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Sample records for tunnel test section

  1. Wall Correction Model for Wind Tunnels with Open Test Section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2004-01-01

    , the corrections from the model are in very good agreement with the CFD computaions, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections. Keywords: Wind tunnel correction, momentum theory...

  2. Wall correction model for wind tunnels with open test section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Shen, Wen Zhong; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2006-01-01

    In the paper we present a correction model for wall interference on rotors of wind turbines or propellers in wind tunnels. The model, which is based on a one-dimensional momentum approach, is validated against results from CFD computations using a generalized actuator disc principle. In the model...... good agreement with the CFD computations, demonstrating that one-dimensional momentum theory is a reliable way of predicting corrections for wall interference in wind tunnels with closed as well as open cross sections....

  3. Suppression of background noise in a transonic wind-tunnel test section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.; Howard, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Some exploratory tests were recently performed in the transonic test section of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 14-in. wind tunnel to suppress the background noise. In these tests, the perforated walls of the test section were covered with fine wire screens. The screens eliminated the edge tones generated by the holes in the perforated walls and significantly reduced the tunnel background noise. The tunnel noise levels were reduced to such a degree by this simple modification at Mach numbers 0.75, 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.46 that the fluctuating pressure levels of a turbulent boundary layer could be measured on a 5-deg half-angle cone.

  4. Simulation of Model Force-Loading with Changing Its Position in the Wind Tunnel Test Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When planning and implementing an aerodynamic experiment, model sizes and its position in the test section of the wind tunnel (WT play very important role. The paper focuses on the value variations of the aerodynamic characteristics of a model through changing its position in the WT test section and on the attenuation of the velocity field disturbance in front of the model. Flow around aerodynamic model profile in the open test section of the low-speed WT T-500 is simulated at BMSTU Department SM3. The problem is solved in a two-dimensional case using the ANSYS Fluent package. The mathematical model of flow is based on the Reynolds equations closed by the SST turbulence model. The paper also presents the results of the experiment. Experiments conducted in WT T-500 well correlate with the calculated data and show the optimal position in the middle of the test section when conducting the weighing and drainage experiments. Disturbance of tunnel dynamic pressure (velocity head and flow upwash around the model profile and circular cylinder in the WT test section is analyzed. It was found that flow upstream from the front stagnation point on the body weakly depends on the Reynolds number and obtained results can be used to assess the level of disturbances in the flow around a model by incompressible airflow.

  5. Test Section Turbulence in the AEDC/VKF Supersonic/Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    8 4.3 Ins t rumen ta t ion ....................................................... 18...Pressure Fluctuation Spectral Content in AEDC Tunnels A and B (Based on FY79 Pitot Probe), Af = 200 Hz...intensity, spatial distribution, and spectral content , has become increasingly important in the analysis of test data. The sector- supported model in the

  6. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  7. V/STOL Tandem Fan transition section model test. [in the Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkin, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    An approximately 0.25 scale model of the transition section of a tandem fan variable cycle engine nacelle was tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 10-by-10 foot wind tunnel. Two 12-inch, tip-turbine driven fans were used to simulate a tandem fan engine. Three testing modes simulated a V/STOL tandem fan airplane. Parallel mode has two separate propulsion streams for maximum low speed performance. A front inlet, fan, and downward vectorable nozzle forms one stream. An auxilliary top inlet provides air to the aft fan - supplying the core engine and aft vectorable nozzle. Front nozzle and top inlet closure, and removal of a blocker door separating the two streams configures the tandem fan for series mode operations as a typical aircraft propulsion system. Transition mode operation is formed by intermediate settings of the front nozzle, blocker door, and top inlet. Emphasis was on the total pressure recovery and flow distortion at the aft fan face. A range of fan flow rates were tested at tunnel airspeeds from 0 to 240 knots, and angles-of-attack from -10 to 40 deg for all three modes. In addition to the model variables for the three modes, model variants of the top inlet were tested in the parallel mode only. These lip variables were: aft lip boundary layer bleed holes, and Three position turning vane. Also a bellmouth extension of the top inlet side lips was tested in parallel mode.

  8. Calibration of the Flow in the Test Section of the Research Wind Tunnel at DST Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    of research projects, including the prediction of the performance of gas - turbine engines under conditions of pulsating flow , parametric studies of...the tunnel. The calibration data are presented and analysed and explanations of flow behaviour are given. 2. Mean-Velocity Measurements 2.1...

  9. Design and Numerical Calculation of Variable Test Section for Small Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav DVOŘÁK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with numerical modelling of transition in a separated boundary layer. The model of laminar/turbulent transition is based on the combination of empirical terms determining position of the transition and averaged Navier – Stokes equations closed by the k – ω SST turbulence model. The model of transition is applied in computation of 2D flow past NACA63A421 airfoil. Computation is performed using the commercial code ANSYS Fluent 6.3.26, in which the transition method is implemented as a User-Defined-Function. Computed distributions of Cp along the airfoil are verified by comparison with experimental data, which were obtained by measurements in a closed circuit wind tunnel at the constant Reynolds number and several angles of attack. Comparisons prove applicability of the implemented transitional model.

  10. Evolution, calibration, and operational characteristics of the two-dimensional test section of the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Ray, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a review of the development of the world's first cryogenic pressure tunnel, the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). Descriptions of the instrumentation, data acquisition systems, and physical features of the two-dimensional 8- by 24-in, (20.32 by 60.96 cm) and advanced 13- by 13-in (33.02 by 33.02 cm) adaptive-wall test-section inserts of the 0.3-m TCT are included. Basic tunnel-empty Mach number distributions, stagnation temperature distributions, and power requirements are included. The Mach number capability of the facility is from about 0.20 to 0.90. Stagnation pressure can be varied from about 80 to 327 K.

  11. Experimental evaluation of wall Mach number distributions of the octagonal test section proposed for NASA Lewis Research Center's altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Douglas E.; Burley, Richard R.; Corban, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    Wall Mach number distributions were determined over a range of test-section free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.92. The test section was slotted and had a nominal porosity of 11 percent. Reentry flaps located at the test-section exit were varied from 0 (fully closed) to 9 (fully open) degrees. Flow was bled through the test-section slots by means of a plenum evacuation system (PES) and varied from 0 to 3 percent of tunnel flow. Variations in reentry flap angle or PES flow rate had little or no effect on the Mach number distributions in the first 70 percent of the test section. However, in the aft region of the test section, flap angle and PES flow rate had a major impact on the Mach number distributions. Optimum PES flow rates were nominally 2 to 2.5 percent wtih the flaps fully closed and less than 1 percent when the flaps were fully open. The standard deviation of the test-section wall Mach numbers at the optimum PES flow rates was 0.003 or less.

  12. Wall adjustment strategy software for use with the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel adaptive wall test section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    The Wall Adjustment Strategy (WAS) software provides successful on-line control of the 2-D flexible walled test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This software package allows the level of operator intervention to be regulated as necessary for research and production type 2-D testing using and Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS). The software is designed to accept modification for future requirements, such as 3-D testing, with a minimum of complexity. The WAS software described is an attempt to provide a user friendly package which could be used to control any flexible walled AWTS. Control system constraints influence the details of data transfer, not the data type. Then this entire software package could be used in different control systems, if suitable interface software is available. A complete overview of the software highlights the data flow paths, the modular architecture of the software and the various operating and analysis modes available. A detailed description of the software modules includes listings of the code. A user's manual is provided to explain task generation, operating environment, user options and what to expect at execution.

  13. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  14. Tunnel fire testing and modeling the Morgex North tunnel experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borghetti, Fabio; Gandini, Paolo; Frassoldati, Alessio; Tavelli, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This book aims to cast light on all aspects of tunnel fires, based on experimental activities and theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. In particular, the authors describe a transient full-scale fire test (~15 MW), explaining how they designed and performed the experimental activity inside the Morgex North tunnel in Italy. The entire organization of the experiment is described, from preliminary evaluations to the solutions found for management of operational difficulties and safety issues. This fire test allowed the collection of different measurements (temperature, air velocity, smoke composition, pollutant species) useful for validating and improving CFD codes and for testing the real behavior of the tunnel and its safety systems during a diesel oil fire with a significant heat release rate. Finally, the fire dynamics are compared with empirical correlations, CFD simulations, and literature measurements obtained in other similar tunnel fire tests. This book will be of interest to all ...

  15. Wind tunnel test of musi VI bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permata, Robby; Andika, Matza Gusto; Syariefatunnisa, Risdhiawan, Eri; Hermawan, Budi; Noordiana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Musi VI Bridge is planned to cross the Musi River in Palembang City, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia. The main span is a steel arch type with 200 m length and side span length is 75 m. Finite element analysis results showed that the bridge has frequency ratio for torsional and heaving mode (torsional frequency/heaving frequency)=1.14. This close to unity value rises concern about aerodynamic behaviour and stability of the bridge deck under wind loading. Sectional static and free vibration wind tunnel test were performed to clarify this phenomena in B2TA3 facility in Serpong, Indonesia. The test followed the draft of Guide of Wind Tunnel Test for Bridges developed by Indonesian Ministry of Public Works. Results from wind tunnel testing show that the bridge is safe from flutter instability and no coupled motion vibration observed. Therefore, low value of frequency ratio has no effect to aerodynamic behaviour of the bridge deck. Vortex-induced vibration in heaving mode occurred in relatively low wind velocity with permissible maximum amplitude value.

  16. Tunnel boring waste test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricio, J.G.

    1984-03-01

    The test plan has been prepared in anticipation of the need to excavate certain repository openings by relying upon mechanical excavation techniques. The test plan proposes that specific technical issues can be resolved and key design parameters defined by excavating openings in basalt near the surface, utilizing a full face tunnel boring machine (TBM). The purpose and objective of this type of testing will define the overall feasibility and attributes of mechanical excavation in basalt. The test plan recognizes that although this technology is generally available for underground construction for some geologic settings, the current state of technology for excavation in basalt is limited and the potential for improvement is considerable. The test plan recommends that it is economically advantageous to conduct additional testing in the laboratory to allow refinement of this plan based on the laboratory results. Thus, this test plan is considered preliminary in nature, with respect to detailed testing recommendations. However, the gross design attributes and resource requirements of a near-surface TBM demonstration are considered to be valid. 15 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Design and Testing of an Educational Water Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2017-11-01

    A new water tunnel is designed and tested for educational and research purposes at Northern Arizona University. The university currently owns an educational wind tunnel with a test section of 12in X 12in X 24in. However, due to limited size of test section and range of Reynolds numbers, its application is currently limited to very few experiments. In an effort to expand the educational and research capabilities, a student team is tasked to design, build and test a water tunnel as a Capstone Senior Design project. The water tunnel is designed to have a test section of 8in X 8in X 36in. and be able to test up to Re = 50E3. Multiple numerical models are used to optimize the flow field inside the test section before building the physical apparatus. The water tunnel is designed to accommodate multiple experiments for drag and lift studies. The built-in die system can deliver up to three different colors to study the streamlines and vortex shedding from the surfaces. During the first phase, a low discharge pump is used to achieve Re = 4E3 to test laminar flows. In the second phase, a high discharge pump will be used to achieve targeted Re = 50E3 to study turbulent flows.

  18. Water table tests of proposed heat transfer tunnels for small turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, P. L.

    1974-01-01

    Water-table flow tests were conducted for proposed heat-transfer tunnels which were designed to provide uniform flow into their respective test sections of a single core engine turbine vane and a full annular ring of helicopter turbine vanes. Water-table tests were also performed for the single-vane test section of the core engine tunnel. The flow in the heat-transfer tunnels was shown to be acceptable.

  19. Experimental evaluation of blockage ratio and plenum evacuation system flow effects on pressure distribution for bodies of revolution in 0.1 scale model test section of NASA Lewis Research Center's proposed altitude wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the slotted test section of the 0.1-scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate wall interference effects at tunnel Mach numbers from 0.70 to 0.95 on bodies of revolution with blockage rates of 0.43, 3, 6, and 12 percent. The amount of flow that had to be removed from the plenum chamber (which surrounded the slotted test section) by the plenum evacuation system (PES) to eliminate wall interference effects was determined. The effectiveness of tunnel reentry flaps in removing flow from the plenum chamber was examined. The 0.43-percent blockage model was the only one free of wall interference effects with no PES flow. Surface pressures on the forward part of the other models were greater than interference-free results and were not influenced by PES flow. Interference-free results were achieved on the aft part of the 3- and 6-percent blockage models with the proper amount of PES flow. The required PES flow was substantially reduced by opening the reentry flaps.

  20. Wind Tunnel Testing of Active Control System for Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes preparation of wind tunnel testing of the principle of using flaps to control the motion of suspension bridges. The experiment will take place at the Instituto Superior Technico Lisbon, Portugal. The bridge section model is constructed of foam with an aluminium frame. The flaps...... are regulated by servo motors. Neural networks are used to position the flaps in the optimal positions....

  1. Effect of tunnel cross section on gas temperatures and heat fluxes in case of large heat release rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Chuan Gang; Li, Ying Zhen; Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of tunnel cross section together with ventilation velocity was studied. • Ceiling temperature varies clearly with tunnel height, but little with tunnel width. • Downstream temperature decreases with increasing tunnel dimensions. • HRR is an important factor that influences decay rate of excess gas temperature. • An equation considering both tunnel dimensions and HRR was developed. - Abstract: Tests with liquid and solid fuels in model tunnels (1:20) were performed and analysed in order to study the effect of tunnel cross section (width and height) together with ventilation velocity on ceiling gas temperatures and heat fluxes. The model tunnel was 10 m long with varying width (0.3 m, 0.45 m and 0.6 m) and height (0.25 m and 0.4 m). Test results show that the maximum temperature under the ceiling is a weak function of heat release rate (HRR) and ventilation velocity for cases with HRR more than 100 MW at full scale. It clearly varies with the tunnel height and is a weak function of the tunnel width. With a lower tunnel height, the ceiling is closer to the base of continuous flame zone and the temperatures become higher. Overall, the gas temperature beneath the ceiling decreases with the increasing tunnel dimensions, and increases with the increasing longitudinal ventilation velocity. The HRR is also an important factor that influences the decay rate of excess gas temperature, and a dimensionless HRR integrating HRR and other two key parameters, tunnel cross-sectional area and distance between fuel centre and tunnel ceiling, was introduced to account for the effect. An equation for the decay rate of excess gas temperature, considering both the tunnel dimensions and HRR, was developed. Moreover, a larger tunnel cross-sectional area will lead to a smaller heat flux.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Turid

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS) in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  3. Scanning Tunneling Spectroscope Use in Electrocatalysis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turid Knutsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the electrocatalytic properties of an electrode and its ability to transfer electrons between the electrode and a metallic tip in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM is investigated. The alkaline oxygen evolution reaction (OER was used as a test reaction with four different metallic glasses, Ni78Si8B14, Ni70Mo20Si5B5, Ni58Co20Si10B12, and Ni25Co50Si15B10, as electrodes. The electrocatalytic properties of the electrodes were determined. The electrode surfaces were then investigated with an STM. A clear relationship between the catalytic activity of an electrode toward the OER and its tunneling characteristics was found. The use of a scanning tunneling spectroscope (STS in electrocatalytic testing may increase the efficiency of the optimization of electrochemical processes.

  4. Toward an Integrated Optical Data System for Wind Tunnel Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruyten, Wim

    1999-01-01

    ...) of the test article in a wind tunnel test. The theory for such P&A determinations is developed and applied to data from a recent pressure sensitive paint test in AEDC's 16 ft transonic wind tunnel...

  5. The design of an aerosol test tunnel for occupational hygiene investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, D. B.; Heighington, K.

    An aerosol test tunnel which provides large working sections is described and its performance evaluated. Air movement within the tunnel is achieved with a powerful D.C. motor and centrifugal fan. Test dusts are dispersed and injected into the tunnel by means of an aerosol generator. A unique divertor valve allows aerosol laden air to be either cleaned by a commercial pulse jet filtration unit or recycled around the tunnel to obtain a high aerosol concentration. The tunnel instrumentation is managed by a microcomputer which automatically controls the airspeed and aerosol concentration.

  6. SMART Rotor Development and Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    amplifier and control system , and data acquisition, processing, and display systems . Boeing�s LRTS (Fig. 2), consists of a sled structure that...Support Test Stand Sled Tail Sting Outrigger Arm Figure 2: System integration test at whirl tower Port Rotor Balance Main Strut Flap Tail...demonstrated. Finally, the reliability of the flap actuation system was successfully proven in more than 60 hours of wind tunnel testing

  7. Continuous Extraction of Subway Tunnel Cross Sections Based on Terrestrial Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhong Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for the continuous extraction of subway tunnel cross sections using terrestrial point clouds is proposed. First, the continuous central axis of the tunnel is extracted using a 2D projection of the point cloud and curve fitting using the RANSAC (RANdom SAmple Consensus algorithm, and the axis is optimized using a global extraction strategy based on segment-wise fitting. The cross-sectional planes, which are orthogonal to the central axis, are then determined for every interval. The cross-sectional points are extracted by intersecting straight lines that rotate orthogonally around the central axis within the cross-sectional plane with the tunnel point cloud. An interpolation algorithm based on quadric parametric surface fitting, using the BaySAC (Bayesian SAmpling Consensus algorithm, is proposed to compute the cross-sectional point when it cannot be acquired directly from the tunnel points along the extraction direction of interest. Because the standard shape of the tunnel cross section is a circle, circle fitting is implemented using RANSAC to reduce the noise. The proposed approach is tested on terrestrial point clouds that cover a 150-m-long segment of a Shanghai subway tunnel, which were acquired using a LMS VZ-400 laser scanner. The results indicate that the proposed quadric parametric surface fitting using the optimized BaySAC achieves a higher overall fitting accuracy (0.9 mm than the accuracy (1.6 mm obtained by the plain RANSAC. The results also show that the proposed cross section extraction algorithm can achieve high accuracy (millimeter level, which was assessed by comparing the fitted radii with the designed radius of the cross section and comparing corresponding chord lengths in different cross sections and high efficiency (less than 3 s/section on average.

  8. Combustor Section Acoustic Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swanson, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    .... Following successful coupon and subelement tests on laser welding of Inco 625 heat exchangers, a full-scale scramjet flowpath section was fabricated to more realistically demonstrate the viability of the design concept...

  9. Nano-ADEPT Aeroloads Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon; Yount, Bryan; Kruger, Carl; Brivkalns, Chad; Makino, Alberto; Cassell, Alan; Zarchi, Kerry; McDaniel, Ryan; Ross, James; Wercinski, Paul; hide

    2016-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) was conducted in April 2015 at the US Army's 7 by10 Foot Wind Tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center. Key geometric features of the fabric test article were a 0.7 meter deployed base diameter, a 70 degree half-angle forebody cone angle, eight ribs, and a nose-to-base radius ratio of 0.7. The primary objective of this wind tunnel test was to obtain static deflected shape and pressure distributions while varying pretension at dynamic pressures and angles of attack relevant to entry conditions at Earth, Mars, and Venus. Other objectives included obtaining aerodynamic force and moment data and determining the presence and magnitude of any dynamic aeroelastic behavior (buzz/flutter) in the fabric trailing edge. All instrumentation systems worked as planned and a rich data set was obtained. This paper describes the test articles, instrumentation systems, data products, and test results. Four notable conclusions are drawn. First, test data support adopting a pre-tension lower bound of 10 foot pounds per inch for Nano-ADEPT mission applications in order to minimize the impact of static deflection. Second, test results indicate that the fabric conditioning process needs to be reevaluated. Third, no flutter/buzz of the fabric was observed for any test condition and should also not occur at hypersonic speeds. Fourth, translating one of the gores caused ADEPT to generate lift without the need for a center of gravity offset. At hypersonic speeds, the lift generated by actuating ADEPT gores could be used for vehicle control.

  10. Pressure field in measurement section of wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hnidka Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Defence in Brno has a new low-speed wind tunnel. In order to confirm the quality of the wind inside of the measurement section, several measurements of the dynamic pressure have been performed with the Pitot-static tube. The pressure fields are then analysed and quality of the field is evaluated. Measurement of a pressure drop on the body of a standing helicopter was conducted.

  11. Extruded Tunnel Lining System : Phase 1. Conceptual Design and Feasibility Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    The Extruded Tunnel Lining System (ETLS) has been conceived as a means of continuously placing the final concrete tunnel lining directly behind a tunnel boring machine. The system will shorten the time required to excavate and line a tunnel section, ...

  12. The value of MRI iniIdiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome by measuring the cross-sectional area of tarsal tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Jeong, Yu Mi; Lee, Sheen Woo; Choi Seung; Kim, Jeong Ho; Park, Hong Gi [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of MRI as a diagnostic test in tarsal tunnel syndrome. There are no published reports with this aim and no diagnostic standard for idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) using imaging modalities. We retrospectively searched our Picture Archiving and Communication System data and medical records to identify patients who were clinically and electomyographically diagnosed with idiopathic TTS without space-occupying lesion on MRI. Twenty five patients were included in the patient group. Another twenty-five patients who underwent ankle MRI for Achilles tendon disease were selected and included in the control group. Cross-sectional areas (CSA) of tarsal tunnel were manually measured independently by two radiologists who were blinded to clinical and surgical results, using three-dimensional reconstruction software in our hospital. Measurements were done on axial images at three levels (level 1, tibiotalar joint level; level 2, medial malleolar tip level; level 3, sustentaculum tali level). Patient and control group data were statistically analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test. The mean values of CSA at levels 1, 2, and 3 of the tarsal tunnel were 87.8 mm2, 98.2 mm2, and 105.2 mm2, respectively in the patient group; and 100.0 mm2, 113.8 mm2, and 127.9 mm2 in the control group, respectively, in reader 1; and 86.2 mm2, 97.6 mm2, 105.2 mm2, respectively in the patient group; and 99.7 mm2, 112.3 mm2, 124.4 mm2, respectively, in the control group, in reader 2. The mean CSA in the patient group was significantly less than that of the control group at all three levels (p < 0.05). Intra-class correlation coefficient value between reader 1 and reader 2 were 0.98 in group 1, and 0.97 in group 2, respectively. MRI can be helpful in the assessment of idiopathic tarsal tunnel syndrome. CSA measurements of tarsal tunnel at each level may predict TTS even though there are no space occupying lesions in the tarsal tunnel on MRI.

  13. Characterization of magnetic tunnel junction test pads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Kjær, Daniel; Nielsen, Peter Folmer

    2015-01-01

    We show experimentally as well as theoretically that patterned magnetic tunnel junctions can be characterized using the current-in-plane tunneling (CIPT) method, and the key parameters, the resistance-area product (RA) and the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), can be determined. The CIPT method...

  14. Build an Inexpensive Wind Tunnel to Test CO2 Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    As part of the technology education curriculum, the author's eighth-grade students design, build, test, and race CO2 vehicles. To help them in refining their designs, they use a wind tunnel to test for aerodynamic drag. In this article, the author describes how to build a wind tunnel using inexpensive, readily available materials. (Contains 1…

  15. Excavation of the SPS tunnel (view of a section prior to lining by a concrete shell)

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS ring (6911 m in circumference) is housed at a depth of 40 m (average) under the surface. The tunnel with an overall cross-sectional diameter of 4.8 m was drilled by big tunnelling machines (see 7406022X, 7406027X) into the molasse rock present in the Geneva basin. After the passage of the tunnelling machine the tunnel walls were lined with a concrete layer of about 30cm thickness.

  16. Ultrasonographic median nerve cross-section areas measured by 8-point 'inching test' for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: a correlation of nerve conduction study severity and duration of clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-01

    Incremental palmar stimulation of the median nerve sensory conduction at the wrist, the 'inching test', provides an assessment with reference to segments proximal and distal to the entrapment. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography (US) to measure the median nerve's cross-section areas (CSAs) like the 'inching test' and to correlate with the nerve conduction study (NCS) severity and duration of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Two hundred and twelve (212) 'CTS-hands' from 135 CTS patients and 50 asymptomatic hands ('A-hands') from 25 control individuals were enrolled. The median nerve CSAs were measured at the 8-point marked as i4, i3, i2, i1, w, o1, o2, and 03 in inching test. The NCS severities were classified into six groups based on motor and sensory responses (i.e., negative, minimal, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme). Results of US studies were compared in terms of NCS severity and duration of clinical CTS symptoms. There was significantly larger CSA of the NCS negative group of 'CTS-hands' than of 'A-hands'. The cut-off values of the CSAs of the NCS negative CTS group were 12.5 mm 2 , 11.5 mm 2 and 10.1 mm 2 at the inlet, wrist crease, and outlet, respectively. Of the 212 'CTS-hands', 32 were NCS negative while 40 had minimal, 43 mild, 85 moderate, 10 severe, and two extreme NCS severities. The CSAs of 'CTS-hands' positively correlated with different NCS severities and with the duration of CTS symptoms. By duration of clinical symptoms, 12 of the 212 'CTS-hands' were in the 1 month group; 82 in >1 month and ≤12 months group, and 118 in >12 months group. In 'inching test', segments i4-i3 and i3-i2 were the most common 'positive-site'. The corresponding CSAs measured at i4 and i3, but not at i2, were significantly larger than those measured at points that were not 'positive-site'. Using the 8-point measurement of the median

  17. A Study of Aerodynamics in Kevlar-Wall Test Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kenneth Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study is undertaken to characterize the aerodynamic behavior of Kevlar-wall test sections and specifically those containing two-dimensional, lifting models. The performance of the Kevlar-wall test section can be evaluated against the standard of the hard-wall test section, which in the case of the Stability Wind Tunnel (SWT) at Virginia Tech can be alternately installed or replaced by the Kevlar-wall test section. As a first step towards the evaluation of the Kevlar-wall test section aer...

  18. Photogrammetry Applied to Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Cattafesta, L. N., III; Radeztsky, R. H.; Burner, A. W.

    2000-01-01

    In image-based measurements, quantitative image data must be mapped to three-dimensional object space. Analytical photogrammetric methods, which may be used to accomplish this task, are discussed from the viewpoint of experimental fluid dynamicists. The Direct Linear Transformation (DLT) for camera calibration, used in pressure sensitive paint, is summarized. An optimization method for camera calibration is developed that can be used to determine the camera calibration parameters, including those describing lens distortion, from a single image. Combined with the DLT method, this method allows a rapid and comprehensive in-situ camera calibration and therefore is particularly useful for quantitative flow visualization and other measurements such as model attitude and deformation in production wind tunnels. The paper also includes a brief description of typical photogrammetric applications to temperature- and pressure-sensitive paint measurements and model deformation measurements in wind tunnels.

  19. Contributions of Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Testing to Airplane Flutter Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jose A.; Florance, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) became in operational in 1960, and since that time has achieved the status of the world's premier wind tunnel for testing large in aeroelastically scaled models at transonic speeds. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelastic testing. This paper will briefly describe these capabilities and features, and their relevance to aeroelastic testing. Contributions to specific airplane configurations and highlights from the flutter tests performed in the TDT aimed at investigating the aeroelastic characteristics of these configurations are presented.

  20. Glide back booster wind tunnel model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricop, M. V.; Cojocaru, M. G.; Stoica, C. I.; Niculescu, M. L.; Neculaescu, A. M.; Persinaru, A. G.; Boscoianu, M.

    2017-07-01

    Affordable space access requires partial or ideally full launch vehicle reuse, which is in line with clean environment requirement. Although the idea is old, the practical use is difficult, requiring very large technology investment for qualification. Rocket gliders like Space Shuttle have been successfullyoperated but the price and correspondingly the energy footprint were found not sustainable. For medium launchers, finally there is a very promising platform as Falcon 9. For very small launchers the situation is more complex, because the performance index (payload to start mass) is already small, versus medium and heavy launchers. For partial reusable micro launchers this index is even smaller. However the challenge has to be taken because it is likely that in a multiyear effort, technology is going to enable the performance recovery to make such a system economically and environmentally feasible. The current paper is devoted to a small unitary glide back booster which is foreseen to be assembled in a number of possible configurations. Although the level of analysis is not deep, the solution is analyzed from the aerodynamic point of view. A wind tunnel model is designed, with an active canard, to enablea more efficient wind tunnel campaign, as a national level premiere.

  1. Validation of US3D for Capsule Aerodynamics using 05-CA Wind Tunnel Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Several comparisons of computational fluid dynamics to wind tunnel test data are shown for the purpose of code validation. The wind tunnel test, 05-CA, uses a 7.66% model of NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle in the 11-foot test section of the Ames Unitary Plan Wind tunnel. A variety of freestream conditions over four Mach numbers and three angles of attack are considered. Test data comparisons include time-averaged integrated forces and moments, time-averaged static pressure ports on the surface, and Strouhal Number. The applicability of the US3D code to subsonic and transonic flow over a bluff body is assessed on a comprehensive data set. With close comparison, this work validates US3D for highly separated flows similar to those examined here.

  2. Conversion Method of the Balance Test Results in Open Jet Tunnel on the Free Flow Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Bui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a problem of sizing a model and converting the balance test results in the low speed open-jet wind tunnel to free-flow conditions. The ANSYS Fluent commercial code performs flow model calculations in the test section and in the free flow, and the ANSYS ICEM CFD module is used to provide grid generation. A structured grid is generated in the free flow and an unstructured one is provided in the test section. The changes of aerodynamic coefficients are determined at the different values of the blockage factor for the segmental-conical and hemisphere cylinder-cone shapes of the model. The blockage factor values are found at which the interference of the test section – model is neglected. The paper presents a technique to convert the wind tunnel test results to the free flow conditions.

  3. Seismic scanning tunneling macroscope - Elastic simulations and Arizona mine test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic seismic simulations and field data tests are used to validate the theory of a seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM). For nearfield elastic simulation, the SSTM results show superresolution to be better than λ/8 if the only scattered data are used as input data. If the direct P and S waves are muted then the resolution of the scatterer locations are within about λ/5. Seismic data collected in an Arizona tunnel showed a superresolution limit of at least λ/19. These test results are consistent with the theory of the SSTM and suggest that the SSTM can be a tool used by geophysicists as a probe for near-field scatterers.

  4. Characterization of a New Open Jet Wind Tunnel to Optimize and Test Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Using Flow Visualization and Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tourn, S.; Gilabert, R.; Sánchez, V.

    Characterize a new open jet wind tunnel and define the uniform test section where performance studies of small VAWTs will be carried out.......Characterize a new open jet wind tunnel and define the uniform test section where performance studies of small VAWTs will be carried out....

  5. The first tunnel section of the Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundin, T.K.; Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project will be constructed for the United States Department of Energy at a competitively-selected site in Ellis County, Texas, about 30 mile (50 km) south of the central business district of Dallas. The injector system and main collider ring will be housed in 70 mile (110 km) of tunnel, and the project will include additional shafts and underground enclosures with clear spans up to 30 ft (10 m) at depths of more than 250 ft (75 m). The first tunnel segment to be designed and constructed will include approximately 5.9 mile (9.4 km) of 12 ft (3.7 m) finished internal diameter tunnel, four shafts up to 55 ft (16.8 m) diameter, and various connecting tunnels and adits. Construction will be in weak rock lithologies, including mudstones, marls, and chalks with compressive strengths typically between 300 and 2500 psi (2.0 and 17.2 MPa). Design is underway, with an expected bid date before the end of 1990, and with start of construction following in the spring of 1991. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  6. Small-scale tunnel test for blast performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felts, J E; Lee, R J

    2014-01-01

    The data reported here provide a validation of a small-scale tunnel test as a tool to guide the optimization of new explosives for blast performance in tunnels. The small-scale arrangement consisted of a 2-g booster and 10-g sample mounted at the closed end of a 127 mm diameter by 4.6-m long steel tube with pressure transducers along its length. The three performance characteristics considered were peak pressure, initial energy release, and impulse. The relative performance from five explosives was compared to that from a 1.16-m diameter by 30-m long tunnel that used 2.27-kg samples. The peak pressure values didn't correlate between the tunnels. Partial impulse for the explosives did rank similarly. The initial energy release was determined from a one-dimensional point-source analysis, which nearly tracked with impulse suggesting additional energy released further down the tunnel for some explosives. This test is a viable tool for optimizing compositional variations for blast performance in target scenarios of similar geometry.

  7. Vivitron dead section pumping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heugel, J.; Bayet, J.P.; Brandt, C.; Delhomme, C.; Krieg, C.; Kustner, F.; Meiss, R.; Riehl, R.; Roth, C.; Schlewer, B.; Six, P.; Weber, A.

    1990-10-01

    Pumping tests have been conducted on a simulated accelerator dead section. The behavior of different pump types are compared and analyzed. Vacuum conditions to be expected in the Vivitron are reached and several parameters are verified. Selection of a pump for the Vivitron dead section is confirmed

  8. Correlations of Platooning Track Test and Wind Tunnel Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, Michael P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kelly, Kenneth J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering, Sharonville, OH (United States)

    2018-02-02

    In this report, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed results from multiple, independent truck platooning projects to compare and contrast track test results with wind tunnel test results conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Some highlights from the report include compiled data, and results from four independent SAE J1321 full-size track test campaigns that were compared to LLNL wind tunnel testing results. All platooning scenarios tested demonstrated significant fuel savings with good correlation relative to following distances, but there are still unanswered questions and clear opportunities for system optimization. NOx emissions showed improvements from NREL tests in 2014 to Auburn tests in 2015 with respect to J1321 platooning track testing of Peloton system. NREL evaluated data from Volpe's Naturalistic Study of Truck Following Behavior, which showed minimal impact of naturalistic background platooning. We found significant correlation between multiple track studies, wind tunnel tests, and computational fluid dynamics, but also showed that there is more to learn regarding close formation and longer-distance effects. We also identified potential areas for further research and development, including development of advanced aerodynamic designs optimized for platooning, measurement of platoon system performance in traffic conditions, impact of vehicle lateral offsets on platooning performance, and characterization of the national potential for platooning based on fleet operational characteristics.

  9. Resonant tunneling quantum waveguides of variable cross-section, asymptotics, numerics, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baskin, Lev; Plamenevskii, Boris; Sarafanov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This volume studies electron resonant tunneling in two- and three-dimensional quantum waveguides of variable cross-sections in the time-independent approach. Mathematical models are suggested for the resonant tunneling and develop asymptotic and numerical approaches for investigating the models. Also, schemes are presented for several electronics devices based on the phenomenon of resonant tunneling.   Devices based on the phenomenon of electron resonant tunneling are widely used in electronics. Efforts are directed towards refining properties of resonance structures. There are prospects for building new nanosize electronics elements based on quantum dot systems.   However, the role of resonance structure can also be given to a quantum wire of variable cross-section. Instead of an "electrode - quantum dot - electrode" system, one can use a quantum wire with two narrows. A waveguide narrow is an effective potential barrier for longitudinal electron motion along a waveguide. The part of the waveguide between ...

  10. Testing measurements of airflow velocity in road tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danišovič Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the project entitled “Models of formation and spread of fire to increase safety of road tunnels”, it was necessary to devise a method how to record airflow velocity during the fire in situ tests in road tunnels. Project is in first year of its solution so one testing measurement was performed to check the functionality of anemometers selected for this project and the first in situ measurement was also performed just a few days ago.

  11. Wind tunnel tests of a deep seabed penetrator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visintini, L.; Murray, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    C.C.R. Euratom Ispra are currently involved in studies on the possibility of storing radioactive wastes in deep ocean sediment beds. The report summarizes the results of wind tunnel tests performed in March 1985 on a 1:2.5 scale model of a European Standard Penetrator in Aermacchi low speed wind tunnel. Tests covered the measurement of overall fluid dynamic forces at varying angle of attack and measurement of unsteady pressures acting on the instrumentation head protruding in the penetrator's wake. Overall force coefficients were found to be in good agreement with predictions. Unsteady pressures were found to be much smaller than expected so that no mechanical damage to instrumentation is to be foreseen even at the high dynamic pressures typical of the penetrator moving into water. The present work has been undertaken under contract 2450-84-08 ED ISP I of C.C.R. EURATOM ISPRA

  12. Testing of tunnel support: dynamic load testing of rock support containment systems (eg wire mesh).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ortlepp, WD

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project was to determine the performance characteristics of containment elements of tunnel support in common use in South African mines under dynamic loading. The magnitude of the energy levels in this testing had...

  13. Wind tunnel testing to predict control room atmospheric dispersion factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmquist, L.J.; Harden, P.A.; Muraida, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent concerns at Palisades about control room habitability in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident have led to an extensive effort to increase control room habitability margin. The heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system servicing the control room has the potential for unfiltered in-leakage through its normal outside air intake louvered isolation dampers during emergency mode. The current limiting control room habitability analysis allows for 1.2 x 10 -2 m 3 /s (25 ft 3 /min) unfiltered in-leakage into the control room envelope. This leakage value was not thought to be achievable with the existing as-built configuration. Repairing the system was considered as a potential solution; however, this would be costly and could negatively affect plant operation. In addition, the system would still be required to meet the low specified unfiltered in-leakage. A second approach to this problem was to determine the atmospheric dispersion factors (x/Q's) through a wind tunnel test using a scale model of Palisades. The results of the wind tunnel testing could yield more realistic x/Q's for control room habitability than previously employed methods. Palisades selected the wind tunnel study option based on its ease of implementation, realistic results, and low cost. More importantly, the results of the study could increase the allowable unfiltered in-leakage

  14. Borehole heater test at KAERI Underground Research Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. K.; Cho, W. J.; Jeon, S. W.

    2009-09-01

    At HLW repository, the temperature change due to the decay heat in near field can affect the hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical behaviors and influence on the repository safety. Therefore, the understanding of the thermal behavior in near field is essential for the site selection, design, as well as operation of the repository. In this study, various studies for the in situ heater test, which is for the investigation of the thermo-mechanical behavior in rock mass, were carried out. At first, similar in situ tests at foreign URLs were reviewed and summarized the major conclusions from the tests. After then an adequate design of heater, observation sensors, and data logging system were developed and installed with a consideration of the site condition and test purposes. In order to minimize the effect of hydraulic phenomenon, a relatively day zone was chosen for the in situ test. Joint distribution and characteristics in the zone were surveyed and the rock mass properties were determined with various laboratory tests. In this study, an adequate location for an in situ borehole heater test was chosen. Also a heater for the test was designed and manufactured and the sensors for measuring the rock behavior were installed. It was possible to observe that stiff joints are developed overwhelmingly in the test area from the joint survey at the tunnel wall. The major rock and rock mass properties at the test site could be determined from the thermo-mechanical laboratory tests using the rock cores retrieved from the site. The measured data were implemented in the three-dimensional computer simulation. From the modeling using FLAC3D code, it was possible to find that the heat convection through the tunnel wall can influence on temperature distribution in rock. Because of that it was necessary to installed a blocking wall to minimize the effect of ventilation system on the heater test, which is carrying out nearby the tunnel wall. The in situ borehole heater test is the first

  15. Wind tunnel test IA300 analysis and results, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, P. B.; Beaufait, W. B.; Kitchens, L. L.; Pace, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of wind tunnel pressure data from the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test IA300 are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the effects of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) plumes on the integrated vehicle forebody pressure distributions, the elevon hinge moments, and wing loads. The results of this test will be combined with flight test results to form a new data base to be employed in the IVBC-3 airloads analysis. A secondary objective was to obtain solid plume data for correlation with the results of gaseous plume tests. Data from the power level portion was used in conjunction with flight base pressures to evaluate nominal power levels to be used during the investigation of changes in model attitude, eleveon deflection, and nozzle gimbal angle. The plume induced aerodynamic loads were developed for the Space Shuttle bases and forebody areas. A computer code was developed to integrate the pressure data. Using simplified geometrical models of the Space Shuttle elements and components, the pressure data were integrated to develop plume induced force and moments coefficients that can be combined with a power-off data base to develop a power-on data base.

  16. Preliminary Design of a LSA Aircraft Using Wind Tunnel Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert ANGI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents preliminary results concerning the design and aerodynamic calculations of a light sport aircraft (LSA. These were performed for a new lightweight, low cost, low fuel consumption and long-range aircraft. The design process was based on specific software tools as Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA, XFlr 5 aerodynamic and dynamic stability analysis, and Catia design, according to CS-LSA requirements. The calculations were accomplished by a series of tests performed in the wind tunnel in order to assess experimentally the aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane.

  17. Median nerve cross-sectional area and MRI diffusion characteristics: normative values at the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lawrence; Gai, Neville

    2009-01-01

    Enlargement of the median nerve is an objective potential imaging sign of carpal tunnel syndrome. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) may provide additional structural information that may prove useful in characterizing median neuropathy. This study further examines normal values for median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA). Twenty-three wrists in 17 healthy volunteers underwent MRI of the wrist at 3 T. In 13 subjects, DTI was performed at a B value of 600 mm 2 /s. Median nerve CSA, ADC, and FA were analyzed at standardized anatomic levels. Mean (SD) median nerve CSA within the proximal carpal tunnel was 10.0 (3.4) mm 2 . The mean (SD) FA of the median nerve was 0.71 (0.06) and 0.70 (0.13) proximal to and within the carpal tunnel, respectively. There was a significant difference between nerve CSA and ADC, but not FA, at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel. Nerve CSA, ADC, and FA did not differ between men and women or between dominant and non-dominant wrists. Nerve CSA at the proximal carpal tunnel was positively correlated with subject age and body mass index. Our results suggest a 90% upper confidence limit for normal median nerve CSA of 14.4 mm 2 at the proximal carpal tunnel, higher than normal limits reported by many ultrasound studies. We observed a difference between the CSA and ADC, but not the FA, of the median nerve at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel levels. (orig.)

  18. Shock-tunnel combustor testing for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed configurations for the next generation of transatmospheric vehicles will rely on air breathing propulsion systems during all or part of their mission. At flight Mach numbers greater than about 7 these engines will operate in the supersonic combustion ramjet mode (scramjet). Ground testing of these engine concepts above Mach 8 requires high pressure, high enthalpy facilities such as shock tunnels and expansion tubes. These impulse, or short duration facilities have test times on the order of a millisecond, requiring high speed instrumentation and data systems. One such facility ideally suited for scramjet testing is the NASA-Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel, which over the last two years has completed a series of tests for the NASP (National Aero-Space Plane) program at simulated flight Mach numbers ranging from 12-16. The focus of the experimental programs consisted of a series of classified tests involving a near-full scale hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor model in the semi-free jet method of engine testing whereby the compressed forebody flow ahead of the cowl inlet is reproduced (see appendix A). The AIMHYE-1 (Ames Integrated Modular Hypersonic Engine) test entry for the NASP program was completed in April 1993, while AIMHYE-2 was completed in May 1994. The test entries were regarded as successful, resulting in some of the first data of its kind on the performance of a near full scale scramjet engine at Mach 12-16. The data was distributed to NASP team members for use in design system verification and development. Due to the classified nature of the hardware and data, the data reports resulting from this work are classified and have been published as part of the NASP literature. However, an unclassified AIAA paper resulted from the work and has been included as appendix A. It contains an overview of the test program and a description of some of the important issues.

  19. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    . The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy......This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off...... the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process...

  20. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    During February and April 2012 a series of wind tunnel tests were performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility (OJF) with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible ...... in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2....... blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the tower base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is provided as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating...

  1. Ambient temperature testing of the G-tunnel heated block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Board, M.P.; Hardin, E.L.; Voegele, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The G-Tunnel heated block experiment is being conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project (NNWSI). The purpose of the ambient temperature testing phase is to evaluate rock-mass mechanical properties of a block (≅8 m/sup 3/) under biaxial stress changes up to 7.5 MPa above an initialization in situ value of 3.1 MPa. Results indicate that the modulus of deformation ranges from 9.7 to 17.0 GPa and Poisson's ratio ranges from 0.21 to 0.33. In general, the higher values of the modulus and Poisson's ratio were influenced by fracture propagations parallel to the compressive stress field. Other measurements indicated that cross-hole compression (p) wave velocities and single fracture permeability values were relatively insensitive to stress changes above the in situ value

  2. Computer Simulation of Blast Waves in a Tunnel with Sudden Decrease in Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, L. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neuscamman, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-22

    The case of an explosion in a tunnel where the blast wave encounters a sudden decrease in cross section is studied with quasi-one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional axisymmetric codes (2D) and the results are compared to experimental data. It is found that the numerical results from both codes are in good agreement until the interface at the change in cross section is encountered. Thereafter, however, the peak pressure derived with the codes is found to be significantly higher than the experimental results although the agreement between the 2D result and the experiment improves with increasing distance down the tunnel. Peak pressure and impulse per unit area obtained downstream of the interface with the 1D analysis are found to be substantially higher than with either the experiment or the 2D results. The reason for this is the time delay for the shock reflecting off the (vertical) rigid wall between the inner and outer tunnel radii to interact with the (supersonic) core flow into the decreased cross section. In the 1D case the reflected and transmitted shocks are formed instantaneously across the entire cross section resulting in higher pressure and increased shock speed downstream of the interface.

  3. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2014-08-05

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  4. Fault detection by surface seismic scanning tunneling macroscope: Field test

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    The seismic scanning tunneling macroscope (SSTM) is proposed for detecting the presence of near-surface impedance anomalies and faults. Results with synthetic data are consistent with theory in that scatterers closer to the surface provide brighter SSTM profiles than those that are deeper. The SSTM profiles show superresolution detection if the scatterers are in the near-field region of the recording line. The field data tests near Gulf of Aqaba, Haql, KSA clearly show the presence of the observable fault scarp, and identify the subsurface presence of the hidden faults indicated in the tomograms. Superresolution detection of the fault is achieved, even when the 35 Hz data are lowpass filtered to the 5-10 Hz band.

  5. Electrodiagnostic Testing and Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Pi Shan, Rodney; Nicolle, Michael; Chan, Ming; Ashworth, Nigel; White, Chris; Winston, Paul; Dukelow, Sean

    2016-01-01

    1) Assess which electrodiagnostic studies Canadian clinicians use to aid in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). 2) Assess whether Canadian clinicians follow the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Neurology/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in CTS. 3) Assess how Canadian clinicians manage CTS once a diagnosis has been established. In this prospective observational study, an electronic survey was sent to all members of the Canadian Neuromuscular Group (CNMG) and the Canadian Association of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (CAPM&R) Neuromuscular Special Interest Group. Questions addressed which electrodiagnostic tests were being routinely used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Management recommendations for CTS was also explored. Of the 70 individuals who completed the survey, fourteen different nerve conduction study techniques were reported. Overall, 36/70 (51%) of participants followed the AANEM/AAN/AAPM&R Practice Parameter. The standard followed by the fewest of our respondents with 64% compliance (45/70) was the use of a standard distance of 13 to 14 cm with respect to the median sensory nerve conduction study. Regarding management, 99% would recommend splinting in the case of mild CTS. In moderate CTS, splinting was recommended by 91% of clinicians and 68% would also consider referral for surgery. In severe CTS, most recommended surgery (93%). There is considerable variability in terms of which electrodiagnostic tests Canadian clinicians perform for CTS. Canadian clinicians are encouraged to adhere to the AANEM/AAN/AAPM&R Practice Parameter for Electrodiagnostic Studies in CTS.

  6. 40 CFR 53.63 - Test procedure: Wind tunnel inlet aspiration test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the sampler inlet opening centered in the sampling zone. To meet the maximum blockage limit of § 53.62(c)(1) or for convenience, part of the test sampler may be positioned external to the wind tunnel... = reference method sampler volumetric flow rate; and t = sampling time. (iii) Remove the reference method...

  7. Validation of a wind tunnel testing facility for blade surface pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Antoniou, I.; Soerensen, N.N.; Madsen, H.A.

    1998-04-01

    This report concerns development and validation of a 2d testing facility for airfoil pressure measurements. The VELUX open jet wind tunnel was used with a test stand inserted. Reynolds numbers until 1.3 million were achieved with an airfoil chord of 0.45 m. The aerodynamic load coefficients were found from pressure distribution measurements and the total drag coefficient was calculated from wake rake measurements. Stationary inflow as well as dynamic inflow through pitching motion was possible. Wind tunnel corrections were applied for streamline curvature and down-wash. Even though the wind tunnel is not ideal for 2d testing, the overall quality of the flow was acceptable with a uniform flow field at the test stand position and a turbulence intensity of 1 % at the inlet of the test section. Reference values for free stream static and total pressure were found upstream of the test stand. The NACA 63-215 airfoil was tested and the results were compared with measurements from FFA and NACA. The measurements agreed well except for lift coefficient values at high angles of attack and the drag coefficient values at low angles of attack, that were slightly high. Comparisons of the measured results with numerical predictions from the XFOIL code and the EllipSys2D code showed good agreement. Measurements with the airfoil in pitching motion were carried out to study the dynamic aerodynamic coefficients. Steady inflow measurements at high angles of attack were used to investigate the double stall phenomenon. (au) EFP-94; EFP-95; EFP-97. 8 tabs., 82 ills., 16 refs.

  8. Overload prevention in model supports for wind tunnel model testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton IVANOVICI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Preventing overloads in wind tunnel model supports is crucial to the integrity of the tested system. Results can only be interpreted as valid if the model support, conventionally called a sting remains sufficiently rigid during testing. Modeling and preliminary calculation can only give an estimate of the sting’s behavior under known forces and moments but sometimes unpredictable, aerodynamically caused model behavior can cause large transient overloads that cannot be taken into account at the sting design phase. To ensure model integrity and data validity an analog fast protection circuit was designed and tested. A post-factum analysis was carried out to optimize the overload detection and a short discussion on aeroelastic phenomena is included to show why such a detector has to be very fast. The last refinement of the concept consists in a fast detector coupled with a slightly slower one to differentiate between transient overloads that decay in time and those that are the result of aeroelastic unwanted phenomena. The decision to stop or continue the test is therefore conservatively taken preserving data and model integrity while allowing normal startup loads and transients to manifest.

  9. Static Aeroelastic Deformation Effects in Preliminary Wind-tunnel Tests of Silent Supersonic Technology Demonstrator

    OpenAIRE

    Makino, Yoshikazu; Ohira, Keisuke; Makimoto, Takuya; Mitomo, Toshiteru; 牧野, 好和; 大平, 啓介; 牧本, 卓也; 三友, 俊輝

    2011-01-01

    Effects of static aeroelastic deformation of a wind-tunnel test model on the aerodynamic characteristics are discussed in wind-tunnel tests in the preliminary design phase of the silent supersonic technology demonstrator (S3TD). The static aeroelastic deformation of the main wing is estimated for JAXA 2m x 2m transonic wind-tunnel and 1m x 1m supersonic wind-tunnel by a finite element method (FEM) structural analysis in which its structural model is tuned with the model deformation calibratio...

  10. New Model Exhaust System Supports Testing in NASA Lewis' 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeder, James W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    In early 1996, the ability to run NASA Lewis Research Center's Abe Silverstein 10- by 10- Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10) at subsonic test section speeds was reestablished. Taking advantage of this new speed range, a subsonic research test program was scheduled for the 10x10 in the fall of 1996. However, many subsonic aircraft test models require an exhaust source to simulate main engine flow, engine bleed flows, and other phenomena. This was also true of the proposed test model, but at the time the 10x10 did not have a model exhaust capability. So, through an in-house effort over a period of only 5 months, a new model exhaust system was designed, installed, checked out, and made ready in time to support the scheduled test program.

  11. Morphing wing system integration with wind tunnel testing =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guezguez, Mohamed Sadok

    Preserving the environment is a major challenge for today's aviation industry. Within this context, the CRIAQ MDO 505 project started, where a multidisciplinary approach was used to improve aircraft fuel efficiency. This international project took place between several Canadian and Italian teams. Industrial teams are Bombardier Aerospace, Thales Canada and Alenia Aermacchi. The academic partners are from Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal and Naples University. Teams from 'CIRA' and IAR-NRC research institutes had, also, contributed on this project. The main objective of this project is to improve the aerodynamic performance of a morphing wing prototype by reducing the drag. This drag reduction is achieved by delaying the flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) by performing shape optimization of the flexible upper skin according to different flight conditions. Four linear axes, each one actuated by a 'BLDC' motor, are used to morph the skin. The skin displacements are calculated by 'CFD' numerical simulation based on flow parameters which are Mach number, the angle of attack and aileron's angle of deflection. The wing is also equipped with 32 pressure sensors to experimentally detect the transition during aerodynamic testing in the subsonic wind tunnel at the IAR-NRC in Ottawa. The first part of the work is dedicated to establishing the necessary fieldbus communications between the control system and the wing. The 'CANopen' protocol is implemented to ensure real time communication between the 'BLDC' drives and the real-time controller. The MODBUS TCP protocol is used to control the aileron drive. The second part consists of implementing the skin control position loop based on the LVDTs feedback, as well as developing an automated calibration procedure for skin displacement values. Two 'sets' of wind tunnel tests were carried out to, experimentally, investigate the morphing wing controller effect; these tests also offered the

  12. Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12T), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD

  13. A numerical study on the influence of slope and curvature on smoke flow in special section tunnel with natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhou; Zhou, Xianping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Ya; Liu, Wanfu; Hong, Li

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a special section tunnel model was established by using FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). The influences of lope and curvature on smoke flow under natural ventilation have been studied. The results showed that under the condition of natural ventilation, the slope has some influences on the smoke flow in special section tunnel. The smoke spreading speed is accelerated along the upstream direction and decrease along the downstream direction due to buoyancy effect of slope. The steeper the tunnel, the more obvious the buoyancy effect. The curvature has little effect on the flow of flue gas.

  14. Capabilities of wind tunnels with two-adaptive walls to minimize boundary interference in 3-D model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebstock, Rainer; Lee, Edwin E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    An initial wind tunnel test was made to validate a new wall adaptation method for 3-D models in test sections with two adaptive walls. First part of the adaptation strategy is an on-line assessment of wall interference at the model position. The wall induced blockage was very small at all test conditions. Lift interference occurred at higher angles of attack with the walls set aerodynamically straight. The adaptation of the top and bottom tunnel walls is aimed at achieving a correctable flow condition. The blockage was virtually zero throughout the wing planform after the wall adjustment. The lift curve measured with the walls adapted agreed very well with interference free data for Mach 0.7, regardless of the vertical position of the wing in the test section. The 2-D wall adaptation can significantly improve the correctability of 3-D model data. Nevertheless, residual spanwise variations of wall interference are inevitable.

  15. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makanji, H. S.; Becker, S. J. E.; Mudgal, C. S.; Jupiter, J. B.; Ring, D.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study measured and compared the diagnostic performance characteristics of various clinical signs and physical examination manoeuvres for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), including the scratch collapse test. Eighty-eight adult patients that were prescribed electrophysiological testing

  16. Low temperature ultrahigh vacuum cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscope for luminescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khang, Yoonho; Park, Yeonjoon; Salmeron, Miquel; Weber, Eicke R.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed a scanning tunneling microscope with simultaneous light collection capabilities in order to investigate the opto-electronic properties of semiconductors. The microscope has in situ sample cleavage mechanism for cross-sectional sample. In order to reach low temperature (4 K), we used a specially designed cryostat. The efficiency of light collection generated in the tip-surface junction was greatly improved by use of a small parabolic mirror with the tip located at its focal point. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Facility Closure Report for Tunnel U16a, Area 16, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    U16a is not listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The closure of U16a was sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and performed with the cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This report documents closure of this site as identified in the DTRA Fiscal Year 2008 Statement of Work, Task 6.3. Closure activities included: (1) Removing and disposing of a shack and its contents; (2) Disposing of debris from within the shack and in the vicinity of the tunnel entrance; (3) Verifying that the tunnel is empty; (4) Welding screened covers over tunnel vent holes to limit access and allow ventilation; and (5) Constructing a full-tunnel cross-section fibercrete bulkhead to prevent access to the tunnel Field activities were conducted from July to August 2008.

  18. Instanton tunneling for de Sitter space with real projective spatial sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Yen Chin [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yeom, Dong-han, E-mail: ongyenchin@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2017-04-01

    The physics of tunneling from one spacetime to another is often understood in terms of instantons. For some instantons, it was recently shown in the literature that there are two complementary ''interpretations'' for their analytic continuations. Dubbed ''something-to-something'' and ''nothing-to-something'' interpretations, respectively, the former involves situation in which the initial and final hypersurfaces are connected by a Euclidean manifold, whereas the initial and final hypersurfaces in the latter case are not connected in such a way. We consider a de Sitter space with real projective space RP{sup 3} spatial sections, as was originally understood by de Sitter himself. This original version of de Sitter space has several advantages over the usual de Sitter space with S{sup 3} spatial sections. In particular, the interpretation of the de Sitter entropy as entanglement entropy is much more natural. We discuss the subtleties involved in the tunneling of such a de Sitter space.

  19. Two-Dimensional Bifurcated Inlet Variable Cowl Lip Test Completed in 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, T. R.

    2000-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field successfully tested a variable cowl lip inlet at simulated takeoff conditions in Glenn s 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) as part of the High-Speed Research Program. The test was a follow-on to the Two-Dimensional Bifurcated (2DB) Inlet/Engine test. At the takeoff condition for a High-Speed Civil Transport aircraft, the inlet must provide adequate airflow to the engine with an acceptable distortion level and high-pressure recovery. The test was conducted to study the effectiveness of installing two rotating lips on the 2DB Inlet cowls to increase mass flow rate and eliminate or reduce boundary layer flow separation near the lips. Hardware was mounted vertically in the test section so that it extended through the tunnel ceiling and that the 2DB Inlet was exposed to the atmosphere above the test section. The tunnel was configured in the aerodynamic mode, and exhausters were used to pump down the tunnel to vacuum levels and to provide a maximum flow rate of approximately 58 lb/sec. The test determined the (1) maximum flow in the 2DB Inlet for each variable cowl lip, (2) distortion level and pressure recovery for each lip configuration, (3) boundary layer conditions near variable lips inside the 2DB Inlet, (4) effects of a wing structure adjacent to the 2DB Inlet, and (5) effects of different 2DB Inlet exit configurations. It also employed flow visualization to generate enough qualitative data on variable lips to optimize the variable lip concept. This test was a collaborative effort between the Boeing Company and Glenn. Extensive inhouse support at Glenn contributed significantly to the progress and accomplishment of this test.

  20. Comparison of Force and Moment Coefficients for the Same Test Article in Multiple Wind Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares the results of force and moment measurements made on the same test article and with the same balance in three transonic wind tunnels. Comparisons are made for the same combination of Reynolds number, Mach number, sideslip angle, control surface configuration, and angle of attack range. Between-tunnel force and moment differences are quantified. An analysis of variance was performed at four unique sites in the design space to assess the statistical significance of between-tunnel variation and any interaction with angle of attack. Tunnel to tunnel differences too large to attribute to random error were detected were observed for all forces and moments. In some cases these differences were independent of angle of attack and in other cases they changed with angle of attack.

  1. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Further low speed testing and final design studies for the transonic facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Work was continued with the low speed self streamlining wind tunnel (SSWT) using the NACA 0012-64 airfoil in an effort to explain the discrepancies between the NASA Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel (LTPT) and SSWT results obtained with the airfoil stalled. Conventional wind tunnel corrections were applied to straight wall SSWT airfoil data, to illustrate the inadequacy of standard correction techniques in circumstances of high blockage. Also one SSWT test was re-run at different air speeds to investigate the effects of such changes (perhaps through changes in Reynold's number and freestream turbulence levels) on airfoil data and wall contours. Mechanical design analyses for the transonic self-streamlining wind tunnel (TSWT) were completed by the application of theoretical airfoil flow field data to the elastic beam and streamline analysis. The control system for the transonic facility, which will eventually allow on-line computer operation of the wind tunnel, was outlined.

  2. Wind Tunnel Tests of Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors: March 2001--August 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, N.; Peterka, J. A.; Gee, R. C.; Kearney, D.

    2008-05-01

    Conducted extensive wind-tunnel tests on parabolic trough solar collectors to determine practical wind loads applicable to structural design for stress and deformation, and local component design for concentrator reflectors.

  3. Wind tunnel experiments on unstable self-excited vibration of sectional girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Král, Radomil; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a wind tunnel analysis of two degrees-of-freedom system represented by sectional girders is carried out. Besides an evaluation of the aeroelastic coefficients, the analysis is focused on the influence of the natural frequency ratio on the initiation of unstable vibration, which can be of practical interest. On the phenomenological level, the paper also discusses experimentally ascertained response regimes, with an emphasis on their stability character. The attention is paid to the memory effect in the response described by the hysteresis loop together with the separation curves determining the stability boundaries. The influence of initial disturbance on the stability is examined. Two types of cross-sections were investigated: (i) rectangular one with the aspect ratio 1:5, and (ii) bridge-like cross-section with comparable principal dimensions. For both types of cross-sections, the limits of the stability are significantly affected by an intentionally introduced initial disturbance. This holds especially with regard to the rectangular profile where the separation curves create very narrow sub-domains between a stable and an unstable response, while the bridge-like cross-section demonstrates much stable behaviour.

  4. Work-related carpal tunnel syndrome treatment: a cross-sectional study among 106 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aouatef

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to assess the influence of sociodemographic, professional and clinical variables on the choice of treatment of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. An exhaustive and trans-sectional study was conducted over a period of eight years, from 1st January 2006 to 31 December 2013 in the Department of Occupational Medicine at University Hospital of Mahdia, Tunisia. The study population was represented by patients with work-related carpal tunnel syndrome. Data collection was based on a questionnaire sheet, describing social, occupational and medical characteristics of patients. The study population was characterized by a large female dominance, representing 95.3% with an average age of 42±7.8 years. Patients medically treated represented 38.7% and 61.3% had had surgical treatment. After binary logistic regression, surgical indication of CTS was significantly correlated to diabetes (p=0.017, other musculoskeletal disorders (p=0.02, functional signs of CTS (acrocyanosis p=0.05; muscle weakness p=0.015; radiating pain p=0.01; painful discomfort of the hand, the forearm or arm p=0.027 and to the atrophy of thenar muscles (p=0.018. According to this study, the choice of therapy for occupational CTS depends only on clinical data. More detailed studies will be needed to refine these results.

  5. Documentation and archiving of the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test data base. Volume 1: Background and description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romere, Paul O.; Brown, Steve Wesley

    1995-01-01

    Development of the space shuttle necessitated an extensive wind tunnel test program, with the cooperation of all the major wind tunnels in the United States. The result was approximately 100,000 hours of space shuttle wind tunnel testing conducted for aerodynamics, heat transfer, and structural dynamics. The test results were converted into Chrysler DATAMAN computer program format to facilitate use by analysts, a very cost effective method of collecting the wind tunnel test results from many test facilities into one centralized location. This report provides final documentation of the space shuttle wind tunnel program. The two-volume set covers evolution of space shuttle aerodynamic configurations and gives wind tunnel test data, titles of wind tunnel data reports, sample data sets, and instructions for accessing the digital data base.

  6. Tests to determine water uptake behaviour of tunnel backfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) (Canada)); Anttila, S.; Viitanen, M. (Poeyry InfRa Oy (Finland)); Keto, Paula (Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-12-15

    A series of 27 large-scale tests have been completed at the 420 level of SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. These tests have examined the influence of natural Aespoe fracture zone water on the movement of water into and through assemblies of Friedland clay blocks and bentonite pellets/ granules. These tests have established the manner in which groundwater may influence backfill and backfilling operations at the repository-scale. Tests have established that it is critical to provide a clay block backfilling system with lateral support and confinement as quickly as possible following block installation. Exposure of the blocks to even low rates of water ingress can result in rapid loss of block cohesion and subsequent slumping of the block materials into the spaces between the blocks and the tunnel walls. Installation of granular or pelletized bentonite clay between the blocks and the walls resulted in a system that was generally stable and not prone to unacceptable short-term strains as water entered. Inflow of water into a backfilled volume does not result in uniform wetting of the pellet/granule filled volume and as a result there is the potential for rapid movement of water from the point(s) of ingress to the downstream face of the backfill. Depending on the inflow rate and flow path(s) developed this flow can be via discrete flow channels that are essentially non-erosive or else they can develop highly erosive flow paths through the clay block materials. Erosion generally tends to be highest in the period immediately following first water exit from the backfill and then decreases as preferential flow paths develop to channel the water directly through the backfill, bypassing large volumes of unsaturated backfill. At the scale examined in this study inflow rates of 0.1 l/min or less do not tend to be immediately problematic when the source is 0.6 m distant from the downstream face of the backfill. At larger scales or longer distances from the working face, it

  7. Tests to determine water uptake behaviour of tunnel backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, David; Anttila, S.; Viitanen, M.; Keto, Paula

    2008-12-01

    A series of 27 large-scale tests have been completed at the 420 level of SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. These tests have examined the influence of natural Aespoe fracture zone water on the movement of water into and through assemblies of Friedland clay blocks and bentonite pellets/ granules. These tests have established the manner in which groundwater may influence backfill and backfilling operations at the repository-scale. Tests have established that it is critical to provide a clay block backfilling system with lateral support and confinement as quickly as possible following block installation. Exposure of the blocks to even low rates of water ingress can result in rapid loss of block cohesion and subsequent slumping of the block materials into the spaces between the blocks and the tunnel walls. Installation of granular or pelletized bentonite clay between the blocks and the walls resulted in a system that was generally stable and not prone to unacceptable short-term strains as water entered. Inflow of water into a backfilled volume does not result in uniform wetting of the pellet/granule filled volume and as a result there is the potential for rapid movement of water from the point(s) of ingress to the downstream face of the backfill. Depending on the inflow rate and flow path(s) developed this flow can be via discrete flow channels that are essentially non-erosive or else they can develop highly erosive flow paths through the clay block materials. Erosion generally tends to be highest in the period immediately following first water exit from the backfill and then decreases as preferential flow paths develop to channel the water directly through the backfill, bypassing large volumes of unsaturated backfill. At the scale examined in this study inflow rates of 0.1 l/min or less do not tend to be immediately problematic when the source is 0.6 m distant from the downstream face of the backfill. At larger scales or longer distances from the working face, it is

  8. Rotary Balance Wind Tunnel Testing for the FASER Flight Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Casey; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Flight dynamics research was conducted to collect and analyze rotary balance wind tunnel test data in order to improve the aerodynamic simulation and modeling of a low-cost small unmanned aircraft called FASER (Free-flying Aircraft for Sub-scale Experimental Research). The impetus for using FASER was to provide risk and cost reduction for flight testing of more expensive aircraft and assist in the improvement of wind tunnel and flight test techniques, and control laws. The FASER research aircraft has the benefit of allowing wind tunnel and flight tests to be conducted on the same model, improving correlation between wind tunnel, flight, and simulation data. Prior wind tunnel tests include a static force and moment test, including power effects, and a roll and yaw damping forced oscillation test. Rotary balance testing allows for the calculation of aircraft rotary derivatives and the prediction of steady-state spins. The rotary balance wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST). Rotary balance testing includes runs for a set of given angular rotation rates at a range of angles of attack and sideslip angles in order to fully characterize the aircraft rotary dynamics. Tests were performed at angles of attack from 0 to 50 degrees, sideslip angles of -5 to 10 degrees, and non-dimensional spin rates from -0.5 to 0.5. The effects of pro-spin elevator and rudder deflection and pro- and anti-spin elevator, rudder, and aileron deflection were examined. The data are presented to illustrate the functional dependence of the forces and moments on angle of attack, sideslip angle, and angular rate for the rotary contributions to the forces and moments. Further investigation is necessary to fully characterize the control effectors. The data were also used with a steady state spin prediction tool that did not predict an equilibrium spin mode.

  9. Model-Scale Aerodynamic Performance Testing of Proposed Modifications to the NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Coston, Calvin W., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 1/20th-scale model of the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel to determine the performance effects of insertion of acoustic baffles in the tunnel inlet, replacement of the existing collector with a new collector design in the open jet test section, and addition of flow splitters to the acoustic baffle section downstream of the test section. As expected, the inlet baffles caused a reduction in facility performance. About half of the performance loss was recovered by addition the flow splitters to the downstream baffles. All collectors tested reduced facility performance. However, test chamber recirculation flow was reduced by the new collector designs and shielding of some of the microphones was reduced owing to the smaller size of the new collector. Overall performance loss in the facility is expected to be a 5 percent top flow speed reduction, but the facility will meet OSHA limits for external noise levels and recirculation in the test section will be reduced.

  10. Section 608 Technician Certification Test Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identifies some of the topics covered on Section 608 Technician Certification tests such as ozone depletion, the Clean Air Act and Montreal Protocol, Substitute Refrigerants and oils, Refrigeration and Recovery Techniques.

  11. Wind Tunnel Testing on Crosswind Aerodynamic Forces Acting on Railway Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Bin; Nam, Seong-Won; You, Won-Hee

    This study is devoted to measure the aerodynamic forces acting on two railway trains, one of which is a high-speed train at 300km/h maximum operation speed, and the other is a conventional train at the operating speed 100km/h. The three-dimensional train shapes have been modeled as detailed as possible including the inter-car, the upper cavity for pantograph, and the bogie systems. The aerodynamic forces on each vehicle of the trains have been measured in the subsonic wind tunnel with 4m×3m test section of Korea Aerospace Research Institute at Daejeon, Korea. The aerodynamic forces and moments of the train models have been plotted for various yaw angles and the characteristics of the aerodynamic coefficients has been discussed relating to the experimental conditions.

  12. The tunneling magnetoresistance current dependence on cross sectional area, angle and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetoresistance of a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ was studied experimentally. The magnetoresistance as a function of current was measured systematically on MTJs for various MgO cross sectional areas and at various temperatures from 7.5 to 290.1 K. The resistance current dependence of the MTJ was also measured for different angles between the two ferromagnetic layers. By considering particle and angular momentum conservation of transport electrons, the current dependence of magnetoresistance can be explained by the changing of spin polarization in the free magnetic layer of the MTJ. The changing of spin polarization is related to the magnetoresistance, its angular dependence and the threshold current where TMR ratio equals zero. A phenomenological model is used which avoid the complicated barrier details and also describes the data.

  13. Theory and feasibility tests for a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope

    KAUST Repository

    Schuster, Gerard T.

    2012-09-01

    We propose a seismic scanning tunnelling macroscope (SSTM) that can detect subwavelength scatterers in the near-field of either the source or the receivers. Analytic formulas for the time reverse mirror (TRM) profile associated with a single scatterer model show that the spatial resolution limit to be, unlike the Abbe limit of λ/2, independent of wavelength and linearly proportional to the source-scatterer separation as long as the scatterer is in the near-field region. This means that, as the scatterer approaches the source, imaging of the scatterer with super-resolution can be achieved. Acoustic and elastic simulations support this concept, and a seismic experiment in an Arizona tunnel shows a TRM profile with super-resolution adjacent to the fault location. The SSTM is analogous to the optical scanning tunnelling microscopes having subwavelength resolution. Scaled to seismic frequencies, it is theoretically possible to extract 100 Hz information from 20 Hz data by the imaging of near-field seismic energy.

  14. Characterization of a new open jet wind tunnel to optimize and test vertical axis wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tourn, Silvana; Pallarès, Jordi; Cuesta, Ildefonso

    2017-01-01

    Based on the increasing interest in urban environmental technologies, the study of small scale vertical axis wind turbines shows motivating challenges. In this paper, we present the characteristics and potentials of a new open jet wind tunnel. It has a nozzle exit area of 1.5 × 1.5 m2, and it can......%. The detailed characterization of the flow carried out indicates that the wind tunnel can be used to test small scale models of wind turbines....

  15. Diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome: interobserver reliability of the blinded scratch-collapse test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Robin D.; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Ring, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The reliability of the scratch-collapse test for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has not been tested by independent investigators. This study measured the reliability of the scratch-collapse test comparing the treating hand surgeon and blinded evaluators. We performed a prospective

  16. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  17. Shortcomings of the Winkler Model in the Assessment of Sectioned Tunnels under Seismic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars; Lyngs, Jakob Hausgaard

    A Winkler-type model is often applied in the design of tunnels subject to seismic loading. Since the subgrade stiffness is modelled by disjoint springs, distributed continuously along the tunnel, the model does not account for retroaction via the soil. This may not be a problem in the design......-element solution, using a planned tunnel at Thessaloniki, Greece, as a case study. The aim of the analysis is to quantify the inaccuracy of the Winkler model in the prediction of damage at a gasket between two tunnel elements....

  18. Wind Tunnel and Hover Performance Test Results for Multicopter UAS Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Carl R.; Jung, Jaewoo; Willink, Gina; Glasner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a lack of published data for the performance of multicopter unmanned aircraft system (UAS) vehicles, such as quadcopters and octocopters, often referred to collectively as drones. With the rapidly increasing popularity of multicopter UAS, there is interest in better characterizing the performance of this type of aircraft. By studying the performance of currently available vehicles, it will be possible to develop models for vehicles at this scale that can accurately predict performance and model trajectories. This paper describes a wind tunnel test that was recently performed in the U.S. Army's 7- by 10-ft Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. During this wind tunnel entry, five multicopter UAS vehicles were tested to determine forces and moments as well as electrical power as a function of wind speed, rotor speed, and vehicle attitude. The test is described here in detail, and a selection of the key results from the test is presented.

  19. Anechoic wind tunnel tests on high-speed train bogie aerodynamic noise

    OpenAIRE

    Latorre Iglesias, E.; Thompson, D.; Smith, M.; Kitagawa, T.; Yamazaki, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise becomes a significant noise source at speeds normally reached by high-speed trains. The train bogies are identified as important sources of aerodynamic noise. Due to the difficulty to assess this noise source carrying out field tests, wind tunnel tests offer many advantages. Tests were performed in the large-scale low-noise anechoic wind tunnel at Maibara, Japan, using a 1/7 scale train car and bogie model for a range of flow speeds between 50, 76, 89 and 100 m/s. The depend...

  20. Aerodynamic research of a racing car based on wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jianfeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation are two main methods for the study of automotive aerodynamics. CFD simulation software solves the results in calculation by using the basic theory of aerodynamic. Calculation will inevitably lead to bias, and the wind tunnel test can effectively simulate the real driving condition, which is the most effective aerodynamics research method. This paper researches the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing of a racing car. Aerodynamic model of a racing car is established. Wind tunnel test is carried out and compared with the simulation results of computational fluid dynamics. The deviation of the two methods is small, and the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics simulation is verified. By means of CFD software simulation, the coefficients of six aerodynamic forces are fitted and the aerodynamic equations are obtained. Finally, the aerodynamic forces and torques of the racing car travel in bend are calculated.

  1. [The cross-sectional area of the median nerve by sonography in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabag-Ruiz, Enrique; Higuera-Lugo, Cirilo Omar; Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Gómez-Alcalá, Alejandro V

    2009-01-01

    To measure the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) at the carpal tunnel (CT) level by sonography (S) in a Mexican population. A comparative cross-sectional design study with a nonprobabilistic sampling with 50 women and 50 men in good health were submitted for measuring MNCSA at the level of the CT. Other variables like sex; side and degree of daily hand activity were also studied. The analysis was made by descriptive statistics, and Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests. The mean MNCSA was 0.063 +/- 0.015 cm(2), in women; in men it was 0.072 +/- 0.018 cm(2); the difference was significant (p right side and 0.060 cm(2) in the left (90th percentile for both hands of 0.084 cm(2)); in men, it was of 0.070 cm(2) in the right hand and of 0.069 cm(2) in the left (90th percentile for both hands of 0.097 cm(2)). The difference between women and men was significant in each side, but not between right and left hands (p = 0.21). There was no correlation between age and MNCSA on either side, or with hand activity. A MNCSA value of 0.1 cm(2) for men and 0.09 cm(2) for women is proposed as a standard parameter for the Mexican population.

  2. Progression of carpal tunnel syndrome according to electrodiagnostic testing in nonoperatively treated patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Suchtelen, Mark; Becker, Stéphanie J. E.; Gruber, Jillian S.; Ring, David

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the null hypothesis that nonoperatively treated patients would not show disease progression of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) over time according to median nerve distal motor latency (DML) on two electrodiagnostic tests. This retrospective study analyzed sixty-two adult

  3. Free Surface Water Tunnel (FSWT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Free Surface Water Tunnel consists of the intake plenum, the test section and the exit plenum. The intake plenum starts with a perforated pipe that...

  4. Excavation damage zone tracer experiment in the floor of the room 415 test tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.H.; Everitt, R.A.

    1997-03-01

    A 3.5-m-diameter test tunnel was constructed on the 420 Level of AECL's Underground Research Laboratory using a mechanical excavation technique. The orientation of the tunnel was chosen to maximize the stress ratio in the plane perpendicular to the tunnel axis in order to promote and study stress-induced excavation damage. The resulting excavation damage zone (EDZ) is characterized by a distinct breakout notch in both the floor and roof of the tunnel. In the floor of the tunnel, the main flow pathway within the EDZ is within a zone of intense grain-size fracturing (process zone) located at the tip of the breakout notch; virtually no flow occurs outside this region. A tracer experiment was performed within the EDZ in the floor of the tunnel to characterize the solute transport properties (permeability, transport porosity and dispersivity) within the process zone, as well as to develop and demonstrate methods for determining the transport properties within EDZs of underground tunnels. The experiment was performed as a constant head test by continuously injecting a constant concentration of iodide tracer into a region of the process zone, and by monitoring tracer breakthrough from the zone at a distance 1.5 m away. An equivalent-porous-media approach was taken in analysing fluid flow and solute transport through the process zone. Based on mass flux calculations, the hydraulic conductivity and transport porosity of the process zone are estimated to be 7.4 x 10 -7 m/s and 2.7 % respectively. Based on an analytic solution that represents tracer transport within the process zone as one-dimensional advective diffusive transport in a finite homogeneous porous medium, the longitudinal dispersivity and transport porosity of the zone are estimated to be 0.60 m and 3.3 % respectively. The transport porosity values estimated by both the mass flux and analytic calculations compare quite well. (author)

  5. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufay-Chanat, L; Bremer, J; Casas-Cubillos, J; Koettig, T; Vauthier, N; Van Weelderen, R; Winkler, T; Chorowski, M; Grabowski, M; Jedrusyna, A; Lindell, G; Nonis, M

    2015-01-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium were released under standard operational tunnel conditions. The data recorded include oxygen concentration, temperature and flow speed measurements, and video footage used to assess qualitatively the visibility. These measurements have been made in the up- and downstream directions, with respect to the air ventilation flow, of the spill point.This paper presents the experimental set-up under which these release tests were made, the effects of these releases on the atmospheric tunnel condition as a function of the release flow rate. We discuss the modification to the personnel access conditions to the LHC tunnel that are presently implemented as a result of these tests. (paper)

  6. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufay-Chanat, L.; Bremer, J.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Koettig, T.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.

    2015-12-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium were released under standard operational tunnel conditions. The data recorded include oxygen concentration, temperature and flow speed measurements, and video footage used to assess qualitatively the visibility. These measurements have been made in the up- and downstream directions, with respect to the air ventilation flow, of the spill point. This paper presents the experimental set-up under which these release tests were made, the effects of these releases on the atmospheric tunnel condition as a function of the release flow rate. We discuss the modification to the personnel access conditions to the LHC tunnel that are presently implemented as a result of these tests.

  7. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  8. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  9. The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.M.; Newsom, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain

  10. Design and preliminary test results at Mach 5 of an axisymmetric slotted sound shield. [for supersonic wind tunnels (noise reduction in wind tunnel nozzles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, I. E.; Spokowski, A. J.; Harvey, W. D.; Stainback, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The basic theory and sound attenuation mechanisms, the design procedures, and preliminary experimental results are presented for a small axisymmetric sound shield for supersonic wind tunnels. The shield consists of an array of small diameter rods aligned nearly parallel to the entrance flow with small gaps between the rods for boundary layer suction. Results show that at the lowest test Reynolds number (based on rod diameter) of 52,000 the noise shield reduced the test section noise by about 60 percent ( or 8 db attenuation) but no attenuation was measured for the higher range of test reynolds numbers from 73,000 to 190,000. These results are below expectations based on data reported elsewhere on a flat sound shield model. The smaller attenuation from the present tests is attributed to insufficient suction at the gaps to prevent feedback of vacuum manifold noise into the shielded test flow and to insufficient suction to prevent transition of the rod boundary layers to turbulent flow at the higher Reynolds numbers. Schlieren photographs of the flow are shown.

  11. Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in transonic wind-tunnel/flight-test correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    The capability for calculating transonic flows for realistic configurations and conditions is discussed. Various phenomena which were modeled are shown to have the same order of magnitude on the influence of predicted results. It is concluded that CFD can make the following contributions to the task of correlating wind tunnel and flight test data: some effects of geometry differences and aeroelastic distortion can be predicted; tunnel wall effects can be assessed and corrected for; and the effects of model support systems and free stream nonuniformities can be modeled.

  12. Coldbox installation for HL-LHC crab cavity test in the SPS tunnel (BA6)

    CERN Document Server

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2018-01-01

    The Cold-box, produced by Linde Kryotechnik for the SPS crab-cavity test stand for HL-LHC, on its arrival at CERN. It wll be transported into the tunnel in horizontal position and then will have to be tilted in its operational position, on its vertical axis, before connecting it to cryogenics lines.

  13. Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

  14. Construction of a cylindrical brine test room using a tunnel boring machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likar, V.F.; Burrington, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the construction of a horizontal cylindrical brine test room at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The room was constructed in the bedded salt formation at a depth of 655 meters with a tunnel boring machine. The machine leasing, technical and operational management, parameters involved, and successful completion of this effort are included. 3 figs

  15. Construction of a cylindrical brine test room using a tunnel boring machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likar, V.F.; Burrington, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the construction of a horizontal cylindrical brine test room at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The room was constructed in the bedded salt formation at a depth of 655 meters with a tunnel boring machine. The machine leasing technical and operational management, parameters involved, and successful completion of this effort are included. 3 figs

  16. Design and Wind Tunnel Testing of a Thick, Multi-Element High-Lift Airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahle, Frederik; Gaunaa, Mac; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    In this work a 2D CFD solver has been used to optimize the shape of a leading edge slat with a chord length of 30% of the main airfoil which was 40% thick. The airfoil configuration was subsequently tested in a wind tunnel and compared to numerical predictions. The multi-element airfoil was predi...

  17. Resonant tunneling of UCN through the moving interference filter and experimental test of the UCN dispersion law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, A.I.; Bondarenko, I.V.; Balashov, S.N.; Geltenbort, P.; Hoghoj, P.; Kozlov, A.V.; Masalovich, S.V.; Toperverg, B.P.

    2004-01-01

    With the aim to test experimentally the dispersion law validity for very slow neutrons a spectrum of ultracold neutrons (UCN) under the condition of resonance tunneling through the moving Neutron Interference Filter was investigated. The neutron spectrum in this case has a narrow width resonance, whose parameters depend on the filter characteristics and dispersion law of neutron waves in matter. For a number of samples a noticeable shift of the resonance position when the filter moved parallel to its surface was detected. This shift is in strong contradiction with the commonly accepted dispersion law. Further investigations have shown that the spectrum of tunneling neutrons is not exactly defined by the solution of one-dimensional quantum problem, but substantially affected by neutron scattering from filter imperfections. The cross section of this scattering depends on the neutron wave number and increases dramatically in resonance conditions. Experimental results as well as comprehensive theoretical analysis have led us to the unambiguous conclusion that observed phenomena of the resonance shift in a moving sample are caused by scattering of neutron tunneling states rather than by a deviation from the commonly accepted dispersion law. (author)

  18. Test of RIPL-2 cross section calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, M.

    2002-01-01

    The new levels and optical segments and microscopic HF-BCS level densities (part of the density segment) were tested in practical calculations of cross sections for neutron induced reactions on 22 targets (40-Ca, 47-Ti, 52-Cr, 55-Mn, 58-Ni, 63-Cu, 71-Ga, 80-Se, 92-Mo, 93-Nb, 100-Mo, 109-Ag, 114-Cd, 124-Sn, 127-I, 133-Cs, 140-Ce, 153-Eu, 169-Tm, 186-W, 197-Au, 208-Pb). For each target all reactions involving up to 3 neutron, 1 proton and 1 α-particle emissions (subject to actual reaction thresholds) were considered in the incident energy range from 1 keV up to 20 MeV (in some cases up to 27 MeV). In addition, total, elastic, and neutron capture cross sections were calculated

  19. Wind-tunnel development of an SR-71 aerospike rocket flight test configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Shirakata, Norm; Moes, Timothy R.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Conners, Timothy H.

    1996-01-01

    A flight experiment has been proposed to investigate the performance of an aerospike rocket motor installed in a lifting body configuration. An SR-71 airplane would be used to carry the aerospike configuration to the desired flight test conditions. Wind-tunnel tests were completed on a 4-percent scale SR-71 airplane with the aerospike pod mounted in various locations on the upper fuselage. Testing was accomplished using sting and blade mounts from Mach 0.6 to Mach 3.2. Initial test objectives included assessing transonic drag and supersonic lateral-directional stability and control. During these tests, flight simulations were run with wind-tunnel data to assess the acceptability of the configurations. Early testing demonstrated that the initial configuration with the aerospike pod near the SR-71 center of gravity was unsuitable because of large nosedown pitching moments at transonic speeds. The excessive trim drag resulting from accommodating this pitching moment far exceeded the excess thrust capability of the airplane. Wind-tunnel testing continued in an attempt to find a configuration suitable for flight test. Multiple configurations were tested. Results indicate that an aft-mounted model configuration possessed acceptable performance, stability, and control characteristics.

  20. Effect of localized water uptake on backfill hydration and water movement in a backfilled tunnel: half-scale tests at Aespoe Bentonite Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.; Jonsson, E.; Hansen, J.; Hedin, M.; Ramqvist, G.

    2011-04-01

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the project 'SU508.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKB doc 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-019 and AP TD SU 50820-09-071. SKB and Posiva have been examining those processes that may have particularly strong effects on the evolution of a newly backfilled deposition tunnel in a KBS-3V repository. These assessments have involved the conduct of increasingly large and complex laboratory tests and simulations of a backfilled tunnel section. In this series of four tests, the effect of water inflow into a backfilled tunnel section via an intersecting fracture feature was evaluated. The tests included the monitoring of mock-ups where water entered via the simulated fractures as well as evaluation of what the effect of isolated tunnel sections caused by localized water inflow would have on subsequent evolution of these isolated sections. It was found that even a slowly seeping fracture can have a substantial effect on the backfill evolution as it will cause development of a gasket-like feature that effectively cuts of air and water movement from inner to outer regions of the backfilled tunnel. Water entering via these fractures will ultimately move out of the tunnel via a single discrete flow path, in a manner similar to what was observed in previous 1/2-scale and smaller simulations. If the low-rate of water inflow from fracture is the only source of water inflow to the tunnel this will result in hydraulic behaviour similar to that observed for a single inflow point in previous tests. The presence of a fracture feature will however result in a larger proportion of water uptake by the process of suction than might occur in a point inflow situation and hence a more uniform water distribution will be present in the pellet fill. This also results in a greater tendency for water to be absorbed into the adjacent block fill material and

  1. Effect of localized water uptake on backfill hydration and water movement in a backfilled tunnel: half-scale tests at Aespoe Bentonite Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River (Canada); Jonsson, E. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Hansen, J. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Hedin, M. [Aangpannefoereningen, Stockholm (Sweden); Ramqvist, G. [Eltekno AB, Figeholm (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    The report describes the outcome of the work within the project 'SU508.20 Impact of water inflow in deposition tunnels'. Project decision SKB doc 1178871 Version 3.0. Two activity plans have been used for the field work: AP TD SU50820-09-019 and AP TD SU 50820-09-071. SKB and Posiva have been examining those processes that may have particularly strong effects on the evolution of a newly backfilled deposition tunnel in a KBS-3V repository. These assessments have involved the conduct of increasingly large and complex laboratory tests and simulations of a backfilled tunnel section. In this series of four tests, the effect of water inflow into a backfilled tunnel section via an intersecting fracture feature was evaluated. The tests included the monitoring of mock-ups where water entered via the simulated fractures as well as evaluation of what the effect of isolated tunnel sections caused by localized water inflow would have on subsequent evolution of these isolated sections. It was found that even a slowly seeping fracture can have a substantial effect on the backfill evolution as it will cause development of a gasket-like feature that effectively cuts of air and water movement from inner to outer regions of the backfilled tunnel. Water entering via these fractures will ultimately move out of the tunnel via a single discrete flow path, in a manner similar to what was observed in previous 1/2-scale and smaller simulations. If the low-rate of water inflow from fracture is the only source of water inflow to the tunnel this will result in hydraulic behaviour similar to that observed for a single inflow point in previous tests. The presence of a fracture feature will however result in a larger proportion of water uptake by the process of suction than might occur in a point inflow situation and hence a more uniform water distribution will be present in the pellet fill. This also results in a greater tendency for water to be absorbed into the adjacent block fill

  2. Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC Tunnel at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettig, T.; Casas-Cubillos, J.; Chorowski, M.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Grabowski, M.; Jedrusyna, A.; Lindell, G.; Nonis, M.; Vauthier, N.; van Weelderen, R.; Winkler, T.; Bremer, J.

    The helium cooled magnets of the LHC particle accelerator are installed in a confined space, formed by a 27 km circumference 3.8 m diameter underground tunnel. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting LHC magnets are protected by a lift plate against excessive overpressure created by eventual leaks from the magnet helium bath, or from the helium supply headers. A three-meter long no stay zone has been defined centered to these plates, based on earlier scale model studies, to protect the personnel against the consequences of an eventual opening of such a lift plate. More recently several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the resulting helium/air mixture along the tunnel in case of such a cold helium release at a rate in the range of 1 kg/s. To validate the different scale models and simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed in the LHC, releasing about 1000 liter of liquid helium under standard operational tunnel conditions. Data recorded during these tests include oxygen level, temperature and flow speed as well as video recordings, taken up- and downstream of the spill point (-100 m to +200 m) with respect to the ventilation direction in the LHC tunnel. The experimental set-up and measurement results are presented. Generic effects found during the tests will be discussed to allow the transposal to possible cold helium release cases in similar facilities.

  3. NASA ERA Integrated CFD for Wind Tunnel Testing of Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Joseph A.; Melton, John E.; Schuh, Michael; James, Kevin D.; Long, Kurt R.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Deere, Karen A.; Luckring, James M.; Carter, Melissa B.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project explores enabling technologies to reduce aviations impact on the environment. One research challenge area for the project has been to study advanced airframe and engine integration concepts to reduce community noise and fuel burn. In order to achieve this, complex wind tunnel experiments at both the NASA Langley Research Centers (LaRC) 14x22 and the Ames Research Centers 40x80 low-speed wind tunnel facilities were conducted on a Boeing Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration. These wind tunnel tests entailed various entries to evaluate the propulsion airframe interference effects including aerodynamic performance and aeroacoustics. In order to assist these tests in producing high quality data with minimal hardware interference, extensive Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations were performed for everything from sting design and placement for both the wing body and powered ejector nacelle systems to the placement of aeroacoustic arrays to minimize its impact on the vehicles aerodynamics. This paper will provide a high level summary of the CFD simulations that NASA performed in support of the model integration hardware design as well as some simulation guideline development based on post-test aerodynamic data. In addition, the paper includes details on how multiple CFD codes (OVERFLOW, STAR-CCM+, USM3D, and FUN3D) were efficiently used to provide timely insight into the wind tunnel experimental setup and execution.

  4. New Rock Abrasivity Test Method for Tool Life Assessments on Hard Rock Tunnel Boring: The Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, F. J.; Dahl, F.; Bruland, A.

    2016-05-01

    The tunnel boring machine (TBM) method has become widely used and is currently an important presence within the tunnelling industry. Large investments and high geological risk are involved using TBMs, and disc cutter consumption has a great influence on performance and cost, especially in hard rock conditions. Furthermore, reliable cutter life assessments facilitate the control of risk as well as avoiding delays and budget overruns. Since abrasive wear is the most common process affecting cutter consumption, good laboratory tests for rock abrasivity assessments are needed. A new abrasivity test method by rolling disc named Rolling Indentation Abrasion Test (RIAT) has been developed. The goal of the new test design and procedure is to reproduce wear behaviour on hard rock tunnel boring in a more realistic way than the traditionally used methods. Wear by rolling contact on intact rock samples is introduced and several rock types, covering a wide rock abrasiveness range, have been tested by RIAT. The RIAT procedure indicates a great ability of the testing method to assess abrasive wear on rolling discs. In addition and to evaluate the newly developed RIAT test method, a comprehensive laboratory testing programme including the most commonly used abrasivity test methods and the mineral composition were carried out. Relationships between the achieved results from conventional testing and RIAT results have been analysed.

  5. Petrology and geochemistry of samples from bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5, U12g-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, J.R.; Keil, K.; Mansker, W.L.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Lowy, R.; Fortney, D.R.; Lappin, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworked zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain

  6. Wind tunnel tests on a one-foot diameter SR-7L propfan model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabri, Abdullah S.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a one-foot diameter model of the SR-7L propfan in the Langley 16-Foot and 4 x 7 Meter Wind Tunnels as part of the Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program. The model propfan was sized to be used on a 1/9-scale model of the PTA testbed aircraft. The model propeller was tested in isolation and wing-mounted on the aircraft configuration at various Mach numbers and blade pitch angles. Agreement between data obtained from these tests and data from Hamilton Standard validate that the 1/9-scale propeller accurately simulates the aerodynamics of the SR-7L propfan. Predictions from an analytical computer program are presented and show good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Application of tests of goodness of fit in determining the probability density function for spacing of steel sets in tunnel support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnoosh Basaligheh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional methods for temporary support of tunnels is to use steel sets with shotcrete. The nature of a temporary support system demands a quick installation of its structures. As a result, the spacing between steel sets is not a fixed amount and it can be considered as a random variable. Hence, in the reliability analysis of these types of structures, the selection of an appropriate probability distribution function of spacing of steel sets is essential. In the present paper, the distances between steel sets are collected from an under-construction tunnel and the collected data is used to suggest a proper Probability Distribution Function (PDF for the spacing of steel sets. The tunnel has two different excavation sections. In this regard, different distribution functions were investigated and three common tests of goodness of fit were used for evaluation of each function for each excavation section. Results from all three methods indicate that the Wakeby distribution function can be suggested as the proper PDF for spacing between the steel sets. It is also noted that, although the probability distribution function for two different tunnel sections is the same, the parameters of PDF for the individual sections are different from each other.

  8. Parametric Data from a Wind Tunnel Test on a Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Engine Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rene; Trefny, Charles J.; Thomas, Scott R.; Bulman, Mel J.

    2001-01-01

    A 40-percent scale model of the inlet to a rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The full-scale RBCC engine is scheduled for test in the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Glenn's Plum Brook Station at Mach 5 and 6. This engine will incorporate the configuration of this inlet model which achieved the best performance during the present experiment. The inlet test was conducted at Mach numbers of 4.0, 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0. The fixed-geometry inlet consists of an 8 deg.. forebody compression plate, boundary layer diverter, and two compressive struts located within 2 parallel sidewalls. These struts extend through the inlet, dividing the flowpath into three channels. Test parameters investigated included strut geometry, boundary layer ingestion, and Reynolds number (Re). Inlet axial pressure distributions and cross-sectional Pitot-pressure surveys at the base of the struts were measured at varying back-pressures. Inlet performance and starting data are presented. The inlet chosen for the RBCC engine self-started at all Mach numbers from 4 to 6. Pitot-pressure contours showed large flow nonuniformity on the body-side of the inlet. The inlet provided adequate pressure recovery and flow quality for the RBCC cycle even with the flow separation.

  9. G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations

  10. Background Pressure Profiles for Sonic Boom Vehicle Testing in the NASA Glenn 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond; Shaw, Stephen; Adamson, Eric; Simerly, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to identify test facilities that offer sonic boom measurement capabilities, an exploratory test program was initiated using wind tunnels at NASA research centers. The subject of this report is the sonic boom pressure rail data collected in the Glenn Research Center 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The purpose is to summarize the lessons learned based on the test activity, specifically relating to collecting sonic boom data which has a large amount of spatial pressure variation. The wind tunnel background pressure profiles are presented as well as data which demonstrated how both wind tunnel Mach number and model support-strut position affected the wind tunnel background pressure profile. Techniques were developed to mitigate these effects and are presented.

  11. Complot test section outlet CFD optimization (pre - test and dimensioning)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Profir, M. M.; Moreau, V.; Kennedy, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the FP7 MAXSIMA European project, the COMPLOT (COMPonent LOop Testing) LBE experimental facility is employed for thermal-hydraulic experiments aimed to test and qualify, among other components, a buoyancy driven safety/control rods (SR/CR) system, as key components for the safe operation of the MYRRHA reactor. This paper focuses mainly on a simplified CFD representation of the SR test section outlet in order to optimise it for the testing program. Parametric cases, associated with different positions of the SR assembly have been set up and analysed. A quasi-static analysis has been performed for each case, accounting for the LBE volume displaced by the insertion of the SR bundle, by introducing appropriately positioned additional mass sources. Velocity and pressure fields, as well as pressure drop magnitudes and mass flow rates through relevant guide tube hole outlets have been calculated and compared. The CFD analysis proved that the outer boundary of the test section does not impact the expected performance of the SR (rapid transient downward insertion). Preliminary simulations reproducing the timely repositioning of the SR/CR in COMPLOT using procedures of automatic volume mesh regeneration, consistently with the rod imposed displacement, are illustrated. (authors)

  12. Cavitation erosion in sodium flow, sodium cavitation tunnel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, Pierre.

    1981-04-01

    The high-volume sodium flows present in fast neutron reactors are liable to induce cavitation phenomena in various portion of the sodium lines and pumps. The absence of sufficient data in this area led the C.E.A. to undertake an erosion research program in cavitating sodium flow. This paper discusses the considerations leading to the definition and execution of sodium cavitation erosion tests, and reviews the tests run with 400 0 C sodium on various steel grades: 316, 316 L, 316 Ti (Z8CNDT17-12), Poral (Z3CND18-12), 304 L and LN2 - clad 316 L (Ni coating-clad 316 L). Acoustic detection and signal processing methods were used with an instrument package designed and implemented at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center

  13. A New Position Measurement System Using a Motion-Capture Camera for Wind Tunnel Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousok Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the characteristics of wind tunnel tests, a position measurement system that can minimize the effects on the flow of simulated wind must be established. In this study, a motion-capture camera was used to measure the displacement responses of structures in a wind tunnel test, and the applicability of the system was tested. A motion-capture system (MCS could output 3D coordinates using two-dimensional image coordinates obtained from the camera. Furthermore, this remote sensing system had some flexibility regarding lab installation because of its ability to measure at relatively long distances from the target structures. In this study, we performed wind tunnel tests on a pylon specimen and compared the measured responses of the MCS with the displacements measured with a laser displacement sensor (LDS. The results of the comparison revealed that the time-history displacement measurements from the MCS slightly exceeded those of the LDS. In addition, we confirmed the measuring reliability of the MCS by identifying the dynamic properties (natural frequency, damping ratio, and mode shape of the test specimen using system identification methods (frequency domain decomposition, FDD. By comparing the mode shape obtained using the aforementioned methods with that obtained using the LDS, we also confirmed that the MCS could construct a more accurate mode shape (bending-deflection mode shape with the 3D measurements.

  14. Plasma Wind Tunnel Testing of Electron Transpiration Cooling Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Colorado State University ETC Electron Transpiration Cooling LHTS Local Heat Transfer Simulation LTE Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium RCC Reinforced...ceramic electric material testing in plasma environment (not performed), 4. measurements and analysis of the Electron Transpiration Cooling (Sec. 4.2). 2...VKI 1D boundary layer code for computation of enthalpy and boundary layer parameters: a) iterate on ’virtually measured ’ heat flux, b) once enthalpy

  15. G-tunnel pressurized slot-testing evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratories elected to conduct a development program to enhance mechanical-type measurements. The program was focused on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of pressurized slot strength testing results and methods. This report contains data interpretation and evaluations. Included are recommendations for future efforts. This third report contains the interpretations of the testing with emphasis on the measurement results as they apply to describing rock behavior. In particular, emphases are placed on (1) normal stress determinations using the flatjack cancellation (FC) method, (2) modulus of deformation determinations, and (3) high pressure investigations. Most of the material in the first two reports is not repeated here. Appropriate data are repeated in tabular form

  16. Problems With Section Two ITP TOEFL Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizki Ananda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate (1 the difficulties faced by EFL university students with section two of the ITP, and (2 whether part A or part B was more difficult for them and why. A number of 26 students from two different universities, Syiah Kuala University and the State Islamic University Ar-Raniry were the samples for the test. The data was obtained from a multiple choice questionnaire test consisting of 46 questions, each with 4 answers to choose from. The results showed that inversions (12%, subject-verb agreements (10%, adverb clause connectors (7%, passives (6%, reduced adjective clauses (5%, parallel structures (5% and use of verbs (5% were the most difficult questions for the students. Furthermore, they felt that part B was more difficult than part A, as finding an error in a sentence was harder than completing a sentence from a multiple choice. Furthermore, the length of questions in part A did not affect the amount of time the students spent to complete part A and did not cause them to panic. Also, unfamiliar words in part A were not regarded as a problem by the students. Hence, TOEFL teachers and trainers are highly encouraged to pay more attention to doing study exercises for the seven topics with the highest percentages above in part A and also to more practice for part B.

  17. Wing configuration on Wind Tunnel Testing of an Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryanto, Yanto; Purwono, Joko; Subagyo

    2018-04-01

    Control surface of an Unmanned Aircraft Vehicle (UAV) consists of flap, aileron, spoiler, rudder, and elevator. Every control surface has its own special functionality. Some particular configurations in the flight mission often depend on the wing configuration. Configuration wing within flap deflection for takeoff setting deflection of flap 20° but during landing deflection of flap set on the value 40°. The aim of this research is to get the ultimate CLmax for take-off flap deflection setting. It is shown from Wind Tunnel Testing result that the 20° flap deflection gives optimum CLmax with moderate drag coefficient. The results of Wind Tunnel Testing representing by graphic plots show good performance as well as the stability of UAV.

  18. Wind tunneling testing and analysis relating to the spinning of light aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccormick, B. W.; Zilliac, G. G.; Ballin, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Included is a summary of two studies related to the spinning of light aircraft. The first study was conducted to demonstrate that the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on a tail of a spinning aircraft can be obtained from static wind-tunnel tests. The second study analytically investigated spinning using a high angle-of-attack aerodynamic model derived from a static wind-tunnel data base. The validity of the aerodynamic model is shown by comparisons with rotary-balance data and forced-oscillation tests. The results of a six-degree-of-freedom analysis show that the dynamics and aerodynamics of the steep- and flat-spin modes of a modified Yankee have been properly modeled.

  19. Preliminary wing model tests in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Max M

    1926-01-01

    This report contains the results of a series of tests with three wing models. By changing the section of one of the models and painting the surface of another, the number of models tested was increased to five. The tests were made in order to obtain some general information on the air forces on wing sections at a high Reynolds number and in particular to make sure that the Reynolds number is really the important factor, and not other things like the roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge. The few tests described in this report seem to indicate that the air forces at a high Reynolds number are not equivalent to respective air forces at a low Reynolds number (as in an ordinary atmospheric wind tunnel). The drag appears smaller at a high Reynolds number and the maximum lift is increased in some cases. The roughness of the surface and the sharpness of the trailing edge do not materially change the results, so that we feel confident that tests with systematic series of different wing sections will bring consistent results, important and highly useful to the designer.

  20. The test section of the COSIMA blowdown test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruederle, F.; Hain, K.

    1980-08-01

    The test section of the COSIMA blowdown test facility has been designed as a geometric analogy of the core of a pressurized water reactor for a shortened single fuel rod simulator. Its design and instrumentation together with the whole loop allow to simulate out of pile and trace by measurements the energy and hydraulic conditions arising in a blowdown. Special attention is being given in this report to one particular design problem: the number of load cycles up to incipient cracking of the test section as a pressure vessel containing hot water at high pressures and subjected to extreme rates of temperature variation in excess of 300 K/min. The methods of calculating cyclic loads as specified in the German Technical Rules for Boilers (TRD) have been supplemented in such a way that the number of load cycles up to incipient cracking may now be determined not only by the mean wall temperature, which is difficult to measure, but equally also well by the outer wall temperature, which is easy to measure precisely. (orig.) [de

  1. Progression of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome According to Electrodiagnostic Testing in Nonoperatively Treated Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark van Suchtelen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  This study tested the null hypothesis that nonoperatively treated patients would not show disease progression of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS over time according to median nerve distal motor latency (DML on two electrodiagnostic tests.   Methods:  This retrospective study analyzed sixty-two adult nonoperatively treated patients who were diagnosed with CTS confirmed by a minimum of two electrodiagnostic tests at our institution between December 2006 and  tober 2012. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was conducted to test the difference between electrodiagnostic measurements between the first and last test. Results: The mean time between the first and last electrodiagnostic test was 26±12 months (range, 12 to 55 months. The only electrodiagnostic measurement that increased significantly was the difference between median and ulnar DML on the same side (r=0.19, P =0.038. The time between the electrodiagnostic tests was significantly longer for patients with at least 10% worsening of the DML at the second test compared to cases of which the DML did not worsen or improve a minimum of 10% (P =0.015.  Conclusions: There is evidence that—on average—idiopathic median neuropathy at the carpal tunnel slowly progresses over time, and this can be measured with electrodiagnostics, but studies with a much longer interval between lectrodiagnostic tests may be needed to determine if it always progresses.

  2. Application of Rapid Prototyping Methods to High-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, A. M.

    1998-01-01

    This study was undertaken in MSFC's 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel to determine if rapid prototyping methods could be used in the design and manufacturing of high speed wind tunnel models in direct testing applications, and if these methods would reduce model design/fabrication time and cost while providing models of high enough fidelity to provide adequate aerodynamic data, and of sufficient strength to survive the test environment. Rapid prototyping methods utilized to construct wind tunnel models in a wing-body-tail configuration were: fused deposition method using both ABS plastic and PEEK as building materials, stereolithography using the photopolymer SL-5170, selective laser sintering using glass reinforced nylon, and laminated object manufacturing using plastic reinforced with glass and 'paper'. This study revealed good agreement between the SLA model, the metal model with an FDM-ABS nose, an SLA nose, and the metal model for most operating conditions, while the FDM-ABS data diverged at higher loading conditions. Data from the initial SLS model showed poor agreement due to problems in post-processing, resulting in a different configuration. A second SLS model was tested and showed relatively good agreement. It can be concluded that rapid prototyping models show promise in preliminary aerodynamic development studies at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds.

  3. Harmonic oscillations of a longitudinal shear infinite hollow cylinder arbitrary cross-section with a tunnel crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrylova, O. I.; Popov, V. G.

    2018-04-01

    An effective analytical-numerical method for determining the dynamic stresses in a hollow cylindrical body of arbitrary cross-section with a tunnel crack under antiplane strain conditions is proposed. The method allows separately solving the integral equations on the crack faces and satisfying the boundary conditions on the body boundaries. It provides a convenient numerical scheme. Approximate formulas for calculating the dynamic stress intensity factors in a neighborhood of the crack are obtained and the influence of the crack geometry and wave number on these quantities is investigated, especially from the point of view of the resonance existence.

  4. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy of antiphase boundaries in epitaxially grown GaP layers on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prohl, Christopher; Lenz, Andrea, E-mail: alenz@physik.tu-berlin.de [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Döscher, Henning; Kleinschmidt, Peter; Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    In a fundamental cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on epitaxially grown GaP layers on a Si(001) substrate, differently oriented antiphase boundaries are studied. They can be identified by a specific contrast and by surface step edges starting/ending at the position of an antiphase boundary. Moreover, a change in the atomic position of P and Ga atoms along the direction of growth is observed in agreement with the structure model of antiphase boundaries in the GaP lattice. This investigation opens the perspective to reveal the orientation and position of the antiphase boundaries at the atomic scale due to the excellent surface sensitivity of this method.

  5. An apparatus to estimate the hydrodynamic coefficients of autonomous underwater vehicles using water tunnel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, N M; Mostafapour, K; Bahadori, R

    2016-06-01

    Hydrodynamic coefficients or hydrodynamic derivatives of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) play an important role in their development and maneuverability. The most popular way of estimating their coefficients is to implement captive model tests such as straight line tests and planar motion mechanism (PMM) tests in the towing tanks. This paper aims to develop an apparatus based on planar experiments of water tunnel in order to estimate hydrodynamic derivatives due to AUVs' acceleration and velocity. The capability of implementing straight line tests and PMM ones using mechanical oscillators located in the downstream flow of the model is considered in the design procedure of the system. The hydrodynamic derivatives that resulted from the acceleration and velocity of the AUV model were estimated using the apparatus that we developed. Static and dynamics test results were compared for the similar derivatives. The findings showed that the system provided the basis for conducting static tests, i.e., straight-line and dynamic tests that included pure pitch and pure heave. By conducting such tests in a water tunnel, we were able to eliminate errors related to the time limitation of the tests and the effects of surface waves in the towing tank on AUVs with applications in the deep sea.

  6. Acoustic Modifications of the Ames 40x80 Foot Wind Tunnel and Test Techniques for High-Speed Research Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NFAC 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames is being refurbished with a new, deep acoustic lining in the test section which will make the facility nearly anechoic over a large frequency range. The modification history, key elements, and schedule will be discussed. Design features and expected performance gains will be described. Background noise reductions will be summarized. Improvements in aeroacoustic research techniques have been developed and used recently at NFAC on several wind tunnel tests of High Speed Research models. Research on quiet inflow microphones and struts will be described. The Acoustic Survey Apparatus in the 40x80 will be illustrated. A special intensity probe was tested for source localization. Multi-channel, high speed digital data acquisition is now used for acoustics. And most important, phased microphone arrays have been developed and tested which have proven to be very powerful for source identification and increased signal-to-noise ratio. Use of these tools for the HEAT model will be illustrated. In addition, an acoustically absorbent symmetry plane was built to satisfy the HEAT semispan aerodynamic and acoustic requirements. Acoustic performance of that symmetry plane will be shown.

  7. Final report on the Controlled Cold Helium Spill Test in the LHC tunnel at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Dufay-Chanat, L; Casas-Cubillos, J; Chorowski, M; Grabowski, M; Jedrusyna, A; Lindell, G; Nonis, M; Koettig, T; Vauthier, N; van Weelderen, R; Winkler, T

    2015-01-01

    The 27 km circumference LHC underground tunnel is a space in which the helium cooled LHC magnets are installed. The vacuum enclosures of the superconducting magnets are protected by over-pressure safety relief devices that open whenever cold helium escapes either from the magnet cold enclosure or from the helium supply headers, into this vacuum enclosure. A 3-m long no stay zone around these devices is defined based on scale model studies, protecting the personnel against cold burns or asphyxia caused by such a helium release event. Recently, several simulation studies have been carried out modelling the propagation of the helium/air mixture, resulting from the opening of such a safety device, along the tunnel. The released helium flows vary in the range between 1 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. To validate these different simulation studies, real life mock-up tests have been performed inside the LHC tunnel, releasing helium flow rates of 1 kg/s, 0.3 kg/s and 0.1 kg/s. For each test, up to 1000 liters of liquid helium wer...

  8. Continuous section extraction and over-underbreak detection of tunnel based on 3D laser technology and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Wang, Zhiwei; Han, Ya; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xin

    2015-03-01

    In order to ensure safety, long term stability and quality control in modern tunneling operations, the acquisition of geotechnical information about encountered rock conditions and detailed installed support information is required. The limited space and time in an operational tunnel environment make the acquiring data challenging. The laser scanning in a tunneling environment, however, shows a great potential. The surveying and mapping of tunnels are crucial for the optimal use after construction and in routine inspections. Most of these applications focus on the geometric information of the tunnels extracted from the laser scanning data. There are two kinds of applications widely discussed: deformation measurement and feature extraction. The traditional deformation measurement in an underground environment is performed with a series of permanent control points installed around the profile of an excavation, which is unsuitable for a global consideration of the investigated area. Using laser scanning for deformation analysis provides many benefits as compared to traditional monitoring techniques. The change in profile is able to be fully characterized and the areas of the anomalous movement can easily be separated from overall trends due to the high density of the point cloud data. Furthermore, monitoring with a laser scanner does not require the permanent installation of control points, therefore the monitoring can be completed more quickly after excavation, and the scanning is non-contact, hence, no damage is done during the installation of temporary control points. The main drawback of using the laser scanning for deformation monitoring is that the point accuracy of the original data is generally the same magnitude as the smallest level of deformations that are to be measured. To overcome this, statistical techniques and three dimensional image processing techniques for the point clouds must be developed. For safely, effectively and easily control the problem of

  9. Intraneural blood flow analysis during an intraoperative Phalen's test in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayama, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Awara, Kousuke; Takeno, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Kubota, Masafumi; Negoro, Kohei; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-08-01

    Phalen's test has been one of the most significant of clinical signs when making a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). However, it is unknown whether intraneural blood flow changes during Phalen's test in patients with CTS. In this study, an intraoperative Phalen's test was conducted in patients with CTS to observe the changes in intraneural blood flow using a laser Doppler flow meter. During Phalen's test, intraneural blood flow showed a sharp decrease, which lasted for 1 min. Intraneural blood flow decreased by 56.7%-100% (average, 78.0%) in the median nerve relative to the blood flow before the test. At 1 min after completing the test, intraneural blood flow returned to the baseline value. After carpal tunnel release, there was no marked decrease in intraneural blood flow. This study demonstrated that the blood flow in the median nerve is reduced when Phalen's test is performed in vivo. Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. In-situ failure test in the research tunnel at Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J.; Johansson, E.; Kirkkomaeki, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Hakala, M. [Gridpoint Finland Oy (Finland); Heikkilae, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Rock Engineering

    2000-05-01

    A failure test suitable for execution in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto has been planned to study the failure of rock in-situ. The objectives of the in-situ failure test is to assess the applicability of numerical modelling codes and methods to the study of rock failure and associated crack propagation and to develop a novel technique to be used to determine the strength of rock in-situ. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary design of the failure test, assess the technical feasibility of the test and to give input information for further numerical modelling of the test. The design of the failure test is reported and results of preliminary modelling are given. The input information for future modelling includes a study of rock properties, fracture propagation in rock, in-situ stresses and the development of techniques for using the expanding agent to produce artificial stress field. The study showed that mechanical properties such as strength of gneissic tonalite, the main rock type in the Research Tunnel, depends highly on the orientation of schistocity. The in-situ failure test was shown to be technically feasible and a state of stress high enough to cause failure can be created artificially by using a proper expansive agent and design. (orig.)

  11. Documentation and archiving of the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test data base. Volume 2: User's Guide to the Archived Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romere, Paul O.; Brown, Steve Wesley

    1995-01-01

    Development of the Space Shuttle necessitated an extensive wind tunnel test program, with the cooperation of all the major wind tunnels in the United States. The result was approximately 100,000 hours of Space Shuttle wind tunnel testing conducted for aerodynamics, heat transfer, and structural dynamics. The test results were converted into Chrysler DATAMAN computer program format to facilitate use by analysts, a very cost effective method of collecting the wind tunnel test results from many test facilities into one centralized location. This report provides final documentation of the Space Shuttle wind tunnel program. The two-volume set covers the evolution of Space Shuttle aerodynamic configurations and gives wind tunnel test data, titles of wind tunnel data reports, sample data sets, and instructions for accessing the digital data base.

  12. Nacelle Chine Installation Based on Wind-Tunnel Test Using Efficient Global Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazaki, Masahiro; Yokokawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Takeshi; Jeong, Shinkyu; Yamamoto, Kazuomi

    Design exploration of a nacelle chine installation was carried out. The nacelle chine improves stall performance when deploying multi-element high-lift devices. This study proposes an efficient design process using a Kriging surrogate model to determine the nacelle chine installation point in wind-tunnel tests. The design exploration was conducted in a wind-tunnel using the JAXA high-lift aircraft model at the JAXA Large-scale Low-speed Wind Tunnel. The objective was to maximize the maximum lift. The chine installation points were designed on the engine nacelle in the axial and chord-wise direction, while the geometry of the chine was fixed. In the design process, efficient global optimization (EGO) which includes Kriging model and genetic algorithm (GA) was employed. This method makes it possible both to improve the accuracy of the response surface and to explore the global optimum efficiently. Detailed observations of flowfields using the Particle Image Velocimetry method confirmed the chine effect and design results.

  13. Wind tunnel test on PC cable-stayed bridge; PC shachokyo no taifu seino shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Y. [Kyushu Inst. of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-30

    This paper describes the wind tunnel test on a PC cable-stayed bridge. The aerodynamic force that acts on a building is represented by the drag that works in the wind direction, the lift that works perpendicularly to the wind direction, and the aerodynamic moment that causes rotation. In the measurement of wind load, a girder is partially extracted in the wind tunnel and set in a three-component balance, and the drag, lift, and aerodynamic moment are measured using a strain meter while blowing the wind. In a wind tunnel experiment, the similarity on Reynolds number, field number, rigidity, hydraulic force, structural attenuation, and reduced wind velocity is required. However, the wind velocity in the actual bridge uses the same air as that in an experiment. The similarity rule on the Reynolds is not thus satisfied. It is necessary to cause no self-excited vibration (galloping and flutter) as wind-resistant performance and suppress the eddy excitation to less than the allowable amplitude. Moreover, the three-dimensional experiment using an elastic model is conducted in addition to the two-dimensional experiment using a rigid model. In the three-dimensional experiment, various vibration modes that occur in the actual bridge appear. 12 refs., 15 figs.

  14. Mn doped InSb studied at the atomic scale by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauger, S. J. C.; Bocquel, J.; Koenraad, P. M.; Feeser, C. E.; Parashar, N. D.; Wessels, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    We present an atomically resolved study of metal-organic vapor epitaxy grown Mn doped InSb. Both topographic and spectroscopic measurements have been performed by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The measurements on the Mn doped InSb samples show a perfect crystal structure without any precipitates and reveal that Mn acts as a shallow acceptor. The Mn concentration of the order of ∼10 20  cm −3 obtained from the cross-sectional STM data compare well with the intended doping concentration. While the pair correlation function of the Mn atoms showed that their local distribution is uncorrelated beyond the STM resolution for observing individual dopants, disorder in the Mn ion location giving rise to percolation pathways is clearly noted. The amount of clustering that we see is thus as expected for a fully randomly disordered distribution of the Mn atoms and no enhanced clustering or second phase material was observed

  15. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drollinger, Harold [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Jones, Robert C. [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Bullard, Thomas F. [Desert Research Institute (DRI), Nevada System of Higher Education, Reno,NV (United States); Ashbaugh, Laurence J. [Southern Nevada Courier Service, NV (United States); Griffin, Wayne R. [Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  16. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  17. Second-Generation Large Civil Tiltrotor 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel Test Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Russell, Carl R.; Willink, Gina C.; Pete, Ashley E.; Adibi, Sierra A.; Ewert, Adam; Theuns, Lieselotte; Beierle, Connor

    2016-01-01

    An approximately 6-percent scale model of the NASA Second-Generation Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR2) Aircraft was tested in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center January 4 to April 19, 2012, and September 18 to November 1, 2013. The full model was tested, along with modified versions in order to determine the effects of the wing tip extensions and nacelles; the wing was also tested separately in the various configurations. In both cases, the wing and nacelles used were adopted from the U.S. Army High Efficiency Tilt Rotor (HETR) aircraft, in order to limit the cost of the experiment. The full airframe was tested in high-speed cruise and low-speed hover flight conditions, while the wing was tested only in cruise conditions, with Reynolds numbers ranging from 0 to 1.4 million. In all cases, the external scale system of the wind tunnel was used to collect data. Both models were mounted to the scale using two support struts attached underneath the wing; the full airframe model also used a third strut attached at the tail. The collected data provides insight into the performance of the preliminary design of the LCTR2 and will be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation and the development of flight dynamics simulation models.

  18. Hard rock tunnel boring machine penetration test as an indicator of chipping process efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Villeneuve

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The transition from grinding to chipping can be observed in tunnel boring machine (TBM penetration test data by plotting the penetration rate (distance/revolution against the net cutter thrust (force per cutter over the full range of penetration rates in the test. Correlating penetration test data to the geological and geomechanical characteristics of rock masses through which a penetration test is conducted provides the ability to reveal the efficiency of the chipping process in response to changing geological conditions. Penetration test data can also be used to identify stress-induced tunnel face instability. This research shows that the strength of the rock is an important parameter for controlling how much net cutter thrust is required to transition from grinding to chipping. It also shows that the geological characteristics of a rock will determine how efficient chipping occurs once it has begun. In particular, geological characteristics that lead to efficient fracture propagation, such as fabric and mica contents, will lead to efficient chipping. These findings will enable a better correlation between TBM performance and geological conditions for use in TBM design, as a basis for contractual payments where penetration rate dominates the excavation cycle and in further academic investigations into the TBM excavation process.

  19. Experiences with a high-blockage model tested in the NASA Ames 12-foot pressure wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coder, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Representation of the flow around full-scale ships was sought in the subsonic wind tunnels in order to a Hain Reynolds numbers as high as possible. As part of the quest to attain the largest possible Reynolds number, large models with high blockage are used which result in significant wall interference effects. Some experiences with such a high blockage model tested in the NASA Ames 12-foot pressure wind tunnel are summarized. The main results of the experiment relating to wind tunnel wall interference effects are also presented.

  20. The value of ultrasonographic measurement in carpal tunnel syndrome in patients with negative electrodiagnostic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyuncuoglu, Hasan Rifat; Kutluhan, Suleyman; Yesildag, Ahmet; Oyar, Orhan; Guler, Kezban; Ozden, Ahmet

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is mainly based on clinical findings and electrodiagnostic tests (EDT). However, EDT results do not support clinical findings in some cases. It has been recently suggested that ultrasonography (US) can be used to diagnose CTS. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether US has a diagnostic value for CTS in patients with negative EDT findings or not. EDT was performed on 319 wrists with clinical CTS findings in electrophysiology laboratory. Median and ulnar nerve conduction velocities were measured in all cases and electromyography was performed in patient with tenar atrophy and having suspicion involvement of brachial plexus as EDT. Fifty-nine wrists with negative EDT (study group) and 30 wrists from 15 healthy individuals (control group) were examined using US. The mean of cross-sectional areas (CSAs) measurements were found 8.83 ± 3.05 mm 2 by tracing method (TM) and 8.51 ± 3.13 mm 2 by ellipsoid formula (EF) in study group, and 7.63 ± 1.52 mm 2 by TM and 7.66 ± 1.42 mm 2 by EF in control group. The differences between study group and control group according to both TM and EF were significant (t-test p = 0.0079, p = 0.0460, respectively). In study group, CSAs were larger than 10.5 mm 2 in 18 (30.51%) and 16 (27.12%) wrists according to TM and EF findings, respectively, and in only one wrist (3.33%) in control group by both TM and EF. The differences of ultrasonographic CTS numbers between study group and control group were significant (p = 0.0024 by TM, p = 0.0086 by EF). We confirmed the usefulness of quantitative US assessment in the diagnosis of CTS in the patients with negative EDT findings. If EDT findings are inadequate to confirm the CTS in the patients with clinical CTS, US studies may be helpful to diagnose

  1. BACEKO II. Flow-through, open-front and saturation tests of pre-compacted backfill blocks in a quarter-scale test tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keski-Kuha, E.; Nemlander, R.; Koho, P.

    2013-11-01

    The series of tests performed in BACEKO II project examined three different block materials for potential use in backfilling the repository; Friedland clay, 40/60-mixture of bentonite (40 %) and crushed rock (60 %) and Milos B clay in conjunction with pellet materials Cebogel QSE and Milos B clay. The testing program consisted of 9 tests, that continued the 1/4-scale tests executed in BACEKO 2008. The block backfilling degree of the 1/4-scale test tunnels was 73.8 % which was consistent with the material ratios associated with filling a repository tunnel having a 10 % over-excavation ratio. Some of these tests were conducted using a restraint installed at the front face of the setup and open-front tests were subsequently added in order to establish the time span which an open backfill front can remain stable should an interruption in the backfilling process occur. Additionally one flow-through test with higher salinity water (7 % TDS versus the 3,5 % TDS used in all other tests), was performed for an assembly constructed using Friedland clay. The rate of test assembly, consumption of materials and achieved densities were all monitored. During the tests, the erosion rates, progression of saturation and development of total pressure were monitored. In disassembling the tests, samples were collected for gravimetric water content measurement, the erosion pathways were identified and the sections were photographed with an infrared camera to illustrate the moister areas in the backfill. The greatest amounts of eroded material were observed in open-front tests where exiting water removed clay from the face of the backfill and formed a deepening channel in the block backfill. The open-front tests remained stable only until the outflow emerged. The properties of the pellet layer depend on the as-placed conditions which were operatordependant and also affect the outflow times. There was not much difference in the amount of erosion observed for the different block materials

  2. Background Acoustics Levels in the 9x15 Wind Tunnel and Linear Array Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David

    2011-01-01

    The background noise level in the 9x15 foot wind tunnel at NASA Glenn has been documented, and the results compare favorably with historical measurements. A study of recessed microphone mounting techniques was also conducted, and a recessed cavity with a micronic wire mesh screen reduces hydrodynamic noise by around 10 dB. A three-microphone signal processing technique can provide additional benefit, rejecting up to 15 dB of noise contamination at some frequencies. The screen and cavity system offers considerable benefit to test efficiency, although there are additional calibration requirements.

  3. The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Leanne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time. Methods In a prospective cohort study 63 patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression were assessed using standardised clinician-derived and patient reported outcomes before surgery, at 4 and 8 months follow up. Clinical sensory assessments included: touch threshold with monofilaments (WEST, shape-texture identification (STI™ test, static two-point discrimination (Mackinnon-Dellon Disk-Criminator and the locognosia test. Motor assessments included: grip and tripod pinch strength using a digital grip analyser (MIE, manual muscle testing of abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis using the Rotterdam Intrinsic Handheld Myometer (RIHM. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ was used as a patient rated outcome measure. Results Relative responsiveness at 4 months was highest for the BCTQ symptom severity scale with moderate to large effects sizes (ES = -1.43 followed by the BCTQ function scale (ES = -0.71. The WEST and STI™ were the most responsive sensory tests at 4 months showing moderate effect sizes (WEST ES = 0.55, STI ES = 0.52. Grip and pinch strength had a relatively higher responsiveness compared to thenar muscle strength but effect sizes for all motor tests were very small (ES ≤0.10 or negative indicating a decline compared to baseline in some patients. Conclusions For clinical assessment of sensibility touch threshold assessed by monofilaments (WEST and tactile gnosis measured with the STI™ test are the most responsive tests and are recommended for future studies. The use of handheld myometry (RIHM for manual muscle testing, despite more specifically targeting thenar muscles, was less responsive than grip or tripod

  4. Tunneling Current Probe for Noncontract Wafer-Level Photodiode Array Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verdun, Horacio

    1999-01-01

    The Tunneling Current Probe (TCP) is an automated picometer-sensitive proximity sensor and current measurement system which measures the current through a photodiode detector array element by establishing a tunneling current...

  5. The application of cryogenics to high Reynolds number testing in wind tunnels. I - Evolution, theory, and advantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, R. A.; Dress, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    During the time which has passed since the construction of the first wind tunnel in 1870, wind tunnels have been developed to a high degree of sophistication. However, their development has consistently failed to keep pace with the demands placed on them. One of the more serious problems to be found with existing transonic wind tunnels is their inability to test subscale aircraft models at Reynolds numbers sufficiently near full-scale values to ensure the validity of using the wind tunnel data to predict flight characteristics. The Reynolds number capability of a wind tunnel may be increased by a number of different approaches. However, the best solution in terms of model, balance, and model support loads, as well as in terms of capital and operating cost appears to be related to the reduction of the temperature of the test gas to cryogenic temperatures. The present paper has the objective to review the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel concept and to describe its more important advantages.

  6. Noise Localization Method for Model Tests in a Large Cavitation Tunnel Using a Hydrophone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheolsoo Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Model tests are performed in order to predict the noise level of a full ship and to control its noise signature. Localizing noise sources in the model test is therefore an important research subject along with measuring noise levels. In this paper, a noise localization method using a hydrophone array in a large cavitation tunnel is presented. The 45-channel hydrophone array was designed using a global optimization technique for noise measurement. A set of noise experiments was performed in the KRISO (Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering large cavitation tunnel using scaled models, including a ship with a single propeller, a ship with twin propellers and an underwater vehicle. The incoherent broadband processors defined based on the Bartlett and the minimum variance (MV processors were applied to the measured data. The results of data analysis and localization are presented in the paper. Finally, it is shown that the mechanical noise, as well as the propeller noise can be successfully localized using the proposed localization method.

  7. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million

  8. Heat-flux gage measurements on a flat plate at a Mach number of 4.6 in the VSD high speed wind tunnel, a feasibility test (LA28). [wind tunnel tests of measuring instruments for boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of employing thin-film heat-flux gages was studied as a method of defining boundary layer characteristics at supersonic speeds in a high speed blowdown wind tunnel. Flow visualization techniques (using oil) were employed. Tabulated data (computer printouts), a test facility description, and photographs of test equipment are given.

  9. Tunneling works. Tunnel koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higo, M [Hazam Gumi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-10-25

    A mountain tunneling method for rock-beds used to be applied mainly to construction works in the mountains under few restrictions by environmental problems. However, construction works near residential sreas have been increasing. There are such enviromental problems due to tunneling works as vibration, noise, lowering of ground-water level, and influences on other structures. This report mainly describes the measurement examples of vibration and noise accompanied with blasting and the effects of the measures to lessen such influences. When the tunneling works for the railroad was carried out on the natural ground mainly composed of basalt, vibration of the test blasting was measured at three stations with piezoelectric accelerometers. Then, ordinary blasting, mutistage blasting, and ABM blasting methods were used properly besed on the above results, and only a few complaints were made. In the different works, normal noise and low-frequency sound were mesured at 22 stations around the pit mouth. As countermeasures for noise, sound-proof sheets, walls, and single and double doors were installed and foundto be effective. 1 ref., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Thermal-cycle testing of the G-tunnel heated block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Wilson, M.L.; Board, M.P.; Hall, M.E.; Schuch, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Volcanic tuffs are being considered by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a medium for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project was established in 1977 to evaluate such disposal in geologic formations on or adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), as one of the NNWSI project participants, is responsible for the rock mechanics program to support the design of underground portions of a radioactive-waste repository in tuff. A rock mechanics field testing program is underway in G-Tunnel in Rainier Mesa on the NTS, where tuffs similar to those at Yucca Mountain, the potential candidate site, are found; later experiments are planned as part of the exploratory shaft investigations in Yucca Mountain. Science Applications International Corporation has been under contract to SNL to prepare and install instrumentation and control systems and to aid in the evaluation of the heated-block rock mechanics experiment

  11. In situ tests for investigating thermal and mechanical rock behaviors at an underground research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sangki; Cho, Won-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviors expected to be happened around an underground high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is important for a successful site selection, construction, operation, and closure of the repository. In this study, the thermal and mechanical behaviors of rock and rock mass were investigated from in situ borehole heater test and the studies for characterizing an excavation damaged zone (EDZ), which had been carried out at an underground research tunnel, KURT, constructed in granite for the validation of a HLW disposal concept. Thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic properties in EDZ could be predicted from various in situ and laboratory tests as well as numerical simulations. The complex thermo-mechanical coupling behavior of rock could be modeled using the rock properties. (author)

  12. Wind-tunnel Tests of a Hall High-life Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weick, Fred E; Sanders, Robert

    1932-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been made to find the lift, drag, and center-of-pressure characteristics of a Hall high-lift wing model. The Hall wing is essentially a split-flap airfoil with an internal air passage. Air enters the passage through an opening in the lower surface somewhat back of and parallel to the leading edge, and flows out through an opening made by deflecting the rear portion of the under surface downward as a flap. For ordinary flight conditions the front opening and the rear flap can be closed, providing in effect a conventional airfoil (the Clark Y in this case). The tests were made with various flap settings and with the entrance to the passage both open and closed. The highest lift coefficient found, C(sub L) = 2.08, was obtained with the passage closed.

  13. Calculation of a Tunnel Cross Section Subjected to Fire – with a New Advanced Transient Concrete Model for Reinforced Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Schneider

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the structural application of a new thermal induced strain model for concrete – the TIS-Model. An advanced transient concrete model (ATCM is applied with the material model of the TIS-Model. The non-linear model comprises thermal strain, elastic strain, plastic strain and transient temperature strains, and load history modelling of restraint concrete structures subjected to fire.The calculations by finite element analysis (FEA were done using the SAFIR structural code. The FEA software was basically new with respect to the material modelling derived to use the new TIS-Model (as a transient model considers thermal induced strain. The equations of the ATCM consider a lot of capabilities, especially for considering irreversible effects of temperature on some material properties. By considering the load history during heating up, increasing load bearing capacity may be obtained due to higher stiffness of the concrete. With this model, it is possible to apply the thermal-physical behaviour of material laws for calculation of structures under extreme temperature conditions.A tunnel cross section designed and built by the cut and cover method is calculated with a tunnel fire curve. The results are compared with the results of a calculation with the model of the Eurocode 2 (EC2-Model. The effect of load history in highly loaded structures under fire load will be investigated.A comparison of this model with the ordinary calculation system of Eurocode 2 (EC2 shows that a better evaluation of the safety level was achieved with the new model. This opens a space for optimizing concrete structure design with transient temperature conditions up to 1000 °C. 

  14. Accelerated load testing of geosynthetic base reinforced pavement test sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The main objective of this research is to evaluate the benefits of geosynthetic stabilization and reinforcement of subgrade/base aggregate layers in flexible pavements built on weak subgrades and the effect of pre-rut pavement sections, prior to the ...

  15. Laboratory tests to study the influence of rock stress confinement on the performances of TBM discs in tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innaurato, N.; Oggeri, C.; Oreste, P.; Vinai, R.

    2011-06-01

    To clarify some aspects of rock destruction with a disc acting on a high confined tunnel face, a series of tests were carried out to examine fracture mechanisms under an indenter that simulates the tunnel boring machine (TBM) tool action, in the presence of an adjacent groove, when a state of stress (lateral confinement) is imposed on a rock sample. These tests proved the importance of carefully establishing the optimal distance of grooves produced by discs acting on a confined surface, and the value (as a mere order of magnitude) of the increase of the thrust to produce the initiation of chip formation, as long as the confinement pressure becomes greater.

  16. COR1 Engineering Test Unit Measurements at the NCAR/HAO Vacuum Tunnel Facility, October-November 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William

    2002-01-01

    The Engineering Test Unit (ETU) of COR1 was made in two configurations. The first configuration, ETU-1, was for vibration testing, while the second, ETU-2, was for optical testing. This is a report on the optical testing performed on ETU-2 at the NCAR/HAO Vacuum Tunnel Facility during the months of October and November, 2002. This was the same facility used to test the two previous breadboard models. In both configurations, the first two tube sections were complete, with all optical elements aligned. The vibration model ETU-1 had the remaining tube sections attached, with mass models for the remaining optics, for the various mechanisms, and for the focal plane assembly. It was then converted into the optical model ETU-2 by removing tube sections 3 to 5, and mounting the remaining optics on commercial mounts. (The bandpass filter was also installed into tube 2, which had been replaced in ETU-1 by a mass model, so that pre- and post-vibration optical measurements could be made.) Doublet 2 was installed in a Newport LP-2 carrier, and aligned to the other optics in the first two tube sections. The LP-2 adjustment screws were then uralened so that the alignment could be maintained during shipping. Because neither the flight polarizer nor Hollow Core Motor were available, they were simulated by a commercial polarizer and rotational mount, both from Oriel corporation. The Oriel rotational stage was not designed for vacuum use, but it was determined after consultation with the company, and lab testing, that the stage could be used in the moderate vacuum conditions at the NCAR/HAO facility. The shutter and focal plane assembly were simulated with the same camera used for the previous two breadboard tests. The focal plane mask was simulated with a plane of BK7 glass with a mask glued on, using the same procedure as for the Lyot spot on Doublet 1, and mounted in an adjustable LP-2 carrier. Two masks were made, one made to the precise specifications of the optical design, the

  17. Confined states of individual type-II GaSb/GaAs quantum rings studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Rainer; Eisele, Holger; Lenz, Andrea; Ivanova, Lena; Vossebürger, Vivien; Warming, Till; Bimberg, Dieter; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Dähne, Mario

    2010-10-13

    Combined cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy results reveal the interplay between the atomic structure of ring-shaped GaSb quantum dots in GaAs and the corresponding electronic properties. Hole confinement energies between 0.2 and 0.3 eV and a type-II conduction band offset of 0.1 eV are directly obtained from the data. Additionally, the hole occupancy of quantum dot states and spatially separated Coulomb-bound electron states are observed in the tunneling spectra.

  18. Dynamic Wind-Tunnel Testing of a Sub-Scale Iced S-3B Viking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sam; Barnhart, Billy; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of ice accretion on a 1/12-scale complete aircraft model of S-3B Viking was studied in a rotary-balance wind tunnel. Two types of ice accretions were considered: ice protection system failure shape and runback shapes that form downstream of the thermal ice protection system. The results showed that the ice shapes altered the stall characteristics of the aircraft. The ice shapes also reduced the control surface effectiveness, but mostly near the stall angle of attack. There were some discrepancies with the data with the flaps deflected that were attributed to the low Reynolds number of the test. Rotational and forced-oscillation studies showed that the effects of ice were mostly in the longitudinal forces, and the effects on the lateral forces were relatively minor.

  19. Wind tunnel testing of the DeepWind demonstrator in design and tilted operating conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battistia, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.

    2016-01-01

    The DeepWind Project aims at investigating the feasibility of a new floating vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) concept, whose purpose is to exploit wind resources at deep-water offshore sites. The results of an extensive experimental campaign on the DeepWind reduced scale demonstrator are here...... was installed on a high precision test bench, whose axis was suitable to be inclined up to 15° with respect to the design (i.e. upright) operating condition. The experiments were performed at the large scale, high speed wind tunnel of the Politecnico di Milano (Italy), using a “free jet” (open channel...... presented for different wind speeds and rotor angular velocities, including also skewed flow operation due to a tilted rotor arrangement. To accomplish this, after being instrumented to measure aerodynamic power and thrust (both in streamwise and transversal directions), a troposkien three-bladed rotor...

  20. Final report of the borehole, shaft, and tunnel sealing test. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Ramqvist, G.

    1987-02-01

    Like the borehole and shaft plugging tests, the tunnel test gave evidence of the very effective sealing power of Na betonite. The test arrangement consisted of a 9 m long 1.5 m diameter steel tube surrounded by sand and cast in concrete plugs at each end. These plugs contained bentonite forming 'O-ring' sealings at the concrete/rock interface. The test had the form of injecting water into the sand and measuring the leakage that took place through the adjacent rock and along the plug. It was concluded that the drop in leakage from more than 200 l at 100 kPa water pressure early in the test to 75 l at 3 MPa pressure at the end was due partly to the swelling pressure exerted by the bentonite on the rock and by penetration of bentonite into water-bearing rock fractures. The major sealing process appears to be the establishment of a very tight bentonite/rock interface. (orig./HP)

  1. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  2. Temperature measurements from a horizontal heater test in G-Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wunan; Ramirez, A.L.; Watwood, D.

    1991-10-01

    A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The measured temperatures agree well with a scoping calculation that was performed using a model which investigates the transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in fractured porous media. Our results indicate that the temperature field might be affected by the initial moisture content of the rock, the fractures in the rock, the distance from the free surface of the alcove wall, and the temperature distribution on the heater surface. Higher initial moisture content, higher fracture density, and cooling from the alcove wall tend to decrease the measured temperature. The temperature on top of the horizontal heater can was about 30 degrees C greater than at the bottom throughout most of the heating phase, causing the rock temperatures above the heater to be greater than those below. Along a radius from the center of the heater, the heating created a dry zone, followed by a boiling zone and condensation zone. Gravity drainage of the condensed water in the condensation zone had a strong effect on the boiling process in the test region. The temperatures below and to the side of the heater indicated a region receiving liquid drainage from an overlying region of condensation. We verified that a thermocouple in a thin-wall tubing measures the same temperature as one grouted in a borehole

  3. Development and Operation of an Automatic Rotor Trim Control System for the UH-60 Individual Blade Control Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Tischler, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    An automatic rotor trim control system was developed and successfully used during a wind tunnel test of a full-scale UH-60 rotor system with Individual Blade Control (IBC) actuators. The trim control system allowed rotor trim to be set more quickly, precisely and repeatably than in previous wind tunnel tests. This control system also allowed the rotor trim state to be maintained during transients and drift in wind tunnel flow, and through changes in IBC actuation. The ability to maintain a consistent rotor trim state was key to quickly and accurately evaluating the effect of IBC on rotor performance, vibration, noise and loads. This paper presents details of the design and implementation of the trim control system including the rotor system hardware, trim control requirements, and trim control hardware and software implementation. Results are presented showing the effect of IBC on rotor trim and dynamic response, a validation of the rotor dynamic simulation used to calculate the initial control gains and tuning of the control system, and the overall performance of the trim control system during the wind tunnel test.

  4. A "Projective" Test of the Golden Section Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chris; Adams-Webber, Jack

    1987-01-01

    In a projective test of the golden section hypothesis, 24 high school students rated themselves and 10 comic strip characters on basis of 12 bipolar constructs. Overall proportion of cartoon figures which subjects assigned to positive poles of constructs was very close to golden section. (Author/NB)

  5. EVALUATION OF REINFORCING EFFECT ON FACEBOLTS FOR TUNNELING USING X-RAY CT AND CENTRIFUGE MODEL TEST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Daiki; Otani, Jun; Date, Kensuke; Yokot, Yasuhiro; Nagatani, Hideki

    The purpose of this paper is firstly to simulate the tunnel face failure in laboratory with four cases of model tests by pulling out tunnel model from a sandy ground that are without using auxiliary method nor facebolts and using facebolts with three different lengths of bolts, and secondary, to investigate the behavior of model ground using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner to visualize the failure zone in three dimensions. In addition to those results, a series of centrifuge model tests are conducted to confirm the results of X-ray CT test and also to discuss the ground behavior under full scale stress level. Finally, the effect of face bolting method is evaluated based on all the test results.

  6. Organizational and psychosocial risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome: a cross-sectional study of French workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigouin, Pascal; Ha, Catherine; Bodin, Julie; Le Manac'h, Audrey Petit; Descatha, Alexis; Goldberg, Marcel; Roquelaure, Yves

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the organizational and psychosocial risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in workers exposed to various levels of work-related constraints, with a special focus on factors related to the work organization. From 3,710 workers, representative of a French region's working population, trained occupational physicians diagnosed a total of 156 cases of CTS between 2002 and 2005. Diagnoses were established by standardized physical examination, while personal factors and work exposure were assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Statistical associations between CTS and personal and work-related factors were analyzed for each gender using logistic regression modeling. Among the factors related to work organization, working with temporary workers was associated with CTS for women (OR = 1.99, 95 % CI 1.23-3.25), but not for men. Task rotation during the job (OR = 2.45 95 % CI 1.41-4.24) and work pace dependent on quantified targets (OR = 1.93 95 % CI 1.08-3.46) were associated with CTS only for men. The work-related psychosocial factors highlighted by the logistic modeling were high psychological demand for women (OR = 1.90, 95 % CI 1.17-3.09) and low skill discretion (OR = 1.77, 95 % CI 1.01-3.11) for men. This study has identified some psychosocial factors and factors related to work organization associated with clinically diagnosed and symptom-only cases of CTS as well as personal and biomechanical factors. However, due to the cross-sectional design of the study, no causal conclusion could be drawn and longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm these results.

  7. Correaltion of full-scale drag predictions with flight measurements on the C-141A aircraft. Phase 2: Wind tunnel test, analysis, and prediction techniques. Volume 1: Drag predictions, wind tunnel data analysis and correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macwilkinson, D. G.; Blackerby, W. T.; Paterson, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The degree of cruise drag correlation on the C-141A aircraft is determined between predictions based on wind tunnel test data, and flight test results. An analysis of wind tunnel tests on a 0.0275 scale model at Reynolds number up to 3.05 x 1 million/MAC is reported. Model support interference corrections are evaluated through a series of tests, and fully corrected model data are analyzed to provide details on model component interference factors. It is shown that predicted minimum profile drag for the complete configuration agrees within 0.75% of flight test data, using a wind tunnel extrapolation method based on flat plate skin friction and component shape factors. An alternative method of extrapolation, based on computed profile drag from a subsonic viscous theory, results in a prediction four percent lower than flight test data.

  8. Wind Tunnel Simulations of the Mock Urban Setting Test - Experimental Procedures and Data Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gailis, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    ... of the data analysis techniques is given. Emphasis is placed on the scaling arguments used to compare data between a wind tunnel and full-scale study, and on methods of uncertainty analysis to provide a rigorous underpinning to the dataset. The report serves as a complete documentation for users of the MUST wind tunnel simulation dataset, which can be obtained by contacting the author.

  9. Wind and water tunnel testing of a morphing aquatic micro air vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddall, Robert; Ortega Ancel, Alejandro; Kovač, Mirko

    2017-02-06

    Aerial robots capable of locomotion in both air and water would enable novel mission profiles in complex environments, such as water sampling after floods or underwater structural inspections. The design of such a vehicle is challenging because it implies significant propulsive and structural design trade-offs for operation in both fluids. In this paper, we present a unique Aquatic Micro Air Vehicle (AquaMAV), which uses a reconfigurable wing to dive into the water from flight, inspired by the plunge diving strategy of water diving birds in the family Sulidae . The vehicle's performance is investigated in wind and water tunnel experiments, from which we develop a planar trajectory model. This model is used to predict the dive behaviour of the AquaMAV, and investigate the efficacy of passive dives initiated by wing folding as a means of water entry. The paper also includes first field tests of the AquaMAV prototype where the folding wings are used to initiate a plunge dive.

  10. Design and Testing of a Natural Convection Solar Tunnel Dryer for Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Nyambe Simate

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A natural convection solar tunnel dryer comprising three major units, a solar collector unit, a drying unit, and a vertical bare flat-plate chimney, was constructed. No-load tests with a horizontal configuration of air entry into the collector resulted in a bidirectional air flow in the dryer. To correct this undesirable situation, an air guide at the collector was incorporated to ensure that air entered in a vertical direction. To investigate its performance, drying experiments with mango were carried out at the University of Zambia, Department of Agricultural Engineering. Uncertainties in the parameters measured in the experiment were analysed and quantified. The results showed that, under solar radiation between 568.4 and 999.5 W/m2, air temperature of up to 65.8°C was attained at the collector unit. The average relative humidity values were 30.8%, 6.4%, and 8.4% for the ambient, collector, and drying unit, respectively. Under these conditions, mango with an initial moisture content of 85.5% (wet basis was dried to 13.0% (wet basis in 9.5 hours. The collector, drying, and pick-up efficiencies were found to be 24.7%, 12.8%, and 35.0%, respectively. The average temperature difference between the chimney air and ambient air was 12.1°C, and this was sufficient in driving the flow of air through the dryer.

  11. Wind Tunnel Tests for Wind Pressure Distribution on Gable Roof Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gable roof buildings are widely used in industrial buildings. Based on wind tunnel tests with rigid models, wind pressure distributions on gable roof buildings with different aspect ratios were measured simultaneously. Some characteristics of the measured wind pressure field on the surfaces of the models were analyzed, including mean wind pressure, fluctuating wind pressure, peak negative wind pressure, and characteristics of proper orthogonal decomposition results of the measured wind pressure field. The results show that extremely high local suctions often occur in the leading edges of longitudinal wall and windward roof, roof corner, and roof ridge which are the severe damaged locations under strong wind. The aspect ratio of building has a certain effect on the mean wind pressure coefficients, and the effect relates to wind attack angle. Compared with experimental results, the region division of roof corner and roof ridge from AIJ2004 is more reasonable than those from CECS102:2002 and MBMA2006.The contributions of the first several eigenvectors to the overall wind pressure distributions become much bigger. The investigation can offer some basic understanding for estimating wind load distribution on gable roof buildings and facilitate wind-resistant design of cladding components and their connections considering wind load path. PMID:24082851

  12. Augmented Cross-Sectional Prevalence Testing for Estimating HIV Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, R.; Lagakos, S. W.

    2010-01-01

    Estimation of an HIV incidence rate based on a cross-sectional sample of individuals evaluated with both a sensitive and less-sensitive diagnostic test offers important advantages to incidence estimation based on a longitudinal cohort study. However, the reliability of the cross-sectional approach has been called into question because of two major concerns. One is the difficulty in obtaining a reliable external approximation for the mean “window period” between detectability of HIV infection ...

  13. Acceleration and support post deformation measurements during surface and tunnel transport of a LHC Short Straight Section

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    This technical note is a complement to the technical note [1]. The former technical note dealt with the experimental modal analysis and the road transport with transport restraints and special suspension. The present note describes the measured accelerations and support post deformations during road transport at reduced speed without end restraints or special suspension. This note also reports the accelerations and support post deformations during handling and tunnel transport with the dedicated tunnel vehicle. The measured accelerations are compared with the specified acceleration limits.

  14. Design criteria and fabrication in-pile test section of HANARO fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. Y.

    1997-10-01

    Safety state fuel test loop will be equipped in HANARO to obtain the development and betterments of advanced fuel and materials through the irradiation tests. The objective of this study is to determine the design criteria and technical specification of in-pile test section and to specify the manufacturing requirements of in-pile test section. HANARO fuel test loop was designed to meet the CANDU and PWR fuel testing and in-pile section will be manufactured and installed in HANARO. The design criteria and technical specification of in-pile test section could be used the fuel and materials design with for irradiation testing IPS of HANARO fuel test loop. This results will become guidances for the planning and programming of irradiation testing. (author). 12 refs., tabs., figs.

  15. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  16. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  17. Wind Tunnel Testing of a 120th Scale Large Civil Tilt-Rotor Model in Airplane and Helicopter Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.; Willink, Gina C.; Russell, Carl R.; Amy, Alexander R.; Pete, Ashley E.

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012 and October 2013, NASA and the U.S. Army jointly conducted a wind tunnel test program examining two notional large tilt rotor designs: NASA's Large Civil Tilt Rotor and the Army's High Efficiency Tilt Rotor. The approximately 6%-scale airframe models (unpowered) were tested without rotors in the U.S. Army 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Measurements of all six forces and moments acting on the airframe were taken using the wind tunnel scale system. In addition to force and moment measurements, flow visualization using tufts, infrared thermography and oil flow were used to identify flow trajectories, boundary layer transition and areas of flow separation. The purpose of this test was to collect data for the validation of computational fluid dynamics tools, for the development of flight dynamics simulation models, and to validate performance predictions made during conceptual design. This paper focuses on the results for the Large Civil Tilt Rotor model in an airplane mode configuration up to 200 knots of wind tunnel speed. Results are presented with the full airframe model with various wing tip and nacelle configurations, and for a wing-only case also with various wing tip and nacelle configurations. Key results show that the addition of a wing extension outboard of the nacelles produces a significant increase in the lift-to-drag ratio, and interestingly decreases the drag compared to the case where the wing extension is not present. The drag decrease is likely due to complex aerodynamic interactions between the nacelle and wing extension that results in a significant drag benefit.

  18. Force Tests of the Boeing XB-47 Full-Scale Empennage in the Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunton, Lynn W.

    1947-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of the Boeing XB-47 full-scale empennage was conducted to provide, prior to flight tests, data required on the effectiveness of the elevator and rudder. The XB-47 airplane is a jet-propelled medium bomber having wing and tail surfaces swept back 35 degrees. The investigation included tests of the effectiveness of the elevator with normal straight sides, with a buldged trailing edge, and with a modified hinge-line gap and tests of the effectiveness of the rudder with a normal straight-sided tab and with a bulged tab.

  19. PIV Measurements in the 14 x 22 Low Speed Tunnel: Recommendations for Future Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ralph D.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; McGinley, Catherine B.; Paschal, Keith B.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2003-01-01

    During the period from February 4 to March 21, 2003 stereo digital particle imaging velocimetry measurements were made on a generic high lift model, the Trap Wing, as part of the High Lift Flow Physics Experiment. These measurements were the first PIV measurements made in the NASA, Langley Research Center 14 x 22 Foot Low Speed Tunnel, and several problems were encountered and solved in the acquisition of the data. It is the purpose of this paper to document the solutions to these problems and to make recommendations for further improvements to the tunnel/setup in order to facilitate future measurements of this type.

  20. Experimental test results of multi-channel test rig of T1 test section, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Takase, Kazuyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1990-09-01

    Channel blockage test on a fuel column of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) has been performed under the helium gas atmosphere at a high temperature and a high pressure in order to obtain safety data on flow rate and temperature distributions in the fuel column with the multi-channel test rig of the fuel stack test section (T 1 ) in HENDEL. In the test, one of 12 fuel channels was blockaded to 90% of flow area at the channel inlet. Experimental results showed that the helium gas flow rate in the blockaded channel was 28%∼33% lower than the average flow rate for Reynolds number from 2300 to 14000 in isothermal flow. When simulated fuel rods were heated, the flow rate in the blockaded channel did not decrease down in comparison with the isothermal flow. This is due to that the heat generated in the fuel rods conducts to the other fuel channels in graphite fuel blocks, so that accelerated pressure losses in the fuel channels change with helium gas temperatures. (author)

  1. Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. Part II. Intermediate vessel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, G.D.

    1975-01-01

    The testing of the intermediate pressure vessels is a major activity under the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program. A primary objective of these tests is to develop or verify methods of fracture prediction, through the testing of selected structures and materials, in order that a valid basis can be established for evaluating the serviceability and safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels. These vessel tests were planned with sufficiently specific objectives that substantial quantitative weight could be given to the results. Each set of testing conditions was chosen so as to provide specific data by which analytical methods of predicting flaw growth, and in some cases crack arrest, could be evaluated. Every practical effort was made to assure that results would be relevant to some aspect of real reactor pressure vessel performance through careful control of material properties, selection of test temperatures, and design of prepared flaws. 5 references

  2. Lessons Learned from the Construction of Upgrades to the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and Re-activation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, David W.; Andracchio, Charles R.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Spera, David A.; Austinson, Todd A.

    2001-01-01

    Major upgrades were made in 1999 to the 6- by 9-Foot (1.8- by 2.7-m) Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These included replacement of the electronic controls for the variable-speed drive motor, replacement of the heat exchanger, complete replacement and enlargement of the leg of the tunnel containing the new heat-exchanger, the addition of flow-expanding and flow-contracting turning vanes upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, respectively, and the addition of fan outlet guide vanes (OGV's). This paper presents an overview of the construction and reactivation testing phases of the project. Important lessons learned during the technical and contract management work are documented.

  3. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...... that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved....

  4. An evaluation of iced bridge hanger vibrations through wind tunnel testing and quasi-steady theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos T.; Larsen, A.

    2012-01-01

    roughness is also examined. The static force coefficients are used to predict parameter regions where aerodynamic instability of the iced bridge hanger might be expected to occur, through use of an adapted theoretical 3- DOF quasi-steady galloping instability model, which accounts for sectional axial...... rotation. A comparison between the 3-DOF model and the instabilities found through two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) dynamic tests is presented. It is shown that, although there is good agreement between the instabilities found through use of the quasi-steady theory and the dynamic tests, discrepancies exist......-indicating the possible inability of quasi-steady theory to fully predict these vibrational instabilities....

  5. UHV testing of spare straight section chambers of Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, S.K.; Ratnakala, K.C.; Sridhar, R.; Bhange, N.J.; Netram; Shukla, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    The vacuum system of Synchrotron Radiation Source, Indus-2, in RRCAT has been functioning up to the mark, continuously for last 10 years. To continue the same trouble-free functioning, it was planned to procure spares for all critical vacuum components, test for UHV performance and keep ready for installation, in case of requirement. As a part of this planning, fifteen chambers made of Aluminium alloy (6063 T6), procured as spare straight section chambers for Indus-2, and were tested for UHV performance. They were tested in batches of 2 or 3 chambers, depending upon their length, and the similar testing-procedure was followed. This paper narrates the tests carried out, and the results obtained. Ultimate vacuum in the range (2 to 9) x 10 -10 mbar was achieved. (author)

  6. Results of Low Power Deicer tests on a swept inlet component in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Thomas H.; Shin, Jaiwon

    1993-01-01

    Tests were conducted under a USAF/NASA Low Power Deicer program on two expulsive technologies to examine system performance on hardware representative of a modern aircraft part. The BF Goodrich Electro-Expulsive Deicing System and Pneumatic Impulse Ice Protection system were installed on a swept, compound curve, engine inlet component with varying leading edge radius, and tested through a range of icing and system operating conditions in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. A description of the experimental procedure and results, including residual ice thickness, shed ice particle size, and changes in system energy/pressure characteristics are presented.

  7. Automatic control of cryogenic wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.

    1989-01-01

    Inadequate Reynolds number similarity in testing of scaled models affects the quality of aerodynamic data from wind tunnels. This is due to scale effects of boundary-layer shock wave interaction which is likely to be severe at transonic speeds. The idea of operation of wind tunnels using test gas cooled to cryogenic temperatures has yielded a quantrum jump in the ability to realize full scale Reynolds number flow similarity in small transonic tunnels. In such tunnels, the basic flow control problem consists of obtaining and maintaining the desired test section flow parameters. Mach number, Reynolds number, and dynamic pressure are the three flow parameters that are usually required to be kept constant during the period of model aerodynamic data acquisition. The series of activity involved in modeling, control law development, mechanization of the control laws on a microcomputer, and the performance of a globally stable automatic control system for the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) are discussed. A lumped multi-variable nonlinear dynamic model of the cryogenic tunnel, generation of a set of linear control laws for small perturbation, and nonlinear control strategy for large set point changes including tunnel trajectory control are described. The details of mechanization of the control laws on a 16 bit microcomputer system, the software features, operator interface, the display and safety are discussed. The controller is shown to provide globally stable and reliable temperature control to + or - 0.2 K, pressure to + or - 0.07 psi and Mach number to + or - 0.002 of the set point value. This performance is obtained both during large set point commands as for a tunnel cooldown, and during aerodynamic data acquisition with intrusive activity like geometrical changes in the test section such as angle of attack changes, drag rake movements, wall adaptation and sidewall boundary-layer removal. Feasibility of the use of an automatic Reynolds number control mode with

  8. Proportional fuzzy feed-forward architecture control validation by wind tunnel tests of a morphing wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Joël Tchatchueng Kammegne

    2017-04-01

    wing for a specified flight condition. The feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control system by use of a proportional fuzzy feed-forward methodology are demonstrated experimentally through bench and wind tunnel tests of the morphing wing model.

  9. Fire safety case study of a railway tunnel: Smoke evacuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Maele Karim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available When a fire occurs in a tunnel, it is of great importance to assure the safety of the occupants of the tunnel. This is achieved by creating smoke-free spaces in the tunnel through control of the smoke gases. In this paper, results are presented of a study concerning the fire safety in a real scale railway tunnel test case. Numerical simulations are performed in order to examine the possibility of natural ventilation of smoke in inclined tunnels. Several aspects are taken into account: the length of the simulated tunnel section, the slope of the tunnel and the possible effects of external wind at one portal of the tunnel. The Fire Dynamics Simulator of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA, is applied to perform the simulations. The simulations show that for the local behavior of the smoke during the early stages of the fire, the slope of the tunnel is of little importance. Secondly, the results show that external wind and/or pressure conditions have a large effect on the smoke gases inside the tunnel. Finally, some idea for the value of the critical ventilation velocity is given. The study also shows that computational fluid dynamics calculations are a valuable tool for large scale, real life complex fire cases. .

  10. Increased Mach Number Capability for the NASA Glenn 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, J. W.; Saunders, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations and wind tunnel testing were conducted to explore the operation of the Abe Silverstein Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center at test section Mach numbers above the current limit of Mach 3.5. An increased Mach number would enhance the capability for testing of supersonic and hypersonic propulsion systems. The focus of the explorations was on understanding the flow within the second throat of the tunnel, which is downstream of the test section and is where the supersonic flow decelerates to subsonic flow. Methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were applied to provide details of the shock boundary layer structure and to estimate losses in total pressure. The CFD simulations indicated that the tunnel could be operated up to Mach 4.0 if the minimum width of the second throat was made smaller than that used for previous operation of the tunnel. Wind tunnel testing was able to confirm such operation of the tunnel at Mach 3.6 and 3.7 before a hydraulic failure caused a stop to the testing. CFD simulations performed after the wind tunnel testing showed good agreement with test data consisting of static pressures along the ceiling of the second throat. The CFD analyses showed increased shockwave boundary layer interactions, which was also observed as increased unsteadiness of dynamic pressures collected in the wind tunnel testing.

  11. Airflow over Barchan dunes: field measurements, mathematical modelling and wind tunnel testing

    OpenAIRE

    Wiggs, G. F. S.

    1992-01-01

    There are few empirical measurements of velocity, shear velocity, sand transport, morphological change on the windward slopes of dunes.This thesis compares field measurements on a barchan dune in Oman with calculations using a mathematical model (FLOWSTAR) and measurements in a wind tunnel. All three techniques demonstrate similar patterns of velocity, confirming the acceleration of flow up the windward slope, deceleration between the crest and brink and significant flow decele...

  12. Analysis of dynamic accumulative damage about the lining structure of high speed railway’s tunnel based on ultrasonic testing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-qiu; Zhang, Huojun; Xie, Wen-xi

    2017-08-01

    Based on the similar material model test of full tunnel, the theory of elastic wave propagation and the testing technology of intelligent ultrasonic wave had been used to research the dynamic accumulative damage characteristics of tunnel’s lining structure under the dynamic loads of high speed train. For the more, the dynamic damage variable of lining structure of high speed railway’s tunnel was obtained. The results shown that the dynamic cumulative damage of lining structure increases nonlinearly with the times of cumulative vibration, the weakest part of dynamic cumulative damage is the arch foot of tunnel. Much more attention should be paid to the design and operation management of high speed railway’s tunnel.

  13. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  15. About tunnelling times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olkhovsky, V.S.; Recami, E.

    1991-08-01

    In this paper, first we critically analyse the main theoretical definitions and calculations of the sub-barrier tunnelling and reflection times. Secondly, we propose a new, physically sensible definition of such durations, on the basis of a recent general formalism (already tested for other types of quantum collisions). At last, we discuss some results regarding temporal evolution of the tunnelling processes, and in particular the ''particle'' speed during tunnelling. (author). 36 refs, 1 fig

  16. Full-scale wind-tunnel tests of high-lift system modifications on a carrier based fighter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Zell, Peter T.; Hagan, John L.; Schoch, David

    1993-01-01

    Modifications to the high-lift system of a full-scale F/A-I8A were tested in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. The objective was to measure the effect of simple modifications on the aerodynamic performance of the high-lift system. The modifications included the placement of a straight fairing in the shroud cove above the trailing-edge flap and the addition of seals to prevent air leakage through the hinge lines of the leading-edge flap, the trailing-edge shroud, and the wing fold. The test was carried out on an actual F/A-18A with it's flaps deployed in the landing approach configuration. The angle of attack ranged from 0 to 16 degrees and the wind speed was 100 knots. At an angle of attack of 8 degrees, the trimmed lift coefficient was improved by 0.09 with all wing seals in place. This corresponds to a reduction in the approach speed for the F/A-I8A of about 5 knots. The seal along the wing fold hinge, a feature present on many naval aircraft, provided one third of the total increment in trimmed lift. A comparison of the full-scale wind-tunnel results with those obtained from flight test is also presented.

  17. STRESSED STATE OF ROCKY SUBSOIL IN THE VICINITY OF A CIRCULAR SECTION HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING TUNNEL TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE ANISOTROPY OF THE GROUND MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Bautdinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study consists ina parametric analysis of the stress state of transversely isotropic rocky ground in the vicinity of a circular cross-sectional hydraulic tunnel taking into account the dead load of the subsoil medium under various relations of the elastic characteristics of the subsoil environment in orthogonal directions and at different angles of inclination of the plane of isotropy. Methods. A transversely isotropic medium model (a special case of an anisotropic medium is applied, in which the subsoil in one plane has the characteristics of an isotropic medium (isotropic plane but in a perpendicular direction – in contradistinction to the characteristics of an isotropic medium.The angle of isotropic planar inclination models the oblique bedding of subsoil layers. Results. The determination of tangential stresses on the contour generation allows the strength of the subsoil medium to be estimated at different depths of emplacement. The calculation of extensive hydraulic engineering tunnels, constructed in strong, transversely isotropic rocky ground, is reduced to a problem of plane strain elasticity theory for a transversely isotropic medium surrounding the tunnel construction. Since the solution of this problem cannot be achieved using analytical methods, the analysis of the stress state was carried out by finite element method using the ANSYS software complex. The type and size of the finite element appropriate for the calculation were pre-identified based on solutions to the task of verification. For the verificatory task, the Kirsch problem was adopted. Conclusion.When designing underground structures, it is necessary to determine the physical and mechanical properties of rocky soils in greater detail and to pay special attention to the elastic characteristics. The absence of tensile stresses in the upper section of development with some relations of the moduli of deformation and Poisson's ratios benefit the

  18. Wind Tunnel Test of a Risk-Reduction Wing/Fuselage Model to Examine Juncture-Flow Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Neuhart, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    A wing/fuselage wind-tunnel model was tested in the Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel in preparation for a highly-instrumented Juncture Flow Experiment to be conducted in the same facility. This test, which was sponsored by the NASA Transformational Tool and Technologies Project, is part of a comprehensive set of experimental and computational research activities to develop revolutionary, physics-based aeronautics analysis and design capability. The objectives of this particular test were to examine the surface and off-body flow on a generic wing/body combination to: 1) choose a final wing for a future, highly instrumented model, 2) use the results to facilitate unsteady pressure sensor placement on the model, 3) determine the area to be surveyed with an embedded laser-doppler velocimetry (LDV) system, 4) investigate the primary juncture corner- flow separation region using particle image velocimetry (PIV) to see if the particle seeding is adequately entrained and to examine the structure in the separated region, and 5) to determine the similarity of observed flow features with those predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This report documents the results of the above experiment that specifically address the first three goals. Multiple wing configurations were tested at a chord Reynolds number of 2.4 million. Flow patterns on the surface of the wings and in the region of the wing/fuselage juncture were examined using oil- flow visualization and infrared thermography. A limited number of unsteady pressure sensors on the fuselage around the wing leading and trailing edges were used to identify any dynamic effects of the horseshoe vortex on the flow field. The area of separated flow in the wing/fuselage juncture near the wing trailing edge was observed for all wing configurations at various angles of attack. All of the test objectives were met. The staff of the 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel provided outstanding support and delivered

  19. Postprocedural Aspiration Test to Predict Adequacy of Dialysis Following Tunneled Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jason C.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; Michael, Beckie

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if a timed aspiration technique with a 20-ml syringe can be used to predict adequacy of blood flow in tunneled dialysis catheters. Sixteen patients referred for de novo placement or manipulation of failing tunneled hemodialysis catheters had the time it takes to fill a 20-ml syringe with the plunger fully withdrawn measured to the nearest tenth of a second. These measurements were correlated with flow rates recorded in dialysis just prior to (if failed catheter) and in the following dialysis session with adequacy determined as at least 300 ml/min. Syringe-filling time (22 catheters in 16 patients) was plotted against adequacy of dialysis. The mean time to fill a 20-ml syringe was 2.2 sec, with a range of 1.0-4.7 sec. The mean time to fill syringes for catheters with adequate dialysis was 1.7 ± 0.5 sec, and for inadequate catheters, it was 2.8 ± 0.8 sec. These differences are statistically significant (p < 0.001). Using a filling time of greater than or equal to 2 sec as a threshold gives the highest sensitivity (100%) for predicting inadequate dialysis while maintaining high specificity (75%). To achieve a specificity of 100%, a 3-sec cutoff would be necessary, but would lead to a sensitivity of only 20%. A simple and objective aspiration technique can be performed at the time of tunneled dialysis catheter placement/manipulation to reasonably predict adequacy of subsequent dialysis

  20. Structural damping results from vibration tests of straight piping sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the USNRC and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on 76-mm and 203-mm (3-in. amd 8-in.) Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 10-m (33-ft) straight sections of piping were rigidly supported at the ends. Spring, rod, and constant force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers were included as intermediate supports. Excitation was provided by low-force level hammer inpacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 445-kN (50-ton) overhead crane. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This paper presents results from the testing showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping

  1. Wind tunnel tests of the NACA 63-415 and a modified NACA 63-415 airfoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, C.; Fuglsang, P.; Johansen, J.

    2000-01-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risø-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUXopen jet wind tunnel was used having a backgr......This report contains 2D measurements of the NACA 63-415 and a NACA 63-415 airfoil with modified leading edge called NACA 63-415-Risø-D. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The VELUXopen jet wind tunnel was used having...... a background turbulence intensity of 1%, an inlet flow velocity of 40 m/s which resulted in a Reynolds number of 1.6×106. The airfoil sections had a chord of 0.600 m and 0.606 m for NACA 63-415 and NACA 63-415-Risø-D,respectively. The span was 1.9 m and end plates were used to minimise 3D flow effects...

  2. Cross sections, benchmarks, etc.: What is data testing all about

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagschal, J.; Yeivin, Y.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine the consistency of two distinct measurements of a physical quantity, the discrepancy d between the two should be compared with its own standard deviation, σ = √(σ/sub 1//sup 2/+σ/sub 2//sup 2/). To properly test a given cross-section library by a set of benchmark (integral) measurements, the quantity corresponding to (d/σ)/sup 2/ is the quadratic d/sup dagger/C/sup -1/d. Here d is the vector of which the components are the discrepancies between the calculated values of the integral parameters and their corresponding measured values, and C is the uncertainty matrix of these discrepancies. This quadratic form is the only true measure of the joint consistency of the library and benchmarks. On the other hand, the very matrix C is essentially all one needs to adjust the library by the benchmarks. Therefore, any argument against adjustment simultaneously disqualifies all serious attempts to test cross-section libraries against integral benchmarks

  3. Morphing Wing-Tip Open Loop Controller and its Validation During Wind Tunnel Tests at the IAR-NRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sadok GUEZGUEZ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this project, a wing tip of a real aircraft was designed and manufactured. This wing tip was composed of a wing and an aileron. The wing was equipped with a composite skin on its upper surface. This skin changed its shape (morphed by use of 4 electrical in-house developed actuators and 32 pressure sensors. These pressure sensors measure the pressures, and further the loads on the wing upper surface. Thus, the upper surface of the wing was morphed using these actuators with the aim to improve the aerodynamic performances of the wing-tip. Two types of ailerons were designed and manufactured: one aileron is rigid (non-morphed and one morphing aileron. This morphing aileron can change its shape also for the aerodynamic performances improvement. The morphing wing-tip internal structure is designed and manufactured, and is presented firstly in the paper. Then, the modern communication and control hardware are presented for the entire morphing wing tip equipped with actuators and sensors having the aim to morph the wing. The calibration procedure of the wing tip is further presented, followed by the open loop controller results obtained during wind tunnel tests. Various methodologies of open loop control are presented in this paper, and results obtained were obtained and validated experimentally through wind tunnel tests.

  4. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R K

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved

  5. Pilot instrumentation of a Superpave test section at the Kansas Accelerated Testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Two Superpave test sections were constructed at the Kansas Accelerated Testing Laboratory (K-ATL) with 12.5 mm (2 in) nominal maximum size Superpave mixture (SM-2A) with varying percentages (15 and 30 percent) of river sand. A 150 kN (34 kip) tandem ...

  6. Investigation on wind turbine wakes: wind tunnel tests and field experiments with LIDARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, Giacomo; Wu, Ting; Cöeffé, Juliette; Porté-Agel, Fernando; WIRE Team

    2011-11-01

    An investigation on the interaction between atmospheric boundary layer flow and wind turbines is carried out with wind tunnel and LIDAR measurements. The former were carried out using hot-wire anemometry and multi-hole pressure probes in the wake of a three-bladed miniature wind turbine. The wind turbine wake is characterized by a strong velocity defect in the proximity of the rotor, and its recovery is found to depend on the characteristics of the incoming atmospheric boundary layer (mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles). Field experiments were performed using three wind LIDARs. Bi-dimensional scans are performed in order to analyse the wake wind field with different atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Furthermore, simultaneous measurements with two or three LIDARs allow the reconstruction of multi-component velocity fields. Both LIDAR and wind tunnel measurements highlight an increased turbulence level at the wake boundary for heights comparable to the top-tip of the blades; this flow feature can produce dangerous fatigue loads on following wind turbines.

  7. Aerodynamic results of wind tunnel tests on a 0.010-scale model (32-QTS) space shuttle integrated vehicle in the AEDC VKF-40-inch supersonic wind tunnel (IA61)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daileda, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Plotted and tabulated aerodynamic coefficient data from a wind tunnel test of the integrated space shuttle vehicle are presented. The primary test objective was to determine proximity force and moment data for the orbiter/external tank and solid rocket booster (SRB) with and without separation rockets firing for both single and dual booster runs. Data were obtained at three points (t = 0, 1.25, and 2.0 seconds) on the nominal SRB separation trajectory.

  8. Emission factor of ammonia (NH3) from on-road vehicles in China: tunnel tests in urban Guangzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tengyu; Wang, Xinming; Ding, Xiang; Deng, Wei; Lü, Sujun; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Boguang

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia (NH 3 ) is the primary alkaline gas in the atmosphere that contributes to formation of secondary particles. Emission of NH 3 from vehicles, particularly gasoline powered light duty vehicles equipped with three-way catalysts, is regarded as an important source apart from emissions from animal wastes and soils, yet measured emission factors for motor vehicles are still not available in China, where traffic-related emission has become an increasingly important source of air pollutants in urban areas. Here we present our tunnel tests for NH 3 from motor vehicles under ‘real world conditions’ in an urban roadway tunnel in Guangzhou, a central city in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in south China. By attributing all NH 3 emissions in the tunnel to light-duty gasoline vehicles, we obtained a fuel-based emission rate of 2.92 ± 0.18 g L −1 and a mileage-based emission factor of 229.5 ± 14.1 mg km −1 . These emission factors were much higher than those measured in the United States while measured NO x emission factors (7.17 ± 0.60 g L −1 or 0.56 ± 0.05 g km −1 ) were contrastingly near or lower than those previously estimated by MOBILE/PART5 or COPERT IV models. Based on the NH 3 emission factors from this study, on-road vehicles accounted for 8.1% of NH 3 emissions in the PRD region in 2006 instead of 2.5% as estimated in a previous study using emission factors taken from the Emission Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) in the United States. (letter)

  9. Emission factor of ammonia (NH3) from on-road vehicles in China: tunnel tests in urban Guangzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tengyu; Wang, Xinming; Wang, Boguang; Ding, Xiang; Deng, Wei; Lü, Sujun; Zhang, Yanli

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the primary alkaline gas in the atmosphere that contributes to formation of secondary particles. Emission of NH3 from vehicles, particularly gasoline powered light duty vehicles equipped with three-way catalysts, is regarded as an important source apart from emissions from animal wastes and soils, yet measured emission factors for motor vehicles are still not available in China, where traffic-related emission has become an increasingly important source of air pollutants in urban areas. Here we present our tunnel tests for NH3 from motor vehicles under ‘real world conditions’ in an urban roadway tunnel in Guangzhou, a central city in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in south China. By attributing all NH3 emissions in the tunnel to light-duty gasoline vehicles, we obtained a fuel-based emission rate of 2.92 ± 0.18 g L-1 and a mileage-based emission factor of 229.5 ± 14.1 mg km-1. These emission factors were much higher than those measured in the United States while measured NO x emission factors (7.17 ± 0.60 g L-1 or 0.56 ± 0.05 g km-1) were contrastingly near or lower than those previously estimated by MOBILE/PART5 or COPERT IV models. Based on the NH3 emission factors from this study, on-road vehicles accounted for 8.1% of NH3 emissions in the PRD region in 2006 instead of 2.5% as estimated in a previous study using emission factors taken from the Emission Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) in the United States.

  10. Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (TRAM) Overview and 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel Test. [conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluer, Megan S.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most helicopter data trends cannot be extrapolated to tiltrotors because blade geometry and aerodynamic behavior, as well as rotor and fuselage interactions, are significantly different for tiltrotors. A tiltrotor model has been developed to investigate the aeromechanics of tiltrotors, to develop a comprehensive database for validating tiltrotor analyses, and to provide a research platform for supporting future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span Tiltrotor Aeroacoustic Model (FS TRAM) is a dual-rotor, powered aircraft model with extensive instrumentation for measurement of structural and aerodynamic loads. This paper will present the Full-Span TRAM test capabilities and the first set of data obtained during a 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test conducted in late 2000 at NASA Ames Research Center. The Full-Span TRAM is a quarter-scale representation of the V-22 Osprey aircraft, and a heavily instrumented NASA and U.S. Army wind tunnel test stand. Rotor structural loads are monitored and recorded for safety-of-flight and for information on blade loads and dynamics. Left and right rotor balance and fuselage balance loads are monitored for safety-of-flight and for measurement of vehicle and rotor aerodynamic performance. Static pressure taps on the left wing are used to determine rotor/wing interactional effects and rotor blade dynamic pressures measure blade airloads. All of these measurement capabilities make the FS TRAM test stand a unique and valuable asset for validation of computational codes and to aid in future tiltrotor designs. The Full-Span TRAM was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel from October through December 2000. Rotor and vehicle performance measurements were acquired in addition to wing pressures, rotor acoustics, and Laser Light Sheet (LLS) flow visualization data. Hover, forward flight, and airframe (rotors off) aerodynamic runs were performed. Helicopter-mode data were acquired during angle of attack and thrust sweeps for

  11. Development and Operation of an Automatic Rotor Trim Control System for use During the UH-60 Individual Blade Control Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Colin R.

    2010-01-01

    A full-scale wind tunnel test to evaluate the effects of Individual Blade Control (IBC) on the performance, vibration, noise and loads of a UH-60A rotor was recently completed in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel [1]. A key component of this wind tunnel test was an automatic rotor trim control system that allowed the rotor trim state to be set more precisely, quickly and repeatably than was possible with the rotor operator setting the trim condition manually. The trim control system was also able to maintain the desired trim condition through changes in IBC actuation both in open- and closed-loop IBC modes, and through long-period transients in wind tunnel flow. This ability of the trim control system to automatically set and maintain a steady rotor trim enabled the effects of different IBC inputs to be compared at common trim conditions and to perform these tests quickly without requiring the rotor operator to re-trim the rotor. The trim control system described in this paper was developed specifically for use during the IBC wind tunnel test

  12. Performance of overlapped shield tunneling through an integrated physical model tests, numerical simulations and real-time field monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlong Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, deformations and internal forces of an existing tunnel subjected to a closely overlapped shield tunneling are monitored and analyzed using a series of physical model experiments and numerical simulations. Effects of different excavation sequences and speeds are explicitly considered in the analysis. The results of the physical model experiments show that the bottom-up tunneling procedure is better than the top-down tunneling procedure. The incurred deformations and internal forces of the existing tunnel increase with the excavation speed and the range of influence areas also increase accordingly. For construction process control, real-time monitoring of the power tunnel is used. The monitoring processes feature full automation, adjustable frequency, real-time monitor and dynamic feedback, which are used to guide the construction to achieve micro-disturbance control. In accordance with the situation of crossing construction, a numerical study on the performance of power tunnel is carried out. Construction control measures are given for the undercrossing construction, which helps to accomplish the desired result and meet protection requirements of the existing tunnel structure. Finally, monitoring data and numerical results are compared, and the displacement and joint fracture change models in the power tunnel subject to the overlapped shield tunnel construction are analyzed. Keywords: Overlapped tunnel, Automatic monitoring, Micro-disturbance control

  13. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H - beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H - injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2βγ Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2βγ DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented

  14. Aerodynamic Parameters of High Performance Aircraft Estimated from Wind Tunnel and Flight Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of system identification applied to high performance aircraft is introduced followed by a discussion on the identification methodology. Special emphasis is given to model postulation using time invariant and time dependent aerodynamic parameters, model structure determination and parameter estimation using ordinary least squares an mixed estimation methods, At the same time problems of data collinearity detection and its assessment are discussed. These parts of methodology are demonstrated in examples using flight data of the X-29A and X-31A aircraft. In the third example wind tunnel oscillatory data of the F-16XL model are used. A strong dependence of these data on frequency led to the development of models with unsteady aerodynamic terms in the form of indicial functions. The paper is completed by concluding remarks.

  15. Sealing performance test for main flange of pressure vessel of T2 test section in HENDEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Kiminori; Kondou, Yasuo; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Asami, Masanobu.

    1990-12-01

    A pressure vessel of T 2 test section in helium engineering demonstration loop (HENDEL) was fabricated to the same scale of the reactor pressure vessel made of 2(1/4)Cr-1Mo steel in high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). Also, the sealing structure of a main flange of pressure vessel in T 2 test section was composed of the double metal O-rings and Ω-seal which would be used in the sealing structure of HTTR. The sealing performance test for the main flange of the pressure vessel in T 2 test section was carried out to confirm the integrity of sealing structure of a main flange in HTTR. T 2 test section has been operated about 7700 hours in previous 18 cycles. The leakage of helium gas from inner metal O-ring was measured by the static pressurized process under the operating condition of HTTR (helium gas: 400degC, 40kg/cm 2 G, 4gk/s). The calculated leakage of helium gas was less than 9.6x10 -7 atm·cm 3 /sec. From the result, it is expected that the sealing structure of main flange in HTTR would maintain the leak tightness in the life. (author)

  16. Cleanup Summary Report for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency Fiscal Year 2007, Task 6.7, U12u-Tunnel (Legacy Site), Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This letter serves as notice of completion for cleanup of the U12u-Tunnel (Legacy Site) as specified in the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Fiscal Year 2007 Statement of Work, Task 6.7. The U12u-Tunnel Legacy Site is located near the intersection of the U12u-Tunnel access road and the U12n-Tunnel access road in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (see Figure 1). The site encompasses 1.2 acres and was used to store miscellaneous mining equipment and materials that were used to support DTRA testing in Area 12. Field activities commenced February 11, 2008, and were completed February 20, 2008. Radiological surveys were performed on a drill jumbo and all material stored at the site. The drill jumbo was relocated to U12p-Tunnel portal and consolidated with other critical mining equipment for future use or storage. Ten truck loads of solid waste (53 tons) were shipped to the Nevada Test Site, Area 9 U10c Sanitary Landfill for disposal. No hazardous or radiological waste was generated at this site

  17. Double capping of molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs/InP quantum dots studied by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, J. M.; Koenraad, P. M.; Gapihan, E.; Letoublon, A.; Bertru, N.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study at the atomic scale the double capping process of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a (311)B substrate. The thickness of the first capping layer is found to play a mayor role in determining the final results of the process. For first capping layers up to 3.5 nm, the height of the QDs correspond to the thickness of the first capping layer. Nevertheless, for thicknesses higher than 3.5 nm, a reduction in the dot height compared to the thickness of the first capping layer is observed. These results are interpreted in terms of a transition from a double capping to a classical capping process when the first capping layer is thick enough to completely cover the dots

  18. Design, Development and Tests in Real Time of Control Methodologies for a Morphing Wing in Wind Tunnel =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchatchueng Kammegne, Michel Joel

    In order to leave a cleaner environmental space to future generations, the international community has been mobilized to find green solutions that are effective and feasible in all sectors. The CRIAQ MDO505 project was initiated to test the morphing wingtip (wing and aileron) technology as one of these possible solutions. The main objectives of this project are: the design and manufacturing of a morphing wing prototype, the extension and control of the laminar region over the extrados, and to compare the effects of morphing and rigid aileron in terms of lift, drag and pressure distributions. The advantage of the extension of the laminar region over a wing is the drag reduction that results by delaying the transition towards its trailing edge. The location of the transition region depends on the flight case and it is controlled, for a morphing wing, via the actuators positions and displacements. Therefore, this thesis work focuses on the control of the actuators positions and displacements. This thesis presents essentially the modeling, instrumentation and wind tunnel testing results. Three series of wind tunnel tests with different values of aileron deflection angle, angle of attack and Mach number have been performed in the subsonic wind tunnel of the IAR-NRC. The used wing airfoil consisted of stringers, ribs, spars and a flexible upper surface mad of composite materials (glass fiber carbon), a rigid aileron and flexible aileron. The aileron was able to move between +/-6 degrees. The demonstrator's span measures 1.5 m and its chord measures 1.5 m. Structural analyses have been performed to determine the plies orientation, and the number of fiberglass layers for the flexible skin. These analyses allowed also to determine the actuator's forces to push and pull the wing upper surface. The 2D XFoil and 3D solvers Fluent were used to find the optimized airfoil and the optimal location of the transition for each flight case. Based on the analyses done by the

  19. Modification of heating system on HeaTiNG-02 test section of beta test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagino; Dedy Haryanto; Riswan Djambiar; Edy Sumarno

    2013-01-01

    Modifications have been carried out on the heating test section heating-02 on the integration strand Beta Test (UUB). The activities carried out to overcome the obstacles that arise in the test section when used. Constraint that often arises is the fall of the heating source super chantal when it reaches a certain temperature. To mitigate the super chantal is initially converted into a horizontal vertical position. Change from vertical to horizontal position on super chantal aims to stabilize the position of super chantal, so it needs to be modified in the heating system. Modification activities include manufacturing, installation and testing of super chantal and refractory stone as super chantal support. Manufacturing refractory stone formation and assembly into the heater in accordance with design modifications that have been done in electromechanical workshop obtained using some machine tools. Testing results of fabrication has been done by providing voltage 110 volts until it reaches operating temperature 400°C. Test results obtained super chantal stable position when it reaches operating temperature, and heater of heating-02 test section feasible to be used for experiments. (author)

  20. Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Two Main-rotor Blade Designs for a Utility-Class Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to evaluate an advanced main rotor designed for use on a utility class helicopter, specifically the U.S. Army UH-60A Blackhawk. This rotor design incorporated advanced twist, airfoil cross sections, and geometric planform. For evaluation purposes, the current UH-60A main rotor was also tested and is referred to as the baseline blade set. A total of four blade sets were tested. One set of both the baseline and the advanced rotors were dynamically scaled to represent a full scale helicopter rotor blade design. The remaining advanced and baseline blade sets were not dynamically scaled so as to isolate the effects of structural elasticity. The investigation was conducted in hover and at rotor advance ratios ranging from 0.15 to 0.4 at a range of nominal test medium densities from 0.00238 to 0.009 slugs/cu ft. This range of densities, coupled with varying rotor lift and propulsive force, allowed for the simulation of several vehicle gross weight and density altitude combinations. Performance data are presented for all blade sets without analysis; however, cross referencing of data with flight condition may be useful to the analyst for validating aeroelastic theories and design methodologies as well as for evaluating advanced design parameters.

  1. U.S. aerospace industry opinion of the effect of computer-aided prediction-design technology on future wind-tunnel test requirements for aircraft development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of the U.S. aerospace industry in late 1977 suggests that there will be an increasing use of computer-aided prediction-design technology (CPD Tech) in the aircraft development process but that, overall, only a modest reduction in wind-tunnel test requirements from the current level is expected in the period through 1995. Opinions were received from key spokesmen in 23 of the 26 solicited major companies or corporate divisions involved in the design and manufacture of nonrotary wing aircraft. Development programs for nine types of aircraft related to test phases and wind-tunnel size and speed range were considered.

  2. U.S. Geological Survey investigations in connection with the dining car event, U12e.18 tunnel, rainier mesa, Nevada test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    The Dining Car event was a Defense Nuclear Agency nuclear weapons test located in the U12e.18 drift of the E-tunnel complex, central Rainier Mesa, Area 12, Nevada Test Site. The main drift and bypass drift were mined in zeolitized tuff to a total length of 544 m (1,785 ft). The overburden thickness above the experiment is approximately 396 m (1,300 ft) in the U12e.18 area. The pre-Tertiary surface, which is most probably quartzite in this area, is located approximately 243.8 to 274.3 m (800 to 900 ft) below tunnel level. Site geology and geophysical investigations were made in one vertical and two horizontal drill holes prior to mining of the U12e.18 drift. Electric logs in the two horizontal holes indicate no extensive zones of argillization which might create problems in tunnelling. Geophysical logs in the vertical exploratory hole suggest that the tuff is saturated at a depth of about 244 m (800 ft). Electric logs in all three holes show a pronounced signature in tunnel bed 4J. Seismic velocities obtained in the tunnel after mining compare favorably with sonic velocities obtained in one hole by means of a sonic probe, indicating that the bulk geologic structure is not significant in affecting seismic-wave propagation. This condition is not always observed in such comparisons. A repeat seismic survey in the tunnel showed no change in seismic velocity 4 months after mining. In situ stresses determined by the overcore technique are within experience for the Rainier Mesa tunnel complex

  3. Tests of three tapered airfoils based on the N.A.C.A. 2200, the N.A.C.A.-M6, and the Clark Y sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Raymond F

    1934-01-01

    Three tapered airfoils based on the N.A.C.A. 2200, the N.A.C.A.-M6, and the Clark Y sections were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel at a Reynolds Number of approximately 3,100,000. The models, which were of aspect ratio 6, had constant core center sections and rounded tips, and tapered in thickness from 18 percent at the roots to 9 percent at the tips. The aerodynamic characteristics are given by the usual dimensionless coefficients plotted for both positive and negative angles of attack and by effective profile-drag coefficients plotted against lift coefficients.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 481: Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 481 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Area 12 T-Tunnel Conditional Release Storage Yard. CAU 481 is located in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 12-42-05, Housekeeping Waste. CAU 481 closure activities were conducted by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency from August 2007 through July 2008 according to the FFACO and Revision 3 of the Sectored Clean-up Work Plan for Housekeeping Category Waste Sites. Closure activities included removal and disposal of construction debris and low-level waste. Drained fluids, steel, and lead was recycled as appropriate. Waste generated during closure activities was appropriately managed and disposed.

  5. Cap Bubble Drift Velocity in a Confined Test Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Mamoru Ishii; Lincoln, Frank W.; Beus, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    In the two-group interfacial area transport equation, bubbles are categorized into two groups, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as group 1 and cap/slug/churn-turbulent bubbles as group 2. The bubble rise velocities for both groups of bubbles may be estimated by the drift flux model by applying different distribution parameters and drift velocities for both groups. However, the drift velocity for group 2 bubbles is not always applicable (when the wall effect becomes important) as in the current test loop of interest where the flow channel is confined by two parallel flat walls, with a dimension of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. The previous experiments indicated that no stable slug flow existed in this test section, which was designed to permit visualization of the flow patterns and bubble characteristics without the distortion associated with curved surfaces. In fact, distorted cap bubbly and churn-turbulent flow was observed. Therefore, it is essential to developed a correlation for cap bubble drift velocity in this confined flow channel. Since the rise velocity of a cap bubble depends on its size, a high-speed movie camera is used to capture images of cap bubbles to obtain the bubble size information. Meanwhile, the rise velocity of cap and elongated bubbles (called cap bubbles hereafter) is investigated by examining the captured images frame by frame. As a result, the conventional correlation of drift velocity for slug bubbles is modified and acceptable agreements between the measurements and correlation estimation are achieved

  6. Space Shuttle AFRSI OMS pod environment test using model 81-0 test fixture in the Ames Research Center 9x7-foot supersonic wind tunnel (OS-314A/B/C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A test was conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 9x7-foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to help resolve an anomaly that developed during the STS-6 orbiter flight wherein sections of the Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation (AFRSI) covering the OMS pods suffered some damage. A one-third scale two-dimensional shell structure model of an OMS pod cross-section was employed to support the test articles. These consisted of 15 AFRSI blanket panels form-fitted over the shell structures for exposure to simulated flight conditions. Of six baseline blankets, two were treated with special surface coatings. Two other panels were configured with AFRSI sections removed from the OV099 orbiter vehicle after the STS-6 flight. Seven additional specimens incorporated alternative designs and repairs. Following a series of surface pressure calibration runs, the specimens were exposed to simulated ascent and entry dynamic pressure profiles. Entry conditions included the use of a vortex generator to evaluate the effect of shed vortices on the AFRSI located in the area of concern.

  7. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier....... The airfoil was tested at Re = 1.66 × 106. Steady state and dynamic tests were carried out with prescribed deflections of the ATEF. The steady state tests showed that deflecting the ATEF towards the pressure side (positive ) translated the lift curve to higher lift values and deflecting the ATEF towards...... the suction side (negative ) translated the lift curve to lower lift values. Testing the airfoil for a step change of the ATEF from = -3.0 to +1.8 showed that the obtainable cl was 0.10 to 0.13 in the linear part of the lift curve. Modeling the step response with an indicial function formulation showed...

  8. Sequential Indentation Tests to Investigate the Influence of Confining Stress on Rock Breakage by Tunnel Boring Machine Cutter in a Biaxial State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Ping; Han, Dongya

    2016-04-01

    The influence of confining stress on rock breakage by a tunnel boring machine cutter was investigated by conducting sequential indentation tests in a biaxial state. Combined with morphology measurements of breaking grooves and an analysis of surface and internal crack propagation between nicks, the effects of maximum confining stress and minimum stress on indentation efficiency, crack propagation and chip formation were investigated. Indentation tests and morphology measurements show that increasing a maximum confining stress will result in increased consumed energy in indentations, enlarged groove volumes and promoted indentation efficiency when the corresponding minimum confining stress is fixed. The energy consumed in indentations will increase with increase in minimum confining stress, however, because of the decreased groove volumes as the minimum confining stress increases, the efficiency will decrease. Observations of surface crack propagation show that more intensive fractures will be induced as the maximum confining stress increases, whereas the opposite occurs for an increase of minimum confining stress. An observation of the middle section, cracks and chips shows that as the maximum confining stress increases, chips tend to form in deeper parts when the minimum confining stress is fixed, whereas they tend to formed in shallower parts as the minimum confining stress increases when the maximum confining stress is fixed.

  9. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  10. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  11. Aerothermal evaluation of a spherically blunted body with a trapezoidal cross section in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Cindy W.

    1987-01-01

    A model to be used in the flow studies and curved Thermal Protection System (TPS) evaluations was tested in the Langley 8 Foot High-Temperature Tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 6.8. The purpose of the study was to define the surface pressure and heating rates at high angles of attack (in support of curved metallic TPS studies) and to determine the conditions for which the model would be suitable as a test bed for aerothermal load studies. The present study was conducted at a nominal total temperature of 2400 and 3300 R, dynamic pressures from 2.3 to 10.9 psia, and free-stream Reynolds numbers from 4000,000 to 1,700,000/ft. The measurements consisted primarily of surface pressure and cold-wall (530 R) heating rates. Qualitative comparisons between predictions and data show that for this configuration, aerothermal tests should be limited to angles of attack between 10 and -10 degrees. Outside this range, the effects of free-stream flow nonuniformity appear in the data, as a result of the long length of the model. However, for TPS testing, this is not a concern and tests can be performed at angles of attack ranging from 20 to -20 degrees. Laminar and naturally turbulent boundary layers are available over limited ranges of conditions.

  12. Determination of aerodynamic damping and force coefficients of filleted twin cables in dry conditions through passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattiello, E.; Eriksen, M. B.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    /FORCE Technology Climatic Wind Tunnel facility. The measured aerodynamic damping of the twin-cable arrangement in dry conditions was compared to the values obtained from full-scale monitoring and from an analytical model using static force coefficients. The comparison revealed broad agreement in the investigated...... Re range, as did the force coefficients obtained from dynamic and static tests....

  13. Demonstration tests for HTGR fuel elements and core components with test sections in HENDEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Hino, Ryutaro; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1995-03-01

    In the fuel stack test section (T{sub 1}) of the Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL), thermal and hydraulic performances of helium gas flows through a fuel rod channel and a fuel stack have been investigated for the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) core thermal design. The test data showed that the turbulent characteristics appearing in the Reynolds number above 2000: no typical behavior in the transition zone, and friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in the fuel channel were found to be higher than those in a smooth annular channel. Heat transfer behavior of gas flow in a fuel element channel with blockage and cross-flow through a gap between upper and lower fuel elements stacked was revealed using the mock-up models. On the other hand, demonstration tests have been performed to verify thermal and hydraulic characteristics and structural integrity related to the core bottom structure using a full-scale test facility named as the in-core structure test section (T{sub 2}). The sealing performance test revealed that the leakage of low-temperature helium gas through gaps between the permanent reflector blocks to the core was very low level compared with the HTTR design value and no change of the leakage flow rate were observed after a long term operation. The heat transfer tests including thermal transient at shutdown of gas circulators verified good insulating performance of core insulation structures in the core bottom structure and the hot gas duct; the temperature of the metal portion of these structure was below the design value. Examination of the thermal mixing characteristics indicated that the mixing of the hot helium gas started at a hot plenum and finished completely at downstream of the outlet hot gas duct. The present results obtained from these demonstration tests have been practically applied to the detailed design works and licensing procedures of the HTTR. (J.P.N.) 92 refs.

  14. Experimental Verification of a Pneumatic Transport System for the Rapid Evacuation of Tunnels, Part II - Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-01

    This study is the final phase of a muck pipeline program begun in 1973. The objective of the study was to evaluate a pneumatic pipeline system for muck haulage from a tunnel excavated by a tunnel boring machine. The system was comprised of a muck pre...

  15. Gust load alleviation wind tunnel tests of a large-aspect-ratio flexible wing with piezoelectric control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Bi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An active control technique utilizing piezoelectric actuators to alleviate gust-response loads of a large-aspect-ratio flexible wing is investigated. Piezoelectric materials have been extensively used for active vibration control of engineering structures. In this paper, piezoelectric materials further attempt to suppress the vibration of the aeroelastic wing caused by gust. The motion equation of the flexible wing with piezoelectric patches is obtained by Hamilton’s principle with the modal approach, and then numerical gust responses are analyzed, based on which a gust load alleviation (GLA control system is proposed. The gust load alleviation system employs classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID controllers which treat piezoelectric patches as control actuators and acceleration as the feedback signal. By a numerical method, the control mechanism that piezoelectric actuators can be used to alleviate gust-response loads is also analyzed qualitatively. Furthermore, through low-speed wind tunnel tests, the effectiveness of the gust load alleviation active control technology is validated. The test results agree well with the numerical results. Test results show that at a certain frequency range, the control scheme can effectively alleviate the z and x wingtip accelerations and the root bending moment of the wing to a certain extent. The control system gives satisfying gust load alleviation efficacy with the reduction rate being generally over 20%.

  16. A 1:8.7 Scale Water Tunnel Verification & Validation Test of an Axial Flow Water Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Arnold A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Straka, William A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Meyer, Richard S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Jonson, Michael L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    As interest in waterpower technologies has increased over the last few years, there has been a growing need for a public database of measured data for these devices. This would provide a basic understanding of the technology and means to validate analytic and numerical models. Through collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories, Penn State University Applied Research Laboratory, and University of California, Davis, a new marine hydrokinetic turbine rotor was designed, fabricated at 1:8.7-scale, and experimentally tested to provide an open platform and dataset for further study and development. The water tunnel test of this three-bladed, horizontal-axis rotor recorded power production, blade loading, near-wake characterization, cavitation effects, and noise generation. This report documents the small-scale model test in detail and provides a brief discussion of the rotor design and an initial look at the results with comparison against low-order modeling tools. Detailed geometry and experimental measurements are released to Sandia National Laboratories as a data report addendum.

  17. The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. Evaluation from the viewpoint of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Jun

    2003-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome has not been clarified. A cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, flexor tendons, median nerve, and thickness of transverse carpal ligament were evaluated by MRI. Twenty-six patients who were electrophysiologically diagnosed with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were tested by MRI. All patients were females; the mean age was sixty-four years old. The cross sectional area of carpal tunnel, the median nerve area, the area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament were calculated. The following are of a seuere type carpal tunnel syndrome: Mean area of the flexor tendons and its synovium in carpal tunnel, 110.5±25.5 mm 2 (control group; 79.3±13.8 mm 2 ); ratio of flexor tendons and its synovium area to carpal tunnel area, 51.6±8.8% (control; 40.5±2.3%); and thickness of the transverse carpal ligament, 3.3±0.4 mm (control; 2.4±0.4 mm). These mean areas in severe carpal tunnel syndrome were significantly greater than those in mild type (p<0.05 or p<0.01). From the viewpoint of this result, it is possible that tenosynovitis is strongly to the etiology of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. In other words, synovium edema causes chronic high pressure environment in carpal tunnel. Moreover, we classified these MRI findings into the following subgroups: enlargement of cross sectional area of flexor tendon and its synovia (n=8; 25.8%), thickened transverse carpal ligament (n=11; 35.5%), and combined type (n=7; 22.6%). This classification by MRI imaging was related to a clinical course and electro-physiologic severity. The present study suggests that to evaluate the cross sectional, area of an MRI image is useful for diagnosis and cure of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  18. Experimental hydraulic analysis in conduction tunnels at the trunk section working as a channel considering compound roughness; Analisis hidraulico experimental en tuneles de conduccion en seccion baul trabajando como canal, considerando rugosidades compuestas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marengo-Mogollon, Humberto; Cortes-Cortes, Carlos [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico); Arreguin-Cortes, Felipe I [Comision Nacional del Agua (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    This paper presents the roughness coefficients of a conduction tunnel at the trunk section working as a channel obtained experimentally using a hydraulic model of the diversion tunnel of the Hydroelectric Project called El Cajon (Mexico). A comparative analysis between experimental and theoretical coefficients obtained in the literature is shown. [Spanish] Se presentan los coeficientes de rugosidad compuesta de un tunel de conduccion en seccion baul trabajando como canal obtenidos en forma experimental en un modelo hidraulico del tunel de desvio del Proyecto Hidroelectrico El Cajon (Mexico). Se muestra un analisis comparativo entre los coeficientes experimentales y los teoricos obtenidos en la literatura.

  19. Testing of cross section libraries for TRIGA criticality benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snoj, L.; Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of various up-to-date cross section libraries on the multiplication factor of TRIGA benchmark as well as the influence of fuel composition on the multiplication factor of the system composed of various types of TRIGA fuel elements was investigated. It was observed that keff calculated by using the ENDF/B VII cross section library is systematically higher than using the ENDF/B-VI cross section library. The main contributions (∼ 2 20 pcm) are from 235 U and Zr. (author)

  20. Us army corps of engineers - Engineering research and development center - Petrographic analysis of section 3 personnel tunnel concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-04

    The Concrete and Materials Branch (CMB) of the Geotechnical and Structures Laboratory was requested to perform an analysis on concrete cores collected from the north and south walls of the H-Canyon Section 3 Personnel Tunel, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina to determine the cause of the lower than expected compressive strength. This study examined five cores provided to the ERDC by the Department of Energy. The cores were logged in as CMB No. 170051-1 to 170051-5 and subjected to petrographic examination, air void analysis, chemical sprays, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction.

  1. Understanding and Exploiting Wind Tunnels with Porous Flexible Walls for Aerodynamic Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kenneth Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The aerodynamic behavior of wind tunnels with porous, flexible walls formed from tensioned Kevlar has been characterized and new measurement techniques in such wind tunnels explored. The objective is to bring the aerodynamic capabilities of so-called Kevlar-wall test sections in-line with those of traditional solid-wall test sections. The primary facility used for this purpose is the 1.85-m by 1.85-m Stability Wind Tunnel at Virginia Tech, and supporting data is provided by the 2-m by 2-m L...

  2. Characteristics of Control Laws Tested on the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christhilf, David M.; Moulin, Boris; Ritz, Erich; Chen, P. C.; Roughen, Kevin M.; Perry, Boyd

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Span Supersonic Transport (S4T) is an aeroelastically scaled wind-tunnel model built to test active controls concepts for large flexible supersonic aircraft in the transonic flight regime. It is one of several models constructed in the 1990's as part of the High Speed Research (HSR) Program. Control laws were developed for the S4T by M4 Engineering, Inc. and by Zona Technologies, Inc. under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) contracts. The model was tested in the NASA-Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) four times from 2007 to 2010. The first two tests were primarily for plant identification. The third entry was used for testing control laws for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression. Whereas the third entry only tested FS subcritically, the fourth test demonstrated closed-loop operation above the open-loop flutter boundary. The results of the third entry are reported elsewhere. This paper reports on flutter suppression results from the fourth wind-tunnel test. Flutter suppression is seen as a way to provide stability margins while flying at transonic flight conditions without penalizing the primary supersonic cruise design condition. An account is given for how Controller Performance Evaluation (CPE) singular value plots were interpreted with regard to progressing open- or closed-loop to higher dynamic pressures during testing.

  3. Process of long-term tunnel instability by temperature and humidity variation in sedimentary rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka; Okada, Tetsuji; Nakata, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    It is concerned that tunnels in the sedimentary rock are seriously damaged during the long operation after excavation, while there are various plans to construct significant underground facilities such as a high-level radioactive waste disposal facility. A case history study on tunnel instability is important in order to assess and evaluate tunnel instability behavior. In this respect, an accelerated tunnel deformation test by removing tunnel supports was conducted. Instability of tunnel wall was observed before and after this test in the summer, when it is warm and humid in the test tunnel. Fiber optic sensing detected the instability. Scale of collapsed rock was evaluated from the variation of shape of tunnel cross-section measured by a 3-D lazar measurement tool. The maximum size of collapsed rock block is 1m in diameter. Surrounding sandstone has such a characteristic that crack growth is much faster and its strength decreases gradually in the condition of high relative humidity. Numerical simulation considering this decrease of rock strength reproduced the instable zone around the test tunnel. (author)

  4. INCAS TRISONIC WIND TUNNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin MUNTEANU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The 1.2 m x 1.2 m Trisonic Blowdown Wind Tunnel is the largest of the experimental facilities at the National Institute for Aerospace Research - I.N.C.A.S. "Elie Carafoli", Bucharest, Romania. The tunnel has been designed by the Canadian company DSMA (now AIOLOS and since its commissioning in 1978 has performed high speed aerodynamic tests for more than 120 projects of aircraft, missiles and other objects among which the twin jet fighter IAR-93, the jet trainer IAR-99, the MIG-21 Lancer, the Polish jet fighter YRYDA and others. In the last years the wind tunnel has been used mostly for experimental research in European projects such as UFAST. The high flow quality parameters and the wide range of testing capabilities ensure the competitivity of the tunnel at an international level.

  5. Wind tunnel tests with combined pitch and free-floating flap control: data-driven iterative feedforward controller tuning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Navalkar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbine load alleviation has traditionally been addressed in the literature using either full-span pitch control, which has limited bandwidth, or trailing-edge flap control, which typically shows low control authority due to actuation constraints. This paper combines both methods and demonstrates the feasibility and advantages of such a combined control strategy on a scaled prototype in a series of wind tunnel tests. The pitchable blades of the test turbine are instrumented with free-floating flaps close to the tip, designed such that they aerodynamically magnify the low stroke of high-bandwidth actuators. The additional degree of freedom leads to aeroelastic coupling with the blade flexible modes. The inertia of the flaps was tuned such that instability occurs just beyond the operational envelope of the wind turbine; the system can however be stabilised using collocated closed-loop control. A feedforward controller is shown to be capable of significant reduction of the deterministic loads of the turbine. Iterative feedforward tuning, in combination with a stabilising feedback controller, is used to optimise the controller online in an automated manner, to maximise load reduction. Since the system is non-linear, the controller gains vary with wind speed; this paper also shows that iterative feedforward tuning is capable of generating the optimal gain schedule online.

  6. Wind tunnel tests of modified cross, hemisflo, and disk-gap-band parachutes with emphasis in the transonic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foughner, J. T., Jr.; Alexander, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    Transonic wind-tunnel studies were conducted with modified cross, hemisflo, and disk-gap-band parachute models in the wake of a cone-cylinder shape forebody. The basic cross design was modified with the addition of a circumferential constraining band at the lower edge of the canopy panels. The tests covered a Mach number range of 0.3 to 1.2 and a dynamic pressure range from 479 Newtons per square meter to 5746 Newtons per square meter. The parachute models were flexible textile-type structures and were tethered to a rigid forebody with a single flexible riser. Different size models of the modified cross and disk-gap-band canopies were tested to evaluate scale effects. Model reference diameters were 0.30, 0.61, and 1.07 meters (1.0, 2.0, and 3.5 ft) for the modified cross; and nominal diameters of 0.25 and 0.52 meter (0.83 and 1.7 ft) for the disk-gap-band; and 0.55 meter (1.8 ft) for the hemisflo. Reefing information is presented for the 0.61-meter-diameter cross and the 0.52-meter-diameter disk-gap-band. Results are presented in the form of the variation of steady-state average drag coefficient with Mach number. General stability characteristics of each parachute are discussed. Included are comments on canopy coning, spinning, and fluttering motions.

  7. Wind Tunnel Aeroacoustic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: August 23, 2002 through March 31, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S.

    2004-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, working through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve our understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. To that end, wind tunnel aerodynamic tests and aeroacoustic tests have been performed on six airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines. Results are documented in this report.

  8. Seismic analysis of the in-pile test section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. M.; Park, K. N.; Chi, D. Y.; Park, S. K.; Sim, B. S.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, Y. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This study gives the results of the seismic analysis of the IPS (In Pile Section) with lower bracket support. The results cover the natural frequency and seismic response of the IPS for the SSE and OBE events. An FE (Finite Element) model which includes the two vessels of the IPS and its support structure were analyzed by ABAQUS.

  9. Final report of the borehole, shaft, and tunnel sealing test. Vol.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Ramqvist, G.

    1987-01-01

    Shaft sealing by use of highly compacted bentonite was investigated in a 14 m long shaft in which two plugs were constructed with a central sand-filled central space for injecting water. A first reference test with concrete plugs was followed by a main test in which the plug material consisted of blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite powder. In the latter test, the outflow from the injection chamber was only a few percent of that with the concrete plugs, which demonstrates the excellent sealing properties of the clay. The main effect was that practically no water flow took place along the rock/clay interface. The longevity of smectite clay in crystalline rock is sufficient to make bentonite plugs operative for several thousand years. (authors)

  10. Final report of the borehole, shaft and tunnel sealing test. Vol.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Ramqvist, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Borehole Plugging Experiment comprised field tests of the sealing function and the practicality in handling and application of plugs consisting of segments of perforated metal casings filled with cylindrical blocks of highly compacted sodium bentonite. Preparative tests had shown that the clay swells out through the perforation and embeds the casings. The field tests demonstrated that even very long holes can be effectively sealed by such plugs and that the clay becomes very homogeneous and forms a tight contact with the rock in a relatively short time. By that the plugs become practically impervious and the flow along the clay/rock contact will be insignificant. The longevity of such plugs extends over several thousand years under the conditions that usually prevail in crystalline rock. (authors)

  11. Computational Wind Tunnel: A Design Tool for Rotorcraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotorcraft engineers traditionally use the wind tunnel to evaluate and finalize designs. Insufficient correlation between wind tunnel results and flight tests, have...

  12. Typical Underwater Tunnels in the Mainland of China and Related Tunneling Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kairong Hong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many underwater tunnels have been constructed in the mainland of China, and great progress has been made in related tunneling technologies. This paper presents the history and state of the art of underwater tunnels in the mainland of China in terms of shield-bored tunnels, drill-and-blast tunnels, and immersed tunnels. Typical underwater tunnels of these types in the mainland of China are described, along with innovative technologies regarding comprehensive geological prediction, grouting-based consolidation, the design and construction of large cross-sectional tunnels with shallow cover in weak strata, cutting tool replacement under limited drainage and reduced pressure conditions, the detection and treatment of boulders, the construction of underwater tunnels in areas with high seismic intensity, and the treatment of serious sedimentation in a foundation channel of immersed tunnels. Some suggestions are made regarding the three potential great strait-crossing tunnels—the Qiongzhou Strait-Crossing Tunnel, Bohai Strait-Crossing Tunnel, and Taiwan Strait-Crossing Tunnel—and issues related to these great strait-crossing tunnels that need further study are proposed. Keywords: Underwater tunnel, Strait-crossing tunnel, Shield-bored tunnel, Immersed tunnel, Drill and blast

  13. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  14. On-Line Flutter Prediction Tool for Wind Tunnel Flutter Testing using Parameter Varying Estimation Methodology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA Technology, Inc. (ZONA) proposes to develop an on-line flutter prediction tool for wind tunnel model using the parameter varying estimation (PVE) technique to...

  15. Evaluation of a Proposed Drift Reduction Technology High-Speed Wind Tunnel Testing Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    05: “Standard Test Method for Determining Liquid Drop Size Characteristics in a Spray Using Optical Nonimaging Light- Scattering Instruments” 15...Method for Determining Liquid Drop Size Characteris- tics in a Spray Using Optical Nonimaging Light-Scattering Instruments,” Annual Book of ASTM Standards

  16. Post Flight Analysis Of SHEFEX I: Shock Tunnel Testing And Related CFD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Jan Martinez; Barth, Tarik; Wagner, Alexander; Hannemann, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The SHarp Edge Flight EXperiment (SHEFEX) program of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) is primarily focused on the investigation of the potential to utilise improved shapes for space vehicles by considering sharp edges and facetted surfaces. One goal is to set up a sky based test facility to gain knowledge of the physics of hypersonic flow, complemented by numerical analysis and ground based testing. Further, the series of SHEFEX flight experiments is an excellent test bed for new technological concepts and flight instrumentation, and it is a source of motivation for young scientist and engineers providing an excellent school for future space-program engineers and managers. After the successful first SHEFEX flight in October 2005, a second flight is scheduled for September 2011 and additional flights are planned for 2015 ff. With the SHEFEX-I flight and the subsequent numerical and experimental post flight analysis, DLR could for the first time close the loop between the three major disciplines of aerothermodynamic research namely CFD, ground based testing and flight.

  17. The design of in-pile test section for fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K. N.; Lee, J. M.; Shim, B. S.; Zee, D. Y.; Park, S. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    As an equipment for nuclear fuel's general performance irradiation test in HANARO, Fuel Test Loop(FTL) has been developed that can irradiate the pin to the maximum number of 3 at the core irradiation hole(IR1 hole) by considering for it's utility and user's irradiation requirement. 3-Pin FTL consists of In-Pile Test Section (IPS) and Out-of-Pile System (OPS). IPS consists for IPS Vessel assembly, In-Pool Piping, IPS Support, In-Pool Piping Support etc. Design that such IPS considers interference item consisted to do not bear in existing facilities by one. IVA that is connected to the OPS are controlled and regulated by means of system pressure, system temperature and the water quality. IPS Vessel assembly is consisted of outer pressure vessel, inner pressure vessel, IPS head, inner assembly and test fuel carrier. After 3-Pin FTL development which is expected to be finished by the 2006, FTL will be used for the irradiation test of the new PWR-type fuel and can maximize the usage of HANARO.

  18. Petrology and geochemistry of the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, Rock-Mechanics Drift, U12g Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, J.R.; Mansker, W.L.; Hicks, R.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Keil, K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    G-Tunnel at Nevada Test Site (NTS) is the site of thermal and thermomechanical experiments examining the feasibility of emplacing heat-producing nuclear wastes in silicic tuffs. This report describes the general stratigraphy, mineralogy, and bulk chemistry of welded portions of the Grouse Canyon Member of the Belted Range Tuff, the unit in which most of these experiments will be performed. The geologic characteristics of the Grouse Canyon Member are compared with those of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, presently the preferred horizon for an actual waste repository at Yucca Mountain, near the southwest boundary of Nevada Test Site. This comparison suggests that test results obtained in welded tuff from G-Tunnel are applicable, with limitations, to evaluation of the Topopah Spring Member at Yucca Mountain

  19. An investigation of drag reduction for tractor trailer vehicles with air deflector and boattail. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, V. U.

    1981-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the influence of several physical variables on the aerodynamic drag of a trailer model. The physical variables included: a cab mounted wind deflector, boattail on trailer, flow vanes on trailer front, forced transition on trailer, and decreased gap between tractor and trailer. Tests were conducted at yaw angles (relative wind angles) of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 degrees and Reynolds numbers of 3.58 x 10 to the 5th power 6.12 x 10 to the 5th power based upon the equivalent diameter of the vehicles. The wind deflector on top of the cab produced a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of about 5 percent of the aerodynamic portion of the fuel budget for a wind speed of 15.3 km/hr (9.5 mph) over a wind angle range of 0 deg to 180 deg and for a vehicle speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). The boattail produced a calculated 7 percent to 8 percent reduction in fuel consumption under the same conditions. The decrease in gap reduced the calculated fuel consumption by about 5 percent of the aerodynamic portion of the fuel budget.

  20. Testing of tunnel support : dynamic load testing of rockbolt elements to provide data for safer support design.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ortlepp, WD

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This research report discusses the development of a realistic and controllable method of testing support tendons dynamically, which has been achieved in this research project, offers a new and fresh opportunity for improving the design methodology...

  1. Wind Tunnel Tests of Ailerons at Various Speeds I : Ailerons of 0.20 Airfoil Chord and True Contour with 0.35 Aileron-chord Extreme Blunt Nose Balance on the NACA 66,2-216 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letko, W; Denaci, H. G.; Freed, C

    1943-01-01

    Hinge-moment, lift, and pressure-distribution measurements were made in the two-dimensional test section of the NACA stability tunnel on a blunt-nose balance-type aileron on an NACA 66,2-216 airfoil at speeds up to 360 miles per hour corresponding to a Mach number of 0.475. The tests were made primarily to determine the effect of speed on the action of this type of aileron. The balance-nose radii of the aileron were varied from 0 to 0.02 of the airfoil chord and the gap width was varied from 0.0005 to 0.0107 of the airfoil chord. Tests were also made with the gap sealed.

  2. Wind tunnel tests for a flapping wing model with a changeable camber using macro-fiber composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Kwan; Han, Jae-Hung; Kwon, Ki-Jung

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, a biomimetic flexible flapping wing was developed on a real ornithopter scale by using macro-fiber composite (MFC) actuators. With the actuators, the maximum camber of the wing can be linearly changed from −2.6% to +4.4% of the maximum chord length. Aerodynamic tests were carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics, particularly the camber effect, the chordwise flexibility effect and the unsteady effect. Although the chordwise wing flexibility reduces the effective angle of attack, the maximum lift coefficient can be increased by the MFC actuators up to 24.4% in a static condition. Note also that the mean values of the perpendicular force coefficient rise to a value of considerably more than 3 in an unsteady aerodynamic flow region. Additionally, particle image velocimetry (PIV) tests were performed in static and dynamic test conditions to validate the flexibility and unsteady effects. The static PIV results confirm that the effective angle of attack is reduced by the coupling of the chordwise flexibility and the aerodynamic force, resulting in a delay in the stall phenomena. In contrast to the quasi-steady flow condition of a relatively high advance ratio, the unsteady aerodynamic effect due to a leading edge vortex can be found along the wing span in a low advance ratio region. The overall results show that the chordwise wing flexibility can produce a positive effect on flapping aerodynamic characteristics in quasi-steady and unsteady flow regions; thus, wing flexibility should be considered in the design of efficient flapping wings

  3. Base pressure and heat transfer tests of the 0.0225-scale space shuttle plume simulation model (19-OTS) in yawed flight conditions in the NASA-Lewis 10x10-foot supersonic wind tunnel (test IH83)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed to determine pressures, heat transfer rates, and gas recovery temperatures in the base region of a rocket firing model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle during simulated yawed flight conditions. First and second stage flight of the space shuttle were simulated by firing the main engines in conjunction with the SRB rocket motors or only the SSME's into the continuous tunnel airstream. For the correct rocket plume environment, the simulated altitude pressures were halved to maintain the rocket chamber/altitude pressure ratio. Tunnel freestream Mach numbers from 2.2 to 3.5 were simulated over an altitude range of 60 to 130 thousand feet with varying angle of attack, yaw angle, nozzle gimbal angle and SRB chamber pressure. Gas recovery temperature data derived from nine gas temperature probe runs are presented. The model configuration, instrumentation, test procedures, and data reduction are described.

  4. Snowdrift – visualisation on an architectural model in wind tunnel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiebig, Jennifer; Koss, Hans Holger Hundborg

    2016-01-01

    transport and deposition at and around buildings in comparison to the nature phenomenon. Although a number of studies performed the deposition on a test model with different snow substitutes, the scaling of the phenomenon is still not understood or inaccurate. The study is a visual method of the snow...... is an alternative approach hence the model design and the visual effect was primarily considered. Main aspects in the model design were different materials and sizes (matter of scale) which were photographed in picture series and time laps. The method indicates the aerodynamic phenomenon as a visual understanding...

  5. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. [Lewis 8 by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of a coannular exhaust nozzle for a proposed variable stream control supersonic propulsion system. Tests were conducted with two simulated configurations differing primarily in the fan duct flowpaths: a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At take off conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less.

  6. Mining methods used in the underground tunnels and test rooms at Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Halen, P.A.

    1978-08-01

    Results of the Swedish-American cooperative research program are reported in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a large crystalline rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. Two new methods, smooth blasting and slot drilling, were tested and used at Stripa. The smooth blasting technique uses the symmetric pattern of the contour holes and a low charge density in each round, which results in a uniform and minimal damage to the roof and walls of the excavated cavern and limits the number of newly opened fractures. The length of freshly opened fractures in meters is equal to the charge in kilograms per meter. The slot drilling technique uses an array of small-diameter peripheral percussion-drilled holes to drill ultra-large cores 1 meter in diameter and larger. Both techniques described have been successfully tested and their further use in future excavations of large storage caverns is recommended

  7. Overview of the computerized adaptive testing special section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Ponsoda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentación de la sección monográfica sobre test adaptativos informatizados. Este artículo proporciona una visión conjunta de la sección especial de Psicológica sobre tests adaptativos informatizados. Se presenta también una breve introducción al tema. De cada artículo se muestran sus principales resultados, las conexiones con los demás trabajos de la sección especial y el tema de investigación con el que está más relacionado.

  8. What scaling means in wind engineering: Complementary role of the reduced scale approach in a BLWT and the full scale testing in a large climatic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Olivier

    2017-12-01

    Wind engineering problems are commonly studied by wind tunnel experiments at a reduced scale. This introduces several limitations and calls for a careful planning of the tests and the interpretation of the experimental results. The talk first revisits the similitude laws and discusses how they are actually applied in wind engineering. It will also remind readers why different scaling laws govern in different wind engineering problems. Secondly, the paper focuses on the ways to simplify a detailed structure (bridge, building, platform) when fabricating the downscaled models for the tests. This will be illustrated by several examples from recent engineering projects. Finally, under the most severe weather conditions, manmade structures and equipment should remain operational. What “recreating the climate” means and aims to achieve will be illustrated through common practice in climatic wind tunnel modelling.

  9. Feasibility Study for Implementing Magnetic Suspension in the Glenn Research Center 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel for Testing the Dynamic Stability of Blunt Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David O.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Barnhart, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a magnetic suspension system in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel would be a powerful test technique that could accurately determine the dynamic stability of blunt body entry vehicles with no sting interference. This paper explores initial design challenges to be evaluated before implementation, including defining the lowest possible operating dynamic pressure and corresponding model size, developing a compatible video analysis technique, and incorporating a retractable initial support sting.

  10. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  11. Design heating test section HeaTiNG-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riswan Djambiar; Sagino; Dedy Haryanto; Joko Prasetio Witoko

    2013-01-01

    HeaTiNG-02 is a component test loop BETA which serves as a heater in conducting experimental heat transfer processes in two-phase flow in narrow slit-shaped plate, considering this phenomenon is one of the conditions postulated accident scenarios a NPP type PWR. To produce heat for the heating component takes the AC power the source voltage can be set from 0 Volts to 220 Volts with no more than a maximum power of 25 KVA. To obtain the thermal conditions on HeaTiNG-02 heating wire dimensions need to be determined and the corresponding voltage so that it will an expected power. Determination of the dimensions of the heater wire through calculations using electricity formulations. Retrieved draft heater test BETA (UUB) HeaTiNG-02 use material super kanthal (FeCuAl) in diameter (Ø) = 2 mm and wire length 3770 mm. Voltage regulators with a maximum power of 25 kVA with a minimum voltage of 0 volts and a maximum of 220 volts. Heater is used as the base to form refractory stone trench. (author)

  12. Post-test geologic observations made at the non-proliferation experiment site, N-tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, D.R.; Bradford, R.P.; Hopkins, S.P. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Mercury, NV (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Qualitative evaluations of damage resulting from an underground explosion can provide valuable information concerning the size of the charge, as well as the location of a clandestine detonation. However, caution must be exercised during the appraisal because the effects of an explosion are a function of many factors in addition to yield. Construction techniques, the physical properties of the surrounding rock, and the depth of burial are all important considerations when evaluating the effects of an underground detonation. Raytheon Services Nevada geologists documented underground and surface effects of the Non-Proliferation Experiment, as they have for all recent underground weapons-effects tests conducted by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Underground, the extent of the visible damage decreased rapidly from severe at the closest inspection point 100 m from the Working Point, to insignificant 300 m from the Working Point. The severity of damage correlates in some instances with the orientation of the drift with respect to the shock-wave propagation direction. No evidence of the Non-Proliferation explosion was visible on the mesa surface 389 m above the Working Point the day after the explosion.

  13. Blockage and flow studies of a generalized test apparatus including various wing configurations in the Langley 7-inch Mach 7 Pilot Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, C. W.

    1982-03-01

    A 1/12th scale model of the Curved Surface Test Apparatus (CSTA), which will be used to study aerothermal loads and evaluate Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) on a fuselage-type configuration in the Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Structures Tunnel (8 ft HTST), was tested in the Langley 7-Inch Mach 7 Pilot Tunnel. The purpose of the tests was to study the overall flow characteristics and define an envelope for testing the CSTA in the 8 ft HTST. Wings were tested on the scaled CSTA model to select a wing configuration with the most favorable characteristics for conducting TPS evaluations for curved and intersecting surfaces. The results indicate that the CSTA and selected wing configuration can be tested at angles of attack up to 15.5 and 10.5 degrees, respectively. The base pressure for both models was at the expected low level for most test conditions. Results generally indicate that the CSTA and wing configuration will provide a useful test bed for aerothermal pads and thermal structural concept evaluation over a broad range of flow conditions in the 8 ft HTST.

  14. High Response Dew Point Measurement System for a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Philip Z.

    1996-01-01

    A new high response on-line measurement system has been developed to continuously display and record the air stream dew point in the NASA Lewis 10 x 10 supersonic wind tunnel. Previous instruments suffered from such problems as very slow response, erratic readings, and high susceptibility to contamination. The system operates over the entire pressure level range of the 10 x 10 SWT, from less than 2 psia to 45 psia, without the need for a vacuum pump to provide sample flow. The system speeds up tunnel testing, provides large savings in tunnel power costs and provides the dew point input for the data-reduction subroutines which calculate test section conditions.

  15. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot Transonic wind tunnel (IA613A), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e. top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  16. Results of wind tunnel tests of an ASRM configured 0.03 scale Space Shuttle integrated vehicle model (47-OTS) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin, J.; Lemoine, P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental Aerodynamic and Aero-Acoustic loads data base was obtained at transonic Mach numbers for the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle configured with the ASRM Solid Rocket Boosters as an increment to the current flight configuration (RSRB). These data were obtained during transonic wind tunnel tests (IA 613A) conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center 16-Foot transonic propulsion wind tunnel from March 27, 1991 through April 12, 1991. This test is the first of a series of two tests covering the Mach range from 0.6 to 3.5. Steady state surface static and fluctuating pressure distributions over the Orbiter, External Tank and Solid Rocket Boosters of the Shuttle Integrated Vehicle were measured. Total Orbiter forces, Wing forces and Elevon hinge moments were directly measured as well from force balances. Two configurations of Solid Rocket Boosters were tested, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Booster (RSRB) and the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The effects of the position (i.e., top, bottom, top and bottom) of the Integrated Electronics Assembly (IEA) box, mounted on the SRB attach ring, were obtained on the ASRM configured model. These data were obtained with and without Solid Plume Simulators which, when used, matched as close as possible the flight derived pressures on the Orbiter and External Tank base. Data were obtained at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55 at a Unit Reynolds Number of 2.5 million per foot through model angles of attack from -8 to +4 degrees at sideslip angles of 0, +4 and -4 degrees.

  17. A test section design to simulate horizontal two-phase air-water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccini, Jose Luiz H.; Cesar, Silvia B.G.; Coutinho, Jorge A.; Freitas, Sergio Carlos; Addor, Pedro N.

    2002-01-01

    In this work an air-water two-phase flow horizontal test section assembling at Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN) is presented. The test section was designed to allow four-phase flow patterns to be simulated: bubble flow, stratified flow, wave flow and slug flow. These flow patterns will be identified by non-conventional ultrasonic techniques which have been developed to meet this particular application. Based on the separated flow and drift-flux models the test section design steps are shown. A description of the test section and its instrumentation and data acquisition system is also provided. (author)

  18. Wind tunnel tests of Risø-B1-18 and Risø-B1-24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac

    2003-01-01

    This report contains 2D measurements of the Risø-B1-18 and Risø-B1-24 airfoils. The aerodynamic properties were derived from pressure measurements on the airfoil surface and in the wake. The measurements were conducted in the VELUX open jet wind tunnel,which has a background turbulence intensity...

  19. Design and Development of Low-Cost Water Tunnel for Educational Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahari, M.; Dol, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behaviour of immersed body is essential in fluid dynamics study. Water tunnel is an example of facility required to provide a controlled condition for fluid flow research. The operational principle of water tunnel is quite similar to the wind tunnel but with different working fluid and higher flow-pumping capacity. Flow visualization in wind tunnel is more difficult to conduct as turbulent flows in wind dissipate quickly whilst water tunnel is more suitable for such purpose due to higher fluid viscosity and wide variety of visualization techniques can be employed. The present work focusses on the design and development of open flow water tunnel for the purpose of studying vortex-induced vibration from turbulent vortex shedding phenomenon. The water tunnel is designed to provide a steady and uniform flow speed within the test section area. Construction details are discussed for development of low-cost water tunnel for quantitative and qualitative fluid flow measurements. The water tunnel can also be used for educational purpose such as fluid dynamics class activity to provide quick access to visualization medium for better understanding of various turbulence motion learnt in class.

  20. Seismic Response of Tunnel Lining for Shallow-Bias Tunnel with a Small Clear Distance under Wenchuan Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the internal force characteristics of shallow-bias tunnel with a small clear distance in earthquake, a large-scale shaking table slope model test was designed, and the geometric scale was 1 : 10. In the model test, the Wenchuan (WC seismic wave was used as the excitation wave. Then, the three-dimensional numerical model was established by using MIDAS-NX, and the reliability of the numerical model was verified by comparing the acceleration of the test results. The axial force, bending moment, and shear force of the tunnel cross section and longitudinal direction were calculated by the numerical model under different excitation directions included the horizontal direction (X, the vertical direction (Z, and the horizontal and vertical direction (XZ. The results show the following. (1 The internal force of right arch foot of left hole and the left arch foot of right hole is larger than other part of the tunnels because the distance between the two tunnels is smaller and they interact with each other. (2 The loading direction of single direction loading method is different and the variation trend of tunnel force are different, so the loading direction of seismic wave has a significant influence on the seismic force response of the tunnel. (3 All of the internal force values of tunnel lining under the seismic wave action in bidirection are larger than those in single direction. The value is not a simple superposition of two directions and has some coupling effect. The influence of the vertical seismic wave cannot be ignored in dynamic response research. These results improve the understanding of the rock slope with small spacing tunnel under seismic action.

  1. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  2. Phase 2 and 3 wind tunnel tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model. [conducted in Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications were made to the model to improve longitudinal acceleration capability during transition from hovering to wing borne flight. A rearward deflection of the fuselage augmentor thrust vector is shown to be beneficial in this regard. Other agmentor modifications were tested, notably the removal of both endplates, which improved acceleration performance at the higher transition speeds. The model tests again demonstrated minimal interference of the fuselage augmentor on aerodynamic lift. A flapped canard surface also shows negligible influence on the performance of the wing and of the fuselage augmentor.

  3. Tool for assistance in testing the safety logic section of nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulc'h, J.; Meur, M. le; Collart, J.M.; Segalard, J.; Uberschlag, J.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the protection system logic section (SPIN) of the PALUEL plant performed manually have led to the study of a logical tool for testing the safety logic section having or having not failures. It is a dynamic analyser which from a terminal in a sharing time system will be able to generate testing sequences, to simulate a processor and its environment and to analyse the logic sections with their workable code

  4. User manual for NASA Lewis 10 by 10 foot supersonic wind tunnel. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, Ronald H.

    1995-01-01

    This manual describes the 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center and provides information for users who wish to conduct experiments in this facility. Tunnel performance operating envelopes of altitude, dynamic pressure, Reynolds number, total pressure, and total temperature as a function of test section Mach number are presented. Operating envelopes are shown for both the aerodynamic (closed) cycle and the propulsion (open) cycle. The tunnel test section Mach number range is 2.0 to 3.5. General support systems, such as air systems, hydraulic system, hydrogen system, fuel system, and Schlieren system, are described. Instrumentation and data processing and acquisition systems are also described. Pretest meeting formats and schedules are outlined. Tunnel user responsibility and personnel safety are also discussed.

  5. Analysis of mechanical behavior of soft rocks and stability control in deep tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the weakness in mechanical properties of chlorite schist and the high in situ stress in Jinping II hydropower station, the rock mass surrounding the diversion tunnels located in chlorite schist was observed with extremely large deformations. This may significantly increase the risk of tunnel instability during excavation. In order to assess the stability of the diversion tunnels laboratory tests were carried out in association with the petrophysical properties, mechanical behaviors and water-weakening properties of chlorite schist. The continuous deformation of surrounding rock mass, the destruction of the support structure and a large-scale collapse induced by the weak chlorite schist and high in situ stress were analyzed. The distributions of compressive deformation in the excavation zone with large deformations were also studied. In this regard, two reinforcement schemes for the excavation of diversion tunnel bottom section were proposed accordingly. This study could offer theoretical basis for deep tunnel construction in similar geological conditions.

  6. IR1 flow tube and In-Pile Test Section Pressure drop test for the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. H.; Park, K. N.; Chi, D. Y.; Sim, B. S.; Park, S. K.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, H. N

    2006-02-15

    The in-pile Section (IPS) of 3-pin Fuel Test Loop(FTL) shall be installed in the vertical hole call IR1 of HANARO reactor core. In order to verify the pressure drop and flow rate both the inside region of IPS at the annular region between IPS and IR1 flow tube, a pressure drop was measured by varing the flow rate on both regions. The measured pressure drop in the annular region is 209kpa at 14.9kg/s which meets the limiting condition of operation of 200kpa. The measured pressure drop in side the IPS becomes 260.25kpa which is lower than the designed value of 306.65kpa. As the pressure drop is lower than the design value, it is quite conservative from the safety and operating point of view.

  7. Construction of In-core Structure Test Section in HENDEL, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Ioka, Ikuo; Kondoh, Yasuo; Nekoya, Shinichi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Akisada, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    An In-core Structure Test Section (T 2 ) in Helium Engineering Demonstration Loop (HENDEL) simulates a part of the core bottom structure with the same scale as that of a high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) designed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The design and construction of T 2 test section were started in March 1983, and completed in June 1986. The main objectives of the T 2 test section are to verify thermal-hydraulic performance and integrity of the core bottom structure. The report describes the general outline of T 2 test section, and experience gained from construction and preliminary test with regard to the simulated core bottom structure. (author)

  8. An overview of HyFIE Technical Research Project: cross testing in main European hypersonic wind tunnels on EXPERT body

    OpenAIRE

    Brazier , J.P.; Schramm , J.M.; Paris , S.; Gawehn , T.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; HyFIE project aimed at improving the measurement techniques in hypersonic wind-tunnels and comparing the experimental data provided by four major European facilities: DLR HEG and H2K, ONERA F4 and VKI Longshot. A common geometry of EXPERT body was chosen and four different models were used. A large amount of experimental data was collected and compared with the results of numerical simulations. Collapsing all the measured values showed a good agreement between the diff...

  9. Lessons in the Design and Characterization Testing of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T) Wind-Tunnel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on some of the more challenging design processes and characterization tests of the Semi-Span Super-Sonic Transport (S4T)-Active Controls Testbed (ACT). The model was successfully tested in four entries in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to satisfy the goals and objectives of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Supersonic Project Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic effort. Due to the complexity of the S4T-ACT, only a small sample of the technical challenges for designing and characterizing the model will be presented. Specifically, the challenges encountered in designing the model include scaling the Technology Concept Airplane to model scale, designing the model fuselage, aileron actuator, and engine pylons. Characterization tests included full model ground vibration tests, wing stiffness measurements, geometry measurements, proof load testing, and measurement of fuselage static and dynamic properties.

  10. Application of wind tunnel tests to the development of solutions to problems related to immissions which affect urban climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuttler, W.

    1991-01-01

    In the last two decades urban climatology has developed to a pragmatically oriented field of research. Synthetic-functional maps of the climate and derived maps for town planning have widely been accepted by municipal or communal management. However, there is a disadvantage of the generalized urban-climatic maps because they only show the actual climatic state for stable sunny weather conditions. When future planning is done with due regard to forecasts on possible changes of the climatic or air-hygienic conditions, it is necessary to carry out model calculations and/or wind tunnel experiments. Because of the complexity of urban building structures, it is still difficult to acquire necessary information by numeric models. In most cases wind tunnel measurements will have to be carried out. After having illustrated the methods of wind tunnel experiments, the following paper shows results from measurements carried out for a street canyon with dense traffic in Duesseldorf's northern quarter Moersenbroich. This investigation intended to show how the field of immissions - mainly caused by traffic - changes after the construction of a six-storey office building on a remaining free space. It proved that the planned building wouldn't really lead to a deterioration of the field of the immissive situation. On the contrary, in most cases we could measure a reduced amount of pollution compared to the former building structure with a free spot. Only in few cases, the new building led to increased values in proportion to the given threshold values. (orig.) [de

  11. CFD and experimental data of closed-loop wind tunnel flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kaiser Calautit

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article were the basis for the study reported in the research articles entitled ‘A validated design methodology for a closed loop subsonic wind tunnel’ (Calautit et al., 2014 [1], which presented a systematic investigation into the design, simulation and analysis of flow parameters in a wind tunnel using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The authors evaluated the accuracy of replicating the flow characteristics for which the wind tunnel was designed using numerical simulation. Here, we detail the numerical and experimental set-up for the analysis of the closed-loop subsonic wind tunnel with an empty test section.

  12. Recognition tunneling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lindsay, S.; He, J.; Sankey, O.; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Zhang, P.; Chang, S.; Huang, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 26 (2010), 262001/1-262001/12 ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : STM * tunneling current * molecular electronics * DFT calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  13. Thermal effects influencing measurements in a supersonic blowdown wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Đorđe S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During a supersonic run of a blowdown wind tunnel, temperature of air in the test section drops which can affect planned measurements. Adverse thermal effects include variations of the Mach and Reynolds numbers, variation of airspeed, condensation of moisture on the model, change of characteristics of the instrumentation in the model, et cetera. Available data on thermal effects on instrumentation are pertaining primarily to long-run-duration wind tunnel facilities. In order to characterize such influences on instrumentation in the models, in short-run-duration blowdown wind tunnels, temperature measurements were made in the wing-panel-balance and main-balance spaces of two wind tunnel models tested in the T-38 wind tunnel. The measurements showed that model-interior temperature in a run increased at the beginning of the run, followed by a slower drop and, at the end of the run, by a large temperature drop. Panel-force balance was affected much more than the main balance. Ways of reducing the unwelcome thermal effects by instrumentation design and test planning are discussed.

  14. Wing pressure distributions from subsonic tests of a high-wing transport model. [in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applin, Zachary T.; Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted on a generic, high-wing transport model in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This report contains pressure data that document effects of various model configurations and free-stream conditions on wing pressure distributions. The untwisted wing incorporated a full-span, leading-edge Krueger flap and a part-span, double-slotted trailing-edge flap system. The trailing-edge flap was tested at four different deflection angles (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 60 deg). Four wing configurations were tested: cruise, flaps only, Krueger flap only, and high lift (Krueger flap and flaps deployed). Tests were conducted at free-stream dynamic pressures of 20 psf to 60 psf with corresponding chord Reynolds numbers of 1.22 x 10(exp 6) to 2.11 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers of 0.12 to 0.20. The angles of attack presented range from 0 deg to 20 deg and were determined by wing configuration. The angle of sideslip ranged from minus 20 deg to 20 deg. In general, pressure distributions were relatively insensitive to free-stream speed with exceptions primarily at high angles of attack or high flap deflections. Increasing trailing-edge Krueger flap significantly reduced peak suction pressures and steep gradients on the wing at high angles of attack. Installation of the empennage had no effect on wing pressure distributions. Unpowered engine nacelles reduced suction pressures on the wing and the flaps.

  15. Flow Observations with Tufts and Lampblack of the Stalling of Four Typical Airfoil Sections in the NACA Variable-density Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Ira H; Sherman, Albert

    1938-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the stalling processes of four typical airfoil sections was made over the critical range of the Reynolds Number. Motion pictures were taken of the movements of small silk tufts on the airfoil surface as the angle of attack increased through a range of angles including the stall. The boundary-layer flow also at certain angles of attack was indicated by the patterns formed by a suspension of lampblack in oil brushed onto the airfoil surface. These observations were analyzed together with corresponding force-test measurements to derive a picture of the stalling processes of airfoils.

  16. Magnetic Fluxtube Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos,, Spiro K.; Norton, D.

    1996-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of two initially orthogonal, twisted, force free field magnetic fluxtubes. The simulations were carried out using a new three dimensional explicit parallelized Fourier collocation algorithm for solving the viscoresistive equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the fluxtubes can 'tunnel' through each other. Two key conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch much greater than 1, and the magnetic Lundquist number must be somewhat large, greater than or equal to 2880. This tunneling behavior has not been seen previously in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic fluxtube interactions. An examination of magnetic field lines shows that tunneling is due to a double reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections and 'pass' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  17. Tunnel nitrogen spill experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageyev, A.I.; Alferov, V.N.; Mulholland, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Energy Saver Safety Analysis Report (SAR) found the tunnel oxygen deficiency considerations emphasized helium spills. These reports concluded the helium quickly warms and because of its low denisty, rises to the apex of the tunnel. The oxygen content below the apex and in all but the immediate vicinity of the helium spill is essentially unchanged and guarantees an undisturbed source of oxygen especially important to fallen personnel. In contrast nitrogen spills warm slower than helium due to the ratio of the enthalpy changes per unit volume spilled spread more uniformly across the tunnel cross-section when warmed because of the much smaller density difference with air, and generally provides a greater hazard than helium spills as a result. In particular there was concern that personnel that might fall to the floor for oxygen deficiency or other reasons might find less, and not more, oxygen with dire consequences. The SAR concluded tunnel nitrogen spills were under-investigated and led to this work

  18. Testing Cross-Sectional Correlation in Large Panel Data Models with Serial Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi H. Baltagi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of testing cross-sectional correlation in large panel data models with serially-correlated errors. It finds that existing tests for cross-sectional correlation encounter size distortions with serial correlation in the errors. To control the size, this paper proposes a modification of Pesaran’s Cross-sectional Dependence (CD test to account for serial correlation of an unknown form in the error term. We derive the limiting distribution of this test as N , T → ∞ . The test is distribution free and allows for unknown forms of serial correlation in the errors. Monte Carlo simulations show that the test has good size and power for large panels when serial correlation in the errors is present.

  19. Construction of experimental HMA test sections in order to monitor the compaction process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Huerne, Henderikus L.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; van de Ven, M.F.C.

    2003-01-01

    For getting better understanding about the process of HMA compaction, a test section was constructed while the governing process parameters, like; compaction progress, temperature of the material at which activities were employed, equipment properties and meteorological circumstances, were

  20. Tunnel - history of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    This book introduces history of tunnel in ancient times, the middle ages and modern times, survey of tunnel and classification of bedrock like environment survey of position, survey of the ground, design of tunnel on basic thing of the design, and design of tunnel of bedrock, analysis of stability of tunnel and application of the data, construction of tunnel like lattice girder and steel fiber reinforced shot crete, and maintenance control and repair of tunnel.

  1. CFRMF spectrum update and application to dosimeter cross-section data testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Harker, Y.D.; Millsap, D.A.; Rogers, J.W.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) benchmark for data testing of dosimetry, fission-product and actinide cross sections important to fast-reactor technology. In this paper we present the results of our work in updating the CFRMF spectrum characterization and in applying CFRMF integral data to testing ENDF/B-V dosimeter cross sections. Updated characterization of the central neutron spectrum includes the results of neutronics calculations with ENDF/B-V nuclear data, the generation of a fine-group spectrum representation for integral data-testing applications, and a sensitivity and uncertainty analysis which provides a flux-spectrum covariance matrix related to uncertainties and correlations in the nuclear data used in a neutronics calculation. Our application of CFRMF integral data to cross section testing has included both conventional integral testing analyses and least-squares-adjustment analyses with the FERRET code. The conventional integral data-testing analysis, based on C/E ratios, indicates discrepancies outside the estimated integral test uncertainty for the 6 Li(n,He), 10 B(n,He), 47 Ti(n,p), 58 Fe(n,γ), 197 Au(n,γ) and 232 Th(n,γ) cross sections. The integral test uncertainty included contributions from the measured integral data and from the spectrum and cross sections used to obtain the calculated integral data. Within the uncertainty and correlation specifications for the input spectrum and dosimeter cross sections, the least-squares-adjustment analysis indicated a high degree of consistency between the measured integral data and the ENDF/B-V dosimeter cross sections for all reactions except 10 B

  2. Experimental Evidence for Quantum Tunneling Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Nicolas; Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Fechner, Lutz; Klaiber, Michael; Laux, Martin; Mi, Yonghao; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Pfeifer, Thomas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-07-01

    The first hundred attoseconds of the electron dynamics during strong field tunneling ionization are investigated. We quantify theoretically how the electron's classical trajectories in the continuum emerge from the tunneling process and test the results with those achieved in parallel from attoclock measurements. An especially high sensitivity on the tunneling barrier is accomplished here by comparing the momentum distributions of two atomic species of slightly deviating atomic potentials (argon and krypton) being ionized under absolutely identical conditions with near-infrared laser pulses (1300 nm). The agreement between experiment and theory provides clear evidence for a nonzero tunneling time delay and a nonvanishing longitudinal momentum of the electron at the "tunnel exit."

  3. Variability in ACL tunnel placement: observational clinical study of surgeon ACL tunnel variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Wright, Rick W; Brophy, Robert H; McCarty, Eric C; Vidal, Armando R; Parker, Richard D; Andrish, Jack T; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-06-01

    Multicenter and multisurgeon cohort studies on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are becoming more common. Minimal information exists on intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement. Purpose/ The purpose of this study was to analyze intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement in a series of The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) ACL reconstruction patients and in a clinical cohort of ACL reconstruction patients. The hypothesis was that there would be minimal variability between surgeons in ACL tunnel placement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventy-eight patients who underwent ACL reconstruction by 8 surgeons had postoperative imaging with computed tomography, and ACL tunnel location and angulation were analyzed using 3-dimensional surface processing and measurement. Intersurgeon and intrasurgeon variability in ACL tunnel placement was analyzed. For intersurgeon variability, the range in mean ACL femoral tunnel depth between surgeons was 22%. For femoral tunnel height, there was a 19% range. Tibial tunnel location from anterior to posterior on the plateau had a 16% range in mean results. There was only a small range of 4% for mean tibial tunnel location from the medial to lateral dimension. For intrasurgeon variability, femoral tunnel depth demonstrated the largest ranges, and tibial tunnel location from medial to lateral on the plateau demonstrated the least variability. Overall, surgeons were relatively consistent within their own cases. Using applied measurement criteria, 85% of femoral tunnels and 90% of tibial tunnels fell within applied literature-based guidelines. Ninety-one percent of the axes of the femoral tunnels fell within the boundaries of the femoral footprint. The data demonstrate that surgeons performing ACL reconstructions are relatively consistent between each other. There is, however, variability of average tunnel placement up to 22% of mean condylar depth

  4. Integral test on activation cross section of tag gas nuclides using fast neutron spectrum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-03-01

    Activation cross sections of tag gas nuclides, which will be used for the failed fuel detection and location in FBR plants, were evaluated by the irradiation tests in the fast neutron spectrum fields in JOYO and YAYOI. The comparison of their measured radioactivities and the calculated values using the JENDL-3.2 cross section set showed that the C/E values ranged from 0.8 to 2.8 for the calibration tests in YAYOI and that the present accuracies of these cross sections were confirmed. (author)

  5. New Tools to Prepare ACE Cross-section Files for MCNP Analytic Test Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Forrest B.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations using one-group cross sections, multigroup cross sections, or simple continuous energy cross sections are often used to: (1) verify production codes against known analytical solutions, (2) verify new methods and algorithms that do not involve detailed collision physics, (3) compare Monte Carlo calculation methods with deterministic methods, and (4) teach fundamentals to students. In this work we describe 2 new tools for preparing the ACE cross-section files to be used by MCNP ® for these analytic test problems, simple a ce.pl and simple a ce m g.pl.

  6. Super-long bridges with floating towers: the role of multi-box decks and Hardware-In-the-Loop technology for wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasso, A.; Argentini, T.; Bayati, I.; Belloli, M.; Rocchi, D.

    2017-12-01

    The super long fjord crossings in E39 Norwegian project pose new challenges to long span bridge design and construction technology. Proposed solutions should consider the adoption of bridge deck with super long spans or floating solutions for at least one of the towers, due to the relevant fjord depth. At the same time, the exposed fjord environment, possibly facing the open ocean, calls for higher aerodynamic stability performances. In relation to this scenario, the present paper addresses two topics: 1) the aerodynamic advantages of multi-box deck sections in terms of aeroelastic stability, and 2) an experimental setup in a wind tunnel able to simulate the aeroelastic bridge response including the wave forcing on the floating.

  7. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  8. The fabrication of a vanadium-stainless steel test section for MHD testing of insulator coatings in flowing lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.; Chung, H.; Tsai, H.-C.; Morgan, G.D.; Wille, G.W.; Young, C.

    1996-01-01

    To test the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop reduction performance of candidate insulator coatings for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium Breeding Blanket, a test section comprised of a V- 4Cr-4Ti liner inside a stainless steel pipe was designed and fabricated. Theoretically, the MHD pressure drop reduction benefit resulting, from an electrically insulating coating on a vanadium- lined pipe is identical to the benefit derived from an insulated pipe fabricated of vanadium alone. A duplex test section design consisting of a V alloy liner encased in a SS pressure boundary provided protection for vanadium from atmospheric contamination during operation at high temperature and obviated any potential problems with vanadium welding while also minimizing the amount of V alloy material required. From the MHD and insulator coating- point of view, the test section outer SS wall and inner V alloy liner can be modeled simply as a wall having a sandwich construction. Two 52.3 mm OD x 2.9 m long V-alloy tubes were fabricated by Century Tubes from 64 mm x 200 mm x 1245 mm extrusions produced by Teledyne Wah Chang. The test section's duplex structure was subsequently fabricated at Century Tubes by drawing down a SS pipe (2 inch schedule 10) over one of the 53.2 mm diameter V tubes

  9. Mass spectrometric measurements of driver gas arrival in the T4 free-piston shock-tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, R. R.; Takahashi, M.; Stalker, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    Available test time is an important issue for ground-based flow research, particularly for impulse facilities such as shock tunnels, where test times of the order of several ms are typical. The early contamination of the test flow by the driver gas in such tunnels restricts the test time. This paper reports measurements of the driver gas arrival time in the test section of the T4 free-piston shock-tunnel over the total enthalpy range 3 17 MJ/kg, using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The results confirm measurements made by previous investigators using a choked duct driver gas detector at these conditions, and extend the range of previous mass spectrometer measurements to that of 3 20 MJ/kg. Comparisons of the contamination behaviour of various piston-driven reflected shock tunnels are also made.

  10. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  11. Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid: Some prototype studies conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chornack, M.P.; French, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    Horizontal coring using air as the circulating fluid has been conducted in the G Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) at the Nevada Test Site. This work is part of the prototype investigations of hydrogeology for the Yucca Mountain Project. The work is being conducted to develop methods and procedures that will be used at the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Site, a candidate site for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository, during the site characterization phase of the investigations. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting this prototype testing under the guidance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in conjunction with Reynolds Electrical ampersand Engineering Company (REECo), the drilling contractor. 7 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Development of a Large Field-of-View PIV System for Rotorcraft Testing in the 14- x 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Harris, Jerome; Allan, Brian; Wong, Oliver; Mace, W. Derry

    2009-01-01

    A Large Field-of-View Particle Image Velocimetry (LFPIV) system has been developed for rotor wake diagnostics in the 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The system has been used to measure three components of velocity in a plane as large as 1.524 meters by 0.914 meters in both forward flight and hover tests. Overall, the system performance has exceeded design expectations in terms of accuracy and efficiency. Measurements synchronized with the rotor position during forward flight and hover tests have shown that the system is able to capture the complex interaction of the body and rotor wakes as well as basic details of the blade tip vortex at several wake ages. Measurements obtained with traditional techniques such as multi-hole pressure probes, Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV), and 2D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) show good agreement with LFPIV measurements.

  13. Geared-elevator flutter study. [wind tunnel tests of transonic flutter effects on control surfaces of supersonic transport tail assemblies, conducted in a NASA-Langley transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Gregory, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was made of the transonic flutter characteristics of a supersonic transport tail assembly model having an all-movable, horizontal tail with a geared elevator. Two model configurations, namely, one with a gear-elevator (2.8 to 1.0 gear ratio) and one with locked-elevator (1.0 to 1.0 gear ratio), were flutter tested in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel with an empennage cantilever-mounted on a sting. The geared-elevator configuration fluttered experimentally at about 20% higher dynamic pressures than the locked-elevator configuration. The experimental flutter dynamic pressure boundaries for both configurations were nearly flat over a Mach number range from 0.9 to 1.1. Flutter calculations (mathematical models) were made for the geared-elevator configuration using three subsonic lifting-surface methods. In one method, the elevator was treated as a discrete surface, and in the other two methods, the stabilizer and elevator were treated as a single warped-surface with the primary difference between these two methods being in the mathematical implementation used. A comparison of the experimental and analytical results shows that the discrete-elevator method predicted best the experimental flutter dynamic pressure level. However, the single warped-surface methods predicts more closely the experimental flutter frequencies and Mach number trends.

  14. Finite Element Simulations of Two Vertical Drop Tests of F-28 Fuselage Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Annett, Martin S.; Haskin, Ian M.

    2018-01-01

    In March 2017, a vertical drop test of a forward fuselage section of a Fokker F-28 MK4000 aircraft was conducted as part of a joint NASA/FAA project to investigate the performance of transport aircraft under realistic crash conditions. In June 2017, a vertical drop test was conducted of a wing-box fuselage section of the same aircraft. Both sections were configured with two rows of aircraft seats, in a triple-double configuration. A total of ten Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were secured in seats using standard lap belt restraints. The forward fuselage section was also configured with luggage in the cargo hold. Both sections were outfitted with two hat racks, each with added ballast mass. The drop tests were performed at the Landing and Impact Research facility located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The measured impact velocity for the forward fuselage section was 346.8-in/s onto soil. The wing-box section was dropped with a downward facing pitch angle onto a sloping soil surface in order to create an induced forward acceleration in the airframe. The vertical impact velocity of the wing-box section was 349.2-in/s. A second objective of this project was to assess the capabilities of finite element simulations to predict the test responses. Finite element models of both fuselage sections were developed for execution in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark), a commercial explicit nonlinear transient dynamic code. The models contained accurate representations of the airframe structure, the hat racks and hat rack masses, the floor and seat tracks, the luggage in the cargo hold for the forward section, and the detailed under-floor structure in the wing-box section. Initially, concentrated masses were used to represent the inertial properties of the seats, restraints, and ATD occupants. However, later simulations were performed that included finite element representations of the seats, restraints, and ATD occupants. These models were developed to more

  15. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  16. Automated Boundary Conditions for Wind Tunnel Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2018-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of models tested in wind tunnels require a high level of fidelity and accuracy particularly for the purposes of CFD validation efforts. Considerable effort is required to ensure the proper characterization of both the physical geometry of the wind tunnel and recreating the correct flow conditions inside the wind tunnel. The typical trial-and-error effort used for determining the boundary condition values for a particular tunnel configuration are time and computer resource intensive. This paper describes a method for calculating and updating the back pressure boundary condition in wind tunnel simulations by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. The controller methodology and equations are discussed, and simulations using the controller to set a tunnel Mach number in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are demonstrated.

  17. Method for stress determination in N, E, and T tunnels, Nevada Test Site, by hydraulic fracturing, with a comparison of overcoring methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.H.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-nine intervals in 10 core holes were hydraulically fractured in N, E, and T tunnels, Nevada Test Site, during 1974. Certain pressures were determined and related to the ambient stress field, but the orientation of the hydraulic fractures was not measured. These data and data from previous investigations in G tunnel indicated that both the magnitude of the hydraulic pressures and the direction of fracturing are independent of the orientation of the core holes. The maximum and minimum principal compressive stresses determined by the hydraulic fracturing methods are good approximations of those determined by nearby overcore methods. The data show that a good approximation of the magnitudes of the maximum and minimum principal stress axes can be obtained from several hydrofractured intervals in one core hole. Furthermore, if fracture orientation can be measured, then the direction of minimum principal compressive stress can be determined and the orientation of the plane of the maximum and intermediate principal compressive stresses can also be determined

  18. Tunnel boring machine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, K.K.; McDonald, R.; Saunders, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that characterization of Yucca Mountain for a potential repository requires construction of an underground Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Mechanical excavating methods have been proposed for construction of the ESF as they offer a number of advantages over drilling and blasting at the Yucca Mountain site, including; less ground disturbance and therefore a potential for less adverse effects on the integrity of the site, creation of a more stable excavation cross section requiring less ground support, and an inherently safer and cleaner working environment. The tunnel boring machine (TBM) provides a proven technology for excavating the welded and unwelded Yucca Mountain tuffs. The access ramps and main underground tunnels form the largest part of the ESF underground construction work, and have been designed for excavation by TBM

  19. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  20. Tunneling through landsliding zone; Jisuberi chitainai no tunnel seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konbu, A; Hatabu, K; Kano, T [Tekken Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    At the new tunnel construction site of the Shirakata tunnel on the Obama line in Yamaguchi Prefecture, a landsliding occurred at about 60 meters to the upper portion obliquely to the right hand side of the shaft when the excavation progressed to about 10 meters from the starting side. The landslide caused displacement at the shaft opening and change in the supports. As a result of the re-investigation, it was confirmed that the slide face went through the tunnel cross section. The measures taken were removal of the upper soil and an adoption of the all ground fastening (AGF) method (injection type long tip fastening method) as an auxiliary construction to stop loosening of the natural ground associated with the tunnel excavation. The result was a completion of tunneling the landsliding zone without a problem. This paper reports the AGF method adopted in the above construction, together with the construction works and natural ground conditions. The AGF method is about the same as the pipe roof method with regard to the natural ground accepting mechanism and the materials used. The difference is building an improved body in a limited area in the natural ground around the steel pipes by injecting the fixing material. The use of this method caused no problems in subsidence and displacement in the surrounding ground, and completed the tunneling construction without an unusual event. 1 ref., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Analytical Work in Support of the Design and Operation of Two Dimensional Self Streamlining Test Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, M.; Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A method has been developed for accurately computing the imaginary flow fields outside a flexible walled test section, applicable to lifting and non-lifting models. The tolerances in the setting of the flexible walls introduce only small levels of aerodynamic interference at the model. While it is not possible to apply corrections for the interference effects, they may be reduced by improving the setting accuracy of the portions of wall immediately above and below the model. Interference effects of the truncation of the length of the streamlined portion of a test section are brought to an acceptably small level by the use of a suitably long test section with the model placed centrally.

  2. Design of a High-Reynolds Number Recirculating Water Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Libin; Elbing, Brian

    2014-11-01

    An experimental fluid mechanics laboratory focused on turbulent boundary layers, drag reduction techniques, multiphase flows and fluid-structure interactions has recently been established at Oklahoma State University. This laboratory has three primary components; (1) a recirculating water tunnel, (2) a multiphase pipe flow loop, and (3) a multi-scale flow visualization system. The design of the water tunnel is the focus of this talk. The criteria used for the water tunnel design was that it had to produce a momentum-thickness based Reynolds number in excess of 104, negligible flow acceleration due to boundary layer growth, maximize optical access for use of the flow visualization system, and minimize inlet flow non-uniformity. This Reynolds number was targeted to bridge the gap between typical university/commercial water tunnels (103) and the world's largest water tunnel facilities (105) . These objectives were achieved with a 152 mm (6-inch) square test section that is 1 m long and has a maximum flow speed of 10 m/s. The flow non-uniformity was mitigated with the use of a tandem honeycomb configuration, a settling chamber and an 8.5:1 contraction. The design process that produced this final design will be presented along with its current status.

  3. 49 CFR 177.810 - Vehicular tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... through any urban vehicular tunnel used for mass transportation. [Amdt. 177-52, 46 FR 5316, Jan. 19, 1981... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vehicular tunnels. 177.810 Section 177.810 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...

  4. Sub-Scale Orion Parachute Test Results from the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- By 120-ft Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian P.; Greathouse, James S.; Powell, Jessica M.; Ross, James C.; Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura; Porter, Barry J.; Goulding, Patrick W., II; Zwicker, Matthew L.; Mollmann, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    A two-week test campaign was conducted in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80 x 120-ft Wind Tunnel in support of Orion parachute pendulum mitigation activities. The test gathered static aerodynamic data using an instrumented, 3-tether system attached to the parachute vent in combination with an instrumented parachute riser. Dynamic data was also gathered by releasing the tether system and measuring canopy performance using photogrammetry. Several canopy configurations were tested and compared against the current Orion parachute design to understand changes in drag performance and aerodynamic stability. These configurations included canopies with varying levels and locations of geometric porosity as well as sails with increased levels of fullness. In total, 37 runs were completed for a total of 392 data points. Immediately after the end of the testing campaign a down-select decision was made based on preliminary data to support follow-on sub-scale air drop testing. A summary of a more rigorous analysis of the test data is also presented.

  5. Wind tunnel evaluation of the RAAMP sampler. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderpool, R.W.; Peters, T.M.

    1994-11-01

    Wind tunnel tests of the Department of Energy RAAMP (Radioactive Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Program) monitor have been conducted at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr. The RAAMP sampler was developed based on three specific performance objectives: (1) meet EPA PM10 performance criteria, (2) representatively sample and retain particles larger than 10 microm for later isotopic analysis, (3) be capable of continuous, unattended operation for time periods up to 2 months. In this first phase of the evaluation, wind tunnel tests were performed to evaluate the sampler as a potential candidate for EPA PM10 reference or equivalency status. As an integral part of the project, the EPA wind tunnel facility was fully characterized at wind speeds of 2 km/hr and 24 km/hr in conjunction with liquid test aerosols of 10 microm aerodynamic diameter. Results showed that the facility and its operating protocols met or exceeded all 40 CFR Part 53 acceptance criteria regarding PM10 size-selective performance evaluation. Analytical procedures for quantitation of collected mass deposits also met 40 CFR Part 53 criteria. Modifications were made to the tunnel's test section to accommodate the large dimensions of the RAAMP sampler's instrument case

  6. Influence of Test Section Geometry on the Blast Environment in an Explosively Driven Conical Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-30

    ARL-TR-8335•MAR 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Influence of Test Section Geometry on theBlast Environment in an Explosively DrivenConical Shock...ARL-TR-8335•MAR 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Influence of Test Section Geometry on theBlast Environment in an Explosively DrivenConical Shock...TITLE AND SUBTITLE    5a. CONTRACT NUMBER  5b. GRANT NUMBER  5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S)    5d.  PROJECT  NUMBER  5e. TASK NUMBER  5f

  7. Equilibrium quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Maganas, A.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the fully-developed quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section. The three subchannels had the geometrical characteristics of the corner, side, and interior subchannels of a BWR-5 rod bundle. Data collected with Refrigerant-144 at pressures ranging from 7 to 14 bar, simulating operation with water in the range 55 to 103 bar are reported. The average mass flux and quality in the test section were in the ranges 1300 to 1750 kg/m s and -0.03 to 0.25, respectively. The data are analyzed and presented in various forms

  8. Design Improvement of Double Pressure Vessel in the In-pile Test Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Heo, Sung-Ho; Joung, Chang-Young; Kim, Ka-Hye [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To carry out an irradiation test of nuclear fuels, a nuclear fuel test rig should be fabricated and installed in the in-pile test section (IPS), which is installed in the reactor hall. While carrying out an irradiation test, sealing out coolant which passes through the test rig is one of the most important issues. In particular, although the double pressure vessel is assembled with the IPS head by two o-rings and six bolts, 15.5 MPa of highly pressurized coolant leaks through the gap between the vessel and IPS head. Because the temperature of the coolant in the test loop is 300 .deg. C , and the pool of HANARO is 40 .deg. C, the double pressure vessel is necessary to insulate them. Therefore, a new design to prevent the leakage of coolant needs to be developed. In this study, EB welding technique is considered to assemble the double pressure vessel and the IPS head, and their mechanical design is modified to enable the welding process. In this study, an improved design for sealing out the coolant at the pressure boundary between the double pressure vessel and the IPS head has been developed. An EB weld is applied to seal out the pressure boundary, and its sealing performance is verified by NDE, a cross section test, and a hydraulic pressure test. From the verification test results, the improved design can be used in fabricating the IPS for a nuclear fuel irradiation test.

  9. Tunneling technologies for the collider ring tunnels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frobenius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Texas site chosen for the Superconducting Super Collider has been studied, and it has been determined that proven, conventional technology and accepted engineering practice are suitable for constructing the collider tunnels. The Texas National Research Laboratory Commission report recommended that two types of tunneling machines be used for construction of the tunnels: a conventional hard rock tunnel boring machine (TBM) for the Austin chalk and a double shielded, rotary TBM for the Taylor marl. Since the tunneling machines usually set the pace for the project, efficient planning, operation, and coordination of the tunneling system components will be critical to the schedule and cost of the project. During design, tunneling rate prediction should be refined by focusing on the development of an effective tunneling system and evaluating its capacity to meet or exceed the required schedules. 8 refs., 13 figs

  10. Design of Intelligent Power Supply System for Expressway Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Yutong; Lin, Zimian

    2018-01-01

    Tunnel lighting program is one of the key points of tunnel infrastructure construction. As tunnels tend to handle remote locations, power supply line construction generally has been having the distance, investment, high cost characteristics. To solve this problem, we propose a green, environmentally friendly, energy-efficient lighting system. This program uses the piston-wind which cars within tunnel produce as the power and combines with solar energy, physical lighting to achieve it, which solves the problem of difficult and high cost of highway tunnel section, and provides new ideas for the future construction of tunnel power supply.

  11. Plans for Testing the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment 10m Diameter HAWT in the NASA Ames Wind Tunnel: Minutes, Conclusions, and Revised Text Matrix from the 1st Science Panel Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, D.; Schreck, S.; Hand, M.; Fingersh, L.; Cotrell, J.; Pierce, K.; Robinson, M.

    2000-08-28

    Currently, the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) research turbine is scheduled to enter the NASA Ames 80-ft x 120-ft wind tunnel in early 2000. To prepare for this 3-week test, a Science Panel meeting was convened at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in October 1998. During this meeting, the Science Panel and representatives from the wind energy community provided numerous detailed recommendations regarding test activities and priorities. The Unsteady Aerodynamics team of the NWTC condensed this guidance and drafted a detailed test plan. This test plan represents an attempt to balance diverse recommendations received from the Science Panel meeting, while taking into account multiple constraints imposed by the UAE research turbine, the NASA Ames 80-ft x 120-ft wind tunnel, and other sources. The NREL-NASA Ames wind tunnel tests will primarily be focused on obtaining rotating blade pressure data. NREL has been making these types of measurements since 1987 and has considerable experience in doing so. The purpose of this wind tunnel test is to acquire accurate quantitative aerodynamic and structural measurements, on a wind turbine that is geometrically and dynamically representative of full-scale machines, in an environment free from pronounced inflow anomalies. These data will be exploited to develop and validate enhanced engineering models for designing and analyzing advanced wind energy machines.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

  13. Design of in-pile section monitoring system in fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, B. S.; Park, K. N.; Park, S. K.; Chi, D. Y.; Lee, J. M.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Kim, Y. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In this paper a brief summary of the monitoring system of In-Pile Section(IPS) is described. To meet the user requirements on the test fuel and irradiation conditions, various instruments are installed on the test fuel pin itself and the appropriate locations in IPS. The requirements and descriptions for instruments, gas supply system, and the data acquisition system to sample and record parameters are described.

  14. Experimental study of wind tunnel performance by a two-component laserDopplerAnemometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pourmahabadian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This survey studies the wind tunnel performance by a two- componentlaser Doppler Anemometer, so some experiments were carried out to assess the performance of awind tunnel.Method: The tunnel was capable to produce air velocity of up to 40 m/s.. Measurements ofvelocity profiles have been made actors the test section of wind tunnel through the using a twocomponentfiber optic Laser Doppler anemometer. Measurements of velocity profiles andturbulence intensities have been made across the test section of the wind tunnel using a twocomponentfiber optic Laser Doppler anemometer (I.D.A for wind speeds ranging from 1 to3m/s.Results: Performance rests of velocity profiles at a given flow rate and various position of aerosolgenerator showed that although uniformity of flow dependent to the place of an atomizer (asaerosol generator but the variation of wind speed across the test section meets the wind speedrequirements, as specified by US EPAfor 3m/s only.Conclusion:At time which particles velocity reach to less than one micron, the air velocity relateson the similarity of particles and

  15. Diagnostic and laboratory test ordering in Northern Portuguese Primary Health Care: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Luísa; Teixeira, Andreia Sofia Costa; Tavares, Fernando; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Couto, Luciana; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Hespanhol, Alberto Pinto; Santos, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the test ordering pattern in Northern Portugal and to investigate the influence of context-related factors, analysing the test ordered at the level of geographical groups of family physicians and at the level of different healthcare organisations. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Northern Primary Health Care, Portugal. Participants Records about diagnostic and laboratory tests ordered from 2035 family physicians working at the Northern Regional Health Administration, who served approximately 3.5 million Portuguese patients, in 2014. Outcomes To determine the 20 most ordered diagnostic and laboratory tests in the Northern Regional Health Administration; to identify the presence and extent of variations in the 20 most ordered diagnostic and laboratory tests between the Groups of Primary Care Centres and between health units; and to study factors that may explain these variations. Results The 20 most ordered diagnostic and laboratory tests almost entirely comprise laboratory tests and account for 70.9% of the total tests requested. We can trace a major pattern of test ordering for haemogram, glucose, lipid profile, creatinine and urinalysis. There was a significant difference (P<0.001) in test orders for all tests between Groups of Primary Care Centres and for all tests, except glycated haemoglobin (P=0.06), between health units. Generally, the Personalised Healthcare Units ordered more than Family Health Units. Conclusions The results from this study show that the most commonly ordered tests in Portugal are laboratory tests, that there is a tendency for overtesting and that there is a large variability in diagnostic and laboratory test ordering in different geographical and organisational Portuguese primary care practices, suggesting that there may be considerable potential for the rationalisation of test ordering. The existence of Family Health Units seems to be a strong determinant in decreasing test ordering by Portuguese family

  16. Determination of a test section parameters for Iris nuclear reactor pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mario A.B. da; Lira, Carlos A.B. de O.

    2009-01-01

    An integral, modular and medium size nuclear reactor, known as IRIS, is being developed by Westinghouse and by research centers. IRIS is characterized by having most of its components inside the pressure vessel, eliminating the probability of accidents. Due to its integral configuration, there is no spray system for boron homogenization, which may cause power transients. Thus, boron mixing must be investigated. The aim of this paper is to establish the conditions under which a test section has to be built for boron dispersion analysis inside IRIS reactor pressurizer. Through Fractional Scaling Analysis, which is a new methodology of similarity, the main parameters for a test section are obtained. By combining Fractional Scaling Analysis with local scaling for the densimetric Froude number and a previously established volumetric scale factor, the values of recirculation orifices, inlet water temperature, time scale factor and recirculation flow for the test section (model) are determined so that boron distribution is well represented in IRIS reactor pressurizer (prototype). Analytical solutions were used to validate the adopted methodology and when the results simulated in the model are compared to those that characterize the prototype, the agreement for both systems is absolute. The thermal power also influences boron distribution inside the test section. This power is determined by condensation laws in the vapor region and by suitable correlations for free convection. The fractions for rising inlet recirculation water enthalpy and vapor formation are also considered. (author)

  17. The cryogenic pumping section of KATRIN and the test experiment TRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Eichelhardt, F

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) employs a Cryogenic Pumping Section (CPS) at ~ 4.5 K to suppress the tritium penetration into the spectrometers. A test experiment (TRAP - Tritium Argon frost Pump) has been set up to investigate the tritium pumping performance of the CPS.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Tensile Test on Connection of Cold-formed Cut-curved Steel Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Mohd Syahrul Hisyam Mohd; Muftah, Fadhluhartini; Rahman, Nurul Farraheeda Abdul; Fakri Muda, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cold-formed steel (CFS) is widely used as structural and non-structural components such as roof trusses and purlin. A CFS channel section with double intermediate web stiffener and lipped is chosen based on the broader usage in roof truss construction. CFS section is cut to form cold-formed pre-cut-curved steel section and lastly strengthened by several types of method or likely known as connection to establish the cold-formed cut-curved steel (CFCCS) section. CFCCS is proposed to be used as a top chord section in the roof truss system. The CFCCS is to resist the buckling phenomena of the roof truss structure and reduced the compression effect on the top chord. The tensile test connection of CFCCS section, especially at the flange element with eight types of connection by welding, plate with self-drilling screw and combination is investigated. The flange element is the weakest part that must be solved first other than the web element because they are being cut totally, 100% of their length for curving process. The testing is done using a universal testing machine for a tensile load. From the experiment, specimen with full welding has shown as a good result with an ultimate load of 13.37 kN and reported having 35.41% when compared with normal specimen without any of connection methods. Furthermore, the experimental result is distinguished by using Eurocode 3. The failure of a full welding specimen is due to breaking at the welding location. Additionally, all specimens with either full weld or spot weld or combination failed due to breaking on weld connection, but specimen with flange plate and self-drilling screw failed due to tilting and bearing. Finally, the full welding specimen is chosen as a good connection to perform the strengthening method of CFCCS section.

  19. Wind tunnel testing of scaled models of a newly developed Darrieus-style vertical axis wind turbine with auxiliary straight blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scungio, M.; Arpino, F.; Focanti, V.; Profili, M.; Rotondi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Wind tunnel investigations of Darrieus-style VAWT with auxiliary blades have been made. • Results have been compared with those from standard Darrieus VAWT. • Static and dynamic power and torque coefficients were measured and evaluated. • The auxiliary airfoils have demonstrated to give more torque at the lower wind speeds. • The proposed VAWT configuration is able to work in a wide range of wind speeds. - Abstract: Renewable sources of energy, needed because of the increasing price of fossil derivatives, global warming and energy market instabilities, have led to an increasing interest in wind energy. Among the different typologies, small scale Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) present the greatest potential for off grid power generation at low wind speeds. In the present work, wind tunnel investigations about the performance of an innovative configuration of straight-blades Darrieus-style vertical axis micro wind turbine, specifically developed for small scale energy conversion at low wind speeds, has been made on scaled models. The micro turbine under investigation consists of three pairs of airfoils. Each pair consists of a main and auxiliary airfoil with different chord lengths. A standard Darrieus configuration, consisting of three single airfoils, was also tested for comparison. The experiments were conducted in a closed circuit open chamber wind tunnel facility available at the Laboratory of Industrial Measurements (LaMI) of the University of Cassino and Lazio Meridionale (UNICLAM). Measured data were reported in terms of dimensionless power and torque coefficients for dynamic performance analysis and static torque coefficient for static performance analysis. The adoption of auxiliary airfoils has demonstrated to give more dynamic torque at the lower wind speeds with respect to a standard Darrieus rotor, resulting in better performance for all the wind speeds considered. In terms of dynamic power coefficient, the standard Darrieus

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 504: 16a-Tunnel Muckpile, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 504, 16a-Tunnel Muckpile. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 504 is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): • 16-06-01, Muckpile • 16-23-01, Contaminated Burial Pit • 16-23-02, Contaminated Area • 16-99-01, Concrete Construction Waste Corrective Action Site 16-23-01 is not a burial pit; it is part of CAS 16-06-01. Therefore, there is not a separate data analysis and assessment for CAS 16-23-01; it is included as part of the assessment for CAS 16-06-01. In addition to these CASs, the channel between CAS 16-23-02 (Contaminated Area) and Mid Valley Road was investigated with walk-over radiological surveys and soil sampling using hand tools. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 504. A CADD was originally submitted for CAU 504 and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). However, following an agreement between NDEP, DTRA, and the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office to change to a risk-based approach for assessing the corrective action investigation (CAI) data, NDEP agreed that the CAU could be re-evaluated using the risk-based approach and a CADD/CR prepared to close the site.

  1. Drop test and crash simulation of a civil airplane fuselage section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaochuan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Crashworthiness of a civil airplane fuselage section was studied in this paper. Firstly, the failure criterion of a rivet was studied by test, showing that the ultimate tension and shear failure loads were obviously affected by the loading speed. The relations between the loading speed and the average ultimate shear, tension loads were expressed by two logarithmic functions. Then, a vertical drop test of a civil airplane fuselage section was conducted with an actual impact velocity of 6.85 m/s, meanwhile the deformation of cabin frame and the accelerations at typical locations were measured. The finite element model of a main fuselage structure was developed and validated by modal test, and the error between the calculated frequencies and the test ones of the first four modes were less than 5%. Numerical simulation of the drop test was performed by using the LS-DYNA code and the simulation results show a good agreement with that of drop test. Deforming mode of the analysis was the same as the drop test; the maximum average rigid acceleration in test was 8.81g while the calculated one was 9.17g, with an error of 4.1%; average maximum test deformation at four points on the front cabin floor was 420 mm, while the calculated one was 406 mm, with an error of 3.2%; the peak value of the calculated acceleration at a typical location was 14.72g, which is lower than the test result by 5.46%; the calculated rebound velocity result was greater than the test result 17.8% and energy absorption duration was longer than the test result by 5.73%.

  2. The use of wind tunnel facilities to estimate hydrodynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kristoffer; Tophøj Rasmussen, Johannes; Hansen, Svend Ole; Reiso, Marit; Isaksen, Bjørn; Egeberg Aasland, Tale

    2016-03-01

    Experimental laboratory testing of vortex-induced structural oscillations in flowing water is an expensive and time-consuming procedure, and the testing of high Reynolds number flow regimes is complicated due to the requirement of either a large-scale or high-speed facility. In most cases, Reynolds number scaling effects are unavoidable, and these uncertainties have to be accounted for, usually by means of empirical rules-of-thumb. Instead of performing traditional hydrodynamic measurements, wind tunnel testing in an appropriately designed experimental setup may provide an alternative and much simpler and cheaper framework for estimating the structural behavior under water current and wave loading. Furthermore, the fluid velocities that can be obtained in a wind tunnel are substantially higher than in a water testing facility, thus decreasing the uncertainty from scaling effects. In a series of measurements, wind tunnel testing has been used to investigate the static response characteristics of a circular and a rectangular section model. Motivated by the wish to estimate the vortex-induced in-line vibration characteristics of a neutrally buoyant submerged marine structure, additional measurements on extremely lightweight, helium-filled circular section models were conducted in a dynamic setup. During the experiment campaign, the mass of the model was varied in order to investigate how the mass ratio influences the vibration amplitude. The results show good agreement with both aerodynamic and hydrodynamic experimental results documented in the literature.

  3. Tunnel sealing: concept and feasibility evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, R.P.; Eppinger, G.; Mettler, K.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses first the aim and purpose of tunnel seals as well as the requirements which should be satisfied. The basic seal concept is a zoned plug consisting of key zones and intermediate zones. The key zones act as barrier elements and will be placed into sections of competent and sound rock. The main function of the intermediate zones is that of a support and the requirements for sealing efficiency may be somewhat relaxed. Three sealing concepts have been devised for both the key zones and the intermediate zones. They differ in the materials used for the seal and in the placement method. For the key zones highly compacted bentonite is recommended, but also cement-based materials, such as standard concrete or prepact concrete are considered suitable. For the intermediate zones, the use of pumped concrete with subsequent grouting of the roof zone is favourable, but also a combination of concrete with a sand/gravel mixture or with properly compacted excavation material is feasible. The concepts introduced can all be realized by conventional tunnelling methods. Excavation by tunnel boring machine is most advantageous as it minimizes disturbance of the rock caused by the cavity-forming process. By employing simple material models, it can be shown that the depth of the excavation disturbed zone can be minimized if support of the tunnel is provided as early as possible after excavation. The cutting of a groove in the tunnel wall along the key zone can further contribute to reduce the depth of the excavation-disturbed zone. In order to ensure the quality of a seal, the quantities of the materials used can be checked and the work procedures to place the seal can be supervised. For the latter the experiences obtained from a large-scale test should be available. Finally, it is also shown that when considering safety analytical aspects, the proposed sealing concepts represent adequate solutions in spite of the probably increased permeability in the excavation

  4. Development of a Test to Evaluate Aerothermal Response of Materials to Hypersonic Flow Using a Scramjet Wind Tunnel (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    prevent the possible slip of the sample within the dovetail. The dovetail holder was made of inconel and was attached to the tube by TIG welding . Moni...Composite Materials and Processing Section Composite Materials and Processing Section Composite Branch...dovetail ( welded ) 0.775" 0.156" hole Coolant (water) Set screws 0.625" OD 0.049" wall TBC Cooled metallic holder Ceramic TC Fig. 4. Schematic sketches of

  5. Wind-Tunnel Tests of Ailerons at Various Speeds. 1 - Ailerons of 0.20 Airfoil Chord and Tube Contour with 0.35 Aileron-Chord Extreme Blunt Nose Balance on the NACA 66,2-216 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1943-06-01

    which includes effectelof boundary layer at the tunnel wall and of gaps at the ends of the aileron as well as the effects of any cross flow over the...the gap width cauaed a d? urease in the slope except at the highest speed tested where an increase in gap resulted in an increase in the slope. Figure 13

  6. Installation in the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The SPS tunnel is 6910 m in circumference and has a cross section of 4 m inner diameter. It is situated at an elevation of 400 m above sea level at a depth below the surface varying between 23 and 65 m. Its walls are lined with a concrete shell of about 30 cm thickness. See also 7410043X

  7. Design and optimization of resistance wire electric heater for hypersonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Khurram; Malik, Afzaal M.; Khan, I. J.; Hassan, Jehangir

    2012-06-01

    The range of flow velocities of high speed wind tunnels varies from Mach 1.0 to hypersonic order. In order to achieve such high speed flows, a high expansion nozzle is employed in the converging-diverging section of wind tunnel nozzle. The air for flow is compressed and stored in pressure vessels at temperatures close to ambient conditions. The stored air is dried and has minimum amount of moisture level. However, when this air is expanded rapidly, its temperature drops significantly and liquefaction conditions can be encountered. Air at near room temperature will liquefy due to expansion cooling at a flow velocity of more than Mach 4.0 in a wind tunnel test section. Such liquefaction may not only be hazardous to the model under test and wind tunnel structure; it may also affect the test results. In order to avoid liquefaction of air, a pre-heater is employed in between the pressure vessel and the converging-diverging section of a wind tunnel. A number of techniques are being used for heating the flow in high speed wind tunnels. Some of these include the electric arc heating, pebble bed electric heating, pebble bed natural gas fired heater, hydrogen burner heater, and the laser heater mechanisms. The most common are the pebble bed storage type heaters, which are inefficient, contaminating and time consuming. A well designed electrically heating system can be efficient, clean and simple in operation, for accelerating the wind tunnel flow up to Mach 10. This paper presents CFD analysis of electric preheater for different configurations to optimize its design. This analysis has been done using ANSYS 12.1 FLUENT package while geometry and meshing was done in GAMBIT.

  8. Study of the thermal and hydraulic phenomena occurring during power excursion on a heated test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyer, M.

    1969-01-01

    The thermal and hydrodynamic phenomena occurring during a power excursion were studied in an out-of-pile loop with a water cooled channel at low pressure (1 to 4 atm. abs. ). Circular and rectangular test sections with electrically heated walls of two different thermal diffusivity materials(aluminium and stainless steel) were used. The rectangular test sections were 600 mm long, 35 mm wide and had a 2, 9 mm gap; they simulate two half plates of the M.T.R. fuel element. Natural or forced convection are possible in the test section; the water height above it can be varied from 2.8 to 8 meters and the maximum allowed pressure at its outlet is 4 atm. abs.The heating source is a series of lead batteries which is able to generate, for short periods of time, 85 volts and 25000 amperes; linear, square or exponential power rise versus time can be realized. A 14 channels tape recorder (0-10 000 Hz bandwidth; is used for the measurements of temperature (8/100 mm diameter thermocouple), pressure ('Statham' pressure transducers) and void fraction (X rays). More than 500 tests have been carried out. The influence of the initial water temperature, flow rate, pressure, water height on the water ejections, pressure variations and void fraction in the test section were studied. Tests with energies up to 3000 W/cm in 50 milliseconds were attempted. The energy above which the instabilities appear was determined. An interpretation of the observed phenomena and a simplified theoretical model are presented [fr

  9. Reliability of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) and BESTest sections for adults with hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Letícia C.; Marques, Aline P.; Barros, Paula B.; Michaelsen, Stella M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) was recently created to allow the development of treatments according to the specific balance system affected in each patient. The Brazilian version of the BESTest has not been specifically tested after stroke. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the intra- and inter-rater reliability and concurrent and convergent validity of the total score of the BESTest and BESTest sections for adults with hemiparesis after stroke. METHOD: The study included 16 subjects (61.1±7.5 years) with chronic hemiparesis (54.5±43.5 months after stroke). The BESTest was administered by two raters in the same week and one of the raters repeated the test after a one-week interval. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to assess intra- and interrater reliability. Concurrent validity with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and convergent validity with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC-Brazil) were assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. RESULTS: Both the BESTest total score (ICC=0.98) and the BESTest sections (ICC between 0.85 and 0.96) have excellent intrarater reliability. Interrater reliability for the total score was excellent (ICC=0.93) and, for the sections, it ranged between 0.71 and 0.94. The correlation coefficient between the BESTest and the BBS and ABC-Brazil were 0.78 and 0.59, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian version of the BESTest demonstrated adequate reliability when measured by sections and could identify what balance system was affected in patients after stroke. Concurrent validity was excellent with the BBS total score and good to excellent with the sections. The total scores but not the sections present adequate convergent validity with the ABC-Brazil. However, other psychometric properties should be further investigated. PMID:25003281

  10. Results of flutter test OS6 obtained using the 0.14-scale wing/elevon model (54-0) in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter wing was tested in the Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Dynamics Wind Tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and elevon buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between 0.3 and 1.1 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 54-0 was utilized for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  11. Results of flutter test OS7 obtained using the 0.14-scale space shuttle orbiter fin/rudder model number 55-0 in the NASA LaRC 16-foot transonic dynamics wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A 0.14-scale dynamically scaled model of the space shuttle orbiter vertical tail was tested in a 16-foot transonic dynamic wind tunnel to determine flutter, buffet, and rudder buzz boundaries. Mach numbers between .5 and 1.11 were investigated. Rockwell shuttle model 55-0 was used for this investigation. A description of the test procedure, hardware, and results of this test is presented.

  12. How do people respond to self-test results? A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Nanne K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-tests, tests on medical conditions that can be performed by consumers without consulting a doctor first, are frequently used. Nevertheless, there are concerns about the safety of self-testing, as it may delay diagnosis and appropriate treatment in the case of inappropriate use of the test, or false-negative results. It is unclear whether self-tests stimulate appropriate follow-up behaviour. Our aim was to examine the frequency of self-test use, consumers' response to self-test results in terms of their confidence in the result, reassurance by the test result, and follow-up behaviour. Methods A two step cross-sectional survey was designed. A random sample of 6700 Internet users in an existing Internet panel received an online questionnaire on the use of self-tests. Self-tests were defined as tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim to diagnose a disease or risk factor. A second questionnaire on consumers' response to self-test results was sent to the respondents that were identified as a self-tester in the first questionnaire (n = 703. Results 18.1% (799/4416 of the respondents had ever performed a self-test, the most frequently used tests being those for diabetes (5.3%, kidney disease (4.9%, cholesterol (4.5%, urinary tract infection (1.9% and HIV/AIDS and Chlamydia (both 1.6%. A total of 78.1% of the testers with a normal test result and 81.4% of those with an abnormal result reported confidence in this result. Almost all (95.6% of the testers with a normal result felt reassured. After a normal result, 78.1% did not take any further action and 5.8% consulted a doctor. The corresponding figures after an abnormal test result were 9.3% and 72.2%, respectively. Conclusions Respondents who had performed a self-test seemed to base their follow-up behaviour on the result of the test. They had confidence in the test result, and were often reassured by a normal result. After an abnormal result, most self

  13. Enhanced MRI in carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsuhiko; Nakane, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Asai, Takahiro; Wada, Kunio; Yoshizawa, Hidezo

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we performed contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome and examined the morphologic change in the carpal tunnel. In the transverse section of the opening of carpal tunnel where scaphoid and pisiform bones are figured out, we measured and examined 4 items, viz. the soft carpal tunnel volume, flat rate of median nerve, position of median nerve and thickness of palmer ligaments composing the base of carpal tunnel, with an image analyzer attached to the MRI apparatus. Whereas the average carpal tunnel volume in 12 hands of normal controls was 166.8 mm 2 , that in 74 hands of carpal tunnel syndrome was 207.2 mm 2 , a significant increase compared with the normal controls. The flat rate of median nerve was 46% in the controls, but that was 37.5% in the carpal tunnel syndrome, a significant flattening was noted. We connected the peaks of the scaphoid node and pisiform bone with a line and named it standard line. When we observed the position of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, the nerve in 9 of 12 hands, 75%, lay below the standard line in the controls, but the nerve in 65 of 74 hands, 87.8%, lay above the standard line in the carpal tunnel syndrome, clearly showing that the median nerve had shifted to the palmar side. Regarding these morphologic changes of the carpal tunnel, the internal pressure of the carpal tunnel is considered to be raised with swelling of the soft tissues mainly composing the inside of carpal tunnel, thus the area of cross section of carpal tunnel to be increased, the median nerve to be shifted to the palmar side and the median nerve to be compressed by the transverse carpal ligament at that time. Although we can observe these morphological changes readily in MRI images, these images show only the results of carpal tunnel syndrome after all, and do not specify the direct causes. However, we believe that these facts are important factors in the manifestation of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome. (author)

  14. Computer graphic of LHC in the tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    A computer-generated image of the LHC particle accelerator at CERN in the tunnel originally built for the LEP accelerator that was closed in 2000. The cross-section of an LHC superconducting dipole magnet is also seen.

  15. A Top Pilot Tunnel Preconditioning Method for the Prevention of Extremely Intense Rockbursts in Deep Tunnels Excavated by TBMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanqing; Feng, Xiating; Zhou, Hui; Qiu, Shili; Wu, Wenping

    2012-05-01

    The headrace tunnels at the Jinping II Hydropower Station cross the Jinping Mountain with a maximum overburden depth of 2,525 m, where 80% of the strata along the tunnels consist of marble. A number of extremely intense rockbursts occurred during the excavation of the auxiliary tunnels and the drainage tunnel. In particular, a tunnel boring machine (TBM) was destroyed by an extremely intense rockburst in a 7.2-m-diameter drainage tunnel. Two of the four subsequent 12.4-m-diameter headrace tunnels will be excavated with larger size TBMs, where a high risk of extremely intense rockbursts exists. Herein, a top pilot tunnel preconditioning method is proposed to minimize this risk, in which a drilling and blasting method is first recommended for the top pilot tunnel excavation and support, and then the TBM excavation of the main tunnel is conducted. In order to evaluate the mechanical effectiveness of this method, numerical simulation analyses using the failure approaching index, energy release rate, and excess shear stress indices are carried out. Its construction feasibility is discussed as well. Moreover, a microseismic monitoring technique is used in the experimental tunnel section for the real-time monitoring of the microseismic activities of the rock mass in TBM excavation and for assessing the effect of the top pilot tunnel excavation in reducing the risk of rockbursts. This method is applied to two tunnel sections prone to extremely intense rockbursts and leads to a reduction in the risk of rockbursts in TBM excavation.

  16. Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Conversion Research at UNH: From Fundamental Studies of Hydrofoil Sections, to Moderate Reynolds Number Turbine Tests in a Tow Tank, to Open Water Deployments at Tidal Energy Test Sites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.; Nedyalkov, I.; Rowell, M.; Dufresne, N.; Lyon, V.

    2013-12-01

    We report on research related to MHK turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy (CORE) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). The research projects span varies scales, levels of complexity and environments - from fundamental studies of hydrofoil sections in a high speed water tunnel, to moderate Reynolds number turbine tests with inflow and wake studies in a large cross-section tow tank, to deployments of highly instrumented process models at tidal energy test sites in New England. A concerted effort over the past few years has brought significant new research infrastructure for marine hydrokinetic energy conversion online at UNH-CORE. It includes: a high-speed cavitation tunnel with independent control of velocity and pressure; a highly accurate tow mechanism, turbine test bed and wake traversing system for the 3.7m x 2.4m cross-section UNH tow tank; a 10.7m x 3.0m tidal energy test platform which can accommodate turbines up to 1.5m in diameter, for deployments at the UNH-CORE Tidal Energy Test Site in Great Bay Estuary, NH, a sheltered 'nursery site' suitable for intermediate scale tidal energy conversion device testing with peak currents typically above 2 m/s during each tidal cycle. Further, a large boundary layer wind tunnel, the new UNH Flow Physics Facility (W6.0m x H2.7m xL72m) is being used for detailed turbine wake studies, producing data and insight also applicable to MHK turbines in low Froude number deployments. Bi-directional hydrofoils, which perform equally well in either flow direction and could avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, are being investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. For selected candidate shapes lift, drag, wake, and cavitation inception/desinence are measured. When combined with a cavitation inception model for MHK turbines, this information can be used to prescribe turbine design/operational parameters. Experiments were performed with a 1m diameter and 1m

  17. Backfilling of deposition tunnels, in situ alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, P.

    2007-04-01

    The backfilling process described in this report is based on in situ compaction of a mixture of bentonite and ballast (30:70) into the deposition tunnel. This method has been tested in practice in various field tests by SKB, most recently in the Prototype repository test performed at Aespoe HRL. The backfill mixture is prepared above ground and transported to the repository level with a tank truck. The material is compacted into layers with an inclination of 35 deg C and a thickness of approximately 20 cm. The compaction is performed with a vibratory plate attached to a boom of an excavator. In order to keep up with the required canister installation rate determined for the Finnish repository, at least 13 layers need to be compacted daily. This means working in 2-3 shifts on the working days that are available for backfilling operations. The dry densities achieved in field tests for the wall/roof section of the backfill have been insufficient compared with the dry density criteria set for the backfill. In theory, it may be possible to reach dry densities that fulfil the criteria, although with a relatively small safety margin. Another open issue is whether the mixture of bentonite and ballast has sufficient self-healing ability to seal-off erosion channels after the tunnels have been closed and the backfill has reached full saturation. (orig.)

  18. Benchmark experiments to test plutonium and stainless steel cross sections. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenquin, U.P.; Bierman, S.R.

    1978-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) commissioned Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to ascertain the accuracy of the neutron cross sections for the isotopes of plutonium and the constituents of stainless steel and determine if improvements can be made in application to criticality safety analysis. NRC's particular area of interest is in the transportation of light-water reactor spent fuel assemblies. The project was divided into two tasks. The first task was to define a set of integral experimental measurements (benchmarks). The second task is to use these benchmarks in neutronics calculations such that the accuracy of ENDF/B-IV plutonium and stainless steel cross sections can be assessed. The results of the first task are given in this report. A set of integral experiments most pertinent to testing the cross sections has been identified and the code input data for calculating each experiment has been developed

  19. ONKALO 3D tunnel seismic investigations at Olkiluoto in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosma, C.; Enescu, N.; Balu, L.; Jacome, M.

    2011-02-01

    POSIVA Oy conducts bedrock investigations at the spent nuclear fuel final disposal site at Olkiluoto, in western Finland. The excavation of the access tunnel to the repository hosts the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility. The investigations carried out at ONKALO focus on the bedrock and groundwater conditions prevailing on the final disposal site and how construction work affects them. Tunnel seismic investigations were carried out in July 2009, as an extension of similar work performed in December 2007. The main objective of the tunnel seismic investigations have been to demonstrate the possibility to detect, locate and image cost effectively steeply and gently dipping fractures, at the side and/or below the tunnel and to characterize the volume of rock surrounding a 250 m long segment of the ONKALO tunnel. The survey was conducted at a depth of 350 m, over a 240 m long line of 3-components receivers, spaced at 3m intervals. Seismic signals were produced along two lines, on the tunnel wall and floor, with source points spaced at 1m. A timedistributed swept-impact, the Vibsist-250 hydraulic source, was used. The source was hosted on a mini excavator. Receiver holes approximately 0.4 m deep were drilled prior to the survey, horizontally into the tunnel wall. One of the procedures used for data stacking and migration is based on a proprietary method combining the DMO (Dip Move Out) correction and an expression of the Radon Transform. Horizontal and vertical migrated profiles were computed both for the P wave and S wave reflected wave fields. A true 3D migration technique (Image Point migration) was used to create 3D migrated sections oriented to incremental azimuths around the tunnel, the result being a cylindrical imaging volume. A general conclusion is that seismic surveys along the tunnel can economically be used for rock mass characterization. High quality results can be obtained by operations in tunnel working conditions, provided that due

  20. Equilibrium quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Maganas, A.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the fully developed quality and mass flux distributions in an adiabatic three-subchannel test section. The three subchannels had the geometrical characteristics of the corner, side, and interior subchannels of a boiling water reactor (BWR-5) rod bundle. Data collected with Refrigerant-114 at pressures ranging from 7 to 14 bars, simulating operation with water in the range 55 to 103 bars are reported. The average mass flux and quality in the test section were in the ranges 1,300 to 1,750 kg/m 2 · s and -0.03 to 0.25, respectively. The data are analyzed and presented in various forms

  1. Transient and steady-state flows in shock tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, K. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany); Jacobs, P.A. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Thomas, A.; McIntyre, T.J. [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD. (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1999-12-01

    Due to the difficulty of measuring all necessary flow quantities in the nozzle reservoir and the test section of high enthalpy shock tunnels, indirect computational methods are necessary to estimate the required flow parameters. In addition to steady state flow computations of the nozzle flow and the flow past wind tunnel models it is necessary to investigate the transient flow in the facility in order to achieve a better understanding of its performance. These transient effects include the nozzle starting flow, the interaction of the shock tube boundary layers and the reflected shock, thermal losses in the shock reflection region and the developing boundary layers in the expanding section of the nozzle. Additionally, the nonequilibrium chemical and thermal relaxation models which are used to compute high enthalpy flows have to be validated with appropriate experimental data. (orig.)

  2. Transient and steady-state flows in shock tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, K. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany)); Jacobs, P.A. (Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Thomas, A.; McIntyre, T.J. (Queensland Univ., Brisbane, QLD. (Australia). Dept. of Physics)

    1999-01-01

    Due to the difficulty of measuring all necessary flow quantities in the nozzle reservoir and the test section of high enthalpy shock tunnels, indirect computational methods are necessary to estimate the required flow parameters. In addition to steady state flow computations of the nozzle flow and the flow past wind tunnel models it is necessary to investigate the transient flow in the facility in order to achieve a better understanding of its performance. These transient effects include the nozzle starting flow, the interaction of the shock tube boundary layers and the reflected shock, thermal losses in the shock reflection region and the developing boundary layers in the expanding section of the nozzle. Additionally, the nonequilibrium chemical and thermal relaxation models which are used to compute high enthalpy flows have to be validated with appropriate experimental data. (orig.)

  3. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula.

  4. Sectional pipeline bundles. Design, fabrication and testing of a subsea pipeline connection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The tests of the prototype system indicated that the system is applicable for connecting pipeline bundle sections. The overall performance of the system is therefore concluded to be satisfactory. Some modifications are required though, for improving the reliability of the system to the level required for offshore North Sea application. The tests showed that connection of the pipeline bundle sections can be performed for alignment tolerances larger than those expected during a typical subsea installation. Pull-in of bundle end sections can be performed with pull-in wires deployed from surface. The offshore tests showed that handling of wires must be done with great care to avoid possibility for wire entanglement, especially if a fully diverless system is to be used. The flowline connection tool was found to be suitable for final alignment of the individual spool ends. It was demonstrated that face to face contact between the hub faces in the connector was obtained after tie-in. Pressure tests showed that the connector could be sealed by the tie-in force applied by the connection tool tie-in system. However, the standard connector clamp which was used, was found to be insuficient for maintaining the connector effectively sealed after removal of the pull-in force applied by the connection tool. Based on the results proposals for improvements of the system are included. Improvements are applicable to the current system for connection of bundle sections or for tie-in operations, relating to conventional pipelines. The improvements also includes a strong connection clamp suitable for subsea use. The connection clamp will replace the standard clamp devise used in this project. (au) EFP-96. 41 refs.

  5. Fracture toughness testing of core from the Cambro-Ordovician Section on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemiszki, P.J.; Landes, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The modified ring test was used to determine the mode I fracture toughness of bedrock cores from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. Low porosity sandstones, limestones, and dolostones from the lower part of the Paleozoic section in Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheets were sampled. In general, the average mode I fracture toughness decreases from sandstone, dolostone, and limestone. The fracture toughness of the limestones varies between rock units, which is related to different sedimentologic characteristics. Quality of results was evaluated by testing cores of Berea Sandstone and Indiana Limestone, which produced results similar to published results

  6. Thermal response test data of five quadratic cross section precast pile heat exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi-Pagola, Maria

    2018-06-01

    This data article comprises records from five Thermal Response Tests (TRT) of quadratic cross section pile heat exchangers. Pile heat exchangers, typically referred to as energy piles, consist of traditional foundation piles with embedded heat exchanger pipes. The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Comparing heat flow models for interpretation of precast quadratic pile heat exchanger thermal response tests" (Alberdi-Pagola et al., 2018) [1]. The TRT data consists of measured inlet and outlet temperatures, fluid flow and injected heat rate recorded every 10 min. The field dataset is made available to enable model verification studies.

  7. Improving clinical cognitive testing: report of the AAN Behavioral Neurology Section Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffner, Kirk R; Gale, Seth A; Barrett, A M; Boeve, Bradley F; Chatterjee, Anjan; Coslett, H Branch; D'Esposito, Mark; Finney, Glen R; Gitelman, Darren R; Hart, John J; Lerner, Alan J; Meador, Kimford J; Pietras, Alison C; Voeller, Kytja S; Kaufer, Daniel I

    2015-09-08

    To evaluate the evidence basis of single-domain cognitive tests frequently used by behavioral neurologists in an effort to improve the quality of clinical cognitive assessment. Behavioral Neurology Section members of the American Academy of Neurology were surveyed about how they conduct clinical cognitive testing, with a particular focus on the Neurobehavioral Status Exam (NBSE). In contrast to general screening cognitive tests, an NBSE consists of tests of individual cognitive domains (e.g., memory or language) that provide a more comprehensive diagnostic assessment. Workgroups for each of 5 cognitive domains (attention, executive function, memory, language, and spatial cognition) conducted evidence-based reviews of frequently used tests. Reviews focused on suitability for office-based clinical practice, including test administration time, accessibility of normative data, disease populations studied, and availability in the public domain. Demographic and clinical practice data were obtained from 200 respondents who reported using a wide range of cognitive tests. Based on survey data and ancillary information, between 5 and 15 tests in each cognitive domain were reviewed. Within each domain, several tests are highlighted as being well-suited for an NBSE. We identified frequently used single-domain cognitive tests that are suitable for an NBSE to help make informed choices about clinical cognitive assessment. Some frequently used tests have limited normative data or have not been well-studied in common neurologic disorders. Utilizing standardized cognitive tests, particularly those with normative data based on the individual's age and educational level, can enhance the rigor and utility of clinical cognitive assessment. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Critical Heat Flux Experiments on the Reactor Vessel Wall Using 2-D Slice Test Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won-Pil

    2005-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer wall was measured using the two-dimensional slice test section. The radius and the channel area of the test section were 2.5 m and 10 cm x 15 cm, respectively. The flow channel area and the heater width were smaller than those of the ULPU experiments, but the radius was greater than that of the ULPU. The CHF data under the inlet subcooling of 2 to 25 deg. C and the mass flux 0 to 300 kg/m 2 .s had been acquired. The measured CHF value was generally slightly lower than that of the ULPU. The difference possibly comes from the difference of the test section material and the thickness. However, the general trend of CHF according to the mass flux was similar with that of the ULPU. The experimental CHF data were compared with the predicted values by SULTAN correlation. The SULTAN correlation predicted well this study's data only for the mass flux higher than 200 kg/m 2 .s, and for the exit quality lower than 0.05. The local condition-based correlation was developed, and it showed good prediction capability for broad quality (-0.01 to 0.5) and mass flux ( 2 .s) conditions with a root-mean-square error of 2.4%. There were increases in the CHF with trisodium phosphate-added water

  9. Evaluation of mechanical design fire brick at test section on the HeaTiNG-02

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedy Haryanto; Riswan Djambiar; Sagino; Edy Sumarno

    2013-01-01

    The activity was carried out due to the modification of the heating in the HeaTiNG-02 test section. Modification of the heater needs to be done to overcome the obstacles that arise as part of the test section is used. Constraint that often arises is the fall of the heating source with super khantal material when it reaches a certain temperature. To mitigate the super khantal position is initially converted into a vertical position horizontal. The change from vertical to horizontal position on super khantal cause any deformities in refractory fire brick which serves as a support super khantal. Manufacture of refractory design fire brick formation and mechanical strength evaluation performed using CATIA V5 R20 software. Evaluation of fireproof rock mechanics to be based on the mechanical properties of alumina as a refractory material of fire brick. The results of the analysis have a fire brick design stress greater than the bend strength alumina materials, so that the necessary checks before and after the experiment as well as the replacement of refractory fire brick if something is broken. Translational greatest displacement 0.453 mm at a temperature of 1575 K did not give any meaningful form. Thus the refractory fire brick design can be used as heating source support in the HeaTiNG-02 test section with checks before and after the operation. (author)

  10. Comprehensive surface geophysical investigation of karst caves ahead of the tunnel face: A case study in the Xiaoheyan section of the water supply project from Songhua River, Jilin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Liu; Zhengyu, Liu; Shucai, Li; Lichao, Nie; Maoxin, Su; Huaifeng, Sun; Kerui, Fan; Xinxin, Zhang; Yonghao, Pang

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the application of a comprehensive surface geophysical investigation of underground karst systems ahead of the tunnel face in the Xiaoheyan section in the main line of the water supply project from Songhua River, located in Jilin, China. To make an accurate investigation, Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography (S-ERT), Transient Electromagnetic Method (TEM), Geological Drilling (Geo-D) and Three-dimensional Cross-hole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (3D cross-hole ERT) were applied to gain a comprehensive interpretation. To begin with, S-ERT and TEM are adopted to detect and delineate the underground karst zone. Based on the detection results, surface and in-tunnel Geo-D are placed in major areas with more specific and accurate information gained. After that, survey lines of 3D cross-hole ERT are used to conduct detailed exploration towards underground karst system. In the comprehensive investigation, it is the major question to make the best of prior information so as to promote the quality of detection. The paper has put forward strategies to make the full use of effective information in data processing and the main ideas of those strategies include: (1) Take the resistivity distribution of the subsurface stratum gained by S-ERT inversion as the initial model of TEM inversion; (2) Arrange borehole positions with the results of S-ERT and TEM. After that, gain more accurate information about resistivity of subsurface stratum using those boreholes located; (3) Through the comprehensive analysis of the information about S-ERT, TEM and Geo-D, set the initial model of 3D cross-hole resistivity inversion and meanwhile, gain the variation range of stratum resistivity. At last, a 3D cross-hole resistivity inversion based on the incorporated initial model and inequality constraint is conducted. Constrained inversion and joint interpretation are realized by the effective use of prior information in comprehensive investigation, helping to suppress

  11. Wind tunnel tests of biodegradable fugitive dust suppressants being considered to reduce soil erosion by wind at radioactive waste construction sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Dennis, G.W.; Bushaw, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed of three fugitive dust control agents derived from potato and sugar beet products. These materials are being considered for use as dust suppressants to reduce the potential for transport of radioactive materials by wind from radioactive waste construction and remediation sites. Soil and dust control agent type, solution concentrations, application quantities, aging (or drying) conditions, surface disturbance, and wind and saltating sand eolian erosive stresses were selected and controlled to simulate application and exposure of excavated soil surfaces in the field. A description of the tests, results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this report. The results of this study indicate that all three dust control agents can protect exposed soil surfaces from extreme eolian stresses. It is also clear that the interaction and performance of each agent with various soil types may differ dramatically. Thus, soils similar to that received from ML should be best protected by high concentration (∼2.5%) solutions of potato starch at low water application levels (∼1 to 2 L/m 2 ). Because the effectiveness of PS on this soil type is degraded after a moderate amount of simulated rainfall, other options or additives should be considered if surfaces are to be protected for long intervals or during periods of intermittent rainfall and hot, windy conditions. On the other hand, XDCA should be considered when excavating sandy soils. It should be noted, however, that because the Hanford soil test results are based on a small number of tests, it would be prudent to perform additional tests prior to selecting a fugitive dust control agent for use at the Hanford Site. While fermented potato waste was not the best fixative used on either soil, it did perform reasonably well on both soil types (better than XDCA on Idaho soil and better than PS on Hanford soil)

  12. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  13. Transonic control effectiveness for full and partial span elevon configurations on a 0.0165 scale model space shuttle orbiter tested in the LaRC 8-foot transonic wind tunnel (LA48)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A transonic pressure tunnel test is reported on an early version of the space shuttle orbiter (designated 089B-139) 0.0165 scale model to systematically determine both longitudinal and lateral control effectiveness associated with various combinations of inboard, outboard, and full span wing trailing edge controls. The test was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.08 at angles of attack from -2 deg to 23 deg at 0 deg sideslip.

  14. 11 Foot Unitary Plan Tunnel Facility Optical Improvement Large Window Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Veronica M.

    2015-01-01

    The test section of the 11 by 11-foot Unitary Plan Transonic Wind Tunnel (11-foot UPWT) may receive an upgrade of larger optical windows on both the North and South sides. These new larger windows will provide better access for optical imaging of test article flow phenomena including surface and off body flow characteristics. The installation of these new larger windows will likely produce a change to the aerodynamic characteristics of the flow in the Test Section. In an effort understand the effect of this change, a computational model was employed to predict the flows through the slotted walls, in the test section and around the model before and after the tunnel modification. This report documents the solid CAD model that was created and the inviscid computational analysis that was completed as a preliminary estimate of the effect of the changes.

  15. Optimised design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of the IFMIF/HFTM test section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Lang, K.H.; Moeslang, A.; Schleisiek, K.; Slobodtchouk, V.; Stratmanns, E.

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of previous concepts, analyses and experiments, the high flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) was further optimised. The work focused on the design and the thermal hydraulic analysis of the HFTM section containing the material specimens to be irradiated, the ''test section'', with the main objective to improve the concept with respect to the optimum use of the available irradiation volume and to the temperature of the specimens. Particular emphasis was laid on the application of design principles which assure stable and reproducible thermal conditions. The present work has confirmed the feasibility and suitability of the optimised design of the HFTM test section with chocolate plate like shaped rigs. In particular it has been shown that the envisaged irradiation temperatures can be reached with acceptable temperature differences inside the specimen stack. The latter can be achieved only by additional electrical heating of the axial ends of the capsules. Division of the heater in three sections with separate power supply and control units is necessary. Maintaining of the temperatures during beam-off periods likewise requires electrical heating. The required electrical heaters - mineral isolated wires - are commercially available. The potential of the CFD code STAR-CD for the thermal hydraulic analysis of complex systems like the HFTM was confirmed. Nevertheless, experimental confirmation is desirable. Suitable experiments are under preparation. To verify the assumptions made on the thermal conductivity of the contact faces and layers between the two shells of the rig, dedicated experiments are suggested. The present work must be complemented by a thermal mechanical analysis of the module. Most critical component in this respect seems to be the rig wall. Furthermore, it will be necessary to investigate the response of the HFTM to power transients, and to determine the requirements

  16. Optimised design and thermal-hydraulic analysis of the IFMIF/HFTM test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Lang, K.H.; Moeslang, A.; Schleisiek, K.; Slobodtchouk, V.; Stratmanns, E.

    2003-10-01

    On the basis of previous concepts, analyses and experiments, the high flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) was further optimised. The work focused on the design and the thermal hydraulic analysis of the HFTM section containing the material specimens to be irradiated, the ''test section'', with the main objective to improve the concept with respect to the optimum use of the available irradiation volume and to the temperature of the specimens. Particular emphasis was laid on the application of design principles which assure stable and reproducible thermal conditions. The present work has confirmed the feasibility and suitability of the optimised design of the HFTM test section with chocolate plate like shaped rigs. In particular it has been shown that the envisaged irradiation temperatures can be reached with acceptable temperature differences inside the specimen stack. The latter can be achieved only by additional electrical heating of the axial ends of the capsules. Division of the heater in three sections with separate power supply and control units is necessary. Maintaining of the temperatures during beam-off periods likewise requires electrical heating. The required electrical heaters - mineral isolated wires - are commercially available. The potential of the CFD code STAR-CD for the thermal hydraulic analysis of complex systems like the HFTM was confirmed. Nevertheless, experimental confirmation is desirable. Suitable experiments are under preparation. To verify the assumptions made on the thermal conductivity of the contact faces and layers between the two shells of the rig, dedicated experiments are suggested. The present work must be complemented by a thermal mechanical analysis of the module. Most critical component in this respect seems to be the rig wall. Furthermore, it will be necessary to investigate the response of the HFTM to power transients, and to determine the requirements on the electrical

  17. Lexical patterns in the reading comprehension section of the toefl test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Macmillan

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language is currently one of the most widely accepted English language proficiency tests. Designed by the ETS (Educational Testing Service, the main purpose of the TOEFL is to determine whether the English language skills of a student applying to a North American college or university are adequate for enrollment into the selected program of study. This study will focus upon the third section of the TOEFL, Reading Comprehension, which consists of several passages followed by questions with different testing purposes. An adaptation of Hoey's (1991 analytical system for the analysis of lexical cohesion in authentic texts will be used to identify bonds connecting reading comprehension questions on the test to key excerpts in the passages they are related to. A number of sample reading comprehension questions taken from practice tests produced by the ETS will be analyzed. The analysis will focus on the relationship between the testing purpose of each question and the type(s of lexical link involved in the identification of the correct answer.

  18. Four-Point Bending Strength Testing of Pultruded Fiberglass Composite Wind Turbine Blade Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musial, W.; Bourne, B; Hughes, S; Zuteck, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate strength of the PS Enterprises pultruded blade section was experimentally determined under four-point bending at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Thirteen 8-foot long full-scale blade segments were individually tested to determine their maximum moment carrying capability. Three airfoil-bending configurations were tested: high- and low-pressure skin buckling, and low pressure skin buckling with foam interior reinforcement. Maximum strain was recorded for each sample on the compressive and tensile surfaces of each test blade. Test data are compared to the results of three analytical buckling prediction methods. Based on deviations from the linear strain versus load curve, data indicate a post-buckling region. High-pressure side buckling occurred sooner than low-pressure side buckling. The buckling analyses were conservative for both configurations, but high-pressure side buckling in particular was substantially under-predicted. Both high- and low-pressure buckling configurations had very similar failure loads. These results suggests that a redundant load path may be providing strength to the section in the post-buckling region, making the onset of panel buckling a poor predictor of ultimate strength for the PS Enterprises pultrusion

  19. To test or not to test: A cross-sectional survey of the psychosocial determinants of self-testing for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinant Geert-Jan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although self-tests are increasingly available and widely used, it is not clear whether their use is beneficial to the users, and little is known concerning the determinants of self-test use. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of self-test use for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV, and to examine whether these are similar across these tests. Self-testing was defined as using in-vitro tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a particular disorder, condition, or risk factor for disease. Methods A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted among 513 self-testers and 600 non-testers, assessing possible determinants of self-test use. The structured questionnaire was based on the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Protection Motivation Theory. Data were analyzed by means of logistic regression. Results The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions. Other psychosocial determinants, e.g. gender, cues to action, perceived barriers, subjective norm, and moral obligation, seemed to be more test-specific. Conclusions Psychosocial determinants of self-testing are not identical for all tests and therefore information about self-testing needs to be tailored to a specific test. The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages. Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use.

  20. Damping test results for straight sections of 3-inch and 8-inch unpressurized pipes. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on unpressurized 3-in. and 8-in. Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 33-ft straight sections of piping were supported at the ends. Additionally, intermediate supports comprising spring, rod, and constant-force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers, were used. Excitation was provided by low-force-level hammer impacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 50-ton overhead crane for snapback testing. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This report presents test results showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping.

  1. Damping test results for straight sections of 3-inch and 8-inch unpressurized pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on unpressurized 3-in. and 8-in. Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 33-ft straight sections of piping were supported at the ends. Additionally, intermediate supports comprising spring, rod, and constant-force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers, were used. Excitation was provided by low-force-level hammer impacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 50-ton overhead crane for snapback testing. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This report presents test results showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping

  2. Verification Test for Ultra-Light Deployment Mechanism for Sectioned Deployable Antenna Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Kai; Schmidt, Tilo; Schiller, Marko; Seifart, Klaus; Schmalbach, Matthias; Scolamiero, Lucio

    2013-09-01

    The ultra-light deployment mechanism (UDM) is based on three carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) curved tape springs made of carbon fibre / cyanate ester prepregs.In the frame of the activity its space application suitability for the deployment of solid reflector antenna sections was investigated. A projected diameter of the full reflector of 4 m to 7 m and specific mass in the order of magnitude of 2.6kg/m2 was focused for requirement derivation.Extensive verification tests including health checks, environmental and functional tests were carried out with an engineering model to enable representative characterizing of the UDM unit.This paper presents the design and a technical description of the UDM as well as a summary of achieved development status with respect to test results and possible design improvements.

  3. Wind Tunnel Measurements at Virginia Tech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Andreas; Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    In this section, the wind tunnel configuration used for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic measurement is described. Then, the validation of the method for evaluating far-field noise from surface microphones as described in Section 5 is presented. Finally, the design concept proposed in Section 6 is ve...

  4. BUGLE-93 (ENDF/B-VI) cross-section library data testing using shielding benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; White, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Several integral shielding benchmarks were selected to perform data testing for new multigroup cross-section libraries compiled from the ENDF/B-VI data for light water reactor (LWR) shielding and dosimetry. The new multigroup libraries, BUGLE-93 and VITAMIN-B6, were studied to establish their reliability and response to the benchmark measurements by use of radiation transport codes, ANISN and DORT. Also, direct comparisons of BUGLE-93 and VITAMIN-B6 to BUGLE-80 (ENDF/B-IV) and VITAMIN-E (ENDF/B-V) were performed. Some benchmarks involved the nuclides used in LWR shielding and dosimetry applications, and some were sensitive specific nuclear data, i.e. iron due to its dominant use in nuclear reactor systems and complex set of cross-section resonances. Five shielding benchmarks (four experimental and one calculational) are described and results are presented

  5. The use of wind tunnel facilities to estimate hydrodynamic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    In a series of measurements, wind tunnel testing has been used to investigate the static response characteristics of a circular and a rectangular section model. Motivated by the wish to estimate the vortex-induced in-line vibration characteristics of a neutrally buoyant submerged marine structure, additional measurements on extremely lightweight, helium-filled circular section models were conducted in a dynamic setup. During the experiment campaign, the mass of the model was varied in order to investigate how the mass ratio influences the vibration amplitude. The results show good agreement with both aerodynamic and hydrodynamic experimental results documented in the literature.

  6. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. About 10 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, A; Perrot, P; Truffandier, M V; Bellier-Waast, F; Duteille, F

    2014-06-01

    The carpal tunnel syndrome is a common peripheral neuropathy in adults but is rare in children. We report a series of 10 carpal tunnel syndromes in children. We have supported five children, two males and three females, with a bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. We studied the clinical history (history, symptoms, stage of disease), therapeutic management and remote development. Three children were diagnosed with a mucopolysaccharidosis, the fourth with VATER association. For the last child, it was a form considered idiopathic. Two children were referred for night pains, the others for under-utilization of their first three fingers, two of which had a thenar atrophy. Four children underwent an electromyogram for diagnostic confirmation. We realized open surgical treatment at one time, by section of the carpal ligament. The average age of our patients was 4years. The average decline in the surgical study was 19 months. Postoperatively, we noted, in all patients, complete regression of the painful symptoms, a sensory improvement and recovery of the opposition of the thumb. The scarcity of carpal tunnel syndrome in children and the atypical symptoms may cause diagnostic delay, with serious consequences. We keep vigilant and ready to access to additional tests (electromyogram). For our team, the therapeutic approach is a systematic open surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is a continuous flow wind-tunnel facility capable of speeds up to Mach 1.2 at stagnation pressures up to one atmosphere. The TDT...

  8. Quantum theory of tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Razavy, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    In this revised and expanded edition, in addition to a comprehensible introduction to the theoretical foundations of quantum tunneling based on different methods of formulating and solving tunneling problems, different semiclassical approximations for multidimensional systems are presented. Particular attention is given to the tunneling of composite systems, with examples taken from molecular tunneling and also from nuclear reactions. The interesting and puzzling features of tunneling times are given extensive coverage, and the possibility of measurement of these times with quantum clocks are critically examined. In addition by considering the analogy between evanescent waves in waveguides and in quantum tunneling, the times related to electromagnetic wave propagation have been used to explain certain aspects of quantum tunneling times. These topics are treated in both non-relativistic as well as relativistic regimes. Finally, a large number of examples of tunneling in atomic, molecular, condensed matter and ...

  9. Road and Railroad Tunnels

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Tunnels in the United States According to the HSIP Tiger Team Report, a tunnel is defined as a linear underground passageway open at both ends. This dataset is based...

  10. Groundwater Seepage Estimation into Amirkabir Tunnel Using Analytical Methods and DEM and SGR Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Farhadian; Homayoon Katibeh

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, groundwater seepage into Amirkabir tunnel has been estimated using analytical and numerical methods for 14 different sections of the tunnel. Site Groundwater Rating (SGR) method also has been performed for qualitative and quantitative classification of the tunnel sections. The obtained results of above mentioned methods were compared together. The study shows reasonable accordance with results of the all methods unless for two sections of tunnel. In these t...

  11. Travelling inside the SPS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The golf cart proved to be a very useful form of transport around the 7 km circumference of the machine. It could carry four passengers and pull light equipment in its trailer. Here Peter Zettwoch is the driver along a mock-up tunnel for installation tests. (see photo 7401011X and Photo Archive 7401018)

  12. Longitudinal Acceleration Tests of Overhead Luggage Bins and Auxiliary Fuel Tank in a Transport Airplane Airframe Section

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Robert

    1999-01-01

    This report contains the description and test results of overhead stowage bin calibrations and longitudinal impact testing of a 10-foot transport airframe section conducted at the Transportation Research Center Inc. (TRC...

  13. Longitudinal Acceleration Test of Overhead Luggage Bins and Auxiliary Fuel Tank in a Transport Airplane Airframe Section, Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Robert

    2000-01-01

    This report contains the description and test results of overhead stowage bin calibrations and longitudinal impact testing of a 10-foot transport airframe section conducted at the Transportation Research Center Inc. (TRC...

  14. Geomaterial characterizations of full scale pavement test sections for mechanistic analysis and design

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kwon, J

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available roller compactor. The compaction effort was monitored with nuclear density gauge and DCP measurements taken from each pavement test section. As-built density of each subgrade lift obtained using the nuclear gauge satisfied a minimum relative density... was monitored with a nuclear gauge to maintain a minimum 95% relative compaction in the field. 0 100 200 300 400 500 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 CBR (%) Pe n et ra tio n (m m ) Pe n et ra tio n (m m ) Figure 2...

  15. Thermal response test data of five quadratic cross section precast pile heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alberdi-Pagola

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article comprises records from five Thermal Response Tests (TRT of quadratic cross section pile heat exchangers. Pile heat exchangers, typically referred to as energy piles, consist of traditional foundation piles with embedded heat exchanger pipes. The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Comparing heat flow models for interpretation of precast quadratic pile heat exchanger thermal response tests” (Alberdi-Pagola et al., 2018 [1]. The TRT data consists of measured inlet and outlet temperatures, fluid flow and injected heat rate recorded every 10 min. The field dataset is made available to enable model verification studies.

  16. Testing of the IRDF-90 cross-section library in benchmark neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolthenius, H.J.; Zsolnay, E.M.; Szondi, E.J.

    1993-09-01

    The new version of the International Reactor Dosimetry File IRDF-90 (called ''Version April 1993'') has been tested by calculation of average cross-sections and their uncertainties in a coarse three energy group structure and by neutron spectrum adjustments in reference neutron spectra. This paper presents the results obtained and compares them with the corresponding ones of the old IRDF-85 and with the data of the Nuclear Data Guide for Reactor Neutron Metrology. The applicability of the new library in the field of neutron metrology is discussed. (orig.)

  17. HIV testing and tolerance to gender based violence: a cross-sectional study in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gari

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of social relations and gender-based conflicts on the uptake of HIV testing in the South and Central provinces of Zambia. We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study of 1716 randomly selected individuals. Associations were examined using mixed-effect multivariable logistic regression. A total of 264 men (64% and 268 women (56% had never tested for HIV. The strongest determinants for not being tested were disruptive couple relationships (OR = 2.48 95% CI = 1.00-6.19; tolerance to gender-based violence (OR = 2.10 95% CI = 1.05-4.32 and fear of social rejection (OR = 1.48 95% CI = 1.23-1.80. In the Zambian context, unequal power relationships within the couple and the community seem to play a pivotal role in the decision to test which until now have been largely underestimated. Policies, programs and interventions to rapidly increase HIV testing need to urgently address gender-power inequity in relationships and prevent gender-based violence to reduce the negative impact on the lives of couples and families.

  18. Determination of aerodynamic damping of twin cables in wet conditions through passive-dynamic wind tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mads Beedholm; Mattiello, E.; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2013-01-01

    Moderate amplitude cable vibrations continue to be reported on the cable-stayed Øresund Bridge, despite the presence of helical fillets and dampers. The vibrations are particularly notable in wet conditions, which would suggest a form of rain-wind induced vibrations (RWIV). A statistical...... of the bridge cables. For the wet tests, the twin cable surfaces were treated in order to obtain uniform upper and lower water rivulets. The interaction between water rivulets, surface properties and the flow was found to govern the activation of the RWIV mechanism. The resulting aerodynamic damping from wet...

  19. Heat transfer in the in-pile test section and penetration region of 3-pin fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Park, Kook Nam; Park, Su Ki; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Young Jin

    2003-12-01

    This report studies two types of normal heat transfer. One is the heat loss from the pressure vessel of In-Pile Test Section to HANARO pool water via IPS insulation gas gap. The other is the heat transfer of the Penetration Cooling Water System including the effect of the Foamglas insulator at the penetration region. The heat transfer from IPS insulation gas gap has been performed according to the detail design results from NUKEM. The heat loss also occurs at the concrete penetration region between the HANARO pool water and the FTL pipe gallery. The Foamglas insulator has been already installed at the MCW piping of the penetration region. This insulation effect has been reviewed. The Penetration Cooling Water System has been designed to fulfill the design requirement not to exceed the allowable temperature at the penetration concrete wall. The cooling ability and heat loss of PCW system has been reviewed with the insulation effect.

  20. Results of the 1986 NASA/FAA/DFVLR main rotor test entry in the German-Dutch wind tunnel (DNW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Martin, Ruth M.

    1987-10-01

    An acoustics test of a 40%-scale MBB BO-105 helicopter main rotor was conducted in the Deutsch-Niederlandischer Windkanal (DNW). The research, directed by NASA Langley Research Center, concentrated on the generation and radiation of broadband noise and impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise over ranges of pertinent rotor operational envelopes. Both the broadband and BVI experimental phases are reviewed, along with highlights of major technical results. For the broadband portion, significant advancement is the demonstration of the accuracy of prediction methods being developed for broadband self noise, due to boundary layer turbulence. Another key result is the discovery of rotor blade-wake interaction (BWI) as an important contributor to mid frequency noise. Also the DNW data are used to determine for full scale helicopters the relative importance of the different discrete and broadband noise sources. For the BVI test portion, a comprehensive data base documents the BVI impulsive noise character and directionality as functions of rotor flight conditions. The directional mapping of BVI noise emitted from the advancing side as well as the retreating side of the rotor constitutes a major advancement in the understanding of this dominant discrete mechanism.

  1. Evaluation of dust-related health hazards associated with air coring at G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Ortiz, L.W.; Burton, D.J.; Isom, B.L.; Vigil, E.A.

    1991-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project was established to evaluate the potential for storing high-level radioactive wastes in geologic formations. Hydrologists recommended that drilling or coring in support of characterization tests be performed dry. Dry drilling, or air coring, presents a concern about health protection for the drilling personnel. The rock generally has a high silica content, and natural zeolites are abundant. Some zeolites are fibrous, leading to concerns that inhalation may result in asbestos-like lung diseases. An industrial hygiene study (IH) was conducted as part of an air coring technical feasibility test. The IH study found the potential for exposures to airborne silica and nuisance dusts to be within regulatory requirements and determined the commercial dust control equipment monitored to be effective when used in conjunction with a good area ventilation system and sound IH practices. Fibrous zeolites were not detected. Recommendations for the Yucca Mountain studies are (1) dust collection and control equipment equivalent or superior to that monitored must be used for any dry drilling activity and must be used with good general dilution ventilation and local exhaust ventilation provided on major emission sources; (2) good industrial hygiene work practices must be implemented, including monitoring any area where zeolitic fibers are suspect; and (3) a study should be conducted to determine the biological effects of the fibrous zeolite, mordenite. 25 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Review Report on the Design of In-Pile Test Section(IPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Park, Kook Nam; Shim, Bong Sik; Lee, Chung Young; Chi, Dae Young; Park, Su Ki; Ahn, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Ki; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2009-01-01

    The In-Pile Test Section(IPS) accommodating fuel pins has loaded IR-1 hole in HANARO has double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 deg. C, 17.5 MPa and is composed of outer assembly and inner assembly. Dummy fuel, dummy fuel supports and Top flange are the main components in inner assembly and inner pressure vessel, outer pressure vessel and head are the components in outer assembly. The IPS at current status has dummy fuels and confirm the requirements for the IPS design improvements during the design, manufacturing and installation process. Head, Top Flange, Instrumentation Feed through, Lifting Eye, Fuel Carrier Leg, Retainer and Nozzle cover are the main parts that the design needs to be changed. This report suggest the needs for the IPS design modification and it would be reflected to the new IPS design which would accommodating test fuel pins

  3. Review Report on the Design of In-Pile Test Section(IPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Park, Kook Nam; Shim, Bong Sik; Lee, Chung Young; Chi, Dae Young; Park, Su Ki; Ahn, Sung Ho; Kim, Young Ki; Lee, Kye Hong; Kim, Kwan Hyun

    2009-01-15

    The In-Pile Test Section(IPS) accommodating fuel pins has loaded IR-1 hole in HANARO has double pressure vessel for the design conditions of 350 deg. C, 17.5 MPa and is composed of outer assembly and inner assembly. Dummy fuel, dummy fuel supports and Top flange are the main components in inner assembly and inner pressure vessel, outer pressure vessel and head are the components in outer assembly. The IPS at current status has dummy fuels and confirm the requirements for the IPS design improvements during the design, manufacturing and installation process. Head, Top Flange, Instrumentation Feed through, Lifting Eye, Fuel Carrier Leg, Retainer and Nozzle cover are the main parts that the design needs to be changed. This report suggest the needs for the IPS design modification and it would be reflected to the new IPS design which would accommodating test fuel pins.

  4. Numerical prediction of shock induced oscillations over a 2D airfoil: Influence of turbulence modelling and test section walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiery, Mylene [Aerodynamics and Energetics Modelling Department, Turbulence Modelling and Prediction Unit, ONERA Toulouse, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Coustols, Eric [Aerodynamics and Energetics Modelling Department, Turbulence Modelling and Prediction Unit, ONERA Toulouse, 2 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)]. E-mail: Eric.Coustols@onera.fr

    2006-08-15

    The present study deals with recent numerical results from on-going research conducted at ONERA/DMAE regarding the prediction of transonic flows, for which shock wave/boundary layer interaction is important. When this interaction is strong enough (M {>=} 1.3), shock induced oscillations (SIO) appear at the suction side of the airfoil and lead to the formation of unsteady separated areas. The main issue is then to perform unsteady computations applying appropriate turbulence modelling and relevant boundary conditions with respect to the test case. Computations were performed with the ONERA elsA software and the URANS-type approach, closure relationships being achieved from transport-equation models. Applications are provided for the OAT15A airfoil data base, well documented for unsteady CFD validation (mean and r.m.s. pressure, phase-averaged LDA data, ...). In this paper, the capabilities of turbulence models are evaluated with two 2D URANS strategies, under free-stream or confined conditions. The latter takes into account the adaptive upper and lower wind-tunnel walls. A complete 3D URANS simulation was then performed to demonstrate the real impact of all lateral wind-tunnel walls on such a flow.

  5. Numerical prediction of shock induced oscillations over a 2D airfoil: Influence of turbulence modelling and test section walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiery, Mylene; Coustols, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The present study deals with recent numerical results from on-going research conducted at ONERA/DMAE regarding the prediction of transonic flows, for which shock wave/boundary layer interaction is important. When this interaction is strong enough (M ≥ 1.3), shock induced oscillations (SIO) appear at the suction side of the airfoil and lead to the formation of unsteady separated areas. The main issue is then to perform unsteady computations applying appropriate turbulence modelling and relevant boundary conditions with respect to the test case. Computations were performed with the ONERA elsA software and the URANS-type approach, closure relationships being achieved from transport-equation models. Applications are provided for the OAT15A airfoil data base, well documented for unsteady CFD validation (mean and r.m.s. pressure, phase-averaged LDA data, ...). In this paper, the capabilities of turbulence models are evaluated with two 2D URANS strategies, under free-stream or confined conditions. The latter takes into account the adaptive upper and lower wind-tunnel walls. A complete 3D URANS simulation was then performed to demonstrate the real impact of all lateral wind-tunnel walls on such a flow

  6. Application of fuzzy methods in tunnelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudmila Tréfová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Full-face tunnelling machines were used for the tunnel construction in Slovakia for boring of the exploratory galleries of highwaytunnels Branisko and Višňové-Dubná skala. A monitoring system of boring process parameters was installed on the tunnelling machinesand the acquired outcomes were processed by several theoretical approaches. Method IKONA was developed for the determination ofchanges in the rock mass strength characteristics in the line of exploratory gallery. Individual geological sections were evaluated bythe descriptive statistics and the TBM performance was evaluated by the fuzzy method. The paper informs on the procedure of the designof fuzzy models and their verification.

  7. Reduction of Background Noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Stephen M.; Allen, Christopher S.; Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Background noise in both open-jet and closed wind tunnels adversely affects the signal-to-noise ratio of acoustic measurements. To measure the noise of increasingly quieter aircraft models, the background noise will have to be reduced by physical means or through signal processing. In a closed wind tunnel, such as the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel, the principle background noise sources can be classified as: (1) fan drive noise; (2) microphone self-noise; (3) aerodynamically induced noise from test-dependent hardware such as model struts and junctions; and (4) noise from the test section walls and vane set. This paper describes the steps taken to minimize the influence of each of these background noise sources in the 40 x 80.

  8. Testing for Unit Roots in Small Panels with Short-run and Long-run Cross-sectional Dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Yoosoon Chang; Wonho Song

    2009-01-01

    An IV approach, using as instruments non-linear transformations of the lagged levels, is explored to test for unit roots in panels with general dependency and heterogeneity across cross-sectional units. We allow not only for the cross-sectional dependencies of innovations, but also for the presence of co-integration across cross-sectional levels. Unbalanced panels and panels with differing individual short-run dynamics and cross-sectionally related dynamics are also permitted. We also more ca...

  9. Potential long-term chemical effects of diesel fuel emissions on a mining environment: A preliminary assessment based on data from a deep subsurface tunnel at Rainer Mesa, Nevada test site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meike, A.; Bourcier, W.L.; Alai, M. [and others

    1995-09-01

    The general purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) Introduced Materials Task is to understand and predict potential long-term modifications of natural water chemistry related to the construction and operation of a radioactive waste repository that may significantly affect performance of the waste packages. The present study focuses on diesel exhaust. Although chemical information on diesel exhaust exists in the literature, it is either not explicit or incomplete, and none of it establishes mechanisms that might be used to predict long-term behavior. In addition, the data regarding microbially mediated chemical reactions are not well correlated with the abiotic chemical data. To obtain some of the required long-term information, we chose a historical analog: the U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site. This choice was based on the tunnel`s extended (30-year) history of diesel usage, its geological similarity to Yucca Mountain, and its availability. The sample site within the tunnel was chosen based on visual inspection and on information gathered from miners who were present during tunnel operations. The thick layer of dark deposit at that site was assumed to consist primarily of rock powder and diesel exhaust. Surface samples and core samples were collected with an intent to analyze the deposit and to measure potential migration of chemical components into the rock. X-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis were used to measure both spatial distribution and concentration for the wide variety of chemical components that were expected based on our literature survey.

  10. Portuguese Family Physicians' Awareness of Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Costs: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Sá

    Full Text Available Physicians' ability to make cost-effective decisions has been shown to be affected by their knowledge of health care costs. This study assessed whether Portuguese family physicians are aware of the costs of the most frequently prescribed diagnostic and laboratory tests.A cross-sectional study was conducted in a representative sample of Portuguese family physicians, using computer-assisted telephone interviews for data collection. A Likert scale was used to assess physician's level of agreement with four statements about health care costs. Family physicians were also asked to estimate the costs of diagnostic and laboratory tests. Each physician's cost estimate was compared with the true cost and the absolute error was calculated.One-quarter (24%; 95% confidence interval: 23%-25% of all cost estimates were accurate to within 25% of the true cost, with 55% (95% IC: 53-56 overestimating and 21% (95% IC: 20-22 underestimating the true actual cost. The majority (76% of family physicians thought they did not have or were uncertain as to whether they had adequate knowledge of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and only 7% reported receiving adequate education. The majority of the family physicians (82% said that they had adequate access to information about the diagnostic and laboratory test costs. Thirty-three percent thought that costs did not influence their decision to order tests, while 27% were uncertain.Portuguese family physicians have limited awareness of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and our results demonstrate a need for improved education in this area. Further research should focus on identifying whether interventions in cost knowledge actually change ordering behavior, in identifying optimal methods to disseminate cost information, and on improving the cost-effectiveness of care.

  11. Portuguese Family Physicians’ Awareness of Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Costs: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Luísa; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Teixeira, Andreia; Couto, Luciana; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Hespanhol, Alberto; Santos, Paulo; Martins, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians’ ability to make cost-effective decisions has been shown to be affected by their knowledge of health care costs. This study assessed whether Portuguese family physicians are aware of the costs of the most frequently prescribed diagnostic and laboratory tests. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a representative sample of Portuguese family physicians, using computer-assisted telephone interviews for data collection. A Likert scale was used to assess physician’s level of agreement with four statements about health care costs. Family physicians were also asked to estimate the costs of diagnostic and laboratory tests. Each physician’s cost estimate was compared with the true cost and the absolute error was calculated. Results One-quarter (24%; 95% confidence interval: 23%–25%) of all cost estimates were accurate to within 25% of the true cost, with 55% (95% IC: 53–56) overestimating and 21% (95% IC: 20–22) underestimating the true actual cost. The majority (76%) of family physicians thought they did not have or were uncertain as to whether they had adequate knowledge of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and only 7% reported receiving adequate education. The majority of the family physicians (82%) said that they had adequate access to information about the diagnostic and laboratory test costs. Thirty-three percent thought that costs did not influence their decision to order tests, while 27% were uncertain. Conclusions Portuguese family physicians have limited awareness of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and our results demonstrate a need for improved education in this area. Further research should focus on identifying whether interventions in cost knowledge actually change ordering behavior, in identifying optimal methods to disseminate cost information, and on improving the cost-effectiveness of care. PMID:26356625

  12. Self administered cognitive screening test (TYM) for detection of Alzheimer’s disease: cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengas, George; Dawson, Kate; Clatworthy, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a cognitive test, the TYM (“test your memory”), in the detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Outpatient departments in three hospitals, including a memory clinic. Participants 540 control participants aged 18-95 and 139 patients attending a memory clinic with dementia/amnestic mild cognitive impairment. Intervention Cognitive test designed to use minimal operator time and to be suitable for non-specialist use. Main outcome measures Performance of normal controls on the TYM. Performance of patients with Alzheimer’s disease on the TYM compared with age matched controls. Validation of the TYM with two standard tests (the mini-mental state examination (MMSE) and the Addenbrooke’s cognitive examination-revised (ACE-R)). Sensitivity and specificity of the TYM in the detection of Alzheimer’s disease. Results Control participants completed the TYM with an average score of 47/50. Patients with Alzheimer’s disease scored an average of 33/50. The TYM score shows excellent correlation with the two standard tests. A score of ≤42/50 had a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 86% in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. The TYM was more sensitive in detection of Alzheimer’s disease than the mini-mental examination, detecting 93% of patients compared with 52% for the mini-mental state exxamination. The negative and positive predictive values of the TYM with the cut off of ≤42 were 99% and 42% with a prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease of 10%. Thirty one patients with non-Alzheimer dementias scored an average of 39/50. Conclusions The TYM can be completed quickly and accurately by normal controls. It is a powerful and valid screening test for the detection of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:19509424

  13. Investigations on tunneling and kissing bond defects in FSW joints for dissimilar aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Noor Zaman, E-mail: noor_0315@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi (India); Siddiquee, Arshad Noor; Khan, Zahid A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi (India); Shihab, Suha K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering College, Diyala University, Diyala (Iraq)

    2015-11-05

    In this paper an attempt has been made to investigate the effect of two Friction Stir Welding (FSW) parameters i.e. tool pin offset and tool plunge depth on the formation of defects such as tunnel (tunneling defect) and kissing bond (KB) during welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys. 4.75 mm thick plates of AA5083-H116 and AA6063-T6 were welded using a novel work-fixture developed in-house which, apart from clamping the plated also imparted continuous variation of offset on both side of the faying line. The tunneling defect was modeled as a function of offset and plunge depth. The welds were characterised using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical testing. The causes of such defects have been analyzed and discussed and recommendations have been made to prevent their occurrence. The findings of the study have revealed that the tunneling defects are formed at all offset (including zero offset) values towards stronger material (advancing side). And the cross-section of the tunnel varied with the amount of offset. Further, KBs are formed at the interface for all pin offset values except 0.5 mm towards weaker material and high plunge depth resulting in the poor mechanical properties. - Highlights: • Two dissimilar aluminum alloys are welded using FSW. • Formation of kissing bond and tunneling defects are investigated. • Defects are formed at pin offsets towards stronger material and also without offset. • The size of tunnel reduces significantly by increasing the plunge depth. • Tool pin offset towards weaker material prevent tunneling defects.

  14. Proton tunneling in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-10-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  15. Proton tunneling in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, J.

    1998-01-01

    The tunneling rate of the proton and its isotopes between interstitial sites in solids is studied theoretically. The phonons and/or the electrons in the solid have two effects on the tunneling phenomenon. First, they suppress the transfer integral between two neighbouring states. Second, they give rise to a finite lifetime of the proton state. Usually the second effect is large and the tunneling probability per unit time (tunneling rate) can be defined. In some cases, however, a coherent tunneling is expected and actually observed. (author)

  16. Drill and blast tunnelling; Konvensjonell drift av tunneler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roenn, Paal-Egil

    1997-12-31

    This thesis treats drill and blast tunnelling. The rapid technological advance necessitates revised and updated design criteria, quality requirements and quality control. In situ blast experiments were carried out in order to test new methods and improve the basis for calculation and design. The main topics of the experiments were (1) longer rounds and increased drillhole diameter, (2) emulsion slurry as explosives in tunnelling, and (3) electronic detonators in contour blasting. The experiments show that it is technically feasible to blast rounds of up to 8.6 m length. Using current technology, the economical optimum round length is substantially shorter. Dust, low visibility, noise and toxic fumes are occupational environmental strains for the tunnel workers. Several of the environmental factors are strongly influenced by the type of explosives used. For example, emulsion slurry resulted in 4 to 5 times better visibility than Anolit and the concentration of respirable dust and total dust was reduced by 30-50 %. Electronic detonators were tested and found to give a higher percentage of remaining drillholes in the contour than Nonel detonators. The thesis includes a chapter on economic design of hydropower tunnels. 42 refs., 83 figs., 45 tabs.

  17. Geotechnical aspects of tunnel construction in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Moor, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    The significant factors affecting the construction of tunnels in deep clay formations for radioactive waste disposal were outlined. Two aspects of tunneling were discussed; the feasibility of tunnel construction and changes in pore water pressure that might occur with time. Some results of model tunnel tests and analyses were presented. (U.K.)

  18. Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program intermediate-scale pressure vessel tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.H.; Merkle, J.G.; Smith, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The tests of intermediate-size vessels with sharp flaws permitted the comparison of experimentally observed behavior with analytical predictions of the behavior of flawed pressure vessels. Fracture strains estimated by linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) were accurate in the cases in which the flaws resided in regions of high transverse restraint and the fracture toughness was sufficiently low for unstable fracture to occur prior to yielding through the vessel wall. When both of these conditions were not present, unstable fracture did occur, always preceded by stable crack growth; and the cylinders with flaws initially less than halfway through the wall attained gross yield prior to burst. Predictions of failure pressure of the vessels with flawed nozzles, based upon LEFM estimates of failure strain, were very conservative. LEFM calculations of critical load were based upon small-specimen fracture toughness test data. Whenever gross yielding preceded failure, the actual strains achieved were considerably greater than the estimated strains at failure based on LEFM. In such cases the strength of the vessel may be no longer dependent upon plane-strain fracture toughness but upon the capacity of the cracked section to carry the imposed load stably in the plastic range. Stable crack growth, which has not been predictable quantitatively, is an important factor in elastic-plastic analysis of strength. The ability of the flawed vessels to attain gross yield in unflawed sections has important qualitative implications on pressure vessel safety margins. The gross yield condition occurs in light-water-reactor pressure vessels at about 2 x design pressure. The intermediate vessel tests that demonstrated a capacity for exceeding this load confirm that the presumed margin of safety is not diminished by the presence of flaws of substantial size, provided that material properties are adequate

  19. Experimental set-up for advanced aeroelastic tests on sectional models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Radomil; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2016), s. 3-13 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA103/09/0094; GA AV ČR IAA200710902; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0060 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : bridge aeroelasticity * wind tunnel * experimental set-up * non- linear response Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.932, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40799-015-0004-6

  20. Factors affecting voluntary HIV counselling and testing among men in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leta Tesfaye H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT is one of the key strategies in the HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes in Ethiopia. However, utilization of this service among adults is very low. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with VCT utilization among adult men since men are less likely than women to be offered and accept routine HIV testing. Methods The study utilized data from the Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey (EDHS 2005, which is a cross-sectional survey conducted on a nationally representative sample. Using cluster sampling, 6,778 men aged 15–59 years were selected from all the eleven administrative regions in Ethiopia. Logistic regression was used to analyze potential factors associated with VCT utilization. Results Overall, 21.9% of urban men and 2.6% of rural men had ever tested for HIV through VCT and most of them had learned their HIV test result. Having no stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS was found to be strongly and positively associated with VCT utilization in both urban and rural strata. In rural areas HIV test rates were higher among younger men (aged ≤44 years and those of higher socio-economic position (SEP. Among urban men, risky sexual behaviour was positively associated with VCT utilization whereas being Muslim was found to be inversely associated with utilization of VCT. Area of residence as well as SEP strongly affected men’s level of stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS. Conclusions VCT utilization among men in Ethiopia was low and affected by HIV/AIDS-related stigma and residence. In order to increase VCT acceptability, HIV/AIDS prevention and control programs in the country should focus on reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Targeting rural men with low SEP should be given first priority when designing, expanding, and implementing VCT services in the country.

  1. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow base line and suppressor nozzles. Summary report. [conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40by 80-foot wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to study the near- and far-field jet noise characteristics of six baseline and suppressor nozzles. Static and wind-on noise source locations were determined. A technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field was established. It was determined if flight effects measured in the near field are the same as those in the far field. The flight effects on the jet noise levels of the baseline and suppressor nozzles were determined. Test models included a 15.24-cm round convergent nozzle, an annular nozzle with and without ejector, a 20-lobe nozzle with and without ejector, and a 57-tube nozzle with lined ejector. The static free-field test in the anechoic chamber covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. The wind tunnel flight effects test repeated these nozzle test conditions with ambient velocities of 0 to 92 m/s.

  2. Wind Tunnel Measurements at LM Wind Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck

    2012-01-01

    This section presents the results obtained during the experimental campaign that was conducted in the wind tunnel at LM Wind Power in Lunderskov from August 16th to 26th, 2010. The goal of this study is to validate the so-called TNO trailing edge noise model through measurements of the boundary...... layer turbulence characteristics and the far-field noise generated by the acoustic scattering of the turbulent boundary layer vorticies as they convect past the trailing edge. This campaign was conducted with a NACA0015 airfoil section that was placed in the wind tunnel section. It is equipped with high...

  3. Integral tests of coupled multigroup neutron and gamma cross sections with fission and fusion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriewer, J.; Hehn, G.; Mattes, M.; Pfister, G.; Keinert, J.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations were made for different benchmark experiments in order to test the coupled multigroup neutron and gamma library EURLIB-3 with 100 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups. In cooperation with EURATOM, Ispra, we produced this shielding library recently from ENDF/B-IV data for application in fission and fusion technology. Integral checks were performed for natural lithium, carbon, oxygen, and iron. Since iron is the most important structural material in nuclear technology, we started with calculations of iron benchmark experiments. Most of them are integral experiments of INR, Karlsruhe, but comparisons were also done with benchmark experiments from USA and Japan. For the experiments with fission sources we got satisfying results. All details of the resonances cannot be checked with flux measurements and multigroup cross sections used. But some averaged resonance behaviour of the measured and calculated fluxes can be compared and checked within the error limits given. We get greater differences in the calculations of benchmark experiments with 14 MeV neutron sources. For iron the group cross sections of EURLIB-3 produce an underestimation of the neutron flux in a broad energy region below the source energy. The conclusion is that the energy degradation by inelastic scattering is too strong. For fusion application the anisotropy of the inelastic scatter process must be taken into account, which isn't done by the processing codes at present. If this effect isn't enough, additional corrections have to be applied to the inelastic cross sections of iron in ENDF/B-IV. (author)

  4. The effect of inlet flow oscillations on reflooding of a tubular test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.; Banerjee, S.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1983-01-01

    The reflooding of a vertical channel under oscillatory inlet flow conditions has been investigated experimentally. Compared to constant injection, oscillations always increase the liquid carryover in the early stages of reflooding. As reflooding progresses, the enhancement diminishes. The crossover point roughly coincides with saturation of the liquid at the quench front (QF). The higher liquid carryover at the beginning increases downstream heat transfer and speeds up QF propagation. But this higher liquid carryover, in turn, reduces the test section mass accumulation rate and delays QF propagation at later stages. The enhancement of liquid carryover, and the early increase and subsequent decrease in quench velocity are all accentuated as the oscillation amplitude and frequency increase. Large amplitude oscillations change the characteristics of QF propagation and the heat transfer immediately downstream of QF substantially. Correlations based on constant-injection reflooding data are not adequate, even if they are applied on an average local-conditions basis

  5. Utilization of Advanced Diagnostic Methods for Texture and Rut Depth Analysis on a Testing Pavement Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slabej Martin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of pavement in wide range reflects the pavement serviceability, which is a summary of the characteristics of the pavement, providing a fast, smooth, economical and especially safe driving of motor-vehicles. The target factor of pavement serviceability and safety of roads represents the quality of their surface properties. In the framework of research activities performed in the Research Centre founded under the auspices of University of Žilina, individual parameters of pavement serviceability were monitored by pavement surface scanning. This paper describes the creation of a 3D - road surface model and its analysis and evaluation from the viewpoint of two pavement serviceability parameters - the rut depth and texture. Measurements were performed on an experimental pavement section used contemporary in an Accelerated Pavement Testing experiment. The long-term goal is to ascertain functions predicting degradation of these two pavement serviceability parameters.

  6. Nucleate pool boiling investigation on a silicon test section with micro-fabricated cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanna, A.; Kenning, D.B.R.; Karayiannis, T.G.; Hutter, C.; Sefiane, K.; Nelson, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The basic mechanisms of nucleate boiling are still not completely understood, in spite of the many numerical and experimental studies dedicated to the topic. The use of a hybrid code allows reasonable computational times for simulations of a solid plate with a large population of artificial micro-cavities with fixed distribution. This paper analyses the guidelines for the design, through numerical simulations, of the location and sizes of micro-fabricated cavities on a new silicon test section immersed in FC-72 at the saturation temperature for different pressures with an imposed heat flux applied at the back of the plate. Particular focus is on variations of wall temperature around nucleation sites. (author)

  7. Measurement of single-top cross section and test of anomalous $Wtb$ coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ji-Eun [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    The top quark is most often produced in tt pairs via the strong interaction, however electroweak production of a singly-produced top quark is also possible. Electroweak single-top production is more difficult to observe than tt production. Studying single-top production is important for the following reasons. It provides direct measurement of the CKM matrix element and also single-top events are a background to several searches for SM or non-SM signals, such as Higgs boson searches. The information of spin polarization of top-quark can be used to t est anomalous W-t-b coupling. This thesis describes the result of a measurement of single-top cross-section and a test of anomalous W-t-b coupling using 4.8 f b-1 of data collected by the CDF Run II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The measured cross-section is 1.83$+0.7\\atop{-0.6}$ pb and measured limit of |Vtb| is 0.41 at 95% CL. The fraction of V+A coupling is 0 ± 28 (%).

  8. An Experimental Study of Natural Circulation in a Loop with Parallel Flow Test Sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathisen, R.P.; Eklind, O.

    1965-10-01

    The dynamic behaviour of a natural circulation loop parallel round duct channels has been studied. The test sections were both electrically heated and the power distribution was uniform along the 4300 mm heated length of the 20 mm dia. channels. The inter channel interference and the threshold of flow instability were obtained by using a dynamically calibrated flowmeter in each channel. The pressure was 50 bars and the sub-cooling 6 deg C. The main parameters varied, were the flow restrictions in the one-phase and two-phase sections. The instability data were correlated to the resistance coefficients due to these restrictions. Theoretical calculations for parallel channels in natural circulation have been compared with the experimental results. For the conditions determined by the above mentioned magnitudes, the steady-state computations are in excellent agreement with experiment. The transients are also nearly similar, except for the resonance frequency which for the theoretical case is higher by an amount between 0.3 and 0.5 c.p.s

  9. Test of the universal rise of hadronic total cross sections at super-high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Muneyuki; Igi, Keiji

    2007-01-01

    The increase of the total cross sections at very high energies described by log 2 (s/s 0 ) appears to be confirmed. In the analysis of the COMPETE collaboration in the Particle Data Group (2006), the Blog 2 (s/s 0 ) was assumed to extend the universal rise of all the total hadronic cross sections to reduce the number of adjustable parameters. We test if the assumption on the universality of B is justified, through investigation of the values of B for π ± p(K ± p) and pp,pp scatterings. We search for the simultaneous best fit to the σ tot and ρ ratios, using a constraint from the FESR of the P' type for π -+ p scatterings and constraints that are free from the unphysical regions for the pp, pp and K ± p scatterings. By including rich information of the low-energy scattering data owing to the use of FESR, the errors of the B parameters decrease especially for πp. The resulting value of B pp is consistent with B πp within two standard deviations, which appears to support the universality hypothesis. (orig.)

  10. An Experimental Study of Natural Circulation in a Loop with Parallel Flow Test Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, R P; Eklind, O

    1965-10-15

    The dynamic behaviour of a natural circulation loop parallel round duct channels has been studied. The test sections were both electrically heated and the power distribution was uniform along the 4300 mm heated length of the 20 mm dia. channels. The inter channel interference and the threshold of flow instability were obtained by using a dynamically calibrated flowmeter in each channel. The pressure was 50 bars and the sub-cooling 6 deg C. The main parameters varied, were the flow restrictions in the one-phase and two-phase sections. The instability data were correlated to the resistance coefficients due to these restrictions. Theoretical calculations for parallel channels in natural circulation have been compared with the experimental results. For the conditions determined by the above mentioned magnitudes, the steady-state computations are in excellent agreement with experiment. The transients are also nearly similar, except for the resonance frequency which for the theoretical case is higher by an amount between 0.3 and 0.5 c.p.s.

  11. Wind-tunnel investigation of the flow correction for a model-mounted angle of attack sensor at angles of attack from -10 deg to 110 deg. [Langley 12-foot low speed wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moul, T. M.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary wind tunnel investigation was undertaken to determine the flow correction for a vane angle of attack sensor over an angle of attack range from -10 deg to 110 deg. The sensor was mounted ahead of the wing on a 1/5 scale model of a general aviation airplane. It was shown that the flow correction was substantial, reaching about 15 deg at an angle of attack of 90 deg. The flow correction was found to increase as the sensor was moved closer to the wing or closer to the fuselage. The experimentally determined slope of the flow correction versus the measured angle of attack below the stall angle of attack agreed closely with the slope of flight data from a similar full scale airplane.

  12. Calculations of air cooler for new subsonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rtishcheva, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    As part of the component development of TsAGI’s new subsonic wind tunnel where the air flow velocity in the closed test section is up to 160 m/sec hydraulic and thermal characteristics of air cooler are calculated. The air cooler is one of the most important components due to its highest hydraulic resistance in the whole wind tunnel design. It is important to minimize its hydraulic resistance to ensure the energy efficiency of wind tunnel fans and the cost-cutting of tests. On the other hand the air cooler is to assure the efficient cooling of air flow in such a manner as to maintain the temperature below 40 °C for seamless operation of measuring equipment. Therefore the relevance of this project is driven by the need to develop the air cooler that would demonstrate low hydraulic resistance of air and high thermal effectiveness of heat exchanging surfaces; insofar as the cooling section must be given up per unit time with the amount of heat Q=30 MW according to preliminary evaluations. On basis of calculation research some variants of air cooler designs are proposed including elliptical tubes, round tubes, and lateral plate-like fins. These designs differ by the number of tubes and plates, geometrical characteristics and the material of finned surfaces (aluminium or cooper). Due to the choice of component configurations a high thermal effectiveness is achieved for finned surfaces. The obtained results form the basis of R&D support in designing the new subsonic wind tunnel.

  13. Benchmark test of MORSE-DD code using double-differential form cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Masayuki; Mori, Takamasa; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1985-02-01

    The multi-group double-differential form cross sections (DDX) and the three dimensional Monte Carlo code MORSE-DD devised to utilize the DDX, which were developed for the fusion neutronics analysis, have been validated through many benchmark tests. All the problems tested have a 14 MeV neutron source. To compare the calculated results with the measured values, the following experiments were adopted as the benchmark problems; leakage neutron spectra from spheres composed of nine kinds of materials measured at LLNL, neutron angular spectra from the Li 2 O slab measured at FNS in JAERI, tritium production rate (TPR) in the graphite-reflected Li 2 O sphere measured at FNS and the TPR in the metallic Li sphere measured at KfK. In addition in order to test an accuracy of the calculation method in detail, spectra of neutrons scattered from a small sample and various reaction rates in a Li 2 O cylinder were compared between the present method and the continuous energy Monte Carlo method. The nuclear data files used are mainly ENDF/B4 and partly JENDL-3PR1. The tests were carried out through a comparison with the measured values and also with the results obtained from the conventional Legendre expansion method and the continuous energy Monte Carlo method. It is found that the results by the present method are more accurate than those by the conventional one and agree well with those by the continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. Discrepancies due to the nuclear data are also discussed. (author)

  14. Development of a tunnel backfilling concept for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Borgesson, L.

    2003-01-01

    In the main concept for disposal of the Swedish Nuclear Waste (KBS-3V) it is vital that the drifts can be backfilled with sufficiently good material at high density to fulfill the following requirements: - to obstruct upwards swelling of bentonite from the deposition holes, - to prevent or restrict the water flow in the tunnel and around the canister, - to resist chemical conversion for a long period of time, - not to cause any significant chemical conversion of the buffer surrounding the canister. Investigations and tests of backfill material and techniques have been running in the Swedish underground laboratory, Aspo HRL, since 1996. In the first test, Field Test of Tunnel Backfilling, the objectives were to test the manufacturing of backfill material, to develop and test a backfilling technique and to investigate what densities could be achieved with different backfill materials in the field. Horizontal layers were applied and compacted by a roller in 0.2 m thick layers to 1.5 m from the floor. The rest of the tunnel was backfilled with inclined layers. Five different backfill materials were tested; TBM-muck, TBM-muck crushed to a maximum grain size of 20 mm and crushed TBM-muck mixed with 10, 20 and 30% MX-80 bentonite. The main conclusions from these tests were that the technique for manufacturing backfill material and for backfilling the tunnel were suitable but that the horizontal backfill layers were sensitive to wet conditions, that the backfilling equipment needed to be improved to better reach the areas close to the rock walls and roof and that the durability of the equipment needed to be improved. For the continued development for the Backfill and Plug Test and the Prototype Repository it was decided that the backfilling should be made with inclined layers in the entire cross section of the tunnel in order to decrease the sensitivity to water inflow. The backfilling equipment was improved; two new compactors, the so-called slope compactor and the so

  15. Development of a tunnel backfilling concept for nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, D.; Borgesson, L. [Clay Technology AB, Ideon, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    In the main concept for disposal of the Swedish Nuclear Waste (KBS-3V) it is vital that the drifts can be backfilled with sufficiently good material at high density to fulfill the following requirements: - to obstruct upwards swelling of bentonite from the deposition holes, - to prevent or restrict the water flow in the tunnel and around the canister, - to resist chemical conversion for a long period of time, - not to cause any significant chemical conversion of the buffer surrounding the canister. Investigations and tests of backfill material and techniques have been running in the Swedish underground laboratory, Aspo HRL, since 1996. In the first test, Field Test of Tunnel Backfilling, the objectives were to test the manufacturing of backfill material, to develop and test a backfilling technique and to investigate what densities could be achieved with different backfill materials in the field. Horizontal layers were applied and compacted by a roller in 0.2 m thick layers to 1.5 m from the floor. The rest of the tunnel was backfilled with inclined layers. Five different backfill materials were tested; TBM-muck, TBM-muck crushed to a maximum grain size of 20 mm and crushed TBM-muck mixed with 10, 20 and 30% MX-80 bentonite. The main conclusions from these tests were that the technique for manufacturing backfill material and for backfilling the tunnel were suitable but that the horizontal backfill layers were sensitive to wet conditions, that the backfilling equipment needed to be improved to better reach the areas close to the rock walls and roof and that the durability of the equipment needed to be improved. For the continued development for the Backfill and Plug Test and the Prototype Repository it was decided that the backfilling should be made with inclined layers in the entire cross section of the tunnel in order to decrease the sensitivity to water inflow. The backfilling equipment was improved; two new compactors, the so-called slope compactor and the so

  16. Design modification of the in-pile test section for increase of sealing capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, J T; Ahn, S H; Joung, C Y; Jeong, H Y; Lee, J M; Sim, B S [Department of Research Reactor Utilization and Development, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Since KAERI established the fuel test loop (FTL) at HANARO in 2009, KAERI has carried out several experiments to verify the performances of the equipment. Based on the experiments, the design modification of the In-Pile test Section (IPS) has been processed to improve some difficulties such as difficulty in ejecting the inner assembly of the IPS from the pressure vessel, difficulty of the sealing process of the cooling water, etc. At first, because the cooling water of HANARO in KAERI consists of an open-pool type, if a certain shock is generated during the disassembly process, the cooling water can be spattered out of the pool. Therefore, two jacking bolts will be added on the top flange part of the inner assembly to decrease the shock. Second, at the pressure boundary of the IPS where MI-cables go through, the brazing process has been used to seal out the cooling water. However, because the length of the IPS is up to 5.5 meters, it is too difficult and time consuming to carry out the brazing process at the end part of the IPS. Therefore, the brazing process will be replaced with the mechanical sealing structure to simplify the assembly process. (author)

  17. Operation and post operative examinations on the 1 MW test section SDP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casalini, P.; Valentini, P.; Urbani, A.

    1975-01-01

    The tests carried out were essentially, of general interest and could regard the general Performance and the behavior of the materials. The last aspect was rather interesting as the steam generator coil consists of a steel which has not been yet homologated in Italy. As already specified, the geometry of the steam generator was somewhat particular: it consisted of a stainless steel (Type AISI 316) cylindrical envelope with a diameter of about 500 mm and about 4 m high, with inside an helicoidal duct having a rectangular section, also in AISI 316 stainless steel. Three helicoidal tubes with an outer diameter of 26,9 mm and a thickness of 5 mm, out of ferritic steel - Type Mannesman F 11 were arranged inside the duct. The rectangular duct was run through by sodium downwards, while water/steam was running through the three parallel tubes upwards. The main characteristics pertaining to the steam generator and the nominal operational data are given. All the tests carried out on the tube coil resulted in noticeable alteration due to operation in sodium. In particular, with regard to the absence of variation of the carbon content between the inner and outer side in all the specimens analyzed, one can conclude that no considerable mass transfer occurred in the tube

  18. Study on climate control of dwellings using underground air tunnel in the cold region. Part 1. Cooling performance of the underground air tunnel connected to a small-scaled test house; Kanreichi ni okeru chika air tunnel ni yoru junetsukankyo kaizen ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Shokibo shiken kaoku ni okeru kaki no ryobo seino hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miki, Y; Sanji, H; Ito, J; Komoda, T; Mitsuoka, K; Mogami, S [Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Underground air tunnel is provided for cooling an experimentally built small house and the cooling performance is examined at Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido. The house is provided with 120mm-thick layers of insulating material under the floor and inside the side walls and partitioning walls. The windows are equipped with blinds, with reed screens positioned outside to cover the windows. The air tunnel is a hard vinyl chloride tube, 200mm in internal diameter. It is buried 4.5m deep in the ground, and extends as long as 27m. A filter-provided 72W blower installed at the tunnel outlet is driven to force air through. As for the natural soil temperature in summer, it is found variable between 7.2 and 8.5degC. As the result of the experiment, it is found that thanks to the underground tunnel the room temperature is kept below 27degC even when the maximum temperature in the daytime is 30degC or higher provided the air flow is appropriately regulated. In this experiment, the maximum rate of instantaneously removed heat is approximately 2.5 times higher than the values in other previously reported experiments. The daily coefficient of performance is 6.5-11.1, again higher than the previously reported values. Different from application in warm regions, the effect of rise in the surrounding soil temperature on the cooling performance is not so conspicuous. 3 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Towards vortex imaging with scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dan T.

    1994-02-01

    A low temperature, Besocke beetle type scanning tunneling microscope, with a scan range of 10 by 10 microns was built. The scanning tunneling microscope was calibrates for various temperatures and tested on several samples. Gold monolayers evaporated at 400 deg C were resolved and their dynamic behavior observed. Atomic resolution images of graphite were obtained. The scanning tunneling microscope was designed for future applications of vortex imaging in superconductors. The special design considerations for this application are discussed and the physics underlying it reviewed. (author)

  20. A flow visualization study of spore release using a wind tunnel-mounted laser light sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Eisner, A.D.; Wiener, R.W.; Main, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    A phase Doppler anemometry system in combination with a laser light sheet was used in a low-speed recirculating wind tunnel to examine the flow field around an individual leaf. Turbulence similar to that encountered near the surface of the earth in a neutral stability boundary layer was generated using a grid at the upwind end of the wind tunnel test section. Individual healthy and diseased plant leaves were introduced into the tunnel with the leaf tip pointing downwind. The Mie-scattered radiation from the spores departing the diseased leaf was captured on videotape. Image processing software was used to enhance the visual quality of the individual frames from the videotape and to make spore velocity calculations. Three main vortex regions around the leaf were identified. The importance of these regions to the separation of the spores from the leaf surface and their subsequent downwind movement was analyzed

  1. Skin Sensitive Difference of Human Body Sections under Clothing-Smirnov Test of Skin Surface Temperatures' Dynamic Changing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; WU Hai-yan; WANG Yun-yi

    2004-01-01

    Skin sensitive difference of human body sections under clothing is the theoretic foundation of thermal insulation clothing design.By a new method of researching on clothing comfort perception,the skin temperature live changing procedure of human body sections affected by the same cold stimulation is inspected.Furthermore with the Smirnov test the skin temperatures dynamic changing patterns of main human body sections are obtained.

  2. Texas flexible pavements and overlays : year 1 report, test sections, data collection, analyses, and data storage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This five-year project was initiated to collect materials and pavement performance data on a minimum of 100 highway test sections around the State of Texas, incorporating both flexible pavements and overlays. Besides being used to calibrate and valid...

  3. Quantum tunneling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.S.; Lai, C.H.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a calculation of quantum tunneling time based on the transition duration of wave peak from one side of a barrier to the other. In our formulation, the tunneling time comprises a real and an imaginary part. The real part is an extension of the phase tunneling time with quantum corrections whereas the imaginary time is associated with energy derivatives of the probability amplitudes

  4. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  5. Josephson tunneling and nanosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Ovchinnikov, Yurii; Kresin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Josephson tunneling between nanoclusters is analyzed. The discrete nature of the electronic energy spectra, including their shell ordering, is explicitly taken into account. The treatment considers the two distinct cases of resonant and non-resonant tunneling. It is demonstrated that the current density greatly exceeds the value discussed in the conventional theory. Nanoparticles are shown to be promising building blocks for nanomaterials-based tunneling networks.

  6. A century of wind tunnels since Eiffel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanetz, Bruno

    2017-08-01

    Fly higher, faster, preserve the life of test pilots and passengers, many challenges faced by man since the dawn of the twentieth century, with aviation pioneers. Contemporary of the first aerial exploits, wind tunnels, artificially recreating conditions encountered during the flight, have powerfully contributed to the progress of aeronautics. But the use of wind tunnels is not limited to aviation. The research for better performance, coupled with concern for energy saving, encourages manufacturers of ground vehicles to perform aerodynamic tests. Buildings and bridge structures are also concerned. This article deals principally with the wind tunnels built at ONERA during the last century. Somme wind tunnels outside ONERA, even outside France, are also evocated when their characteristics do not exist at ONERA.

  7. Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Microsystem Aeromechanics Wind Tunnel advances the study of fundamental flow physics relevant to micro air vehicle (MAV) flight and assesses vehicle performance...

  8. Study of the stall delay phenomenon and of wind turbine blade dynamics using numerical approaches and NREL's wind tunnel tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, Simon-Philippe

    2008-06-15

    The production of electricity from wind has experienced an enormous growth worldwide in the last 20 years. It is now widely seen as a serious alternative to more conventional energy production methods. Improvements are however still possible to make it more cost-effective. This can be done through a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in the interaction of the wind with the wind turbine rotor. This growth in the production of energy from wind is expected to continue at a similar rate in the years to come, helped by the installation of wind turbines at sea, that is becoming a hot topic in the wind energy field today. The phenomenon of stall delay affecting rotating wind turbine blades is an example of an aerodynamic phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Several models exist to correct for this effect. Five such models were first tested within a vortex wake simulation code based on the modelling of a prescribed wake behind the rotor of the turbine. Comparison was made with wind tunnel test data acquired in head-on flow on a two-bladed 10.1 diameter wind turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in 2000. It revealed a general overprediction of the stall delay effects, at the same time as great disparity was obtained between the different models. Conclusions from this work served as a starting point for a much more thorough investigation on this subject, where several models were tested in terms of different quantities using the same simulation code, and where the application of some of the models was improved. Overprediction of the loads was once again obtained when comparison was made to the NREL results in head-on flow, and none of the models was found to correctly represent the flow physics involved. The premises on which each of the models relies were discussed as a means of better understanding and modelling this phenomenon. The important issue of tip loss was also covered, and guidelines were suggested to improve

  9. Potential long-term chemical effects of diesel fuel emissions on a mining environment: A preliminary assessment based on data from a deep subsurface tunnel at Rainer Mesa, Nevada test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meike, A.; Bourcier, W.L.; Alai, M.

    1995-09-01

    The general purpose of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMSCP) Introduced Materials Task is to understand and predict potential long-term modifications of natural water chemistry related to the construction and operation of a radioactive waste repository that may significantly affect performance of the waste packages. The present study focuses on diesel exhaust. Although chemical information on diesel exhaust exists in the literature, it is either not explicit or incomplete, and none of it establishes mechanisms that might be used to predict long-term behavior. In addition, the data regarding microbially mediated chemical reactions are not well correlated with the abiotic chemical data. To obtain some of the required long-term information, we chose a historical analog: the U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site. This choice was based on the tunnel's extended (30-year) history of diesel usage, its geological similarity to Yucca Mountain, and its availability. The sample site within the tunnel was chosen based on visual inspection and on information gathered from miners who were present during tunnel operations. The thick layer of dark deposit at that site was assumed to consist primarily of rock powder and diesel exhaust. Surface samples and core samples were collected with an intent to analyze the deposit and to measure potential migration of chemical components into the rock. X-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectra (EDS) analysis, secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis were used to measure both spatial distribution and concentration for the wide variety of chemical components that were expected based on our literature survey

  10. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Testing an ionization chamber with gaseous samples and measurements of the (n, alpha) reaction cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gledenov, Yu M; Salatskii, V I; Sedyshev, P V; Andrzejewski, J; Szalanski, P

    1999-01-01

    A new ionization chamber with gaseous samples (GIC) has been designed and tested on the thermal and resonance neutron beams of FLNP's neutron sources. The exposed gas volume serves as a target for neutrons. The obtained thermal cross sections for the sup 1 sup 7 O(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 2 sup 1 Ne(n, alpha) sup 1 sup 8 O and sup 3 sup 6 Ar(n, alpha) sup 3 sup 3 S reactions are (233+-12) mb, (0.18+-0.09) mb and (5.43+-0.27) mb, respectively. These measurements have been performed on a pure beam of thermal neutrons from the high flux reactor IBR-2; and they demonstrated high efficiency and reliability of the method. Compared to samples on substrates, the application of gaseous samples makes the beam background essentially lower, and what is more important, the background component is totally absent due to the absence of Li and B microimpurities in gaseous samples while they do present in the samples on substrates. The method is also applicable to measurements with resonance neutrons. The recovery capabili...

  12. Development of the tunneling junction simulation environment for scanning tunneling microscope evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajewski, Krzysztof; Piasecki, Tomasz; Kopiec, Daniel; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2017-01-01

    Proper configuration of scanning tunneling microscope electronics plays an important role in the atomic scale resolution surface imaging. Device evaluation in the tunneling contact between scanning tip and sample may be prone to the surface quality or mechanical disturbances. Thus the use of tunneling junction simulator makes electronics testing more reliable and increases its repeatability. Here, we present the theoretical background enabling the proper selection of electronic components circuitry used as a tunneling junction simulator. We also show how to simulate mechanics related to the piezoelectric scanner, which is applied in real experiments. Practical use of the proposed simulator and its application in metrological characterization of the developed scanning tunneling microscope is also shown. (paper)

  13. Background noise levels measured in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Dittmar, James H.; Hall, David G.; Kee-Bowling, Bonnie

    1994-01-01

    The acoustic capability of the NASA Lewis 9 by 15 Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel has been significantly improved by reducing the background noise levels measured by in-flow microphones. This was accomplished by incorporating streamlined microphone holders having a profile developed by researchers at the NASA Ames Research Center. These new holders were fabricated for fixed mounting on the tunnel wall and for an axially traversing microphone probe which was mounted to the tunnel floor. Measured in-flow noise levels in the tunnel test section were reduced by about 10 dB with the new microphone holders compared with those measured with the older, less refined microphone holders. Wake interference patterns between fixed wall microphones were measured and resulted in preferred placement patterns for these microphones to minimize these effects. Acoustic data from a model turbofan operating in the tunnel test section showed that results for the fixed and translating microphones were equivalent for common azimuthal angles, suggesting that the translating microphone probe, with its significantly greater angular resolution, is preferred for sideline noise measurements. Fixed microphones can provide a local check on the traversing microphone data quality, and record acoustic performance at other azimuthal angles.

  14. A rotating bluff-body disc for reduced variability in wind tunnel aerosol studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Anthony, T Renee; van Dyke, Michael; Volckens, John

    2011-01-01

    A rotating bluff-body disc (RBD) was developed to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. The RBD is designed to rotate eight personal aerosol samplers around a circular path in a forward-facing plane aligned with the wind tunnel cross section. Rotation of the RBD allows each sampler to traverse an identical path about the wind tunnel cross section, which reduces the effects of spatial heterogeneity associated with dispersing supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. Samplers are positioned on the face of the RBD via sampling ports, which connect to an air manifold on the back of the disc. Flow through each sampler was controlled with a critical orifice or needle valve, allowing air to be drawn through the manifold with a single pump. A metal tube, attached to this manifold, serves as both the axis of rotation and the flow conduction path (between the samplers and the vacuum source). Validation of the RBD was performed with isokinetic samplers and 37-mm cassettes. For facing-the-wind tests, the rotation of the RBD significantly decreased intra-sampler variability when challenged with particle diameters from 1 to 100 μm. The RBD was then employed to determine the aspiration efficiency of Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) personal samplers under a facing-the-wind condition. Operation of IOM samplers on the RBD reduced the between-sampler variability for all particle sizes tested.

  15. 46 CFR 171.100 - Shaft tunnels and stern tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shaft tunnels and stern tubes. 171.100 Section 171.100... PERTAINING TO VESSELS CARRYING PASSENGERS Additional Subdivision Requirements § 171.100 Shaft tunnels and... passengers on an international voyage. (b) The watertight seal in the bulkhead between the stern tube space...

  16. Interleaving of beam lines inside the PS tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    View against the direction of the proton beams. The PS ring (section 26) is on the left. The injection tunnel for LEAR leaving from here has increased the trafic in this already busy area where the two Linacs and the transfer tunnel leading to the SPS, ISR and AA join the PS ring (cf. photo 7802260, 7802261, Annual Report 1981, p. 89, fig. 12).

  17. Can Impairment Interfere with Performance by Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome According to International Classification of Function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Kavousipor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most prevalent compression neuropathy of upper extremity which, two of the most important risk factors of that are the female sex and manual works. In the model of international classification of function, disability and health, disease is an impairment, results in functional limitation. The goal of this study is to compare hand function of participants between various severities of carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, during 6 months period of time, 30 housekeeper women with carpal tunnel syndrome, with the mean age of 47.03 years, were selected through simple sampling. They were assessed for hand function, by Purdue peg board test and Boston questionnaire, after that a professional practitioner had performed Nerve Conductive Velocity (NCV test and identified the severity of their diseases. Then the data were analyzed with SPSS software, by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The mean of Purdue peg board test and Boston questionnaire scores in various clusters of carpal tunnel syndrome severity, were not different (P>0.05. Conclusion: In this research, severity of electrodiagnostic findings of participants, with carpal tunnel syndrome, is not related to their performance and functional limitations.

  18. NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel: Background Noise and Flow Survey Results Prior to FY05 Construction of Facilities Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel is a premier facility for model-scale testing of jet noise reduction concepts at realistic flow conditions. However, flow inside the open jet test section is less than optimum. A Construction of Facilities project, scheduled for FY 05, will replace the flow collector with a new design intended to reduce recirculation in the open jet test section. The reduction of recirculation will reduce background noise levels measured by a microphone array impinged by the recirculation flow and will improve flow characteristics in the open jet tunnel flow. In order to assess the degree to which this modification is successful, background noise levels and tunnel flow are documented, in order to establish a baseline, in this report.

  19. 77 FR 28281 - Withdrawal of Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... Withdrawal of Revocation of TSCA Section 4 Testing Requirements for One High Production Volume Chemical...]amino]- (CAS No. 1324-76-1), also known as C.I. Pigment Blue 61. EPA received an adverse comment regarding C.I. Pigment Blue 61. This document withdraws the revocation of testing requirements for C.I...

  20. Scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnig, G.; Rohrer, H.

    1983-01-01

    Based on vacuum tunneling, a novel type of microscope, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was developed. It has an unprecedented resolution in real space on an atomic scale. The authors review the important technical features, illustrate the power of the STM for surface topographies and discuss its potential in other areas of science and technology. (Auth.)

  1. Electron tunneling in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamaraev, K.I.; Khajrutdinov, R.F.; Zhdanov, V.P.; Molin, Yu.N.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental and theoretical investigations are outlined systematically on electron tunnelling in chemical reactions. Mechanism of electron transport to great distances is shown to be characteristic to chemical compounds of a wide range. The function of tunnel reactions is discussed for various fields of chemistry, including radiation chemistry, electrochemistry, chemistry of solids, chemistry of surface and catalysis

  2. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  3. Background noise measurements from jet exit vanes designed to reduced flow pulsations in an open-jet wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, D. R.; Martin, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Many open jet wind tunnels experience pulsations of the flow which are typically characterized by periodic low frequency velocity and pressure variations. One method of reducing these fluctuations is to install vanes around the perimeter of the jet exit to protrude into the flow. Although these vanes were shown to be effective in reducing the fluctuation content, they can also increase the test section background noise level. The results of an experimental acoustic program in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel is presented which evaluates the effect on tunnel background noise of such modifications to the jet exit nozzle. Noise levels for the baseline tunnel configuration are compared with those for three jet exit nozzle modifications, including an enhanced noise reduction configuration that minimizes the effect of the vanes on the background noise. Although the noise levels for this modified vane configuration were comparable to baseline tunnel background noise levels in this facility, installation of these modified vanes in an acoustic tunnel may be of concern because the noise levels for the vanes could be well above background noise levels in a quiet facility.

  4. Revalidation of the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with a Commercial Airplane Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmak, Frank J.; Hudgins, M.; Hergert, D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 11-By 11-Foot Transonic leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve tunnel performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Wind tunnel tests to demonstrate the readiness of the tunnel for a return to production operations included an Integrated Systems Test (IST), calibration tests, and airplane validation tests. One of the two validation tests was a 0.037-scale Boeing 777 model that was previously tested in the 11-By 11-Foot tunnel in 1991. The objective of the validation tests was to compare pre-modernization and post-modernization results from the same airplane model in order to substantiate the operational readiness of the facility. Evaluation of within-test, test-to-test, and tunnel-to-tunnel data repeatability were made to study the effects of the tunnel modifications. Tunnel productivity was also evaluated to determine the readiness of the facility for production operations. The operation of the facility, including model installation, tunnel operations, and the performance of tunnel systems, was observed and facility deficiency findings generated. The data repeatability studies and tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons demonstrated outstanding data repeatability and a high overall level of data quality. Despite some operational and facility problems, the validation test was successful in demonstrating the readiness of the facility to perform production airplane wind tunnel%, tests.

  5. Tunnel fire dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ingason, Haukur; Lönnermark, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of issues in fire safety engineering in tunnels, describes the phenomena related to tunnel fire dynamics, presents state-of-the-art research, and gives detailed solutions to these major issues. Examples for calculations are provided. The aim is to significantly improve the understanding of fire safety engineering in tunnels. Chapters on fuel and ventilation control, combustion products, gas temperatures, heat fluxes, smoke stratification, visibility, tenability, design fire curves, heat release, fire suppression and detection, CFD modeling, and scaling techniques all equip readers to create their own fire safety plans for tunnels. This book should be purchased by any engineer or public official with responsibility for tunnels. It would also be of interest to many fire protection engineers as an application of evolving technical principles of fire safety.

  6. Thin-section CT imaging that correlates with pulmonary function tests in obstructive airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hiroaki, E-mail: arakawa@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine (Japan); Fukushima, Yasutugu [Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Dokkyo Medical University (Japan); Kaji, Yasushi [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify independent CT findings that correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with obstructive airway diseases. Materials and methods: Sixty-eight patients with obstructive airway disease and 29 normal subjects (mean age, 52 years; 36 men and 61 women) underwent inspiratory and expiratory thin-section CT and PFTs. Patient with obvious emphysema was excluded. Two radiologists independently reviewed the images and semi-quantitatively evaluated lung attenuation (mosaic perfusion, air trapping) and airway abnormalities (extent and severity of bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis or centrilobular nodules, mucous plugging). Univariate, multivariate and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed with CT findings and PFTs. Results: Forty-two patients showed obstructive PFTs, 26 symptomatic patients showed near-normal PFTs. On univariate analysis, air trapping and bronchial wall thickening showed highest correlation with obstructive PFTs such as FEV1.0/FVC, MMEF and FEF75 (r ranged from -0.712 to -0.782; p < 0.001), while mosaic perfusion and mucous plugging showed moderate correlation, and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis and nodules showed the least, but significant, correlation. Multiple logistic analyses revealed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening as the only significant independent determinants of obstructive PFTs. ROC analysis revealed the cut-off value of air trapping for obstructive PFTs to be one-third of whole lung (area under curve, 0.847). Conclusions: Our study confirmed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening are the most important observations when imaging obstructive PFTs. The cut-off value of air trapping for identifying obstructive PFTs was one-third of lung irrespective of inspiratory CT findings.

  7. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg. 1: Low wing model C. [wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcay, W. J.; Rose, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics obtained in a helical flow environment utilizing a rotary balance located in the Langley spin tunnel are presented in plotted form for a 1/6 scale, single engine, low wing, general aviation model (model C). The configurations tested included the basic airplane and control deflections, wing leading edge and fuselage modification devices, tail designs and airplane components. Data are presented without analysis for an angle of attack range of 8 deg to 90 deg and clockwise and counter clockwise rotations covering an omega b/2v range from 0 to .9.

  8. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-01-01

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed

  9. Tunnels: different construction methods and its use for pipelines installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Tales; Soares, Ana Cecilia; Assis, Slow de; Bolsonaro, Ralfo; Sanandres, Simon [Petroleo do Brasil S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In a continental dimensions country like Brazil, the pipeline modal faces the challenge of opening ROW's in the most different kind of soils with the most different geomorphology. To safely fulfill the pipeline construction demand, the ROW opening uses all techniques in earthworks and route definition and, where is necessary, no digging techniques like horizontal directional drilling, micro tunneling and also full size tunnels design for pipelines installation in high topography terrains to avoid geotechnical risks. PETROBRAS has already used the tunnel technique to cross higher terrains with great construction difficult, and mainly to make it pipeline maintenance and operation easier. For the GASBOL Project, in Aparados da Serra region and in GASYRG, in Bolivia, two tunnels were opened with approximately 700 meters and 2,000 meters each one. The GASBOL Project had the particularity of being a gallery with only one excavation face, finishing under the hill and from this point was drilled a vertical shaft was drilled until the top to install the pipeline section, while in GASYRG Project the tunnel had two excavation faces. Currently, two projects are under development with tunnels, one of then is the Caraguatatuba-Taubate gas pipeline (GASTAU), with a 5 km tunnel, with the same concepts of the GASBOL tunnel, with a gallery to be opened with the use of a TBM (Tunneling Boring Machine), and a shaft to the surface, and the gas pipeline Cabiunas-Reduc III (GASDUC III) project is under construction with a 3.7 km tunnel, like the GASYRG tunnel with two faces. This paper presents the main excavation tunneling methods, conventional and mechanized, presenting the most relevant characteristics from both and, in particular, the use of tunnels for pipelines installation. (author)

  10. Flow instability and turbulence - ONERA water tunnel visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, H.

    The experimental technique used for visualizing laminar-turbulent transition phenomena, developed in previous tests in ONERA's small TH1 water tunnel, has been successfully applied in the new TH2 tunnel. With its very extensive Reynold's number domain (10 to the 4th - 10 to the 6th), this tunnel has shown itself to be well adapted to the study of turbulence and of the flow instabilities related to its appearance.

  11. A Vision in Aeronautics: The K-12 Wind Tunnel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A Vision in Aeronautics, a project within the NASA Lewis Research Center's Information Infrastructure Technologies and Applications (IITA) K-12 Program, employs small-scale, subsonic wind tunnels to inspire students to explore the world of aeronautics and computers. Recently, two educational K-12 wind tunnels were built in the Cleveland area. During the 1995-1996 school year, preliminary testing occurred in both tunnels.

  12. Comparison of Ares I-X Wind-Tunnel Derived Buffet Environment with Flight Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, David J.; Sekula, Martin K.; Rausch, Russ D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle (FTV), launched in October 2009, carried with it over 243 buffet verification pressure sensors and was one of the most heavily instrumented launch vehicle flight tests. This flight test represented a unique opportunity for NASA and its partners to compare the wind-tunnel derived buffet environment with that measured during the flight of Ares I-X. It is necessary to define the launch vehicle buffet loads to ensure that structural components and vehicle subsystems possess adequate strength, stress, and fatigue margins when the vehicle structural dynamic response to buffet forcing functions are considered. Ares I-X buffet forcing functions were obtained via wind-tunnel testing of a rigid buffet model (RBM) instrumented with hundreds of unsteady pressure transducers designed to measure the buffet environment across the desired frequency range. This paper discusses the comparison of RBM and FTV buffet environments, including fluctuating pressure coefficient and normalized sectional buffet forcing function root-mean-square magnitudes, frequency content of power-spectral density functions, and force magnitudes of an alternating flow phenomena. Comparison of wind-tunnel model and flight test vehicle buffet environments show very good agreement with root-mean-square magnitudes of buffet forcing functions at the majority of vehicle stations. Spectra proved a challenge to compare because of different wind-tunnel and flight test conditions and data acquisition rates. However, meaningful and promising comparisons of buffet spectra are presented. Lastly, the buffet loads resulting from the transition of subsonic separated flow to supersonic attached flow were significantly over-predicted by wind-tunnel results.

  13. Numerical analysis of the slipstream development around a high-speed train in a double-track tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min; Li, Peng; Liang, Xi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the slipstream development around the high-speed trains in tunnels would provide references for assessing the transient gust loads on trackside workers and trackside furniture in tunnels. This paper focuses on the computational analysis of the slipstream caused by high-speed trains passing through double-track tunnels with a cross-sectional area of 100 m2. Three-dimensional unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and a realizable k-ε turbulence model were used to describe the airflow characteristics around a high-speed train in the tunnel. The moving boundary problem was treated using the sliding mesh technology. Three cases were simulated in this paper, including two tunnel lengths and two different configurations of the train. The train speed in these three cases was 250 km/h. The accuracy of the numerical method was validated by the experimental data from full-scale tests, and reasonable consistency was obtained. The results show that the flow field around the high-speed trains can be divided into three distinct regions: the region in front of the train nose, the annular region and the wake region. The slipstream development along the two sides of train is not in balance and offsets to the narrow side in the double-track tunnels. Due to the piston effect, the slipstream has a larger peak value in the tunnel than in open air. The tunnel length, train length and length ratio affect the slipstream velocities; in particular, the velocities increase with longer trains. Moreover, the propagation of pressure waves also induces the slipstream fluctuations: substantial velocity fluctuations mainly occur in front of the train, and weaken with the decrease in amplitude of the pressure wave.

  14. Calibration of an experimental six component wind tunnel block balance using optical fibre sensors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Ponte, JD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the increasingly stringent requirements for wind tunnel balances, as expressed by the wind tunnel testing community, balance design philosophy needs to be further expanded to include alternative sensor, material, design...

  15. Design and development of an experimental six component wind tunnel block balance using optical fibre sensors.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Ponte, JD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the increasingly stringent requirements for wind tunnel balances, as expressed by the wind tunnel testing community, balance design philosophy needs to be further expanded to include alternative sensor, material, design...

  16. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, D.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  17. Tunnel magnetoresistance in alumina, magnesia and composite tunnel barrier magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebaum, Oliver; Drewello, Volker; Auge, Alexander; Reiss, Guenter; Muenzenberg, Markus; Schuhmann, Henning; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Using magnetron sputtering, we have prepared Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions with tunnel barriers consisting of alumina, magnesia, and magnesia-alumina bilayer systems. The highest tunnel magnetoresistance ratios we found were 73% for alumina and 323% for magnesia-based tunnel junctions. Additionally, tunnel junctions with a unified layer stack were prepared for the three different barriers. In these systems, the tunnel magnetoresistance ratios at optimum annealing temperatures were found to be 65% for alumina, 173% for magnesia, and 78% for the composite tunnel barriers. The similar tunnel magnetoresistance ratios of the tunnel junctions containing alumina provide evidence that coherent tunneling is suppressed by the alumina layer in the composite tunnel barrier. - Research highlights: → Transport properties of Co-Fe-B/tunnel barrier/Co-Fe-B magnetic tunnel junctions. → Tunnel barrier consists of MgO, Al-Ox, or MgO/Al-Ox bilayer systems. → Limitation of TMR-ratio in composite barrier tunnel junctions to Al-Ox values. → Limitation indicates that Al-Ox layer is causing incoherent tunneling.

  18. Manufacturing of In-Pile Test Section(IPS) Mock-up for the 3-Pin Fuel Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. M.; Park, K. N.; Chi, D. Y. (and others)

    2005-10-15

    Manufacturing process of IPS Mock-up was initiated in late of 2003 with DAEWOO Precision industries Company. Manufacturing drawings due to detail drawings are composed of Outer assembly and Inner assembly. Welding of IPS Mock-up was performed by the GMAW(Gas Metal Arc Welding) process. After the welding process, non-destructive examination was conducted. Leak test was performed to the Main cooling water part and Neon gas inter-space gap part by the He gas injection with the pressure of 6.0 kg{sub f}/cm{sup 2} and 30 minutes holding time. the result was shown that there was no leak at the Neon gas inter-space gap part but leak was occurred at Main cooling water part according to imperfect screw of purge plug. so, it was re-finished and test was performed to certify the leak tightness. To satisfy the HANARO Limiting Operation Condition, IPS should be tested ahead of installation at the HANARO reactor by the use of test facilities. IPS Mock-up and its test facilities will be designed and used for the test of 'HANARO flow tube pressure drop', 'IPS inner pressure drop' and 'IPS inner vibration'.

  19. Tunneling current between graphene layers

    OpenAIRE

    Poklonski, Nikolai A.; Siahlo, Andrei I.; Vyrko, Sergey A.; Popov, Andrey M.; Lozovik, Yurii E.

    2013-01-01

    The physical model that allows to calculate the values of the tunneling current be-tween graphene layers is proposed. The tunneling current according to the pro-posed model is proportional to the area of tunneling transition. The calculated value of tunneling conductivity is in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  20. Construction of a 2- by 2-foot transonic adaptive-wall test section at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Daniel G.; Lee, George

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new production-size, two-dimensional, adaptive-wall test section with ventilated walls at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. The new facility incorporates rapid closed-loop operation, computer/sensor integration, and on-line interference assessment and wall corrections. Air flow through the test section is controlled by a series of plenum compartments and three-way slide vales. A fast-scan laser velocimeter was built to measure velocity boundary conditions for the interference assessment scheme. A 15.2-cm- (6.0-in.-) chord NACA 0012 airfoil model will be used in the first experiments during calibration of the facility.