WorldWideScience

Sample records for tunnelling microscopy study

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of diamond films and optoelectronic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose M.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we report on progress achieved from 12/1/92 to 10/1/93 under the grant entitled 'Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Diamond Films and Optoelectronic Materials'. We have set-up a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond film growth system and a Raman spectroscopy system to study the nucleation and growth of diamond films with atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A unique feature of the diamond film growth system is that diamond films can be transferred directly to the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber of a scanning tunneling microscope without contaminating the films by exposure to air. The University of North Texas (UNT) provided $20,000 this year as matching funds for the NASA grant to purchase the diamond growth system. In addition, UNT provided a Coherent Innova 90S Argon ion laser, a Spex 1404 double spectrometer, and a Newport optical table costing $90,000 to set-up the Raman spectroscopy system. The CVD diamond growth system and Raman spectroscopy system will be used to grow and characterize diamond films with atomic resolution using STM as described in our proposal. One full-time graduate student and one full-time undergraduate student are supported under this grant. In addition, several graduate and undergraduate students were supported during the summer to assist in setting-up the diamond growth and Raman spectroscopy systems. We have obtained research results concerning STM of the structural and electronic properties of CVD grown diamond films, and STM and scanning tunneling spectroscopy of carbon nanotubes. In collaboration with the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) group at UNT, we have also obtained results concerning the optoelectronic material siloxene. These results were published in refereed scientific journals, submitted for publication, and presented as invited and contributed talks at scientific conferences.

  2. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed

  3. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of GaAs(001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qi-Kun; Hashizume, T.; Sakurai, T.

    1999-03-01

    While GaAs(001) is the most commonly used substrate in fabrication of wireless and opto-electronic devices based on III-V compound semiconductors by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metallorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and related techniques, its surface structure have been disputed since the beginning of development of the techniques. Invention of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has revolutionized the approach of surface/interface investigation, contributing greatly in the atomistic understanding of the GaAs surface phases. This paper reviews the STM studies of principal reconstructions, from As-rich c(4×4), 2×4, 2×6 to Ga-rich 4×2 and 4×6, found on the GaAs (001) surface. These studies, together with advanced theoretical efforts, have helped us to establish a unified structural model for various reconstructions, with which we can now explain most of the observations and long-standing controversies in atomic structures and surface stoichiometries.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of glucose oxidase on gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losic, D.; Shapter, J.G.; Gooding, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Three immobilization methods have been used for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of glucose oxidase (GOD) on gold. They are based on a) physical adsorption from solution, b) microcontact printing and c) covalent bonding onto self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). The STM images are used to provide information about the organization of individual GOD molecules and more densely packed monolayers of GOD on electrode surfaces, thus providing information of the role of interfacial structure on biosensor performance. The use of atomically flat gold substrates enables easy distinction of deposited enzyme features from the flat gold substrate. Microcontact printing is found to be a more reliable method than adsorption from solution for preparing individual GOD molecules on the gold surface STM images of printed samples reveal two different shapes of native GOD molecules. One is a butterfly shape with dimensions of 10 ± 1 nm x 6 ± 1 nm, assigned to the lying position of molecule while the second is an approximately spherical shape with dimensions of 6.5 ± 1 nm x 5 ± 1nm assigned to a standing position. Isolated clusters of 5 to 6 GOD molecules are also observed. With monolayer coverage, GOD molecules exhibit a tendency to organize themselves into a two dimensional array with adequate sample stability to obtain high-resolution STM images. Within these two-dimensional arrays are clearly seen repeating clusters of five to six enzyme molecules in a unit STM imaging of GOD monolayers covalently immobilized onto SAM (MPA) are considerably more difficult than when the enzyme is adsorbed directly onto the metal. Cluster structures are observed both high and low coverage despite the fact that native GOD is a negatively charged molecule. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  5. Molecules on vicinal Au surfaces studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Jensen, H; Berndt, R; Rurali, R; Lorente, N

    2006-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we investigated the adsorption characteristics of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride and fullerenes on Au(788), Au(433), and Au(778). On Au(788) and Au(778), 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride exhibits three coexisting superstructures, which do not reflect the periodicity of the hosting substrate. The adsorption on Au(433) leads to the formation of molecule chains along the step edges after annealing the sample. Fullerene molecules on Au(788) arrange in a mesh of islands, which extends over several hundreds of nanometres with an extraordinarily high periodicity. A combination of fullerene adsorption and annealing leads to facetting of Au(433) and the formation of extraordinarily long fullerene stripes

  6. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  7. Metallocene Molecular Clusters Studied with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeonghoon; Ham, Ungdon; Lee, Minjun; Lim, Seong Joon; Kuk, Young

    2014-03-01

    Atomic spins and molecular magnets have been actively reported using Scanning Tunneling Microscope(STM) in recent studies. One can even assemble an artificial magnet by STM manipulation. Manganocene((C5H5)2 Mn), a sandwich complex of metallocene, is composed of one manganese atom and two cyclopentadianyl ligands. This molecule is known to reveal not only high spin number S = 5/2 at room temperature but also two structural states: monomer and molecular chain. In this presentation, we report STM images and spectroscopic results of these monomers and dimers. We try to map the molecular electronic state and the spin texture. The molecule is adsorbed on an insulating layer to decouple the spin state from the metallic substrate. We will present that manganocene can become a basic element of a spin chain.

  8. Adsorption of Cu phthalocyanine on Pt modified Ge(001): A scanning tunneling microscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saedi, A.; Berkelaar, Robin P.; Kumar, Avijit; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption configurations of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules on platinum-modified Ge(001) have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. After deposition at room temperature and cooling down to 77 K the CuPc molecules are still dynamic. However, after annealing at 550±50 K, the

  9. Tetrairon(III) Single Molecule Magnet Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtek; Jeong, Hogyun; Lee, Minjun; Kwon, Jeonghoon; Yu, Jaejun; Mamun, Shariful Islam; Gupta, Gajendra; Kim, Jinkwon; Kuk, Young

    2011-03-01

    Tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnet (SMM) on a clean Au(111) has studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to understand quantum mechanical tunneling of magnetization and hysteresis of pure molecular origin. Before the STM studies, elemental analysis, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement and Energy Dispersive X- ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out to check the robustness of the sample. The STM image of this molecule shows a hexagonal shape, with a phenyl ring at the center and surrounding six dipivaloylmethane ligands. Two peaks are observed at 0.5 eV, 1.5 eV in the STS results, agreeing well with the first principles calculations. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SPSTM) measurements have been performed with a magnetic tip to get the magnetization image of the SMM. We could observe the antiferromagnetic coupling and a centered- triangular topology with six alkoxo bridges inside the molecule while applying external magnetic fields.

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  11. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - image interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maca, F.

    1998-01-01

    The basic ideas of image interpretation in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy are presented using simple quantum-mechanical models and supplied with examples of successful application. The importance is stressed of a correct interpretation of this brilliant experimental surface technique

  12. Pulse Plating on Gold Surfaces Studied by In Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Bech-Nielsen, Gregers; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    Deposition of bulk copper on thin film gold surfaces is carried out by computer-aided pulse plating. It is demonstrated that the morphology of the copper deposit can be studied by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy both in potentiostatic experiments and in galvanostatic experiments. Optimized...... procedures for obtaining smooth deposits by pulse plating are explained in terms of a levelling effect. Possible non-faradaic processes observed in measurements with high frequency pulse plating are discussed....

  13. Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houselt, Arie; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy has revolutionized our ability to image, study, and manipulate solid surfaces on the size scale of atoms. One important limitation of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is, however, its poor time resolution. Recording a standard image with a STM typically takes

  14. Scanning tunneling microscopy of monoatomic gold chains on vicinal Si(335) surface: experimental and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krawiec, M.; Kwapinski, T.; Jalochowski, M. [Institute of Physics and Nanotechnology Center, M. Curie-Sklodowska University, pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2005-02-01

    We study electronic and topographic properties of the Si(335) surface, containing Au wires parallel to the steps. We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) supplemented by reflection of high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) technique. The STM data show the space and voltage dependent oscillations of the distance between STM tip and the surface which can be explained within one band tight binding Hubbard model. We calculate the STM current using nonequilibrium Keldysh Green function formalism. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-17

    the study of surfact strain. A variety of studies were conducted on Au(in air) CdTe (in air), Hg1-xMnxTe (under glycerin), and Hg 1-xCdx Te (in air...HgCdTe and CdMnTe. (7) Scribing of adjacent parallel lines on the HgCdTe and CdMnTe surfaces. (8) Identification of a new c(4x6) reconstruction on some...tihodoluminescence spectroscopy, coupled with pulsed laser annealing-to reveal systematics between interface chemical and electronic structure. The

  16. The study of optimal conditions of electrochemical etching of tunnel electron microscopy tungsten tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguiano, E.; Aguilar, M.; Olivar, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained during the study made in the electrochemical etching of tunneling electron microscopy tungsten tips. The experiments was made using DC and two usual electrolytes: KOH and NaOH. For the tip preparation we used a electrochemical cell with stainless steel cathode and the tungsten wire as anode. the electrodes was introduced in a glass recipient containing the electrolytic solution. We study the effects of applied voltage, polish time, tip length and electrolyte concentration as process relevant parameters. The best condition for tip preparation was obtained with a metallurgical microscope and with a SEM.EDX and Auger analysis was made. The results shown the better tips was made with KOH as electrolyte with a limited concentration range (2-4 normal) and applied voltage (2-6 volts) (Author) 20 refs

  17. Fabrication of Gate-tunable Graphene Devices for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies with Coulomb Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Han Sae; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wong, Dillon; Germany, Chad; Kahn, Salman; Kim, Youngkyou; Aikawa, Andrew S; Desai, Dhruv K; Rodgers, Griffin F; Bradley, Aaron J; Velasco, Jairo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Wang, Feng; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F

    2015-07-24

    Owing to its relativistic low-energy charge carriers, the interaction between graphene and various impurities leads to a wealth of new physics and degrees of freedom to control electronic devices. In particular, the behavior of graphene's charge carriers in response to potentials from charged Coulomb impurities is predicted to differ significantly from that of most materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) can provide detailed information on both the spatial and energy dependence of graphene's electronic structure in the presence of a charged impurity. The design of a hybrid impurity-graphene device, fabricated using controlled deposition of impurities onto a back-gated graphene surface, has enabled several novel methods for controllably tuning graphene's electronic properties. Electrostatic gating enables control of the charge carrier density in graphene and the ability to reversibly tune the charge and/or molecular states of an impurity. This paper outlines the process of fabricating a gate-tunable graphene device decorated with individual Coulomb impurities for combined STM/STS studies. These studies provide valuable insights into the underlying physics, as well as signposts for designing hybrid graphene devices.

  18. Surface x-ray scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy studies at the Au(111) electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocko, B.M.; Magnussen, O.M.; Wang, J.X.; Adzic, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter reviews Surface X-ray Scattering and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy results carried out at the Au(111) surface under electrochemical conditions. Results are presented for the reconstructed surface, and for bromide and thallium monolayers. These examples are used to illustrate the complementary nature of the techniques

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of thin foil x-ray mirrors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Besenbacher, Flemming; Garnaes, Jorgen

    1990-01-01

    In this paper scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of x-ray mirrors are presented. The x-ray mirrors are 0.3 mm thick dip-lacquered aluminum foils coated with gold by evaporation, as well as state-of-the-art polished surfaces coated with gold, platinum, or iridium. The measurements...

  20. Hydrogen adsorption on Ru(001) studied by Scanning TunnelingMicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarkhanov, Mous; Rose, Franck; Fomin, Evgeny; Ogletree, D.Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-01-18

    The adsorption of hydrogen on Ru(001) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy at temperatures around 50 K. Hydrogen was found to adsorb dissociatively forming different ordered structures as a function of coverage. In order of increasing coverage {theta} in monolayers (ML) these were ({radical}3 x {radical}3)r30{sup o} at {theta} = 0.3 ML; (2 x 1) at {theta} = 0.50 ML, (2 x 2)-3H at {theta} = 0.75, and (1 x 1) at {theta} = 1.00. Some of these structures were observed to coexist at intermediate coverage values. Close to saturation of 1 ML, H-vacancies (unoccupied three fold fcc hollow Ru sites) were observed either as single entities or forming transient aggregations. These vacancies diffuse and aggregate to form active sites for the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen.

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of organic monolayers adsorbed on the rhodium(111) crystal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernota, Paul Davis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy studies were carried out on ordered overlayers on the (111) surface of rhodium. These adsorbates include carbon monoxide (CO), cyclohexane, cyclohexene, 1,4-cyclohexadiene, para-xylene, and meta-xylene. Coadsorbate systems included: CO with ethylidyne, CO with para- and meta-xylene, and para-xylene with meta-xylene. In the case of CO, the structure of the low coverage (2x2) overlayer has been observed. The symmetry of the unit cell in this layer suggests that the CO is adsorbed in the 3-fold hollow sites. There were also two higher coverage surface structures with (√7x√7) unit cells. One of these is composed of trimers of CO and has three CO molecules in each unit cell. The other structure has an additional CO molecule, making a total of four. This extra CO sits on a top site.

  2. An experimental study of furan adsorption and decomposition on vicinal palladium surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, A.; Chiang, S.

    2018-04-01

    The intact adsorption and decomposition of furan (C4H4O) on vicinal palladium surfaces with (111)-oriented terraces has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) over a range of temperatures. STM images at 225 K show that furan molecules lie flat and prefer to adsorb at upper step edges. At 225 K, furan molecules adsorbed on "narrow" terraces of 20 to 45 Å in width appear to diffuse more readily than those adsorbed on "wide" terraces of 160 to 220 Å. A distinct population of smaller features appears in STM images on "narrow" terraces at 288 K and on "wide" terraces at 415 K and is identified with the C3H3 decomposition product, agreeing with prior studies which demonstrated that furan dissociates on Pd(111) to yield carbon monoxide (CO) and a C3H3 moiety in the 280 to 320 K range. Based on our direct visualization of this reaction using STM, we propose a spatial mechanism in which adsorption of furan at upper step edges allows catalysis of the dissociation, followed by diffusion of the product to lower step edges.

  3. Defects in oxide surfaces studied by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas König

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfaces of thin oxide films were investigated by means of a dual mode NC-AFM/STM. Apart from imaging the surface termination by NC-AFM with atomic resolution, point defects in magnesium oxide on Ag(001 and line defects in aluminum oxide on NiAl(110, respectively, were thoroughly studied. The contact potential was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM and the electronic structure by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS. On magnesium oxide, different color centers, i.e., F0, F+, F2+ and divacancies, have different effects on the contact potential. These differences enabled classification and unambiguous differentiation by KPFM. True atomic resolution shows the topography at line defects in aluminum oxide. At these domain boundaries, STS and KPFM verify F2+-like centers, which have been predicted by density functional theory calculations. Thus, by determining the contact potential and the electronic structure with a spatial resolution in the nanometer range, NC-AFM and STM can be successfully applied on thin oxide films beyond imaging the topography of the surface atoms.

  4. Adsorption stages of O on Ru(0001) studied by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Meinel, K; Ammer, C; Beckmann, A; Neddermeyer, H

    1997-01-01

    The adsorption of O on Ru(0001) at a temperature of 400 K is studied in detail by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). With increasing O coverage, an ordered p(2x2) structure develops, followed by a p(2x1) structure. While the p(2x2) structure grows via island formation, the p(2x1) structure is abruptly formed by a disorder - order phase transition. After completion of the p(2x2) structure at a coverage of 0.25 ML, the surface develops a rough structure where the (2x2) units remain visible but appear with different heights. As the origin of this phenomenon, we propose additional O-O interactions and/or subsurface O due to the increase in O coverage. At coverages between 0.3 monolayer (ML) and 0.35 ML, different preformations of the p(2x1) structure are observed. First, small fragments of p(2x1) rows develop, which are randomly distributed over the surface and rotated by 120 deg. with respect to each other. They grow in one dimension and induce a criss-cross arrangement of linear chains of O atoms. T...

  5. Molecular electronics of a single photosystem I reaction center: Studies with scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, I.; Lee, J.W.; Warmack, R.J.; Allison, D.P.; Greenbaum, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Thylakoids and photosystem I (PSI) reaction centers were imaged by scanning tunneling microscopy. The thylakoids were isolated from spinach chloroplasts, and PSI reaction centers were extracted from thylakoid membranes. Because thylakoids are relatively thick nonconductors, they were sputter-coated with Pd/Au before imaging. PSI photosynthetic centers and chemically platinized PSI were investigated without sputter-coating. They were mounted on flat gold substrates that had been treated with mercaptoacetic acid to help bind the proteins. With tunneling spectroscopy, the PSI centers displayed a semiconductor-like response with a band gap of 1.8 eV. Lightly platinized (platinized for 1 hr) centers displayed diode-like conduction that resulted in dramatic contrast changes between images taken with opposite bias voltages. The electronic properties of this system were stable under long-term storage. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  6. For seeing atoms: tunnel effect microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, E.; Humbert, A.

    1985-01-01

    A new technique, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is described, which allows surface detail to be resolved at atomic level. The principles are described, together with an account of a recent experiment; various theoretical considerations are examined. Samples of recorded topographies are depicted and analysed. It is concluded that the technique is of value for chemical studies of surfaces on an atomic scale. (D.A.J.)

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of superconducting boron-doped diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terukazu Nishizaki, Yoshihiko Takano, Masanori Nagao, Tomohiro Takenouchi, Hiroshi Kawarada and Norio Kobayashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS experiments on (1 1 1-oriented epitaxial films of heavily boron-doped diamond grown by using the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. STM/STS measurements were performed by 3He-refrigerator based STM under ultra-high vacuum. The STM topography on the film surface shows a corrugation (with a typical size of ~1 μm and grain-like microstructures (~5–20 nm. The tunneling conductance spectra do not show large spatial dependence and superconductivity is observed independent of the surface structures. The tunneling spectra are analyzed by the Dynes function and the superconducting energy gap is estimated to be Δ=0.87 meV at T=0.47 K, corresponding to 2Δ/kBTc=3.7. The relatively large value of the broadening parameter Γ=0.38 meV is discussed in terms of the inelastic electron scattering processes.

  8. Terthiophene on Au(111: A scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berndt Koslowski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Terthiophene (3T molecules adsorbed on herringbone (HB reconstructed Au(111 surfaces in the low coverage regime were investigated by means of low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and spectroscopy (STS under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The 3T molecules adsorb preferentially in fcc regions of the HB reconstruction with their longer axis oriented perpendicular to the soliton walls of the HB and at maximum mutual separation. The latter observation points to a repulsive interaction between molecules probably due to parallel electrical dipoles formed during adsorption. Constant-separation (I-V and constant-current (z-V STS clearly reveal the highest occupied (HOMO and lowest unoccupied (LUMO molecular orbitals, which are found at −1.2 eV and +2.3 eV, respectively. The HOMO–LUMO gap corresponds to that of a free molecule, indicating a rather weak interaction between 3T and Au(111. According to conductivity maps, the HOMO and LUMO are inhomogeneously distributed over the adsorbed 3T, with the HOMO being located at the ends of the linear molecule, and the LUMO symmetrically with respect to the longer axis of the molecule at the center of its flanks. Analysis of spectroscopic data reveals details of the contrast mechanism of 3T/Au(111 in STM. For that, the Shockley-like surface state of Au(111 plays an essential role and appears shifted outwards from the surface in the presence of the molecule. As a consequence, the molecule can be imaged even at a tunneling bias within its HOMO–LUMO gap. A more quantitative analysis of this detail resolves a previous discrepancy between the fairly small apparent STM height of 3T molecules (1.4–2.0 nm, depending on tunneling bias and a corresponding larger value of 3.5 nm based on X-ray standing wave analysis. An additionally observed linear decrease of the differential tunneling barrier at positive bias when determined on top of a 3T molecule is compared to the bias independent barrier obtained on

  9. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of chromium on a Cr(001) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoute, J; Kawahara, S L; Chacon, C; Repain, V; Girard, Y; Rousset, S

    2011-02-02

    Several tens of chromium layers were deposited at 250 °C on a Cr(001) surface and investigated by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Chromium is found to grow with a mound-like morphology resulting from the stacking of several monolayers which do not uniformly cover the whole surface of the substrate. The terminal plane consists of an irregular array of Cr islands with lateral sizes smaller than 20 × 20 nm(2). Combined AES and STS measurements reveal the presence of a significant amount of segregants prior to and after deposition. A detailed investigation of the surface shows that it consists of two types of patches. Thanks to STS measurements, the two types of area have been identified as being either chromium pure or segregant rich. SP-STM experiments have evidenced that the antiferromagnetic layer coupling remains in the chromium mounds after deposition and is not significantly affected by the presence of the segregants.

  10. Co on Pt(111) studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, F.K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis the electronic properties of the bare Pt(111) surface, the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of monolayer and double-layer high Co nanostructures as well as the spin-averaged electronic structure of single Co atoms on Pt(111) were studied by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS). The experiments on the bare Pt(111) surface and on single Co atoms have been performed in an STM facility operating at temperatures of down to 0.3 K and at magnetic fields of up to 14 T under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The facility has been taken into operation within the time period of this thesis and its specifications were tested by STS measurements. These characterization measurements show a very high stability of the tunneling junction and an energy resolution of about 100 {mu}eV, which is close to the thermal limit. The investigation of the electronic structure of the bare Pt(111) surface reveals the existence of an unoccupied surface state. By a comparison of the measured dispersion to first-principles electronic structure calculations the state is assigned to an sp-derived surface band at the lower boundary of the projected bulk band gap. The surface state exhibits a strong spin-orbit coupling induced spin splitting. The close vicinity to the bulk bands leads to a strong linear contribution to the dispersion and thus to a deviant appearance in the density of states in comparison to the surface states of the (111) surfaces of noble metals. A detailed study of Co monolayer and double-layer nanostructures on the Pt(111) surface shows that both kinds of nanostructures exhibit a highly inhomogeneous electronic structure which changes at the scale of only a few Aa due to a strong stacking dependence with respect to the Pt(111) substrate. With the help of first principles calculations the different spectroscopic appearance for Co atoms within the Co monolayer is assigned to a stacking dependent hybridization of Co states

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy study on the oxidation and annealing of Ga/Si(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Arifumi; Naeshirozako, Takuya; Nishimura, Keiya; Yoshimura, Masamichi; Kadono, Kohei

    2017-04-01

    The oxidation and annealing of Ga/Si(111) surfaces with a coverage below 1 ML have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various gallium-induced phases from a partially \\sqrt{3} × \\sqrt{3} -R30°-covered 7×7 structure (less than 1/3 ML) to a fully covered Ga/Si bilayer (close to 1 ML) were successfully prepared on Si(111) surfaces. Oxygen exposure at elevated temperatures induced a structural change in the bilayer phase, in which etching seems to start from the domain boundaries of the tiled bilayer structure. After 200 L oxygen exposure, the bilayer changed to randomly distributed nanocluster-like and nanoparticle-like structures. The evolution of the oxidized surface induced by annealing in ultrahigh vacuum suggests the formation of volatile compounds such as Ga2O and SiO.

  12. Surface Morphology and Overlayer Formation Kinetics of OXYGEN/SILVER(110) Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Woei Wu.

    1995-01-01

    I have applied scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study clean and oxygen-covered vicinal Ag(110) surfaces at room temperature. Experimental results of surface morphology/stability, surface mass transport and surface chemical reactivity are presented. On clean vicinal Ag(110) surfaces, the steps distribute under the influence of step-step interactions. The terrace width distributions indicate an additional oscillatory component besides an l^{-2} interaction term. If the surface is contaminated slightly (quasi-clean), isolated "pinning sites" impede the motion of steps. The interactions between steps push the steps across the pinning site, resulting in a curved step front. When oxygen atoms adsorb on stepped Ag(110), a dramatic change in surface morphology occurs. The surface separates into two distinct phases--step bunches and large terraces (facets). The orientational instability is closely related to the linear "added-row" structure of the oxygen overlayer, as the long O chains push steps into bunches. The O chains do not push the steps effectively when O chains orient perpendicular to steps, and the faceting proceeds through nucleation. If the O chains orient near parallel to steps, however, O chains push the steps easily and the faceting proceeds through spinodal decomposition. To understand the mass transport during faceting, I quantify the thermal step fluctuations by employing a Langevin statistical analysis. The mass transport mechanism at the step edge is shown to be by atomic exchange between steps and terraces, making the step an effective source or sink for Ag adatoms. This Ag source also proves essential in O overlayer formation, since both Ag and O atoms are incorporated into the "added -row" overlayer structure. Because an Ag source must be found during the adlayer formation, I show the surface morphology is sensitive to oxygen dosing pressure. Above a critical O pressure of 10^{-5} mbar, vacancy islands on terraces provide a second source of Ag

  13. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    out the potential landscape of the system (often a molecule or an atom) under study [4, 5]. However, the dynamical processes might also be induced by the tunnelling process itself [6, 7]. In the field of molecular science, excited single molecule experiments have been especially performed [8]. As a nice example, we refer to the work of Sykes' group [9] on thioether molecular rotors. In addition, several groups explore the possibility of combining time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy with optical techniques [10, 11]. Although the majority of studies that have been performed so far focus on rather simple systems under nearly ideal and well-defined conditions, we anticipate that time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy can also be applied in other research areas, such as biology and soft condensed matter, where the experimental conditions are often less ideal. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the possibilities of this simple, but powerful technique. References [1] Besenbacher F, Laegsgaard E and Stengaard I 2005 Mater. Today 8 26 [2] van Houselt A and Zandvliet H J W 2010 Rev. Mod. Phys. 82 1593 [3] Tringides M C and Hupalo M 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264002 [4] Ronci F, Colonna S, Cricenti A and Le Lay G 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264003 [5] van Houselt A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264004 [6] Sprodowski C, Mehlhorn M and Morgenstern K 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264005 [7] Saedi A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264007 [8] Sloan P A 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264001 [9] Jewell A D, Tierney H L, Baber A E, Iski E V, Laha M M and Sykes E C H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264006 [10] Riedel D 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264009 [11] Terada Y, Yoshida S, Takeuchi O and Shigekawa H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264008

  14. Adsorbate structures and catalytic reactions studied in the torrpressure range by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kevin Shao-Lin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (HPHTSTM) was used to study adsorbate structures and reactions on single crystal model catalytic systems. Studies of the automobile catalytic converter reaction [CO + NO → 1/2 N2 + CO2] on Rh(111) and ethylene hydrogenation [C2H4 + H2 → C2H6] on Rh(111) and Pt(111) elucidated information on adsorbate structures in equilibrium with high-pressure gas and the relationship of atomic and molecular mobility to chemistry. STM studies of NO on Rh(111) showed that adsorbed NO forms two high-pressure structures, with the phase transformation from the (2 x 2) structure to the (3 x 3) structure occurring at 0.03 Torr. The (3 x 3) structure only exists when the surface is in equilibrium with the gas phase. The heat of adsorption of this new structure was determined by measuring the pressures and temperatures at which both (2 x 2) and (3 x 3) structures coexisted. The energy barrier between the two structures was calculated by observing the time necessary for the phase transformation to take place. High-pressure STM studies of the coadsorption of CO and NO on Rh(111) showed that CO and NO form a mixed (2 x 2) structure at low NO partial pressures. By comparing surface and gas compositions, the adsorption energy difference between topsite CO and NO was calculated. Occasionally there is exchange between top-site CO and NO, for which we have described a mechanism for. At high NO partial pressures, NO segregates into islands, where the phase transformation to the (3 x 3) structure occurs. The reaction of CO and NO on Rh(111) was monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) and HPHTSTM. From MS studies the apparent activation energy of the catalytic converter reaction was calculated and compared to theory. STM showed that under high-temperature reaction conditions, surface metal atoms become mobile. Ethylene hydrogenation and its poisoning by CO was

  15. Oxidation of graphene on Ru(0 0 0 1) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Q.; Zhang, H.J.; Wu, K.; Li, H.Y.; Bao, S.N.; He, P.

    2010-01-01

    The oxidation of graphene layer on Ru(0 0 0 1) has been investigated by means of scanning tunneling microscopy. Graphene overlayer can be formed by decomposing ethyne on Ru(0 0 0 1) at a temperature of about 1000 K. The lattice mismatch between the graphene overlayer and the substrate causes a moire pattern with a superstructure in a periodicity of about 30 A. The oxidation of graphene/Ru(0 0 0 1) was performed by exposure the sample to O 2 gas at 823 K. The results showed that, at the initial stage, the oxygen intercalation between the graphene and the Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate takes place at step edges, and extends on the lower steps. The oxygen intercalation decouples the graphene layer from the Ru(0 0 0 1) substrate. More oxygen intercalation yields wrinkled bumps on the graphene surface. The oxidation of graphene, or the removal of carbon atoms can be attributed to a process of the combination of the carbon atoms with atomic oxygen to form volatile reaction products. Finally, the Ru(0 0 0 1)-(2 x 1)O phase was observed after the graphene layer is fully removed by oxidation.

  16. Self-Organized Graphene Nanoribbons on SiC(0001) Studied with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, David; Zhang, Baiqian; Hoang, Tien; First, Phillip

    2012-02-01

    Graphene nanoribbons grown directly on nanofacets of SiC(0001) offer an attractive union of top-down and bottom-up fabrication techniques. Nanoribbons have been shown to form on the facets of templated silicon carbide substrates,ootnotetextSprinkle et al., Nat. Nanotech. 5, 727 (2010). but also appear spontaneously along step-bunches on vicinal SiC(0001) miscut slightly towards . These self-organized graphene nanoribbons were characterized with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) in ultra-high vacuum. Our measurements indicate that the graphene forms a continuous ``buffer layer'' across the SiC(0001) terraces during nanoribbon formation, with the zigzag edge of the buffer layer aligned parallel to the step-bunched nanofacets. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) was used to characterize the topography and electrical characteristics of the graphene nanoribbons. These measurements indicate that the graphene nanoribbons are highly-crystalline with predominantly zigzag edges.

  17. Strongly compressed Bi (111) bilayer films on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, K. F.; Yang, Fang; Song, Y. R. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Canhua; Qian, Dong; Gao, C. L.; Jia, Jin-Feng [Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-09-21

    Ultra-thin Bi films show exotic electronic structure and novel quantum effects, especially the widely studied Bi (111) film. Using reflection high-energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, we studied the structure and morphology evolution of Bi (111) thin films grown on Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. A strongly compressed, but quickly released in-plane lattice of Bi (111) is found in the first three bilayers. The first bilayer of Bi shows a fractal growth mode with flat surface, while the second and third bilayer show a periodic buckling due to the strong compression of the in-plane lattice. The lattice slowly changes to its bulk value with further deposition of Bi.

  18. Atomic structure of screw dislocations intersecting the Au(111) surface: A combined scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbæk, Jakob; Schiøtz, Jakob; Dahl-Madsen, Bjarke

    2006-01-01

    The atomic-scale structure of naturally occurring screw dislocations intersecting a Au(111) surface has been investigated both experimentally by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and theoretically using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The step profiles of 166 dislocations were measured using...

  19. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ∼10 20  cm −3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed

  20. Thermally processed titanium oxides film on Si(0 0 1) surface studied with scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, T.; Shudo, K.; Sato, K.; Ohno, S.; Tanaka, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal structural changes of TiO x films built on a Si(0 0 1) surface were investigated at the nanometer scale with scanning tunneling microscopy. Electronic properties of individual clusters were classified by means of scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The differential conductance (dI/dV) near the Fermi energy showed that nano-clusters were transformed from semiconducting Ti-silicates into metallic Ti-silicides after heating to 970 K. Peaks of normalized differential conductance (dI/dV/(I/V)) of the clusters shifted after heating to about 1070 K, indicating exclusion of oxygen from the clusters.

  1. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy study of Ca-modified rutile TiO2(110 in bulk water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Serrano

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the rising technological interest in the use of calcium-modified TiO2 surfaces in biomedical implants, the Ca/TiO2 interface has not been studied in an aqueous environment. This investigation is the first report on the use of in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM to study calcium-modified rutile TiO2(110 surfaces immersed in high purity water. The TiO2 surface was prepared under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV with repeated sputtering/annealing cycles. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED analysis shows a pattern typical for the surface segregation of calcium, which is present as an impurity on the TiO2 bulk. In situ STM images of the surface in bulk water exhibit one-dimensional rows of segregated calcium regularly aligned with the [001] crystal direction. The in situ-characterized morphology and structure of this Ca-modified TiO2 surface are discussed and compared with UHV-STM results from the literature. Prolonged immersion (two days in the liquid leads to degradation of the overlayer, resulting in a disordered surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, performed after immersion in water, confirms the presence of calcium.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Lau, Janis E.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Tin, Padetha; Wilt, David M.; Pal, Anna Maria; Fahey, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The ability to determine the in situ optoelectronic properties of semiconductor materials has become especially important as the size of device architectures has decreased and the development of complex microsystems has increased. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy, or STORM, can interrogate the optical bandgap as a function of its position within a semiconductor micro-structure. This technique uses a tunable solidstate titanium-sapphire laser whose output is "chopped" using a spatial light modulator and is coupled by a fiber-optic connector to a scanning tunneling microscope in order to illuminate the tip-sample junction. The photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current is spectroscopically measured using a lock-in technique. The capabilities of this technique were verified using semiconductor microstructure calibration standards that were grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy. Bandgaps characterized by STORM measurements were found to be in good agreement with the bulk values determined by transmission spectroscopy and photoluminescence and with the theoretical values that were based on x-ray diffraction results.

  3. High-Resolution Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Molecular Nanostructures on Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xin

    . First, to study the role of hydrogen bonding in self-assembly, we investigate the monomolecular self-assembled system of pyrene-4,5,9,10-tetrone and phenanthrene- 9,10-dione molecules on Au(111) and HOPG surface respectively and the binary molecular self-assembled system of stearic acid and guanine...

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Surface Structures of Icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe Quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Tanhong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Three papers are included in this dissertation. The first paper: ''Structural aspects of the fivefold quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe surface from STM and dynamical LEED studies'', is in press with ''Surface Science''. The second paper: ''An STM study of the atomic structure of the icosahedral Al-Cu-Fe fivefold surface'' is submitted to ''Physical Review B, Rapid Communication''. The third paper: ''Pseudomorphic starfish: arrangement of extrinsic metal atoms on a quasicrystalline substrate'' is submitted to ''Nature''. Following the third paper are general conclusions and appendices that document the published paper ''Structural aspects of the three-fold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn'' (appearing in volume 461, issue 1-3 of ''Surface Science'' on page L521-L527, 2000), the design as well as the specifications of the aluminum evaporator used in the aluminum deposition study in this dissertation, an extended discussion of the aluminum deposition on the quasicrystalline surface, and the STM database.

  5. Double-decker phthalocyanine complex: Scanning tunneling microscopy study of film formation and spin properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeda, Tadahiro; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    We review recent studies of double-decker and triple-decker phthalocyanine (Pc) molecules adsorbed on surfaces in terms of the bonding configuration, electronic structure and spin state. The Pc molecule has been studied extensively in surface science. A Pc molecule can contain various metal atoms at the center, and the class of the molecule is called as metal phthalocyanine (MPc). If the center metal has a large radius, like as lanthanoid metals, it becomes difficult to incorporate the metal atom inside of the Pc ring. Pc ligands are placed so as to sandwich the metal atom, where the metal atom is placed out of the Pc plane. The molecule in this configuration is called as a multilayer-decker Pc molecule. After the finding that the double-decker Pc lanthanoid complex shows single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior, it has attracted a large attention. This is partly due to a rising interest for the ‘molecular spintronics’, in which the freedoms of spin and charge of an electron are applied to the quantum process of information. SMMs represent a class of compounds in which a single molecule behaves as a magnet. The reported blocking temperature, below which a single SMM molecule works as an quantum magnet, has been increasing with the development in the molecular design and synthesis techniques of multiple-decker Pc complex. However, even the bulk properties of these molecules are promising for the use of electronic materials, the films of multi-decker Pc molecules is less studied than those for the MPc molecules. An intriguing structural property is expected for the multi-decker Pc molecules since the Pc planes are linked by metal atoms. This gives an additional degree of freedom to the rotational angle between the two Pc ligands, and they can make a wheel-like symmetric rotation. Due to a simple and well-defined structure of a multi-decker Pc complex, the molecule can be a model molecule for molecular machine studies. The multi-decker Pc molecules can provide

  6. Growth of nanocrystalline MoO3 on Au(111) studied by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Schalek, Richard; Friend, Cynthia M.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of nanocrystalline MoO 3 islands on Au(111) using physical vapor deposition of Mo has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The growth conditions affect the shape and distribution of the MoO 3 nanostructures, providing a means of preparing materials with different percentages of edge sites that may have different chemical and physical properties than atoms in the interior of the nanostructures. MoO 3 islands were prepared by physical vapor deposition of Mo and subsequent oxidation by NO 2 exposure at temperatures between 450 K and 600 K. They exhibit a crystalline structure with a c(4x2) periodicity relative to unreconstructed Au(111). While the atomic-scale structure is identical to that of MoO 3 islands prepared by chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate that the distribution of MoO 3 islands on the Au(111) surface reflects the distribution of Mo clusters prior to oxidation although the growth of MoO 3 involves long-range mass transport via volatile MoO 3 precursor species. The island morphology is kinetically controlled at 450 K, whereas an equilibrium shape is approached at higher preparation temperatures or after prolonged annealing at the elevated temperature. Mo deposition at or above 525 K leads to the formation of a Mo-Au surface alloy as indicated by the observation of embedded MoO 3 islands after oxidation by NO 2 . Au vacancy islands, formed when Mo and Au dealloy to produce vacancies, are observed for these growth conditions

  7. Sub-Kelvin scanning tunneling microscopy on magnetic molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic molecules have attracted lots interest. In this work, an ultra-stable and low noise scanning tunneling microscopy operating at 400 mK using He-3 (930 mK using He-4) has been developed. The magnetic behavior of different magnetic molecules on substrates, especially the exchange interaction between the magnetic ions, the magnetic anisotropy on the surface, the magnetic excitations as well as the Kondo effect, were studied by using STM.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in STM I, these studies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described in chapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, and scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Together, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspects of STM. They provide essential reading and reference material for all students and researchers involved in this field. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  9. Thermovoltages in vacuum tunneling investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, D. H.; Rettenberger, Armin; Grand, Jean Yves; Läuger, K.; Leiderer, Paul; Dransfeld, Klaus; Möller, Rolf

    1995-01-01

    By heating the tunneling tip of a scanning tunneling microscope the thermoelectric properties of a variable vacuum barrier have been investigated. The lateral variation of the observed thermovoltage will be discussed for polycrystalline gold, stepped surfaces of silver, as well as for copper islands on silver.

  10. Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-26

    The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography with self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamborini, Francis Patrick

    The research in this dissertation examines the possible applications of organomercaptan self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for corrosion passivation and nanometer-scale lithography. We examined linear-chain n-alkanethiol and aromatic SAMs in these studies and used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as the main tool for surface characterization. The corrosion passivation properties of n-alkanethiol SAMs were studied on Au in aqueous CN- and Br - solutions and on underpotentially deposited Cu on Au (Au/Cu-UPD) in aqueous HClO4. All SAMs suppress corrosion and shift the potential for corrosion to more positive potentials compared to that on the unmodified metals. We found that corrosion of n-alkanethiol SAM-modified Au begins at defects in the monolayer and the surface morphology depends on the functional end group of the SAM. Corrosion on the unpassivated metal surface begins at high energy sites such as step edges and pits. The chain length and functional end group of SAMs were varied to determine which factors were most important for the best protection against corrosion. We found that corrosion passivation improves with increasing chain length and more hydrophilic functional end groups like OH and COOH protect better than hydrophobic end groups like CH3. The passivation properties of linear-chain SAMs was compared with aromatic SAMs and we found that if they are equally thick and contain the same functional end group, the aromatic SAMs are superior. One goal of this research was to improve the barrier properties of SAMs. We found that depositing a single layer of Cu onto Au before adsorbing the SAM improved its barrier properties dramatically compared to when the SAM was adsorbed directly to the Au. In summary, the corrosion-related studies in this dissertation discuss the corrosion mechanism of SAM-modified metal surfaces, the important factors that determine the passivation properties of SAMs, and a strategy for dramatically improving the barrier properties of

  12. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy: breakthroughs and highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    The principle of scanning tunneling microscopy, an imaging method with atomic resolution capability invented by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982, can be adapted for surface magnetism studies by using magnetic probe tips. The contrast mechanism of this so-called spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy, or SP-STM, relies on the tunneling magneto-resistance effect, i.e. the tip-sample distance as well as the differential conductance depend on the relative magnetic orientation of tip and sample. To illustrate the working principle and the unique capabilities of SP-STM, this compilation presents some key experiments which have been performed on various magnetic surfaces, such as the topological antiferromagnet Cr(001), a double-layer of Fe which exhibits a stripe- domain pattern with about 50 nm periodicity, and the Mn monolayer on W(110), where the combination of experiment and theory reveal an antiferromagnetic spin cycloid. Recent experimental results also demonstrate the suitability of SP-STM for studies of dynamic properties, such as the spin relaxation time of single magnetic nanostructures.

  13. Ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelic, Vedran; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Nguyen, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast terahertz scanning tunneling microscopy (THz-STM) can probe single atoms on a silicon surface with simultaneous sub-nanometer and sub-picosecond spatio-temporal resolution. THz-STM is established as a new technique for exploring high-field non-equilibrium tunneling...

  14. The possibility to determine a constant of spin-orbit interaction by scanning tunneling microscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khotkevich, N.V.; Kolesnichenko, Yu.A.; Vovk, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    The electron tunneling from the quasi-two-dimensional (surface) states with the spin-orbit interaction into bulk-mode states is studied in the framework of a model of an infinitely thin inhomogeneous tunnel magnetic barrier. The influence of the scattering of quasi-two-dimensional electrons by a single magnetic defect on the tunnel current is analyzed. Analytic formulas for the conductance of a tunnel point-contact as a function of its distance from the defect are obtained. It is shown that the analysis of the local magnetization density around the defect by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy allows finding the constant of spin orbit interaction.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Theoretical Study of Water Adsorption on Fe3O4: Implications for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Kwang T.; Eom, Daejin; Chan, Siu-Wai; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Flynn, George; Wen, Xiaodong; Batista, Enrique R.

    2012-10-23

    The reduced surface of a natural Hematite single crystal a-Fe2O3(0001) sample has multiple surface domains with di!erent terminations, Fe2O3(0001), FeO(111), and Fe3O4(111). The adsorption of water on this surface was investigated via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and first-principle theoretical simulations. Water species are observed only on the Fe-terminated Fe3O4(111) surface at temperatures up to 235 K. Between 235 and 245 K we observed a change in the surface species from intact water molecules and hydroxyl groups bound to the surface to only hydroxyl groups atop the surface terminating FeIII cations. This indicates a low energy barrier for water dissociation on the surface of Fe3O4 that is supported by our theoretical computations. Our first principles simulations con"rm the identity of the surface species proposed from the STM images, finding that the most stable state of a water molecule is the dissociated one (OH + H), with OH atop surface terminating FeIII sites and H atop under-coordinated oxygen sites. Attempts to simulate reaction of the surface OH with coadsorbed CO fail because the only binding sites for CO are the surface FeIII atoms, which are blocked by the much more strongly bound OH. In order to promote this reaction we simulated a surface decorated with gold atoms. The Au adatoms are found to cap the under-coordinated oxygen sites and dosed CO is found to bind to the Au adatom. This newly created binding site for CO not only allows for coexistence of CO and OH on the surface of Fe3O4 but also provides colocation between the two species. These two factors are likely promoters of catalytic activity on Au/Fe3O4(111) surfaces.

  16. The nucleation and growth of uranium on the basal plane of graphite studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tench, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    For the first time, nanometer scale uranium clusters were created on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by laser ablation under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The physical and chemical properties of these clusters were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as standard surface science techniques. Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies found the uranium deposit to be free of contamination and showed that no carbide had formed with the underlying graphite. Clusters with sizes ranging from 42 Angstrom 2 to 630 Angstrom 2 were observed upon initial room temperature deposition. Surface diffusion of uranium was observed after annealing the substrate above 800 K, as evidenced by the decreased number density and the increased size of the clusters. Preferential depletion of clusters on terraces near step edges as a result of annealing was observed. The activation energy for diffusion deduced from these measurements was found to be 15 Kcal/mole. Novel formation of ordered uranium thin films was observed for coverages greater than two monolayers after annealing above 900 K. These ordered films displayed islands with hexagonally faceted edges rising in uniform step heights characteristic of the unit cell of the P-phase of uranium. In addition, atomic resolution STM images of these ordered films indicated the formation of the β-phase of uranium. The chemical properties of these surfaces were investigated and it was shown that these uranium films had a reduced oxidation rate in air as compared to bulk metal and that STM imaging in air induced a polarity-dependent enhancement of the oxidation rate

  17. Spectroscopy of surface adsorbed molecules (scanning tunneling microscopy). Progress report, May 1, 1985-April 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the scanning tunneling microscopy program is given. This article contains a description of the design and fabrication of the microscope in addition to description of studies which use the microscope: studies of charge-density waves and studies of tunnel junctions doped with metals and semiconductors. 48 refs., 26 figs

  18. Multiterminal semiconductor/ferromagnet probes for spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera Marun, I.J.; Jansen, R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of multiterminal semiconductor/ferromagnet probes for a new technique to study magnetic nanostructures: spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy. We describe the principle of the technique, which is based on spin-polarized tunneling and subsequent analysis of the spin

  19. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R

    2014-04-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  20. Facility for low-temperature spin-polarized-scanning tunneling microscopy studies of magnetic/spintronic materials prepared in situ by nitride molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Foley, Andrew; Alam, Khan; Wang, Kangkang; Liu, Yinghao; Chen, Tianjiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur R.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the interest in, as well as exciting outlook for, nitride semiconductor based structures with regard to electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic applications, it is compelling to investigate these systems using the powerful technique of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), a technique capable of achieving magnetic resolution down to the atomic scale. However, the delicate surfaces of these materials are easily corrupted by in-air transfers, making it unfeasible to study them in stand-alone ultra-high vacuum STM facilities. Therefore, we have carried out the development of a hybrid system including a nitrogen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy/pulsed laser epitaxy facility for sample growth combined with a low-temperature, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscope system. The custom-designed molecular beam epitaxy growth system supports up to eight sources, including up to seven effusion cells plus a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source, for epitaxially growing a variety of materials, such as nitride semiconductors, magnetic materials, and their hetero-structures, and also incorporating in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction. The growth system also enables integration of pulsed laser epitaxy. The STM unit has a modular design, consisting of an upper body and a lower body. The upper body contains the coarse approach mechanism and the scanner unit, while the lower body accepts molecular beam epitaxy grown samples using compression springs and sample skis. The design of the system employs two stages of vibration isolation as well as a layer of acoustic noise isolation in order to reduce noise during STM measurements. This isolation allows the system to effectively acquire STM data in a typical lab space, which during its construction had no special and highly costly elements included, (such as isolated slabs) which would lower the environmental noise. The design further enables tip exchange and tip coating without

  1. From Graphite to Graphene via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dejun

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to study both graphene on graphite and pristine freestanding grapheme using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) simulation technique. In the experiment part, good quality tungsten metalic tips for experiment were fabricated using our newly developed tip making setup. Then a series of measurements using a technique called electrostatic-manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy (EM-STM) of our own development were performed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. The electrostatic interaction between the STM tip and the sample can be tuned to produce both reversible and irreversible large-scale movement of the graphite surface. Under this influence, atomic-resolution STM images reveal that a continuous electronic transition between two distinct patterns can be systematically controlled. DFT calculations reveal that this transition can be related to vertical displacements of the top layer of graphite relative to the bulk. Evidence for horizontal shifts in the top layer of graphite is also presented. Excellent agreement is found between experimental STM images and those simulated using DFT. In addition, the EM-STM technique was also used to controllably and reversibly pull freestanding graphene membranes up to 35 nm from their equilibrium height. Atomic-scale corrugation amplitudes 20 times larger than the STM electronic corrugation for graphene on a substrate were observed. The freestanding graphene membrane responds to a local attractive force created at the STM tip as a highly conductive yet flexible grounding plane with an elastic restoring force.

  2. Structure, Mobility, and Composition of Transition Metal Catalyst Surfaces. High-Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Ambient-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhongwei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-12-06

    Surface structure, mobility, and composition of transition metal catalysts were studied by high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) at high gas pressures. HP-STM makes it possible to determine the atomic or molecular rearrangement at catalyst surfaces, particularly at the low-coordinated active surface sites. AP-XPS monitors changes in elemental composition and chemical states of catalysts in response to variations in gas environments. Stepped Pt and Cu single crystals, the hexagonally reconstructed Pt(100) single crystal, and Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles with controlled size, shape and composition, were employed as the model catalysts for experiments in this thesis.

  3. Probing superconductors. Spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaguri, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a cuprate triggered developments of various spectroscopic tools which have been utilized to elucidate electronic states of this mysterious compound. Particularly, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and scanning-tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy are improved considerably. It is now possible to map the superconducting gap in both momentum and real spaces using these two techniques. Here we review spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunneling microscopy which is able to explore momentum-space phase structure of the superconducting gap, as well as real-space structure. Applications of this technique to a cuprate and an iron-based superconductor are discussed. (author)

  4. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy methods for spectroscopic imaging of subsurface interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method for spatially-resolved, spectroscopic investigation of subsurface interface structure has been developed. The method, Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM), is based on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) techniques. BEEM combines STM vacuum tunneling with unique ballistic electron spectroscopy capabilities. BEEM enables, for the first time, direct imaging of subsurface interface electronic properties with nanometer spatial resolution. STM topographic images of surface structure and BEEM images of subsurface properties are obtained simultaneously. BEEM capabilities are demonstrated by investigation of important metal-semiconductor interfaces.

  5. The use of splines to analyze scanning tunneling microscopy data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wormeester, Herbert; Kip, Gerhardus A.M.; Sasse, A.G.B.M.; van Midden, H.J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) requires a two‐dimensional (2D) image displaying technique for its interpretation. The flexibility and global approximation properties of splines, characteristic of a solid data reduction method as known from cubic spline interpolation, is called for. Splines were

  6. Oxygen-free in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy under full electrochemical potential control (in situ STM) has been used extensively as an efficient method to characterize microstructures at solid/liquid interfaces at the atomic and molecular levels. However, under ambient conditions oxygen may interfere in open...

  7. Polarization contrast in photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Propstra, K.; Propstra, K.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Photon scanning tunnelling microscopy combined with atomic force microscopy allows simultaneous acquisition and direct comparison of optical and topographical images, both with a lateral resolution of about 30 nm, far beyond the optical diffraction limit. The probe consists of a modified

  8. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  9. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberbeck, Lars; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Schofield, Steven R.; Curson, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy II further applications and related scanning techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy II, like its predecessor, presents detailed and comprehensive accounts of the basic principles and broad range of applications of STM and related scanning probe techniques. The applications discussed in this volume come predominantly from the fields of electrochemistry and biology. In contrast to those described in Vol. I, these sudies may be performed in air and in liquids. The extensions of the basic technique to map other interactions are described inchapters on scanning force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning near-field optical microscopy, together with a survey of other related techniques. Also described here is the use of a scanning proximal probe for surface modification. Togehter, the two volumes give a comprehensive account of experimental aspcets of STM. They provide essentialreading and reference material for all students and researchers involvedin this field.

  11. Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21 -(Ag+Cs) surface studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Morikawa, H; Okino, H; Hasegawa, S; Okuda, T; Kinoshita, T

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) were used to study the atomic and electronic structures of the Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag + Cs) surface (sq root 21-Cs in short), which was induced by depositing caesium atoms on the Si(111)-sq root 3 x sq root 3-Ag surface at room temperature (RT). Compared with previously reported STM images of noble-metal induced sq root 21 x sq root 21 phases including the Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag+Ag) and Si(111)-sq root 21 x sq root 21-(Ag+Au) surfaces (sq root 21-Ag and sq root 21-Au, respectively), the sq root 21-Cs surface displayed quite different features in STM images. The ARPES data of the sq root 21-Cs surface revealed an intrinsic dispersive surface-state band, together with a non-dispersive one near the Fermi level, which was also different from those of the sq root 21-Ag and sq root 21-Au surfaces. These results strongly suggest different atomic arrangements between Cs- and noble-metal induced sq root ...

  12. Thin films of metal oxides on metal single crystals: Structure and growth by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, H.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed studies of the growth and structure of thin films of metal oxides grown on metal single crystal surfaces using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) are presented. The oxide overlayer systems studied are iron oxide and titanium oxide on the Pt(III) surface. The complexity of the metal oxides and large lattice mismatches often lead to surface structures with large unit cells. These are particularly suited to a local real space technique such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, the symmetry that is directly observed with the STM elucidates the relationship of the oxide overlayers to the substrate as well as distinguishing, the structures of different oxides

  13. The impact of structural relaxation on spin polarization and magnetization reversal of individual nano structures studied by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Dirk; Phark, Soo-Hyon; Corbetta, Marco; Fischer, Jeison A; Oka, Hirofumi; Kirschner, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    The application of low temperature spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in magnetic fields for the quantitative characterization of spin polarization, magnetization reversal and magnetic anisotropy of individual nano structures is reviewed. We find that structural relaxation, spin polarization and magnetic anisotropy vary on the nm scale near the border of a bilayer Co island on Cu(1 1 1). This relaxation is lifted by perimetric decoration with Fe. We discuss the role of spatial variations of the spin-dependent electronic properties within and at the edge of a single nano structure for its magnetic properties.

  14. Platinum nanofilm formation by EC-ALE via redox replacement of UPD copper: studies using in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Geun; Kim, Jay Y; Vairavapandian, Deepa; Stickney, John L

    2006-09-14

    The growth of Pt nanofilms on well-defined Au(111) electrode surfaces, using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE), is described here. EC-ALE is a deposition method based on surface-limited reactions. This report describes the first use of surface-limited redox replacement reactions (SLR(3)) in an EC-ALE cycle to form atomically ordered metal nanofilms. The SLR(3) consisted of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of a copper atomic layer, subsequently replaced by Pt at open circuit, in a Pt cation solution. This SLR(3) was then used a cycle, repeated to grow thicker Pt films. Deposits were studied using a combination of electrochemistry (EC), in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) using an electrochemical flow cell, and ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface studies combined with electrochemistry (UHV-EC). A single redox replacement of upd Cu from a PtCl(4)(2-) solution yielded an incomplete monolayer, though no preferential deposition was observed at step edges. Use of an iodine adlayer, as a surfactant, facilitated the growth of uniformed films. In-situ STM images revealed ordered Au(111)-(square root 3 x square root 3)R30 degrees-iodine structure, with areas partially distorted by Pt nanoislands. After the second application, an ordered Moiré pattern was observed with a spacing consistent with the lattice mismatch between a Pt monolayer and the Au(111) substrate. After application of three or more cycles, a new adlattice, a (3 x 3)-iodine structure, was observed, previously observed for I atoms adsorbed on Pt(111). In addition, five atom adsorbed Pt-I complexes randomly decorated the surface and showed some mobility. These pinwheels, planar PtI(4) complexes, and the ordered (3 x 3)-iodine layer all appeared stable during rinsing with blank solution, free of I(-) and the Pt complex (PtCl(4)(2-)).

  15. Adsorption of selenium atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface: A combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy and density functional theory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.Q.; Zhou Yinghui; Wu Qihui; Pakes, C.I.; Zhu Zizhong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A selenium atom, which adsorbs at site close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms on the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface, will break the Si-Si bond and consequently disorder the Si reconstruction surface. Research highlights: → STM and DFT are used to study the adsorption properties of Se atoms on a Si surface. → The adsorption site of Se atom on the Si surface has been identified. → The electronic effect of Se atom on the adsorbed Si surface has been ivestigaed. → The Se atom weakens the bond between two Si atom bonding with the Se atom. - Abstract: The adsorption of selenium (Se) atoms at the Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface has been investigated using both scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory calculations. A single Se atom prefers to adsorb at sites close to a Si adatom and bonds with this Si adatom and one of its backbonding Si atoms. The adsorption sites are referred to as A*-type sites in this article. The density of the conduction band (empty states) of the Si adatom increases as a result of the adsorption of a Se atom, which causes the Si adatom to become brighter in the empty state STM images. At the same time, the adsorption of the Se atom weakens the bonding between the Si adatom and its backbonding Si atom due to the charge transfer from them to the Se atom, and consequently destructs the ordered Si(1 1 1)-7 x 7 surface with increasing Se coverage.

  16. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prastani, C; Vetushka, A.; Fejfar, A.; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, torsional resonance tunneling mode atomic force microscopy is used to study the conductivity of nanoparticles. SnS nanoparticles capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and with In2S3 shell are analyzed. This contactless technique allows carrying out measurements on nanoparticles

  17. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy analysis of space-exposed polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Carol R.; Young, Philip R.

    1993-01-01

    The characterization of the surface of selected space-exposed polymer films by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is reported. Principles of STM, an emerging new technique for materials analysis, are reviewed. The analysis of several films which received up to 5.8 years of low Earth orbital (LEO) exposure onboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is discussed. Specimens included FEP Teflon thermal blanket material, Kapton film, and several experimental polymer films. Ultraviolet and atomic oxygen-induced crazing and erosion are described. The intent of this paper is to demonstrate how STM is enhancing the understanding of LEO space environmental effects on polymer films.

  18. Multilayered cuprate superconductor Ba2Ca5Cu6O12(O1-x,Fx) 2 studied by temperature-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Akira; Ekino, Toshikazu; Gabovich, Alexander M.; Sekine, Ryotaro; Tanabe, Kenji; Tokiwa, Kazuyasu

    2017-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements were carried out on a multilayered cuprate superconductor Ba2Ca5Cu6O12 (O1 -x,Fx )2. STM topography revealed random spot structures with the characteristic length ≤0.5 nm. The conductance spectra d I /d V (V ) show the coexistence of smaller gaps ΔS and large gaps (pseudogaps) ΔL. The pseudogap-related features in the superconducting state were traced with the spatial resolution of ˜0.07 nm. Here, I and V are the tunnel current and bias voltage, respectively. The temperature, T , dependence of ΔS follows the reduced Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) dependence. The hallmark ratio 2 ΔS(T =0 ) /kBTc equals to 4.9, which is smaller than those of other cuprate superconductors. Here, Tc is the superconducting critical temperature and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The larger gap ΔL survives in the normal state and even increases with T above Tc. The T dependencies of the spatial distributions for both relevant gaps (Δ map), as well as for each gap separately (ΔS and ΔL), were obtained. From the histogram of Δ map, the averaged gap values were found to be Δ¯S=˜24 meV and Δ¯L=˜79 meV. The smaller gap ΔS shows a spatially homogeneous distribution while the larger gap ΔL is quite inhomogeneous, indicating that rather homogeneous superconductivity coexists with the patchy distributed pseudogap. The spatial variation length ξΔ L of ΔL correlates with the scale of the topography spot structures, being approximately 0.4 nm. This value is considerably smaller than the coherence length of this class of superconductors, suggesting that ΔL is strongly affected by the disorder of the apical O/F.

  19. Thermovoltage in scanning tunnelling microscopy. Study of heterogeneous metal surfaces on atomic scale; Thermospannung in der Rastertunnelmikroskopie. Untersuchung heterogener Metalloberflaechen auf atomarer Skala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyers, B.

    2005-07-01

    In this thesis the thermovoltage has been studied via a tunnel barrier under different aspects. Au(111) has been chosen as substrate. The mean free path of the electrons on the Au(111) surface was determined by a comparison of the standing waves on stage edges with the theoretical prediction. The measurements were performed at different temperatures. Detailed studies were performed on Au(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) in order to examine the question whether the cause for strong signal on the stage edges lies in the surface state itself or in the band gap. The mani theme of this thesis is the study of a binary metal system, in this case silver on Au(111).

  20. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of phase change alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramaniam, Dinesh; Pauly, Christian; Pratzer, Marco; Liebmann, Marcus; Morgenstern, Markus [II. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Rausch, Pascal; Woda, Michael; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) is a very promising candidate for the next generation of memories. In contrast to the standard Si-based RAM, PCRAM is a non-volatile storage system which exploits the high electrical contrast between the amorphous and the crystalline phase. However, the origin of this contrast is not well understood. Scanning tunneling microscopy gives insight into the local atomic structure and the electronic properties of phase change materials. Using the topography mode of STM, we realized images of Ge{sub 1}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 4} on the nanometer down to the atomic scale, revealing the morphology as well as the complex atomic arrangement of the sputter-deposited material. The spectroscopy mode enabled us to analyse the local density of states in the amorphous and crystalline phase. The band gap varied continuously from 0.5 eV in the amorphous phase to 0.2 eV in the crystalline phase. The Fermi level moved from the center of the gap in the amorphous phase into the valence band within the crystalline phase.

  2. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations

  3. Recent advances in atomic-scale spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arthur R; Yang, Rong; Yang, Haiqiang; Dick, Alexey; Neugebauer, Joerg; Lambrecht, Walter R L

    2005-02-01

    The Mn3N2 (010) surface has been studied using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy at the atomic scale. The principle objective of this work is to elucidate the properties and potential of this technique to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. The experimental approach involves the use of a combined molecular beam epitaxy/scanning tunneling microscopy system that allows the study of atomically clean magnetic surfaces. Several key findings have been obtained. First, both magnetic and non-magnetic atomic-scale information has been obtained in a single spin-polarized image. Magnetic modulation of the height profile having an antiferromagnetic super-period of c = 12.14 A (6 atomic rows) together with a non-magnetic superstructure having a period of c/2 = 6.07 A (3 atomic rows) was observed. Methods of separation of magnetic and non-magnetic profiles are presented. Second, bias voltage-dependent spin-polarized images show a reversal of the magnetic modulation at a particular voltage. This reversal is clearly due to a change in the sign of the magnetic term in the tunnel current. Since this term depends on both the tip's as well as the sample's magnetic local density of states, the reversal can be caused by either the sample or the tip. Third, the shape of the line profile was found to vary with the bias voltage, which is related to the energy-dependent spin contribution from the 2 chemically inequivalent Mn sites on the surface. Overall, the results shown here expand the application of the method of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to measure atomic-scale magnetic structures. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. EDITORIAL: Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science Three decades of scanning tunnelling microscopy that changed the course of surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2011-11-01

    Three decades ago, with a tiny tip of platinum, the scientific world saw the real space imaging of single atoms with unprecedented spatial resolution. This signalled the birth of one of the most versatile surface probes, based on the physics of quantum mechanical tunnelling: the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Invented in 1981 by Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer of IBM, Zurich, it led to their award of the 1986 Nobel Prize. Atoms, once speculated to be abstract entities used by theoreticians for mere calculations, can be seen to exist for real with the nano-eye of an STM tip that also gives real-space images of molecules and adsorbed complexes on surfaces. From a very fundamental perspective, the STM changed the course of surface science and engineering. STM also emerged as a powerful tool to study various fundamental phenomena relevant to the properties of surfaces in technological applications such as tribology, medical implants, catalysis, sensors and biology—besides elucidating the importance of local bonding geometries and defects, non-periodic structures and the co-existence of nano-scale phases. Atom-level probing, once considered a dream, has seen the light with the evolution of STM. An important off-shoot of STM was the atomic force microscope (AFM) for surface mapping of insulating samples. Then followed the development of a flurry of techniques under the general name of scanning probe microscopy (SPM). These techniques (STM, AFM, MFM, PFM etc) designed for atomic-scale-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, have led to brand new developments in surface analysis. All of these novel methods enabled researchers in recent years to image and analyse complex surfaces on microscopic and nanoscopic scales. All of them utilize a small probe for sensing the surface. The invention of AFM by Gerd Binnig, Calvin Quate and Christopher Gerber opened up new opportunities for characterization of a variety of materials, and various industrial applications could be

  5. Graphene quantum dots probed by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgenstern, Markus; Freitag, Nils; Nent, Alexander; Nemes-Incze, Peter; Liebmann, Marcus [II. Institute of Physics B and JARA-FIT, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy results probing the electronic properties of graphene quantum dots are reviewed. After a short summary of the study of squared wave functions of graphene quantum dots on metal substrates, we firstly present data where the Landau level gaps caused by a perpendicular magnetic field are used to electrostatically confine electrons in monolayer graphene, which are probed by the Coulomb staircase revealing the consecutive charging of a quantum dot. It turns out that these quantum dots exhibit much more regular charging sequences than lithographically confined ones. Namely, the consistent grouping of charging peaks into quadruplets, both, in the electron and hole branch, portrays a regular orbital splitting of about 10meV. At low hole occupation numbers, the charging peaks are, partly, additionally grouped into doublets. The spatially varying energy separation of the doublets indicates a modulation of the valley splitting by the underlying BN substrate. We outline that this property might be used to eventually tune the valley splitting coherently. Afterwards, we describe graphene quantum dots with multiple contacts produced without lithographic resist, namely by local anodic oxidation. Such quantum dots target the goal to probe magnetotransport properties during the imaging of the corresponding wave functions by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Local crystallography analysis for atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Belianinov, Alexei; Gai, Zheng; Baddorf, Arthur P; Pan, Minghu; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sales, Brian C; Sefat, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful and flexible tool for atomically resolved imaging of surface structures. However, due to the amount of information extracted, in many cases the interpretation of such data is limited to being qualitative and semi-quantitative in nature. At the same time, much can be learned from local atom parameters, such as distances and angles, that can be analyzed and interpreted as variations of local chemical bonding, or order parameter fields. Here, we demonstrate an iterative algorithm for indexing and determining atomic positions that allows the analysis of inhomogeneous surfaces. This approach is further illustrated by local crystallographic analysis of several real surfaces, including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and an Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . This study provides a new pathway to extract and quantify local properties for scanning probe microscopy images. (paper)

  7. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which ...

  8. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  9. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and High PressureX-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure,Composition and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions on A Model SingleCrystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montano, Max O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our research focuses on taking advantage of the ability of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to operate at high-temperatures and high-pressures while still providing real-time atomic resolution images. We also utilize high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HPXPS) to monitor systems under identical conditions thus giving us chemical information to compare and contrast with the structural and dynamic data provided by STM.

  10. Investigation of non-collinear spin states with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfhekel, W; Gao, C L

    2010-03-05

    Most ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic substances show a simple collinear arrangement of the local spins. Under certain circumstances, however, the spin configuration is non-collinear. Scanning tunneling microscopy with its potential atomic resolution is an ideal tool for investigating these complex spin structures. Non-collinearity can be due to topological frustration of the exchange interaction, due to relativistic spin-orbit coupling or can be found in excited states. Examples for all three cases are given, illustrating the capabilities of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1996-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy III provides a unique introduction to the theoretical foundations of scanning tunneling microscopy and related scanning probe methods. The different theoretical concepts developed in the past are outlined, and the implications of the theoretical results for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed in detail. Therefore, this book serves as a most useful guide for experimentalists as well as for theoreticians working in the filed of local probe methods. In this second edition the text has been updated and new methods are discussed.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and adsorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Scanning Tunneling Microscopy I provides a unique introduction to a novel and fascinating technique that produces beautiful images of nature on an atomic scale. It is the first of three volumes that together offer a comprehensive treatment of scanning tunneling microscopy, its diverse applications, and its theoretical treatment. In this volume the reader will find a detailed description of the technique itself and of its applications to metals, semiconductors, layered materials, adsorbed molecules and superconductors. In addition to the many representative results reviewed, extensive references to original work will help to make accessible the vast body of knowledge already accumulated in this field.

  13. A scanning tunneling microscopy study of the electronic and spin states of bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(iii) (TbPc2) molecules on Ag(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Ferdous; Qi, Zhi Kun; Hou, Jie; Komeda, Tadahiro; Katoh, Keiichi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2016-10-25

    tunneling feature caused by the spin flipping. This feature is not observed for the TbPc 2 /Au(111) system, suggesting that the decoupling between the TbPc 2 molecule and Ag(111) by the presence of the first layer produces an inelastic feature in the tunneling spectra.

  14. Ab-initio theory of scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Ventra, M.; Pantelides, S. T.

    1998-03-01

    An ab-initio theory of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) has been developed by treating the sample and the tip as a single system. The theory combines density functional theory with the Kubo-Greenwood linear-response formalism for the conductivity( See, e.g., N.F. Mott in Conduction in Non-Crystalline Materials), (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1987).. The current is computed by taking into account the atomic relaxations that occur on both the surface and the tip due to their mutal interactions. Illustrative examples will be presented for the case of a clean Al(110) surface and the same surface with a vacancy.

  15. Near-field optical microscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbara, A.; Lopez-Rios, T.; Quemerais, P.

    2005-01-01

    A homemade apertureless near-field optical microscope using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is described. The experimental set-up simultaneously provides optical and topographic images of the sample. Technical details and features of the set-up are presented, together with results demonstrating the sub-wavelength resolution achieved as well as its sensitivity to dielectric contrasts. We show that the use of a STM permits to precisely control very small distances between the tip and the sample which is a great advantage to excite localized optical resonances between the tip and the surface

  16. Sequencing of adenine in DNA by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2017-08-01

    The development of DNA sequencing technology utilizing the detection of a tunnel current is important for next-generation sequencer technologies based on single-molecule analysis technology. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, we previously reported that dI/dV measurements and dI/dV mapping revealed that the guanine base (purine base) of DNA adsorbed onto the Cu(111) surface has a characteristic peak at V s = -1.6 V. If, in addition to guanine, the other purine base of DNA, namely, adenine, can be distinguished, then by reading all the purine bases of each single strand of a DNA double helix, the entire base sequence of the original double helix can be determined due to the complementarity of the DNA base pair. Therefore, the ability to read adenine is important from the viewpoint of sequencing. Here, we report on the identification of adenine by STM topographic and spectroscopic measurements using a synthetic DNA oligomer and viral DNA.

  17. Optical characterication of probes for photon scanning tunnelling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    The photon scanning tunnelling microscope is a well-established member of the family of scanning near-field optical microscopes used for optical imaging at the sub-wavelength scale. The quality of the probes, typically pointed uncoated optical fibres, used is however difficult to evaluate...... in a direct manner and has most often been inferred from the apparent quality of recorded optical images. Complicated near-field optical imaging characteristics, together with the possibility of topographically induced artefacts, however, has increased demands for a more reliable probe characterization...... technique. Here we present experimental results obtained for optical characterization of two different probes by imaging of a well-specified near-field intensity distribution at various spatial frequencies. In particular, we observe that a sharply pointed dielectric probe can be highly suitable for imaging...

  18. Elaborations et caractérisations d'auto-assemblages dipolaires par microscopie à effet tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    This work is dedicated to the investigation under ultra high vacuum of _-conjugated molecule on a silicon surface by means of scanningtunneling microscopy (STM). The manuscript consists of five chapters.In the first chapter, we present a state-of-the-art of organic assembly on metal and semiconductor.Chapter two describes the experimental setup using during thesis. It also shows Si(111)-B substrate and gives theoretical conceptsassociated with the scanning tunneling microscopy.The third chapt...

  19. Note: Development of a wideband amplifier for cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Jeon, Hoyeon; Oh, Myungchul; Lee, Minjun; Kim, Sungmin; Yi, Sunwouk; Lee, Hanho; Zoh, Inhae; Yoo, Yongchan; Kuk, Young

    2017-06-01

    A wideband cryogenic amplifier has been developed for low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The amplifier consisting of a wideband complementary metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors operational amplifier together with a feedback resistor of 100 kΩ and a capacitor is mounted within a 4 K Dewar. This amplifier has a wide bandwidth and is successfully applied to scanning tunneling microscopy applications at low temperatures down to ˜7 K. The quality of the designed amplifier is validated by high resolution imaging. More importantly, the amplifier has also proved to be capable of performing scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements, showing the detection of the Shockley surface state of the Au(111) surface and the superconducting gap of Nb(110).

  20. In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of redox molecules. Coherent electron transfer at large bias voltages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Theories of in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of molecules with redox levels near the substrate and tip Fermi levels point to 'spectroscopic' current-overpotential features. Prominent features require a narrow 'probing tip', i.e. a small bias voltage, eV(bias), compared...

  1. Covalently Immobilised Cytochrome C Imaged by In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Olesen, Klaus G.; Danilov, Alexey I.

    1997-01-01

    In situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging of cytochrome c (cyt c) on polycrystalline Pt surfaces and on Au(lll) was achieved first by covalent immobilisation of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) brought to react with oxide present on the Pt surfaces. Covalently bound 3-APTS forms...

  2. Preparation of Chemically Etched Tips for Ambient Instructional Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccardi, Margot J.; Winkelmann, Kurt; Olson, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    A first-year laboratory experiment that utilizes concepts of electrochemical tip etching for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is described. This experiment can be used in conjunction with any STM experiment. Students electrochemically etch gold STM tips using a time-efficient method, which can then be used in an instructional grade STM that…

  3. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Adsorbate Structure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions. Novel Design of an Ultra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling Microscope System for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope's (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 C). The design of a high pressure, high temperature scanning tunneling microscope system, that is capable of monitoring reactions in situ at conditions from UHV and ambient temperature up to 1 atm and 250 C, is briefly presented along with vibrational and thermal analysis, as this system serves as a template to improve upon during the design of the new ultra high pressure, high temperature STM. Using this existing high pressure scanning tunneling microscope we monitored the co-adsorption of hydrogen, ethylene and carbon dioxide on platinum (111) and rhodium (111) crystal faces in the mTorr pressure range at 300 K in equilibrium with the gas phase. During the catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane in the absence of CO the metal surfaces are covered by an adsorbate layer that is very mobile on the time scale of STM imaging. We found that the addition of CO poisons the hydrogenation reaction and induces ordered structures on the single crystal surfaces. Several ordered structures were observed upon CO addition to the surfaces pre-covered with hydrogen and ethylene: a rotated (√19 x √19)R23.4 o on Pt(111), and domains of c(4 x 2)-CO+C 2 H 3 , previously unobserved (4 x 2)-CO+3C 2 H 3 , and (2 x 2)-3CO on Rh(111). A mechanism for CO poisoning of ethylene hydrogenation on the metal single crystals was proposed, in which CO blocks surface metal sites and reduces adsorbate mobility to limit adsorption and reaction rate of ethylene and hydrogen. In order to observe heterogeneous catalytic reactions that occur well above ambient pressure and temperature that more closely

  4. Perspectives of cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy for complex oxide physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aaron; Chien, TeYu

    2018-03-01

    Complex oxide heterostructure interfaces have shown novel physical phenomena which do not exist in bulk materials. These heterostructures can be used in the potential applications in the next generation devices and served as the playgrounds for the fundamental physics research. The direct measurements of the interfaces with excellent spatial resolution and physical property information is rather difficult to achieve with the existing tools. Recently developed cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (XSTM/S) for complex oxide interfaces have proven to be capable of providing local electronic density of states (LDOS) information at the interface with spatial resolution down to nanometer scale. In this perspective, we will briefly introduce the basic idea and some recent achievements in using XSTM/S to study complex oxide interfaces. We will also discuss the future of this technique and the field of the interfacial physics.

  5. Ring structures on natural molybdenum disulfide investigated by scanning tunneling and scanning force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckl, W.M.; Ohnesorge, F.; Binnig, G. (IBM Research Division, Muenchen (West Germany)); Specht, M. (Univ. Muenchen (West Germany)); Hashmi, M. (MPIf. Plasmaphysics, Garching (West Germany))

    In this paper the authors present a study of ring-like structures of two different sizes on a nanometer scale found on natural molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}). Investigation by scanning tunneling and scanning force microscopy as well as secondary-ion mass spectroscopy indicate that these rings might originate from included molecules. Synthetic compared to natural MoS{sub 2} shows characteristic differences. The origin of these striking structures could be the morphology of organic or even remnants of biological material included at the geological time when the mineral was formed and could therefore be regarded as a result of a molecular fossilization process. The alternative explanation that the ring structure is a nonmorphological and purely electronic effect caused by a point defect like a dopant is also discussed.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R; Ikeda, H; Sakashita, M; Sakai, A; Yasuda, Y; Nakatsuka, O; Zaima, S

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  7. Dopant migration in silicon during implantation/annealing measured by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hessel, H.E.; Memmert, U.; Behm, R.J. (Univ. Muenchen (West Germany)); Cerva, H. (Siemens Research Lab., Muenchen (West Germany))

    In this paper spatial correlation between the lateral distribution of the doping type and the former implantation mask edge was investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. The position of the former mask edge was determined from surface steps resolved by STM topography measurements. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) data recorded simultaneously allowed to detect the transition from a high doping level with an ohmic I-V curve to a lower doping level displaying a Schottky barrier behavior. The influence of different annealing treatments on the position of this transition was investigated.

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy study of nano-structured polyatom-substituted H4PW11M1O40 Keggin and H7P2W17M1O62 (M = Nb, Ta) Wells-Dawson heteropolyacid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Ryul; Park, Sunyoung; Song, In Kyu

    2012-07-01

    Polyatom-substituted H4PW11M1O40 Keggin and H7P2W17M1O62 (M = Nb, Ta) Wells-Dawson heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy to elucidate their redox property and oxidation catalysis. STM images clearly showed that HPAs formed nano-structured monolayer arrays on graphite surface. In tunneling spectroscopy, HPAs exhibited a distinctive current-voltage behavior called negative differential resistance (NDR). NDR peak voltage of the HPAs was then correlated with reduction potential determined by electrochemical method in solution. NDR peak voltage of the HPAs appeared at less negative voltage with increasing reduction potential. Vapor-phase oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde to methacrolein was also carried out as a model reaction to probe oxidation catalysis of the HPAs. NDR peak voltage of the HPAs appeared at less negative voltage with increasing yield for methacrolein. NDR peak voltage could be utilized as a correlating parameter for the reduction potential and as a probe of oxidation catalysis in the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutyraldehyde.

  9. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped...... of the characteristic details of the images. A large proportion of the observed noise may be explained by the scanning actions of the feedback circuitry while a minor fraction of the image details may be explained by surface drift phenomena. As opposed to the method of deconvolution, conventional methods of filtering...

  10. Imaging by Electrochemical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Deconvolution Resolving More Details of Surfaces Nanomorphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    Upon imaging, electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ESTM), scanning electrochemical micro-scopy (SECM) and in situ STM resolve information on electronic structures and on surface topography. At very high resolution, imaging processing is required, as to obtain information that relates...... to crystallographic-surface structures. Within the wide range of new technologies, those images surface features, the electrochemical scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM) provides means of atomic resolution where the tip participates actively in the process of imaging. Two metallic surfaces influence ions trapped.......g., nanoelectronics and single-molecule probing. In principle, the ESTM is capable of sub-atomic resolution but many details at this level of magnification need further treatment of recorded data before real information is obtained. Deconvolution of the data according to the instrument response may explain some...

  11. Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Route to Femtosecond Ångstrom Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Yamashita, Mikio; Morita, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    "Mono-Cycle Photonics and Optical Scanning Tunneling Microscopy" deals with both the ultrashort laser-pulse technology in the few- to mono-cycle region and the laser-surface-controlled scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) extending into the spatiotemporal extreme technology. The former covers the theory of nonlinear pulse propagation beyond the slowly-varing-envelope approximation, the generation and active chirp compensation of ultrabroadband optical pulses, the amplitude and phase characterization of few- to mono-cycle pulses, and the feedback field control for the mono-cycle-like pulse generation. In addition, the wavelength-multiplex shaping of ultrabroadband pulse is described. The latter covers the CW-laser-excitation STM, the femtosecond-time-resolved STM and atomic-level surface phenomena controlled by femtosecond pulses.

  12. Conductivity mapping of nanoparticles by torsional resonance tunneling atomic force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prastani, C.; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Fejfar, Antonín; Nanu, M.; Nanu, D.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 8 (2012), , "083107-1"-"083107-4" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA MŠk 7E10061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * nanoparticles * tin compounds * tunnelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.794, year: 2012

  13. Comparative microscopy study of Vibrio cholerae flagella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnov, Nikolai P.; Baiburin, Vil B.; Zadnova, Svetlana P.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    1999-06-01

    A fine structure of bacteria flagella is an important problem of molecular cell biology. Bacteria flagella are the self-assembled structures that allow to use the flagellum protein in a number of biotechnological applications. However, at present, there is a little information about high resolution scanning probe microscopy study of flagellum structure, in particular, about investigation of Vibrio cholerae flagella. In our lab have been carried out the high resolution comparative investigation of V. cholerae flagella by means of various microscopes: tunneling (STM), scanning force (SFM) and electron transmission. As a scanning probe microscope is used designed in our lab versatile SPM with replaceable measuring heads. Bacteria were grown, fixed and treated according to the conventional techniques. For STM investigations samples were covered with Pt/Ir thin films by rotated vacuum evaporation, in SFM investigations were used uncovered samples. Electron microscopy of the negatively stained bacteria was used as a test procedure.

  14. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  15. Topographic and electronic contrast of the graphene moir´e on Ir(111) probed by scanning tunneling microscopy and noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.; Hämäläinen, K.; Sainio, K.; Lahtinen, J.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; Liljeroth, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epitaxial graphene grown on transition-metal surfaces typically exhibits a moir´e pattern due to the lattice mismatch between graphene and the underlying metal surface. We use both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the electronic and topographic contrast

  16. Self-assembly of F16ZnPc thin films and F16ZnPc-ZnPc heterostructures on deactivated Si surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew; Wagner, Sean; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2017-02-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we show that hexadecafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine (F16ZnPc) molecules form two morphologically different self-assembled structures that both display point-on-line coincident epitaxial registration with the deactivated Si(111)-B √{3 }×√{3 } surface. The packing motif in these structures suggests that fluorination of conjugated organic molecules can lead to stronger molecule-substrate interaction, π-π intermolecular interaction, and side-to-side intermolecular repulsion. The delicate balance and interplay between these interactions determine the self-assembly behavior of fluorinated molecules. Furthermore, we demonstrate the formation of vertically and laterally stacked F16ZnPc-ZnPc heterojunctions, allowing for future spectroscopy investigation of molecular electronic structures and charge transfer behavior at organic-organic hetero-interfaces.

  17. Transition between scanning tunneling microscopy images of alkane derivatives on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hibino, Masahiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAMs of dialkyl sulfides form at the liquid–graphite interface. • STM contrast of molecules change reversibly between zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns. • The free energy for contrast change is smaller than the thermal energy (RT). • STM contrast change is caused by electronic effects and registry of the alkyl chains. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers of alkylated sulfides containing two alkyl chains and a sulfur atom positioned at the center of the molecules were studied on a graphite surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). STM images of the closed-packed alkyl chains that extend linearly from the sulfur atoms change reversibly between a zigzag pattern and an aligned bright spot pattern on a time scale of minutes. The observation times of the zigzag and aligned bright spot patterns indicate that the difference between the free energies of these two stable molecular configurations with respect to the graphite surface is smaller than their thermal energies in the presence of a solvent, and 10 times smaller than the theoretical free energy between parallel and perpendicular configurations of the alkyl chains on graphite under vacuum. The change in the contrast of the STM images occurred owing to the electronic effects that depend on the registry of the alkyl chains on the graphite surface, and not by the classical observation of transfer between parallel and perpendicular orientations of alkyl chains on the surface.

  18. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Measurements of the Full Cycle of a Heterogeneous Asymmetric Hydrogenation Reaction on Chirally Modified Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demers-Carpentier, Vincent; Goubert, Guillaume; Masini, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogenation of a prochiral substrate, 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone (TFAP), on Pt(111) was studied using room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements. The experiments were carried out both on a clean surface and on a chirally modified surface, using chemisorbed (R)-(+)-1...... protrusion compared to TFAP in dimer structures. They are attributed to a half-hydrogenated intermediate. The introduction of H2 to a mixture of (R)-NEA and TFAP on Pt(111) leads to the removal of TFAP without any change in the population of the modifier, as required for an efficient chirally modified...

  19. Grain boundary engineering of La{sub 0.7} Sr{sub 0.3} MnO{sub 3} films on silicon substrate: Scanning Tunneling Microscopy-Spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Anupama [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Nori, Rajashree [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Bombay), Mumbai 400076 (India); Dhobale, Sandip [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Ramgopal Rao, V. [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Bombay), Mumbai 400076 (India); Kale, S.N., E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Datar, Suwarna, E-mail: suwarna.datar@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India)

    2014-09-01

    We employed a Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM) to study the surface topography and spatially resolved local electronic properties like local density of states (LDOS) of nanostructured films of La{sub 0.7} Sr{sub 0.3} MnO{sub 3} (LSMO). The nanostructured thin films of LSMO on silicon substrate were prepared using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique. The deposition conditions were tuned to yield two different morphologies; one with uniform columnar closely packed islands and other with larger grain distribution in random fashion. The Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopy (STS) revealed the extent of variation of density of states (DOS) near the Fermi level. From the spectroscopic features obtained we found the occurrence of phase separation between conducting and semiconducting domains and its possible correlation with the properties of the system. Semiconducting nature was observed at the grain boundaries, which could be extremely promising in futuristic nano-devices.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, David

    2009-01-01

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  1. Electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy of pure and redox-marked DNA- and UNA-based oligonucleotides on Au(111)-electrode surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Glargaard; Salvatore, Princia; Karlsen, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied adsorption and electrochemical electron transfer of several 13- and 15-base DNA and UNA (unlocked nucleic acids) oligonucleotides (ONs) linked to Au(111)-electrode surfaces via a 50-C6-SH group using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and scanning tunnelling microscopy in aqueous buffer under...

  2. First-principles modelling of scanning tunneling microscopy using non-equilibrium Green's functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, H.P.; Rauba, J.M.C.; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    The investigation of electron transport processes in nano-scale architectures plays a crucial role in the development of surface chemistry and nano-technology. Experimentally, an important driving force within this research area has been the concurrent refinements of scanning tunneling microscopy...... into account. As an illustrating example we apply the NEGF-STM method to the Si(001)(2x1):H surface with sub-surface P doping and discuss the results in comparison to the Bardeen and Tersoff-Hamann methods....

  3. Real-Space Analysis of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Topography Datasets Using Sparse Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyama, Masamichi J.; Hukushima, Koji

    2018-04-01

    A sparse modeling approach is proposed for analyzing scanning tunneling microscopy topography data, which contain numerous peaks originating from the electron density of surface atoms and/or impurities. The method, based on the relevance vector machine with L1 regularization and k-means clustering, enables separation of the peaks and peak center positioning with accuracy beyond the resolution of the measurement grid. The validity and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated using synthetic data in comparison with the conventional least-squares method. An application of the proposed method to experimental data of a metallic oxide thin-film clearly indicates the existence of defects and corresponding local lattice distortions.

  4. Imaging by in situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and its Nanotechnological Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2002-01-01

    of the tip and working electrode. In collaboration with Danish Micro Engineering A/S, the instrument was constructed and tested in laboratory environments. The system was successfully developed, as to meet international-market requirements. Within the frame of the work, procedures of tip coating...... and bipotentiostat construction were evaluated. After the fulfilment of the instrument manufacturing process followed application of the system to scientific investigations. The generation of an image by in situ STM is founded on the principle of electron tunneling but the application of the instrument to aqueous...... in the interpretation of the imaging procedure. Other methods of in situ Scanning Probe Microscopy (in situ SPM), such as in situ Scanning Force Microscopy (in situ AFM) are considered for the sake of comparison and they are applied to imaging of non-conducting systems. Major results include demonstration of atomic...

  5. Facile synthesis and electron transport properties of NiO nanostructures investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind Mallick

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique chemical, thermal, electronic and photonic properties, low -dimensional transition metal oxides, especially NiO, have attracted great deal of attention for potential applications in a wide range of technologies, such as, sensors, electrochromic coatings and self-healing materials. However, their synthesis involves multi-step complex procedures that in addition to being expensive, further introduce impurities. Here we present a low cost facile approach to synthesize uniform size NiO nanoparticles (NPs from hydrothermally grown Ni(OH2. Detailed transmission electron microscopic analysis reveal the average size of NiO NPs to be around 29 nm. The dimension of NiO NP is also corroborated by the small area scanning tunneling microscope (STM measurements. Further, we investigate electron transport characteristics of newly synthesized Ni(OH2 and NiO nanoparticles on p-type Si substrate using scanning tunneling microscopy. The conductivity of Ni(OH2 and NiO are determined to be 1.46x10-3 S/cm and 2.37x10-5 S/cm, respectively. The NiO NPs exhibit a lower voltage window (∼0.7 V electron tunneling than the parent Ni(OH2.

  6. Characterization and Properties of Oligothiophenes Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy for Possible Use in Organic Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishara, E.M.El.

    2009-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscopy study has been made on a group of alkyl-substituted oligothiophenes. The self-assembled monolayers of this type of semi-conducting oligomers on graphite were observed and characterized. To control the self-assembly, it is important to first understand the forces that drive the spontaneous ordering of molecules at interfaces. For the identification of the forces, several substituted oligothiophenes were examined: carboxylic acid groups, methyl ester carboxylic acid, and iodine atoms at one end and benzyl esters at the other end of the oligomers this is in addition to the non-functionalized oligothiophehens, Self-assembled monolayers of these molecules were then examined by STM. A detailed analysis of the driving forces and parameters controlling the formation of the self-assembled 2- D crystal monolayers was carried out by performing modeling of the experimental observations. The theoretical calculations gave us a conclusive insight into the intermolecular interactions, which lead to the observed conformation of molecules on the surface. An attempt to react two iodinated oligomers on the surface after the formation of the monolayer has been done; a topochemical reaction studies using UV/Vis light irradiation has been preceded. The targeted reaction was achieved. This can be considered as a great step towards the formation of nano-wires and other organic electronic devices. The applicability of the above method of force-driven self organisation in different patterns was examined as template for building donor-nano structures for electronic devices. It was necessary to examine the stability of the formed templates in air. The monolayers were left to dry and STM images were taken; C60 was then added to the monolayer, and the complexation of the C60 (as acceptor) with the formed monolayer template was examined.

  7. Dielectric breakdown of ultrathin aluminum oxide films induced by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magtoto, N. P.; Niu, C.; Ekstrom, B. M.; Addepalli, S.; Kelber, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of 7-Aa-thick Al 2 O 3 (111) films grown on Ni 3 Al(111) under ultrahigh vacuum conditions is induced by increasing the bias voltage on the scanning tunneling microscopy tip under constant current feedback. Breakdown is marked by the precipitous retreat of the tip from the surface, and the formation of an elevated feature in the scanning tunneling microscopy image, typically greater than 5 nm high and ∼100 nm in diameter. Constant height measurements performed at tip/sample distances of 1 nm or less yield no tip/substrate physical interaction, indicating that such features do not result from mass transport. Consistent with this, current/voltage measurements within the affected regions indicate linear behavior, in contrast to a band gap of 1.5 eV observed at unaffected regions of the oxide surface. A threshold electric field value of 11±1 MV cm -1 is required to induce breakdown, in good agreement with extrapolated values from capacitance measurements on thicker oxides. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  9. A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique and its application to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A scanning tunneling microscopy based potentiometry technique for the measurements of the local surface electric potential is presented. A voltage compensation circuit based on this potentiometry technique is developed and employed to maintain a desired tunneling voltage independent of the bias current flow through the film. The application of this potentiometry technique to the local sensing of the spin Hall effect is outlined and some experimental results are reported.

  10. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study of DNA conductivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvílová, Irena; Král, Karel; Bunček, M.; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Todorciuc, Tatiana; Weiter, M.; Navrátil, J.; Schneider, Bohdan; Pavluch, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2008), s. 422-426 ISSN 1895-1082 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN401770651; GA MŠk OC 137; GA AV ČR KAN400720701; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular electronics * DNA * scanning tunneling microscopy * conductivity * charge carrier transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.448, year: 2008

  11. Manipulating individual dichlorotin phthalocyanine molecules on Cu(100) surface at room temperature by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Xiang, Feifei; Wang, Zhongping; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Danfeng; Wang, Li; Wang, Guang; Zhang, Xueao; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Single molecule manipulations have been achieved on dichlorotin phthalocyanine(SnCl 2 Pc) molecules adsorbed on Cu (100) at room temperature. Scanning tunneling microscopy observations directly demonstrate that the individual SnCl 2 Pc molecules can be moved along the [100] direction on Cu(100) surface by employing a scanning tunneling microscope tip fixed at the special position of the molecules. The orientation of the molecule can be switched between two angles of ±28° with respect to the [011] surface direction in the same way. Dependences of the probability of molecular motion on the distances between the tip and the molecules reveal that the mechanism for such manipulation of a SnCl 2 Pc molecule is dominated by the repulsive interactions between the tip and the molecules. With the assistance of this manipulation process, a prototype molecular storage array with molecular orientation as information carrier and an artificial hydrogen bonded supramolecular structure have been constructed on the surface. (paper)

  12. Spin-filter scanning tunneling microscopy : a novel technique for the analysis of spin polarization on magnetic surfaces and spintronic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera Marun, I.J.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a versatile technique to measure spin polarization with atomic resolution. A microscopy technique that can measure electronic spin polarization is relevant for characterization of magnetic nanostructures and spintronic devices. Scanning tunneling microscopy

  13. Graphene formation on metal surfaces investigated by in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, G C; Van Baarle, D W; Rost, M J; Frenken, J W M

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbon decomposition on transition metals provides a practical way of producing graphene. Here, ethylene deposition on Rh (111) is taken as an example. In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy measurements, under various growth conditions and at temperatures up to 1100 K, were carried out, revealing the processes of graphene formation at the atomic level. The initial nucleation stage nearly completely determines the phase in which further C is deposited, graphene or rhodium carbide, and the orientation of the growing graphene patches. We demonstrate that by separating the stages of nucleation and further growth and controlling other growth parameters, we obtain graphene of higher quality, while avoiding carbide formation and controlling the dissolved C to form graphene. Based on these observations, a universal physical picture emerges for graphene formation on metal surfaces. (paper)

  14. Atomic resolution on the (111 )B surface of mercury cadmium telluride by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Fang-Xing; Hong, Feng; Pan, Bi-Cai; Wang, Yin; Shao, Jun; Shen, Xue-Chu

    2018-01-01

    The real-space atomic surface structure of mercury cadmium telluride was successfully achieved on the (111 )B surface of H g0.78C d0.22Te by ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The work casts light on the reconstructions of the (111 )B surface unraveling a (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction induced by adatom adsorption of Cd. The other (2 ×2 ) surface reconstruction is clarified to be induced by the single Te vacancy, which is more stable than the reconstruction of multivacancies in contrast to the prevailing view. The simulated STM images are in good agreement with the experiments. We also observed an in situ morphology transition from the (1 ×1 ) structure to those (2 ×2 ) reconstructions, implying the stability of the reconstructions.

  15. Cytochrome C Dynamics at Gold and Glassy Carbon Surfaces Monitored by in Situ Scanning Tunnel Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Møller, Per; Pedersen, Marianne Vind

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the absorption of cytochrome c on gold and glassy carbon substrates by in situ scanning tunnel microscopy under potentiostatic control of both substrate and tip. Low ionic strength and potential ranges where no Faradaic current flows were used. Cyt c aggregates into flat...... composite structures of about 50 nm lateral extension at gold surfaces. The aggregates evolve in time, and structures resembling individual cyt c molecules can be distinguished in the space between the 50 nm structures. Cyt c aggregates also form at glassy carbon but have a different, unbroken character...... where cyt c both sticks well to the surface and exhibits notable mobility. The observations suggest that characteristic surface specific, internally mobile protein aggregates are formed at both surfaces and that in situ molecular resolution of the STM pictures may have been achieved....

  16. Measurement of phosphorus segregation in silicon at the atomic scale using scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberbeck, L.; Curson, N.J.; Hallam, T.; Simmons, M.Y.; Bilger, G.; Clark, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to fabricate precise atomic-scale devices in silicon using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to position dopant atoms and molecular beam epitaxy to encapsulate the dopants it is necessary to minimize the segregation/diffusion of dopant atoms during silicon encapsulation. We characterize the surface segregation/diffusion of phosphorus atoms from a δ-doped layer in silicon after encapsulation at 250 deg. C and room temperature using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and STM. We show that the surface phosphorus density can be reduced to a few percent of the initial δ-doped density if the phosphorus atoms are encapsulated with 5 monolayers of epitaxial silicon at room temperature. We highlight the limitations of SIMS to determine phosphorus segregation at the atomic scale and the advantage of using STM directly

  17. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces.

  18. A study for the KAERI research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Hwang, Y. S.; Park, H. S.; Park, S. K.; Park, B. Y.; Bang, K. S.; Kuh, J. H.; Kang, K. H.

    1997-12-01

    Major goal of the R and D on the KAERI Research Tunnel in 1997 are 1) concept development of the KAERI research tunnel and its major units 2) computer simulation of facilities 3) study on thermo-hydro mechanical coupling in the vicinity of a waste repository 4) effect of excavated distrubed zone. In addition supplementary site investigation to understand the distribution of stresses in the site was done along with long term monitoring of the water table. (author). 44 refs., 16 tabs., 36 figs

  19. Two-Dimensional Cysteine and Cystine Cluster Networks on Au(111) Disclosed by Voltammetry and in Situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    Microscopic structures for molecular monolayers of L-cysteine and L-cystine assembled on Au(111) have been disclosed by employing electrochemistry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). HighresolutionSTMimages show that the adlayers of both cyteine and cystine exhibit highly-ordered net...

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy I general principles and applications to clean and absorbate-covered surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wiesendanger, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Since the first edition of "Scanning 'funneling Microscopy I" has been pub­ lished, considerable progress has been made in the application of STM to the various classes of materials treated in this volume, most notably in the field of adsorbates and molecular systems. An update of the most recent develop­ ments will be given in an additional Chapter 9. The editors would like to thank all the contributors who have supplied up­ dating material, and those who have provided us with suggestions for further improvements. We also thank Springer-Verlag for the decision to publish this second edition in paperback, thereby making this book affordable for an even wider circle of readers. Hamburg, July 1994 R. Wiesendanger Preface to the First Edition Since its invention in 1981 by G. Binnig, H. Rohrer and coworkers at the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has devel­ oped into an invaluable surface analytical technique allowing the investigation of real-space surface structures at th...

  1. Hydrophilicity and Microsolvation of an Organic Molecule Resolved on the Sub-molecular Level by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Karsten; Loose, Dirk; Ruschmeier, Maximilian; Strotkötter, Valerie; Dyker, Gerald; Morgenstern, Karina

    2018-01-26

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy was used to follow the formation of a solvation shell around an adsorbed functionalized azo dye from the attachment of the first water molecule to a fully solvated molecule. Specific functional groups bind initially one water molecule each, which act as anchor points for additional water molecules. Further water attachment occurs in areas close to these functional groups even when the functional groups themselves are already saturated. In contrast, water molecules surround the hydrophobic parts of the molecule only when the two-dimensional solvation shell closes around them. This study thus traces hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of an organic molecule down to a sub-molecular length scale. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Interface-induced chiral domain walls, spin spirals and skyrmions revealed by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, Kirsten; Kubetzka, André; Pietzsch, Oswald; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2014-10-01

    The spin textures of ultra-thin magnetic layers exhibit surprising variety. The loss of inversion symmetry at the interface of the magnetic layer and substrate gives rise to the so-called Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction which favors non-collinear spin arrangements with unique rotational sense. Here we review the application of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy to such systems, which has led to the discovery of interface-induced chiral domain walls and spin spirals. Recently, different interface-driven skyrmion lattices have been found, and the writing as well as the deleting of individual skyrmions based on local spin-polarized current injection has been demonstrated. These interface-induced non-collinear magnetic states offer new exciting possibilities to study fundamental magnetic interactions and to tailor material properties for spintronic applications.

  3. Insulating nanoparticles on YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films revealed by comparison of atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, R.E.; Moreland, J.; Missert, N.; Rudman, D.A.; Sanders, S.C.; Cole, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    The surface topography of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin films has been studied with both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The AFM images reveal a high density of small distinct nanoparticles, 10--50 nm across and 5--20 nm high, which do not appear in STM images of the same samples. In addition, we have shown that scanning the STM tip across the surface breaks off these particles and moves them to the edge of the scanned area, where they can later be imaged with the AFM

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrochemical characterization of 2-naphthalenethiol self-assembled monolayers on the Au surface: a study of bridge-mediated electron transfer in Ru(NH3)6(2+)/Ru(NH3)6(3+) redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, V; Lakshminarayanan, V

    2005-09-01

    We have studied the structure, adsorption kinetics, and barrier properties of self-assembled monolayers of 2-naphthalenethiol on Au using electrochemical techniques, grazing-angle Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The results of cyclic voltammetric and impedance measurements using redox probes show that 2-naphthalenethiol on Au forms a stable and reproducible, but moderately blocking, monolayer. Annealing of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-modified surface at 72 +/- 2 degrees C remarkably improves the blocking property of the monolayer of 2-naphthalenethiol on Au. From the study of kinetics of SAM formation, we find that the self-assembly follows Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Our STM and FTIR results show that the molecules are adsorbed with the naphthalene ring tilted from the surface normal by forming a square root 3 x 3 R30 degrees overlayer structure. From our studies, we conclude that the electron-transfer reaction of ferro/ferricyanide in the freshly formed monolayer occurs predominantly through the pinholes and defects present in the monolayer. However, in the case of thermally annealed specimen, although the ferro/ferricyanide reaction is almost completely blocked, the electron-transfer reaction of hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride is not significantly inhibited. It is proposed that the electron-transfer reaction in the case of the ruthenium redox couple takes place by a tunneling mechanism through the high-electron-density aromatic naphthalene ring acting as a bridge between the monolayer-modified electrode and the ruthenium complex.

  5. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-07-10

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between {theta} = 78.5 and {theta} = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For {theta} = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount

  6. Surface damage through grazing incidence ions investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redinger, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Surface damage, caused by grazing incidence ions, is investigated with variable temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The experiments are carried out on a Pt(111) crystal. The kinetic energy of noble gas ions is varied between 1-15 keV and the angle of incidence can be adjusted between θ = 78.5 and θ = 90 measured with respect to the surface normal. The damage patterns of single ion impacts, on flat terraces and at step edges of monoatomic height, are investigated at low surface temperatures. Ions hitting a flat terrace are usually specular reflected. The energy transfer from the ion to the crystal atoms is small and only little damage is produced. In contrast, at ascending step edges, which are illuminated by the ion beam, large angle scattering events occur. Sputtering, adatom and vacancy production is induced. However, a significant fraction of the ions, which hit step edges, enter the crystal and are guided in between two atomic layers parallel to the surface via small angle binary collisions. This steering process is denoted as subsurface channeling. The energy loss per length scale of the channeled particles is low, which results in long ion trajectories (up to 1000A). During the steering process, the ions produce surface damage. Depending on the ion species and the ion energy, adatom and vacancies or surface vacancy trenches of monoatomic width are observed. The surface damage can be used to track the path of the ion. This makes the whole trajectory of single ions with keV energy visible. The number of sputtered atoms per incident ion at ascending step edges, i.e. the step edge sputtering yield, is measured experimentally for different irradiation conditions. For θ = 86 , the sputtering yield is determined from the fluence dependent retraction of pre-existing illuminated step edges. An alternative method for the step edge sputtering yield determination, is the analysis of the concentration of ascending steps and of the removed amount of material as a

  7. A functional renormalization group application to the scanning tunneling microscopy experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Juan Ramos Cárdenas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of a system composed of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM tip coupled to an absorbed impurity on a host surface using the functional renormalization group (FRG. We include the effect of the STM tip as a correction to the self-energy in addition to the usual contribution of the host surface in the wide band limit. We calculate the differential conductance curves at two different lateral distances from the quantum impurity and find good qualitative agreement with STM experiments where the differential conductance curves evolve from an antiresonance to a Lorentzian shape.

  8. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy with quantitative insights into magnetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phark, Soo-Hyon; Sander, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (spin-STM/S) have been successfully applied to magnetic characterizations of individual nanostructures. Spin-STM/S is often performed in magnetic fields of up to some Tesla, which may strongly influence the tip state. In spite of the pivotal role of the tip in spin-STM/S, the contribution of the tip to the differential conductance d I /d V signal in an external field has rarely been investigated in detail. In this review, an advanced analysis of spin-STM/S data measured on magnetic nanoislands, which relies on a quantitative magnetic characterization of tips, is discussed. Taking advantage of the uniaxial out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy of Co bilayer nanoisland on Cu(111), in-field spin-STM on this system has enabled a quantitative determination, and thereby, a categorization of the magnetic states of the tips. The resulting in-depth and conclusive analysis of magnetic characterization of the tip opens new venues for a clear-cut sub-nanometer scale spin ordering and spin-dependent electronic structure of the non-collinear magnetic state in bilayer high Fe nanoislands on Cu(111).

  9. Visualizing period fluctuations in strained-layer superlattices with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanedy, K.; Lopez, F.; Wood, M. R.; Gmachl, C. F.; Weimer, M.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Shaner, E. A.; Kim, J. K.

    2018-01-01

    We show how cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) may be used to accurately map the period fluctuations throughout epitaxial, strained-layer superlattices based on the InAs/InAsSb and InGaAs/InAlAs material systems. The concept, analogous to Bragg's law in high-resolution x-ray diffraction, relies on an analysis of the [001]-convolved reciprocal-space satellite peaks obtained from discrete Fourier transforms of individual STM images. Properly implemented, the technique enables local period measurements that reliably discriminate vertical fluctuations localized to within ˜5 superlattice repeats along the [001] growth direction and orthogonal, lateral fluctuations localized to within ˜40 nm along directions in the growth plane. While not as accurate as x-ray, the inherent, single-image measurement error associated with the method may be made as small as 0.1%, allowing the vertical or lateral period fluctuations contributing to inhomogeneous energy broadening and carrier localization in these structures to be pinpointed and quantified. The direct visualization of unexpectedly large, lateral period fluctuations on nanometer length scales in both strain-balanced systems supports a common understanding in terms of correlated interface roughness.

  10. Preparation of scanning tunneling microscopy tips using pulsed alternating current etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, Victor A.; Thaker, Avesh A.; Derouin, Jonathan; Valencia, Damian N.; Farber, Rachael G.; Gebel, Dana A.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical method using pulsed alternating current etching (PACE) to produce atomically sharp scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips is presented. An Arduino Uno microcontroller was used to control the number and duration of the alternating current (AC) pulses, allowing for ready optimization of the procedures for both Pt:Ir and W tips using a single apparatus. W tips prepared using constant and pulsed AC power were compared. Tips fashioned using PACE were sharper than those etched with continuous AC power alone. Pt:Ir tips were prepared with an initial coarse etching stage using continuous AC power followed by fine etching using PACE. The number and potential of the finishing AC pulses was varied and scanning electron microscope imaging was used to compare the results. Finally, tip quality using the optimized procedures was verified by UHV-STM imaging. With PACE, at least 70% of the W tips and 80% of the Pt:Ir tips were of sufficiently high quality to obtain atomically resolved images of HOPG or Ni(111)

  11. Preparation of scanning tunneling microscopy tips using pulsed alternating current etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Victor A.; Thaker, Avesh A.; Derouin, Jonathan; Valencia, Damian N.; Farber, Rachael G.; Gebel, Dana A.; Killelea, Daniel R., E-mail: dkillelea@luc.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Loyola University Chicago, 1068 W. Sheridan Rd., Chicago, Illinois 60660 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    An electrochemical method using pulsed alternating current etching (PACE) to produce atomically sharp scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips is presented. An Arduino Uno microcontroller was used to control the number and duration of the alternating current (AC) pulses, allowing for ready optimization of the procedures for both Pt:Ir and W tips using a single apparatus. W tips prepared using constant and pulsed AC power were compared. Tips fashioned using PACE were sharper than those etched with continuous AC power alone. Pt:Ir tips were prepared with an initial coarse etching stage using continuous AC power followed by fine etching using PACE. The number and potential of the finishing AC pulses was varied and scanning electron microscope imaging was used to compare the results. Finally, tip quality using the optimized procedures was verified by UHV-STM imaging. With PACE, at least 70% of the W tips and 80% of the Pt:Ir tips were of sufficiently high quality to obtain atomically resolved images of HOPG or Ni(111)

  12. Scanning tunneling microscopy III theory of STM and related scanning probe methods

    CERN Document Server

    Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    While the first two volumes on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and its related scanning probe (SXM) methods have mainly concentrated on intro­ ducing the experimental techniques, as well as their various applications in different research fields, this third volume is exclusively devoted to the theory of STM and related SXM methods. As the experimental techniques including the reproducibility of the experimental results have advanced, more and more theorists have become attracted to focus on issues related to STM and SXM. The increasing effort in the development of theoretical concepts for STM/SXM has led to considerable improvements in understanding the contrast mechanism as well as the experimental conditions necessary to obtain reliable data. Therefore, this third volume on STM/SXM is not written by theorists for theorists, but rather for every scientist who is not satisfied by just obtaining real­ space images of surface structures by STM/SXM. After a brief introduction (Chap. 1), N. D. Lang first co...

  13. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy of picene thin films formed on Ag(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Yasuo, E-mail: yyoshida@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yokosuka, Takuya; Hasegawa, Yukio, E-mail: hasegawa@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The Institute of Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan); Yang, Hung-Hsiang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hsu-Sheng; Guan, Shu-You; Su, Wei-Bin; Chang, Chia-Seng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yanagisawa, Susumu [Department of Physics and Earth Science Department, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Lin, Minn-Tsong [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hoffmann, Germar [The Institute of Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan); Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-21

    Using ultrahigh-vacuum low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with first principles density functional theory calculations, we have investigated structural and electronic properties of pristine and potassium (K)-deposited picene thin films formed in situ on a Ag(111) substrate. At low coverages, the molecules are uniformly distributed with the long axis aligned along the [112{sup ¯}] direction of the substrate. At higher coverages, ordered structures composed of monolayer molecules are observed, one of which is a monolayer with tilted and flat-lying molecules resembling a (11{sup ¯}0) plane of the bulk crystalline picene. Between the molecules and the substrate, the van der Waals interaction is dominant with negligible hybridization between their electronic states; a conclusion that contrasts with the chemisorption exhibited by pentacene molecules on the same substrate. We also observed a monolayer picene thin film in which all molecules were standing to form an intermolecular π stacking. Two-dimensional delocalized electronic states are found on the K-deposited π stacking structure.

  14. Probing the location of displayed cytochrome b562 on amyloid by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, C J; Barker, P D; Wang, N; Durkan, C; Yang, Z Y; Mowat, C G; Jarvis, S

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibres displaying cytochrome b 562 were probed using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) in vacuo. The cytochromes are electron transfer proteins containing a haem cofactor and could, in principle, mediate electron transfer between the tip and the gold substrate. If the core fibres were insulating and electron transfer within the 3D haem network was detected, then the electron transport properties of the fibre could be controlled by genetic engineering. Three kinds of STM images were obtained. At a low bias ( 562 was not detected by STM, which was attributed to low adhesion, whereas a monomeric multi-haem protein, GSU1996, was readily imaged. We conclude that the fibre superstructure may be intermittently conducting, that the cytochromes have been seen within the fibres and that they are too far apart for detectable current flow between sites to occur. We predict that GSU1996, being 10 nm long, is more likely to mediate successful electron transfer along the fibre as well as being more readily detectable when displayed from amyloid. (paper)

  15. A tilting wind tunnel for fire behavior studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise

    1994-01-01

    The combined effects of wind velocity and slope on wildland fire behavior can be studied in the laboratory using a tilting wind tunnel. The tilting wind tunnel requires a commercially available fan to induce wind and can be positioned to simulate heading and backing fires spreading up and down slope. The tunnel is portable and can be disassembled for transport using a...

  16. TC study of the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Gozzoli, L.; Uggetti, C.; Zanlungo, M.; Ferrari, P.; Leddi, G.

    1987-01-01

    The standard technique for CT investigation of the carpal tunnel and its normal anatomy were studied. Ten healty asymptomatic volunteers, age 25-45, underwent wrist CT. The hand is placed in prone position with the third metacarpus in line with radius. Digital radiograph and four axial CT scans are performed respectively: at the distal end of the radius, at the scaphoid tubercle level, at the hamate hook level and at the carpal and metacarpal joint. Standard carpal tunnel diameters are thus available with good reliability and repeatibility when correct technique is adopted. The results permit a morphological description of the osseous walls, transverse ligament, flexor tendons with synovial sheets and median nerve. Gujon's canal and its content can also be investigated

  17. SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY STUDY OF MOLECULAR NANOSTRUCTURES ON 2D MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chuanhui

    2017-01-01

    Molecules adsorbed on two-dimensional (2D) materials can show interesting physical and chemical properties. This thesis presents scanning probe microscopy (SPM) investigation of emerging 2D materials, molecular nanostructures on 2D substrates at the nanometer scale, and biophysical processes on the biological membrane. Two main techniques of nano-probing are used: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The study particularly emphasizes on self-assembled molecul...

  18. Josephson scanning tunneling microscopy -- a local and direct probe of the superconducting order parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Hikari; Dynes, Robert; Barber Jr., Richard. P.; Ono, S.; Ando, Y.

    2009-09-01

    Direct measurements of the superconducting superfluid on the surface of vacuum-cleaved Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta (BSCCO) samples are reported. These measurements are accomplished via Josephson tunneling into the sample using a novel scanning tunneling microscope (STM) equipped with a superconducting tip. The spatial resolution of the STM of lateral distances less than the superconducting coherence length allows it to reveal local inhomogeneities in the pair wavefunction of the BSCCO. Instrument performance is demonstrated first with Josephson measurements of Pb films followed by the layered superconductor NbSe2. The relevant measurement parameter, the Josephson ICRN product, is discussed within the context of both BCS superconductors and the high transition temperature superconductors. The local relationship between the ICRN product and the quasiparticle density of states (DOS) gap are presented within the context of phase diagrams for BSCCO. Excessive current densities can be produced with these measurements and have been found to alter the local DOS in the BSCCO. Systematic studies of this effect were performed to determine the practical measurement limits for these experiments. Alternative methods for preparation of the BSCCO surface are also discussed.

  19. Proposal for Marshmallow Tunnel Stemming Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-01-01

    Discussion of findings after the shot in the tunnel and instructions for a deeper drilling below the tunnel using radiation probes to help define the cavity shape and documentary photography of the findings.

  20. In silico simulations of tunneling barrier measurements for molecular orbital-mediated junctions: A molecular orbital theory approach to scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terryn, Raymond J.; Sriraman, Krishnan; Olson, Joel A., E-mail: jolson@fit.edu; Baum, J. Clayton, E-mail: cbaum@fit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, Florida 32901 (United States); Novak, Mark J. [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph Street, Rapid City, South Dakota 57701 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A new simulator for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is presented based on the linear combination of atomic orbitals molecular orbital (LCAO-MO) approximation for the effective tunneling Hamiltonian, which leads to the convolution integral when applied to the tip interaction with the sample. This approach intrinsically includes the structure of the STM tip. Through this mechanical emulation and the tip-inclusive convolution model, dI/dz images for molecular orbitals (which are closely associated with apparent barrier height, ϕ{sub ap}) are reported for the first time. For molecular adsorbates whose experimental topographic images correspond well to isolated-molecule quantum chemistry calculations, the simulator makes accurate predictions, as illustrated by various cases. Distortions in these images due to the tip are shown to be in accord with those observed experimentally and predicted by other ab initio considerations of tip structure. Simulations of the tunneling current dI/dz images are in strong agreement with experiment. The theoretical framework provides a solid foundation which may be applied to LCAO cluster models of adsorbate–substrate systems, and is extendable to emulate several aspects of functional STM operation.

  1. Tip-Dependent Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Imaging of Ultrathin FeO Films on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Grabow, Lars C.; Peng, Guowen

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images of moiré-structured FeO films on Pt(111) were obtained in a number of different tip-dependent imaging modes. For the first time, the STM images are distinguished and interpreted unambiguously with the help of distinct oxygen......-vacancy dislocation loops in the FeO moiré structure. The experimental STM results are compared with the results of electronic structure calculations within the DFT+U scheme for a realistic (sqrt(91)xsqrt(91)R5.2 moiré unit cell supported on Pt(111) as well as with the results from previous studies. We find that one...

  2. Atomic mechanism for the growth of wafer-scale single-crystal graphene: theoretical perspective and scanning tunneling microscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Tianchao; Zhang, Jialin; Chen, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most promising approach for producing low-cost, high-quality, and large area graphene. Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for realizing single crystal graphene (SCG) over wafer scale. Density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations are playing an increasingly important role in revealing the structure of the most stable carbon species, understanding the evolution processes, and disclosing the active sites. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is a powerful surface characterization tool to illustrate the real space distribution and atomic structures of growth intermediates during the CVD process. Combining them together can provide valuable information to improve the atomically controlled growth of SCG. Starting from a basic concept of the substrate effect on realizing SCG, this review covers the progress made in theoretical investigations on various carbon species during graphene growth on different transition metal substrates, in the STM study of the structural intermediates on transition metal surfaces, and in synthesizing graphene nanoribbons with atomic-precise width and edge structure, ending with a perspective on the future development of 2D materials beyond graphene.

  3. Switching and sensing spin states of co-porphyrin in bimolecular reactions on Au111 using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Howon; Chang, Yun Hee; Lee, Soon-Hyeong; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2013-10-22

    Controlling and sensing spin states of magnetic molecules at the single-molecule level is essential for spintronic molecular device applications. Here, we demonstrate that spin states of Co-porphyrin on Au(111) can be reversibly switched over by binding and unbinding of the NO molecule and can be sensed using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). Before NO exposure, Co-porphryin showed a clear zero-bias peak, a signature of Kondo effect in STS, whereas after NO exposures, it formed a molecular complex, NO-Co-porphyrin, that did not show any zero-bias feature, implying that the Kondo effect was switched off by binding of NO. The Kondo effect could be switched back on by unbinding of NO through single-molecule manipulation or thermal desorption. Our density functional theory calculation results explain the observations with pairing of unpaired spins in dz(2) and ppπ* orbitals of Co-porphyrin and NO, respectively. Our study opens up ways to control molecular spin state and Kondo effect by means of enormous variety of bimolecular binding and unbinding reactions on metallic surfaces.

  4. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Martins Roberto S.; Siqueira Mario G.; Simplício Hougelli

    2006-01-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist imobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuosly for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment...

  5. Ordered vortex lattice and intrinsic vortex core states in Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub x studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuba, K; Kosugi, N; Nishimori, H; Nishida, N

    2003-01-01

    The ordered vortex lattice in Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub x (overdoped, T sub c = 83 K) has been observed for the first time at 4.2 K in 8 T by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). The vortex lattice is short-range ordered in the length scale of 100 nm. The vortices form an almost square lattice with the sides parallel to the diagonal direction of the CuO sub 2 square lattice, that is, the nodal direction of the d sub x sub sup 2 sub - sub y sub sup 2 superconductor. In all of the vortex cores of the ordered lattice, the localized states are observed at +- 9 meV symmetrically in the superconducting gap and are clearly determined to be intrinsic to the vortex in Bi sub 2 Sr sub 2 CaCu sub 2 O sub x. The intensity is found to be electron-hole asymmetric.

  6. Sediment and Cavitation Erosion Studies through Dam Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of sediment and cavitation erosion through Tunnel 2 and Tunnel 3 of Tarbela Dam in Pakistan. Main bend and main branch of Tunnel 2 and outlet 1 and outlet 3 of Tunnel 3 are concluded to be critical for cavitation and sediment erosion. Studies are also performed for increased sediments flow rate, concluding 5 kg/sec as the critical value for sudden increase in erosion rate density. Erosion rate is concluded to be the function of sediment flow rate and head condition. Particulate mass presently observed is reasonably low, hence presently not affecting the velocity and the flow field.

  7. Study of Perylenetetracarboxylic Acid Dimethylimide Films by Cyclic Thermal Desorption and Scanning Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochtennyi, A. E.; Lappo, A. N.; Il'yushonok, I. P.

    2018-02-01

    Some results of studying the direct-current (DC) conductivity of perylenetetracarboxylic acid dimethylimide films by cyclic oxygen thermal desorption are presented. The microscopic parameters of hopping electron transport over localized impurity and intrinsic states were determined. The bandgap width and the sign of major current carriers were determined by scanning probe microscopy methods (atomic force microscopy, scanning probe spectroscopy, and photoassisted Kelvin probe force microscopy). The possibility of the application of photoassisted scanning tunneling microscopy for the nanoscale phase analysis of photoconductive films is discussed.

  8. Experimental verification of the rotational type of chiral spin spiral structures by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze, Masahiro; Yoshida, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Yukio

    2017-10-16

    We report on experimental verification of the rotational type of chiral spin spirals in Mn thin films on a W(110) substrate using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) with a double-axis superconducting vector magnet. From SP-STM images using Fe-coated W tips magnetized to the out-of-plane and [001] directions, we found that both Mn mono- and double-layers exhibit cycloidal rotation whose spins rotate in the planes normal to the propagating directions. Our results agree with the theoretical prediction based on the symmetry of the system, supporting that the magnetic structures are driven by the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction.

  9. Adsorption of human insulin on single-crystal gold surfaces investigated by in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy and electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welinder, Anna Christina; Zhang, Jingdong; Steensgaard, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    We have explored the adsorption of zinc-free human insulin on the three low-index single-crystalline Au(111)-, Au(100)- and Au(110)-surfaces in aqueous buffer (KH2PO4, pH 5) by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunnelling microscopy (in situ STM) at single-molecule resolution and linear...... sweep, LSV, cyclic, CV, and square wave (SQWV) voltammetry. Multifarious electrochemical patterns were observed. Most attention was given to reductive desorption caused by insulin binding to the Au-surfaces via up to three disulfide groups per insulin monomer, presumably converted to single Au-S links...

  10. Characterization of Si3N4/SiO2 optical channel waveguides by photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Chudgar, Mona H.; Jackson, Howard E.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; De Brabander, Gregory N.; Boyd, Joseph T.

    1993-01-01

    Photon scanning tunneling microscopy (PSTM) is used to characterize Si3N4/Si02 optical channel waveguides being used for integrated optical-micromechanical sensors. PSTM utilizes an optical fiber tapered to a fine point which is piezoelectrically positioned to measure the decay of the evanescent field intensity associated with the waveguide propagating mode. Evanescent field decays are recorded for both ridge channel waveguides and planar waveguide regions. Values for the local effective refractive index are calculated from the data for both polarizations and compared to model calculations.

  11. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy of Ga1-xMnxAs/GaAs Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushan, Pedram; Richardella, Anthony; Mack, Shawn; Awschalom, David; Yazdani, Ali

    2008-03-01

    We have used a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform cross-sectional imaging studies of GaMnAs heterostructures. The heterostructures, consisting of a p-type buffer followed by a 3% Mn doped layer, were grown on a n-type GaAs substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy and cleaved in situ for STM measurements. The topographic measurements on the GaMnAs layer showed a variety of long range electronic structure modulations on the order of a few nm due to high level of disorder and compensation. Combining bias-dependent imaging and spectroscopy, we have used the STM to identify electronic features due to Mn dopants and other defects. In particular, we find that Mn dopants on the top most layer act as deep acceptors and exhibits similar topographic and spectroscopic features as our previous work [1] on Mn adatoms substituted into GaAs using STM manipulation techniques. [1] D. Kitchen, A. Richardella, J-M. Tang, M. Flatte, A. Yazdani, Nature 442, 436--439 (2006)

  12. Structural Safety Assessment of Existing Multiarch Tunnel: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Lai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural health assessment is one of the key activities in maintaining the performance of a tunnel during its service life. Due to the development of modern detection technology, comprehensive structural health assessment system is being established for operating tunnels. To evaluate the actual operational state of Shitigou tunnel, overall detection of the liner crack, tunnel seepage, and liner void was conducted by employing the modern detection technology, such as crack width monitoring technology, concrete strength monitoring technology, and electromagnetic wave nondestructive monitoring technology. Through the statistical analysis of the detection results, the distribution characteristic, development law, and damage grade of structural defects were obtained. Tunnel liner cracks are mainly located on the middle wall; serious water leakage is encountered on the side wall, middle wall, and vault; the strength of foundation and liner structure of left tunnel does not meet the design requirement; the liner voids are mostly located at the tunnel entrance section, especially, on the tunnel vault; and the proportion of influence factors of structural defects should be considered. The research results presented for this study can serve as references for effective design and health assessment of existing multiarch tunnel projects.

  13. Field-Induced Deformation as a Mechanism for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Based Nanofabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ole; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Quaade, Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    The voltage between tip and sample in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) results in a large electric field localized near the tip apex. The mechanical stress due to this field can cause appreciable deformation of both tip and sample on the scale of the tunnel gap. We derive an approximate...... analytical expression for this deformation and confirm the validity of the result by comparison with a finite element analysis. We derive the condition for a field-induced jump to contact of tip and sample and show that this agrees well with experimental results for material transfer between tip and sample...... by voltage pulsing in ultrahigh vacuum....

  14. Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia A. Moss; Les Groom

    2001-01-01

    Microscopy is the study and interpretation of images produced by a microscope. "Interpretation" is the keyword, because the microscope enables one to see structures that are too small or too close together to be resolved by the unaided eye. (The human eye cannot separate two points or lines that are closer together than 0.1 mm.) it is important to...

  15. Simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast in scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Volker; Preissner, Curt A; Hla, Saw-Wai; Wang, Kangkang; Rosenmann, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    A method and system for performing simultaneous topographic and elemental chemical and magnetic contrast analysis in a scanning, tunneling microscope. The method and system also includes nanofabricated coaxial multilayer tips with a nanoscale conducting apex and a programmable in-situ nanomanipulator to fabricate these tips and also to rotate tips controllably.

  16. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface

  17. Comparative study of electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy in photosynthetic research

    OpenAIRE

    MATĚNOVÁ, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the ability of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualize individual protein complexes. The principle of electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy is explained. For comparision of these methods well characterized photosynthetic complexes LH1, LH2, PSI and PSII were selected.

  18. Radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscopy: Instrumentation and applications to physical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemiktarak, Utku

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) relies upon localized electron tunneling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. Perhaps the most serious obstacle in front of realizing the full potential of the STM is its inadequate temporal resolution, limited by the bandwidth of STM current detectors (˜1 kHz). To overcome this limitation, we developed a radically new approach: we embedded the tunnel junction into an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit and measured the reflection of radio-frequency waves from this circuit. Our new apparatus, which we call a radio-frequency scanning tunneling microscope (Rf-STM), allowed us to achieve 100-fold bandwidth increase upon the state-of-the-art. The bandwidth increase resulted in a number of ultrafast and sensitive measurements in nanoscale systems. First, the large bandwidth of the Rf-STM allowed acquisition of surface topography images at high speeds. In a conventional STM scan, it takes from minutes to hours to create a typical image. As the circuit bandwidth increases, one can shorten this time considerably. We showed that the Rf-STM images, collected at a rate of 100 line/s, had comparable resolution to conventional STM images taken at a rate of 1 line/s. Second, we used the Rf-STM to perform broadband electronic noise measurements. Intrinsic current fluctuations in a tunnel junction, called shot noise, gives important in formation about electron transport mechanisms. We used shot noise measurements as an absolute calibration tool for Rf-STM. Conversely, we also demonstrated how the Rf-STM could be used as a local primary thermometer. Finally, using the Rf-STM, we established the very high displacement sensitivity of a tunnel displacement detector. On a driven micro-mechanical membrane, we detected the first ten mechanical resonances, ranging in frequency from 1 MHz to 3 MHz. We also measured the displacements of a Au surface shaken by a calibrated piezoelectric actuator

  19. Sensor integration study for a shallow tunnel detection system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Mark L.; Abbott, Robert E.; Bonal, Nedra; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Senglaub, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    During the past several years, there has been a growing recognition of the threats posed by the use of shallow tunnels against both international border security and the integrity of critical facilities. This has led to the development and testing of a variety of geophysical and surveillance techniques for the detection of these clandestine tunnels. The challenges of detection of these tunnels arising from the complexity of the near surface environment, the subtlety of the tunnel signatures themselves, and the frequent siting of these tunnels in urban environments with a high level of cultural noise, have time and again shown that any single technique is not robust enough to solve the tunnel detection problem in all cases. The question then arises as to how to best combine the multiple techniques currently available to create an integrated system that results in the best chance of detecting these tunnels in a variety of clutter environments and geologies. This study utilizes Taguchi analysis with simulated sensor detection performance to address this question. The analysis results show that ambient noise has the most effect on detection performance over the effects of tunnel characteristics and geological factors.

  20. Nt_STM: A step forward in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoga, Michaël; Archambault, Fabien; Cerdá, Jorge I.

    2012-06-01

    We present the Nt_STM software suite designed to help analysis and interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) images, via the simulation of STM data under different tip and bias conditions and facilitating their comparison against the experimental ones. The Nt_STM package includes two components: (i) an intuitive and directive Graphical User Interface (GUI) designed to build a precise model of the STM set-up and analyze the simulation results and, (ii) a powerful simulation engine (GREEN) allowing an efficient, yet accurate, calculation of the tunneling current necessary to generate current or topographic images, I(V) spectra as well as various properties such as band structures, Local Density Of State (LDOS), etc. The Nt_STM package, at its current version 2.0, gives the opportunity to access parallel computation, a new collection of objects and new Extended Hückel parameters.

  1. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Applied to the Electrochemical Deposition of Lead on the GOLD(111) Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael Philip

    1990-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed and used to study the atomic scale structure of two types of metal surfaces. Operating both in air and through an electrolytic bath, the STM was used to investigate electrochemical deposition on the gold(111) surface. For the study in air, images were taken of both uncoated gold(111) films and those with monolayer and submonolayer deposits of lead and copper, prepared by underpotential deposition (UPD). Comparison between STM images of the bare gold substrates and those with the UPD adlayers reveals no difference. Oxidation of the UPD films is blamed for rendering the overlayers invisible to the STM. The common surface structure of these samples in air is discussed. Dominant features include: planar regions or terraces separated by monoatomic steps; monolayer deep pits; and monolayer high platforms. Room temperature surface diffusion has been monitored and can be seen to produce an overall smoothing of the topography. A second type of diffusion, more rapid and less common, produces finger-like ridges which are related to the gold(111) 1 x 23 reconstruction. In-situ experiments involved real-time STM monitoring of the surface topography during the electrochemical deposition and subsequent removal of a UPD lead monolayer. For the deposition process, step edges show the earliest and most extensive activity; however, nucleation of small lead islands on apparently flat terraces also provides growth sites. The lead coated surfaces are found to be smoother than the underlying gold. Subsequent removal of the UPD overlayer proceeds from the dissolution of lead platforms to the formation and expansion of a network of pits in the adlayer. The topography of the gold substrate is altered by the deposition/stripping process. Design of the STM and Modifications necessary to operate in an electrochemical environment are discussed. The STM has also been used in air to investigate the surface topography of x-ray reflecting optics

  2. Single-molecule conductance of redox molecules in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haiss, W.; Albrecht, Tim; van Zalinge, H.

    2007-01-01

    across the molecular bridge through control of the electrochemical potential and consequently the redox state of the viologen moiety. This gating is theoretically considered within the framework of superexchange and coherent two-step notions for charge transport. It is shown here that the absence...... of a maximum in the I-tunneling versus electrode potential relationship can be fitted by a "soft" gating concept. This arises from large configurational fluctuations of the molecular bridge linked to the gold contacts by flexible chains. This view is incorporated in a formalism that is well-suited for data...

  3. INTER-LAYER INTERACTION IN DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES EVIDENCED BY SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY AND SPECTROSCOPY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giusca, Cristina E; Tison, Yann; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2008-01-01

    and the overall electronic structure for double-walled carbon nanotubes, is demonstrated by our experiments, showing that the effect the inner tube has on the overall electronic structure of double-walled nanotubes cannot be neglected, and is key to the opto-electronic properties of the system. We postulate...... that previous analysis of the opto-electronic properties on multiple-walled carbon nanotubes based purely on the outer layer chirality of the tube needs significant modification based on new understanding brought forth with our analysis.......Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy have been used in an attempt to elucidate the electronic structure of nanotube systems containing two constituent shells. Evidence for modified electronic structure due to the inter-layer interaction in double-walled carbon nanotubes is provided...

  4. Attractive interaction between Mn atoms on the GaAs(110) surface observed by scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Yoshida, Shoji; Kanazawa, Ken; Hayaki, Eiko; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2016-06-16

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) was carried out to investigate the structures of Mn atoms deposited on a GaAs(110) surface at room temperature to directly observe the characteristics of interactions between Mn atoms in GaAs. Mn atoms were paired with a probability higher than the random distribution, indicating an attractive interaction between them. In fact, re-pairing of unpaired Mn atoms was observed during STS measurement. The pair initially had a new structure, which was transformed during STS measurement into one of those formed by atom manipulation at 4 K. Mn atoms in pairs and trimers were aligned in the direction, which is theoretically predicted to produce a high Curie temperature.

  5. Circularly polarized light emission in scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apell, S.P.; Penn, D.R.; Johansson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Light is produced when a scanning tunneling microscope is used to probe a metal surface. Recent experiments on cobalt utilizing a tungsten tip found that the light is circularly polarized; the sense of circular polarization depends on the direction of the sample magnetization, and the degree of polarization is of order 10%. This raises the possibility of constructing a magnetic microscope with very good spatial resolution. We present a theory of this effect for iron and cobalt and find a degree of polarization of order 0.1%. This is in disagreement with the experiments on cobalt as well as previous theoretical work which found order of magnitude agreement with the experimental results. However, a recent experiment on iron showed 0.0±2%. We predict that the use of a silver tip would increase the degree of circular polarization for a range of photon energies

  6. Interdot carrier's transfer via tunneling pathway studied from photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihani, J.; Sallet, V.; Yahyaoui, N.; Harmand, J.C.; Oueslati, M.; Chtourou, R.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs(0 0 1) substrate were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) at a growth temperature of 490 deg. C. Two different families of dots were observed in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image and ambiguously identified in the photoluminescence (PL) spectra. Temperature-dependent PL study was carried out in the 8-270 K temperature range. The integrated-PL intensity behavior of the two QDs populations was fit with the help of a rate equations model. It is found that the evolutions of the integrated-PL intensity of the two QDs population were governed by two regimes. The first one occurs in the 8-210 K temperature range and reveals an unusual enhancement of the integrated-PL intensity of the larger QDs (LQDs) class. This was attributed to the carrier supplies from the smaller QDs (SQDs) class via the tunneling process. The second one occurs in the 210-270 K temperature range and shows a common quench of the PL signals of the two QDs families, reflecting the same thermal escape mechanism of carriers

  7. Scanning electron microscopy study of Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Tiana; De Carli, Geraldo A

    2003-12-01

    A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of Trichomonas gallinae (Rivolta, 1878), provided more information about the morphology of this flagellated protozoan. SEM showed the morphological features of the trophozoites; the emergence of the anterior flagella, the structure of the undulating membrane, the position and shape of the pelta, axostyle and posterior flagellum. Of special interest were the pseudocyst forms.

  8. DESORPTION OF Te CAPPING LAYER FROM ZnTe (100: AUGER SPECTROSCOPY, LOW-ENERGY ELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Sossoe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the annealing temperature to desorb a protective Te capping layer of the zinc telluride (ZnTe (100 surface was investigated. The surface reconstruction of the ZnTe (100 upon the removal of a Te capping layer grown by the molecular beam epitaxy was characterized by different methods. Auger spectroscopy brought out the chemical composition of the surface before and after annealing; the Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED gave information about the crystallographic structure. The surface crystallographic configurations of tellurium Te (c (2x2 and Te (c (2x1 are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM. Such a study reveals a phase transition from a rich-Te to a poor-Te surface as the annealing temperature increases. 

  9. Identifying Antisite and Vacancy Defects in n-doped Bi2Se3 Topological Insulators from Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and First Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jeong Heum; Park, Joon-Suh; Kim, Howon; Jang, Won Jun; Han, Jinhee; Lee, Hyungjun; Choi, Hyung-Joon; Kahng, Se-Jong

    2014-03-01

    Intrinsic defects are the major sources of n-type doping character in Bi2Se3 topological insulators, but their structural nature remains unsettled; Theoretical calculations predicted that SeBi antisite was the most preferred under Se-rich, i.e. molecular beam epitaxy conditions, but there has been no report on its experimental observation. Here, we present our energy-dependent atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images for intrinsic defects obtained from Bi2Se3 thin films grown under Se-rich conditions. We observed two types of defects, and identified them as SeBi antisite and Bi vacancy located at Bi layer right below surface Se layer, by comparing experimental STM images with the simulated ones obtained from first principles calculations. Our study shows that, in agreement with previous predictions, not Se-vacancy at surface but SeBi antisite is the origin of n-type doping in our Bi2Se3.

  10. Cadmium underpotential deposition on Cu(111) in situ scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommrich, J; Hümann, S; Wandelt, K

    2002-01-01

    Atomically resolved in situ STM images are presented for an underpotentially deposited (upd) cadmium layer on a Cu(111) electrode from a 10(-4) M CdCl2/10(-2) M HCl solution. The observed moiré-like structure seen in the images is analysed by means of an algebraic model for this long-range superstructure. A structure model for the upd layer is developed which reflects all features of the observed moiré pattern. Furthermore the height modulation was simulated by a hard-sphere model for the Cd overlayer and shows remarkable agreement with the detailed tunneling current density distribution of the measured STM images. The existence of translational and rotational domains is demonstrated. The results are also compared and shown to be fully consistent with previous (ex situ) low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) observations of this system. The mechanism of Cd upd involves a dynamic site exchange between preadsorbed Cl- anions and adsorbing Cd2+ cations as previously concluded from ex situ X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) measurements.

  11. Geological Hazards analysis in Urban Tunneling by EPB Machine (Case study: Tehran subway line 7 tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Bakhshandeh Amnieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Technological progress in tunneling has led to modern and efficient tunneling methods in vast underground spaces even under inappropriate geological conditions. Identification and access to appropriate and sufficient geological hazard data are key elements to successful construction of underground structures. Choice of the method, excavation machine, and prediction of suitable solutions to overcome undesirable conditions depend on geological studies and hazard analysis. Identifying and investigating the ground hazards in excavating urban tunnels by an EPB machine could augment the strategy for improving soil conditions during excavation operations. In this paper, challenges such as geological hazards, abrasion of the machine cutting tools, clogging around these tools and inside the chamber, diverse work front, severe water level fluctuations, existence of water, and fine-grained particles in the route were recognized in a study of Tehran subway line 7, for which solutions such as low speed boring, regular cutter head checks, application of soil improving agents, and appropriate grouting were presented and discussed. Due to the presence of fine particles in the route, foam employment was suggested as the optimum strategy where no filler is needed.

  12. First Principles Study of Electron Tunneling through Ice

    KAUST Repository

    Cucinotta, Clotilde S.

    2012-10-25

    With the aim of understanding electrochemical scanning tunnel microscopy experiments in an aqueous environment, we investigate electron transport through ice in the coherent limit. This is done by using the nonequilibrium Greens functions method, implemented within density functional theory, in the self-interaction corrected local density approximation. In particular, we explore different ice structures and different Au electrode surface orientations. By comparing the decay coefficient for different thicknesses to the ice complex band structure, we find that the electron transport occurs via tunneling with almost one-dimensional character. The slow decay of the current with the ice thickness is largely due to the small effective mass of the conduction electrons. Furthermore, we find that the calculated tunneling decay coefficients at the Fermi energy are not sensitive to the structural details of the junctions and are at the upper end of the experimental range for liquid water. This suggests that linear response transport measurements are not capable of distinguishing between different ordered ice structures. However, we also demonstrate that a finite bias measurement may be capable of sorting polar from nonpolar interfaces due to the asymmetry of the current-voltage curves for polar interfaces. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Full scale subsonic wind tunnel requirements and design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. W.; Mort, K. W.; Hickey, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    The justification and requirements are summarized for a large subsonic wind tunnel capable of testing full-scale aircraft, rotor systems, and advanced V/STOL aircraft propulsion systems. The design considerations and constraints for such a facility are reviewed, and the trades between facility test capability and costs are discussed. The design studies showed that the structural cost of this facility is the most important cost factor. For this reason (and other considerations such as requirements for engine exhaust gas purging) an open-return wind tunnel having two test sections was selected. The major technical problem in the design of an open-return wind tunnel is maintaining good test section flow quality in the presence of external winds. This problem has been studied extensively, and inlet and exhaust systems which provide satisfactory attenuation of the effects of external winds on test section flow quality were developed.

  14. Transfer doping of single isolated nanodiamonds, studied by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolker, Asaf; Kalish, Rafi; Saguy, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    The transfer doping of diamond surfaces has been applied in various novel two-dimensional electronic devices. Its extension to nanodiamonds (ND) is essential for ND-based applications in many fields. In particular, understanding the influence of the crystallite size on transfer doping is desirable. Here, we report the results of a detailed study of the electronic energetic band structure of single, isolated transfer-doped nanodiamonds with nanometric resolution using a combination of scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy measurements. The results show how the band gap, the valence band maximum, the electron affinity and the work function all depend on the ND’s size and nanoparticle surface properties. The present analysis, which combines information from both scanning tunneling spectroscopy and Kelvin force microscopy, should be applicable to any nanoparticle or surface that can be measured with scanning probe techniques. (paper)

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy-based in situ measurement of fast tool servo-assisted diamond turning micro-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Bing-Feng; Zhu, Wu-Le; Yang, Shunyao; Yang, Keji

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new in situ measurement system based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to realize spiral scanning of a micro-structure without removing it after fast tool servo (FTS) cutting. To avoid distortion of the machined and measured surface, the center alignment of the FTS tool and the STM tip was first implemented by an STM in situ raster scan of two circular grooves cut by the machine tool. To originally observe the machined surface, the trace of the STM tip is put in accord with that of the FTS by setting the same start and end points of cutting and scanning and the same feed rate, and both are triggered by the subdivided rotary encoder of the spindle of the diamond turning machine. The profile data of the in situ spiral scanning of the machined micro-lens array can be fed back to compensate the depth of the cut to guarantee sub-micron form accuracy after second machining. The efficient spiral scanning, proper matching and accurate evaluation results demonstrate that the proposed STM in situ measurement approach is of great significance to the fabrication process. (paper)

  16. Temperature dependent tunneling study of CaFe1.96Ni0.04As2 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Gupta, Anjan K.; Thamizhavel, A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies on CaFe 1.96 Ni 0.04 As 2 single crystals in 5.4 – 19.7 K temperature range across the normal metal - superconductor transition temperature, T C = 14K. The in-situ cleaved crystals show reasonably flat surface with signatures of atomic resolution. The tunnel spectra show significant spatial inhomogeneity below T C , which reduces significantly as the temperature goes above the T C . We discuss these results in terms of an inhomogeneous electronic phase that may exist due to the vicinity of this composition to the quantum critical point

  17. Electron microscopy study of refractory ceramic fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P A; Lentz, T J; Rice, C H; Lockey, J E; Lemasters, G K; Gartside, P S

    2001-10-01

    In epidemiological studies designed to identify potential health risks of exposures to synthetic vitreous fibers, the characterization of airborne fiber dimensions may be essential for assessing mechanisms of fiber toxicity. Toward this end, air sampling was conducted as part of an industry-wide study of workers potentially exposed to airborne fibrous dusts during the manufacture of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) and RCF products. Analyses of a subset of samples obtained on the sample filter as well as on the conductive sampling cowl were performed using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize dimensions of airborne fibers. Comparison was made of bivariate fiber size distributions (length and diameter) from air samples analyzed by SEM and by TEM techniques. Results of the analyses indicate that RCF size distributions include fibers small enough in diameter (fibers (> 60 microm) may go undetected by TEM, as evidenced by the proportion of fibers in this category for TEM and SEM analyses (1% and 5%, respectively). Limitations of the microscopic techniques and differences in fiber-sizing rules for each method are believed to have contributed to the variation among fiber-sizing results. It was concluded from these data that further attempts to characterize RCF exposure in manufacturing and related operations should include analysis by TEM and SEM, since the smallest diameter fibers are not resolved with SEM and the fibers of longer length are not sized by TEM.

  18. Evaluation of the Influence Caused by Tunnel Construction on Groundwater Environment: A Case Study of Tongluoshan Tunnel, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to water inflow during tunnel construction are challenging to designers, workers, and management departments, as they can threaten tunneling project from safety, time, and economic aspects. Identifying the impacts on groundwater environment resulting from tunnel drainage and making a correct assessment before tunnel construction is essential to better understand troubles that would be encountered during tunnel excavation and helpful to adopt appropriate countermeasures to minimize the influences. This study presents an indicator system and quantifies each indicator of Tongluoshan tunnel, which is located in southwest China with a length of 5.2 km and mainly passes through carbonate rocks and sandstones, based on field investigation and related technological reports. Then, an evaluation is made using fuzzy comprehensive assessment method, with a result showing that it had influenced the local groundwater environment at a moderate degree. Information fed back from environmental investigation and hydrologic monitoring carried out during the main construction period proves the evaluation, as the flow of some springs and streams located beside the tunnel route was found experiencing an apparent decline.

  19. Wrist immobilization after carpal tunnel release: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Roberto S; Siqueira, Mario G; Simplício, Hougelli

    2006-09-01

    This prospective study evaluates the possible advantages of wrist immobilization after open carpal tunnel release comparing the results of two weeks immobilization and no immobilization. Fifty two patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were randomly selected in two groups after open carpal tunnel release. In one group (A, n=26) the patients wore a neutral-position wrist splint continuously for two weeks. In the other group (B, n=26) no wrist immobilization was used. Clinical assessment was done pre-operatively and at 2 weeks follow-up and included the two-point discrimination test at the second finger and two questionnaires as an outcome measurement of symptoms severity and intensity. All the patients presented improvement in the postoperative evaluations in the three analyzed parameters. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any of the outcome measurements at the final follow-up. We conclude that wrist immobilization in the immediate post-operative period have no advantages when compared with no immobilization in the end result of carpal tunnel release.

  20. Atom-resolved surface chemistry using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avouris, P.

    1989-01-01

    The author shows that by using STM and STS one can study chemistry with atomic resolution. The author uses two examples: the reaction of Si(111)-(7x7) with (a) NH 3 and (b) decaborane (DB). In case (a) the authors can directly observe the spatial distribution of the reaction. He determined which surface atoms have reacted and how the products of the reaction are distributed. He found that the different dangling-bond sites have significantly different reactivities and explain these differences in terms of the local electronic structure. In case (b) the 7x7 reconstruction is eliminated and at high temperatures, (√3 x √3) R30 degree reconstructions are observed. Depending on the amount of DB and the annealing temperature the √3 structures contain variable numbers of B and Si adatoms on T 4 -sites. Calculations show that the structure involving B adatoms, although kinetically favored, is not the lowest energy configuration. The lowest energy state involves B in a substitutional site under a Si adatom

  1. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy investigation of free radical adsorption to the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guisinger, Nathan P; Elder, Shaun P; Yoder, Nathan L; Hersam, Mark C [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)

    2007-01-31

    Room-temperature ultra-high vacuum (UHV) scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) has been employed to investigate free radical chemistry on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface with atomic-scale spatial resolution. In particular, due to its single-site binding mechanism and extensive previous study on the Si(100)-2 x 1 surface, the nitroxyl free radical 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was explored. UHV STM imaging of isolated molecules revealed that TEMPO covalently reacts with adatom dangling bonds with high affinity. By monitoring TEMPO adsorption as a function of surface coverage, TEMPO was also found to preferentially bind to centre adatom sites at the initial stages of adsorption. On the other hand, as the surface coverage increased, TEMPO molecules adsorbed to centre adatoms and corner adatoms approached a ratio of 1:1. At all surface coverage levels, TEMPO showed minimal preference for binding to either the faulted or unfaulted half of the unit cell. Consequently, upon saturation, the TEMPO adlayer exhibited long-range ordering and preserved the underlying 7 x 7 surface reconstruction. This study provides fundamental insight into free radical surface chemistry and suggests a direct pathway for forming nearly perfectly ordered organic adlayers on the Si(111)-7 x 7 surface.

  2. Initial Adsorption of Fe on an Ethanol-Saturated Si(111)7 × 7 Surface: Statistical Analysis in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoyu; Hattori, Ken

    2018-03-01

    We studied the initial stage of iron deposition on an ethanol-saturated Si(111)7 × 7 surface at room temperature using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The statistical analysis of the Si adatom height at empty states for Si(111)-C2H5OH before and after the Fe deposition showed different types of adatoms: type B (before the deposition) and type B' (after the deposition) assigned to bare adatoms, type D and type D' to C2H5O-terminated adatoms, and type E' to adatoms with Fe. The analysis of the height distribution revealed the protection of the molecule termination for the Fe capture at the initial stage. The analysis also indicated the preferential capture of a single Fe atom to a bare center-adatom rather than a bare corner-adatom which remain after the C2H5OH saturation, but no selectivity was observed in faulted and unfaulted half unit-cells. This is the first STM-based report proving that a remaining bare adatom, but not a molecule-terminated adatom, captures a metal.

  3. Water Tunnel Studies of Dynamic Wing Flap Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    body airfoil was defined by a conventional body and the TEF as an immersed boundary, getting successful results using the hinge moment of the... measurement experiment in a water tunnel at a low Reynolds number (Re = 5402 to Re7054). In this case, this study addressed micro air vehicle...the computational mesh immersed boundary. Source: [9]. ........11 Figure 3. Flow pattern at the trailing edge with a Gurney flap. Source: [7

  4. Dinosaur eggshell study using scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Frankie D; Schweitzer, Mary H; Schmitt, James G

    2002-01-01

    Visualization and analysis of structural features in fossil dinosaur eggs by scanning electron microscopy augment information from traditional petrographic light microscopy. Comparison of characteristics in fossil and modern eggshells allows inferences to be made regarding dinosaur reproductive biology, physiology, and evolutionary relationships. Assessment of diagenetic alteration of primary eggshell calcite structure that occurs during fossilization provides important information necessary for taxonomic identification and paleoenvironmental interpretations.

  5. Analytical modelling and experimental studies of SIS tunnel solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheknane, Ali [Laboratoire de Valorisation des Energies Renouvelables et Environnements Agressifs, Universite Amar Telidji de Laghouat, BP 37G route de Ghardaia, Laghouat (03000) Algerie (Algeria)], E-mail: cheknanali@yahoo.com

    2009-06-07

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study of semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (SIS) tunnel solar cells. A transparent and conductive film of thallium trioxide Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been deposited by anodic oxidation onto an n-Si(1 0 0) face to realize the SIS tunnel solar cells based on Si/SiO{sub x}/Tl{sub 2}O{sub 3}. An efficiency of 8.77% has been obtained under an incident power density of 33 mW cm{sup -2} illumination condition. A PSPICE model is implemented. The calculated results show that the theoretical values are in good agreement with experimental data. Moreover, the simulation clearly demonstrates that the performance of the tested device can be significantly improved.

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on GaN and InGaN surfaces; Rastertunnelmikroskopie und -spektroskopie an GaN- und InGaN-Oberflaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, David

    2009-12-02

    Optelectronic devices based on gallium nitride (GaN) and indium gallium nitride (InGaN) are in the focus of research since more than 20 years and still have great potential for optical applications. In the first part of this work non-polar surfaces of GaN are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In SEM and AFM, the (1 anti 100)- and especially the (anti 2110)-plane are quite corrugated. For the first time, the (anti 2110)-plane of GaN is atomically resolved in STM. In the second part InGaN quantum dot layers are investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and STM. The STMmeasurements show the dependency of surface morphology on growth conditions in the metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Nucleation, a new MOVPE-strategy, is based on phase separations on surfaces. It is shown that locally varying density of states and bandgaps can be detected by STS, that means bandgap histograms and 2D-bandgap-mapping. (orig.)

  7. The scanning probe microscopy study of thin polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harron, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were used systematically to investigate the morphology, uniformity, coverage and structure of the thin films of several commercially important insulating polymers. Despite the poorly conducting nature of the polymer sample, detailed and convincing images of this class of materials were achieved by STM without the need to coat the samples with a conductive layer. The polymer regions of the sample were further investigated by the use of surface profiling with 'line scans'. The fluctuations of the amplitude therein enabled important film characteristics to be assessed. An environmental stage was designed for the STM to enable the effect of various vapour-sample interactions to be observed during the imaging process. Using the data from the environmental stage in addition to the surface profiling with line scans, an insight into the conduction mechanism and image interpretation was gained. Results suggest that the water content of the sample and its immediate surroundings is an important factor in achieving reliable STM images in air. The initial study culminated with the observation by STM alone of the plasticizer induced crystallization of uncoated PC thin films. The 'amorphous' PC films were observed before crystallization and small ordered regions in roughly the same proportion as that predicted by diffraction studies [Prietschk, 1959 and Schnell, 1964] were imaged. This has never been observed by a microscopy technique. Furthermore, images of the crystalline film contained elongated units that were attributed to the lamellae formations that form the basic building blocks of polymer spherulites. The study continued with the AFM imaging of the growth of crystalline entities in a PC film, without the need for harsh sample treatment or metal coating. A method of casting and crystallizing the films was developed such that the growth was predominantly in two dimensions and consequently ideal for observation by

  8. ZEDEX - A study of damage and disturbance from tunnel excavation by blasting and tunnel boring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, S. [Golder Associates, Maidenhead (United Kingdom); Olsson, Olle; Stenberg, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Co., Figeholm (Sweden); Alheid, H.J. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany); Falls, S. [Queens Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of the ZEDEX project were to understand the mechanical behaviour of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) with respect to its origin, character, magnitude of property change, extent and its dependence on excavation method. Excavation with normal smooth blasting, blasting with low shock explosives and tunnel boring were studied. The drifts are located at Aespoe at a depth of 420 m, the profiles are circular and 5 m in diameter. The results have shown that there is a damaged zone, close to the drift wall dominated by changes in rock properties which are irreversible, and that there is a disturbed zone beyond the damaged zone that is dominated by changes in stress state and mainly reversible. There is no distinct boundary between the two zones. The results from ZEDEX indicate that the role of the EDZ as a preferential pathway to radionuclide transport is limited to the damaged zone. The extent of the damaged zone can be limited through application of appropriate excavation methods. By limiting the extent of the damaged zone it should also be feasible to block pathways in the damaged zone by plugs placed at strategic locations 68 refs, 92 figs, 31 tabs

  9. ZEDEX - A study of damage and disturbance from tunnel excavation by blasting and tunnel boring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, S.; Olsson, Olle; Stenberg, L.; Alheid, H.J.; Falls, S.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of the ZEDEX project were to understand the mechanical behaviour of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) with respect to its origin, character, magnitude of property change, extent and its dependence on excavation method. Excavation with normal smooth blasting, blasting with low shock explosives and tunnel boring were studied. The drifts are located at Aespoe at a depth of 420 m, the profiles are circular and 5 m in diameter. The results have shown that there is a damaged zone, close to the drift wall dominated by changes in rock properties which are irreversible, and that there is a disturbed zone beyond the damaged zone that is dominated by changes in stress state and mainly reversible. There is no distinct boundary between the two zones. The results from ZEDEX indicate that the role of the EDZ as a preferential pathway to radionuclide transport is limited to the damaged zone. The extent of the damaged zone can be limited through application of appropriate excavation methods. By limiting the extent of the damaged zone it should also be feasible to block pathways in the damaged zone by plugs placed at strategic locations

  10. Model uncertainty of various settlement estimation methods in shallow tunnels excavation; case study: Qom subway tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademian, Amir; Abdollahipour, Hamed; Bagherpour, Raheb; Faramarzi, Lohrasb

    2017-10-01

    In addition to the numerous planning and executive challenges, underground excavation in urban areas is always followed by certain destructive effects especially on the ground surface; ground settlement is the most important of these effects for which estimation there exist different empirical, analytical and numerical methods. Since geotechnical models are associated with considerable model uncertainty, this study characterized the model uncertainty of settlement estimation models through a systematic comparison between model predictions and past performance data derived from instrumentation. To do so, the amount of surface settlement induced by excavation of the Qom subway tunnel was estimated via empirical (Peck), analytical (Loganathan and Poulos) and numerical (FDM) methods; the resulting maximum settlement value of each model were 1.86, 2.02 and 1.52 cm, respectively. The comparison of these predicted amounts with the actual data from instrumentation was employed to specify the uncertainty of each model. The numerical model outcomes, with a relative error of 3.8%, best matched the reality and the analytical method, with a relative error of 27.8%, yielded the highest level of model uncertainty.

  11. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío [Materials Theory Division, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, S75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Hirsimäki, Mika, E-mail: mikahirsi@gmail.com [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valden, Mika [Surface Science Laboratory, Optoelectronics Research Centre, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Deprotonation reaction of glycine and self-assembly of glycinate is observed on Cu. • Bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy indicates two glycinate geometries. • Density functional theory calculations confirm the two non-identical configurations. • Non-identical adsorption explains the anisotropy in adlayer’s electronic structure. - Abstract: Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH{sub 2}(CH{sub 2})COO–]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  12. Diesel bus emissions measured in a tunnel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamriska, Milan; Morawska, Lidia; Thomas, Steven; He, Congrong

    2004-12-15

    The emission factors of a bus fleet consisting of approximately 300 diesel-powered buses were measured in a tunnel study under well-controlled conditions during a 2-d monitoring campaign in Brisbane. Particle number and mass concentration levels of submicrometer particles and PM2.5 were monitored by SMPS and DustTrak instruments at the tunnel's entrance and exit, respectively. Correlation between DustTrak and TEOM response to diesel emissions was assessed, and the DustTrak results were recalculated into TEOM equivalent data. The mean value of the number and mass emission factors was (3.11+/-2.41) x 10(14) particles km(-1) for submicrometer particles and 583+/-451 mg km(-1) for PM2.5 (DustTrak), respectively. TEOM PM2.5 equivalent emission factor was 267+/-207 mg km(-1). The results are in good agreement with the emission factors determined from steady-state dynamometer testing of 12 buses from the same Brisbane City bus fleet. The results indicate that when carefully designed, both approaches, the dynamometer and on-road studies, can provide comparable results, applicable for the assessment of the effect of traffic emissions on airborne particle pollution. A brief overview of emission factors determined from other on-road and dynamometer studies reported in the literature as well as with the regulatory values used for the vehicle emission inventory assessment is presented and compared with the results obtained in this study.

  13. Ballistic hole magnetic microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haq, E.; Banerjee, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to study nanoscale spin transport of holes is presented: ballistic hole magnetic microscopy. The tip of a scanning tunneling microscope is used to inject hot electrons into a ferromagnetic heterostructure, where inelastic decay creates a distribution of electron-hole pairs.

  14. Use of atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy for correlative studies of bacterial capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J; Dutcher, John R

    2008-09-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency.

  15. Apport de la microscopie a effet tunnel a la caracterisation d'interfaces molecule-metal a fort transfert de charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwani, Stephane

    To assess the importance of charge-transfer on the interface properties, we studied the interaction of the tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) molecule with various copper surfaces. TCNE, a highly electrophilic molecule, appears as an ideal candidate to study the influence of high charge-transfer on the electronic and structural properties of molecule-surface interfaces. Indeed, various TCNE-transition metal complexes exhibit magnetism at room temperature, which is in agreement with a very significant change of the residual charge on the TCNE molecule. The adsorption of TCNE molecules on Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations with a local density approximation (LDA). DFT-LDA calculations were performed to determine the geometric and electronic structure of the studied interfaces. Mulliken analysis was used to evaluate the partial net charge on the adsorbed species. The density of states (DOS) diagrams provided informations on the nature of the frontier orbitals involved in the charge-transfer at molecule-metal interfaces. To validate the theoretical observations, a comparative study was conducted between our simulated STM images and experimental STM images provided by our collaborators. The theoretical STM images were obtained with the SPAGS-STM software using the Landauer-Buttiker formalism with a semi-empirical Hamiltonian based on the extended Huckel theory (EHT) and parameterized using DFT calculations. During the development of the SPAGS-STM software, we have created a discretization module allowing rapid generation of STM images. This module is based on an adaptive Delaunay meshing scheme to minimize the amount of tunneling current to be computed. The general idea consists into refining the mesh, and therefore the calculations, near large contrast zones rather than over the entire image. The adapted mesh provides an STM image resolution equivalent to that obtained with a

  16. Electron holography study on the microstructure of magnetic tunnelling junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.Y.; Wang, Y.G.; You, B.; Du, J.; Hu, A.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Electron holography was applied to study the microstructure evolution of magnetic tunnelling junctions (MTJs) CoFe/AlO x /Co annealed at different temperatures. A mean inner potential barrier was observed in the as-deposited MTJ sample, while it was changed to a potential well after a 200 deg. C or a 400 deg. C annealing. It is suggested that the oxygen atoms were redistributed during the annealing, which left metallic atoms acting as acceptors to confine the electrons, leading to the decrease of the potential of the AlO x barrier layer. The results suggest that the electron holography may be a useful tool for the study of the microstructure of amorphous materials

  17. Study of the geometrical resonances of superconducting tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffmann; Finnegan, T.F.; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1973-01-01

    The resonant cavity structure of superconducting Sn-Sn-oxide-Sn tunnel junctions has been investigated via photon-assisted quasiparticle tunneling. We find that the temperature-dependent losses at 35 GHz are determined by the surface resistance of the Sn films for reduced temperatures between 0.5...

  18. Preliminary study on the transport of hazardous materials through tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubbico, Roberto; Di Cave, Sergio; Mazzarotta, Barbara; Silvetti, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    The risk associated to road and rail transportation of some hazardous materials along two routes, one including a significant portion in tunnels, and the other following the same path, but running completely in the open, is assessed. The results show that, for rail transport, no particular risk increase or mitigation is associated to the circulation of the dangerous goods through tunnels; on the contrary, for road transport, a risk increase is generally observed in the presence of tunnels. However, for LPG, the risk curve in the open lies above that in tunnels in the high frequency-low fatality zone, according to the different evolution of the accidental scenarios in the tunnel (assuming no ventilation). The transportation of liquefied nitrogen, not hazardous in the open but potentially asphyxiating in a tunnel, gives rise to a negligible risk when performed by rail, but to a not negligible one, when performed by road. These preliminary results focused on the risk for the exposed population, suggest that it may be unnecessary to limit dangerous goods circulation through rail tunnels, while, at least for some types of dangerous goods, the circulation through road tunnels may be allowed/forbidden based on the results of a specific risk analysis.

  19. Real-space observation of a right-rotating inhomogeneous cycloidal spin spiral by spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy in a triple axes vector magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, S; Mikuszeit, N; Pressler, A; Vedmedenko, E Y; Pietzsch, O; Wiesendanger, R

    2009-10-09

    Using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy performed in a triple axes vector magnet, we show that the magnetic structure of the Fe double layer on W(110) is an inhomogeneous right-rotating cycloidal spin spiral. The magnitude of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya vector is extracted from the experimental data using micromagnetic calculations. The result is confirmed by comparison of the measured saturation field along the easy axis to the respective value as obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is too weak to destabilize the single domain state. However, it can define the sense of rotation and the cycloidal spiral type once the single domain state is destabilized by dipolar interaction.

  20. Iron on GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ) investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Smith, Arthur R., E-mail: smitha2@ohio.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nanoscale and Quantum Phenomena Institute, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Takeuchi, Noboru [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico Apartado Postal 14, Ensenada Baja California, Codigo Postal 22800 (Mexico); Al-Brithen, Hamad A. H. [Physics and Astronomy Department, King Abdulah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and National Center for Nano Technology, KACST, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-04-28

    We have investigated sub-monolayer iron deposition on atomically smooth GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ). The iron is deposited at a substrate temperature of 360 °C, upon which reflection high energy electron diffraction shows a transformation to a √(3)×√(3)-R30° pattern. After cooling to room temperature, the pattern transforms to a 6 × 6, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals 6 × 6 reconstructed regions decorating the GaN step edges. First-principles theoretical calculations have been carried out for a range of possible structural models, one of the best being a Ga dimer model consisting of 2/9 monolayer of Fe incorporated into 7/3 monolayer of Ga in a relaxed but distorted structure.

  1. Observation of Supermodulation in LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2 by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Satoshi; Ishida, Naoki; Fujisawa, Yuita; Sakata, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    We observed the surface and electronic structure of single-crystal LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2 by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy at 4.2 K. A square lattice composed of Bi atoms was observed at a positive sample bias voltage for the surface prepared by cleavage. At a negative sample bias voltage, a stripe structure along the Bi-Bi directions was observed as in a previous report on NdO0.7F0.3BiS2. Furthermore, we observed a supermodulation along the diagonal directions with a period of about five times the lattice constant. This seems to be indicative of the structural instability of this system rather than the electronic instability attributed to a nesting picture.

  2. Iron on GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ) investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and first-principles theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Mandru, Andrada-Oana; Smith, Arthur R.; Takeuchi, Noboru; Al-Brithen, Hamad A. H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated sub-monolayer iron deposition on atomically smooth GaN(0001) pseudo-1 × 1 (1+1/(12) ). The iron is deposited at a substrate temperature of 360 °C, upon which reflection high energy electron diffraction shows a transformation to a √(3)×√(3)-R30° pattern. After cooling to room temperature, the pattern transforms to a 6 × 6, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals 6 × 6 reconstructed regions decorating the GaN step edges. First-principles theoretical calculations have been carried out for a range of possible structural models, one of the best being a Ga dimer model consisting of 2/9 monolayer of Fe incorporated into 7/3 monolayer of Ga in a relaxed but distorted structure

  3. Study of the Integration of the CNU-TS-1 Mobile Tunnel Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liming; Zhong, Ruofei; Sun, Haili; Zhu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    A rapid, precise and automated means for the regular inspection and maintenance of a large number of tunnels is needed. Based on the depth study of the tunnel monitoring method, the CNU-TS-1 mobile tunnel monitoring system (TS1) is developed and presented. It can efficiently obtain the cross-sections that are orthogonal to the tunnel in a dynamic way, and the control measurements that depend on design data are eliminated. By using odometers to locate the cross-sections and correcting the data based on longitudinal joints of tunnel segment lining, the cost of the system has been significantly reduced, and the interval between adjacent cross-sections can reach 1-2 cm when pushed to collect data at a normal walking speed. Meanwhile, the relative deformation of tunnel can be analyzed by selecting cross-sections from original data. Through the measurement of the actual tunnel, the applicability of the system for tunnel deformation detection is verified, and the system is shown to be 15 times more efficient than that of the total station. The simulation experiment of the tunnel deformation indicates that the measurement accuracy of TS1 for cross-sections is 1.1 mm. Compared with the traditional method, TS1 improves the efficiency as well as increases the density of the obtained points.

  4. Study of the Integration of the CNU-TS-1 Mobile Tunnel Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Du

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, precise and automated means for the regular inspection and maintenance of a large number of tunnels is needed. Based on the depth study of the tunnel monitoring method, the CNU-TS-1 mobile tunnel monitoring system (TS1 is developed and presented. It can efficiently obtain the cross-sections that are orthogonal to the tunnel in a dynamic way, and the control measurements that depend on design data are eliminated. By using odometers to locate the cross-sections and correcting the data based on longitudinal joints of tunnel segment lining, the cost of the system has been significantly reduced, and the interval between adjacent cross-sections can reach 1–2 cm when pushed to collect data at a normal walking speed. Meanwhile, the relative deformation of tunnel can be analyzed by selecting cross-sections from original data. Through the measurement of the actual tunnel, the applicability of the system for tunnel deformation detection is verified, and the system is shown to be 15 times more efficient than that of the total station. The simulation experiment of the tunnel deformation indicates that the measurement accuracy of TS1 for cross-sections is 1.1 mm. Compared with the traditional method, TS1 improves the efficiency as well as increases the density of the obtained points.

  5. DEVISING A VISUAL INSPECTION SYSTEM FOR CANAL TUNNELS: PRELIMINARY STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Albert

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In France, most tunnel canals were built during the 19th and 20th centuries. Maintaining them is not only a matter of heritage preservation but also a question of security. Inspecting tunnel canals is difficult and time consuming, which motivates the development of an image-based surveying system, as already exists for railway or road tunnels. However, while the imaging configuration is similar, referencing the data acquisition device is more difficult in the case of underground waterways, due to the drifts of the inspection barge. In this paper, we introduce the recording prototype we have designed and report the results of the test that were performed in an underground waterway, Niderviller's tunnel, to assess the feasibility of the system. In particular, we give details on the imaging system design. We also analyze the pros and cons of each location method, in terms of costs, practicability, computational burden and accuracy.

  6. Devising a Visual Inspection System for Canal Tunnels: Preliminary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, J.-L.; Charbonnier, P.; Chavant, P.; Foucher, P.; Muzet, V.; Prybyla, D.; Perrin, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Koehl, M.

    2013-07-01

    In France, most tunnel canals were built during the 19th and 20th centuries. Maintaining them is not only a matter of heritage preservation but also a question of security. Inspecting tunnel canals is difficult and time consuming, which motivates the development of an image-based surveying system, as already exists for railway or road tunnels. However, while the imaging configuration is similar, referencing the data acquisition device is more difficult in the case of underground waterways, due to the drifts of the inspection barge. In this paper, we introduce the recording prototype we have designed and report the results of the test that were performed in an underground waterway, Niderviller's tunnel, to assess the feasibility of the system. In particular, we give details on the imaging system design. We also analyze the pros and cons of each location method, in terms of costs, practicability, computational burden and accuracy.

  7. Molecular modeling study on tunnel behavior in different histone deacetylase isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundarapandian Thangapandian

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs have emerged as effective therapeutic targets in the treatment of various diseases including cancers as these enzymes directly involved in the epigenetic regulation of genes. However the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors has been a challenge till date since all HDAC enzymes possess conserved tunnel-like active site. In this study, using molecular dynamics simulation we have analyzed the behavior of tunnels present in HDAC8, 10, and 11 enzymes of class I, II, and IV, respectively. We have identified the equivalent tunnel forming amino acids in these three isoforms and found that they are very much conserved with subtle differences to be utilized in selective inhibitor development. One amino acid, methionine of HDAC8, among six tunnel forming residues is different in isoforms of other classes (glutamic acid (E in HDAC10 and leucine (L in HDAC 11 based on which mutations were introduced in HDAC11, the less studied HDAC isoform, to observe the effects of this change. The HDAC8-like (L268M mutation in the tunnel forming residues has almost maintained the deep and narrow tunnel as present in HDAC8 whereas HDAC10-like (L268E mutation has changed the tunnel wider and shallow as observed in HDAC10. These results explained the importance of the single change in the tunnel formation in different isoforms. The observations from this study can be utilized in the development of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors.

  8. Analysis of an underground structure settlement risk due to tunneling- A case study from Tabriz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Vahdatirad

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The tunnel of the Tabriz urban railway line 2 (TURL2, Iran, will pass through an underground commercial center onits way. Too little distance between the tunnel crown and the underground structure foundation will probably cause collapseor excessive settlement during the tunnel construction based on studied geotechnical conditions of the region. In this paper,a method of risk level assessment for various types of structures, such as frame and masonry structures, and various typesof foundation, such as continuous and isolated, is well defined and the risk level is classified. Moreover, the value of theunderground commercial center structure settlement is estimated using both empirical and numerical methods. The settlementrisk level of the commercial center structure is determined based on presented definitions about risk classification ofvarious types of structures. Consequently, tunneling processes in this section need a special monitoring system and consolidationmeasures before the passage of a tunnel boring machine.

  9. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Marcelo E.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo; Kremer, German; Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simón; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos; Munoz, Raul C.

    2012-01-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, δ and the lateral correlation length, ξ corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using (δ, ξ) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low temperatures.

  10. Monitored Retrievable Storage conceptual system study: tunnel drywells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unterzuber, R.; Cross, T.E.; Krasicki, B.R.; Lundberg, W.L.

    1983-08-01

    A description of the tunnel drywell storage facility concept is presented with the operations required to handle the spent fuel or high-level wastes and transuranic wastes. A generic Receiving and Handling Facility, provided by PNL, has been used for this study. Modifications to the storage delivery side of the handling facility, necessary to couple the Receiving and Handling Facility with the storage facility, are described. The equipment and support facilities needed for the storage facility are also described. Two separate storage facilities are presented herein: one for all spent fuel storage, and one for storage of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic waste (TRU). Each facility is described for the capacities and rates defined by PNL in the Concept Technical Performance Criteria and Base Assumptions. Estimates of costs and time-distributions of expenditures have been developed to construct, operate, and decommission the conceptual MRS facilities in mid 1983 dollars, for the base cases given using the cost categories and percentages provided by PNL. Cost estimates and time-distributions of expenditures have also been developed to expand the facility throughput rate from 1800 MTU to 3000 MTU, and to expand the facility storage capacity from 15,000 MTU to 72,000 MTU. The life cycle cost of the facility for the bounding cases of all spent fuel and all HLW and TRU, using the time-distributions of costs developed above and assuming a two percent per year discount rate, are also presented. 2 references, 14 figures, 16 tables

  11. Attempts to test an alternative electrodynamic theory of superconductors by low-temperature scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronio, Angelo; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-09-01

    We perform an experiment to test between two theories of the electrodynamics of superconductors: the standard London theory and an alternative proposed by J. E. Hirsch [Phys. Rev. B 69, 214515 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevB.69.214515]. The two alternatives give different predictions with respect to the screening of an electric field by a superconductor, and we try to detect this effect using atomic force microscopy on a niobium sample. We also perform the reverse experiment, where we demonstrate a superconductive tip mounted on a qPlus force sensor. Due to limited accuracy, we are able neither to prove nor to disprove Hirsch's hypothesis. Within our accuracy of 0.17 N/m, the superconductive transition does not alter the atomic-scale interaction between tip and sample.

  12. Studies of Au/SAMs/PEDOT-PSS/Au tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nan; Lieberman, Marya; Ruggiero, Steven

    2008-03-01

    We report on tunneling through thin organic films. Junctions of the form: Au/SAMs/Polymer/Au were prepared on electronic-grade Si substrates with Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) including octanedithiol (HS-C8H16-SH) and mercaptohexadecanoic (HS-C15H30-COOH). A transitional conducting polymer film PEDOT-PSS was spun on to the SAMs layer, and junctions were completed with a gold film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to monitor the quality of the SAMs films. The electron tunneling properties including dI/dV and d^2I/dV^2 versus bias for the SAMs are discussed.

  13. Preliminary Study of In Vivo Formed Dental Plaque Using Confocal Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KA. Al-Salihi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM is relatively a new light microscopical imaging technique with a wide range of applications in biological sciences. The primary value of CLSM for the biologist is its ability to provide optical sections from athree-dimensional specimen. The present study was designed to assess the thickness and content of in vivo accumulated dental plaque using CLSM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Materials and Methods: Acroflat lower arch splints (acrylic appliance were worn by five participants for three days without any disturbance. The formed plaques were assessed using CLSM combined with vital fluorescence technique and SEM.Results: In this study accumulated dental plaque revealed varied plaque microflora vitality and thickness according to participant’s oral hygiene. The thickness of plaque smears ranged from 40.32 to 140.72 μm and 65.00 to 128.88 μm for live (vital and dead accumulated microorganisms, respectively. Meanwhile, the thickness of plaque on the appliance ranged from 101 μm to 653 μm. CLSM revealed both dead and vital bacteria on the surface of the dental plaque. In addition, SEM revealed layers of various bacterial aggregations in all dental plaques.Conclusion: This study offers a potent non-invasive tool to evaluate and assess the dental plaque biofilm, which is a very important factor in the development of dental caries.

  14. Geochemical study of acid mine drainage of the Big Lick Tunnel area, Williamstown, PA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tollin, S.

    1993-01-01

    Acid mine drainage in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania continues to be a significant environmental problem. This study examines the acid mine outflow from the Big Lick Tunnel, north of Williamstown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The tunnel drains abandoned mines on the north side of the Big Lick Mountain. Mining ceased in the area circa 1940, and the tunnel has been in operation since that time. The water, soil and stream bed sediment geochemistry has been studied to determine their changes in chemistry over distance. The pH, TDS and metal concentrations were the primary focus. Metal concentrations were determined using an ICP unit. Data indicates the pH of the outflow to range between 6.7 and 7.3 Fe and Mn concentrations are as high as 9.7 ppb. Extensive metal precipitation (''yellow boy'') occurs within the tunnel and for several hundred meters from the mouth of the tunnel. The combination of near neutral pH and high metal concentration suggest that the drainage is in contact with highly alkaline materials prior to discharge from the tunnel. The geology of the area does not suggest bedrock as the possible source of alkaline material. One hypothesis is that the acidic water is reacting with the concrete tunnel and being neutralized. Data also suggests that the Fe precipitates much quicker than the Mn, resulting in a zonation between Fe-rich and Mn-rich sediments along the length of the drainage

  15. Reliability analysis of idealized tunnel support system using probability-based methods with case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharouni-Nik, Morteza; Naeimi, Meysam; Ahadi, Sodayf; Alimoradi, Zahra

    2014-06-01

    In order to determine the overall safety of a tunnel support lining, a reliability-based approach is presented in this paper. Support elements in jointed rock tunnels are provided to control the ground movement caused by stress redistribution during the tunnel drive. Main support elements contribute to stability of the tunnel structure are recognized owing to identify various aspects of reliability and sustainability in the system. The selection of efficient support methods for rock tunneling is a key factor in order to reduce the number of problems during construction and maintain the project cost and time within the limited budget and planned schedule. This paper introduces a smart approach by which decision-makers will be able to find the overall reliability of tunnel support system before selecting the final scheme of the lining system. Due to this research focus, engineering reliability which is a branch of statistics and probability is being appropriately applied to the field and much effort has been made to use it in tunneling while investigating the reliability of the lining support system for the tunnel structure. Therefore, reliability analysis for evaluating the tunnel support performance is the main idea used in this research. Decomposition approaches are used for producing system block diagram and determining the failure probability of the whole system. Effectiveness of the proposed reliability model of tunnel lining together with the recommended approaches is examined using several case studies and the final value of reliability obtained for different designing scenarios. Considering the idea of linear correlation between safety factors and reliability parameters, the values of isolated reliabilities determined for different structural components of tunnel support system. In order to determine individual safety factors, finite element modeling is employed for different structural subsystems and the results of numerical analyses are obtained in

  16. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, A. L., E-mail: a.vasiliev56@gmail.com; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  17. Electron microscopy methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A. L.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    The history of the development and application of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXMA) in studies of cultural heritage sites is considered. In fact, investigations based on these methods began when electron microscopes became a commercial product. Currently, these methods, being developed and improved, help solve many historical enigmas. To date, electron microscopy combined with microanalysis makes it possible to investigate any object, from parchment and wooden articles to pigments, tools, and objects of art. Studies by these methods have revealed that some articles were made by ancient masters using ancient “nanotechnologies”; hence, their comprehensive analysis calls for the latest achievements in the corresponding instrumental methods and sample preparation techniques.

  18. Micro-CT scan, electron microscopy and optical microscopy study of insertional traumas of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Breton, Alexia; Jegoux, Franck; Pilet, Paul; Godey, Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Knowledge of cochlear trauma resulting from the implantation of electrodes is important for the development of atraumatic surgical techniques. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the advantages of micro-CT scanning, back-scattered electron microscopy (BSEM) and optical microscopy (OM) in understanding the mechanisms of cochlear trauma due to cochlear implantation. Our study involved six petrous bones removed from fresh human cadavers: one control specimen plus five other specimens that were surgically implanted with Neurelec Digisonic SP EVO electrode arrays. All six specimens underwent glycol methyl methacrylate embedding, were examined via micro-CT scan and were then sectioned for histological analysis of undecalcified samples via BSEM and OM. The 2D micro-CT scan reconstructions did not display cochlear microtrauma due to a limited resolution and the loss of information caused by the metallic artifacts of the intracochlear electrodes. The 3D reconstructions displayed the quality of the electrode array positioning in the cochlea and enabled determining the axes on which to section the specimens for histological examination. BSEM afforded a clear view of the damage to the osseous structures of the cochlea, but did not display the soft tissue injuries. OM enabled viewing and grading the histological lesions resulting from insertion. In our opinion, the combination of 3D micro-CT scan reconstructions and histological analysis using OM appears to be the best method to analyze this type of trauma.

  19. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therpy of the Tarsal tunnel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Na-ra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Tarsal tunnel Syndrome Methods : From 5th November, 2008 to 8th November, 2008, 1 male patient diagnosed as Tarsal tunnel syndrome(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results : The patient's Rt foot paresthesia, pain were remarkably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of tarsal tunnel syndrome. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  20. Lateral ordering of PTCDA on the clean and the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Stefan; Fiedler, Benjamin; Bauer, Oliver; Marele, Antonela; Sokolowski, Moritz M

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on the clean and on the oxygen pre-covered Cu(100) surface [referred to as (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100)] by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Our results confirm the (4√2 × 5√2)R45° superstructure of PTCDA/Cu(100) reported by A. Schmidt et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99,11770-11779]. However, contrary to Schmidt et al., we have no indication for a dissociation of the PTCDA upon adsorption, and we propose a detailed structure model with two intact PTCDA molecules within the unit cell. Domains of high lateral order are obtained, if the deposition is performed at 400 K. For deposition at room temperature, a significant density of nucleation defects is found pointing to a strong interaction of PTCDA with Cu(100). Quite differently, after preadsorption of oxygen and formation of the (√2 × 2√2)R45° - 2O/Cu(100) superstructure on Cu(100), PTCDA forms an incommensurate monolayer with a structure that corresponds well to that of PTCDA bulk lattice planes.

  1. Investigation of the structural anisotropy in a self-assembling glycinate layer on Cu(100) by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Mikhail; Lahtonen, Kimmo; Vuori, Leena; Sánchez-de-Armas, Rocío; Hirsimäki, Mika; Valden, Mika

    2017-07-01

    Self-assembling organic molecule-metal interfaces exhibiting free-electron like (FEL) states offers an attractive bottom-up approach to fabricating materials for molecular electronics. Accomplishing this, however, requires detailed understanding of the fundamental driving mechanisms behind the self-assembly process. For instance, it is still unresolved as to why the adsorption of glycine ([NH2(CH2)COOH]) on isotropic Cu(100) single crystal surface leads, via deprotonation and self-assembly, to a glycinate ([NH2(CH2)COO-]) layer that exhibits anisotropic FEL behavior. Here, we report on bias-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations for glycine adsorption on Cu(100) single crystal surface. We find that after physical vapor deposition (PVD) of glycine on Cu(100), glycinate self-assembles into an overlayer exhibiting c(2 × 4) and p(2 × 4) symmetries with non-identical adsorption sites. Our findings underscore the intricacy of electrical conductivity in nanomolecular organic overlayers and the critical role the structural anisotropy at molecule-metal interface plays in the fabrication of materials for molecular electronics.

  2. Laser-Combined Scanning Tunneling Microscopy on the Carrier Dynamics in Low-Temperature-Grown GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Terada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated carrier recombination dynamics in a low-temperature-grown GaAs (LT-GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure by laser-combined scanning tunneling microscopy, shaken-pulse-pair-excited STM (SPPX-STM. With the AlGaAs interlayer as a barrier against the flow of photocarriers, recombination lifetimes in LT-GaAs of 4.0 ps and GaAs of 4.8 ns were successfully observed separately. We directly demonstrated the high temporal resolution of SPPX-STM by showing the recombination lifetime of carriers in LT-GaAs (4.0 ps in the range of subpicosecond temporal resolution. In the carrier-lifetime-mapping measurement, a blurring of recombination lifetime up to 50 nm was observed at the LT-GaAs/AlGaAs boundary, which was discussed in consideration of the screening length of the electric field from the STM probe. The effect of the built-in potential on the signal, caused by the existence of LT-GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs boundaries, was discussed in detail.

  3. A Study of Vertical Transport through Graphene toward Control of Quantum Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Lei, Sidong; Tsai, Shin-Hung; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Jun; Yin, Gen; Tang, Min; Torres, Carlos M; Navabi, Aryan; Jin, Zehua; Tsai, Shiao-Po; Qasem, Hussam; Wang, Yong; Vajtai, Robert; Lake, Roger K; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Wang, Kang L

    2018-02-14

    Vertical integration of van der Waals (vdW) materials with atomic precision is an intriguing possibility brought forward by these two-dimensional (2D) materials. Essential to the design and analysis of these structures is a fundamental understanding of the vertical transport of charge carriers into and across vdW materials, yet little has been done in this area. In this report, we explore the important roles of single layer graphene in the vertical tunneling process as a tunneling barrier. Although a semimetal in the lateral lattice plane, graphene together with the vdW gap act as a tunneling barrier that is nearly transparent to the vertically tunneling electrons due to its atomic thickness and the transverse momenta mismatch between the injected electrons and the graphene band structure. This is accentuated using electron tunneling spectroscopy (ETS) showing a lack of features corresponding to the Dirac cone band structure. Meanwhile, the graphene acts as a lateral conductor through which the potential and charge distribution across the tunneling barrier can be tuned. These unique properties make graphene an excellent 2D atomic grid, transparent to charge carriers, and yet can control the carrier flux via the electrical potential. A new model on the quantum capacitance's effect on vertical tunneling is developed to further elucidate the role of graphene in modulating the tunneling process. This work may serve as a general guideline for the design and analysis of vdW vertical tunneling devices and heterostructures, as well as the study of electron/spin injection through and into vdW materials.

  4. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80-foot wind tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise, refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy, was employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line for outdoor test stand, NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels, they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  5. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodjati Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. Methods: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. Results: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Conclusion: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  6. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodjati, Hossein; Baezzat, Saeed Reza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Tanideh, Nader; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  7. The structure of spinach Photosystem I studied by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Wynn, R. Max; Malkin, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The structure of three types of Photosystem I (PS I) complex isolated from spinach chloroplasts was studied by electron microscopy and computer image analysis. Molecular projections (top views and side views) of a native PS I complex (PSI-200), an antenna-depleted PS I complex (PSI-100) and the PS I

  8. Electron microscopy studies on MoS2 nanocrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Pilsgaard

    Industrial-style MoS2-based hydrotreating catalysts are studied using electron microscopy. The MoS2 nanostructures are imaged with single-atom sensitivity to reveal the catalytically important edge structures. Furthermore, the in-situ formation of MoS2 crystals is imaged for the first time....

  9. Phytophthora ramorum tissue colonization studied with fluorescense microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Riedel; S. Wagner; M. Gotz; L. Belbahri; F. Lefort; S. Werres

    2009-01-01

    The proceeding worldwide spread and the expanding host spectrum of P. ramorum has become a serious threat to natural plant communities. To encounter this threat detailed knowledge about infection pathways and tissue colonization is essential. To analyze these issues, histological studies of infected tissue with epifluorescence microscopy have been...

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies on magnetic tunnel junctions with AlO and AlN tunnel barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mun, B. S.; Moon, J. C.; Hong, S. W.; Kang, K. S.; Kim, K.; Kim, T. W.; Ju, H. L.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of the optimized magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) with AlO and AlN barriers have been performed to study the chemical structures of the barrier and the underlying layer. These MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers exhibited increased tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) after annealing at 200 deg. C from 27% to 45% and from 25% to 33%, respectively. Surprisingly, the XPS and XAS measurements confirmed that both the as-grown and the annealed MTJs had metallic Co and Fe at the interface between the barrier and the underlying CoFe layer. After annealing, under-stoichiometric AlO x and AlN x phases in MTJs with AlO and AlN barriers partially transformed into stoichiometric Al 2 O 3 and AlN phases, respectively. Thus the increase in TMR after annealing for MTJs with clean interface between the barrier and the underlying layer is believed due to the anion redistribution inside the barrier layer, not from back diffusion from pinned magnetic layer to barrier layer

  11. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  12. Theoretical study of phosphorene tunneling field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jiwon; Hobbs, Chris [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Rd #2200, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    In this work, device performances of tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) based on phosphorene are explored via self-consistent atomistic quantum transport simulations. Phosphorene is an ultra-thin two-dimensional (2-D) material with a direct band gap suitable for TFETs applications. Our simulation shows that phosphorene TFETs exhibit subthreshold slope below 60 mV/dec and a wide range of on-current depending on the transport direction due to highly anisotropic band structures of phosphorene. By benchmarking with monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs, we predict that phosphorene TFETs oriented in the small effective mass direction can yield much larger on-current at the same on-current/off-current ratio than monolayer MoTe{sub 2} TFETs. It is also observed that a gate underlap structure is required for scaling down phosphorene TFETs in the small effective mass direction to suppress the source-to-drain direct tunneling leakage current.

  13. Electroluminescence from single nanowires by tunnel injection: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmler, Mariano A.; Bao, Jiming; Shalish, Ilan; Yi, Wei; Yoon, Joonah; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Capasso, Federico

    2007-01-01

    We present a hybrid light-emitting diode structure composed of an n-type gallium nitride nanowire on a p-type silicon substrate in which current is injected along the length of the nanowire. The device emits ultraviolet light under both bias polarities. Tunnel-injection of holes from the p-type substrate (under forward bias) and from the metal (under reverse bias) through thin native oxide barriers consistently explains the observed electroluminescence behaviour. This work shows that the stan...

  14. Progresses in low energy electron microscopy and photoemission electron microscopy studies (LEEM and PEEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, Takanori; Yasue, Tsuneo; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Ono, Kanta

    2008-02-01

    Photon factory workshop on low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) studies was held on October 12-13, 2005. The workshop had 18 presentations and 8 contributions to the poster session with 62 attendees. The workshop started with an invitation presentation about nano-imaging and nano-spectroscopy by photoemission electron microscope using synchrotron radiation x-rays. Next two reports were about antiferromagnetic domain structure observations of a NiO(100) surface using a combined method of PEEM and soft x-ray linear dichroism. Recent development of spin SEM (scanning electron microscope) and the observation of magnetic domains of La 1.36 Sr 1.64 Mn 2 O 7 were reported. A new method for observing magnetic domain structures with SEM was developed in which the image is the result of spin polarization of secondary electrons. This method is called spin SEM. A lecture about observation of ultra-high speed phenomena by PEEM and the invitation presentation about spin dynamics in nano-scale magnetic materials attracted much attention. Structural studies of surfaces by LEEM and PEEM were actively discussed. Summaries about the measurements of Au-Si alloy island at atomic steps on Si(111), fabrication of Ga nano-dots in SiO 2 , growth of pentacene films on thin bismuth film and graphite, the surface phase transition on metal surfaces of In/Cu(001) and Sn/Cu(001), and Cu thin film growth on W(110) were also compiled in this report. Many contributions in this report were resulted from the experiments by LEEM and PEEM using SPring-8 synchrotron radiations. (Y.K.)

  15. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy: Superconductor materials. January 1984-June 1990 (A Bibliography from the INSPEC: Information Services for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1984-June 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the development and utilization of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in surface topography analysis of superconductor materials. The citations cover the principles, operation, and implementation of STM. Specific materials analyzed by STM include bismuth, strontium, calcium, copper, yttrium, and barium. Some organic materials for superconductors are also analyzed. A separate Published Search covers the use of STM for analysis of semiconducting materials. (Contains 113 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  17. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Sozer, Emre; Moini-Yekta, Shayan

    2016-01-01

    NASA and Industry are performing vehicle studies of configurations with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern configuration designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty in the aft signatures with often greater boundary layer effects and nozzle jet pressures. Wind tunnel testing at significantly lower Reynolds numbers than in flight and without inlet and nozzle jet pressures make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel from Mach 1.6 to 2.0 will be used to assess the effects of shocks from components passing through nozzle jet plumes on the sonic boom pressure signature and provide datasets for comparison with CFD codes. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of wind tunnel test models with a variety of shock generators that simulate horizontal tails and aft decks have been studied to provide suitable models for sonic boom pressure measurements using a minimally intrusive pressure rail in the wind tunnel. The computational results are presented and the evolution of candidate wind tunnel models is summarized and discussed in this paper.

  18. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Two Photon Excitation Microscopy as Tools to Study Testate Amoebae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdíková, Zuzana; Čapek, Martin; Ostašov, Pavel; Mitchell, E.A.D.; Machač, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.2 (2010), s. 1142-1143 ISSN 1431-9276. [Microscopy and Microanalysis 2010. Portland, 01.08.2010-05.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : testate amoeba e * confocal microscopy * two-photon microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2010

  19. Catalytic monolayer voltammetry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy of copper nitrite reductase on cysteamine-modified Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Welinder, A.C.; Hansen, Allan Glargaard

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption and electrocatalysis of the redox metalloenzyme blue copper nitrite reductase from Achromobacter xylosoxidans (AxCuNiR) on single-crystal Au(111)-electrode surfaces modified by a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and in situ...

  20. X-ray microscopy and spectromicroscopy - tools for environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: X-ray microscopy achieves a much higher resolution than light microscopy. This is due to the much shorter wavelength of X-rays compared to visible light. The smallest structures that can be seen in an X-ray microscope at present are about 20 nm in size. X-ray microscopy is also capable of imaging specimens directly in aqueous media. By choosing the wavelength of the X-radiation appropriately, it is possible to perform spectromicroscopy studies. Comprising, it is a tool very well suited to study colloidal structures in the environment. X-ray microscopy can be performed with two types of instruments. An X-ray microscope quickly takes high-resolution images of objects to be studied, whereas a scanning X-ray microscope is an analytical instrument for spectromicroscopy. Here, an object can be imaged using energies above and below the absorption edge of an element. Dividing both images gives rise to a map of the distribution of this element in the sample. Using near-edge resonances it is possible to conduct NEXAFS studies. As the X-ray energy is raised to match the absorption edge resonances are found, that reflect the chemical bonding state of the element. Therefore, it is possible with X-ray microscopy to combine high spatial resolution with high spectral resolution for studies of colloidal structures. The Institute of X-ray physics builds up an X-ray microscopy beamline at the electron storage ring BESSY II with both, an X-ray microscope and a scanning X-ray microscope. The status of this beamline will be presented in this talk. Colloidal structures play an important role in the environment. Due to their surface activity they are involved in various processes. Substances can be bound and immobilized or transported, colloids can attach to microorganisms building up microhabitats, and organic substances as humics can flocculate due the interaction with metals. A great variety of colloidal structures from the environment have been studied using X

  1. Nanoparticle sizing: a comparative study using atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and ferromagnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacava, L.M.; Lacava, B.M.; Azevedo, R.B.; Lacava, Z.G.M.; Buske, N.; Tronconi, A.L.; Morais, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) were used to unfold the nanoparticle size of a ferrofluid sample. Compared to TEM, the AFM method showed a nanoparticle diameter (D m ) reduction of 20% and standard deviation (σ) increase of 15%. The differences in D m and σ were associated with the AFM tip and the nanoparticle concentration on the substrate

  2. Electroluminescence from single nanowires by tunnel injection: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmler, Mariano A.; Bao, Jiming; Shalish, Ilan; Yi, Wei; Yoon, Joonah; Narayanamurti, Venkatesh; Capasso, Federico

    2007-06-01

    We present a hybrid light-emitting diode structure composed of an n-type gallium nitride nanowire on a p-type silicon substrate in which current is injected along the length of the nanowire. The device emits ultraviolet light under both bias polarities. Tunnel injection of holes from the p-type substrate (under forward bias) and from the metal (under reverse bias) through thin native oxide barriers consistently explains the observed electroluminescence behaviour. This work shows that the standard p-n junction model is generally not applicable to this kind of device structure.

  3. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author) [pt

  4. Analysis of Fractured Teeth Utilizing Digital Microscopy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    elicits pain in a fractured tooth is often obscure and difficult to reproduce in the dental chair . The type and consistency of pain may elicit a number of...ANALYSIS OF FRACTURED TEETH UTILIZING DIGITAL MICROSCOPY: A PILOT STUDY by Thomas Gene Cooper, D.M.D., M.P.H. Lieutenant Commander, Dental Corps...United States Navy A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontic Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services

  5. Immobilization, hybridization, and oxidation of synthetic DNA on gold surface: Electron transfer investigated by electrochemistry and scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Gerald D.; Chen Fan [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States); Zhou Anhong, E-mail: Anhong.Zhou@usu.edu [Biological Engineering Program, Department of Biological and Irrigation Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-4105 (United States)

    2009-06-08

    Fundamental understanding of interfacial electron transfer (ET) among electrolyte/DNA/solid-surface will facilitate the design for electrical detection of DNA molecules. In this report, the electron transfer characteristics of synthetic DNA (sequence from pathogenic Cryptosporidium parvum) self-assembled on a gold surface was electrochemically studied. The effects of immobilization order on the interface ET related parameters such as diffusion coefficient (D{sub 0}), surface coverage ({theta}{sub R}), and monolayer thickness (d{sub i}) were determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). DNA surface density ({Gamma}{sub DNA}) was determined by the integration of the charge of the electro-oxidation current peaks during the initial cyclic voltammetry scans. It was found that the DNA surface densities at different modifications followed the order: {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (MCH/dsS-DNA/Au) > {Gamma}{sub DNA} (dsS-DNA/MCH/Au). It was also revealed that the electro-oxidation of the DNA modified gold surface would involve the oxidation of nucleotides (guanine and adenine) with a 5.51 electron transfer mechanism and the oxidative desorption of DNA and MCH molecules by a 3 electron transfer mechanism. STM topography and current image analysis indicated that the surface conductivity after each surface modification followed the order: dsS-DNA/Au < MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au < Hoechst/oxidized MCH/dsS-DNA/Au. The results from this study suggested a combination of variations in immobilization order may provide an alternative approach for the optimization of DNA hybridization and the further development for electrical detection of DNA.

  6. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  7. Two photon microscopy for studies of xenobiotics in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsson, Carl; Smedh, Maria; Jonson, Charlotte; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Ericson, Marica B.

    2007-07-01

    For successful uptake and distribution of drugs from transdermal formulations, it is important to understand the skin barrier function. Innovative advances in modern microscopy have provided valuable tools to study the interaction between the skin and xenobiotics. Two-photon microscopy (TPM) allows non-invasive visualization of fluorescent compounds in the skin. The advantages of TPM over conventional confocal microscopy are better light penetration into highly scattering and absorbing tissue such as human skin, improved detection efficiency, limited out of focus photobleaching and reduced phototoxic effects. We present TPM as an alternative non-invasive in vitro method to study chemical penetration enhancement of fluorescent model drugs. The permeability of sulforhodamine B (SRB) through human epidermis was measured with vertical diffusion cells. The absorption was visualized using TPM after 24 h passive diffusion. We have evaluated variations in physicochemical parameters controlling dermal drug uptake induced by the penetration enhancer oleic acid according to methods previously described by Yu et al. Optical sectioning by TPM was compared with cryosectioning. Oleic acid significantly increased penetration of sulforhodamine. TPM images demonstrate a four-fold increase in the partition coefficient. In addition, a six-fold increase in the concentration gradient was found over stratum corneum. Better light penetration and detection efficiency increase maximum imaging depth in TPM compared to conventional confocal microscopy, however loss of signal due to scattering and absorption is still significant and will affect distribution profiles generated by optical sectioning. A true concentration profile cannot be established without better knowledge about signal losses in the skin.

  8. Study and fabrication of tunnel diodes made on germanium using a collective planar technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrahides, Michel

    1973-01-01

    The main results of the theory on tunnel diodes are presented in the first chapter. From these results are deduced the technological requirements that any fabrication process should meet to make tunnel diodes. These requirements show up that, among the three techniques for junction making (thermal diffusion of impurities, epitaxy, alloying), the last one is presently the best fitted to the fabrication of tunnel junctions. By analyzing the defects created by various alloying technologies presently used, together with a study of the benefits due to a use of chemical photolithography, evaporation under vacuum and masking by deposited oxide, it is possible to design a tentative scheme of a 0.5 ns tunnel diode. Then, in a second chapter, is presented the collective process for fabrication that has been used on monocrystalline, P-type, germanium wafers. 8 000 tunnel diodes may be positioned on a 1.5 inch diameter wafer by using that process. A description of the various apparatus used is also given. The experimental results are described in the third chapter. The influence of the various fabrication parameters on the electrical characteristics of the diodes are discussed. It is shown, by studying the fabrication yields and parameter spreading, that 80 per cent of the diodes exhibit a standard tunnel diode behaviour and that 90 per cent of these present a peak current dispersion less than ± 25 per cent. When measuring at the peak current drifts under temperature stresses, a good analogy with conventional tunnel diode is found. Some measurements of switching times have led to values as low as 0.6 nanoseconds. (author) [fr

  9. Early studies of placental ultrastructure by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, A M; Enders, A C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was first applied to study placental ultrastructure in the 1950's. We review those early studies and mention the scientists that employed or encouraged the use of TEM. FINDINGS: Among the pioneers Edward W. Dempsey was a key figure who attracted...... many other scientists to Washington University in St. Louis. Work on human placental ultrastructure was initiated at Cambridge and Kyoto whilst domestic animals were initially studied by Björkman in Stockholm and electron micrographs of bat placenta were published by Wimsatt of Cornell University...

  10. Super-resolved linear fluorescence localization microscopy using photostable fluorophores: A virtual microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Udo; Szczurek, Aleksander; Cremer, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Current approaches to overcome the conventional limit of the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), often suffer from non-linear effects, which render the quantification of the image intensities in the reconstructions difficult, and also affect the quantification of the biological structure under investigation. As an attempt to face these difficulties, we discuss a particular method of localization microscopy which is based on photostable fluorescent dyes. The proposed method can potentially be implemented as a fast alternative for quantitative localization microscopy, circumventing the need for the acquisition of thousands of image frames and complex, highly dye-specific imaging buffers. Although the need for calibration remains in order to extract quantitative data (such as the number of emitters), multispectral approaches are largely facilitated due to the much less stringent requirements on imaging buffers. Furthermore, multispectral acquisitions can be readily obtained using commercial instrumentation such as e.g. the conventional confocal laser scanning microscope.

  11. A study of surface diffusion with the scanning tunneling microscope from fluctuations of the tunneling current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, Lozano [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-12

    The transport of atoms or molecules over surfaces has been an important area of study for several decades now, with its progress generally limited by the available experimental techniques to characterize the phenomena. A number of methods have been developed over the years to measure surface diffusion yet only very few systems have been characterized to this day mainly due to the physical limitations inherent in these available methods. Even the STM with its astonishing atomically-resolved images of the surface has been limited in terms of its capability to determine mass transport properties. This is because the STM is inherently a ``slow`` instrument, i.e., a finite time is needed for signal averaging in order to produce the image. A need exists for additional surface diffusion measurement techniques, ideally ones which are able to study varied systems and measure a wide range of diffusion rates. The STM (especially because of its highly local nature) presents itself as a promising tool to conduct dynamical studies if its poor time resolution during ``normal operation`` can somehow be overcome. The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce a new technique of using the STM to measure adatom mobility on surfaces -- one with a capacity to achieve excellent time resolution.

  12. Potential risks at an industrial site: A wind tunnel study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaňour, Zbyněk; Jurčáková, Klára; Brych, Karel; Dittrt, František; Dittrich, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 3 (2010), s. 185-190 ISSN 0957-5820 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : atmospheric turbulence * flow visualization * wind tunnel modeling Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.453, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B8JGG-4Y7P8YF-1&_user=640952&_coverDate=05%2F31%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1433050901&_rerunOrigin= google &_acct=C000034318&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=640952&md5=b036d2c5d747eadc03ff5697ea45e6a2

  13. Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by means of tibial tunnel: anatomical study on cadavers for tunnel positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Altenor Bessa de Queiroz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To determine the reference points for the exit of the tibial guidewire in relation to the posterior cortical bone of the tibia.Methods:Sixteen knees from fresh cadavers were used for this study. Using a viewing device and a guide marked out in millimeters, three guidewires were passed through the tibia at 0, 10 and 15 mm distally in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia. Dissections were performed and the region of the center of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL was determined in each knee. The distances between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and the posterior tibial border (CB and between the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL and wires 1, 2 and 3 (CW1, CW2 and CW3 were measured.Results:In the dissected knees, we found the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL at 1.09 ± 0.06 cm from the posterior tibial border. The distances between the wires 1, 2 and 3 and the center of the tibial insertion of the PCL were respectively 1.01 ± 0.08, 0.09 ± 0.05 and 0.5 ± 0.05 cm.Conclusion:The guidewire exit point 10 mm distal in relation to the posterior crest of the tibia was the best position for attempting to reproduce the anatomical center of the PCL.

  14. Experimental study of wind tunnel performance by a two-component laserDopplerAnemometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pourmahabadian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This survey studies the wind tunnel performance by a two- componentlaser Doppler Anemometer, so some experiments were carried out to assess the performance of awind tunnel.Method: The tunnel was capable to produce air velocity of up to 40 m/s.. Measurements ofvelocity profiles have been made actors the test section of wind tunnel through the using a twocomponentfiber optic Laser Doppler anemometer. Measurements of velocity profiles andturbulence intensities have been made across the test section of the wind tunnel using a twocomponentfiber optic Laser Doppler anemometer (I.D.A for wind speeds ranging from 1 to3m/s.Results: Performance rests of velocity profiles at a given flow rate and various position of aerosolgenerator showed that although uniformity of flow dependent to the place of an atomizer (asaerosol generator but the variation of wind speed across the test section meets the wind speedrequirements, as specified by US EPAfor 3m/s only.Conclusion:At time which particles velocity reach to less than one micron, the air velocity relateson the similarity of particles and

  15. Electron microscopy study of advanced heterostructures for optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katcki, J.; Ratajczak, J.; Phillipp, F.; Muszalski, J.; Bugajski, M.; Chen, J.X.; Fiore, A

    2003-08-28

    The application of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to the investigation of optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Special attention was paid to the electron microscopy assessment of the growth perfection of such crucial elements of the devices like quantum wells, quantum dots, distributed Bragg reflectors as well as electrical contacts. Using these examples, the most important issues of the application of electron microscopy to characterization of optoelectronic devices are discussed.

  16. Role of the anion in the underpotential deposition of cadmium on a Rh(111) electrode: probed by voltammetry and in situ scanning tunneling microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou Yang, Liang-Yueh; Bensliman, Fahd; Shue, Chia-Haw; Yang, Yaw-Chia; Zang, Ze-Haw; Wang, Li; Yau, Shueh-Lin; Yoshimoto, Soichiro; Itaya, Kingo

    2005-08-11

    In situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed to examine the underpotential deposition (UPD) of cadmium on a rhodium(111) electrode in sulfuric and hydrochloric acids. The (bi)sulfate and chloride anions in the electrolytes played a main role in controlling the number and arrangement of Cd adatoms. Deposition of Cd along with hydrogen adsorption occurred near 0.1 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode) in either 0.05 M H2SO4 or 0.1 M HCl containing 1 mM Cd(ClO4)2. These coupled processes resulted in an erroneous coverage of Cd adatoms. The process of Cd deposition shifted positively to 0.3 V and thus separated from that of hydrogen in 0.05 M H2SO4 containing 0.5 M Cd2+. The amount of charge (80 microC/cm2) for Cd deposition in 0.5 M Cd2+ implied a coverage of 0.17 for the Cd adatoms, which agreed with in situ STM results. Regardless of [Cd2+], in situ STM imaging revealed a highly ordered Rh(111)-(6 x 6)-6Cd + HSO4- or SO42- structure in sulfuric acid,. In hydrochloric acid, in situ STM discerned a (2 x 2)-Cd + Cl structure at potentials where Cd deposition commenced. STM atomic resolution showed roughly one-quarter of a monolayer of Cd adatoms were deposited, ca. 50% more than in sulfuric acid. Dynamic in situ STM imaging showed potential dependent, reversible transformations between the (6 x 6) Cd adlattices and (square root 3 x square root 7)-(bi)sulfate structure, and between (2 x 2) and (square root 7 x square root 7)R19.1 degrees -Cl structures. The fact that different Cd structures observed in H2SO4 and HCl entailed the involvement of anions in Cd deposition, i.e. (bi)sulfate and chloride anions were codeposited with Cd adatoms on Rh(111).

  17. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  18. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film with a fine magnetic tip sensitive to a well-defined magnetization component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Matsuyama

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We developed a micrometer-sized magnetic tip integrated onto the write head of a hard disk drive for spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM in the modulated tip magnetization mode. Using SP-STM, we measured a well-defined in-plane spin-component of the tunneling current of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film. The spin asymmetry of the NiFe film was about 1.3% within the bias voltage range of -3 to 1 V. We obtained the local spin component image of the sample surface, switching the magnetic field of the sample to reverse the sample magnetization during scanning. We also obtained a spin image of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film evaporated on the recording medium of a hard disk drive.

  19. Fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions with a single-crystalline LiF tunnel barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Narayananellore, Sai; Doko, Naoki; Matsuo, Norihiro; Saito, Hidekazu; Yuasa, Shinji

    2018-04-01

    We fabricated Fe/LiF/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgO(001) substrate, where LiF is an insulating tunnel barrier with the same crystal structure as MgO (rock-salt type). Crystallographical studies such as transmission electron microscopy and nanobeam electron diffraction observations revealed that the LiF tunnel barrier is single-crystalline and has a LiF(001)[100] ∥ bottom Fe(001)[110] crystal orientation, which is constructed in the same manner as MgO(001) on Fe(001). Also, the in-plane lattice mismatch between the LiF tunnel barrier and the Fe bottom electrode was estimated to be small (about 0.5%). Despite such advantages for the tunnel barrier of the MTJ, the observed tunnel magnetoresistance (MR) ratio was low (˜6% at 20 K) and showed a significant decrease with increasing temperature (˜1% at room temperature). The results imply that indirect tunneling and/or thermally excited carriers in the LiF tunnel barrier, in which the current basically is not spin-polarized, play a major role in electrical transport in the MTJ.

  20. Study of the tunneling effect within lattices with cubic structure on varying temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisone, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this theoretical study, it is underlined that the presence of micro-cracks in the lattice structure increases the probability of tunneling effect between two deuterons by some orders of magnitude with respect to non-deformed lattices. We have derived an expression to compute the tunneling probability within a micro-crack, and hypothesized a D + 2 -D + 2 binding mechanism. Finally, the overall indications provided by these theoretical simulations appear to suggest that the deformation of the crystalline lattice, at varying temperature, seems able to influence the process of tunneling between the deuterons in the metal, while the forced loading with D 2 has, in general, no evident positive effects in pure metals, but in some cases could, on the contrary, condition the phenomenon negatively. (authors)

  1. Study and evaluation of ferro-cement for use in wind tunnel construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, H. J., Jr. (Compiler)

    1972-01-01

    The structural suitability and cost effectiveness of ferro-cement for large subsonic wind tunnel structures is investigated. This investigation was carried out in the following four main categories: (1) a state-of-the-art survey into the uses, properties, and costs of ferro-cement; (2) an evaluation of those ferro-cement properties critical to construction of large, subsonic wind tunnels, which have not been adequately established to date; (3) a laboratory testing program to determine preliminary values for those properties; and (4) a study to establish cost factors for ferro-cement as related to a preliminary construction scheme for a nacelle and shroud unit.

  2. Light microscopy study of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, M R; de Castro Brito, G A; de Carvalho, J V; Gomes, R M; Barreto Martins, M J; de Albuquerque Ribeiro, R

    2009-06-01

    Although most studies on animal ototoxicity employ scanning electron microscopy, all cochlear structures may be identified with light microscopy. This paper describes a simple method of histological assessment of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats, and relates morphological changes to functional changes in hearing detected by distortion product evoked otoacoustic emissions. Male Wistar rats were injected with 8 mg/kg/day cisplatin, or with an equivalent volume of saline solution, for three consecutive days. They underwent distortion product evoked otoacoustic emission testing at baseline and at 24 or 48 hours after the last administration. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed and their cochleae were retrieved and prepared for haematoxylin and eosin staining. A four-point scoring system was used to grade injury to the external ciliated cells, as indicated by the number of cells absent from the basal turn of the cochlear duct. A four-point scoring system was also used to grade stria vascularis injury, as indicated by the degree of shrinkage of the intermediate cells. Scores were significantly higher in groups treated with cisplatin compared with controls. Morphological changes were confirmed by decreased distortion product evoked otoacoustic emission amplitudes in animals treated with cisplatin. This method is simple to perform with routine histology equipment and is appropriate for the study of acute, cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats.

  3. An experimental study of the exergetic performance of an underground air tunnel system for greenhouse cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, Leyla; Ozgener, Onder

    2010-01-01

    The present study highlights the exergetic performance characteristics of an underground air tunnel for greenhouse cooling with a 47 m horizontal, 56 cm nominal diameter U-bend buried galvanized ground heat exchanger. This system was designed and installed in the Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. Underground air tunnel systems, also known as earth-to-air heat exchangers, are recognized to be outstanding heating, cooling and air heating systems. On the other hand, they have not been used yet in the Turkish market. Greenhouses also have important economical potential in Turkey's agricultural sector. Greenhouses should be cooled during the summer or hot days. In order to establish optimum growth conditions in greenhouses, renewable energy sources should be utilized as much as possible. It is expected that effective use of underground air tunnels with a suitable technology in the modern greenhouses will play a leading role in Turkey in the foreseeable future. The exergy transports between the components and the destructions in each of the components of the system are determined for the average measured parameters obtained from the experimental results. Exergetic efficiencies of the system components are determined in an attempt to assess their individual performances and the potential for improvements is also presented. The daily maximum cooling coefficient of performances (COP) values for the system are also obtained to be 15.8. The total average COP in the experimental period is found to be 10.09. The system COP was calculated based on the amount of cooling produced by the air tunnel and the amount of power required to move the air through the tunnel, while the exergetic efficiency of the air tunnel is found to be in a range among 57.8-63.2%. The overall exergy efficiency value for the system on a product/fuel basis is found to be 60.7%. (author)

  4. Electron microscopy--new tool for service failure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warke, W.R.; McCall, J.L.

    1965-05-01

    Electron microscopy, now well established as a research tool for the study of metal fractures, can be valuable for analyzing service failures. The high magnifications of electron microscopes, ranging from 500 to 200,000 X, coupled with their large vertical resolution, make it possible to distinguish overload failures from fatigue failures from brittle intergranular failures, and so on. Generally speaking, 2 basic techniques are used to replicate fractured surfaces. They the direct carbon method and the 2-stage plastic carbon technique. Each has its limitations and specific areas of application. Direct carbon eliminates an intermediate step; it thus gives a higher fidelity replica and allows extraction of inclusions and precipitates, but destroys the sample. The plastic carbon replica is nondestructive, but less faithful in reproducing the finest features of the surface. For this reason, the direct method is used primarily for fundamental research, while the plastic carbon technique is used when specimen availability is a problem or service failures are to be analyzed. The applicability of electron microscopy to service failure analyses is illustrated by 3 examples.

  5. Tunneling features in semiconductor nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseev, P. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Maslova, N. S.; Panov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    The most telling scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) data available on the influence of nonequilibrium tunneling effects and electronic spectra reconstruction are reviewed and theoretically explained by self-consistently accounting for nonequilibrium electron distribution and the change (due to the tunneling current) in the electron density of states near the tunneling junction. The paper discusses the basic ideas of the self-consistent tunneling theory, which forms the basis for experimental research and which allows many effects observed in STM/STS experiments to be explained and new phenomena to be predicted.

  6. Carpal tunnel sonography by the rheumatologist versus nerve conduction study by the neurologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, WAA; Jacobs, JWG; Bussemaker, FEAM; de Waard, J; Bijlsma, JWJ

    Objective. To determine the value of sonogaphy (SG) performed by the rheumatologist to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods. Sixty-three patients with clinical signs of CTS according to the neurologist. based on patient history and clinical examination, were studied. In the 6 weeks prior

  7. Tunneling Spectroscopy Study of Spin-Polarized Quasiparticle Injection Effects in Cuparate/Manganite Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. Y. T.; Yeh, N. C.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy was performed at 4.2K on epitaxial thin-film heterostructures comprising YBa2Cu3O7 and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3, to study the microscopic effects of spin-polarized quasiparticle injection from the half-metallic ferromagnetic manganite on the high-Tc cuprate superconductor.

  8. Fermilab digs 4,000-foot tunnel for neutrino study near Batavia

    CERN Multimedia

    Grady, W

    2002-01-01

    As part of a construction project that began more than two years ago, workers have carved out 4,000 feet of tunnel and two huge caverns under a portion of Fermilab's site near Batavia. The $171 million project will provide research facilities for an experiment designed to study neutrinos (1 page).

  9. The study of electrical conductivity of DNA molecules by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, T. I.; Bakhtizin, R. Z.

    2017-10-01

    An interest to the processes of charge transport in DNA molecules is very high, due to perspective of their using in nanoelectronics. The original sample preparation for studying electrical conductivity of DNA molecules by scanning tunneling spectroscopy has been proposed and tested. The DNA molecules immobilized on gold surface have been imaged clearly and their current-voltage curves have been measured.

  10. A field wind tunnel study of fine dust emissions in sandy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    A portable field wind tunnel has been developed to allow measurements of dust emissions from soil surfaces to test the premise that dust concentration and properties are highly correlated with surface soil properties, as modified by crop management system. In this study, we report on the effect of ...

  11. Numerical Study of the High-Speed Leg of a Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayani, Sudheer; Sellers, William L., III; Brynildsen, Scott E.; Everhart, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical study of the high-speed leg of the NASA Langley 14 by 22-foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel. The high-speed leg consists of the Settling Chamber, Contraction, Test Section, and First Diffuser. Results are shown comparing two different exit boundary conditions and two different methods of determining the surface geometry.

  12. Airflow in the CNGS tunnel structures$bA study for ensured operational safety

    CERN Document Server

    Blom, R

    2003-01-01

    In the CNGS project, the nature of neutrinos is to be studied. These neutrinos are created by a radioactive decay, and to control the path of the particles that decay into neutrinos, a large under-pressure tunnel is needed. To have such a large evacuated volume, where the pressure is kept at 100 Pa, connected with areas accessible for the personnel, might be hazardous. The purpose of this study is to quantify, by means of CFD simulations, the airflow, air velocity, pressure and temperature that would arise in the tunnels in case of a rupture in the sealing of the evacuated tunnel. For the simulated case, where the titanium window that seals the tunnel disappears completely in an accident, the pressure drops to 0.987 bar in the area accessible to the personnel after 7 seconds. An airflow velocity of 50.9 meters per second accompanies this pressure drop. As possible means of personnel protection, the effects of using safety baffles have been studied. These measures would, with a 50 percent close off, lead to a ...

  13. Scaled experiments using the helium technique to study the vehicular blockage effect on longitudinal ventilation control in tunnels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alva, Wilson Ulises Rojas; Jomaas, Grunde; Dederichs, Anne

    2015-01-01

    A model tunnel (1:30 compared to a standard tunnel section) with a helium-air smoke mixture was used to study the vehicular blockage effect on longitudinal ventilation smoke control. The experimental results showed excellent agreement with full-scale data and confirmed that the critical velocity...

  14. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy study and unusual transport properties of the topological semimetal a-Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jiawei

    Weyl semimetals are new states of quantum matter with topological Weyl nodes near Fermi level in the bulk and Fermi arcs at the surface, which are paid a lot attention in recently years. Here#¬we report another topological semimetal a-Sn., which is double Weyl semimetal in the magnetic field and Dirac semimetal in an appropriate in-plane strain. By combing Landau level spectroscopy and quasiparticle interference, we obtain the linear dispersion near the Dirac point within strain while quadratic band dispersion near Γpoint without strain. We also observe the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (LMR) in both two system, which is caused by chiral anomaly. However ,the LMR profiles of strained a-Sn have a little rise and then descend while the unstrained one drop directly, which is due to the different type of Weyl semimetal and further confirm our prediction.

  15. Scanning-tunneling-microscopy studies of the S-induced reconstruction of Cu(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colaianni, Maria Loredana; Chorkendorff, Ib

    1994-01-01

    ordered overlayer. Annealing to 1173 K produces a well-ordered (root 17X root 17)R14 degrees structure which shows four sulfur atoms per unit cell in the STM images. Since the sulfur coverage of the (root 17X root 17)R14 degrees structure has been previously measured to contain a total of eight sulfur...

  16. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Martín Arias, Luis H; Sáinz, María; Escudero, Antonio; Fierro, Inmaculada; Sauzet, Odile; Cornelius, Victoria R; Molokhia, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used to prevent osteoporotic fractures. Some severe musculoskeletal reactions have been described with this medication; among them, some cases of carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether bisphosphonates may be associated with this syndrome. A cohort study was conducted to compare exposed to unexposed women; the exposed group was that composed of women having received at least one prescription of an oral bisphosphonate. For the purpose, we used information from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) database. The outcome of interest was defined as those women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. A survival analysis was performed; the Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and to adjust for identified confounding variables. Out of a sample of 59,475 women older than 51 years, 19,825 were treated with bisphosphonates during the period studied. No differences in age distribution or mean follow-up time were observed between the two groups in comparison. Overall, there were 572 women diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, 242 (1.2%) in the group exposed to bisphosphonates, and 330 (0.8%) in the unexposed. An adjusted hazard ratio of developing carpal tunnel syndrome of 1.38 (95%CI, 1.15-1.64) was found for women exposed to bisphosphonates; no significant changes in the hazard ratios were found when considering different levels of bisphosphonate exposure. An increased risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is associated with the use of bisphosphonates in postmenopausal women.

  17. Wind Tunnel Model Design for Sonic Boom Studies of Nozzle Jet Flows with Shock Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Denison, Marie; Moini-Yekta, Shayan; Morr, Donald E.; Durston, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry are performing studies of supersonic aircraft concepts with low sonic boom pressure signatures. The computational analyses of modern aircraft designs have matured to the point where there is confidence in the prediction of the pressure signature from the front of the vehicle, but uncertainty remains in the aft signatures due to boundary layer and nozzle exhaust jet effects. Wind tunnel testing without inlet and nozzle exhaust jet effects at lower Reynolds numbers than in-flight make it difficult to accurately assess the computational solutions of flight vehicles. A wind tunnel test in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel is planned for February 2016 to address the nozzle jet effects on sonic boom. The experiment will provide pressure signatures of test articles that replicate waveforms from aircraft wings, tails, and aft fuselage (deck) components after passing through cold nozzle jet plumes. The data will provide a variety of nozzle plume and shock interactions for comparison with computational results. A large number of high-fidelity numerical simulations of a variety of shock generators were evaluated to define a reduced collection of suitable test models. The computational results of the candidate wind tunnel test models as they evolved are summarized, and pre-test computations of the final designs are provided.

  18. Numerical Study on Different Series Modes of Jet Fan in a Longitudinal Tunnel Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Pei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient ventilation systems will contribute to maintaining air quality in the tunnel. In order to improve ventilation performance in normal traffic condition, the 3D tunnel models were established according to the original design for the tunnel located in central plains of China. Based on the commercial CFD software Fluent 6.3 and k-ε turbulence model, numerical simulations were carried out to study the patterns of jet flow and the optimization of fan combinations. It is found that the axial velocity profile obtained from numerical simulation agrees quite well with turbulent free jet theory although there is a little difference on the magnitude. The comparison of four combination modes under the condition of operating four fans indicates that the ventilation effectiveness is affected mainly by both the interval of adjacent groups of fans and the combination modes of operational fans. According to the simulation results, a novel combination mode which consists of a group double paralleled fans and two groups single fan is designed. The novel combination mode is regarded as the optimum combination mode with respect to maximizing air velocity in the tunnel. Compared to the traditional combination modes, it will increase the air velocity by 5.7%.

  19. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Guo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO2. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption.

  20. Ab initio simulation study of defect assisted Zener tunneling in GaAs diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Juan; Fan, Zhi-Qiang; Gong, Jian; Jiang, Xiang-Wei

    2017-06-01

    The band to band tunneling of defective GaAs nano-junction is studied by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism with density functional theory. Aiming at performance improvement, two types of defect-induced transport behaviors are reported in this work. By examining the partial density of states of the system, we find the substitutional defect OAs that locates in the middle of tunneling region will introduce band-gap states, which can be used as stepping stones to increase the tunneling current nearly 3 times higher at large bias voltage (Vb≥0.3V). Another type of defects SeAs and VGa (Ga vacancy) create donor and acceptor states at the edge of conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB)respectively, which can change the band bending of the junction as well as increase the tunneling field obtaining a 1.5 times higher ON current. This provides an effective defect engineering approach for next generation TFET device design.

  1. Ab initio simulation study of defect assisted Zener tunneling in GaAs diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Lu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The band to band tunneling of defective GaAs nano-junction is studied by using the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism with density functional theory. Aiming at performance improvement, two types of defect-induced transport behaviors are reported in this work. By examining the partial density of states of the system, we find the substitutional defect OAs that locates in the middle of tunneling region will introduce band-gap states, which can be used as stepping stones to increase the tunneling current nearly 3 times higher at large bias voltage (Vb≥0.3V. Another type of defects SeAs and VGa (Ga vacancy create donor and acceptor states at the edge of conduction band (CB and valence band (VBrespectively, which can change the band bending of the junction as well as increase the tunneling field obtaining a 1.5 times higher ON current. This provides an effective defect engineering approach for next generation TFET device design.

  2. A temperature dependent tunneling study of the spin density wave gap in EuFe2As2 single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Anupam; Hossain, Z; Gupta, Anjan K

    2013-09-18

    We report temperature dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy measurements on single crystals of EuFe2As2 in the 15-292 K temperature range. The in situ cleaved crystals show atomic terraces with homogeneous tunnel spectra that correlate well with the spin density wave (SDW) transition at a temperature, TSDW ≈ 186 K. Above TSDW the local tunnel spectra show a small depression in the density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy (EF). The gap becomes more pronounced upon entering the SDW state with a gap value ∼90 meV at 15 K. However, the zero bias conductance remains finite down to 15 K indicating a finite DOS at the EF in the SDW phase. Furthermore, no noticeable change is observed in the DOS at the antiferromagnetic ordering transition of Eu(2+) moments at 19 K.

  3. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  4. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  5. Effect of Transosseous Tunnels on Patella Fracture Risk After Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazza, Nicholas A; Lewis, Gregory S; Lukosius, Eric Z; Roush, Evan P; Black, Kevin P; Dhawan, Aman

    2018-02-01

    To determine whether (1) tunnels that breach the anterior cortex of the patella result in increased fracture risk and (2) transosseous tunnels drilled across the patella significantly reduce the tensile force needed to fracture the patella. Twenty-six fresh-frozen cadaveric human patellas were randomized to 1 of 3 groups: a control group with unmodified patellas, a group with 2 transverse tunnels (TT) that did not breach the anterior cortex, and a group with 2 TT that breached the anterior cortex of the patella (PA). Patellas were connected in series to a load cell via freeze clamp attachments to the quadriceps and patellar tendons. Pull was fixed at 45° with the patella set in the trochlear groove of a synthetic femur. Patellas were loaded cyclically, then to failure. Twenty-six patellas were tested (mean age = 71.4 years; range = 37-95, standard deviation [STD] = 11.5 years). PA patellas were more likely to fracture through the tunnel than TT patellas (100% vs 25%, P = .033). Control, TT, and PA groups failed at 1,915 N (STD = 508 N), 1,901 N (STD = 884 N), and 1,640 N (STD = 625 N), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in overall load to failure between control and TT (P = .969), control and PA (P = .321), and TT and PA (P = .488) groups. Transosseous patellar tunnels for medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction that breached the anterior cortex were more likely to fracture during longitudinal load than those that did not breach the anterior cortex. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the tensile load to failure between native patellas and patellas with either type of transosseous tunnel. The results of this study show that breaching the anterior cortex during transosseous drilling increases the risk of a patellar fracture occurring through the transosseous tunnel. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scanning Auger microscopy studies of an ancient bronze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paparazzo, E.; Lea, A.S.; Baer, D.R.; Northover, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) has been used to study the surface and interface microchemistry of a sheet bronze belt from the Urartian kingdom in NE Syria of the early first millennium B.C. We find that the patina contains no copper species at all (decuprification), whereas carbonaceous species, Ca-silicates and N-bearing species are detected, the last being tentatively identified as organic (primarily amine-like) residues deriving from the soil. A textured grain, which we qualify as a second phase of bronze originated by an imperfect alloying of the two major metals (i.e., consisting of Cu-rich and Sn-rich domains) is observed on the metallic side lying beneath the patina. SAM imaging with a submicron spatial resolution highlights the presence of SnO 2 oxide inside what appears to be the hollow veins of the grain, whereas a Cu 2 O-like oxide is confined exclusively to the flat regions of the grain. We explain these results by noting that the hollow veins, offering a higher exposure to external fluids, are likely to have promoted preferential formation of the more stable tin oxide over copper oxide. In another region of the metal side we studied the chemistry of grain boundaries and their surrounding areas. We find that S species lie exclusively inside the grain boundaries, whereas Sn and Zn species accumulate just outside the boundary channels, and this lateral chemical inhomogeneity is highlighted with a ∼200 nm spatial resolution. Lateral segregation of Cu and Sn domains is imaged in another region with a spatial resolution of ∼15 nm. This result marks the best spatial resolution any analytical method has yet achieved in highlighting chemical heterogeneities of ancient bronzes. Although archaeomaterials lie outside the mainstream applications of Auger techniques, this study provides convincing evidence that SAM can greatly advance our understanding of these materials, as it provides clues relating to corrosion and patination phenomena, as well as

  7. Anisotropic structures of some microorganisms studied by polarization microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2014), s. 363-368 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Polarization microscopy * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2014

  8. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, Javier A.; Valenzuela B, José; Cao Milán, R.; Herrera, José; Farías, Mario H.; Hernández, Mayra P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New phases of sulfur on gold: hexamer and (√(2)×√(2)) were observed by STM. • Hexamers and (√(2)×√(2)) structures coexist with well-known octomers. • Formation of sulfur multilayer by K 2 DTC 2 pz hydrolysis under alkaline condition. • Top octomer layer have dynamic behavior while (√(2)×√(2)) and hexamer were static. • A model is presented to explain sulfur multilayer formation on Au(100). - Abstract: Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K 2 DTC 2 pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S 6 phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S 4 phase, tetramer with (√(2)×√(2)) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S 8 phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√(2)×√(2)) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√(2)×√(2)) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer

  9. A scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of the phases formed by the sulfur adsorption on Au(100) from an alkaline solution of 1,4-piperazine(bis)-dithiocarbamate of potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Javier A. [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Valenzuela B, José [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Cao Milán, R. [Facultad de Química, Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Herrera, José [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Farías, Mario H. [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología (CNyN), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) , km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Hernández, Mayra P., E-mail: mayrap@fisica.uh.cu [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales (IMRE), Universidad de La Habana, Zapata y G, El Vedado, Plaza de la Revolución, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • New phases of sulfur on gold: hexamer and (√(2)×√(2)) were observed by STM. • Hexamers and (√(2)×√(2)) structures coexist with well-known octomers. • Formation of sulfur multilayer by K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz hydrolysis under alkaline condition. • Top octomer layer have dynamic behavior while (√(2)×√(2)) and hexamer were static. • A model is presented to explain sulfur multilayer formation on Au(100). - Abstract: Piperazine-dithiocarbamate of potassium (K{sub 2}DTC{sub 2}pz) was used as a new precursor for the spontaneous deposition of sulfur on the Au(100) surface in alkaline solution. Two new sulfur phases were studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These phases were formed by six sulfur atoms (S{sub 6} phase, hexamer) and by four sulfur atoms (S{sub 4} phase, tetramer with (√(2)×√(2)) structure), and they were observed in coexistence with the well-known quasi-square patterns formed by eight sulfur atoms (S{sub 8} phase, octomer). A model was proposed where sulfur multilayers were formed by a (√(2)×√(2)) phase adsorbed directly on the gold surface while one of the other structures: hexamers or octomers were deposited on top. Sulfur layers were formed on gold terraces, vacancies and islands produced by lifting reconstructed surface. Sequential high-resolution STM images allowed the direct observation of the dynamic of the octomers, while the (√(2)×√(2)) structure remained static. Images also showed the reversible association/dissociation of the octomer.

  10. The diagnostic efficacy of clinical findings and electrophysiological studies in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukkoyuncu Pekel, Nilufer; Nar Senol, Pelin; Yildiz, Demet; Kilic, Ahmet Kasim; Kamaci Sener, Deniz; Seferoglu, Meral; Gunes, Aygul

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between clinical findings, neurological examination and electrophysiological studies in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and share our institutional experience in patients with CTS. Methods. Patients presenting with complaints of pain, paresthesia, and weakness in hands who diagnosed CTS between 2014 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, clinical and neurological examination findings and electrod...

  11. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Issman

    Full Text Available Microparticles (MPs are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  13. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  14. Ultrastructure of emulsions - a comparative electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard

    . For this reason, electron microscopy was the method of choice. However, electron microscopy is inherently performed in vacuum and the emulsions presented a challenge by being liquid systems which are sensitiveto changes in water vapor and temperature. Furthermore, to achieve resolution and contrast of structural...... differences in specimens, electron microscopy relies on the scattering of electrons and the emulsions contain only light elements with low mass contrast. The objective of this thesis was two-fold. One was to identify and further develop sample preparation methods to enable observation of the emulsions...... is added. The Nanomega project, which is a cooperation between the National Food Institute, the Center for Electron Nanoscopy and the Department of Mechanical Engineering, all at the Technical University of Denmark, has dealt mainly with pure oil in water emulsions to describe the oxidation without...

  15. Study of grain boundary tunneling in barium-titanate ceramic films

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H; Poon, M C

    1999-01-01

    The temperature and the electric-field dependences of the current-voltage characteristics and the low-frequency noise of barium-titanate ceramic films are studied. An abnormal field dependence is observed in the resistivity of BaTiO sub 3 materials with a small average grain size. In addition, experiments show that the low-frequency noise behaviors are governed by grain-boundary tunneling at room temperature and by trapping-detrapping of grain-boundary states at temperatures above the Curie point. Physical models for the new observations are developed. Results suggest that grain-boundary tunneling of carriers is as important as the double Schottky barrier in the current conduction in BaTiO sub 3 materials with small grain sizes.

  16. An experimental study of high contraction ratio, subsonic wind tunnel inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, M. J.; Batill, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    The inlet or contraction section has significant impact on the performance and operating characteristics of any subsonic wind tunnel. Previous experimental studies have been conducted to examine specific aspects of inlet performance and design. This work builds on this earlier experience by performing a comprehensive experimental analysis of a member of a family of high contraction ratio inlets used on indraft type wind tunnels. Quantitative flow field measurements were made using wall static ports, a five-hole pressure probe, and a hot wire anemometry system. Smoke flow visualization techniques were used to examine the inlet flow in a more qualitative manner and to correlate with quantitative measurements. This experimental investigation has provided insight into some of the many problems associated with inlet flows.

  17. Comparative study of construction schemes for proposed LINAC tunnel for ADSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parchani, G.; Suresh, N.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation shielded structures involve architectural, structural and radiation shielding design. In order to attenuate the radiation level to the permissible limits concrete has been recognized as a most versatile radiation shielding material and is being extensively used. Concrete in addition to radiation shielding properties possesses very good mechanical properties, which enables its use as a structural member. High-energy linac lab, which will generate radiation, needs very large thickness of concrete for shielding. The length of tunnel (1.00 kM) is one of the most important factors in finalizing construction scheme. In view of this, it becomes essential to explore alternate construction schemes for such structures to optimize the cost of construction. In this paper, various alternates for the construction of proposed linac tunnel have been studied

  18. A computational study of vertical tunneling transistors based on graphene-WS2 heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horri, A.; Faez, R.; Pourfath, M.; Darvish, G.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, for the first time, we present a computational study on electrical characteristics of field effect tunneling transistors based on a vertical graphene-WS2 heterostructure and vertical graphene nanoribbon (GNR)-WS2 heterostructure (VTGNRFET). Our model uses the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism along with an atomistic tight binding (TB) method. The TB parameters are extracted by fitting the bandstructure to first principles results. We show that, due to the advantage of switching between tunneling and thermionic transport regimes, an improvement can be achieved in the electrical characteristics of the device. We find that the increase of the number of WS2 layers enhances the on/off conductance ratio but degrades the intrinsic gate-delay time. The results indicate that the on/off conductance ratio of VTGNRFET increases with decreasing the GNR width.

  19. Experimental Study on the Tensile Strength and Linear Expansion Coefficient of Air Tunnel Terrazzo Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boping Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, studies on the surface tension of air tunnel terrazzo under wind load and how regularly it is affected by temperature are relatively less, and the measured results of the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo have not yet been given. In this paper, based on the top terrazzo surface structure of the inner wall of the wind tunnel, the tensile performance tests of terrazzo surface layer are conducted, while the thermal expansion coefficient of the six terrazzo test blocks were tested. The tests and analysis show that the construction of terrazzo surface, based on the proposed construction process, can effectively guarantee the reliable cement performance for the binding layer between mortar and concrete base layer, terrazzo surface layer and the cement mortar layer. And the thermal expansion coefficient of terrazzo can be valued at 1.06e-5/ºC.

  20. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  1. Tunneling of electrons via rotor–stator molecular interfaces: Combined ab initio and model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petreska, Irina, E-mail: irina.petreska@pmf.ukim.mk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ohanesjan, Vladimir [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, PO Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Pejov, Ljupčo [Institute of Chemistry, Department of Physical Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Arhimedova 5, P.O. Box 162, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Kocarev, Ljupčo [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Krste Misirkov 2, PO Box 428, 1000 Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Faculty of Computer Science and Engineering, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje, Former Yugolav Republic of Macedonia, The (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling of electrons through rotor–stator anthracene aldehyde molecular interfaces is studied with a combined ab initio and model approach. Molecular electronic structure calculated from first principles is utilized to model different shapes of tunneling barriers. Together with a rectangular barrier, we also consider a sinusoidal shape that captures the effects of the molecular internal structure more realistically. Quasiclassical approach with the Simmons’ formula for current density is implemented. Special attention is paid on conformational dependence of the tunneling current. Our results confirm that the presence of the side aldehyde group enhances the interesting electronic properties of the pure anthracene molecule, making it a bistable system with geometry dependent transport properties. We also investigate the transition voltage and we show that conformation-dependent field emission could be observed in these molecular interfaces at realistically low voltages. The present study accompanies our previous work where we investigated the coherent transport via strongly coupled delocalized orbital by application of Non-equilibrium Green’s Function Formalism.

  2. Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandes Anna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. Methods Cases (n = 220 aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356 were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. Results At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women ≥165 cm; men ≥175 cm was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. Conclusion This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.

  3. Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Stefano; Baldasseroni, Alberto; Bovenzi, Massimo; Curti, Stefania; Cooke, Robin M T; Campo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Pietro G; Ghersi, Rinaldo; Broccoli, Marco; Cancellieri, Maria Pia; Colao, Anna Maria; Dell'omo, Marco; Fateh-Moghadam, Pirous; Franceschini, Flavia; Fucksia, Serenella; Galli, Paolo; Gobba, Fabriziomaria; Lucchini, Roberto; Mandes, Anna; Marras, Teresa; Sgarrella, Carla; Borghesi, Stefano; Fierro, Mauro; Zanardi, Francesca; Mancini, Gianpiero; Violante, Francesco S

    2009-09-16

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. Cases (n = 220) aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356) were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women > or =165 cm; men > or =175 cm) was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.

  4. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J.A.; Crapez, M.A.C.; Lopes, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove’s sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L −1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm 2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm 2 , counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml −1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL −1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs. - Highlights: • We studied bacterial bioremediation by microXRF. • Dense biofilm may act sequestering metal while protecting bacterial metabolism. • Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp decreased seawater metal bioavailability. • Bacterial consortia from polluted areas may be used in bioremediation programs.

  5. Study of Hydrated Lime in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihlaříková, Eva; Neděla, Vilém; Rovnaníková, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, S2 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Hydrated Lime * Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.757, year: 2013

  6. Studying membrane properties using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöckl, M.T.; Bizzarri, R.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Mely, Y.; Duportail, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to investigate the structure and composition of biological membranes. A wide variety of fluorescent probes suitable for FLIM experiments have been described. These compounds differ strongly in the details of their incorporation into

  7. Case Studies for the Statistical Design of Experiments Applied to Powered Rotor Wind Tunnel Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Martin, Preston B.; Commo, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of statistical Design of Experiments (DOE) to helicopter wind tunnel testing was explored during two powered rotor wind tunnel entries during the summers of 2012 and 2013. These tests were performed jointly by the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate Joint Research Program Office and NASA Rotary Wing Project Office, currently the Revolutionary Vertical Lift Project, at NASA Langley Research Center located in Hampton, Virginia. Both entries were conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with a small portion of the overall tests devoted to developing case studies of the DOE approach as it applies to powered rotor testing. A 16-47 times reduction in the number of data points required was estimated by comparing the DOE approach to conventional testing methods. The average error for the DOE surface response model for the OH-58F test was 0.95 percent and 4.06 percent for drag and download, respectively. The DOE surface response model of the Active Flow Control test captured the drag within 4.1 percent of measured data. The operational differences between the two testing approaches are identified, but did not prevent the safe operation of the powered rotor model throughout the DOE test matrices.

  8. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Carpal Tunnel Release: Study Upon Clinical Efficacy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrover, David, E-mail: dpetrover@yahoo.fr; Silvera, Jonathan, E-mail: silvera.jonathan@gmail.com [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre Bachaumont-clinique Blomet RamsayGDS, Department of Interventional Radiology (France); Baere, Thierry De, E-mail: Debaere@igr.fr [Gustave Roussy Institute (France); Vigan, Marie, E-mail: marie.vigan@gmail.com [Association pour la recherche en chirurgie de l’épaule et du coude, clinique Drouot (France); Hakimé, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre Bachaumont-clinique Blomet RamsayGDS, Department of Interventional Radiology (France)

    2017-04-15

    ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and 6 months clinical result of sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) and median nerve decompression after ultra-minimally invasive, ultrasound-guided percutaneous carpal tunnel release (PCTR) surgery.MethodsConsecutive patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in this descriptive, open-label study. The procedure was performed in the interventional radiology room. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and 1 month. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire was administered at baseline, 1, and 6 months.Results129 patients were enrolled. Significant decreases in mean symptom severity scores (3.3 ± 0.7 at baseline, 1.7 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.3 at Month 6) and mean functional status scores (2.6 ± 1.1 at baseline, 1.6 ± 0.4 at Month 1, 1.3 ± 0.5 at Month 6) were noted. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete section of all TCL and nerve decompression in 100% of patients. No complications were identified.ConclusionsUltrasound-guided PCTR was used successfully to section the TCL, decompress the median nerve, and reduce self-reported symptoms.

  9. Finite element analysis of high aspect ratio wind tunnel wing model: A parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosly, N. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Procedure for designing the wind tunnel model of a high aspect ratio (HAR) wing containing geometric nonlinearities is described in this paper. The design process begins with identification of basic features of the HAR wing as well as its design constraints. This enables the design space to be narrowed down and consequently, brings ease of convergence towards the design solution. Parametric studies in terms of the spar thickness, the span length and the store diameter are performed using finite element analysis for both undeformed and deformed cases, which respectively demonstrate the linear and nonlinear conditions. Two main criteria are accounted for in the selection of the wing design: the static deflections due to gravitational loading should be within the allowable margin of the size of the wind tunnel test section and the flutter speed of the wing should be much below the maximum speed of the wind tunnel. The findings show that the wing experiences a stiffness hardening effect under the nonlinear static solution and the presence of the store enables significant reduction in linear flutter speed.

  10. A prospective study of prognostic factors for duration of sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsgaard Jesper

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endoscopic carpal tunnel release with a single portal technique has been shown to reduce sick leave compared to open carpal tunnel release, claiming to be a less invasive procedure and reducing scar tenderness leading to a more rapid return to work, and the purpose of this study was to identify prognostic factors for prolonged sick leave after endoscopic carpal tunnel release in a group of employed Danish patients. Methods The design was a prospective study including 75 employed patients with carpal tunnel syndrome operated with ECTR at two hospitals. The mean age was 46 years (SD 10.1, the male/female ratio was 0.42, and the mean preoperative duration of symptoms 10 months (range 6-12. Only 21 (28% were unable to work preoperatively and mean sick leave was 4 weeks (range 1-4. At base-line and at the 3-month follow-up, a self-administered questionnaire was collected concerning physical, psychological, and social circumstances in relation to the hand problem. Data from a nerve conduction examination were collected at baseline and at the 3-month follow-up. Significant prognostic factors were identified through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results After the operation, the mean functional score was reduced from 2.3 to 1.4 (SD 0.8 and the mean symptom score from 2.9 to 1.5 (SD 0.7. The mean sick leave from work after the operation was 19.8 days (SD 14.3. Eighteen patients (24% had more than 21 days of sick leave. Two patients (3% were still unable to work after 3 months. Significant prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis for more than 21 days of postoperative sick leave were preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem and a preoperative distal motor latency. Conclusion Preoperative sick leave, blaming oneself for the hand problem, and a preoperative distal nerve conduction motor latency were prognostic factors for postoperative work absence of more than 21 days. Other factors may be important

  11. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of nano-structured α-K5PW11(M x OH2)O39(M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)) Keggin heteropolyacid catalyst monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Bang, Yongju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Jun, Jin Oh; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Nano-structured α-K5PW11(M x OH2)O39 (M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)) Keggin heteropolyacids (HPAs) were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS) measurements in order to elucidate their redox property and oxidation catalysis. HPA molecules formed two-dimensional self-assembled monolayer arrays on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface. Furthermore, HPAs exhibited a distinctive current-voltage behavior referred to as negative differential resistance (NDR) phenomenon. The measured NDR peak voltage of HPAs was correlated with the reduction potential and the absorption edge energy determined by electrochemical method and UV-visible spectroscopy, respectively. NDR peak voltage of HPAs appeared at less negative voltage with increasing reduction potential and with decreasing UV-visible absorption edge energy. The correlations strongly suggested that NDR phenomenon was closely related to the redox property of HPAs. Vapor-phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde was carried out as a model reaction to track the oxidation catalysis of HPAs. NDR peak voltage appeared at less negative voltage with increasing yield for benzaldehyde.

  12. Seeing phenomena in flatland: studies of monolayers by fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobler, C M

    1990-08-24

    Monolayers formed at the interface between air and water can be seen with fluorescence microscopy. This allows the phase behavior of these monolayers to be determined by direct observation and opens up the possibility of following the kinetics of phase transformations in two-dimensional systems. Some unexpected morphologies have been discovered that provide information about the nature of monolayer phases and have connections to pattern formation in other systems.

  13. Studying alumina boundary migration using combined microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesterer, J L; Farrer, J K; Munoz, N E; Gilliss, S R; Ravishankar, N; Carter, C B

    2006-01-01

    Thermal grooving and migration of grain boundaries in alumina have been investigated using a variety of microscopy techniques. Using two different methods, polycrystalline alumina was used to investigate wet (implying the presence of a glassy phase), and dry grain boundaries. In the first, single-crystal Al 2 O 3 was hot-pressed via liquid phase sintering (LPS) to polycrystalline alumina with an anorthite glass film at the interface. Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit approximately 100-nm thick glass films. Specimens were annealed in air at 1650 deg. C for 20 h to induce boundary migration. Boundary characterization was carried out using visible light (VLM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Effects on migration due to surface orientation of grains were investigated using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The second method dealt with heat treating dry boundaries in polycrystalline alumina to monitor boundary migration behavior via remnant thermal grooves. Heat treatments were conducted at 1650 deg. C for 30 min. The same region of the sample was mapped using VLM and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and followed over a series of 30 min heat treatments. Boundary migration through a pore trapped inside the grain matrix was of particular interest

  14. Studying alumina boundary migration using combined microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riesterer, J L [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 421 Washington Ave, SE., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Farrer, J K [Now at Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Munoz, N E [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 421 Washington Ave, SE., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gilliss, S R [Now at Robins, Kaplan, Miller and Ciresi, L.L.P., Minneapolis, MN 55402 (United States); Ravishankar, N [Now at Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560 012 (India); Carter, C B [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 421 Washington Ave, SE., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2006-02-22

    Thermal grooving and migration of grain boundaries in alumina have been investigated using a variety of microscopy techniques. Using two different methods, polycrystalline alumina was used to investigate wet (implying the presence of a glassy phase), and dry grain boundaries. In the first, single-crystal Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was hot-pressed via liquid phase sintering (LPS) to polycrystalline alumina with an anorthite glass film at the interface. Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit approximately 100-nm thick glass films. Specimens were annealed in air at 1650 deg. C for 20 h to induce boundary migration. Boundary characterization was carried out using visible light (VLM) and scanning electron (SEM) microscopies. Effects on migration due to surface orientation of grains were investigated using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The second method dealt with heat treating dry boundaries in polycrystalline alumina to monitor boundary migration behavior via remnant thermal grooves. Heat treatments were conducted at 1650 deg. C for 30 min. The same region of the sample was mapped using VLM and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and followed over a series of 30 min heat treatments. Boundary migration through a pore trapped inside the grain matrix was of particular interest.

  15. Ion beam induced charge microscopy studies of power diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmeck, M; Balk, L J; Osipowicz, T; Watt, F; Phang, J C H; Khambadkone, A M; Niedernostheide, F-J; Schulze, H-J

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge microscopy (IBIC microscopy) has been established recently as an analytical tool for the characterization of various types of semiconductor devices. In this paper the potential of IBIC microscopy for the analysis of deeply buried structures of high power devices under biases of more than 2 kV is discussed. Such data are useful in the design process of high power devices because excessive fields at device edge regions or within protection elements (e.g. field ring structures) can be avoided. Since charge collection efficiency within depleted pn junctions is typically 100% for IBIC analysis, the contrast due to E-field variations within the large depletion regions of high power devices is limited. Here we will introduce a new approach for enhancing this contrast by using the temporal information from the IBIC signals gained with a transient IBIC set-up. Simulations and experimental data will be compared to evaluate the suitability of the new approach. The device used here is a high voltage diode with a field ring structure which was analysed using a 2 MeV proton beam

  16. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  17. Study of tunnelling through water-bearing fracture zones. Baseline study on technical issues with NE-1 as reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanting Chang; Swindell, Robert; Bogdanoff, Ingvar; Lindstroem, Beatrice; Termen, Jens [WSP Sweden, Stockholm (Sweden) ; Starsec, Peter [SGI, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) is responsible for the management of Sweden's nuclear waste. SKB is investigating various designs for the construction of an underground deep repository for spent nuclear fuel at 500-600 m depths. For the construction of an access tunnel for such a deep repository, the possibility of encountering a water-bearing fracture zone cannot be discounted. Such a zone named NE-1 (deformation zone in accordance to SKB's terminology) was encountered during the construction of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) and difficulties with large water inflows were reported. With the aim to assess the feasibility of different technical solutions, SKB commissioned a baseline study into the passage of an access tunnel through a water-bearing fracture zone at three different depths (200 m, 400 m and 600 m). The objectives of this baseline study are to: Increase the knowledge of possible technical solutions for tunnelling through water-bearing fractures zones with the characteristics of the brittle deformation zone NE-1 at different depths, namely 200, 400 and 600 metres; Form a reference document to assist the engineering design and construction work for the passage through such a water-bearing fracture zone; To highlight the engineering parameters that should be obtained to facilitate design for the passage through water-bearing fracture zones.The study has been carried out in the following five stages: A. Compilation of the relevant data for deformation zone NE-1; B. Problem identification and proposal of technical solutions; C. Identification of hazards to be involved in the tunnel excavation; D. Recommendations and conclusions for further investigations; E. Documentation of the results in a final report. The analyses will be expressed in statistical/probabilistic terms where appropriate. In order to specify the precondition that will be valid for this study, a descriptive model of the water-bearing fracture zone is

  18. Reliability analysis of idealized tunnel support system using probability-based methods with case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gharouni-Nik, M.; Naeimi, M.; Ahadi, S.; Alimoradi, Z.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the overall safety of a tunnel support lining, a reliability-based approach is presented in this paper. Support elements in jointed rock tunnels are provided to control the ground movement caused by stress redistribution during the tunnel drive. Main support elements contribute

  19. Study of the tunnelling initiated leakage current through the carbon nanotube embedded gate oxide in metal oxide semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Gargi; Sarkar, C K; Lu, X B; Dai, J Y

    2008-01-01

    The tunnelling currents through the gate dielectric partly embedded with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure have been investigated. The application of the gate voltage to such an MOS device results in the band bending at the interface of the partly embedded oxide dielectric and the surface of the silicon, initiating tunnelling through the gate oxide responsible for the gate leakage current whenever the thickness of the oxide is scaled. A model for silicon MOS structures, where carbon nanotubes are confined in a narrow layer embedded in the gate dielectric, is proposed to investigate the direct and the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling currents of such systems. The idea of embedding such elements in the gate oxide is to assess the possibility for charge storage for memory device applications. Comparing the FN tunnelling onset voltage between the pure gate oxide and the gate oxide embedded with carbon nanotubes, it is found that the onset voltage decreases with the introduction of the nanotubes. The direct tunnelling current has also been studied at very low gate bias, for the thin oxide MOS structure which plays an important role in scaling down the MOS transistors. The FN tunnelling current has also been studied with varying nanotube diameter

  20. Study of the tunnelling initiated leakage current through the carbon nanotube embedded gate oxide in metal oxide semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Gargi; Sarkar, C K; Lu, X B; Dai, J Y

    2008-06-25

    The tunnelling currents through the gate dielectric partly embedded with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure have been investigated. The application of the gate voltage to such an MOS device results in the band bending at the interface of the partly embedded oxide dielectric and the surface of the silicon, initiating tunnelling through the gate oxide responsible for the gate leakage current whenever the thickness of the oxide is scaled. A model for silicon MOS structures, where carbon nanotubes are confined in a narrow layer embedded in the gate dielectric, is proposed to investigate the direct and the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling currents of such systems. The idea of embedding such elements in the gate oxide is to assess the possibility for charge storage for memory device applications. Comparing the FN tunnelling onset voltage between the pure gate oxide and the gate oxide embedded with carbon nanotubes, it is found that the onset voltage decreases with the introduction of the nanotubes. The direct tunnelling current has also been studied at very low gate bias, for the thin oxide MOS structure which plays an important role in scaling down the MOS transistors. The FN tunnelling current has also been studied with varying nanotube diameter.

  1. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. ► The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. ► In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. ► Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  3. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari, E-mail: tetsu-n@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Imai, Koichi [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Akio [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka Dental University, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-magnification images with depth selection, and thin sections were observed using CLSM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The direction and velocity of calcification of the bone was observed by administration of 2 fluorescent dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In dog femora grafted with coral blocks, newly-formed bone was observed in the coral block space with a rough surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Twelve weeks after dental implant was grafted in dog femora, the space between screws was filled with newly-formed bones. - Abstract: Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 {mu}m/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  4. Dark field X-ray microscopy for studies of recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahl, Sonja Rosenlund; Simons, Hugh; Jakobsen, Anders Clemen

    2015-01-01

    We present the recently developed technique of Dark Field X-Ray Microscopy that utilizes the diffraction of hard X-rays from individual grains or subgrains at the (sub)micrometre- scale embedded within mm-sized samples. By magnifying the diffracted signal, 3D mapping of orientations and strains...... inside the selected grain is performed with an angular resolution of 0:005o and a spatial resolution of 200 nm. Furthermore, the speed of the measurements at high- intensity synchrotron facilities allows for fast non-destructive in situ determination of structural changes induced by annealing or other...

  5. Thermoluminescence due to tunneling in nanodosimetric materials: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Truong, Phuc

    2018-02-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) signals from nanodosimetric materials have been studied extensively during the past twenty years, especially in the area of nanomaterials doped with rare earths. One of the primary effects being studied experimentally have been possible correlations between the nanocrystal size and the shape and magnitude of TL signals. While there is an abundance of experimental studies attempting to establish such correlations, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. This paper is a Monte Carlo simulation study of the effect of nanocrystal size on the TL signals, for materials in which quantum tunneling is the dominant recombination mechanism. TL signals are simulated for a random distribution of electrons and positive ions, by varying the following parameters in the model: the radius of the crystal R, tunneling length a, and the relative concentrations of electrons and ions. The simulations demonstrate that as the radius of the nanocrystals becomes larger, the peaks of the TL glow curves shift towards lower temperatures and changes occur in both peak intensity and peak width. For large crystals with a constant density of positive ions, the TL glow curves reach the analytical limit expected for bulk materials. The commonly used assumption of nearest neighbor interactions is examined within the model, and simulated examples are given in which this assumption breaks down. It is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo method presented in this paper can also be used for linearly modulated infrared stimulated luminescence (LM-IRSL) signals, which are of importance in luminescence dosimetry and luminescence dating applications. New experimental data are presented for Durango apatite, a material which is known to exhibit strong anomalous fading due to tunneling; the experimental data is compared with the model. The relevance of the simulated results for luminescence dosimetry is discussed.

  6. Correlation of tunnel widening and tunnel positioning with short-term functional outcomes in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon versus hamstring graft: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Udit Kumar; Balaji, Gopisankar; Nema, Sandeep; Poduval, Murali; Menon, Jagdish; Patro, Dilip Kumar

    2016-08-01

    To study the correlation between tunnel widening and tunnel position with short-term functional outcomes post-ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon and hamstring autografts in young adults. A total of 33 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between October 2013 and February 2015 were included and followed up for 6 months. A standardized surgical technique was used for each graft type. Intra-op arthroscopy findings and drilled tunnel diameters were noted. They were followed up for 3 and 6 months. Radiological assessment was done at 3 and 6 months with clinical score assessment at 6 months. At 6 months, clinical scores were comparable in both groups. Tunnel widening in both femoral and tibial tunnel at 3 and 6 months were significantly higher in STG group (p values <0.05). The rate of widening was higher in 0-3 months and reduced in 3-6 months. There was statistically significant negative correlation between femoral tunnel widening by CT and IKDC score at 6 months (p value 0.049). We found a positive correlation between posterior positioning of femoral tunnel and Lysholm and IKDC scores. The correlation with Lysholm scores was statistically significant (p value 0.046). To conclude, tunnel widening is more with hamstrings graft. Femoral tunnel widening has significant negative correlation with that of IKDC scores at 6 months. Posterior femoral tunnel positioning and Lysholm scores at 6 months had significant correlation.

  7. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Studying Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard D. Dietzel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM is a scanning probe technique that utilizes the increase in access resistance that occurs if an electrolyte filled glass micro-pipette is approached towards a poorly conducting surface. Since an increase in resistance can be monitored before the physical contact between scanning probe tip and sample, this technique is particularly useful to investigate the topography of delicate samples such as living cells. SICM has shown its potential in various applications such as high resolution and long-time imaging of living cells or the determination of local changes in cellular volume. Furthermore, SICM has been combined with various techniques such as fluorescence microscopy or patch clamping to reveal localized information about proteins or protein functions. This review details the various advantages and pitfalls of SICM and provides an overview of the recent developments and applications of SICM in biological imaging. Furthermore, we show that in principle, a combination of SICM and ion selective micro-electrodes enables one to monitor the local ion activity surrounding a living cell.

  8. Near Field and Tunnel Effects Study of Controlled Source Magnetotellurics on the Hallandsåsen Horst; Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, C.; Pedersen, L.

    2012-04-01

    In nearly all studies conducted in Sweden using the EnviroMT controlled source technique, near field effects can be seen at frequencies below 15 kHz. In this study a profile parallel to the Hallandsåsen railway tunnel in southern Sweden crossing the 2D Hallandsåsen horst, the electromagnetic response is further influenced by the conductive armed concrete coating the tunnel walls at a depth of 150 m below the surface. Thus the problem of simulating the electromagnetic response from the 3D structure using a controlled source becomes complicated and inversion results based upon 2D models must be interpreted with care. A synthetic 3D model consisting of two conductive zones crossing the profile and one tunnel parallel to the profile was set up and the responses were calculated using the 3D forward program X3D (Avdeev, 2006) to study both the near field effect and the tunnel effect. The geometry of transmitters and receivers was the same as for the field measurements conducted earlier. Apparent resistivity and phase responses are quite similar to those of the real data in both current modes (parallel and orthogonal to the tunnel). A transitional zone between the near field and far field was seen in the synthetic response with dropping apparent resistivity compared with the plane wave response. This effect is more obvious in parallel mode with the electric current perpendicular to the conductive zones and parallel to the tunnel. When comparing this response to the model response without the tunnel, the differences between the apparent resistivity in the parallel mode show that the conductive tunnel reduces the near field effect. In the perpendicular mode, there is only a small near field effect. The difference between the responses with and without tunnel in the perpendicular mode is very small, indicating that the apparent resistivity is not much influenced by the conductor. The phase in the parallel mode only drops at the stations close to the source, but without

  9. An apparatus for studying spallation neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, S.C. [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National United University, Miao-Li, Taiwan (China); Chan, Y.L.; Chen, X.C.; Chu, M.C. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Hahn, R.L. [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ho, T.H.; Hsiung, Y.B. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hu, B.Z. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Kwan, K.K.; Kwok, M.W. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Kwok, T., E-mail: goodtalent@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lau, Y.P.; Lee, K.P.; Leung, J.K.C.; Leung, K.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lin, G.L. [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.C. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Luk, K.B. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Luk, W.H. [Department of Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Ngai, H.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); and others

    2013-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the design, construction and performance of an apparatus installed in the Aberdeen Tunnel laboratory in Hong Kong for studying spallation neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons under a vertical rock overburden of 611 m water equivalent (m.w.e.). The apparatus comprises six horizontal layers of plastic-scintillator hodoscopes for determining the direction and position of the incident cosmic-ray muons. Sandwiched between the hodoscope planes is a neutron detector filled with 650 kg of liquid scintillator doped with about 0.06% of Gadolinium by weight for improving the efficiency of detecting the spallation neutrons. Performance of the apparatus is also presented.

  10. Rotational barriers in ammonium hexachlorometallates as studied by NMR, tunneling spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birczynski, A.; Lalowicz, Z.T.; Lodziana, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    potential barrier. It was also observed that TF correlates directly with the lattice constant of a particular compound. This correlation is explained by density-functional theory (DFT). The size of the unit cell is governed by the nature of metal-chlorine interaction, with respect to which the studied...... structure explain observed variation of the tunnelling frequencies for NH4+. The theory provides also M-Cl distances and barriers for C-2 and C-3 rotations of ammonium ions in respective compounds, which show good agreement with experimental values. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  11. Experimental study of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Bi2212 intrinsic Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Kashiwaya, Hiromi; Shibata, Hajime; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Kawabata, Shiro; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yukio

    2007-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) is studied based on escape rate measurements. The saturations observed in the escape temperature and in the width of the switching current below 0.5 K (= T * ) indicate the transition of the switching mechanism from thermal activation to macroscopic quantum tunnelling. It is shown that the switching properties are consistently explained in terms of the underdamped Josephson junction with a quality factor of 70 ± 20 in spite of possible damping due to the nodal quasiparticles of d-wave superconductivity. The present result gives the upper limit of the damping of IJJs

  12. Hybrid High-Temperature-Superconductor–Semiconductor Tunnel Diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hayat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the demonstration of hybrid high-T_{c}-superconductor–semiconductor tunnel junctions, enabling new interdisciplinary directions in condensed matter research. The devices are fabricated by our newly developed mechanical-bonding technique, resulting in high-T_{c}-superconductor–semiconductor tunnel diodes. Tunneling-spectra characterization of the hybrid junctions of Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} combined with bulk GaAs, or a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well, exhibits excess voltage and nonlinearity, similarly to spectra obtained in scanning-tunneling microscopy, and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a d-wave-superconductor–normal-material junction. Additional junctions are demonstrated using Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} combined with graphite or Bi_{2}Te_{3}. Our results pave the way for new methods in unconventional superconductivity studies, novel materials, and quantum technology applications.

  13. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  14. RAM analysis of earth pressure balance tunnel boring machines: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasel Amini Khoshalan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth pressure balance tunnel boring machines (EPB-TBMs are favorably applied in urban tunneling projects. Despite their numerous advantages, considerable delays and high maintenance cost are the main disadvantages these machines suffer from. Reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM analysis is a practical technique that uses failure and repair dataset obtained over a reasonable time for dealing with proper machine operation, maintenance scheduling, cost control, and improving the availability and performance of such machines. In the present study, a database of failures and repairs of an EBP-TBM was collected in line 1 of Tabriz subway project over a 26-month interval of machine operation. In order to model the reliability of the TBM, this machine was divided into five distinct subsystems including mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and water systems in a series configuration. According to trend and serial correlation tests, the renewal processes were applied, for analysis of all subsystems. After calculating the reliability and maintainability functions for all subsystems, it was revealed that the mechanical subsystem with the highest failure frequency has the lowest reliability and maintainability. Similarly, estimating the availability of all subsystems indicated that the mechanical subsystem has a relatively low availability level of 52.6%, while other subsystems have acceptable availability level of 97%. Finally, the overall availability of studied machine was calculated as 48.3%.

  15. Cavitation studies on axi-symmetric underwater body with pumpjet propulsor in cavitation tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Suryanarayana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A pumpjet propulsor (PJP was designed for an underwater body (UWB with axi-symmetric configuration. Its performance was predicted through CFD study and models were manufactured. The propulsor design was evaluated for its propulsion characteristics through model tests conducted in a Wind Tunnel (WT. In the concluding part of the study, evaluation of the cavitation performance of the pumpjet was undertaken in a cavitation tunnel (CT. In order to assess the cavitation free operation speeds and depths of the body, cavitation tests of the PJP were carried out in behind condition to determine the inception cavitation numbers for rotor, stator and cowl. The model test results obtained were corrected for full scale Reynolds number and subsequently analyzed for cavitation inception speeds at different operating depths. From model tests it was also found that the cavitation inception of the rotor takes place on the tip face side at higher advance ratios and cavitation shifts towards the suction side as the RPS increases whereas the stator and cowl are free from cavitation.

  16. Scanning Tunnelling Spectroscopic Studies of Dirac Fermions in Graphene and Topological Insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    wang K.-L.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report novel properties derived from scanning tunnelling spectroscopic (STS studies of Dirac fermions in graphene and the surface state (SS of a strong topological insulator (STI, Bi2Se3. For mono-layer graphene grown on Cu by chemical vapour deposition (CVD, strain-induced scalar and gauge potentials are manifested by the charging effects and the tunnelling conductance peaks at quantized energies, respectively. Additionally, spontaneous time-reversal symmetry breaking is evidenced by the alternating anti-localization and localization spectra associated with the zero-mode of two sublattices while global time-reversal symmetry is preserved under the presence of pseudo-magnetic fields. For Bi2Se3 epitaxial films grown on Si(111 by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE, spatially localized unitary impurity resonances with sensitive dependence on the energy difference between the Fermi level and the Dirac point are observed for samples thicker than 6 quintuple layers (QL. These findings are characteristic of the SS of a STI and are direct manifestation of strong topological protection against impurities. For samples thinner than 6-QL, STS studies reveal the openup of an energy gap in the SS due to overlaps of wave functions between the surface and interface layers. Additionally, spin-preserving quasiparticle interference wave-vectors are observed, which are consistent with the Rashba-like spin-orbit splitting.

  17. Experimental and Simulation Studies of Hydrodynamic Tunneling of Ultra-Relativistic Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Ruediger; Shutov, Alexander; Tahir, Naeem; Wollmann, Daniel; Zerlauth, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The expected damage due to the release of the full LHC beam energy at a single aperture bottleneck has been studied. These studies have shown that the range of the 7 TeV LHC proton beam is significantly extended compared to that of a single proton due to hydrodynamic tunneling effect. For instance, it was evaluated that the protons and their showers will penetrate up to a length of 25 m in solid carbon compared to a static range of around 3 m. To check the validity of these simulations, beam- target heating experiments using the 440 GeV proton beam generated by the SPS were performed at the HiRadMat test facility at CERN. Solid copper targets were facially irradiated by the beam and measurements confirmed hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons and their showers. Simulations have been done by running the energy deposition code FLUKA and the 2D hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. Very good agreement has been found between the simulations and the experimental results providing confidence in the validity of the ...

  18. Cyclic voltammetry and scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of methylene blue immobilized on the self-assembled monolayer of n-dodecanethiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamifar, Seyed Ehsan; Mehrgardi, Masoud Ayatollahi; Kazemi, Sayed Habib; Mousavi, Mir Fazllollah

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer (ET) kinetics through n-dodecanethiol (C 12 SH) self-assembled monolayer on gold electrode was studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). An SECM model for compensating pinhole contribution, was used to measure the ET kinetics of solution-phase probes of ferrocyanide/ferricyanide (Fe(CN) 6 4-/3- ) and ferrocenemethanol/ferrociniummethanol (FMC 0/+ ) through the C 12 SH monolayer yielding standard tunneling rate constant (k ET 0 ) of (4 ± 1) x 10 -11 and (3 ± 1) x 10 -10 cm s -1 for Fe(CN) 6 4-/3- and FMC 0/+ respectively. Decay tunneling constants (β) of 0.97 and 0.96 A -1 for saturated alkane thiol chains were obtained using Fe(CN) 6 4- and FMC respectively. Also, it was found that methylene blue (MB) molecules are effectively immobilized on the C 12 SH monolayer and can mediate the ET between the solution-phase probes and underlying gold substrate. SECM-mediated model was used to simultaneously measure the bimolecular ET between the solution-phase probes and the monolayer-immobilized MB molecules, as well as tunneling ET between the monolayer-immobilized MB molecules and the underlying gold electrode, allowing the measurement of k BI = (5 ± 1) x 10 6 and (4 ± 2) x 10 7 cm 3 mol -1 s -1 for the bimolecular ET and k ET/MB 0 =(1±0.3)x10 -3 and (7 ± 3) x 10 -2 s -1 for the standard tunneling rate constant of ET using Fe(CN) 6 4-/3- and FMC 0/+ probes respectively.

  19. A tunnelling study on polymer/1T-LixTaS2 layered nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Takai, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Hajime; Lerner, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Electronic structures near the Fermi level of polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 layered nanocomposites have been studied by tunnelling spectroscopy. Polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 layered nanocomposites were synthesized by using the exfoliation-adsorption technique. Single crystals of 1T-TaS 2 were used as host materials. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with different molecular weights were adopted as guest intercalants. Powder x-ray diffraction patterns showed that all samples of the polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 layered nanocomposites contain organic polymer between all individual 1T-TaS 2 sheets. Although 1T-TaS 2 single crystal is well known to show quite unique temperature dependences of the resistivity due to the charge density wave (CDW), the resistivities of all polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 nanocomposites showed semiconductor-like temperature dependences. The tunnelling spectra of polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 nanocomposites revealed that the CDW gap disappears in the density of states near the Fermi level of polymer/1T-Li x TaS 2 nanocomposites and their electronic structures show a metallic behaviour

  20. Study on the snow drifting modelling criteria in boundary layer wind tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta BĂETU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study on modelling the wind drifting of the snow deposited on the flat roofs of buildings in wind tunnel. The physical model of snow drifting in wind tunnel simulating the urban exposure to wind action is not frequently reported in literature, but is justified by the serious damages under accidental important snow falls combined with strong wind actions on the roofs of various buildings. A uniform layer of snow deposited on the flat roof was exposed to wind action in order to obtain the drifting. The parameters involved in the modelling at reduced scale, with particles of glass beads, of the phenomenon of transportation of the snow from the roof were analysed, particularly the roughness length and the friction wind speed. A numerical simulation in ANSYS CFX program was developed in parallel, by which a more accurate visualization of the particularities of the wind flow over the roof was possible, in the specific areas where the phenomenon of snow transportation was more susceptible to occur. Modified roughness length and friction wind speed were determined through methods used in the literature, an attempt being made in this work to analyse the factors that influence their values.

  1. Wind tunnel study of natural ventilation of building integrated photovoltaics double skin façade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudişteanu, Sebastian Valeriu; Popovici, Cătălin George; Cherecheş, Nelu-Cristian

    2018-02-01

    The paper presents a wind tunnel experimental analysis of a small-scale building model (1:30). The objective of the study is to determine the wind influence on the ventilation of a double skin façade channel (DSF) and the cooling effect over integrated photovoltaic panels. The tests were achieved by conceiving and implementation of an experimental program using a wind tunnel with atmospheric boundary layer. The effect of the wind over the ventilation of the horizontal channels of double skin façades is evaluated for different incident velocities. The results are generalized for the average steady state values of the velocities analysed. The experimental results put in evidence the correlation between the reference wind velocity and the dynamics of the air movement inside the double skin façade. These values are used to determine the convective heat transfer and the cooling effect of the air streams inside the channel upon the integrated photovoltaic panels. The decrease of the photovoltaic panels temperature determines a raise of 11% in efficiency and power generated.

  2. Wind tunnel study of natural ventilation of building integrated photovoltaics double skin façade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudişteanu Sebastian Valeriu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a wind tunnel experimental analysis of a small-scale building model (1:30. The objective of the study is to determine the wind influence on the ventilation of a double skin façade channel (DSF and the cooling effect over integrated photovoltaic panels. The tests were achieved by conceiving and implementation of an experimental program using a wind tunnel with atmospheric boundary layer. The effect of the wind over the ventilation of the horizontal channels of double skin façades is evaluated for different incident velocities. The results are generalized for the average steady state values of the velocities analysed. The experimental results put in evidence the correlation between the reference wind velocity and the dynamics of the air movement inside the double skin façade. These values are used to determine the convective heat transfer and the cooling effect of the air streams inside the channel upon the integrated photovoltaic panels. The decrease of the photovoltaic panels temperature determines a raise of 11% in efficiency and power generated.

  3. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Wind Tunnel Design Studies and Technical Evaluation of Advanced Cargo Aircraft Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    In support of aerodynamic studies relating to the design and performance prediction of the National Transonic Facility, the following main tasks were accomplished: (1) estimation of aerodynamic losses of the tunnel circuits, (2) refinement of the high-speed diffuser loss prediction method utilizing experimental data generated for the purpose; (3) model studies of flow in the second-turn and measurements of the fan inlet distortion and overall pressure loss; (4) development of a shortened fan nacelle configuration of improved aerodynamic performance; and (5) evolution through model studies of an efficient rapid-diffuser system as the key to a circuit-modification proposal to reduce volume and minimize liquid-nitrogen consumption, at the same time saving on the shell cost.

  5. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation......This manuscript discusses basic methodological aspects of optical microscopy and micromanipulation methods to study membranes and reviews methods to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In particular, we focus on the use of fluorescence microscopy and micropipette manipulation techniques...

  6. Transmission-line resonators for the study of individual two-level tunneling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Jan David; Bilmes, Alexander; Weiss, Georg; Ustinov, Alexey V.; Lisenfeld, Jürgen

    2017-09-01

    Parasitic two-level tunneling systems (TLS) emerge in amorphous dielectrics and constitute a serious nuisance for various microfabricated devices, where they act as a source of noise and decoherence. Here, we demonstrate a new test bed for the study of TLS in various materials which provides access to properties of individual TLS as well as their ensemble response. We terminate a superconducting transmission-line resonator with a capacitor that hosts TLS in its dielectric. By tuning TLS via applied mechanical strain, we observe the signatures of individual TLS strongly coupled to the resonator in its transmission characteristics and extract the coupling components of their dipole moments and energy relaxation rates. The strong and well-defined coupling to the TLS bath results in pronounced resonator frequency fluctuations and excess phase noise, through which we can study TLS ensemble effects such as spectral diffusion, and probe theoretical models of TLS interactions.

  7. A theoretical study on tunneling based biosensor having a redox-active monolayer using physics based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Yeon; Lee, Won Cheol; Yun, Jun Yeon; Lee, Youngeun; Choi, Seoungwook; Jin, Seonghoon; Park, Young June

    2018-01-01

    We developed a numerical simulator to model the operation of a tunneling based biosensor which has a redox-active monolayer. The simulator takes a realistic device structure as a simulation domain, and it employs the drift-diffusion equation for ion transport, the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for electron tunneling, and the Ramo-Shockley theorem for accurate calculation of non-faradaic current. We also accounted for the buffer reaction and the immobilized peptide layer. For efficient transient simulation, the implicit time integration scheme is employed where the solution at each time step is obtained from the coupled Newton-Raphson method. As an application, we studied the operation of a recently fabricated reference-electrode free biosensor in various bias conditions and confirmed the effect of buffer reaction and the current flowing mechanism. Using the simulator, we also found a strategy to maximize the sensitivity of the tunneling based sensor.

  8. An atomic force microscopy study of the interactions between indolicidin and supported planar bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askou, Hans Jakob; Jakobsen, Rasmus Neergaard; Fojan, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Indolicidin, a tryptophane-rich antimicrobial peptide , was used to investigate the interactions with a zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine as a model membrane system. In situ atomic force microscopy in liquid medium and phosphatidylcholine supported planar bilayers enabled the study...

  9. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    simulation data showed the formation of single and vortex states depending on the thickness of nanomagnets. Keywords. Magnetic nanostructures; micromagnetic simulations; magnetic force microscopy; magnetization reversal; magnetic domains. 1. Introduction. The study of small magnetic features and nanostructures.

  10. Raman and fluorescence microscopy to study the internalization and dissolution of photosensitizer nanoparticles into living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Steiner, Rudolf; Wittig, Rainer; Graefe, Susanna; Ryabova, Anastasia; Loschenov, Victor

    2015-07-01

    In this present study we applied Raman and fluorescence microscopy to investigate the internalisation, cellular distribution and effects on cell metabolism of photosensitizer nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy in fibroblasts and macrophages.

  11. Correlating nerve conduction studies and clinical outcome measures on carpal tunnel syndrome: lessons from a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, Hans M.; Gerritsen, Annette A. M.; Strijers, Rob L. M.; Uitdehaag, Bernard M. J.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2005-01-01

    The reported relationships between nerve conduction studies (NCS) and outcome measures in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are weak to moderate. However, selection of patients may have confounded nonrandomized studies. NCS have potentially great value in selecting patients for a specific treatment and

  12. Analysis of incomplete excisions of basal-cell carcinomas after breadloaf microscopy compared with 3D-microscopy: a prospective randomized and blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Alexandra; Adam, Patrick; Schnabl, Saskia; Häfner, Hans-Martin; Breuninger, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Basal-cell carcinomas may show irregular, asymmetric subclinical growth. This study analyzed the efficacy of 'breadloaf' microscopy (serial sectioning) and three-dimensional (3D) microscopy in detecting positive tumor margins. Two hundred eighty-three (283) tumors (51.2%) were put into the breadloaf microscopy group; 270 tumors (48.8%) into the 3D microscopy group. The position of any detected tumor outgrowths was identified in clock face fashion. The time required for cutting and embedding the specimens and the examination of the microscopic slides was measured. Patient/tumor characteristics and surgical margins did not differ significantly. Tumor outgrowths at the excision margin were found in 62 of 283 cases (21.9%) in the breadloaf microscopy group and in 115 of 270 cases (42.6%) in the 3D microscopy group, constituting a highly significant difference (p < 0.001). This difference held true with incomplete excision of fibrosing (infiltrative/sclerosing/morpheaform) tumors [32.9% in the breadloaf microscopy group and 57.5% in the 3D microscopy group (p = 0.003)] and also with solid (nodular) tumors [16.1 and 34.2%, respectively (p < 0.001)]. The mean overall examination time required showed no important difference. In summary, for detection of tumor outgrowths, 3D microscopy has almost twice the sensitivity of breadloaf microscopy, particularly in the situation of aggressive/infiltrative carcinomas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Band structure of Heusler compounds studied by photoemission and tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelo Jorge, Elena

    2011-07-01

    Heusler compounds are key materials for spintronic applications. They have attracted a lot of interest due to their half-metallic properties predicted by band structure calculations. The aim of this work is to evaluate experimentally the validity of the predictions of half metallicity by band structure calculations for two specific Heusler compounds, Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa. Two different spectroscopy methods for the analysis of the electronic properties were used: Angular Resolved Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARUPS) and Tunneling Spectroscopy. Heusler compounds are prepared as thin films by RF-sputtering in an ultra high vacuum system. For the characterization of the samples, bulk and surface crystallographic and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa are studied. X-ray and electron diffraction reveal a bulk and surface crossover between two different types of sublattice order (from B2 to L2{sub 1}) with increasing annealing temperature. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism results show that the magnetic properties in the surface and bulk are identical, although the magnetic moments obtained are 5 % below from the theoretically predicted. By ARUPS evidence for the validity of the predicted total bulk density of states (DOS) was demonstrated for both Heusler compounds. Additional ARUPS intensity contributions close to the Fermi energy indicates the presence of a specific surface DOS. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the crystallographic order, controlled by annealing, plays an important role on broadening effects of DOS features. Improving order resulted in better defined ARUPS features. Tunneling magnetoresistance measurements of Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} and Co{sub 2}MnGa based MTJ's result in a Co{sub 2}FeAl{sub 0.3}Si{sub 0.7} spin polarization of 44 %, which is the highest experimentally obtained value for this compound, although it is lower than the 100 % predicted. For Co

  14. Spin-resolved tunneling studies of the exchange field in EuS/Al bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y M; Stadler, S; Adams, P W; Catelani, G

    2011-06-17

    We use spin-resolved electron tunneling to study the exchange field in the Al component of EuS/Al bilayers, in both the superconducting and normal-state phases of the Al. Contrary to expectation, we show that the exchange field H(ex) is a nonlinear function of applied field, even in applied fields that are well beyond the EuS coercive field. Furthermore, the magnitude H(ex) is unaffected by the superconducting phase. In addition, H(ex) decreases significantly with increasing temperature in the temperature range of 0.1-1 K. We discuss these results in the context of recent theories of generalized spin-dependent boundary conditions at a superconductor-ferromagnet interface.

  15. Preliminary studies on the Marcoule site, using a wind-tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassany, J.Ph.; Salaun-Penquer, G.

    1961-01-01

    The tests were carried out in the 3.30 x 2.20 subsonic elliptical wind-tunnel of the Marseille Institute of fluid mechanics, on a 1/1000 scale model measuring 3 m x 3 m. The aerodynamic field developing above the site, made visible by ammonium, hydro-chlorate fumes, and the residues were observed and filmed by means of a synchronised cine-camera with stroboscopic lighting for 4 wind directions. The fall-out from the various waste products was obtained from a spraying of lead acetate solution on the model and hydrogen sulphide emissions. The zones of maximum pollution can be determined from a study of the film taken during the blackening of the spots. (author) [fr

  16. Atomic structure of the indium-induced Ge(001)(¤n¤x4) surface reconstruction determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and ¤ab initio¤ calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkenberg, G.; Bunk, O.; Johnson, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    . Sci. 123/124, 104 (1998) for In on Si(001). For the (4x4) subunit, we propose a model that includes the main features of the (3x4) subunit together with additional mixed Ge-In dimers. The atomic positions were optimized using ab initio total-energy calculations. The calculated local densities......Using scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles total-energy calculations, we have determined the atomic geometry of the superstructures formed by the adsorption of up to 0.5 monolayer of indium on Ge(001) and annealing at temperatures above 200 degreesC. A strong interaction between...... indium adatoms and the germanium substrate atoms leads to the formation of two different In-Ge subunits on the Ge(001) surface. In the subsaturation regime separate (nx4) subunits are observed where n can be either 3 or 4 and the STM images resemble those of the Si(001)-(3x4)-In and -Al reconstructions...

  17. Self-assemblies of meso-tetraphenylporphine ligand on surfaces of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and single-walled carbon nanotubes: insights from scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiouk, Maria; Alvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2011-06-01

    The self-assembly of porphyrins into highly organized functional arrays supported on appropriate solid substrates is an area of research with multiple potential applications in the "bottom-up" approach to manufacturing. In order to analyze the self-assembly of meso-tetraphenylporphine (H2TPP) on the surfaces of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), we performed molecular mechanics modeling (by MM+ force field) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging. Molecular modeling predicted an energetic preference of the H2TPP molecules to adsorb in monolayers on the surfaces of graphite and SWNT sidewall, rather than their stacking or separation. On graphite, the most favorable arrays were predicted to be ribbons composed of interacting parallel chains of H2TPP molecules. On the SWNT sidewall, the energetic preference pointed toward the formation of parallel and interacting long-period helixes, resulting in an almost full coverage of the SWNT surface. These preferable arrays on both carbon materials assure the interaction of every porphyrin unit with as many neighbors as possible, thus lowering the potential energy of the adsorption complexes. STM imaging results are in good agreement with molecular modeling predictions. The formation of self-assembled ribbons was a frequently observed phenomenon on the HOPG surface, while on the SWNT surface a full coverage of the exposed portion of the sidewalls was observed, suggesting the formation of interacting long-period helixes. A preferential adsorption of H2TPP molecules near graphite topographic defects was also observed.

  18. Effectiveness of PELOID therapy in carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized controlled single blind study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Ökmen, Burcu; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha; Güneş, Aygül; Eröksüz, Riza; Altan, Lale

    2017-08-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome(CTS) is the most common neuromuscular cause of upper extremity disability. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of peloid therapy in patients with CTS. This randomized, controlled, single-blind study enrolled 70 patients between the ages of 30 to 65 who had a diagnosis of either mild, mild-to-moderate, or moderate CTS. The patients were randomized into two groups using random number table. In the first group, (Group 1)( n = 35), patients were given splint (every night for 6 weeks) + peloid treatment(five consecutive days a week for 2 weeks) and in the second group, (Group 2)( n = 28), patients received splint treatment(every night for 6 weeks) alone. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale(VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography(ENMG), the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire(BCTSQ), hand grip strength(HGS), finger grip strength(FGS), and Short Form-12(SF-12). The data were obtained before treatment(W0), immediately after treatment(W2), and one month after treatment(W6). Both in Group 1 and 2, there was a statistically significant improvement in all the evaluation parameters at W2 and W6 when compared to W0( p < 0.05). Comparison of the groups with each other revealed significantly better results for VAS, BCTSQ, mSNCV, SF-12 in Group 1 than in Group 2 at W2( p < 0.05). There was also a statistically significant difference in favor of Group 1 for VAS, BCTSQ, FGS and MCS at W6 when compared to W0 ( p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrated that in patients with CTS; peloid + splint treatment was more effective than splint treatment alone in pain, functionality and life quality both at after treatment(W2) and one month after treatment (W6). We may suggest peloid as a supplementary therapeutic agent in CTS.

  19. A study of interpolation method in diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The low correlation between the patients′ signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS and results of electrodiagnostic tests makes the diagnosis challenging in mild cases. Interpolation is a mathematical method for finding median nerve conduction velocity (NCV exactly at carpal tunnel site. Therefore, it may be helpful in diagnosis of CTS in patients with equivocal test results. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate interpolation method as a CTS diagnostic test. Settings and Design: Patients with two or more clinical symptoms and signs of CTS in a median nerve territory with 3.5 ms ≤ distal median sensory latency <4.6 ms from those who came to our electrodiagnostic clinics and also, age matched healthy control subjects were recruited in the study. Materials and Methods: Median compound motor action potential and median sensory nerve action potential latencies were measured by a MEDLEC SYNERGY VIASIS electromyography and conduction velocities were calculated by both routine method and interpolation technique. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square and Student′s t-test were used for comparing group differences. Cut-off points were calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A sensitivity of 88%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 70.8% and 84.7% were obtained for median motor NCV and a sensitivity of 98.3%, specificity of 91.7%, PPV and NPV of 91.9% and 98.2% were obtained for median sensory NCV with interpolation technique. Conclusions: Median motor interpolation method is a good technique, but it has less sensitivity and specificity than median sensory interpolation method.

  20. Atom probe field ion microscopy and related topics: A bibliography 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.K.; Hawkins, A.R.; Russell, K.F.

    1990-12-01

    This bibliography includes references related to the following topics: atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM), field ion spectroscopy (FIM), field emission microscopy (FEM), liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and theory. Technique-orientated studies and applications are included. This bibliography covers the period 1989. The references contained in this document were compiled from a variety of sources including computer searches and personal lists of publications.

  1. Water Tunnel Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s High-Pressure Water Tunnel Facility in Pittsburgh, PA, re-creates the conditions found 3,000 meters beneath the ocean’s surface, allowing scientists to study...

  2. Single Electron Tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  3. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  4. Liquid phase epitaxy of abrupt junctions in InAs and studies of injection radiative tunneling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    The p-n junction in a InAs crystal, by liquid phase epitaxy is obtained. The processes of injection and tunneling radiative recombination by emitted radiation from active region of p-n junction for low injection current are studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Hydrogen bond nature of ferroelectric material studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Electric dipole moment and proton tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Yukio; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Mochida, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bond nature of MeHPLN and BrHPLN is studied using x-ray and neutron diffraction technique. We found that electric dipole moment of hydrogen atom plays an important role for the phase transition, and proton tunneling model is confirmed on this isolated hydrogen bond system. (author)

  6. Fuel use and metabolic response to endurance exercise : a wind tunnel study of a long-distance migrant shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Jenni, Lukas; Kvist, Anders; Lindström, Åke; Piersma, Theunis; Visser, G. Henk

    This study examines fuel use and metabolism in a group of long-distance migrating birds, red knots Calidris canutus (Scolopacidae), flying under controlled conditions in a wind tunnel for up to 10 h. Data are compared with values for resting birds fasting for the same time. Plasma levels of free

  7. Study on the traffic air pollution inside and outside a road tunnel in Shanghai, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    Full Text Available To investigate the vehicle induced air pollution situations both inside and outside the tunnel, the field measurement of the pollutants concentrations and its diurnal variations was performed inside and outside the Xiangyin tunnel in Shanghai from 13:00 on April 24th to 13:00 on April 25th, 2013. The highest hourly average concentrations of pollutants were quantified that CO, NO, NO2 and NOX inside the tunnel were 13.223 mg/m3, 1.829 mg/m3, 0.291 mg/m3 and 3.029 mg/m3, respectively, while the lowest ones were 3.086 mg/m3, 0.344 mg/m3, 0.080 mg/m3 and 0.619 mg/m3. Moreover, the concentrations of pollutants were higher during the daytime, and lower at night, which is relevant to the traffic conditions inside the tunnel. Pollutants concentrations inside the tunnel were much higher than those outside the tunnel. Then in a case of slow wind, the effect of wind is much smaller than the impact of pollution sources. Additionally, the PM2.5 concentrations climbed to the peak sharply (468.45 µg/m3 during the morning rush hours. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in PM2.5 inside the tunnel were 37.09-99.06 µg/m3 and 22.69-137.99 µg/m3, respectively. Besides, the OC/EC ratio ranged from 0.72 to 2.19 with an average value of 1.34. Compared with the results of other tunnel experiments in Guangzhou and Shenzhen, China, it could be inferred that the proportion of HDVs through the Xiangyin tunnel is relatively lower.

  8. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1, J.Wesley-Smith2, T. Bush1 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope Unit, University of Kwa... pulp using atomic force microscopy (AFM) have reported increased cellulose fibril aggregation during processing, and a concomitant decrease in surface area available for chemical reaction1,2. These findings were subsequently confirmed...

  9. The scanning probe microscopy study of thin polymer films

    CERN Document Server

    Harron, H R

    1995-01-01

    spherulites fibrils was influenced by the chemical nature of the solvent Results reported here confirm that the fibril structure and spherulite size was significantly affected by the chemical nature of the plasticizing solvent. Detailed observations of the spherulites are included herein. A tapping mode AFM was used in conjunction with the usual contact mode AFM to image the fine spherulitic lamellae structure. It was found that the AFM operated in the tapping mode was less destructive than when operated in the contact mode and gave higher resolution images of the lamellae structure. The lamellae were found to be structurally very similar to the features observed in the study using STM indicating that under certain circumstances, the STM was less destructive over the 'insulating' polymer than the contact mode AFM. technique. Furthermore, images of the crystalline film contained elongated units that were attributed to the lamellae formations that form the basic building blocks of polymer spherulites. The study...

  10. The endolymphatic sac: a scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, Klaus; Bretlau, Poul

    2002-01-01

    A recent investigation has suggested that the chief cells of the endolymphatic sac produce an endogenous inhibitor of sodium resorption in the kidneys, tentatively named saccin. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the endolymphatic sac and in particular the chief cells are described...... to demonstrate that this organ fulfils the morphological criteria of a potential endocrine gland. Accordingly, the chief cells are shown to exhibit all the organelles and characteristics of cells that simultaneously synthesize, secrete, absorb and digest proteins....

  11. Tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansmire, W.H.; Munzer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The current status of tunneling progress on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is presented in this paper. The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a key part of the YMP, has been long in development and construction is ongoing. This is a progress report on the tunneling aspects of the ESF as of January 1, 1996. For purposes of discussion in this summary, the tunneling has progressed in four general phases. The paper describes: tunneling in jointed rock under low stress; tunneling through the Bow Ridge Fault and soft rock; tunneling through the Imbricate Fault Zone; and Tunneling into the candidate repository formation

  12. Electron microscopy studies of activation mechanisms in hydrotreating catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl-Petersen, Christian

    sites are easily accessible for the reaction species. It is found that a crystallographic relationship is present between the MoO2 and MoS2 and that a topotactic conversion from the oxidic to the sulfuric phase enables orientational control. In addition, density functional theory studies shows...... that the topotactic growth is surface dependent and controlled by oxygen to sulfur exchange reactions and surface reconstruction which enable the formulation of an atomic growth mechanism and captures the observations made by in situ TEM. The effect of the reaction conditions on the growth mechanism for MoS2 from Mo...

  13. Case Study on Influence of Step Blast-Excavation on Support Systems of Existing Service Tunnel with Small Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorui Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the construction of newly built tunnel (NBT adjacent to the existing service tunnel (EST, stability of the EST with small interval is affected by vibration waves which are caused by blasting load. The support structures of the EST will be cracked and damaged, while the unreasonable blast-excavation methods are adopted. Presently, the studies on behavior of support structure in the EST under blasting load are not totally clear, especially for the bolts system. Besides, the responses of support structure on blasting load are lacking comprehensive research. In this paper, New Zuofang tunnel is taken as a study case to study the influence of step blast-excavation in NBT on support structures of the EST through field experiment and numerical simulation. Some data, such as blasting vibration velocity (BVV and frequency of support structures, are obtained through field measurement. Based on these data, the formula of BVVs is obtained. Research on stability of tunnel support structures affected by step blast-excavation is conducted using numerical simulation method. The dynamic-plastic constitutive model is adopted in the software ABAQUS to assess safety of support structures. The range and degree of damage for the support structures are obtained. In addition, change laws of axial force and stress with time for the bolts are analyzed.

  14. Simulation study of secondary electron images in scanning ion microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, K

    2003-01-01

    The target atomic number, Z sub 2 , dependence of secondary electron yield is simulated by applying a Monte Carlo code for 17 species of metals bombarded by Ga ions and electrons in order to study the contrast difference between scanning ion microscopes (SIM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In addition to the remarkable reversal of the Z sub 2 dependence between the Ga ion and electron bombardment, a fine structure, which is correlated to the density of the conduction band electrons in the metal, is calculated for both. The brightness changes of the secondary electron images in SIM and SEM are simulated using Au and Al surfaces adjacent to each other. The results indicate that the image contrast in SIM is much more sensitive to the material species and is clearer than that for SEM. The origin of the difference between SIM and SEM comes from the difference in the lateral distribution of secondary electrons excited within the escape depth.

  15. Destructive quantum interference in spin tunneling problems

    OpenAIRE

    von Delft, Jan; Henley, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    In some spin tunneling problems, there are several different but symmetry-related tunneling paths that connect the same initial and final configurations. The topological phase factors of the corresponding tunneling amplitudes can lead to destructive interference between the different paths, so that the total tunneling amplitude is zero. In the study of tunneling between different ground state configurations of the Kagom\\'{e}-lattice quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, this occurs when the spi...

  16. Thin Section Microscopy Applied to the Study of Archaeological Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riederer, J.

    2004-01-01

    For the characterization of archaeological ceramics, the study of thin sections under the polarizing microscope is a very efficient analytical technique. There are two properties of ceramics which can be analysed by thin sections, namely the mineralogical composition and the fabric. Both features show a considerable variety which permits a very detailed description of ceramic wares. With respect to the mineralogical composition, there is a wide variety of rock forming minerals, of heavy and ore minerals, fragments of stone, fossils, organic inclusions like straw or pieces of charcoal as well as artificial inclusions like slag or crushed pottery, which define with the temper of the pottery in much detail. The fabric also shows considerable differences in grain size, in the amount of temper, in the orientation of grains and other features, which provide further quantitative data on the properties of archaeological ceramics. From this information, the material can be well characterised, and conclusions as to the region of origin and the potter's techniques can often be drawn.

  17. Studying of a Tunneling Accelerometer with Piezoelectric Actuation and Fuzzy Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadali Tahmasebi Moradi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This report demonstrates the design of closed-loop micro accelerometer sensor. Proposed sensor consists of a polysilicon cantilever micro beam as a proof mass and uses the extreme sensitivity of electron tunneling to variations in electrode separation as sensing element of the sensor. The model uses piezoelectric forces as an actuating element to control the separation between the tunneling electrodes with a low voltage due to large piezoelectric constant. In order to have a proper response time a Fuzzy controller is considered which can be very useful, fast, and reliable. The inputs for the mentioned controller are tunneling current error, gradient of the tunneling current and the summation of errors. And the output is the piezoelectric voltage. Due to the simulation and its results, it is seen that the proposed micro accelerometer have high linearity and dynamic range and also have good respond to the step and sinusoidal acceleration.

  18. New Technology and Experimental Study on Snow-Melting Heated Pavement System in Tunnel Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid growth of economy and sharp rise of motor vehicles in China, the pavement skid resistance in tunnel portals has become increasingly important in cold region. However, the deicing salt, snow removal with machine, and other antiskid measures adopted by highway maintenance division have many limitations. To improve the treatment effect, we proposed a new snow-melting approach employing electric heat tracing, in which heating cables are installed in the structural layer of road. Through the field experiment, laboratory experiment, and numerical investigation, structure type, heating power, and preheating time of the flexible pavement heating system in tunnel portal were systematically analyzed, and advantages of electric heat tracing technology in improving the pavement skid resistance in tunnel portal were also presented. Therefore, such new technology, which offers new snow-melting methods for tunnel portal, bridge, mountainous area, and large longitudinal slope in cold region, has promising prospect for extensive application.

  19. Recognition tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  20. Recognition tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He Jin; Zhang Peiming; Chang Shuai; Huang Shuo [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Sankey, Otto [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 1862 53, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-02

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. (topical review)

  1. [Anatomical study on the femoral tunnel anatomy reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi-Long; Cai, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Jiang, Gang-Yi; Qian, Yue-Nan; Zhao, Zhang-Wei; Yang, Guo-Jing

    2013-09-01

    To measure anatomical data of the femoral tunnel anatomy reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), so provide anatomical basis for clinical anatomy reconstruction of ACL. There were 30 adults' cadaveric knee specimens. The ACL femoral tunnel was reconstructed through anterior medial approach (AMP) in genuflex position of 120 degree, and was marked by Kirschner. The soft tissue of the specimen was removed and the femoral condyle was split at the middle side. The index including length of the femoral tunnel, the distance from internal opening of tunnel to cortical edge of femoral condyle and vertical distance to the top of femoral intercondylar notch were measured. Then the time position of internal opening of tunnel in the intercondylar notch was recorded, and the location of outside opening of tunnel to the femoral condyle was detected. The mean length of the femoral tunnel was (36.35 +/- 3.14) mm (ranged, 30.65 to 42.35 mm). The distance from internal opening of tunnel to cortical edge of femoral condyle was (17.84 +/- 3.35) mm (ranged, 14.02 to 23.49 mm), vertical distance to the top of femoral intercondylar notch was (14.05 +/- 2.32) mm (ranged, 9.17 to 20.08 mm). According to the way of circular dial,internal opening of tunnel located at 02:30 +/- 00:10 (ranged, 01:50 to 02:50) in the left knee,and 09:30 +/- 0:15 (ranged, 08:30 to 10:40) in the right knee. The outside opening of femoral tunnel located at (3.16 +/- 2.51) mm (ranged, 1.61 to 6.30 mm) to the proximal end of external epicondyle of femur, and (4.25 +/- 2.16) mm (ranged, 1.73 to 8.52 mm) to the posterior of external epicondyle of femur. The anatomical features of femoral tunnel for reconstruction of ACL is revealed,which will provide anatomical basis for clinical practice.

  2. Study on Hot Gases Flow in Case of Fire in a Road Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Król

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of hot smoke tests, which were conducted in a real road tunnel. The tunnel is located within the expressway S69 in southern Poland between cities Żywiec and Zwardoń. Its common name is Laliki tunnel. It is a bidirectional non-urban tunnel. The length of the tunnel is 678 m and it is inclined by 4%. It is equipped with the longitudinal ventilation system. Two hot smoke tests have been carried out according to Australian Standard AS 4391-1999. Hot smoke tests corresponded to a Heat Release Rate (HRR equal to respectively 750 kW and 1500 kW. The fire source was located in the middle of the road lane imitating an initial phase of a car fire (respectively 150 m and 265 m from S portal. The temperature distribution was recorded during both tests using a set of fourteen thermocouples that were mounted at two stand poles located at the main axis of the tunnel on windward. The stand poles were placed at distances of 5 m and 10 m. The recorded data were applied to validate a numerical model, which was built and solved using Ansys Fluent. The calculated temperature distribution matched the measured values.

  3. Prediction Study of Tunnel Collapse Risk in Advance based on Efficacy Coefficient Method and Geological Forecast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIU Daohong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Collapse is one of the most common accidents in underground constructions. Risk evaluation is the method of measuring the risk of chamber collapse. To ensure the safety of construction, a risk evaluation model of tunnel collapse based on an efficacy coefficient method and geological prediction was put forward. Based on the comprehensive analysis of collapse factors, five main factors including rock uniaxial compressive strength, surrounding rock integrated coefficient, state of discontinuous structural planes, the angle between tunnel axis and major structural plane and underground water were chosen as the risk evaluation indices of tunnel collapse. The evaluation indices were quantitatively described by using TSP203 system and core-drilling to establish the risk early warning model of tunnel collapse based on the basic principle of the efficacy coefficient method. The model established in this research was applied in the collapse risk recognition of Kiaochow Bay subsea tunnel in Qingdao, China. The results showed that the collapse risk recognition method presents higher prediction accuracy and provided a new idea for the risk prediction of tunnel collapse.

  4. Quantum tunneling with friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  5. Single-Incision Carpal Tunnel Release and Distal Radius Open Reduction and Internal Fixation: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Michael P; Sessions, Blane A; Dudoussat, Bryan S; Kane, Patrick M

    2016-08-01

    The safety of surgical approaches for single- versus double-incision carpal tunnel release in association with distal radius open reduction and internal fixation remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to identify critical structures to determine if a single-incision extension of the standard flexor carpi radialis (FCR) approach can be performed safely. Nine cadaveric arms with were dissected under loupe magnification, utilizing a standard FCR approach. After the distal radius exposure was complete, the distal portion of the FCR incision was extended to allow release of the carpal tunnel. Dissection of critical structures was performed, including the recurrent thenar motor branch of the median nerve, the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBm), the palmar carpal and superficial palmar branches of the radial artery, and proximally the median nerve proper. The anatomic relationship of these structures relative to the surgical approach was recorded. Extension of the standard FCR approach as described in this study did not damage any critical structure in the specimens dissected. The PCBm was noted to arise from the radial side of the median nerve an average of 6.01cm proximal to the proximal edge of the transverse carpal ligament. The PCBm became enveloped in the layers of the antebrachial fascia and the transverse carpal ligament at the incision site, protecting it from injury. The recurrent motor branch of the median nerve, branches of the radial artery and the median nerve proper were not at risk during extension of the FCR approach to release the carpal tunnel. Extension of the standard FCR approach to include carpal tunnel release can be performed with minimal risk to the underlying structures. This exposure may offer benefits in both visualization and extent of carpal tunnel release.

  6. Cotranslational Protein Folding inside the Ribosome Exit Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola B. Nilsson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At what point during translation do proteins fold? It is well established that proteins can fold cotranslationally outside the ribosome exit tunnel, whereas studies of folding inside the exit tunnel have so far detected only the formation of helical secondary structure and collapsed or partially structured folding intermediates. Here, using a combination of cotranslational nascent chain force measurements, inter-subunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies on single translating ribosomes, molecular dynamics simulations, and cryoelectron microscopy, we show that a small zinc-finger domain protein can fold deep inside the vestibule of the ribosome exit tunnel. Thus, for small protein domains, the ribosome itself can provide the kind of sheltered folding environment that chaperones provide for larger proteins.

  7. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  8. Exponential size-dependent tunability of strain on the transport behavior in ZnO tunnel junctions: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Chen, W J; Zhang, G H; Zheng, Yue

    2015-10-14

    It is an interesting issue if the transport behavior of a piezoelectric tunnel junction is sensitive to external strain or stress, and it implies a prospect for developing novel mechanical sensors, transducers, piezotronic devices, etc. Many studies paid attention to this issue, yet how the strain and stress tunable transport behavior of a tunnel junction depends on the barrier thickness is still rarely known. Using the first principles calculations, we investigate the size-dependent and strain-tunable transport behavior in the tunnel junctions. It was confirmed that external strain has strong control over the transport properties of ZnO tunnel junctions, with several times amplification of tunnel conductance obtained by strain reversal. More importantly, the conductance amplification by strain reversal exponentially changes with the barrier thickness, indicating the size-dependent strain tunability of the transport behavior. The electrostatic quantities (i.e., built-in field, depolarization field, polarization, interfacial dipoles and potential barrier) and the transport properties of tunnel junctions were comprehensively analyzed to reveal the relationships between these quantities and their size dependence. The exponential size-dependence of strain tunable transport behavior in ZnO tunnel junctions is attributed to the linear change in the potential barrier with the barrier thickness. Our simulations provide an insight of how to maximize the strain tunability of transport behavior of piezoelectric tunnel junctions by thickness design and strain engineering.

  9. Aeroelastic Uncertainty Quantification Studies Using the S4T Wind Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbay, Melike; Heeg, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This paper originates from the joint efforts of an aeroelastic study team in the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel from NATO Science and Technology Organization, with the Task Group number AVT-191, titled "Application of Sensitivity Analysis and Uncertainty Quantification to Military Vehicle Design." We present aeroelastic uncertainty quantification studies using the SemiSpan Supersonic Transport wind tunnel model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The aeroelastic study team decided treat both structural and aerodynamic input parameters as uncertain and represent them as samples drawn from statistical distributions, propagating them through aeroelastic analysis frameworks. Uncertainty quantification processes require many function evaluations to asses the impact of variations in numerous parameters on the vehicle characteristics, rapidly increasing the computational time requirement relative to that required to assess a system deterministically. The increased computational time is particularly prohibitive if high-fidelity analyses are employed. As a remedy, the Istanbul Technical University team employed an Euler solver in an aeroelastic analysis framework, and implemented reduced order modeling with Polynomial Chaos Expansion and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to perform the uncertainty propagation. The NASA team chose to reduce the prohibitive computational time by employing linear solution processes. The NASA team also focused on determining input sample distributions.

  10. Wind tunnel study of a vertical axis wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Vincent; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are in a relatively infant state of development when compared to their cousins the horizontal axis wind turbines. Very few studies have been carried out to characterize the wake flow behind VAWTs, and virtually none to observe the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer. Here we present results from an experiment carried out at the EPFL-WIRE boundary-layer wind tunnel and designed to study the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer flow and a VAWT. Specifically we use stereoscopic particle image velocimetry to observe and quantify the influence of the boundary layer flow on the wake generated by a VAWT, as well as the effect the VAWT has on the boundary layer flow profile downstream. We find that the wake behind the VAWT is strongly asymmetric, due to the varying aerodynamic forces on the blades as they change their position around the rotor. We also find that the wake adds strong turbulence levels to the flow, particularly on the periphery of the wake where vortices and strong velocity gradients are present. The boundary layer is also shown to cause greater momentum to be entrained downwards rather than upwards into the wake.

  11. A prospective study of carpal tunnel syndrome: workplace and individual risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Susan; Deddens, James A; Crombie, Ken; Jin, Yan; Wurzelbacher, Steve; Ramsey, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To quantify the risk for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) from workplace physical factors, particularly hand activity level and forceful exertion, while taking into account individual factors including age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and pre-existing medical conditions. Methods Three healthcare and manufacturing workplaces were selected for inclusion on the basis of range of exposure to hand activity level and forceful exertion represented by their jobs. Each study participants job tasks were observed and evaluated ’ onsite and videotaped for further analysis, including frequency and duration of exertion and postural deviation. Individual health assessment entailed electrodiagnostic testing of median and ulnar nerves, physical examination and questionnaires at baseline with annual follow-up for 2 years. Results The incidence of dominant hand CTS during the study was 5.11 per 100 person-years (29 cases). Adjusted HRs for dominant hand CTS were as follows: working with forceful exertion ≥20% but job strain. Conclusions Workplace and individual risk factors both contribute to the risk for CTS. Time spent in forceful exertion can be a greater risk for CTS than obesity if the job exposure is high. Preventive workplace efforts should target forceful exertions. PMID:23788614

  12. Studies on the transformation of fibrinogen to fibrin. Radiation effects. Observation by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguerie de Rotrou, G.; Hollard, D.; Suscillon, M.; Cuong, M.; Vitry, F. de

    1968-01-01

    The authors used electron microscopy, thrombo-dynamo-graphy and spectrophotometry, to study the damage caused by X rays on the fibrinogen molecule and fibrin-formation process. This process is highly disturbed by increasing doses of irradiation from 0 to 3.10 5 roentgen. Electron microscopy observation shows interesting data on the structure of the plug, formed by irradiated fibrinogen solution. This study also lead the authors to propose a new model of the fibrinogen molecule and a schema explaining observed striations and granular appearance of the fibrin fibers surface. (authors) [fr

  13. Study to optimize a disposal tunnel layout taking into account heterogeneous characteristics of the geological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Yasuhiro; Toida, Masaru; Yanagizawa, Koichi

    2007-01-01

    The geological environment has spatially heterogeneous characteristics with varied host rock types, fractures and so on. In this case the generic disposal tunnel layout, which has been designed by JNC, is not the most suitable for HLW disposal in Japan. The existence of spatially heterogeneous characteristics means that in the repository region there exist sub-regions that are more favorable from the perspective of long-term safety and ones that are less favorable. In order that the spatially heterogeneous environment itself may be utilized most effectively as an NBS, an alternative design of disposal tunnel layout is required. Focusing on the geological environment with spatially heterogeneous characteristics, the authors have developed an alternative design of disposal tunnel layout. The alternative design adopts an optimization approach using a 'variable disposal tunnel layout'. The optimization approach minimizes the number of locations where major water conducting fractures are intersected, and maximizes the number of emplacement locations for waste packages. This paper will outline the variable disposal tunnel layout and its applicability. (author)

  14. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co 50 Fe 50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  15. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  16. Inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy—IV. A study of the formation of formic acid from atmospheric carbon dioxide and water within an Al—Aloxide—Pb tunnelling junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, B. O.; Hart, R.; Lewis, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable confusion exists in the literature regarding the interpretation of peaks in the spectra of aluminium—aluminium oxide—lead tunnelling junctions doped with either water or water vapour. These peaks, which appear in the CH bend and stretch regions, have been variously assigned as trace organic impurities or as formic acid chemically produced within the tunnelling junction by a reaction between atmospheric carbon dioxide and the water dopant. The present work attempts to resolve this ambiguity by producing formic acid tunnelling spectra and comparing these with spectra produced from triply distilled water doped junctions. These spectra, which fingerprint exactly, have been assigned. Potential organic impurities in the water have been investigated by high resolution mass spectroscopy. The tunnelling spectrum of a junction electrode penetration doped with a suspension of calcium oxide in water has been produced and is assigned as calcium carbonate. It is suggested that a reaction takes place between calcium hydroxide and carbon dioxide adsorbed on the surface of the alumina to produce calcium carbonate. It is concluded that formic acid is produced within tunnelling junctions by a reaction between atmospheric carbon dioxide and water on the alumina surface.

  17. Mechanical and thermo-mechanical analyses of the tapered plug for plugging of deposition tunnels. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faelth, Billy (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Gatter, Patrik (Vattenfall Power Consultant AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    This report presents results from a study that was carried out in order to examine the applicability of the tapered plug concept for plugging of deposition tunnels in the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The report presents results from mechanical and thermo-mechanical models of the tapered plug. The models were analyzed with 3DEC. The models included a portion of a deposition tunnel and its intersection with a main tunnel. In the deposition tunnel, a tapered concrete plug was installed. The plug was subjected to the combined load from the swelling backfill material and from pore pressure inside the deposition tunnel. The thermo-mechanical effects due to the heat generation in the spent fuel were also included in the analyses. Generic material parameter values for the concrete were used. The following items were studied: - Stresses and displacements in the plug. - Shear stresses and shear displacements in the rock-concrete interface. - Stress additions in the rock due to the loads. The sensitivity of the results to changes of constitutive models, to changes of the plug geometry and to pore water pressure in the rock-concrete interface was examined. The results indicate that the displacements in the plug will be within reasonable ranges but the stresses may locally be high enough that they exceed acceptable levels. However, they can be reduced by choice of advantageous plug geometry and by having a good rock-concrete bond. The results also show that the stress additions in the rock due to the thermal load may yield stresses that locally exceed the spalling strength of the rock. At most locations, however, the rock stresses will amount at lower levels. It was concluded that, with choice of an appropriate design, the tapered plug seems to be an applicable concept for plugging of deposition tunnels. It was also concluded that further studies of the tapered plug concept should use material properties parameter values for low-pH concrete. Further, they should also

  18. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  19. PIV-based study of the gliding osprey aerodynamics in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Roi; Liberzon, Alex; Kopp, Gregory; Kirchhefer, Adam; Weihs, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    The hunting flight of an osprey consists of periods where the bird glides while foraging for prey. High quality measurements of aerodynamics in this flight mode are needed in order to estimate the daily energy expenditure of the bird accurately. An experimental study of an osprey model in a wind tunnel (BLWTL, UWO) was performed in order to characterize the aerodynamic forces using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The model was a stuffed osprey with mechanical joints allowing control of the the wing (angle of attack, tilt) and tail orientation. Two-dimensional velocity realizations in the streamwise-normal plane were obtained simultaneously in the two fields of view: above the wing and in the wake of the wing. Mean and turbulent flow characteristics are presented as function of angle of attack based on measurements taken at 4 different angles of attack at three different locations over the wingspan. The main outcome is the accurate estimate of the drag from the measurements of momentum thickness in the turbulent boundary layer of the osprey wing. Moreover, the gradient of the momentum thickness method was applied to identify the separation point in the boundary layer. This estimate has been compared to the total drag calculated from measurements in the wake of the wing and with a theoretical prediction.

  20. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Related Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-26

    C/W, and TiC clusters) at the tip apexhas been shown to have a larger effect on the STM image than the chemical composition of the tip (C2). Tsukada...investigated the morphology of thin layers of 2, 3-Fe-naphthalocyanine vapor deposited on amorphous carbon (D286). Regions of disoder as well as arrays of

  1. Cellulose fibril aggregation studies of Eucalyptus dissolving pulps using atomic force microscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chunilall, Viren

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available AGGREGATION STUDIES OF Eucalyptus DISSOLVING PULPS USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY V. Chunilall1,3, J.Wesley-Smith2 and T. Bush1,3 1CSIR, Forestry and Forest Product Research Centre, P.O. Box 17001, Congella, 4013, South Africa. 2Electron Microscope... individual fibrils (cellulose molecules) and these, in turn, form fibril aggregates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has revealed that there is a marked increase in the lateral fibril aggregate dimension (LFAD) during pulping and bleaching1. Furthermore...

  2. Stability of Large Parallel Tunnels Excavated in Weak Rocks: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiuli; Weng, Yonghong; Zhang, Yuting; Xu, Tangjin; Wang, Tuanle; Rao, Zhiwen; Qi, Zufang

    2017-09-01

    Diversion tunnels are important structures for hydropower projects but are always placed in locations with less favorable geological conditions than those in which other structures are placed. Because diversion tunnels are usually large and closely spaced, the rock pillar between adjacent tunnels in weak rocks is affected on both sides, and conventional support measures may not be adequate to achieve the required stability. Thus, appropriate reinforcement support measures are needed, and the design philosophy regarding large parallel tunnels in weak rocks should be updated. This paper reports a recent case in which two large parallel diversion tunnels are excavated. The rock masses are thin- to ultra-thin-layered strata coated with phyllitic films, which significantly decrease the soundness and strength of the strata and weaken the rocks. The behaviors of the surrounding rock masses under original (and conventional) support measures are detailed in terms of rock mass deformation, anchor bolt stress, and the extent of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ), as obtained from safety monitoring and field testing. In situ observed phenomena and their interpretation are also included. The sidewall deformations exhibit significant time-dependent characteristics, and large magnitudes are recorded. The stresses in the anchor bolts are small, but the extents of the EDZs are large. The stability condition under the original support measures is evaluated as poor. To enhance rock mass stability, attempts are made to reinforce support design and improve safety monitoring programs. The main feature of these attempts is the use of prestressed cables that run through the rock pillar between the parallel tunnels. The efficacy of reinforcement support measures is verified by further safety monitoring data and field test results. Numerical analysis is constantly performed during the construction process to provide a useful reference for decision making. The calculated deformations are in

  3. Vesicle Adsorption and Lipid Bilayer Formation on Glass Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönherr, Holger; Johnson, Joseph M.; Lenz, Peter; Frank, Curtis W.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles (30, 50, and 100 nm nominal diameters) and of dye-labeled PC vesicles (labeled with 6% Texas Red fluorophore (TR) and encapsulated carboxy fluorescein (CF)) to glass surfaces was studied by contact mode atomic force microscopy in aqueous buffer.

  4. Spectral analysis in microscopy : a study of FRET and single quantum dot luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederix, Patrick Louis Theodorus Martin

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of new techniques and luminescent markers, to improve the quality of luminescence studies in microscopy. A sensitive spectrograph that can be used for spectrally resolved emission spectroscopy in the microscope is described, including design considerations,

  5. Photolithographic Polymerization of Diacetylene-Containing Phospholipid Bilayers Studied by Multimode Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Schönherr, Holger; Frank, Curtis W.; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Photopolymerization of the diacetylene-containing phospholipid 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (1) in substrate-supported planar lipid bilayers (SPBs) has been studied by using multimode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Monolayers and bilayers of 1 have been transferred onto

  6. Study of the leakage field of magnetic force microscopy thin-film tips using electron holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Lunedei, E.; Matteucci, G.; Rikkers, E.

    1996-01-01

    Electron holography is applied for the study of the leakage field of thin-film ferromagnetic tips used as probes in magnetic force microscopy. We used commercially available pyramidal tips covered o­n o­ne face with a thin NiCo film, which were then placed in a high external magnetic field directed

  7. Studying the Adhesion Force and Glass Transition of Thin Polystyrene Films by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kang, Hua; Qian, Xiaoqin; Guan, Li

    2018-01-01

    microscopy (AFM)-based forcedistance curve to study the relaxation dynamics and the film thickness dependence of glass transition temperature (T-g) for normal thin polystyrene (PS) films supported on silicon substrate. The adhesion force (F-ad) between AFM tip and normal thin PS film surfaces...

  8. Morphology of extruded high-density polyethylene pipes studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trifonova, D.; Drouillon, Philippe; Ghanem, Antoine; Vancso, Gyula J.

    1997-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the structure of extruded polyethylene (PE) pipe. During extrusion, the outer surface of the pipe was cooled with water. Two cross sections, parallel and transverse to the extrusion direction, were examined in order to spatially follow the structural

  9. Aggregation and Breakup of Colloidal Particle Aggregates in Shear Flow, Studied with Video Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolpekin, V.A.; Duits, Michael H.G.; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mellema, J.

    2004-01-01

    We used video microscopy to study the behavior of aggregating suspensions in shear flow. Suspensions consisted of 920 nm diameter silica spheres, dispersed in a methanol/bromoform solvent, to which poly(ethylene glycol) (M = 35.000 g) was added to effect weak particle aggregation. With our solvent

  10. Cold-induced imbibition damage of lettuce embryos: A study using cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, J.; Walther, P.; Hoekstra, F.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of rehydration on a multicellular organism was studied in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) embryos, using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). Naked embryos were sensitive to imbibitional stress, whereas embryos with an intact, thick-walled endosperm were not. Imbibitional injury to

  11. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  12. Results of design studies and wind tunnel tests of an advanced high lift system for an Energy Efficient Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The development of an advanced technology high lift system for an energy efficient transport incorporating a high aspect ratio supercritical wing is described. This development is based on the results of trade studies to select the high lift system, analysis techniques utilized to design the high lift system, and results of a wind tunnel test program. The program included the first experimental low speed, high Reynolds number wind tunnel test for this class of aircraft. The experimental results include the effects on low speed aerodynamic characteristics of various leading and trailing edge devices, nacelles and pylons, aileron, spoilers, and Mach and Reynolds numbers. Results are discussed and compared with the experimental data and the various aerodynamic characteristics are estimated.

  13. Impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy: a new method in the study of conjunctival microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, G L; Del Prete, A; Forte, R; Cafiero, G; Del Prete, S; Marasco, D

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies used impression cytology with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to study the conjunctival surface of bovine eyes and normal human eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use impression cytology and SEM (ICSEM) in patients affected by tear film abnormalities. Forty-five patients were divided into three groups according to mild, moderate or severe subjective sensation of dry eye. Fifteen asymptomatic subjects served as control group. In all patients the tear film was evaluated with break-up time (BUT), Schirmer's, and Ferning test, whereas conjunctival epithelium was evaluated with impression cytology and optic microscopy (ICOM), and ICSEM. The Spearman rank correlation test was used to compare the outcome of these examinations with the subjective sensation of dry eye in each group, and to identify correlations among the five tests. ICSEM findings highly correlated with subjective dry eye sensation (Spearman correlation coefficient, 796; P<0.01). ICSEM revealed incipient epithelial damage (reduction or absence of microvilli) before the appearance of alterations of nucleus and cytoplasm of epithelial cells revealed by optic microscopy. The number of microvilli was correlated with the degree of tear film abnormalities and subjective sensation of dry eye (Spearman correlation coefficient, 796; P<0.01). ICSEM was very effective in detecting the reduction in the number of microvilli. Therefore, it could represent an effective method to detect alterations in the conjunctival epithelium resulting from tear film damage even before the epithelial damage occurs and is detected by optic microscopy.

  14. Tunneling through a time-dependent barrier – a numerical study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    involved in what may be simply the stretching of a chemical bond to destruction. Or, as much to the point, an insulating layer separating two semiconducting layers may be sub- ject to a bias that effects the ease with which electrons can tunnel through it. Except, in the highly rarefied atmosphere prevailing in supersonic jets ...

  15. Wind Tunnel Measurement of Turbulent and Advective Scalar Fluxes: A Case Study on Intersection Ventilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kukačka, Libor; Nosek, Štěpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 381357 (2012), s. 1-13 ISSN 1537-744X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : air pollution * atmospheric boundary layer * wind tunnel modelling * contaminant spreading * street canyon Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012 http://www.tswj.com/2012/381357/

  16. Feasibility study and technical proposal for seismic monitoring of tunnel boring machine in Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saari, J.; Lakio, A.

    2009-01-01

    In Olkiluoto, Posiva Oy has operated a local seismic network since February 2002. The purpose of the microearthquake measurements at Olkiluoto is to improve understanding of the structure, behaviour and long term stability of the bedrock. The studies include both tectonic and excavation-induced microearthquakes. An additional task of monitoring is related to safeguarding of the ONKALO. The possibility to excavate an illegal access to the ONKALO, have been concerned when the safeguards are discussed. Therefore all recorded explosions in the Olkiluoto area and in the ONKALO are located. If a concentration of explosions is observed, the origin of that is found out. Also a concept of hidden illegal explosions, detonated at the same time as the real excavation blasts, has been examined. According to the experience gained in Olkiluoto, it can be concluded that, as long the seismic network is in operation and the results are analysed by a skilled person, it is practically impossible to do illegal excavation by blasts. In this report a possibility of seismic monitoring of illegal excavation done by tunnel boring machine (TBM) has been investigated. Characteristics of the seismic signal generated by the raise boring machine are described. According to this study, it can be concluded that the generated seismic signal can be detected and the source of the signal can be located. However, this task calls for different kind of monitoring system than that, which is currently used for monitoring microearthquakes and explosions. The presented technical proposal for seismic monitoring of TBM in Olkiluoto is capable to detect and locate TBM coming outside the ONKALO area about two months before it would reach the ONKALO. (orig.)

  17. Three dimensional transient electromagnetic model study for fracture prediction from tunnel face; Sanjigen model keisan ni yoru TEM ho no tunnel zenpo tansa eno tekiyosei no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, K.; Tsutsui, T.; Saito, A. [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hara, T. [Toda Corp., Tokyo, (Japan); Zhdanov, M. [University of Utah, UT (United States)

    1996-10-01

    In order to apply TEM model to fracture prediction at tunnel face, 3-D TEM model computation by FEM was conducted by installing a transmission loop on a tunnel face. MT field responses diffusing into the 3-D model were computed by time-domain difference calculus, and analytical precision was improved by introducing a staggered grid method. In the case where a low resistive zone exists before a tunnel face, time variance in diffused eddy current and induction current in the low resistive zone could be obtained. The difference in tunnel-axial transient curve (transient phenomenon curve in magnetic field) between uniform medium and low resistive zone models was based on the absorption process of diffused eddy current into the low resistive zone, and the expanding process of it toward the outside. Change in background condition could be predicted from the background and the ratio of transient curves every measurement. The detection limit of the low resistive zone was dependent on resistivity contrast, distance and geometry. Fluctuation in measurement due to noises and S/N ratio were also essential. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Metropolitan transportation management center : a case study : Boston Central Artery/Tunnel Integrated Project control system : responding to incidents rapidly and effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    The following case study provides a snapshot of the Boston Central Artery/Tunnel Integration Project Control System (IPCS) operations control center. It follows the outline provided in the companion document, Metropolitan Transportation Management Ce...

  19. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  20. Experimental study on tunnel lining joints temporarily strengthened by SMA bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bo; Ou, Yunlong

    2014-01-01

    Shield tunnels have been widely used in city metros all over the world. During the long-term period of the metro operation, the joints of shield tunnel’s neighboring segments may degrade due to some environmental factors, leading to the increasing of the joint opening and some resulting adverse consequences. In this paper, a temporary strengthening method by using shape memory alloy (SMA) bolts is proposed and experimentally studied for the joints of neighboring segments, and a revised electric heating method which suits with the strengthening method is presented and experimentally validated for the SMA bolts. The purpose of the proposed temporary strengthening method is to create favorable conditions for the following permanent strengthening. Test results show that: (a) for the joints of shield tunnel’s neighboring segments, the strengthening method can effectively reduce the joint opening, joint deflection, concrete strain in joint’s compression zone, and strain of joint’s steel bolts; (b) the revised electric heating method can be used to heat the SMA rod to a temperature higher than the SMA’s austenite finish temperature quickly, and the average heating rate related to Type 2 inner resistance element is larger than that related to Type 1 inner resistance element; and (c) the reduction percentages of the joint opening increment, joint deflection, concrete strain in joint’s compression zone, and strain of joint’s steel bolts for Specimen I are all larger than those for Specimen II, implying that the less the joint opening is, the more significant the strengthening effect is. (paper)

  1. A wind tunnel study on the effect of trees on PM2.5 distribution around buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wenjing; Zhao, Bin

    2018-03-15

    Vegetation, especially trees, is effective in reducing the concentration of particulate matter. Trees can efficiently capture particles, improve urban air quality, and may further decrease the introduction of outdoor particles to indoor air. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of trees on particle distribution and removal around buildings using wind tunnel experiments. The wind tunnel is 18m long, 12m wide, and 3.5m high. Trees were modeled using real cypress branches to mimic trees planted around buildings. At the inlet of the wind tunnel, a "line source" of particles was released, simulating air laden with particulate matter. Experiments with the cypress tree and tree-free models were conducted to compare particle concentrations around the buildings. The results indicate that cypress trees clearly reduce PM 2.5 concentrations compared with the tree-free model. The cypress trees enhanced the PM 2.5 removal rate by about 20%. The effects of trees on PM 2.5 removal and distribution vary at different heights. At the base of the trees, their effect on reducing PM 2.5 concentrations is the most significant. At a great height above the treetops, the effect is almost negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of dust re-suspension at low pressure in a dedicated wind-tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Anthony; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Chassefière, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The atmosphere of several telluric planets or satellites are dusty. Such is the case of Earth, Venus, Mars and Titan, each bearing different aeolian processes linked principally to the kinematic viscosity of the near-surface atmosphere. Studies of the Martian atmosphere are particularly relevant for the understanding of the dust re-suspension phenomena at low pressure (7 mbar). It turns out that operation of fusion reactors of the tokamak design produces significant amount of dust through the erosion of plasma-facing components. Such dust is a key issue, both regarding the performance and the safety of a fusion reactor such as ITER, under construction in Cadarache, France. Indeed, to evaluate the explosion risk in the ITER fusion reactor, it is essential to quantify the re-suspended dust fraction as a function of the dust inventory that can be potentially mobilized during a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA), with air or water vapour ingress. A complete accident sequence will encompass dust re-suspension from near-vacuum up to atmospheric pressure. Here, we present experimental results of particles re-suspension fractions measured at 1000, 600 and 300 mbar in the IRSN BISE (BlowIng facility for airborne releaSE) wind tunnel. Both dust monolayer deposits and multilayer deposits were investigated. In order to obtain experimental re-suspension data of dust monolayer deposits, we used an optical microscope allowing to measure the re-suspended particles fraction by size intervals of 1 µm. The deposits were made up of tungsten particles on a tungsten surface (an ubiquitous plasma facing component) and alumina particles on a glass plate, as a surrogate. A comparison of the results with the so-called Rock'nRoll dust re-suspension model (Reeks and Hall, 2001) is presented and discussed. The multilayer deposits were made in a vacuum sedimentation chamber allowing to obtain uniform deposits in terms of thickness. The re-suspension experimental data of such deposits were obtained

  3. [Contribution of confocal microscopy and anterior chamber OCT to the study of corneal endothelial pathologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, N; Labbé, A; Dupont-Monod, S; Dupas, B; Baudouin, C

    2007-04-01

    To describe the appearance of various endothelial diseases with in vivo confocal microscopy and anterior chamber optical coherence tomography (AC OCT). In this study, ten patients with five different corneal endothelial pathologies were evaluated. Three patients had cornea guttata, three had corneal endothelial precipitates, two had irido-corneo-endothelial (ICE) syndrome, one had endothelial folds, and one had breaks in the Descemet membrane. All patients had bilateral ophthalmologic examinations, in vivo confocal microscopy, and AC OCT analysis. In cases of cornea guttata, AC OCT showed a finely embossed line corresponding to the empty intercellular cavities found with in vivo confocal microscopy. Corneal endothelium precipitates had the aspect of round formations suspended with the endothelium. Iris atrophy and irido-corneal synechiae resulting from ICE syndrome were precisely visualized with the AC OCT. High-resolution images of the anterior segment could be obtained using the AC OCT. Associated with in vivo confocal microscopy, these two new imaging techniques provide a precise evaluation of endothelial pathologies.

  4. Study of magnetic metal periodic structures by X-Ray and electron microscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prutskov, G. V.; Chesnokov, Yu. M.; Vasilliev, A. L.; Likhachev, I. A.; Pashaev, E. M.; Subbotin, I. A.

    2017-11-01

    Complex studies of magnetic periodic metallic systems based on Dy/Gd layers have been carried out by X-ray diffraction, resonance X-ray reflectometry, transmission electronic microscopy, and energydispersve microanalysis. The application of these methods and joint analysis of their results provide an effective approach to study of the structure and determination of the parameters of individual layers and interfaces and their structural quality with a high degree of reliability.

  5. Spin tunnelling in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study spin tunnelling in molecular magnets as an instance of a mesoscopic phenomenon, with special emphasis on the molecule Fe8. We show that the tunnel splitting between various pairs of Zeeman levels in this molecule oscillates as a function of applied magnetic field, vanishing completely at special points in the ...

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  7. Pore-Scale Mechanisms of Colloid Interfacial Retention as Studied With Confocal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazouskaya, V.; Jin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    the pore scale was studied for the case of colloids transported in an unsaturated capillary channel. The application of confocal microscopy is not limited to the mentioned pore-scale experiments and represents a subject of the ongoing research.

  8. Performance studies of solar tunnel dryer for drying aonla (Embilica Officinalis) pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seveda, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    A solar tunnel dryer was constructed and evaluated the performance for drying aonla pulp. The dryer consists of a transparent UV stabilized plastic covered solar collector cum drying unit. Evaluation parameters are air temperature, solar insolation, moisture content, relative humidity and airflow rate. A minimum of 111.18 m 2 solar collector area is required to dry a batch 1000 kg aonla pulp in 16 hours (two days drying period). The initial and final moisture content considered were 424.93 and 10.08% dry basis, respectively. It was observed that on an average 43 per cent of higher temperature was obtained in solar tunnel dryer over the ambient temperature. The results obtained during the test period denoted that the maximum gained energy occurred at 13 o'clock hour and then gradually declined since the maximum solar radiation occurred at this time. (author)

  9. Wind tunnel study of helical and straight-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Araya, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    It is hypothesized that blade curvature can serve as a passive means to control fluid entrainment and wake recovery in vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) arrays. We test this experimentally in a wind tunnel using two different VAWT configurations, one with straight blades and another with helical blades, keeping all other experimental parameters fixed. A small-scale, commercially available VAWT (15W max power) is used as the baseline wind tunnel model in each case. The commercial VAWT blades are replaced with either straight or helical blades that are 3D-printed extrusions of the same airfoil cross-section. Results from smoke flow visualization, three-component wake velocity measurements, and turbine power data are presented. These results give insight into the potential use of VAWTs with curved blades in utility-scale wind farms.

  10. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel: Digital image processing, part 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A survey of digital image processing techniques and processing systems for aerodynamic images has been conducted. These images covered many types of flows and were generated by many types of flow diagnostics. These include laser vapor screens, infrared cameras, laser holographic interferometry, Schlieren, and luminescent paints. Some general digital image processing systems, imaging networks, optical sensors, and image computing chips were briefly reviewed. Possible digital imaging network systems for the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnel were explored.

  11. New Technology and Experimental Study on Snow-Melting Heated Pavement System in Tunnel Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Jinxing; Qiu, Junling; Chen, Jianxun; Fan, Haobo; Wang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, with the rapid growth of economy and sharp rise of motor vehicles in China, the pavement skid resistance in tunnel portals has become increasingly important in cold region. However, the deicing salt, snow removal with machine, and other antiskid measures adopted by highway maintenance division have many limitations. To improve the treatment effect, we proposed a new snow-melting approach employing electric heat tracing, in which heating cables are installed in the structural ...

  12. Influence of Vehicle Speed on the Characteristics of Driver's Eye Movement at a Highway Tunnel Entrance during Day and Night Conditions: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Dong, Li-Li; Xu, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Li-Dong; Leon, Arturo S

    2018-04-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate how vehicle speed influences the characteristics of driver's eye movement at highway tunnel entrances during day and night. In this study, six drivers' eye movement data (from 200 m before tunnel entrance to 200 m inside tunnel entrance) under five predetermined vehicle speeds (40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 km/h) in the daytime and three predetermined vehicle speeds (40, 60 and 80 km/h) in the nighttime were recorded using the non-intrusive Dikablis Professional eye-tracking system. Pupil size, the average fixation duration time and the average number of fixation were analyzed and then the influence of the vehicle speed on these parameters was evaluated by means of IBM SPSS Statistics 20.0. The results for pupil size in daytime increased when approaching the tunnel entrance, while as for nighttime, pupil size decreased when approaching the tunnel entrance and then increased after entering the tunnel. The pupil size in daytime has a significant negative correlation with vehicle speed, while the pupil size in nighttime did not show a significant association with vehicle speed. Furthermore, the average fixation duration in daytime increased when entering the tunnel, and had a significant negative correlation with vehicle speed. Also, the average number of fixations in daytime decreased when entering the tunnel and has a significant negative correlation with vehicle speed. However, the average fixation duration and the average number of fixations in nighttime did not show any significant association with vehicle speed. Moreover, limitations and future directions of the study are discussed for the further investigation.

  13. Studies of colloidal system in soils with X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, J.; Schmidt, C.; Niemeyer, J.

    2000-01-01

    Soil is a part of the environment where colloidal systems play an important role when it comes to the description of its properties. A great variety of chemical reactions within these systems occur in an aqueous phase. Due to its ability to image specimen directly in their natural aqueous environment, X-ray microscopy is very suitable tool for the study of these systems. Man-made contamination of soils, especially organic contaminations, can be removed with thermal clean-up techniques. These techniques influence strongly the shape of the colloidal systems within the treated soils. X-ray microscopy studies of an agriculturally used soil and a forest soil give examples of this influence

  14. In vivo studies of transdermal nanoparticle delivery with microneedles using photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Seeni, Razina Z.; Xu, Chenjie; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-01-01

    Microneedle technology allows micron-sized conduits to be formed within the outermost skin layers for both localized and systemic delivery of therapeutics including nanoparticles. Histological methods are often employed for characterization, and unfortunately do not allow for the in vivo visualization of the delivery process. This study presents the utilization of optical resolution-photoacoustic microscopy to characterize the transdermal delivery of nanoparticles using microneedles. Specifically, we observe the in vivo transdermal delivery of gold nanoparticles using microneedles in mice ear and study the penetration, diffusion, and spatial distribution of the nanoparticles in the tissue. The promising results reveal that photoacoustic microscopy can be used as a potential imaging modality for the in vivo characterization of microneedles based drug delivery. PMID:29296482

  15. Oxidation study by Moessbauer and optic microscopy of steels from boiler tubes used in sugar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Aguilar, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Optic microscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to study the fail and the inner rusted surface of two boiler tubes used in the sugar industry, respectively. The studied tubes, of the type ASTM A 192, were found to have cracks. By optic microscopy it was observed that the failure begins in the inner surface with circumferential cracking. Also, inside and around the surface close to the cracks a rusted layer was detected. Powder from these layers was collected for Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis. By this method the presence of two or three types of Fe oxides such as wuestite, magnetite and hematite, was proved. These results permit to conclude that the failure mechanism was the thermal fatigue due to a hot work in an O 2 -rich vapor atmosphere. The rusted products are stable at high temperatures

  16. LEP tunnel monorail

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    A monorail from CERN's Large Electron Positron collider (LEP, for short). It ran around the 27km tunnel, transporting equipment and personnel. With its 27-kilometre circumference, LEP was the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built and ran from 1989 to 2000. During 11 years of research, LEP's experiments provided a detailed study of the electroweak interaction. Measurements performed at LEP also proved that there are three – and only three – generations of particles of matter. LEP was closed down on 2 November 2000 to make way for the construction of the Large Hadron Collider in the same tunnel.

  17. Case study of geostructural prospect of a tunnel by using geophysical methods; Butsuri tansa ni yoru tunnel chisan yosoku to jissai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, H. [Japan Railway Construction Public Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kawakami, J. [Taisei Construction Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nagasue, I.; Hiwatashi, S.; Wakuno, M. [Oyo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    A preliminary survey was carried out by combining elastic wave exploration (using a refraction method) and electrical exploration (using a resistivity imaging method) on a long tunnel planned in a granite distributed area. This paper describes a case of verifying geological condition in the area by using a trial survey well and horizontal boring. This tunnel goes through the Seburi mountainous area on the border of Fukuoka Prefecture and Saga Prefecture for a total distance of 12 km. The refraction method and the resistivity imaging method were selected from the necessity of identifying the weathering condition in natural ground, and distributions of fault crush zones and underground water in a section extending 560 m from the well entrance. As a result of comparing the natural ground condition interpreted from the geophysical survey results with the construction records, the fault was detected as a cracked or deformed section in the part where the resistivity value changes abruptly or where the resistivity is low. The tunnel natural ground classification showed a good correspondence with the elastic wave velocities. The largest flooding section showed a good agreement with the section where the resistivity changes suddenly to a lateral direction. Thus, the geological information interpreted from both surveys presented a good correspondence with the construction records, leading to a judgment that the prediction is possible. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Eye Movement Training and Suggested Gaze Strategies in Tunnel Vision - A Randomized and Controlled Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliya V Ivanov

    Full Text Available Degenerative retinal diseases, especially retinitis pigmentosa (RP, lead to severe peripheral visual field loss (tunnel vision, which impairs mobility. The lack of peripheral information leads to fewer horizontal eye movements and, thus, diminished scanning in RP patients in a natural environment walking task. This randomized controlled study aimed to improve mobility and the dynamic visual field by applying a compensatory Exploratory Saccadic Training (EST.Oculomotor responses during walking and avoiding obstacles in a controlled environment were studied before and after saccade or reading training in 25 RP patients. Eye movements were recorded using a mobile infrared eye tracker (Tobii glasses that measured a range of spatial and temporal variables. Patients were randomly assigned to two training conditions: Saccade (experimental and reading (control training. All subjects who first performed reading training underwent experimental training later (waiting list control group. To assess the effect of training on subjects, we measured performance in the training task and the following outcome variables related to daily life: Response Time (RT during exploratory saccade training, Percent Preferred Walking Speed (PPWS, the number of collisions with obstacles, eye position variability, fixation duration, and the total number of fixations including the ones in the subjects' blind area of the visual field.In the saccade training group, RTs on average decreased, while the PPWS significantly increased. The improvement persisted, as tested 6 weeks after the end of the training. On average, the eye movement range of RP patients before and after training was similar to that of healthy observers. In both, the experimental and reading training groups, we found many fixations outside the subjects' seeing visual field before and after training. The average fixation duration was significantly shorter after the training, but only in the experimental training

  19. Enhanced endocytosis of nano-curcumin in nasopharyngeal cancer cells: An atomic force microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, R.; Nair, Greshma; Girish, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies in drug development have shown that curcumin can be a good competent due to its improved anticancer, antioxidant, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammatory activities. A detailed real time characterization of drug (curcumin)-cell interaction is carried out in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells using atomic force microscopy. Nanocurcumin shows an enhanced uptake over micron sized drugs attributed to the receptor mediated route. Cell membrane stiffness plays a critical role in the drug endocytosis in nasopharyngeal cancer cells.

  20. Scanning capacitance microscopy studies of GaN grown by epitaxial layer overgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, R A; Bennett, S E; Sumner, J; Kappers, M J; Humphreys, C J

    2010-01-01

    Epitaxial layer overgrowth (ELOG) is a common technique for dislocation density reduction in GaN heteroepitaxy. Here, scanning capacitance microscopy is used to study the variations in unintentional doping arising from the ELOG process and reveals facet-dependent incorporation of n-type dopants during the initial regrowth of GaN, and then p-type doping arising from the use of bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium to enhance lateral growth during the coalescence stage.

  1. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    McDowell, Matthew T.

    2012-09-04

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. An Investigation of the Strength and Deformation Characteristics of Rock masses: A Case Study in an Excavation of Eskişehir-Köseköy Tunnels, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhan, Sunay; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal; Ogul, Kenan

    2015-04-01

    With increasing of high-speed rail technology in last decades, Turkey has developed many big engineering projects to connect major cities. Excavations conducted for these projects provide very important contributions in term of understanding the strength and deformation characteristics of weak rock masses belongs to various geological materials. The Ankara-Istanbul high-speed railway known as a significant project among these projects was designed in two different phases. To discuss the outcomes, experiences and challenging geological materials during construction of this tunnel, the geotechnical properties of rock masses of a tunnel named as T19 are evaluated and discussed in this study. The T19 tunnel was excavated in stratified and heavily fractured four different geological formations. Rock mass rating (RMR) system, and tunnelling quality index (Q) were utilized for the preliminary design stages of this tunnel. These engineering rock mass classifications were utilized in 135 different locations to find representative RMR and Q values for encountered rock masses during excavation. The RMR and Q values, which range between 18-52 and changing between 0.017 and 1.6 respectively, indicate that the T19 tunnel was mainly constructed in very poor and poor rock masses. Thus, shotcrete immediately was applied after face advance to prevent the fall of loose rock fragments and to minimize excessive deformation in rock, particular in very poor and poor rock masses. In addition, the deformation characteristics of the tunnel were also carefully monitored and measured by 3D-optical measuring system and conventional tape extensometer, and then required further supports were installed. Finally, the rock mass-support interactions of different geological formations were comprehensively evaluated in this study for understanding strength and deformation characteristics of weak and stratified rock masses. Keywords: Convergence, high-speed rail, rock mass, support, tunnel

  3. Scanning electron microscopy study of adhesion in sea urchin blastulae. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Susan D.

    1988-01-01

    The dissociation supernatant (DS) isolated by disaggregating Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae in calcium- and magnesium-free seawater specifically promotes reaggregation of S. purpuratus blastula cells. The purpose of this study was to use scanning electron microscopy to examine the gross morphology of aggregates formed in the presence of DS to see if it resembles adhesion in partially dissociated blastulae. A new reaggregation procedure developed here, using large volumes of cell suspension and a large diameter of rotation, was utilized to obtain sufficient quantities of aggregates for scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that aggregates formed in the presence of DS resemble partially dissociated intact embryos in terms of the direct cell-cell adhesion observed. DS did not cause aggregation to form as a result of the entrapment of cells in masses of extracellular material. These studies provide the groundwork for further studies using transmission electron microscopy to more precisely define the adhesive contacts made by cells in the presence of the putative adhesion molecules present in DS.

  4. The potentials and challenges of electron microscopy in the study of atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, Florian; Torre, Alessandro La; Romdhane, Ferdaous Ben; Cretu, Ovidiu

    2017-04-01

    The article is a brief review on the potential of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the investigation of atom chains which are the paradigm of a strictly one-dimensional material. After the progress of TEM in the study of new two-dimensional materials, microscopy of free-standing one-dimensional structures is a new challenge with its inherent potentials and difficulties. In-situ experiments in the TEM allowed, for the first time, to generate isolated atomic chains consisting of metals, carbon or boron nitride. Besides having delivered a solid proof for the existence of atomic chains, in-situ TEM studies also enabled us to measure the electrical properties of these fundamental linear structures. While ballistic quantum conductivity is observed in chains of metal atoms, electrical transport in chains of sp1-hybridized carbon is limited by resonant states and reflections at the contacts. Although substantial progress has been made in recent TEM studies of atom chains, fundamental questions have to be answered, concerning the structural stability of the chains, bonding states at the contacts, and the suitability for applications in nanotechnology. Contribution to the topical issue "The 16th European Microscopy Congress (EMC 2016)", edited by Richard Brydson and Pascale Bayle-Guillemaud

  5. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) differentiation study by confocal Raman microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, H.; Collart-Dutilleul, P.-Y.; Gergely, C.; Cuisinier, F. J. G.

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative medicine brings a huge application for Mesenchymal stem cells such as Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs). Confocal Raman microscopy, a non-invasive, label free , real time and high spatial resolution imaging technique is used to study osteogenic differentiation of DPSCs. Integrated Raman intensities in the 2800-3000 cm-1 region (C-H stretching) and 960 cm-1 peak (phosphate PO4 3-) were collected. In Dental Pulp Stem Cells 21st day differentiated in buffer solution, phosphate peaks ν1 PO4 3- (first vibrational mode) at 960cm-1 and ν2 PO4 3- at 430cm-1 and ν4 PO4 3- at 585cm-1 are obviously present. Confocal Raman microscopy enables the detection of cell differentiation and it can be used to investigate clinical stem cell research.

  6. Atomic force and confocal microscopy for the study of cortical cells cultured on silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Cui, F Z; Liu, B F; Xu, Q Y

    2007-05-01

    The primary cortical cells were selected as a model to study the adherence and neural network development on chemically roughened silicon substrates without any coatings using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The silicon substrates have a nano-range roughness (RMS) achieved by chemical etching using hydrofluoric (HF) acid. After 7 days of culturing, the neurons were observed to connect together and form dense neural networks. Furthermore, AFM results revealed that some porous structures at a few micrometer range existed between the neuron cells and the silicon substrates. It is suggested that the porous structures are made of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and play an important role in the neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth on the inert silicon wafers.

  7. Microscopy studies on pronton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes with different ionomer contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Shuang; Solterbeck, Claus Henning; Odgaard, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    of the electrode was well displayed in the topography and phase images. The particle and pore size (Z) distributions showed the most frequent values at 30-40 nm and 20-30 nm, respectively. The particle size corresponds to the size of the carbon support for the platinum catalyst. Catalyst agglomeration was observed......Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with different ionomer contents were studied with various microscopic techniques. The morphology and surface potential were examined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM), respectively. The particulate nature...... in high ionomer content electrodes. The surface potential images showed distinct difference to the topography images. The overall grain size was seen to increase, the pore volume to decrease, the surface roughness to decrease, and the surface potential variation to increase with the increase of ionomer...

  8. Investigations on tunneling and kissing bond defects in FSW joints for dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Noor Zaman, E-mail: noor_0315@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi (India); Siddiquee, Arshad Noor; Khan, Zahid A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi (India); Shihab, Suha K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering College, Diyala University, Diyala (Iraq)

    2015-11-05

    In this paper an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of two Friction Stir Welding (FSW) parameters i.e. tool pin offset and tool plunge depth on the formation of defects such as tunnel (tunneling defect) and kissing bond (KB) during welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys. 4.75 mm thick plates of AA5083-H116 and AA6063-T6 were welded using a novel work-fixture developed in-house which, apart from clamping the plated also imparted continuous variation of offset on both side of the faying line. The tunneling defect was modeled as a function of offset and plunge depth. The welds were characterised using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical testing. The causes of such defects have been analyzed and discussed and recommendations have been made to prevent their occurrence. The findings of the study have revealed that the tunneling defects are formed at all offset (including zero offset) values towards stronger material (advancing side). And the cross-section of the tunnel varied with the amount of offset. Further, KBs are formed at the interface for all pin offset values except 0.5 mm towards weaker material and high plunge depth resulting in the poor mechanical properties. - Highlights: • Two dissimilar aluminum alloys are welded using FSW. • Formation of kissing bond and tunneling defects are investigated. • Defects are formed at pin offsets towards stronger material and also without offset. • The size of tunnel reduces significantly by increasing the plunge depth. • Tool pin offset towards weaker material prevent tunneling defects.

  9. Study of fossil bones by synchrotron radiation micro-spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zougrou, I M; Katsikini, M; Pinakidou, F; Paloura, E C; Papadopoulou, L; Tsoukala, E

    2014-01-01

    Earlymost Villafranchian fossil bones of an artiodactyl and a perissodactyl from the Milia excavation site in Grevena, Greece, were studied in order to evaluate diagenetic effects. Optical microscopy revealed the different bone types (fibro-lamellar and Haversian, respectively) of the two fragments and their good preservation state. The spatial distribution of bone apatite and soil-originating elements was studied using micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) mapping and scanning electron microscopy. The approximate value of the Ca/P ratio was 2.2, as determined from scanning electron microscopy measurements. Bacterial boring was detected close to the periosteal region and Fe bearing oxides were found to fill bone cavities, e.g. Haversian canals and osteocyte lacunae. In the perissodactyl bone considerable amounts of Mn were detected close to cracks (the Mn/Fe weight ratio takes values up to 3.5). Goethite and pyrite were detected in both samples by means of metallographic microscopy. The local Ca/P ratio determined with µ-XRF varied significantly in metal-poor spots indicating spatial inhomogeneities in the ionic substitutions. XRF line scans that span the bone cross sections revealed that Fe and Mn contaminate the bones from both the periosteum and medullar cavity and aggregate around local maxima. The formation of goethite, irrespective of the local Fe concentration, was verified by the Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Finally, Sr K-edge extended XAFS (EXAFS) revealed that Sr substitutes for Ca in bone apatite without obvious preference to the Ca1 or Ca2 unit-cell site occupation.

  10. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic nanostructures at the example of bcc-Co/Fe(110), Fe/Mo(110), and copper phthalocyanine/Fe(1110); Spinpolarisierte Rastertunnelmikroskopie magnetischer Nanostrukturen am Beispiel von bcc-Co/Fe(110), Fe/Mo(110) und Kupfer-Phthalocyanin/Fe(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Methfessel, Torsten

    2010-12-09

    This thesis provides an introduction into the technique of spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy as an experimental method for the investigation of magnetic nanostructures. Experimental results for the spin polarized electronic structure depending on the crystal structure of ultrathin Co layers, and depending on the direction of the magnetization for ultrathin Fe layers are presented. High-resolution measurements show the position-dependent spin polarization on a single copper-phthalocyanine molecule deposited on a ferromagnetic surface. Co was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on the (110) surface of the bodycentered cubic metals Cr and Fe. In contrast to previous reports in the literature only two layers of Co can be stabilized in the body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. The bcc-Co films on the Fe(110) surface show no signs of epitaxial distortions. Thicker layers reconstruct into a closed-packed structure (hcp / fcc). The bcc structure increases the spin-polarization of Co to P=62 % in comparison to hcp-Co (P=45 %). The temperature-dependent spin-reorientation of ultrathin Fe/Mo(110) films was investigated by spin-polarized spectroscopy. A reorientation of the magnetic easy axis from the [110] direction along the surface normal to the in-plane [001] axis is observed at T (13.2{+-}0.5) K. This process can be identified as a discontinuous reorientation transition, revealing two simultaneous minima of the free energy in a certain temperature range. The electronic structure of mono- and double-layer Fe/Mo(110) shows a variation with the reorientation of the magnetic easy axis and with the direction of the magnetization. The investigation of the spin-polarized charge transport through a copper-phthalocyanine molecule on the Fe/Mo(110) surface provides an essential contribution to the understanding of spin-transport at the interface between metal and organic molecule. Due to the interaction with the surface of the metal the HOMO-LUMO energy

  11. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, Taylor J.; Rosenberg, Zehava S.; Ciavarra, Gina; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Prost, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, ''subluxation'' of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology. (orig.)

  12. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Taylor J. [Charlotte Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Rosenberg, Zehava S.; Ciavarra, Gina; Bencardino, Jenny T. [New York Langone Medical Center / Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY (United States); Velez, Zoraida Restrepo [Cedimed-Dinamica, Medellin (Colombia); Prost, Roberto [Marino Hospital ASL Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, ''subluxation'' of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology. (orig.)

  13. Subluxation of the peroneus long tendon in the cuboid tunnel: is it normal or pathologic? An ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Taylor J; Rosenberg, Zehava S; Velez, Zoraida Restrepo; Ciavarra, Gina; Prost, Roberto; Bencardino, Jenny T

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the position of the peroneus longus (PL) tendon relative to the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel during ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion using ultrasound and MRI. The study population included two groups: 20 feet of 10 asymptomatic volunteers who underwent prospective dynamic ultrasound and 55 ankles found through retrospective review of routine ankle MRI examinations. The location of the PL tendon at the cuboid tuberosity and cuboid tunnel was designated as completely within the tunnel, indeterminate, or subluxed with respect to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. On dynamic ultrasound, the PL tendon was perched plantar to the cuboid tuberosity in dorsiflexion, and glided to enter the cuboid tunnel distal to the tuberosity in plantarflexion in all 20 feet. On the MRI evaluation, there was a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0006) in the location of the PL tendon between the ankles scanned in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Based on our findings on ultrasound and MRI, the PL tendon can glide in and out of the cuboid tunnel along the cuboid tuberosity depending on ankle position. Thus, "subluxation" of the tendon as it curves to enter the cuboid tunnel, which to the best of our knowledge has not yet been described, should be recognized as a normal, position-dependent phenomenon and not be reported as pathology.

  14. High Surface Area Tunnels in Hexagonal WO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wanmei; Yeung, Michael T; Lech, Andrew T; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chain; Li, Tianqi; Duan, Xiangfeng; Zhou, Jun; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-07-08

    High surface area in h-WO3 has been verified from the intracrystalline tunnels. This bottom-up approach differs from conventional templating-type methods. The 3.67 Å diameter tunnels are characterized by low-pressure CO2 adsorption isotherms with nonlocal density functional theory fitting, transmission electron microscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis. These open and rigid tunnels absorb H(+) and Li(+), but not Na(+) in aqueous electrolytes without inducing a phase transformation, accessing both internal and external active sites. Moreover, these tunnel structures demonstrate high specific pseudocapacitance and good stability in an H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the high surface area created from 3.67 Å diameter tunnels in h-WO3 shows potential applications in electrochemical energy storage, selective ion transfer, and selective gas adsorption.

  15. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of the Magnetization Reversal Mechanism in Information Storage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford-Long; Portier; Bayle-Guillemaud; Anthony; Brug

    1998-05-01

    : The Foucault and Fresnel modes of Lorentz microscopy, together with a quantitative magnetization mapping technique, summed image differential phase-contrast imaging, were used to study the magnetization reversal mechanism of the sense layer in spin-valve structures exhibiting the giant magnetoresistance effect. In addition to studies of sheet film, lithographically defined spin-valve elements were investigated. A current can be passed through the element during magnetizing so that the effect of the applied current on the giant magnetoresistance and magnetization reversal mechanism can be studied. Results are presented for a number of different spin-valve structures.

  16. Biominerals at the nanoscale: transmission electron microscopy methods for studying the special properties of biominerals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2013-01-01

    textures, and magnetic properties of biominerals at the nanoscale. In this chapter, we review the state of the art in the application of TEM techniques to the study of these properties, both in biomineral crystals and at the inorganic-organic interface. Examples are taken primarily from studies of magnetic...... fields. In order to fulfill their roles in organisms, biominerals have strictly controlled physical and chemical properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is ideally suited for the study of the structures, arrangements, compositions, morphologies, crystallographic orientations, crystallographic...

  17. A microscopy study of the structural features of post-LASIK human corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abahussin

    Full Text Available To study the structural features of human post-LASIK corneas.A pair of post-mortem donor corneas, from a 55-year old patient who underwent uncomplicated LASIK surgery five years previously, were bisected and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. The right cornea and one half of the left cornea were processed for light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. One half of the right cornea was also examined by transmission electron microscopy.The flap-bed interface could be easily detected several years after LASIK and, although the flap appeared to be in close association with the stromal bed, there was a noticeable absence of reconnection between adjacent severed lamellae. Tissue gaps were evident at the flap margin, which once free of cellular components revealed the presence of a few bridging fibres.Examination of corneas five years after LASIK revealed evidence of primitive reparative scar development at the wound interface, but no reconnection of severed collagen lamellae. Such findings may explain the occurrence of flap dislocation following trauma in some patients months or years after surgery.

  18. Electron microscopy studies of natural and synthetic zeolites impregnated with uranyl dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, Dwight R.; T-Olguin, Maria; Solache, Marcos; Bosch, Pedro; Bulbulian, Silvia [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico). Inst. de Fisica; Asomoza, Max [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica Nuclear

    1995-09-01

    Full text. The use of Y zeolite and erionite to remove uranyl dioxide ions from aqueous solution is focussed on catalysis and energy transfer problems but it can be oriented to recovery uranyl dioxide ions, among other radioactive compounds. The samples impregnated with uranyl dioxide at several concentrations and contact times were studied using conventional, high resolution and scanning electron microscopy in order to detect changes as consequence of contact with a radioactive material and to verify mechanical stability of zeolites. Also X ray diffraction, thermal analysis, neutron activation were used to characterize the samples at several steps of treatment. The crystallinity of zeolites was maintained only when using dilute uranyl nitrate solution (up to 0.0100 N for y zeolite and 0.0300 N for erionite). The samples impregnated with highest nitrate concentrations partially lost their crystallinity. From selected area electron diffraction pattern, lattice parameter variations were detected and from high resolution electron microscopy localization of uranyl ions in and on zeolite structure was determined. Surface modification in zeolites was observed by scanning electron microscopy just for samples with long contact time with radioactive solutions. (author)

  19. Cross-Sectional Shape of Rat Mesenteric Arterioles at Branching Studied by Confocal Laser Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Atushi; Minamiyama, Motomu; Niimi, Hideyuki

    This study was aimed to investigate the cross-sectional shape of mesenteric arterioles at branching, using confocal laser microscopy. Wistar rats (8 weeks, male) were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital sodium. Blood flow and microvascular network in the mesentery were observed using video microscopy. The rat intestine with mesentery was extracted and the intestinal vasculature was perfused with Krebs-Ringer and then fixed with paraformaldehyde under a static pressure of 100mmHg. A section of mesentery was isolated from the intestine, and spread up to the in vivo geometry based on the intravital microscopic observation. The mesentery section was stained with tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-phalloidin. The samples were observed under a confocal laser microscope. The cross-sectional image was re-sliced to measure the cross-sectional area and major/minor axes of the best fitting ellipse. The aspect ratio was defined in terms of the minor/major diameter ratio. The extended focus image of mesenteric arterioles showed that the cross-sectional shape was not circular but elliptic-like. The cross-sectional area of the parent vessel decreased from proximal to distal positions. The mean aspect ratio of the parent vessel was approximately 0.5, while that of the branching vessel was approximately 0.8. The flattened shape and variation of the cross-sectional area of arterioles requires some correction of in vivo data of the two-dimensional mesenteric microvasculature obtained using intravital microscopy.

  20. Electron and Light Microscopy Techniques Suitable for Studying Fatigue Damage in a Crystallized Glass Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Shelley; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1961-01-01

    The crystals of Pyroceram are randomly oriented and highly reflective so that standard microscopy techniques are not satisfactory for studying this material. Standard replicating procedures proved difficult to use. New microscopy techniques and procedures have therefore been developed. A method for locating, orienting, and identifying specific areas to be viewed with an electron microscope is described. This method not require any special equipment. Plastic replicas were found to be unsatisfactory because of their tendency to adhere to Pryoceram. This caused them to tear when released or resulted in artifacts. Preshadowed silicon monoxide replicas were satisfactory but required a releasing agent. A method of depositing the releasing agent is described. To polish specimens without evidence of fire-polishing, it was found necessary to use a vibratory polishing technique. Chrome oxide was used as the abrasive and either water or kerosene as the lubricant. Vibratory polishing is extremely slow, but surfaces so polished show no evidence of fire polishing, even when examined by electron microscopy. The most satisfactory etching process used for Pyroceram 9608 consisted of a primary etch of 5 milliliters of hydrochloric acid (concentrated), 5 milliliters of hydrogen fluoride (45 percent), and 45 milliliters of water, and a secondary etch with methyl alcohol replacing the water. Best results were obtained with total etching times from 25 to 30 seconds. Staining of the Pyroceram surface with a Sanford's marker was found to be an expedient way to reduce the glare of reflected light.

  1. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  2. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Air Flow with Obstruction Through Test Section of Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Kraidy Rashid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates the sound and flow generated by a turbulent air flow in a duct from the knowledge of mean quantities (average velocity and sound pressure level.The sound excitation by fluid flow through duct can be used to predict fluid behavior. This behavior can be carried out by discovering the relation between sound excitation and fluid flow parameters like Reynolds number, Strouhal number and frequencies of turbulent fluid flow. However, the fluid flow container stability has to be taken in account simultaneously with fluid flow effect on sound generation and propagation. The experimental system used in this work is air flow through subsonic wind tunnel duct.The sound pressure levels of air flows through test section of subsonic wind tunnel (at three air flow velocities2.5, 7.3 and 12.5 m/s respectively were carried out experimentally. The sound excitation or generation by air flow throughout the test section of subsonic wind tunnel without any obstruction can't be used to imagine the fluid behavior. To predict fluid flow properties,an infinite cylinder was immersed in order to obstruct the air flow and generate a new source of sound.This case is relevant to a wide range of engineering applications including aircraft landing gear, rail pantographs and automotive side-mirrors. Sound measurements have been taken in an anechoic room at Babylon University. ANSYS program software is used to simulate all experimental results.The experimental and theoretical data that were presented in this paper will give further insight into the underlying sound generation mechanism.In the presented work, the linkage between sound generation and CFD results using thepresented work results and ANSYS simulation results was done.The results discuss the effects of fluid flow parameters such as Reynolds and Strouhal numbers on the sound generation, propagation features and vice-versa. The results are compared with other researchers which give good agreements.

  4. Comparative study on the effectiveness of a corticosteroid injection for carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with and without Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Y H; Noh, J H; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a corticosteroid injection for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in patients with and without Raynaud's phenomenon. In a prospective study, 139 patients with CTS were treated with a corticosteroid injection (10 mg triamcinolone acetonide); 34 had Raynaud's phenomenon and 105 did not (control group). Grip strength, perception of touch with a Semmes-Weinstein monofilament and the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaires (BCTQ) were assessed at baseline and at six, 12 and 24 weeks after the injection. The Cold Intolerance Severity Score (CISS) questionnaire was also assessed at baseline and 24 weeks after the injection. The two groups had similar baseline BCTQ scores, but the scores in the Raynaud's phenomenon group were significantly higher than those in the control group at 12 and 24 weeks after the injection. Throughout the 24-week follow-up, there were no significant differences in the mean grip strength between the groups, whereas the mean Semmes-Weinstein monofilament sensory index for the control group was significantly higher than that of the Raynaud's phenomenon group. The mean CISSs were not significantly different between the groups at baseline and at 24 weeks. After 24 weeks, 11 patients (32%) in the Raynaud's phenomenon group and 16 (15%) in the control group required carpal tunnel decompression (p = 0.028). Multivariable analysis indicated that concurrent Raynaud's phenomenon (odds ratio (OR) 2.6) and severe electrophysiological grade (OR 2.1) were independently associated with a failure of treatment after a corticosteroid injection. Although considerable improvements in symptoms will probably occur in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon who have CTS, they have higher risk of poor functional outcomes and failure of treatment than those without Raynaud's phenomenon. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1637-42. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  5. The effect of vegetation patterns on Aeolian mass flux at regional scale: a wind tunnel study

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef, Feras; Visser, Saskia M; Karssenberg, Derek; Erpul, Gunay; Cornelis, Wim; Gabriels, Donald; Poortinga, Ate; De Boever, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although insight on the effect of vegetation pattern on Aeolian mass transport is essential for re-planting degraded land, only limited knowledge on this effect is available. The objective of this research was to understand the effect of vegetation design on the Aeolian mass flux inside a single land unit and at the borders among land units. A simulation of Atriplex halimus shrubs inside a wind tunnel was made, and sand redistribution was measured after the application of 200-230 sec...

  6. Quantum tunneling of magnetization in molecular nanomagnet Fe8 studied by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maegawa, Satoru; Ueda, Miki

    2003-01-01

    Magnetization and NMR measurements have been performed for single crystals of molecular magnet Fe8. The field and temperature dependences of magnetization below 25 K are well described in terms of the isolated clusters with the total spin S=10. The stepwise recoveries of 1 H-NMR signals at the level crossing fields caused by the resonant quantum tunneling of magnetization were observed below 400 mK. The recovery of the NMR signals are explained by the fluctuation caused by the transition between the energy states of Fe magnetizations governed by Landau-Zener quantum transitions

  7. BIM Methodology Approach to Infrastructure Design: Case Study of Paniga Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osello, Anna; Rapetti, Niccolò; Semeraro, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the implementation of Building Information Modelling (BIM) in civil design represent a new challenge for the AECO (Architecture, Engineering, Construction, Owner and Operator) world, which will involve the interest of many researchers in the next years. It is due to the incentives of Public Administration and European Directives that aim to improve the efficiency and to enhance a better management of the complexity of infrastructure projects. For these reasons, the goal of this research is to propose a methodology for the use of BIM in a tunnel project, analysing the definition of a correct level of detail (LOD) and the possibility to share information via interoperability for FEM analysis.

  8. Implementing atomic force microscopy (AFM) for studying kinetics of gold nanoparticle's growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiev, P.; Bojinova, A.; Kostova, B.

    2013-01-01

    In a novel experimental approach Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was applied as a tool for studying the kinetics of gold nanoparticle growth. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by classical Turkevich citrate synthesis at two different temperatures. From the analysis of AFM images during...... the synthesis process the nanoparticle s' sizes were obtained. To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of the proposed experimental approach we studied the nanoparticles growth at two different temperatures by spectrophotometric measurements and compared them with the results from AFM experimental...

  9. Study and structural and chemical characterization of human dental smalt by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belio R, I.A.; Reyes G, J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of human dental smalt has been subject to investigation for this methods with electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and image simulation programs have been used with the purpose to determine its chemical and structural characteristics of the organic and inorganic materials. This work has been held mainly for the characterization of hydroxyapatite (Ca) 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH 4 ) 2 , inorganic material which conforms the dental smalt in 97%, so observing its structural unity which is composed by the prisms and these by crystals and atoms. It was subsequently initiated the study of the organic material, with is precursor of itself. (Author)

  10. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for studying the morphology of colloidal drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuntsche, Judith; Horst, Jennifer C; Bunjes, Heike

    2011-01-01

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has evolved into an indispensable tool for the characterization of colloidal drug delivery systems. It can be applied to study the size, shape and internal structure of nanoparticulate carrier systems as well as the overall colloidal composition...... of the corresponding dispersions. This review gives a short overview over the instrumentation used in cryo-TEM experiments and over the sample preparation procedure. Selected examples of cryo-TEM studies on colloidal drug carrier systems, including liposomes, colloidal lipid emulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles...

  11. Multiphoton Microscopy in the Study of Morphological Characteristics of Radiation-Induced Injuries of the Bladder

    OpenAIRE

    S.S. Kuznetsov; V.V. Dudenkova; М.V. Kochueva; Е.B. Kiseleva; N.Yu. Ignatieva; O.L. Zakharkina; E.A. Sergeeva; K.V. Babak; А.V. Maslennikova

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to assess the feasibility of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) for studying dynamics of bladder structural changes following a single exposure to gamma-radiation at various doses (2, 10, and 40 Gy) in experiment. Materials and Methods. Specimens of rat bladders after a single local radiation at the dose of 2, 10, and 40 Gy were the objects of investigation (9 groups with two rats for each dose and term, and two intact rats — 20 observations in all). The study was c...

  12. Efficacy of paraffin wax bath for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordahan, Banu; Karahan, Ali Yavuz

    2017-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most frequently diagnosed neuropathy of upper extremity entrapment neuropathies. We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of paraffin therapy in patients with CTS. Seventy patients diagnosed with mild or moderate CTS were randomly divided into two groups as splint treatment (during the night and day time as much as possible for 3 weeks) alone and splint (during the night and day time as much as possible for 3 weeks) + paraffin treatment (five consecutive days a week for 3 weeks). Clinical and electrophysiological assessments were performed before and 3 weeks after treatment. The patients were assessed by using visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTSQ). The significant improvement was found in VAS scores in both groups when compared with pretreatment values ( p 0.05), whereas a significant improvement was noted in the BCTQ symptom severity scale score in the splint group ( p 0.05), and the difference in these parameters between the groups was statistically significant ( p Paraffin treatment with splint increases the recovery in functional and electrophysiological parameters.

  13. Performance Evaluation and Design Considerations of Electrically Activated Drain Extension Tunneling GNRFET: A Quantum Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoreishi, Seyed Saleh; Yousefi, Reza; Taghavi, Neda

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a tunneling graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor with electrically activated drain extension, namely, EA-T-GNRFET, is proposed. The proposed structure includes a side gate at the drain side with a constant voltage and length of 0.4 V and 15 nm, respectively. Simulations are performed based on the non-equilibrium Green's function method coupled with the Poisson equation in the mode space representation. This side gate creates an additional step in potential profile at the drain side, which increases and decreases the width of tunneling barrier and leakage current, respectively. Furthermore, the proposed structure has lower drain induced barrier thinning, lower sub-threshold swing (SS) and higher I ON/ I OFF ratio than the conventional structure. Also, other characteristics of the device such as switching delay ( τ ), power delay product (PDP) and unity-gain frequency ( f t) are improved in the proposed device. These advantages make EA-T-GNRFET more suitable for digital and analog applications.

  14. Is confocal microscopy a valuable tool in diagnosing nodular lesions? A study of 140 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, C; Farnetani, F; Ciardo, S; Cesinaro, A M; Moscarella, E; Ponti, G; Zalaudek, I; Argenziano, G; Pellacani, G

    2013-07-01

    Nodular lesions pose diagnostic challenges because nodular melanoma may simulate all kinds of melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a novel technique that allows visualization of the skin at nearly histological resolution although limited laser depth penetration hampers visualization of the deep dermis. We sought to assess whether the diagnostic accuracy of RCM was comparable to histopathology for the diagnosis of nodular lesions, and to identify possible limitations of this technique. We retrospectively evaluated 140 nodules by means of RCM while blinded from the histopathological diagnosis. At the end of the study the patient codes were broken and the evaluations were matched with histopathological diagnosis before performing statistical analysis. The study consisted of 140 nodular lesions (23 'pure' nodular melanomas, nine melanoma metastases, 28 BCCs, six invasive SCCs, 32 naevi, 14 seborrhoeic keratoses, 17 dermatofibromas, five vascular lesions and six other lesions). RCM correctly diagnosed 121 of 140 lesions (86.4%); eight of 140 (5.7%) lesions revealed discordance between histopathology and confocal microscopy. Eight of the 140 (5.7%) cases were not evaluable by means of RCM due to the presence of ulceration or hyperkeratosis and three cases showed a nonspecific pattern. Interestingly, confocal microscopy reached a 96.5% sensitivity and 94.1% specificity (area under curve 0.970) (95% CI 0.924-1.015) (P melanoma. The study is retrospective and lesions were not included on the basis of their diagnostic difficulty. Despite the limited laser depth penetration of RCM, this imaging tool represents an effective instrument in diagnosing nodular lesions; however, for fully ulcerated lesions or when a marked hyperkeratosis is present, biopsy should always be performed. Prospective studies on difficult-to-diagnose nodules should be performed to analyse further the pros and cons of RCM in skin cancer diagnosis. © 2013 The

  15. Microstructure and properties of laser clad coatings studied by orientation imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Furar, I.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy, was employed to examine in detail the relationship between laser cladding processing parameters and he properties and the microstructure of single and overlapping laser

  16. Application of atomic force microscopy to the study of natural and model soil particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S; Bryant, R; Doerr, S H; Rhodri Williams, P; Wright, C J

    2008-09-01

    The structure and surface chemistry of soil particles has extensive impact on many bulk scale properties and processes of soil systems and consequently the environments that they support. There are a number of physiochemical mechanisms that operate at the nanoscale which affect the soil's capability to maintain native vegetation and crops; this includes soil hydrophobicity and the soil's capacity to hold water and nutrients. The present study used atomic force microscopy in a novel approach to provide unique insight into the nanoscale properties of natural soil particles that control the physiochemical interaction of material within the soil column. There have been few atomic force microscopy studies of soil, perhaps a reflection of the heterogeneous nature of the system. The present study adopted an imaging and force measurement research strategy that accounted for the heterogeneity and used model systems to aid interpretation. The surface roughness of natural soil particles increased with depth in the soil column a consequence of the attachment of organic material within the crevices of the soil particles. The roughness root mean square calculated from ten 25 microm(2) images for five different soil particles from a Netherlands soil was 53.0 nm, 68.0 nm, 92.2 nm and 106.4 nm for the respective soil depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-40 cm. A novel analysis method of atomic force microscopy phase images based on phase angle distribution across a surface was used to interpret the nanoscale distribution of organic material attached to natural and model soil particles. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of model surfaces were found to be bimodal, indicating multiple layers of material, which changed with the concentration of adsorbed humic acid. Phase angle distributions obtained from phase images of natural soil particles indicated a trend of decreasing surface coverage with increasing depth in the soil column. This was consistent with

  17. Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander; Schülein, Erich; Petervari, René; Hannemann, Klaus; Ali, Syed R. C.; Cerminara, Adriano; Sandham, Neil D.

    2018-05-01

    Combined free-stream disturbance measurements and receptivity studies in hypersonic wind tunnels were conducted by means of a slender wedge probe and direct numerical simulation. The study comprises comparative tunnel noise measurements at Mach 3, 6 and 7.4 in two Ludwieg tube facilities and a shock tunnel. Surface pressure fluctuations were measured over a wide range of frequencies and test conditions including harsh test environments not accessible to measurement techniques such as pitot probes and hot-wire anemometry. Quantitative results of the tunnel noise are provided in frequency ranges relevant for hypersonic boundary layer transition. In combination with the experimental studies, direct numerical simulations of the leading-edge receptivity to fast and slow acoustic waves were performed for the slender wedge probe at conditions corresponding to the experimental free-stream conditions. The receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be characterized by an early amplification of the induced fast mode. For slow acoustic waves an initial decay was found close to the leading edge. At all Mach numbers, and for all considered frequencies, the leading-edge receptivity to fast acoustic waves was found to be higher than the receptivity to slow acoustic waves. Further, the effect of inclination angles of the acoustic wave with respect to the flow direction was investigated. The combined numerical and experimental approach in the present study confirmed the previous suggestion that the slow acoustic wave is the dominant acoustic mode in noisy hypersonic wind tunnels.

  18. Atomic force and scanning near-field optical microscopy study of carbocyanine dye J-aggregates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prokhorov, V.V.; Petrova, M.G.; Kovaleva, Natalia; Demikhov, E.I.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 5 (2014), s. 700-704 ISSN 1573-4137 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbocyanine dye * elementary fibri * high-resolution atomic force microscopy * J-aggregate * probe microscopy * scanning near-field optical microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2014

  19. What Happened when a Superhydrophobic Surface was Immersed in Water? A Study by Optical Transmission Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Emil; Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Smistrup, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a simple and fast optical transmission microscopy study on the wetting transitions on hierarchical polymer surfaces immersed in water. We analyze the influence of immersion time and the liquid pressure on wetting states of individual micro-cavities on these surfaces, as well...... repellent properties of the two materials to a difference in the wetting of their nanostructures. The experimental observations indicate that both the diffusion of gas molecules in water, and the geometry of nanostructures influence the sustainability of superhydrophobicity of surfaces under water...

  20. Surface morphology of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    were identified with the scanning electron microscope. A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, and in the juxtasaccular half of the duct, two additional types of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopic observations...... microscopy was attained by coating of the specimens with osmium tetroxide and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. This technique permitted, for the first time, an investigation of the surface morphology of the epithelial cells in the endolymphatic duct. Three types of cells...... are compared and discussed with reference to previous transmission electron microscopic studies of the endolymphatic duct....