 19, for energy use in offices, 2000). After several computer simulations, the results showed that initial design parameters of the building

  3. Energy reduction using multi-channels optical wireless communication based OFDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwesh, Laialy; Arnon, Shlomi

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of data center networks (DCNs) have been built to provide various cloud applications. Major challenges in the design of next generation DC networks include reduction of the energy consumption, high flexibility and scalability, high data rates, minimum latency and high cyber security. Use of optical wireless communication (OWC) to augment the DC network could help to confront some of these challenges. In this paper we present an OWC multi channels communication method that could lead to significant energy reduction of the communication equipment. The method is to convert a high speed serial data stream to many slower and parallel streams and vies versa at the receiver. We implement this concept of multi channels using optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (O-OFDM) method. In our scheme, we use asymmetrically clipped optical OFDM (ACO-OFDM). Our results show that the realization of multi channels OFDM (ACO-OFDM) methods reduces the total energy consumption exponentially, as the number of channels transmitted through them rises.

  4. Use experiences of MCNP in nuclear energy study. 2. Review of variance reduction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [eds.

    1998-03-01

    `MCNP Use Experience` Working Group was established in 1996 under the Special Committee on Nuclear Code Evaluation. This year`s main activity of the working group has been focused on the review of variance reduction techniques of Monte Carlo calculations. This working group dealt with the variance reduction techniques of (1) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of fusion reactor system, (2) concept design of nuclear transmutation system using accelerator, (3) JMTR core calculation, (4) calculation of prompt neutron decay constant, (5) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation for exposure evaluation, (6) neutron and gamma ray transport calculation of shielding system, etc. Furthermore, this working group started an activity to compile `Guideline of Monte Carlo Calculation` which will be a standard in the future. The appendices of this report include this `Guideline`, the use experience of MCNP 4B and examples of Monte Carlo calculations of high energy charged particles. The 11 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  5. Turbulent Mixing and Flow Resistance over Dunes and Scours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Arfaie, A.; Burns, A. D.; Eggenhuisen, J. T.; Ingham, D. B.; McCaffrey, W. D.

    2014-12-01

    Flows in both submarine and fluvial channels are subject to lower boundary roughness. Lower boundary roughness occurs as frictional roughness suffered by the flow as it moves over the bed (skin friction) or drag suffered by the flow as it moves past a large obstacle (form drag). Critically, to overcome such roughness the flow must expend (lose) energy and momentum. However, whilst overcoming bed roughness the degree of turbulent mixing in the flow may be enhanced increasing the potential energy of the flow. This is of key importance to density driven flows as the balance between kinetic energy lost and potential energy gained (through turbulent diffusion of suspended particulate material) may critically affect the criterion for autosuspension. Moreover, this effect of lower boundary roughness may go as far as helping to explain why, even on shallow slopes, channelized submarine density currents can run out over ultra long distances. Such effects are also important in fluvial systems, where they will be responsible for maximizing or minimizing sediment capacity and competence in different flow environments. Numerical simulations are performed at a high Reynolds number (O (106)) for a series of crestal length to height ratio (c/h) at a fixed width to height ratio (w/h). Here, we present key findings of shear flow over a range of idealized bedform shapes. We show how the total basal shear stress is split into skin friction and form drag and identify how the respective magnitudes vary as a function of bedform shape and scale. Moreover we demonstrate how said bedforms affect the balance of energy lost (frictional) and energy gained (turbulent mixing). Overall, results demonstrate a slow reduction in turbulent mixing and flow resistance with decreasing bedform side slope angle. This suggests that both capacity and competence of the flow may be reduced through decrease in of the potential energy of the flow as a result of change in slope angles.

  6. Effects of sodium restriction and energy reduction on erythrocyte sodium transport in obese hypertensive men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlitz, H; Fagerberg, B; Jonsson, O; Hedner, T; Andersson, O K; Aurell, M

    1988-01-01

    Twelve moderately obese middle-aged male out-patients with untreated mild hypertension reduced their sodium intake by about 120 mmol/day during 4-6 weeks. The low sodium diet period was followed by a period of energy reduction as well as sodium restriction for 15 weeks. Mean body mass was then reduced by 7.5 +/- 1.0 kg. Intraerythrocyte sodium (IeNa), sodium influx (Na-influx) and sodium efflux rate constant (Na-efflux rate), were measured before intervention, during salt restriction and during salt and energy restriction. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and urinary excretion of aldosterone (U-Aldo) and noradrenaline (U-NA) were also determined during the three observation periods. During sodium restriction there was a significant increase in PRA and U-Aldo, but no change was seen in IeNa, Na-influx or Na-efflux rate constant. During sodium restriction there was a significant positive correlation between PRA and both Na-influx and Na-efflux rate constant. When energy reduction was combined with sodium restriction, PRA and U-NA both diminished significantly. Na-influx and Na-efflux rate also exhibited a significant decrease while IeNa did not change. Sodium restriction caused a significant fall in mean arterial blood pressure and a tendency to a further decrease was seen when energy intake was also reduced. No significant correlation could be found between the fall in blood pressure and changes in cellular sodium transport. These data indicate that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic activity influence the regulation of erythrocyte sodium turnover during sodium and energy restriction in obese hypertensive men.

  7. Mathematical model for the calculation of internal turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolau, V. de P.; Valle Pereira Filho, H. do

    1981-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes and the turbulent kinetic energy equations for the incompressible, turbulent and fully developed pipe flow, were solved by a finite difference procedure. The distributions of the mean velocity, turbulent shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy were obtained at different Reynolds numbers. Those numerical results were compared with experimental data and the agreement was good in whole cross section of the flow. (Author) [pt

  8. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...... resolved turbulence immediately upstream of the region or structure of interest. Comparing to the alternative of imposing the turbulence at the inlet, there is a large potential to reduce the computational cost of the simulation by reducing the total number of cells. The reduction comes from a lower demand...... of modifying the source terms. None of the two methods can impose synthetic turbulence with good results, but it is shown that by running the turbulence field through a short precursor simulation, very good results are obtained. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  9. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The open-quotes vortex stringsclose quotes scale l s ∼ LRe -3/10 (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES)

  10. Sonic boom propagation through atmospheric turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru; 山下, 博; 大林, 茂

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the homogeneous atmospheric turbulence on the sonic boom propagation has been investigated. The turbulence field is represented by a finite sum of discrete Fourier modes based on the von Karman and Pao energy spectrum. The sonic boom signature is calculated by the modified Waveform Parameter Method, considering the turbulent velocities. The results show that in 59 % of the cases, the intensity of the sonic boom had decreased, and in other 41 % of the cases had increased the soni...

  11. Discussions on switching mechanism for ultimate reduction in energy consumption for STT-MRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, H.; Shimomura, N.

    2016-10-01

    Critical switching current, ICsw, of STT (Spin Transfer Torque)-MRAM has been reduced by several orders with PMA (Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy)-MTJs and the state-of-the-art writing-charge, Qw, becomes the order of 100fC. With the small Qw, MRAM starts to save energy consumption even for mobile applications. The key to the Qw reduction is a development of MTJs having higher writing-efficiency. Especially coherent switching of storage-layer magnetization was found to be the root key to the high efficiency.

  12. Deployment of Behind-The-Meter Energy Storage for Demand Charge Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Simpson, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how economically motivated customers will use energy storage for demand charge reduction, as well as how this changes in the presence of on-site photovoltaic power generation, to investigate the possible effects of incentivizing increased quantities of behind-the-meter storage. It finds that small, short-duration batteries are most cost effective regardless of solar power levels, serving to reduce short load spikes on the order of 2.5% of peak demand. While profitable to the customer, such action is unlikely to adequately benefit the utility as may be desired, thus highlighting the need for modified utility rate structures or properly structured incentives.

  13. CO2 emissions reduction using energy conservation measures: EPA Region IV's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berish, C.; Day, R.; Sibold, K.; Tiller, J.

    1994-01-01

    EPA Region 4 concluded in a recent comparative environmental risk evaluation that global climate change could substantially impact the Southeast. To address this risk, Region 4 developed an action plan to promote cost-effective pollution prevention and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, The regional plan contains programs that aye specific to Region 4 as well as geographic components of the national Climate Change Action Plan. Sources of carbon dioxide emissions were targeted for pollution prevention based on an energy model that allows the user to create energy efficiency scenarios in four sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation. Activities were selected using the modeled information on sector reduction potentials and resource and cost-effectiveness criteria. Given the high level of uncertainty associated with climate change projections, the programs developed are all cost effective, prevent pollution and/or result in sound adaptation policies. Currently, policy makers at national, regional, and local levels are deciding on what types of energy efficiency programs to implement. The region's action plan is composed of several programs and approaches. The authors have developed implemented, and/or participated in the following: energy scenario model. EARTHWALK (residential energy conservation); energy conservation in affordable homes (new residences); Cool Communities Program (strategic tree planting and light colored surfaces); EPA's Green Lights Program; WAVE (water conservation), the Plant Protection Center; QUEST TO SAVE THE EARTH (outreach tools); energy and water use planning for the 1996 Olympic Games, and planning for sea-level rise. Reviewing the practices of the above programs will be the focus of this paper

  14. A comprehensive analysis of China's regional energy saving and emission reduction efficiency: From production and treatment perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jie; Lv, Lin; Sun, Jiasen; Ji, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Energy and environmental issues have recently aroused increasing interest in China and many approaches are used to evaluate energy and environmental performance. In this paper, a two-stage network DEA framework is applied to evaluate the efficiency of energy saving and emission reduction in China during the period of the eleventh five-year plan, from 2006 to 2010. In this study, economic activities are divided into production and treatment processes. This is different from previous research which generally focused on either environmental efficiency or energy efficiency, omitting the integration of energy and environmental measures. Today, energy saving and emission reduction are both parts of the basic state policy of China and are equally important. The empirical results in this study show that: (i) eastern China has the best energy saving and emission reduction efficiency, performing is better than western and central China. (ii) The efficiency of the production process in central China is better than that in western China while the western area performs better than the central area in term of treatment efficiency. (iii) Integrated efficiency of energy saving and emission reduction of China was relatively stable in the five years and the pollution treatment efficiency maintained a rising trend. -- Highlights: •We measured China's regional energy saving and emission reduction efficiency using two-stage DEA approach. •The production and treatment processes are incorporated in evaluation. •Eastern China performs best in terms of energy saving and emission reduction efficiency. •Integrated efficiency of energy saving and emission reduction of China kept a stable trend during 2006–2010

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on viscosity reduction of cereal porridges for improving energy density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju-Woon [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjwlee@kaeri.re.kr; Kim, Jae-Hun; Oh, Sang-Hee; Byun, Eui-Hong [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Mee-Ree [Department of Food and Nutrition, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwan-Soo [Research and Development Department, Greenpia Technology, Yeoju 469-811 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mwbyun@kaeri.re.kr

    2008-03-15

    Cereal porridges have low energy and nutrient density because of its viscosity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the reduction of viscosity and on the increasing solid content of cereal porridge. Four cereals, wheat, rice, maize (the normal starchy type) and waxy rice, were used in this study. The porridge with 3000 cP was individually prepared from cereal flour, gamma-irradiated at 20 kGy and tested. Gamma irradiation of 20 kGy was allowed that the high viscous and rigid cereal porridges turned into semi-liquid consistencies. The solid contents of all porridges could increase by irradiation, compared with non-irradiated ones. No significant differences of starch digestibility were observed in all cereal porridge samples. The results indicated that gamma irradiation might be helpful for improving energy density of cereal porridge with acceptable consistency.

  16. Energy in the Netherlands. Optimized pathways to CO2 reduction in the Dutch context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-15

    This document reports the findings of research undertaken by the Energy Forum NL (EFNL) which consists of companies active in different parts of the energy sector. The group strives for a more long-term, stable energy policy and investment climate in the Netherlands, one that will help realize overall climate ambitions. This report is part of the group's contribution to the energy debate in the Netherlands; it lays out a fact-based, objective analysis of the potential energy mix if one assumes a continued focus on carbon abatement. In this report, the Energy Forum NL provides pathways that show how the Netherlands can best contribute to the EU target of 80% CO2e emission reduction by 2050 compared to 1990. They particularly focus on the goal for the next 20 years: reducing CO2e emissions by 40% by 2030 compared to 1990. The Forum selected 40% as a midway target for 80% in 2050; this falls within the EU ambition of 40%-44% in 2030.1 The period beyond 2030, which is much more uncertain, is modeled in less detail. However, the Forum took care to not let the choice of any pathway during 2010-2030 lock a pathway after 2030 in or out. A 'least cost' approach, which works across sectors, is used to reduce emissions. In a 'least cost' approach, all emission reduction measures are ranked on costs and implemented progressively (starting from the cheapest) until the targeted abatement level is reached. In addition, a few developing technologies are implemented even if they are more expensive than alternatives. This choice prevents technology lock-in, ensures a more versatile, resilient energy system and provides a reasonable starting position for the period post-2030. The report assumes a pan-European approach for the power sector, which is the key sector in the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS); in this case, Dutch abatement options 'compete' with those in other EU countries. For the other sectors it uses a national approach. Non-cost factors

  17. Graphical Turbulence Guidance - Composite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Forecast turbulence hazards identified by the Graphical Turbulence Guidance algorithm. The Graphical Turbulence Guidance product depicts mid-level and upper-level...

  18. Willingness to engage in energy conservation and CO2 emissions reduction: An empirical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eluwa, S E; Siong, H C

    2014-01-01

    Africa's response to climate change has largely been focused on adaptation rather than mitigation. The reason for this is based on the fact that the continent contributes very little to global CO 2 emission. Again, mitigation policies like carbon tax as being practised in developed countries may be costly and difficult to implement in a continent where most economies are fragile. Using behavioural change as an adaptation approach, we examined the opinion of Ibadan city residents towards energy conservation and CO 2 emissions reduction. A total of 822 respondents were sampled across the three residential neighbourhoods of the city. Results from the study showed that female and male respondents differed in their opinion towards energy conservation. However, the female respondents tended to record higher mean scores on majority of the items used to capture energy conservation behaviour than their male counterparts. Also, those with higher level of education seemed to be more conscious of the environmental consequences arising from energy use at home than those with lower educational background. However, very slight variations were recorded in the mean value score across the different age groups, those respondents above 50 years scored a bit higher than other age groups

  19. Comparison of Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential through Renewable Energy Transition in South Korea and Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Maennel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Germany and South Korea are the world’s sixth and seventh largest emitters of greenhouse gases, respectively; their main sources of pollution being fossil-fueled power plants. Since both countries signed the Paris Agreement in 2016, renewable energy transition is emerging as an effective means and method for avoiding air pollutant emissions and for replacing old fossil-fueled power plants. This paper attempts to evaluate—by using a grid emission factor dependent on a series of energy mix scenarios—the potential for South Korea and Germany to reduce their air pollutants (CO2, NOx, SOx, PM (particulate matter until 2030. South Korea plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by increasing nuclear power, while Germany aims to do so by shutting down its nuclear power plants and expanding the proportion of renewable energy in the energy mix to over 50%. Therefore, both countries are able to achieve their voluntary greenhouse gas reduction targets in the power sector. However, since the uncertainty of the CO2 emission factor of coal power plants in South Korea is as high as 10%, efforts to reduce that uncertainty are required in order to produce a reliable assessment of the avoided emissions.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  1. Introduction to cost-effectiveness analysis of risk reduction measures in energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    The aim of this report is to introduce readers to methods of cost-effectiveness analysis and their application in risk reduction, especially in connection with the energy-producing industries. The background to the assessment of risk and the problems in estimating it quantitatively are outlined. The methodology of cost-effectiveness analysis is then described, particular attention being given to the way in which results are derived and the overall use that can be made of them. This is followed by a discussion of quantitative applications and an outline of the methods that may be used to derive estimates both of risk and the cost of reducing it. The use of cost-effectiveness analysis is illustrated in an appendix, which gives as a worked example a case study on the reduction of public risk associated with radioactive releases during normal operation of a PWR. After drawing some general conclusions the report recommends that such analyses should normally be used as an aid to risk management whenever several alternative risk reduction measures are under consideration

  2. Energy consumption reduction in existing HVAC-R systems via a power law controlling kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnola, C.F.; Vargas, J.V.C.; Buiar, C.L.; Ordonez, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative solution for reducing energy consumption in heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC-R) systems. For that, an existing typical commercial refrigeration system was equipped with a novel control system based on a power law, using a frequency inverter and a programmable logic controller (PLC). Hence, it was possible to compare the operation and energy consumption of the system with the power law control and with the on-off system, quantifying the obtained gains. The experimental unit consisted of a cooling chamber, an enclosing chamber (antechamber), and a vapor compression refrigeration system, i.e., an example of a practical commercial cooling system. A set of graphs shows the experimental measurements performed with the two systems. In this way, the measured temperatures in some selected points of the two systems, as well as the consumption in kWh for a period of 6 h and 10 min were compared in the tests. The main conclusions of this work are: i) The system operating with the power law control with respect to the conventional on-off control, showed energy consumption savings of up to 31% in a test period of 6 h and 10 min, and ii) The system compressor cycling frequency in the system operating with the power law control is smaller than with the traditional on-off system. Therefore, the study shows that the developed power law control kit has potential to be installed in any existing system with immediate significant energy savings with no need for HVAC-R hardware changes. - Highlights: • An energy consumption reduction strategy for HVAC-R systems is presented. • Power law and on-off control actions are experimentally compared. • Energy savings of 31% were obtained with power law control. • Compressor cycling frequency is smaller with power law control. • Power law control kit has potential to be installed in any existing system

  3. ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE, ENERGY CONSERVATION, AND EMISSION REDUCTION IN THE FINANCIAL PROSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHOIRUL ANWAR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the effect of environmental disclosure to financial performance (quantitative case study of company listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange in the year 2008. Empirical result of this study furthermore is being extended by qualitative research for exploring more deeply about implementation of green gas houses in Indonesia trough energy audit. The quantitative research in this study is based on cross-sectional empirical applied research. Through a purposive judgment sampling technique, 31 companies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange which also participated in PROPER (environmental program held by Indonesian Ministry of Environment were included in this study. The first hypothesis is asserted as there is significant effect between environmental performance and financial performance. The second hypothesis is asserted as there is significant effect between environmental disclosure and financial performance. The method of data analysis is multiple linear regressions. The results for both first and second hypotheses indicated that environmental performance and disclosure were significantly affecting financial performance. Further qualitative study in this article extends empirical result of above study. This study discusses about energy conservation and emission reduction in 16 steel industries and 5 pulp and paper industries. Based on result of audit energy that is converted to economical measurement, this study came up with the conclusion that many industries are still extravagant in consuming energy due to inefficient of old equipment process and lack of energy flow Metter measurement. By showing the comparison results of energy consumption in old and new equipment process that are converted to economical measurement, this study recommends to use new machinery for industrial life cycle to support green gas houses program.

  4. Air pollution reduction via use of green energy sources for electricity and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    The implementation of renewable wind and solar energy sources instead of fossil fuels to produce such energy carriers as electricity and hydrogen facilitates reductions in air pollution emissions. Unlike from traditional fossil fuel technologies, air pollution emissions from renewable technologies are associated mainly with the construction of facilities. With present costs of wind and solar electricity, it is shown that, when electricity from renewable sources replaces electricity from natural gas, the cost of air pollution emission abatement is more than ten times less than the cost if hydrogen from renewable sources replaces hydrogen produced from natural gas. When renewable-based hydrogen is used instead of gasoline in a fuel cell vehicle, the cost of air pollution emissions reduction approaches the same value as for renewable-based electricity only if the fuel cell vehicle efficiency exceeds significantly (i.e., by about two times) that of an internal combustion vehicle. The results provide the basis for a useful approach to an optimal strategy for air pollution mitigation.

  5. Reduction of energy intake using just-in-time feedback from a wearable sensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Muhammad; McCrory, Megan A; Sazonov, Edward

    2017-04-01

    This work explored the potential use of a wearable sensor system for providing just-in-time (JIT) feedback on the progression of a meal and tested its ability to reduce the total food mass intake. Eighteen participants consumed three meals each in a lab while monitored by a wearable sensor system capable of accurately tracking chew counts. The baseline visit was used to establish the self-determined ingested mass and the associated chew counts. Real-time feedback on chew counts was provided in the next two visits, during which the target chew count was either the same as that at baseline or the baseline chew count reduced by 25% (in randomized order). The target was concealed from the participant and from the experimenter. Nonparametric repeated-measures ANOVAs were performed to compare mass of intake, meal duration, and ratings of hunger, appetite, and thirst across three meals. JIT feedback targeting a 25% reduction in chew counts resulted in a reduction in mass and energy intake without affecting perceived hunger or fullness. JIT feedback on chewing behavior may reduce intake within a meal. This system can be further used to help develop individualized strategies to provide JIT adaptive interventions for reducing energy intake. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  6. Low-dimensional, free-energy landscapes of protein-folding reactions by nonlinear dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Payel; Moll, Mark; Stamati, Hernán; Kavraki, Lydia E.; Clementi, Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    The definition of reaction coordinates for the characterization of a protein-folding reaction has long been a controversial issue, even for the "simple" case in which one single free-energy barrier separates the folded and unfolded ensemble. We propose a general approach to this problem to obtain a few collective coordinates by using nonlinear dimensionality reduction. We validate the usefulness of this method by characterizing the folding landscape associated with a coarse-grained protein model of src homology 3 as sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The folding free-energy landscape projected on the few relevant coordinates emerging from the dimensionality reduction can correctly identify the transition-state ensemble of the reaction. The first embedding dimension efficiently captures the evolution of the folding process along the main folding route. These results clearly show that the proposed method can efficiently find a low-dimensional representation of a complex process such as protein folding. reaction coordinate | transition state | manifold | embedding | ISOMAP

  7. NASA's Vision for Potential Energy Reduction from Future Generations of Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Through a robust partnership with the aviation industry, over the past 50 years NASA programs have helped foster advances in propulsion technology that enabled substantial reductions in fuel consumption for commercial transports. Emerging global trends and continuing environmental concerns are creating challenges that will very likely transform the face of aviation over the next 20-40 years. In recognition of this development, NASA Aeronautics has established a set of Research Thrusts that will help define the future direction of the agency's research technology efforts. Two of these thrusts, Ultra-Efficient Commercial Vehicles and Transition to Low-Carbon Propulsion, serve as cornerstones for the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) project. The AATT project is exploring and developing high-payoff technologies and concepts that are key to continued improvement in energy efficiency and environmental compatibility for future generations of fixed-wing, subsonic transports. The AATT project is primarily focused on the N+3 timeframe, or 3 generations from current technology levels. As should be expected, many of the propulsion system architectures technologies envisioned for N+3 vary significantly from todays engines. The use of batteries in a hybrid-electric configuration or deploying multiple fans distributed across the airframe to enable higher bypass ratios are just two examples of potential advances that could enable substantial energy reductions over current propulsion systems.

  8. Quantifying non-energy benefits of a carbon reduction initiative for a glassware company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoughb-y, Sheri (World Wildlife Fund (United States)); Guo, Stephan (IKEA Trading (Hongkong) Ltd. (China)); Dahlgren, Maja (IKEA Trading Services Sp. z o.o. (Poland)); Schaefer, Thomas (IKEA of Sweden (Sweden)); Jia, Hongming (Hongwei Glassware Co. Ltd. (China))

    2011-07-01

    A glassware company in Yuncheng, China, which supplies to IKEA, upgraded its furnaces and switched the fuel source from coal to natural gas as a participant in an IKEA and WWF-led carbon reduction project. In addition to reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 35 % (approx7,000 tons CO{sub 2}e) between 2009 and 2010, the company realized numerous non-energy benefits (NEBs) which improved the business case for their investment. While many NEBs can be difficult to quantify, the company calculated that improvements in product quality related to switching the pot furnaces from coal to natural gas directly reduced cost of products by 17 %. This cost reduction was realized from two primary NEBs: 1. Rate of available material: For one product, improved temperature stability in the natural gas furnace increased the output rate from 1,200 to 1,350 pieces, reducing each product's cost 12.5 %. 2. Improvement of qualified rate (non-rejects): For another product output increased from 900 to 1,050 pieces and the qualified rate increased from 75 to 80 percent. This gain was also due to increased temperature stability in the natural gas furnace which made the melted color and the material quality more stable. This resulted in a cost reduction of 5 % compared to the daily output from the coal furnace. While the glassware company had not yet broke even on its investment in the first year, the management had a very favourable view on this project due to the NEBs listed above as well as increased labor productivity due to improved working conditions (cleaner and cooler) and reduced risk of fines due to environmental regulation of coal. If a source of biogas could be secured, further carbon reductions could be realized while maintaining the NEBs achieved by switching to natural gas. This paper will further examine these and other non-energy benefits realized by the glassware company through the IKEA-WWF carbon reduction project

  9. Energy and households : the acceptance of energy reduction options in relation to the performance and organisation of household activities = De acceptatie van energie reductieopties in relatie tot de uitvoering en organisatie van huishoudelijke activiteiten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitdenbogerd, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    Changes in demand-side consumption structures are expected to be supportive in achieving long-term national energy reduction targets. Energy requirement can be distinguished in direct energy consumption through energy carriers, such as electricity and gas, and in indirect energy consumption used for

  10. Low-temperature aluminum reduction of graphene oxide, electrical properties, surface wettability, and energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Dongyun; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Tang, Yufeng; Zhou, Mi; Zhong, Yajuan; Huang, Fuqiang; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-10-23

    Low-temperature aluminum (Al) reduction is first introduced to reduce graphene oxide (GO) at 100-200 °C in a two-zone furnace. The melted Al metal exhibits an excellent deoxygen ability to produce well-crystallized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) papers with a low O/C ratio of 0.058 (Al-RGO), compared with 0.201 in the thermally reduced one (T-RGO). The Al-RGO papers possess outstanding mechanical flexibility and extremely high electrical conductivities (sheet resistance R(s) ~ 1.75 Ω/sq), compared with 20.12 Ω/sq of T-RGO. More interestingly, very nice hydrophobic nature (90.5°) was observed, significantly superior to the reported chemically or thermally reduced papers. These enhanced properties are attributed to the low oxygen content in the RGO papers. During the aluminum reduction, highly active H atoms from H(2)O reacted with melted Al promise an efficient oxygen removal. This method was also applicable to reduce graphene oxide foams, which were used in the GO/SA (stearic acid) composite as a highly thermally conductive reservoir to hold the phase change material for thermal energy storage. The Al-reduced RGO/SnS(2) composites were further used in an anode material of lithium ion batteries possessing a higher specific capacity. Overall, low-temperature Al reduction is an effective method to prepare highly conductive RGO papers and related composites for flexible energy conversion and storage device applications.

  11. Energy-related CO2 emission in European Union agriculture: Driving forces and possibilities for reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tianxiang; Baležentis, Tomas; Makutėnienė, Daiva; Streimikiene, Dalia; Kriščiukaitienė, Irena

    2016-01-01

    behind declines in CO 2 emission. According to the SBM, the lowest carbon shadow prices are observed in France, Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Poland, and Belgium. These countries thus have the highest potential for reduction in CO 2 emission. The results imply that measures to increase energy efficiency are a more effective means to reduce CO 2 emissions than are changes in the fuel-mix.

  12. Measurements of local chemistry and structure in Ni(O)-YSZ composites during reduction using energy-filtered environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeangros, Quentin; Hansen, Thomas W; Wagner, Jakob B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Hébert, Cécile; Van Herle, Jan; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha

    2014-02-21

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy images are acquired during the reduction of a NiO-YSZ composite in H2 up to 600 °C. Temperature-resolved quantitative information about both chemistry and structure is extracted with nm spatial resolution from the data, paving the way for the development of detailed reduction models.

  13. When renewable energy met sustainable growth. Regulation, cost reduction, and the rise of renewable energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Historically and famously fossil-fuel dependent, the U.S. energy and electricity mixes are evolving quickly as costs fall for renewables, regulations mandate their implementation, and fiscal policy incentivizes their installation. The investment and production tax credits (ITC and PTC) as well as power purchase agreements (PPAs) are well-known for their contributions to the development of solar and wind capacity, and the recent extensions of these credits has led to a positive outlook for continued growth in installations and generation. In addition, the green power market is experiencing record participation, as tracking the positive environmental externalities of renewable power has become important to meet renewable portfolio standards, which mandate implementation of renewable energy by state. Cost reduction is further taking place globally due to technological advances and economies of scale, which serves as another key driver for development. Of course, challenges are still present, particularly due to a plentiful and inexpensive domestic fossil fuel supply, uneven application of regulation and incentives state-by-state, and the uncertainty of continued political support. Even so, a progressive lowering of traditional barriers is leading to the potential for widespread deployment of renewables across the American landscape. (author)

  14. Anisotropy of turbulence in wind turbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Elvira, Rafael [Comision Nacional de Energia (Spain); Crespo, Antonio; Migoya, Emilio; Manuel, Fernando [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Julio [Departamento de Mecanica, ETSII, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of non-isotropic characteristics of turbulence in wind turbine wakes, specifically the shear layer of the near wake. A calculation method based on an explicit algebraic model for the components of the turbulent stress tensor is proposed, and the results are found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. Analytical expressions for the estimation of an upper limit of the global turbulence kinetic energy, k, and the individual contributions of each diagonal term in the turbulent stress tensor are proposed. Their predictions are compared with experimental results.

  15. Turbulence modification and multiphase turbulence transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, D.C.; Kataoka, I.; Serizawa, A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown here that in the derivation of turbulence transport models for multiphase flows, terms naturally appear that can be interpreted as related to turbulence modification of one field by the other. We obtain two such terms, one suggesting turbulence enhancement due to instabilities in two-phase flow, the second one showing turbulence damping due to the presence of the other field, both in gas-particle and gas-liquid cases

  16. Architectural and compiler techniques for energy reduction in high-performance microprocessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellas, Nikolaos

    1999-11-01

    The microprocessor industry has started viewing power, along with area and performance, as a decisive design factor in today's microprocessors. The increasing cost of packaging and cooling systems poses stringent requirements on the maximum allowable power dissipation. Most of the research in recent years has focused on the circuit, gate, and register-transfer (RT) levels of the design. In this research, we focus on the software running on a microprocessor and we view the program as a power consumer. Our work concentrates on the role of the compiler in the construction of "power-efficient" code, and especially its interaction with the hardware so that unnecessary processor activity is saved. We propose techniques that use extra hardware features and compiler-driven code transformations that specifically target activity reduction in certain parts of the CPU which are known to be large power and energy consumers. Design for low power/energy at this level of abstraction entails larger energy gains than in the lower stages of the design hierarchy in which the design team has already made the most important design commitments. The role of the compiler in generating code which exploits the processor organization is also fundamental in energy minimization. Hence, we propose a hardware/software co-design paradigm, and we show what code transformations are necessary by the compiler so that "wasted" power in a modern microprocessor can be trimmed. More specifically, we propose a technique that uses an additional mini cache located between the instruction cache (I-Cache) and the CPU core; the mini cache buffers instructions that are nested within loops and are continuously fetched from the I-Cache. This mechanism can create very substantial energy savings, since the I-Cache unit is one of the main power consumers in most of today's high-performance microprocessors. Results are reported for the SPEC95 benchmarks in the R-4400 processor which implements the MIPS2 instruction

  17. Achieving Realistic Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions in U.S. Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhurst, Michael F.

    2011-12-01

    In recognizing that energy markets and greenhouse gas emissions are significantly influences by local factors, this research examines opportunities for achieving realistic energy greenhouse gas emissions from U.S. cities through provisions of more sustainable infrastructure. Greenhouse gas reduction opportunities are examined through the lens of a public program administrator charged with reducing emissions given realistic financial constraints and authority over emissions reductions and energy use. Opportunities are evaluated with respect to traditional public policy metrics, such as benefit-cost analysis, net benefit analysis, and cost-effectiveness. Section 2 summarizes current practices used to estimate greenhouse gas emissions from communities. I identify improved and alternative emissions inventory techniques such as disaggregating the sectors reported, reporting inventory uncertainty, and aligning inventories with local organizations that could facilitate emissions mitigation. The potential advantages and challenges of supplementing inventories with comparative benchmarks are also discussed. Finally, I highlight the need to integrate growth (population and economic) and business as usual implications (such as changes to electricity supply grids) into climate action planning. I demonstrate how these techniques could improve decision making when planning reductions, help communities set meaningful emission reduction targets, and facilitate CAP implementation and progress monitoring. Section 3 evaluates the costs and benefits of building energy efficiency are estimated as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in Pittsburgh, PA and Austin, TX. Two policy objectives were evaluated: maximize GHG reductions given initial budget constraints or maximize social savings given target GHG reductions. This approach explicitly evaluates the trade-offs between three primary and often conflicting program design parameters: initial capital constraints, social savings

  18. Analyzing Agricultural Sustainability Indicators,Under Energy Subsidy Reduction Policy(Case Study of Qorveh Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Balali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Generally, subsidies are the amounts of government payments in order to provide all society members with minimum well-being. In several countries such as Iran, the agriculture sector is supported by different methods to achieve goals such as increasing farmers' income, supporting domestic producers and eliminating dependence on imports, preserving employment and reducing poverty. A significant part of agriculture subsidies has been allocated to energy resources, chemical fertilizers, seeds, agriculture machines, vaccines, animal toxins, the interest on bank loans, insurance fees, certain airplane services, distributing young saplings, and government guaranteed purchase of products. However, examining the subsidies system in Iran reveals that most government payments are in the agriculture sector and more specifically on energy resources. Recently, the extra low cost of energy in the agriculture sector, which has had certain government supports, has resulted in low productivity and environmental damage, and has resulted in increased demand for agricultural products due to population growth, changes in life pattern, deviation in energy cost in agricultural sector, environment destruction and influences on sustainable agriculture indicators. Moreover, among different production units, agriculture has the closest relationship with the environment. This relationship is a mutual.On the one hand, erosion and destruction of the environment along with pollution growth and shortage of water resources negatively influences the production and efficiency of agricultural products, and on the other hand, agricultural pollutants and irregular use of chemical fertilizers in this sector impose indispensable damages to the environment.This study aims to apply a partial equilibrium model in order to examine direct and indirect effects of reduction of energy subsidies on economic and environmental indicators of agricultural sustainability in the Qorveh

  19. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Von L. [Advanced Technology Inst., Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

    2012-09-19

    The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  20. Physical controls on half-hourly, daily, and monthly turbulent flux and energy budget over a high-altitude small lake on the Tibetan Plateau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, B.; Ma, Yaoming; Weiqiang Ma,; Su, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of evaporation and understanding of the physical controls on turbulent heat flux over lakes have fundamental significance for catchment-scale water balance analysis and local-scale climate modeling. The observation and simulation of lake-air turbulent flux processes have been

  1. Carbon-Neutral Energy Supply and Energy Demand-Reduction Technology Needed for Continued Economic Growth Without Dangerous Interference in the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Caldeira, K.

    2007-12-01

    Stabilization of atmospheric CO2 at levels likely to avoid unacceptable climate risk will require a major transformation in the ways we produce and use energy. Most of our energy will need to come from sources that do not emit carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and that energy will need to be used efficiently. The required reduction of carbon dioxide emissions as global energy consumption and GDP grow imposes quantitative requirements on some combination of carbon-neutral primary power and energy demand reduction. (Emission reductions are expressed relative to an implicit or explicit baseline; explicit being better for policy-making. Energy demand reduction involves both efficiency improvements and lifestyle changes.) These requirements can be expressed as CO2 emission reductions needed, or as carbon-neutral primary power production needed combined with power not used by virtue of increased energy end use efficiency or lifestyle changes ("negawatts"), always subject to some reasonably well-characterized uncertainty limits. Climatic changes thus far have been closer to the more extreme zone of the climatic uncertainty envelope of global warming indicating the potential for disastrous impacts by mid-century and beyond for business-as-usual. Emission reductions needed to avoid "dangerous interference in the climate system" imply a revolutionary change in the global energy system beginning now; particularly ominous are massive conventional coal-fired electric power energy infrastructures under construction by the US, China & India. Strong arguments, based on physical science considerations, exist for prompt measures such as (1) an immediate moratorium on coal-fired plants that don't sequester CO2, (2) a gradually increasing price on carbon emissions and (3) regulatory standards, for example, that would encourage utilities and car manufacturers to improve efficiency, and (4) Apollo-scale R & D projects beginning now to develop sustainable carbon-neutral power that can be

  2. How Expensive Is Expensive Enough? Opportunities for Cost Reductions in Offshore Wind Energy Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Thomas; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2016-01-01

    to, and produced, a number of possible opportunities for offshore wind cost reductions through logistics innovation; however, within the case study company, no company-wide logistics organization existed to focus horizontally on reducing logistics costs in general. Logistics was not well defined......This paper reveals that logistics may conservatively amount to 18% of the levelized cost of energy for offshore wind farms. This is the key finding from an extensive case study carried out within the organization of the world’s leading offshore wind farm developer and operator. The case study aimed...... within the case study company, and a logistics strategy did not exist. With full life-cycle costs of offshore wind farms still high enough to present a political challenge within the European Union in terms of legislation to ensure offshore wind diffusion beyond 2020, our research presents logistics...

  3. Production of Si by vacuum carbothermal reduction of SiO2 using concentrated solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutzenhiser, Peter G.; Tuerk, Ozan; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2010-09-01

    Using concentrated solar radiation as the energy source of high-temperature process heat, the carbothermal reduction of silica to silicon was examined thermodynamically and demonstrated experimentally at vacuum pressures. Reducing the system pressure favors Si(g) formation, enabling its vacuum distillation. Experimentation in a solar reactor was performed in the range 1,997-2,263 K at ˜3×10-3 bar with mixtures of charcoal and silica directly exposed to radiative flux intensities equivalent to 6,500 suns, yielding Si purities ranging from 66.1-79.2 wt.%. The Si purity increased with temperature. Solid characterizations showed SiC and SiO as important reaction intermediaries.

  4. Strategic Accident Reduction in an Energy Company and Its Resulting Financial Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Arto; Räisänen, Tuomo; Väyrynen, Seppo; Autio, Tommi

    2018-04-10

    This study provides a case example of an energy company that prioritised occupational safety and health and accident reduction as long-term, strategic development targets. Furthermore, this study describes the monetary benefits of this strategic decision. Company-specific accident indicators and monetary costs and benefits are evaluated. During the observation period (2010-2016), strategic investments in occupational safety and health cost the company EUR 0.8 million. However, EUR 1.8 million were saved in the same period, resulting in a 2.20 cost-benefit ratio. The trend in cost savings is strongly positive. Annual accident costs were EUR 0.4 million lower in 2016 compared to costs in 2010. This study demonstrates that long-term, strategic commitment to occupational safety and health provides monetary value.

  5. Development of strategies for saving energy by temperature reduction in warm forging processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Sonia; Santos, Maite; Vadillo, Leire; Idoyaga, Zuriñe; Valbuena, Óscar

    2016-10-01

    This paper is associated to the European policy of increasing efficiency in raw material and energy usage. This policy becomes even more important in sectors consuming high amount of resources, like hot forging industry, where material costs sums up to 50% of component price and energy ones are continuously raising. The warm forging shows a clear potential of raw material reduction (near-net-shape components) and also of energy saving (forging temperature under 1000°C). However and due to the increment of the energy costs, new solutions are required by the forging sector in order to reduce the temperature below 900°C. The reported research is based on several approaches to reduce the forging temperature applied to a flanged shaft of the automotive sector as demonstration case. The developed investigations have included several aspects: raw material, process parameters, tools and dies behavior during forging process and also metallographic evaluation of the forged parts. This paper summarizes analysis of the ductility and the admissible forces of the flanged shaft material Ck45 in as-supplied state (as-rolled) and also in two additional heat treated states. Hot compression and tensile tests using a GLEEBLE 3800C Thermo mechanical simulator have been performed pursuing this target. In the same way, a coupled numerical model based on Finite Element Method (FEM) has been developed to predict the material flow, the forging loads and the stresses on the tools at lower temperature with the new heat treatments of the raw material. In order to validate the previous development, experimental trials at 850 °C and 750 °C were carried out in a mechanical press and the results were very promising.

  6. An empirical study on the institutional factors of energy conservation and emissions reduction: Evidence from listed companies in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhaoguo; Jin, Xiaocui; Yang, Qingxiang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Corporate excessive energy consumption and emissions are negative externality problems, with the basic countermeasure of establishing a series of institutional programs to promote corporate energy conservation and emissions reduction. This paper analyzes the influence of institutional factors such as laws, tax policies, credit policies, government subsidies, media supervision and marketization degree on corporate energy conservation and emissions reduction from the institutional perspective. The data, from 84 listed Chinese chemical and steel companies from 2006 to 2010, was analyzed using both a fixed effect model and the generalized method of moments (GMM) model. The empirical results demonstrate that these institutional factors positively affect corporate energy conservation and emissions reduction. Specifically, four factors – tax policies, government subsidies, credit policies and media supervision – have a significant positive relationship with corporate energy conservation and emissions reduction; whereas laws and marketization degree exhibit no significant effects. The research findings are theoretically and practically significant to the Chinese government with regard to improving the institutional environment and promoting corporate energy conservation and emissions reduction. - Highlights: ► Theoretical analysis of the influence of institutional factors based on NIE. ► Empirical analysis of the influence of institutional factors on ECER by regression. ► Economic measures and public opinions have positive influence on ECER in China. ► Laws and the degree of marketization have weak influence on ECER in China

  7. A study on the reduction of nitric oxide molecule (NO) to nitroxyl anion (NO{sup -}) by vibrational energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seon Woog [Silla Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    It is shown that one-electron reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitroxyl anion (NO{sup -}) can be accelerated by vibrational energy. Potential energy surfaces of NO and NO{sup -} reveal that the vertical transition between them has favorable energetics for vibrationally excited molecule. Also, Franck-Condon factors between NO and NO{sup -} vibrational wave functions are calculated. It shows that the number of open channels increases with increased vibrational energy. These results mean that we can control the rate of reduction of NO to NO{sup -} by radiating an appropriate light.

  8. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multi-Phase Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Kenneth Kuan-yun

    2012-01-01

    Detailed coverage of advanced combustion topics from the author of Principles of Combustion, Second Edition Turbulence, turbulent combustion, and multiphase reacting flows have become major research topics in recent decades due to their application across diverse fields, including energy, environment, propulsion, transportation, industrial safety, and nanotechnology. Most of the knowledge accumulated from this research has never been published in book form-until now. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multiphase Combustion presents up-to-date, integrated coverage of the fundamentals of turbulence

  9. Dual-energy-based metal segmentation for metal artifact reduction in dental computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Mohamed A A; Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hernandez, Daniel; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2018-02-01

    In a dental CT scan, the presence of dental fillings or dental implants generates severe metal artifacts that often compromise readability of the CT images. Many metal artifact reduction (MAR) techniques have been introduced, but dental CT scans still suffer from severe metal artifacts particularly when multiple dental fillings or implants exist around the region of interest. The high attenuation coefficient of teeth often causes erroneous metal segmentation, compromising the MAR performance. We propose a metal segmentation method for a dental CT that is based on dual-energy imaging with a narrow energy gap. Unlike a conventional dual-energy CT, we acquire two projection data sets at two close tube voltages (80 and 90 kV p ), and then, we compute the difference image between the two projection images with an optimized weighting factor so as to maximize the contrast of the metal regions. We reconstruct CT images from the weighted difference image to identify the metal region with global thresholding. We forward project the identified metal region to designate metal trace on the projection image. We substitute the pixel values on the metal trace with the ones computed by the region filling method. The region filling in the metal trace removes high-intensity data made by the metallic objects from the projection image. We reconstruct final CT images from the region-filled projection image with the fusion-based approach. We have done imaging experiments on a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using a lab-built micro-CT and a commercial dental CT system. We have corrected the projection images of a dental phantom and a human skull phantom using the single-energy and dual-energy-based metal segmentation methods. The single-energy-based method often failed in correcting the metal artifacts on the slices on which tooth enamel exists. The dual-energy-based method showed better MAR performances in all cases regardless of the presence of tooth enamel on the slice of

  10. FINAL REPORT: Reduction in Energy Consumption and Variability in Steel Foundry Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Peters

    2005-05-24

    This project worked to improve the efficiency of the steel casting industry by reducing the variability that occurs because of process and product variation. The project focused on the post shakeout operations since roughly half of the production costs are in this area. These improvements will reduce the amount of variability, making it easier to manage the operation and improve the competitiveness. The reduction in variability will also reduce the need for many rework operations, which will result in a direct reduction of energy usage, particularly by the reduction of repeated heat treatment operations. Further energy savings will be realized from the reduction of scrap and reduced handling. Field studies were conducted at ten steel foundries that represented the U.S. steel casting industry, for a total of over 100 weeks of production observation. These studies quantified the amount of variability, and looked toward determining the source. A focus of the data collected was the grinding operations since this is a major effort in the cleaning room, and it represents the overall casting quality. The grinding was divided into two categories, expected and unexpected. Expected grinding is that in which the location of the effort is known prior to making the casting, such as smoothing parting lines, gates, and riser contacts. Unexpected grinding, which was approximately 80% of the effort, was done to improve the surfaces at weld repair locations, to rectify burnt on sand, and other surface anomalies at random locations. Unexpected grinding represents about 80% of the grinding effort. By quantifying this effort, the project raised awareness within the industry and the industry is continuing to make improvements. The field studies showed that the amount of variation of grinding operations (normalized because of the diverse set of parts studied) was very consistent across the industry. The field studies identified several specific sources that individually contributed to

  11. Reduction of Cogging Torque in Dual Rotor Permanent Magnet Generator for Direct Coupled Wind Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivachandran Paulsamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In wind energy systems employing permanent magnet generator, there is an imperative need to reduce the cogging torque for smooth and reliable cut in operation. In a permanent magnet generator, cogging torque is produced due to interaction of the rotor magnets with slots and teeth of the stator. This paper is a result of an ongoing research work that deals with various methods to reduce cogging torque in dual rotor radial flux permanent magnet generator (DRFPMG for direct coupled stand alone wind energy systems (SAWES. Three methods were applied to reduce the cogging torque in DRFPMG. The methods were changing slot opening width, changing magnet pole arc width and shifting of slot openings. A combination of these three methods was applied to reduce the cogging torque to a level suitable for direct coupled SAWES. Both determination and reduction of cogging torque were carried out by finite element analysis (FEA using MagNet Software. The cogging torque of DRFPMG has been reduced without major change in induced emf. A prototype of 1 kW, 120 rpm DRFPMG was fabricated and tested to validate the simulation results. The test results have good agreement with the simulation predictions.

  12. Reduction of cogging torque in dual rotor permanent magnet generator for direct coupled wind energy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsamy, Sivachandran

    2014-01-01

    In wind energy systems employing permanent magnet generator, there is an imperative need to reduce the cogging torque for smooth and reliable cut in operation. In a permanent magnet generator, cogging torque is produced due to interaction of the rotor magnets with slots and teeth of the stator. This paper is a result of an ongoing research work that deals with various methods to reduce cogging torque in dual rotor radial flux permanent magnet generator (DRFPMG) for direct coupled stand alone wind energy systems (SAWES). Three methods were applied to reduce the cogging torque in DRFPMG. The methods were changing slot opening width, changing magnet pole arc width and shifting of slot openings. A combination of these three methods was applied to reduce the cogging torque to a level suitable for direct coupled SAWES. Both determination and reduction of cogging torque were carried out by finite element analysis (FEA) using MagNet Software. The cogging torque of DRFPMG has been reduced without major change in induced emf. A prototype of 1 kW, 120 rpm DRFPMG was fabricated and tested to validate the simulation results. The test results have good agreement with the simulation predictions.

  13. Improved Switching Energy Reduction Approach in Low-Power SAR ADC for Bioelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyuan Tong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-power analog-to-digital converter (ADC is a crucial part of wearable or implantable bioelectronics. In order to reduce the power of successive-approximation-register (SAR ADC, an improved energy-efficient capacitor switching scheme of SAR ADC is proposed for implantable bioelectronic applications. With sequence initialization, novel logic control, and capacitive subconversion, 97.6% switching energy is reduced compared to the traditional structure. Moreover, thanks to the top-plate sampling and capacitive subconversion, 87% input-capacitance reduction can be achieved over the conventional structure. A 10-bit SAR ADC with this proposed switching scheme is realized in 65 nm CMOS. With 1.514 KHz differential sinusoidal input signals sampled at 50 KS/s, the ADC achieves an SNDR of 61.4 dB and only consumes power of 450 nW. The area of this SAR ADC IP core is only 136 μm × 176 μm, making it also area-efficient and very suitable for biomedical electronics application.

  14. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  15. Turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Wendell

    2012-01-01

    This book explains how magnetized plasmas self-organize in states of electromagnetic turbulence that transports particles and energy out of the core plasma faster than anticipated by the fusion scientists designing magnetic confinement systems in the 20th century. It describes theory, experiments and simulations in a unified and up-to-date presentation of the issues of achieving nuclear fusion power.

  16. [Synergistic emission reduction of chief air pollutants and greenhouse gases-based on scenario simulations of energy consumptions in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuan-bo; Li, Wei

    2013-05-01

    It is one of the common targets and important tasks for energy management and environmental control of Beijing to improve urban air quality while reducing the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). Here, based on the interim and long term developmental planning and energy structure of the city, three energy consumption scenarios in low, moderate and high restrictions were designed by taking the potential energy saving policies and environmental targets into account. The long-range energy alternatives planning (LEAP) model was employed to predict and evaluate reduction effects of the chief air pollutants and GHG during 2010 to 2020 under the three given scenarios. The results showed that if urban energy consumption system was optimized or adjusted by exercising energy saving and emission reduction and pollution control measures, the predicted energy uses will be reduced by 10 to 30 million tons of coal equivalents by 2020. Under the two energy scenarios with moderate and high restrictions, the anticipated emissions of SO2, NOx, PM10, PM2.5, VOC and GHG will be respectively reduced to 71 to 100.2, 159.2 to 218.7, 89.8 to 133.8, 51.4 to 96.0, 56.4 to 74.8 and 148 200 to 164 700 thousand tons. Correspondingly, when compared with the low-restriction scenario, the reducing rate will be 53% to 67% , 50% to 64% , 33% to 55% , 25% to 60% , 41% to 55% and 26% to 34% respectively. Furthermore, based on a study of synergistic emission reduction of the air pollutants and GHG, it was proposed that the adjustment and control of energy consumptions shall be intensively developed in the three sectors of industry, transportation and services. In this way the synergistic reduction of the emissions of chief air pollutants and GHG will be achieved; meanwhile the pressures of energy demands may be deliberately relieved.

  17. Turbulence and energy budget in a self-preserving round jet: direct evaluation using large eddy simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bogey , Christophe; Bailly , Christophe

    2009-01-01

    International audience; An axisymmetric jet at a diameter-based Reynolds number of 1.1 × 104 is computed by a large eddy simulation (LES) in order to investigate its self-similarity region. The LES combines low-dissipation numerical schemes and explicit filtering of the flow variables to relax energy through the smaller scales discretized. The computational domain extends up to 150 jet radii in the downstream direction, which is found to be large enough to discretize a part of this region. Tu...

  18. Turbulent Mixing in Stably Stratified Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Turbulent fluid motions are typically characterized by several features including randomness in both space and time, vorticity, an energy cascade ...drawback of this method is that the portion of the flow identified as a turbulent structure is dependent on the type of wavelet filter used (e.g., Haar ...the mesoscale variability of the atmosphere. J. Atmos. Sci., 40:749-761, 1983. E. Lindborg. The energy cascade in a strongly stratified fluid. J

  19. Turbulent wedge spreading dynamics and control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayanan, Saikishan; Goldstein, David; Brown, Garry

    2017-11-01

    Turbulent wedges are encountered in some routes to transition in wall bounded flows, particularly those involving surface roughness. They are characterized by strongly turbulent regions that are formed downstream of large disturbances, and spread into the non-turbulent flow. Altering the wedge spreading mechanism is a possible drag reduction strategy. Following recent studies of Goldstein, Chu and Brown (Flow Turbul. Combust. 98(1), 2017) and Kuester and White (Exp. Fluids 57(4), 2016), we explore the relation between the base flow vorticity field and turbulent wedge spreading using immersed boundary direct numerical simulations. The lateral spreading rate of the wedges are similar for high Reynolds number boundary layers and Couette flow, but differences emerge in wall normal propagation of turbulence. We also attempt to utilize the surface texture based strategy suggested by Strand and Goldstein (J. Fluid Mech. 668, 2011) to reduce the spreading of isolated turbulent spots, for turbulent wedge control. The effects of height, spacing and orientation of fins on the dynamics of wedge evolution are studied. The results are interpreted from a vorticity dynamics point of view. Supported by AFOSR # FA9550-15-1-0345.

  20. An informal conceptual introduction to turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tsinober, Arkady

    2009-01-01

    This book is a second completely revised edition of ""An Informal Introduction to Turbulence"". The main emphasis is on conceptual and problematic aspects, physical phenomena, observations, misconceptions and unresolved issues rather than on conventional formalistic aspects, models, etc. Apart from the obvious fundamental importance of turbulent flows such an emphasis is a consequence of the view that without corresponding progress in fundamental aspects there is little chance for progress in any applications such as drag reduction, mixing, control and modeling of turbulence. More generally th

  1. Developmental dysplasia of the hip: A computational biomechanical model of the path of least energy for closed reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwawi, Mohammed A; Moslehy, Faissal A; Rose, Christopher; Huayamave, Victor; Kassab, Alain J; Divo, Eduardo; Jones, Brendan J; Price, Charles T

    2017-08-01

    This study utilized a computational biomechanical model and applied the least energy path principle to investigate two pathways for closed reduction of high grade infantile hip dislocation. The principle of least energy when applied to moving the femoral head from an initial to a final position considers all possible paths that connect them and identifies the path of least resistance. Clinical reports of severe hip dysplasia have concluded that reduction of the femoral head into the acetabulum may occur by a direct pathway over the posterior rim of the acetabulum when using the Pavlik harness, or by an indirect pathway with reduction through the acetabular notch when using the modified Hoffman-Daimler method. This computational study also compared the energy requirements for both pathways. The anatomical and muscular aspects of the model were derived using a combination of MRI and OpenSim data. Results of this study indicate that the path of least energy closely approximates the indirect pathway of the modified Hoffman-Daimler method. The direct pathway over the posterior rim of the acetabulum required more energy for reduction. This biomechanical analysis confirms the clinical observations of the two pathways for closed reduction of severe hip dysplasia. The path of least energy closely approximated the modified Hoffman-Daimler method. Further study of the modified Hoffman-Daimler method for reduction of severe hip dysplasia may be warranted based on this computational biomechanical analysis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:1799-1805, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society.

  2. Momentum and scalar transport at the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerweel, J.; Fukushima, C.; Pedersen, Jakob Martin

    2009-01-01

    and well-defined bounding interface between the turbulent and non-turbulent regions of flow. The jet carries a fluorescent dye measured with planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and the surface discontinuity in the scalar concentration is identified as the fluctuating turbulent jet interface. Thence...... velocity and mean scalar and a tendency towards a singularity in mean vorticity. These actual or asymptotic discontinuities are consistent with the conditional mean momentum and scalar transport equations integrated across the interface. Measurements of the fluxes of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy...

  3. Interaction of turbulent length scales with wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Nieves, Sheilla N.

    wind turbine blade as a consequence of its geometry) on the behavior of turbulent boundary layers and to identify and quantify the length scales that are affected by these external conditions. Laser Doppler and hot-wire anemometry measurements, for smooth and rough surfaces, confirmed that FST and FPG cause a reduction in the wake of the boundary layer. Moreover, results show a discrepancy in the behavior of the stream-wise and wall-normal variances due to free-stream turbulence. As a result, the addition of FST increases the anisotropy in the body of the boundary layer. For FPG flows, a budget analysis of the Reynolds stresses shows that turbulent transport and pressure strain terms are responsible for the increase in the stream-wise Reynolds stress component when FST is present. Second-order structure functions and energy spectra are examined to identify and quantify which turbulence length-scales contribute mostly to the increased anisotropy, and to compare these effects to the case of a zero pressure gradient (ZPG) boundary layer. For ZPG flows, it is shown that the anisotropy created by adding nearly isotropic turbulence in the free-stream resides mostly in the larger scales of the flow, in a range between r/delta95 = 3 and 10. With an imposed FPG, the effect of FST resides in the very-largest length scales of the flow, r ≥ 4.3delta95, corresponding to scales of the same size, and even larger, than the integral scale of the outer free-stream turbulence. However, the free-stream turbulence is not increasing the anisotropy to the extent that it did for the ZPG case. The effects of surface roughness on the different length scales of the flow, when a FPG and additional levels of FST are present, are also examined. Second-order structure functions and energy spectra analysis suggests that for highly turbulent favorable pressure gradient flows, the effect of roughness at the surface is felt, not only by the small length scales of the flow, but also by large (e.g. r

  4. High Energy Particle Acceleration and Turbulent Magnetic Field Amplification in Shell Type Supernova Remnants. Degree awarded by Minnesota Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Jonathan Wilmore

    1998-01-01

    Thesis submitted to the faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Minnesota in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Part I discusses the spatial correlation between the x-ray and radio morphologies of Cas A, and in the process address: the effect of inhomogeneous absorption on the apparent x-ray morphology, the interaction between the SNR and a molecular cloud, and the rapid move toward equipartition between the magnetic and gas energy densities. Discussions of the x-ray./radio correlation continues in Chapter 5, where we present a new, deep, ROSAT HRI image of Cas A. Chapter 7 presents ASCA spectra, with non-thermal spectral fits for 13 of the youngest SNRs in the Galaxy.

  5. On energy consumption for size-reduction and yields from subsequent enzymatic saccharification of pretreated lodgepole pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W; Zhu, J Y; Gleisner, R; Pan, X J

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of chemical pretreatment and disk-milling conditions on energy consumption for size-reduction and the efficiency of enzymatic cellulose saccharification of a softwood. Lodgepole pine wood chips produced from thinnings of a 100-year-old unmanaged forest were pretreated by hot-water, dilute-acid, and two SPORL processes (Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose) at acid charge on oven dry (od) wood of 0% and 2.21%. The pretreated wood chips were then milled using a laboratory disk mill under various solids-loadings and disk-plate gaps to produce substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis. We found that post-chemical-pretreatment size-reduction of forest biomass can decrease size-reduction energy consumption by 20-80% depending on the pretreatment applied under 20% solids-loading and a disk-plate gap of 0.76 mm in milling. SPORL with a sodium bisulfite charge of 8% and sulfuric acid charge of 2.21% on wood was the most effective in decreasing size-reduction energy consumption. Solids-loading had the most significant effect on disk-milling energy. When solids-loading was reduced from 30% to 3%, disk-milling energy could be decreased by more than a factor of 10 for wood chips pretreated by both SPORL and dilute-acid at an acid charge of 2.21%. The enzymatic hydrolysis glucose yields (EHGY) from the substrates produced by all pretreatments were independent of the solids-loading in milling, indicating that these energy savings in size-reduction can be realized without affecting EHGY. When wood chips were pretreated by SPORL with 2.21% acid charge, size-reduction energy consumption was decreased to less than 50 Wh/kg od wood at a practical solids-loading of approximately 10-20%, equivalent to that used in size-reduction of agriculture biomass, with excellent EHGY of about 370 g per kg od wood. Similar effects on size-reduction energy savings and excellent EHGY were also achieved when large disk-plate gaps (up to 1.52 mm

  6. The Role of Logistics in Practical Levelized Cost of Energy Reduction Implementation and Government Sponsored Cost Reduction Studies: Day and Night in Offshore Wind Operations and Maintenance Logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Poulsen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reveals that logistics make up at least 17% of annual operational expenditure costs for offshore wind farms. Annual operational expenditure is found to vary by a factor of 9.5, making its share of levelized cost of energy for offshore wind range from 13% to 57%. These are key findings of a 20-month research project targeting cost reduction initiatives for offshore wind systems. The findings reveal that cost-out measures are difficult to implement due to cultural differences. Implementation efforts are rendered by personnel located offshore in a harsh sea environment which is in stark contrast to the shore-based office personnel who develop studies directing cost reduction efforts. This paper details the company motivation to join industry-wide cost reduction initiatives. A business case for offshore wind operations and maintenance logistics yielding 1% savings in levelized cost of energy is included on how to expand working hours from daytime to also work at night.

  7. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Mechanical Performance of Dies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller, Principal Investigator; Kabiri-Bamoradian, Contributors: Khalil; Delgado-Garza, Abelardo; Murugesan, Karthik; Ragab, Adham

    2011-09-13

    provided to NADCA for distribution to the industry. Power law based meta-models for predicting machine tie bar loading and for predicting maximum parting surface separation were successfully developed and tested against simulation results for a wide range of machines and experimental data. The models proved to be remarkably accurate, certainly well within the requirements for practical application. In addition to making die structural modeling more accessible, the work advanced the state-of-the-art by developing improved modeling of cavity pressure effects, which is typically modeled as a hydrostatic boundary condition, and performing a systematic analysis of the influence of ejector die design variables on die deflection and parting plane separation. This cavity pressure modeling objective met with less than complete success due to the limits of current finite element based fluid structure interaction analysis methods, but an improved representation of the casting/die interface was accomplished using a combination of solid and shell elements in the finite element model. This approximation enabled good prediction of final part distortion verified with a comprehensive evaluation of the dimensions of test castings produced with a design experiment. An extra deliverable of the experimental work was development of high temperature mechanical properties for the A380 die casting alloy. The ejector side design objective was met and the results were incorporated into the metamodels described above. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 2.03 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates over a ten year period, based on commercial introduction in 2009, a market penetration of 70% by 2014 is 4.26 trillion BTU's/year by 2019. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting

  8. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) embarked on an initiative to quantify the potential benefits of Heat Island Reduction (HIR) strategies (shade trees, reflective roofs and pavements) in reducing cooling energy use in buildings, lowering the ambient air temperature and improve air quality. This report summarizes the efforts of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to assess the impacts of HIR measures on building cooling- and heating-energy use. We discuss our efforts to calculate annual energy savings and peak-power avoidance of HIR strategies in the building sector of the Greater Toronto Area. The analysis is focused on three major building types that offer most saving potentials: residence, office and retail store. Using an hourly building energy simulation model, we quantify the energy saving potentials of (1) using cool roofs on individual buildings[direct effect], (2) planting deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building[direct effect], (3) planting coniferous wind-shielding vegetation near building[direct effect], (4) ambient cooling by a large-scale program of urban reforestation with reflective building roofs and pavements[indirect effect], (5) and the combined direct and indirect effects. Results show potential annual energy savings of over$11M (with uniform residential and commercial electricity and gas prices of$0.084/kWh and$5.54/GJ) could be realized by ratepayers from the combined direct and indirect effects of HIR strategies. Of that total, about 88 percent was from the direct impact roughly divided equally among reflective roofs, shade trees and wind-shielding, and the remainder (12 percent) from the indirect impact of the cooler ambient air temperature. The residential sector accounts for over half (59 percent) of the total, offices 13 percent and retail stores 28 percent. Savings from cool roofs were about 20 percent, shade trees 30 percent, wind shielding of tree 37 percent, and indirect effect 12 percent. These

  9. UWB Wind Turbine Blade Deflection Sensing for Wind Energy Cost Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Franek, Ondrej; Eggers, Patrick C F; Olesen, Kim; Byskov, Claus; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2015-08-12

    A new application of utilizing ultra-wideband (UWB) technology to sense wind turbine blade deflections is introduced in this paper for wind energy cost reduction. The lower UWB band of 3.1-5.3 GHz is applied. On each blade, there will be one UWB blade deflection sensing system, which consists of two UWB antennas at the blade root and one UWB antenna at the blade tip. The detailed topology and challenges of this deflection sensing system are addressed. Due to the complexity of the problem, this paper will first realize the on-blade UWB radio link in the simplest case, where the tip antenna is situated outside (and on the surface of) a blade tip. To investigate this case, full-blade time-domain measurements are designed and conducted under different deflections. The detailed measurement setups and results are provided. If the root and tip antenna locations are properly selected, the first pulse is always of sufficient quality for accurate estimations under different deflections. The measured results reveal that the blade tip-root distance and blade deflection can be accurately estimated in the complicated and lossy wireless channels around a wind turbine blade. Some future research topics on this application are listed finally.

  10. Markets for renewable energy and pollution emissions. Environmental claims, emission-reduction accounting, and product decoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael R.; Cepela, Daniel J. [University of Michigan, MI (United States); Lewis, Geoffrey McD. [University of Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Green electricity generation can provide an indirect route to cleaner air: by displacing generation from fossil fuels, green electricity can reduce emissions of CO{sub 2} and conventional air pollutants. Several types of voluntary markets have emerged in the United States to take advantage of this relationship, including green electricity programs, carbon offsets, and renewable energy certificates. At the same time, regulators are favoring cap-and-trade mechanisms for regulating emissions. This paper describes the appropriate framing of environmental claims for green electricity products. We apply an accounting framework for evaluating claims made for capped pollutants, with entries for emissions, avoided emissions due to green electricity, and unused emission permits. This framework is applied in case studies of two major electric utilities that operate with green electricity programs and capped pollutants. The cases demonstrate that the relative magnitude of 'unused permits' and 'emissions avoided' is a key relationship for evaluating an emissions reduction claim. Lastly, we consider the evolution of the green electricity marketplace given the reliance on cap-and-trade. In this setting, pollution-emission products could be decoupled from one another and from the various green electricity products. Several positive consequences could transpire, including better transparency of products, lower certification costs, and more product choices. (author)

  11. Markets for renewable energy and pollution emissions: Environmental claims, emission-reduction accounting, and product decoupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael R., E-mail: micmoore@umich.ed [University of Michigan, MI (United States); Lewis, Geoffrey McD. [University of Waterloo, ON (Canada); Cepela, Daniel J. [University of Michigan, MI (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Green electricity generation can provide an indirect route to cleaner air: by displacing generation from fossil fuels, green electricity can reduce emissions of CO{sub 2} and conventional air pollutants. Several types of voluntary markets have emerged in the United States to take advantage of this relationship, including green electricity programs, carbon offsets, and renewable energy certificates. At the same time, regulators are favoring cap-and-trade mechanisms for regulating emissions. This paper describes the appropriate framing of environmental claims for green electricity products. We apply an accounting framework for evaluating claims made for capped pollutants, with entries for emissions, avoided emissions due to green electricity, and unused emission permits. This framework is applied in case studies of two major electric utilities that operate with green electricity programs and capped pollutants. The cases demonstrate that the relative magnitude of 'unused permits' and 'emissions avoided' is a key relationship for evaluating an emissions reduction claim. Lastly, we consider the evolution of the green electricity marketplace given the reliance on cap-and-trade. In this setting, pollution-emission products could be decoupled from one another and from the various green electricity products. Several positive consequences could transpire, including better transparency of products, lower certification costs, and more product choices.

  12. Damping layout optimization for ship's cabin noise reduction based on statistical energy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Weiguo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An optimization analysis study concerning the damping control of ship's cabin noise was carried out in order to improve the effect and reduce the weight of damping. Based on the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA method, a theoretical deduction and numerical analysis of the first-order sensitivity analysis of the A-weighted sound pressure level concerning the damping loss factor of the subsystem were carried out. On this basis, a mathematical optimization model was proposed and an optimization program developed. Next, the secondary development of VA One software was implemented through the use of MATLAB, while the cabin noise damping control layout optimization system was established. Finally, the optimization model of the ship was constructed and numerical experiments of damping control optimization conducted. The damping installation region was divided into five parts with different damping thicknesses. The total weight of damping was set as an objective function and the A-weighted sound pressure level of the target cabin was set as a constraint condition. The best damping thickness was obtained through the optimization program, and the total damping weight was reduced by 60.4%. The results show that the damping noise reduction effect of unit weight is significantly improved through the optimization method. This research successfully solves the installation position and thickness selection problems in the acoustic design of damping control, providing a reliable analysis method and guidance for the design.

  13. Effect of coffee reduction on constituent concentration in an energy-efficient process of ultrasonic extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Cheng-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the popular beverage; its constituents include caffeine, oxidation resistant aromatic constituents, protein, tannin, and fat. It is indicated in literatures that a proper amount of coffee stimulates the brain and enhances memory, but excessive coffee causes negative results, such as coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, heart disease and kidney disease. This study used high-performance ultrasonic process to discuss the effect of pulverized coffee reduction on the constituent concentration. It further compared the constituent concentrations obtained in different extraction periods. The experimental results show that the coffee aroma constituents can be extracted effectively by ultrasonic process without any organic solvent, and the constituent concentration does not decrease with the addition of pulverized coffee. Therefore, the consumption of pulverized coffee can be reduced greatly by using the proposed. The time of extraction process can be shortened, so as to save energy. The most important point is to reduce the enterprises manufacturing cost and to increase the profit.

  14. Energy-Efficiency and Air-Pollutant Emissions-Reduction Opportunities for the Ammonia Industry in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ding [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Wenying [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    2015-06-01

    As one of the most energy-intensive and polluting industries, ammonia production is responsible for significant carbon dioxide (CO2) and air-pollutant emissions. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality, lack of understanding of the cost-effectiveness of such improvements has been a barrier to implementing these measures. Assessing the costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of different energy-efficiency measures is essential to advancing this understanding. In this study, a bottom-up energy conservation supply curve model is developed to estimate the potential for energy savings and emissions reductions from 26 energy-efficiency measures that could be applied in China’s ammonia industry. Cost-effective implementation of these measures saves a potential 271.5 petajoules/year for fuel and 5,443 gigawatt-hours/year for electricity, equal to 14% of fuel and 14% of electricity consumed in China’s ammonia industry in 2012. These reductions could mitigate 26.7 million tonnes of CO2 emissions. This study also quantifies the co-benefits of reducing air-pollutant emissions and water use that would result from saving energy in China’s ammonia industry. This quantitative analysis advances our understanding of the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures and can be used to augment efforts to reduce energy use and environmental impacts.

  15. THE PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT MODEL OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECT ON THE ENERGY SUPPLY COMPANIES IN A TURBULENT ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михайло Збишекович ДОМБРОВСЬКИЙ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A methodical approach of proactive project management model with the estimate (prediction deviation of actual results from planned at each control step is proposed. Deviation of actual results from the project planned, which takes place in the management of the energy company transformation project, as a result of action under uncertainty, determines the acceleration of work over the project plan. Implementation the scope of work, which exceeds the plan, as result of overspending of resources and budget, disrupting the stability of the project as a system. The graphic model helps to form the "corridor" tolerance based resource reserve, and the implementation of the project work is carried out according to the extension concept. Clarification allowable deviation area allows improving the model of project proactive management for each of the next execution step. Project management quality is improved by reducing the time of decision-making and increase the sustainability and efficiency by substantially reducing deviations. The conclusions about the benefits of the assessment of works and project resources balance, by using the proactive management model, which allows comparing variants of works dynamics, to implement the search for the best solution to a predetermined set of admissible, have been made.

  16. The impacts of climate change and carbon emissions reductions on energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahinpey, N.; Asghari, K.; Wilson, M.

    2007-01-01

    The changes occurring in the energy sector were discussed with particular reference to the potential impacts of climate change and responses to climate change on an electrical system in Saskatchewan, a northern sub-humid to semi-arid environment in a continental interior. Grid electricity is supplied primarily by fossil fuels and is made up of a mix of coal, natural gas, water and imports, with some minor wind power and diesel delivery. Most of this power is coal generated along the southern border with the United States. The public utility SaskPower generates, transmits and delivers the electricity. Although electrical supply in the province is not deregulated, the utility is influenced by the changes that are occurring in other jurisdictions. The effects on power generation resulting from climate change will include water quality and availability as well as changing the time of peak electrical loads on the system. From the perspective of hydroelectricity, the utility will be required to rely more on water from the spring snow melt in the mountains to the west. This is an unreliable source of water in that quantities could vary greatly from year to year. This paper also discussed the constraints faced by SaskPower in maintaining competitive energy prices and a reliable system without significantly increasing energy imports. These constraints include dealing with the impacts of climate change on the system; facing the threat of carbon constraints in a Kyoto or post-Kyoto world; assessing the risk of reduced surplus capacity beyond provincial boundaries; and, dealing with fuel supply issues. It was determined that the combination of a changing electricity market in North America along with the physical impacts of climate change on electrical generation and regulations that impose a reduction in the level of greenhouse gas emissions from utilities will result in significant issues for security of supply. It was suggested that the utility will need to evaluate supply

  17. Edge energy transport barrier and turbulence in the I-mode regime on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Churchill, R. M.; Cziegler, I.; Dominguez, A.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Bespamyatnov, I.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.; Reinke, M. L.; Rowan, W. L.; Terry, J. L.

    2011-05-01

    We report extended studies of the I-mode regime [Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)] obtained in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Marmar et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. This regime, usually accessed with unfavorable ion B × ∇B drift, features an edge thermal transport barrier without a strong particle transport barrier. Steady I-modes have now been obtained with favorable B × ∇B drift, by using specific plasma shapes, as well as with unfavorable drift over a wider range of shapes and plasma parameters. With favorable drift, power thresholds are close to the standard scaling for L-H transitions, while with unfavorable drift they are ˜ 1.5-3 times higher, increasing with Ip. Global energy confinement in both drift configurations is comparable to H-mode scalings, while density profiles and impurity confinement are close to those in L-mode. Transport analysis of the edge region shows a decrease in edge χeff, by typically a factor of 3, between L- and I-mode. The decrease correlates with a drop in mid-frequency fluctuations (f ˜ 50-150 kHz) observed on both density and magnetics diagnostics. Edge fluctuations at higher frequencies often increase above L-mode levels, peaking at f ˜ 250 kHz. This weakly coherent mode is clearest and has narrowest width (Δf/f ˜ 0.45) at low q95 and high Tped, up to 1 keV. The Er well in I-mode is intermediate between L- and H-mode and is dominated by the diamagnetic contribution in the impurity radial force balance, without the Vpol shear typical of H-modes.

  18. Wavenumber spectrum of whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, S.; Gary, S. Peter; Narita, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence is studied in low beta plasma to understand essential properties of the energy spectrum at electron scales, by using a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. This simulation demonstrates turbulence in which the energy cascade rate is greater than the dissipation rate at the electron inertial length. The PIC simulation shows that the magnetic energy spectrum of forward-cascaded whistler turbulence at electron inertial scales is anisotropic and develops a very steep power-law spectrum which is consistent with recent solar wind observations. A comparison of the simulated spectrum with that predicted by a phenomenological turbulence scaling model suggests that the energy cascade at the electron inertial scale depends on both magnetic fluctuations and electron velocity fluctuations, as well as on the whistler dispersion relation. Thus, not only kinetic Alfven turbulence but also whistler turbulence may explain recent solar wind observations of very steep magnetic spectra at short scales.

  19. Land cover change in the zone of sporadic permafrost causes shift in landscape-scale turbulent energy fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, M.; Wischnewski, K.; Kljun, N.; Chasmer, L.; Quinton, W. L.; Detto, M.; Sonnentag, O.

    2015-12-01

    current heterogeneous to a homogeneous bog landscape could lead to a decrease in the maximum PBL height by about 700 m and to a decrease in regional Ta by 1 to 2 K. Our results show clearly that permafrost degradation and forest cover shifts will affect local and regional surface energy balances in the boreal zone and could represent important modifiers of future climates.

  20. Selectivity on Etching: Creation of High-Energy Facets on Copper Nanocrystals for CO2 Electrochemical Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenni; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jin, Mingshang; Yin, Yadong

    2016-04-26

    Creating high-energy facets on the surface of catalyst nanocrystals represents a promising method for enhancing their catalytic activity. Herein we show that crystal etching as the reverse process of crystal growth can directly endow nanocrystal surfaces with high-energy facets. The key is to avoid significant modification of the surface energies of the nanocrystal facets by capping effects from solvents, ions, and ligands. Using Cu nanocubes as the starting material, we have successfully demonstrated the creation of high-energy facets in metal nanocrystals by controlled chemical etching. The etched Cu nanocrystals with enriched high-energy {110} facets showed significantly enhanced activity toward CO2 reduction. We believe the etching-based strategy could be extended to the synthesis of nanocrystals of many other catalysts with more active high-energy facets.

  1. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smits, Alexander J

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of the grant were to provide a systematic study to fill the gap between existing research on low Reynolds number turbulent flows to the kinds of turbulent flows encountered on full-scale vehicles...

  2. Turbulent flow computation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drikakis, D; Geurts, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    ... discretization 3 A test-case: turbulent channel flow 4 Conclusions 75 75 82 93 98 4 Analysis and control of errors in the numerical simulation of turbulence Sandip Ghosal 1 Introduction 2 Source...

  3. Modeling of policies for reduction of GHG emissions in energy sector using ANN: case study-Croatia (EU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanča, Tomislav; Strahovnik, Tomislav; Ukić, Šime; Stankov, Mirjana Novak; Rogošić, Marko

    2017-07-01

    This study describes the development of tool for testing different policies for reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in energy sector using artificial neural networks (ANNs). The case study of Croatia was elaborated. Two different energy consumption scenarios were used as a base for calculations and predictions of GHG emissions: the business as usual (BAU) scenario and sustainable scenario. Both of them are based on predicted energy consumption using different growth rates; the growth rates within the second scenario resulted from the implementation of corresponding energy efficiency measures in final energy consumption and increasing share of renewable energy sources. Both ANN architecture and training methodology were optimized to produce network that was able to successfully describe the existing data and to achieve reliable prediction of emissions in a forward time sense. The BAU scenario was found to produce continuously increasing emissions of all GHGs. The sustainable scenario was found to decrease the GHG emission levels of all gases with respect to BAU. The observed decrease was attributed to the group of measures termed the reduction of final energy consumption through energy efficiency measures.

  4. Dissipation range turbulent cascades in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Forest, C. B.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Sarff, J. S.; Fiksel, G.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Prager, S. C.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Dissipation range cascades in plasma turbulence are described and spectra are formulated from the scaled attenuation in wavenumber space of the spectral energy transfer rate. This yields spectra characterized by the product of a power law and exponential fall-off, applicable to all scales. Spectral indices of the power law and exponential fall-off depend on the scaling of the dissipation, the strength of the nonlinearity, and nonlocal effects when dissipation rates of multiple fluctuation fields are different. The theory is used to derive spectra for MHD turbulence with magnetic Prandtl number greater than unity, extending previous work. The theory is also applied to generic plasma turbulence by considering the spectrum from damping with arbitrary wavenumber scaling. The latter is relevant to ion temperature gradient turbulence modeled by gyrokinetics. The spectrum in this case has an exponential component that becomes weaker at small scale, giving a power law asymptotically. Results from the theory are compared to three very different types of turbulence. These include the magnetic plasma turbulence of the Madison Symmetric Torus, the MHD turbulence of liquid metal in the Madison Dynamo Experiment, and gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence.

  5. Turbulent magnetohydrodynamics in liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berhanu, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In electrically conducting fluids, the electromagnetic field is coupled with the fluid motion by induction effects. We studied different magnetohydrodynamic phenomena, using two experiments involving turbulent flows of liquid metal. The first mid-sized uses gallium. The second, using sodium, is conducted within the VKS (Von Karman Sodium) collaboration. It has led to the observation of the dynamo effect, namely converting a part of the kinetic energy of the fluid into magnetic energy. We have shown that, depending on forcing conditions, a statistically stationary dynamo, or dynamical regimes of magnetic field can be generated. In particular, polarity reversals similar to those of Earth's magnetic field were observed. Meanwhile, experiment with Gallium has been developed to study the effects of electromagnetic induction by turbulent flows in a more homogeneous and isotropic configuration than in the VKS experiment. Using data from these two experiments, we studied the advection of magnetic field by a turbulent flow and the induced fluctuations. The development of probes measuring electrical potential difference allowed us to further highlight the magnetic braking of a turbulent flow of Gallium by Lorentz force. This mechanism is involved in the saturation of the dynamo instability. (author) [fr

  6. The Effect of Hands-on '"Energy-Saving House" Learning Activities on Elementary School Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Regarding Energy Saving and Carbon-Emissions Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chang, Liang-Te; Lai, Chih-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) are widely regarded as important issues for progress towards ensuring sustainable forms of economic development. This Taiwanese study focuses on the effects of a series of educational activities about ESCER on students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Sixty fifth-grade students from two…

  7. Measurements of local chemistry and structure in Ni(O)-YSZ composites during reduction using energy-filtered environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Quentin; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy images are acquired during the reduction of a NiO-YSZ composite in H-2 up to 600 degrees C. Temperature-resolved quantitative information about both chemistry and structure is extracted with nm spatial resolution from the data, paving the way...

  8. ThinTool: a spreadsheet model to evaluate fuel reduction thinning cost, net energy output, and nutrient impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang-Kyun Han; Han-Sup Han; William J. Elliot; Edward M. Bilek

    2017-01-01

    We developed a spreadsheet-based model, named ThinTool, to evaluate the cost of mechanical fuel reduction thinning including biomass removal, to predict net energy output, and to assess nutrient impacts from thinning treatments in northern California and southern Oregon. A combination of literature reviews, field-based studies, and contractor surveys was used to...

  9. On energy consumption for size-reduction and yields from subsequent enzymatic saccharification of pretreated lodgepole pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Zhu; Junyong Zhu; Roland Gleisner; X.J. Pan

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of chemical pretreatment and disk-milling conditions on energy consumption for size-reduction and the efficiency of enzymatic cellulose saccharification of a softwood. Lodgepole pine wood chips produced from thinnings of a 100-year-old unmanaged forest were pretreated by hot-water, dilute-acid, and two SPORL processes (Sulfite...

  10. Reduction Potentials and Acidity Constants of Mn Superoxide Dismutase Calculated by QM/MM Free-Energy Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heimdal, J.; Kaukonen, M.; Srnec, Martin; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Ryde, U.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 17 (2011), s. 3337-3347 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acidity constants * enzymes * free-energy * perturbation * molecular modelling * reduction potentials Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  11. Electrochemically enhanced reduction of hexavalent chromium in contaminated clay: Kinetics, energy consumption, and application of pulse current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Tian Ran; Pamukcu, Sibel; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemically enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in clay medium is a technique based on inputting extra energy into the clay to drive the favorable redox reaction. In this study, the reducing reagent Fe(II) was transported into Cr(VI) spiked kaolinite clay by direct current to investigate...

  12. Turbulence and wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Arno J.; Peinke, Joachim; Mann, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed.......The nature of turbulent flow towards, near and behind a wind turbine, the effect of turbulence on the electricity production and the mechanical loading of individual and clustered wind turbines, and some future issues are discussed....

  13. How to Achieve CO2 Emission Reduction Goals by 2050. Abstracts of the 22nd Forum: Energy Day in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This years' annual Forum is held twenty-two years in a row. Analysing the energy development to 2050 takes into consideration the nature and complexity of the energy development, a long period of preparing plants and facilities, a long service life of plants, dimensions of technological development and continuous growth of energy demand. New reasons for a long-term observation of the energy development, at least by 2050, are climate change and radical reducing emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases according to the EU Energy Policy to 2050. The impact of permitted level of carbon dioxide emissions on the energy production and consumption is drastic and fundamentally changes the structure of energy production and consumption. The new legal and economical approach as well as the new technological development and and political determination are required for the implementation of energy policy which should lead to radical reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. The time is also an important factor because postponement of defining the new approach of energy policy decreases the possibility of its realisation. An additional argument for a new technological development is the mobilization of the science and industry for achieving that new step in technological development. This development is required in order to develop the energy industry without or with minimal greenhouse gas emissions. Furthermore, it is very important for renewable energy, at the carbon dioxide capture and storage, at the energy efficiency in the whole range of activities, from the production, transmission and distribution to the consumption of devices and equipment used by consumers, at smart grids, at the energy storage and vehicles. Reducing the energy consumption in buildings is energy, economical, architectual and organizational project which has to include every commercial and residential building. It is important to eliminate all disadvantages that incurred in the period when

  14. Theory of ITG turbulent saturation in stellarators: Identifying mechanisms to reduce turbulent transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.; Terry, P. W.; Faber, B. J.

    2018-02-01

    A three-field fluid model that allows for general three-dimensional equilibrium geometry is developed to describe ion temperature gradient turbulent saturation processes in stellarators. The theory relies on the paradigm of nonlinear transfer of energy from unstable to damped modes at comparable wavelength as the dominant saturation mechanism. The unstable-to-damped mode interaction is enabled by a third mode that for dominant energy transfer channels primarily serves as a regulator of the nonlinear energy transfer rate. The identity of the third wave in the interaction defines different scenarios for turbulent saturation with the dominant scenario depending upon the properties of the 3D geometry. The nonlinear energy transfer physics is quantified by the product of a turbulent correlation lifetime and a geometric coupling coefficient. The turbulent correlation time is determined by a three-wave frequency mismatch, which at long wavelength can be calculated from the sum of the linear eigenfrequencies of the three modes. Larger turbulent correlation times denote larger levels of nonlinear energy transfer and hence smaller turbulent transport. The theory provides an analytic prediction for how 3D shaping can be tuned to lower turbulent transport through saturation processes.

  15. Calculating energy-saving potentials of heat-island reduction strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, H.; Konopacki, S.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed summary tables (sorted by heating- and cooling-degree-days) to estimate the potential of heat-island reduction (HIR) strategies (i.e., solar-reflective roofs, shade trees, reflective pavements, and urban vegetation) to reduce cooling-energy use in buildings. The tables provide estimates of savings for both direct effect (reducing heat gain through the building shell) and indirect effect (reducing the ambient air temperature). In this analysis, we considered three building types that offer the most savings potential: residences, offices, and retail stores. Each building type was characterized in detail by Pre-1980 (old) or 1980 + (new) construction vintage and with natural gas or electricity as heating fuel. We defined prototypical-building characteristics for each building type and simulated the effects of HIR strategies on building cooling- and heating-energy use and peak power demand using the DOE-2.1E model and weather data for about 240 locations in the US. A statistical analysis of previously completed simulations for five cities was used to estimate the indirect savings. Our simulations included the effect of (1) solar-reflective roofing material on building (direct effect), (2) placement of deciduous shade trees near south and west walls of building (direct effect), and (3) ambient cooling achieved by urban reforestation and reflective building surfaces and pavements (indirect effect). Upon completion of estimating the direct and indirect energy savings for all the locations, we integrated the results in tables arranged by heating- and cooling-degree-days. We considered 15 bins for heating-degree-days, and 12 bins for cooling-degree-days. Energy use and savings are presented per 1000 ft 2 of roof area. In residences heated with gas and in climates with greater than 1000 cooling-degree-days, the annual electricity savings in Pre-1980 stock ranged from 650 to 1300 kWh/1000 ft 2 ; for 1980 + stock savings ranged 300-600 kWh/1000 ft 2 . For

  16. Developing an optimal energy supply strategy for Syria in view of GHG reduction with least-cost climate protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainoun, A.; Omar, H.; Almoustafa, A.; Seif Al-din, M.Kh.

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the outcomes of a two years CRP project entitled (Developing an optimal energy supply strategy for Syria in view of GHG reduction with least-cost climate protection). The main activity deals with a case study concerning the assessment of optimal Syrian energy supply strategy taking into account the impact of environmental constraints related to GHG reduction on the cost and prospects of energy sources and technologies with special emphasis on renewable and nuclear options. In a previous activity the future long-term development of Syrian energy and electricity demand has been analyzed according to various scenarios of socio-economic and technological development of the country. The results indicate that energy demand will grow rapidly in the next decades as consequent of many socio-economic and technological factors given by Syria's high population growth, its current economic transition, and its expected economic and technological development, particularly in the industry sector. To meet the projected future energy demand up to 2030, an optimal reference energy supply strategy with minimal supply cost has been developed taking into account, in particular, the availability of national energy resources and diversity of supply options. The analysis has been performed using the IAEA's optimization tool MESSAGE. MESSAGE is suitable to formulate and evaluate alternative energy supply strategies consistent with pre-defined constraints including limits on new investment, fuel availability and trade, environmental regulations, and market penetration rates for new technologies. To evaluate the potential of GHG reduction in the Syrian power sector an alternative energy supply scenario - Mitigation Scenario (Ren S ce) has been introduced reflecting the most probable adaptation measures of this sector to mitigate GHG emission by more dependency on renewable options. Compatible with the Kyoto agreement for developing countries, the CDM is being considered

  17. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  18. Slow food: sustained impact of harder foods on the reduction in energy intake over the course of the day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P; Forde, Ciarán G; Cheng, Yuejiao; Xu, Haohuan; Martin, Nathalie; de Graaf, Cees

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that oral processing characteristics like bite size and oral residence duration are related to the satiating efficiency of foods. Oral processing characteristics are influenced by food texture. Very little research has been done on the effect of food texture within solid foods on energy intake. The first objective was to investigate the effect of hardness of food on energy intake at lunch, and to link this effect to differences in food oral processing characteristics. The second objective was to investigate whether the reduction in energy intake at lunch will be compensated for in the subsequent dinner. Fifty subjects (11 male, BMI: 21±2 kg/m2, age: 24±2 y) participated in a cross-over study in which they consumed ad libitum from a lunch with soft foods or hard foods on two separate days. Oral processing characteristics at lunch were assessed by coding video records. Later on the same days, subjects consumed dinner ad libitum. Hard foods led to a ∼13% lower energy intake at lunch compared to soft foods (Pfoods were consumed with smaller bites, longer oral duration per gram food, and more chewing per gram food compared to the soft foods (Pfoods led to reduced energy intake compared to soft foods, and this reduction in energy intake was sustained over the next meal. We argue that the differences in oral processing characteristics produced by the hardness of the foods explain the effect on intake. The sustained reduction in energy intake suggests that changes in food texture can be a helpful tool in reducing the overall daily energy intake.

  19. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at

  20. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-01-01

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  1. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom); TenBarge, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dorland, W. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States); Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, CB3 0EH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  2. Progress in turbulence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in experiments and eddy simulations, as an introduction to a discussion of turbulence modeling for engineers is reviewed. The most important advances in the last decade rely on computers: microcomputers to control laboratory experiments, especially for multidimensional imaging, and supercomputers to simulate turbulence. These basic studies in turbulence research are leading to genuine breakthroughs in prediction methods for engineers and earth scientists. The three main branches of turbulence research: experiments, simulations (numerically-accurate three-dimensional, time-dependent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, with any empiricism confined to the smallest eddies), and modeling (empirical closure of time-averaged equations for turbulent flow) are discussed. 33 refs

  3. Economic growth, energy conservation and emissions reduction: A comparative analysis based on panel data for 8 Asian-Pacific countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Shuwen; Ding Yongxia; Niu Yunzhu; Li Yixin; Luo Guanghua

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the causality between energy consumption, GDP growth and carbon emissions for eight Asia-Pacific countries from 1971 to 2005 using the panel data. The results indicate that there are long-run equilibrium relationships between these variables. Additionally, causality from energy consumption to CO 2 emissions was observed generally, but there were some opposite relationships also. Parameter estimations of the panel data model indicate that there are great differences in the carbon emissions, the efficiencies of energy use, carbon emissions of unit GDP and unit energy consumption between developed and developing countries. The base carbon emissions, per capita energy consumption and efficiency of energy use in developing countries are far lower than in developed countries; however, the CO 2 emissions per unit of energy use is higher. Although developing countries may reduce their CO 2 emission per unit energy use, total energy consumption will rise rapidly with economic development. Thus, developing countries must determine how to undergo economic growth while conserving energy and reducing emissions. To respond to global climate change, it is necessary to develop innovative technology for energy use, transform the energy structure and conduct the clean development mechanism. - Research highlights: → There is a complex nexus between GDP-energy consumption and CO 2 emissions, the causalities from energy consumption to CO 2 emissions are observed generally, but there are some opposite relationships also. → There are great differences in the carbon emissions, the efficiencies of energy use, carbon emissions of unit GDP and unit energy consumption between developed and developing countries. → There is a large potential for carbon emission reduction in the developing countries through transforming the energy structure, improving energy utilization efficiency and controlling the total energy. → To respond to global climate change

  4. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Melting Efficiency Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator Kent Peaslee; Co-PI’s: Von Richards, Jeffrey Smith

    2012-07-31

    Steel foundries melt recycled scrap in electric furnaces and typically consume 35-100% excess energy from the theoretical energy requirement required to pour metal castings. This excess melting energy is multiplied by yield losses during casting and finishing operations resulting in the embodied energy in a cast product typically being three to six times the theoretical energy requirement. The purpose of this research project was to study steel foundry melting operations to understand energy use and requirements for casting operations, define variations in energy consumption, determine technologies and practices that are successful in reducing melting energy and develop new melting techniques and tools to improve the energy efficiency of melting in steel foundry operations.

  5. Control over multiscale mixing in broadband-forced turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of explicit flow modulation on the dispersion of a passive scalar field are studied. Broadband forcing is applied to homogeneous isotropic turbulence to modulate the energy cascading and alter the kinetic energy spectrum. Consequently, a manipulation of turbulent flow can be achieved

  6. Homogeneous turbulence dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sagaut, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    This book provides state-of-the-art results and theories in homogeneous turbulence, including anisotropy and compressibility effects with extension to quantum turbulence, magneto-hydodynamic turbulence  and turbulence in non-newtonian fluids. Each chapter is devoted to a given type of interaction (strain, rotation, shear, etc.), and presents and compares experimental data, numerical results, analysis of the Reynolds stress budget equations and advanced multipoint spectral theories. The role of both linear and non-linear mechanisms is emphasized. The link between the statistical properties and the dynamics of coherent structures is also addressed. Despite its restriction to homogeneous turbulence, the book is of interest to all people working in turbulence, since the basic physical mechanisms which are present in all turbulent flows are explained. The reader will find a unified presentation of the results and a clear presentation of existing controversies. Special attention is given to bridge the results obta...

  7. More gas, less coal, and less CO2? Unilateral CO2 reduction policy with more than one carbon energy source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daubanes, Julien Xavier; Henriet, Fanny; Schubert, Katheline

    We examine an open economy’s strategy to reduce its carbon emissions by replacing its consumption of coal—very carbon intensive—with gas—less so. Unlike the standard analysis of carbon leakage, unilateral carbon-reduction policies with more than one carbon energy source may turn counter......-productive, ultimately increasing world emissions. Thus, we establish testable conditions as to whether a governmental emission-reduction commitment warrants the exploitation of gas, and whether such a strategy increases global emissions. We also characterize the extent to which this unilateral policy makes the rest...

  8. Framework for Testing the Effectiveness of Bat and Eagle Impact-Reduction Strategies at Wind Energy Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Karin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DeGeorge, Elise [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-13

    The objectives of this framework are to facilitate the study design and execution to test the effectiveness of bat and eagle impact-reduction strategies at wind energy sites. Through scientific field research, the wind industry and its partners can help determine if certain strategies are ready for operational deployment or require further development. This framework should be considered a living document to be improved upon as fatality-reduction technologies advance from the initial concepts to proven readiness (through project- and technology-specific testing) and as scientific field methods improve.

  9. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a 'condensate', that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small kllel)). A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model

  10. Developments in greenhouse gas emissions and net energy use in Danish agriculture - How to achieve substantial CO2 reductions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Olesen, J.E.; Petersen, S.O.; Petersen, B.M.; Jorgensen, U.; Kristensen, T.; Hutchings, N.J.; Gyldenkaerne, S.; Hermansen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture are a significant contributor to total Danish emissions. Consequently, much effort is currently given to the exploration of potential strategies to reduce agricultural emissions. This paper presents results from a study estimating agricultural GHG emissions in the form of methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide (including carbon sources and sinks, and the impact of energy consumption/bioenergy production) from Danish agriculture in the years 1990-2010. An analysis of possible measures to reduce the GHG emissions indicated that a 50-70% reduction of agricultural emissions by 2050 relative to 1990 is achievable, including mitigation measures in relation to the handling of manure and fertilisers, optimization of animal feeding, cropping practices, and land use changes with more organic farming, afforestation and energy crops. In addition, the bioenergy production may be increased significantly without reducing the food production, whereby Danish agriculture could achieve a positive energy balance. - Highlights: → GHG emissions from Danish agriculture 1990-2010 are calculated, including carbon sequestration. → Effects of measures to further reduce GHG emissions are listed. → Land use scenarios for a substantially reduced GHG emission by 2050 are presented. → A 50-70% reduction of agricultural emissions by 2050 relative to 1990 is achievable. → Via bioenergy production Danish agriculture could achieve a positive energy balance. - Scenario studies of greenhouse gas mitigation measures illustrate the possible realization of CO 2 reductions for Danish agriculture by 2050, sustaining current food production.

  11. Effects of anisotropic turbulent thermal diffusion on spherical magnetoconvection in the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivers, D. J.; Phillips, C. G.

    2018-03-01

    that anisotropic turbulent thermal diffusivity has a strong destabilising effect on magneto-convective instabilities, which may relax the tight energy budget constraining geodynamo models. The enhanced instability is not due to a reduction of the total diffusivity. The anisotropy also strengthens instabilities which break the symmetry of the underlying state, which may facilitate magnetic field reversal. Geostrophic flow appears to suppress the symmetry breaking modes and magnetic instabilities. Through symmetry breaking and the geostrophic flow the anisotropy may provide a mechanism of magnetic field reversal and its suppression in computational dynamo models.

  12. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  13. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  14. Dissipative structures in magnetorotational turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Johnathan; Latter, Henrik N.

    2018-03-01

    Via the process of accretion, magnetorotational turbulence removes energy from a disk's orbital motion and transforms it into heat. Turbulent heating is far from uniform and is usually concentrated in small regions of intense dissipation, characterised by abrupt magnetic reconnection and higher temperatures. These regions are of interest because they might generate non-thermal emission, in the form of flares and energetic particles, or thermally process solids in protoplanetary disks. Moreover, the nature of the dissipation bears on the fundamental dynamics of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) itself: local simulations indicate that the large-scale properties of the turbulence (e.g. saturation levels, the stress-pressure relationship) depend on the short dissipative scales. In this paper we undertake a numerical study of how the MRI dissipates and the small-scale dissipative structures it employs to do so. We use the Godunov code RAMSES and unstratified compressible shearing boxes. Our simulations reveal that dissipation is concentrated in ribbons of strong magnetic reconnection that are significantly elongated in azimuth, up to a scale height. Dissipative structures are hence meso-scale objects, and potentially provide a route by which large scales and small scales interact. We go on to show how these ribbons evolve over time — forming, merging, breaking apart, and disappearing. Finally, we reveal important couplings between the large-scale density waves generated by the MRI and the small-scale structures, which may illuminate the stress-pressure relationship in MRI turbulence.

  15. Key Questions for Achieving EU Emission Reductions without Abandoning Other Energy Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stang, G.

    2014-01-01

    What considerations must be addressed to ensure that efforts to achieve the EU's new 2030 emissions and renewables targets are compatible with the other energy goals of the EU and its member states: energy security, and energy affordability? How should these other energy goals be addressed when pursuing energy efficiency improvements, upgrading electricity systems to handle different renewable energy sources, and developing policies to reduce overall CO2 emissions? Markets have been defined as being central to achieving all of Europe's energy goals - both the creation of an EU internal energy market and the use of the Emissions Trading System (ETS) to allow a market for managing a portion of the continent's greenhouse gas emissions. But once these markets are in place and operational, there will still be great variances among the goals, instruments, and level of market integration available for the different countries and regions of Europe. Choosing the most cost effective mechanisms for pursuing the new goals will require effective use of the flexibility that is available - an improved ETS, tradable national targets for non-ETS emissions, and a rapidly widening array of cost-effective renewable energy options. Sufficient use of this flexibility should facilitate the flow of energy investments toward energy system improvements where there is low-hanging fruit - anywhere in the continent - without requiring that local or continental energy security goals be sacrificed. (author).

  16. Combined heat and power systems for commercial buildings: investigating cost, emissions, and primary energy reduction based on system components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda D.

    Combined heat and power (CHP) systems produce electricity and useful heat from fuel. When power is produced near a building which consumes power, transmission losses are averted, and heat which is a byproduct of power production may be useful to the building. That thermal energy can be used for hot water or space heating, among other applications. This dissertation focuses on CHP systems using natural gas, a common fuel, and systems serving commercial buildings in the United States. First, the necessary price difference between purchased electricity and purchased fuel is analyzed in terms of the efficiencies of system components by comparing CHP with a conventional separate heat and power (SHP) configuration, where power is purchased from the electrical grid and heat is provided by a gas boiler. Similarly, the relationship between CDE due to electricity purchases and due to fuel purchases is analyzed as well as the relationship between primary energy conversion factors for electricity and fuel. The primary energy conversion factor indicates the quantity of source energy necessary to produce the energy purchased at the site. Next, greenhouse gas emissions are investigated for a variety of commercial buildings using CHP or SHP. The relationship between the magnitude of the reduction in emissions and the parameters of the CHP system is explored. The cost savings and reduction in primary energy consumption are evaluated for the same buildings. Finally, a CHP system is analyzed with the addition of a thermal energy storage (TES) component, which can store excess thermal energy and deliver it later if necessary. The potential for CHP with TES to reduce cost, emissions, and primary energy consumption is investigated for a variety of buildings. A case study is developed for one building for which TES does provide additional benefits over a CHP system alone, and the requirements for a water tank TES device are examined.

  17. A Bayesian model to correct underestimated 3-D wind speeds from sonic anemometers increases turbulent components of the surface energy balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    John M. Frank; William J. Massman; Brent E. Ewers

    2016-01-01

    Sonic anemometers are the principal instruments in micrometeorological studies of turbulence and ecosystem fluxes. Common designs underestimate vertical wind measurements because they lack a correction for transducer shadowing, with no consensus on a suitable correction. We reanalyze a subset of data collected during field experiments in 2011 and 2013 featuring two or...

  18. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse