WorldWideScience

Sample records for tungsten test limiters

  1. Formation of carbon containing layers on tungsten test limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubel, M.; Philipps, V.; Huber, A.; Tanabe, T.

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten test limiters of mushroom shape and a plasma facing area of approximately 100 cm 2 were exposed at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak to a number of deuterium fuelled discharges performed under various operation conditions. Two types of limiters were tested: a sole tungsten limiter and a twin limiter consisting of two halves, one made of tungsten and another of graphite. The exposed surfaces were examined with ion beam analysis methods and laser profilometry. The formation of some deposition zones was observed near the edges of the limiters. The deuterium-to-carbon concentration ratio was in the range from 0.04 to 0.11 and around 0.2 for the sole tungsten and the twin limiter, respectively. Significant amounts of the co-deposited tungsten and silicon atoms were found on the graphite part of the twin limiter indicating the formation of mixed W-C-Si compounds. (orig.)

  2. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  3. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    temperature on an Instron load frame with a 222.41 kN (50 kip) load cell . The samples were compressed at the same strain rate as on the Gleeble...ID % RE Initial Density (cm 3 ) Density after Compression (cm 3 ) % Change in Density Test Temperature NT1 0 18.08 18.27 1.06 1000 NT3 0...4.1 Nano-Tungsten The results for the compression of the nano-tungsten samples are shown in tables 2 and 3 and figure 5. During testing, sample NT1

  4. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  5. Application of tungsten for plasma limiters in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Wada, M.; Ohgo, T.; Philipps, V.; Rubel, M.; Huber, A.; Seggern, J. von; Ohya, K.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.

    2000-01-01

    Three different types of W limiters were exposed in the TEXTOR plasma and the response of the plasma and materials performance of the limiters were investigated. - A W bulk limiter operated with preheating above 800 K withstood a plasma heat load of about ∼20 MW/m 2 for a few seconds with some slight surface melting during the highest heat load shot. However, it was severely damaged when operated at around 500 K. - A C/W twin test limiter, half made of bulk W and the other half of graphite (EK-98) gave very useful information on how low- and high-Z materials behave under conditions of simultaneous utilization as PFM such as cross-contamination and the influence of a large mass difference on hydrogen reflection and deposition. - Two sets of main poloidal W limiters made of vacuum vapor sprayed (VPS)-W deposited on graphite (IG-430U) with a Re interlayer could absorb about 60% of the total convection heat and the ohmic plasma with a density as high as 5 x 10 13 cm -3 was sustained. Most of the VPS-W coated limiters tolerated a heat load of ∼20 MW/m 2 . This series of W limiters experiments in TEXTOR has shown that W is applicable as a PFM, if its central accumulation is avoided by NBI and/or ICRH heating. Nevertheless, some concerns still remain, including difficulty of plasma start-up, W behavior in higher temperature plasmas, and materials' selection

  6. Robust test limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Otten, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of inaccuracies of the measurement process inspection of manufactured parts requires test limits which are more strict than the given specification limits. Test limits derived under the assumption of normality for product characteristics turn out to violate the prescribed bound on the

  7. Crystal plasticity study of single crystal tungsten by indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Weizhi

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its favorable material properties, tungsten (W) has been studied as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. Experiments on W heating in plasma sources and electron beam facilities have shown an intense micro-crack formation at the heated surface and sub-surface. The cracks go deep inside the irradiated sample, and often large distorted areas caused by local plastic deformation are present around the cracks. To interpret the crack-induced microscopic damage evolution process in W, one needs firstly to understand its plasticity on a single grain level, which is referred to as crystal plasticity. In this thesis, the crystal plasticity of single crystal tungsten (SCW) has been studied by spherical and Berkovich indentation tests and the finite element method with a crystal plasticity model. Appropriate values of the material parameters included in the crystal plasticity model are determined by fitting measured load-displacement curves and pile-up profiles with simulated counterparts for spherical indentation. The numerical simulations reveal excellent agreement with experiment. While the load-displacement curves and the deduced indentation hardness exhibit little sensitivity to the indented plane at small indentation depths, the orientation of slip directions within the crystals governs the development of deformation hillocks at the surface. It is found that several factors like friction, indentation depth, active slip systems, misoriented crystal orientation, misoriented sample surface and azimuthal orientation of the indenter can affect the indentation behavior of SCW. The Berkovich indentation test was also used to study the crystal plasticity of SCW after deuterium irradiation. The critical load (pop-in load) for triggering plastic deformation under the indenter is found to depend on the crystallographic orientation. The pop-in loads decrease dramatically after deuterium plasma irradiation for all three investigated crystallographic planes.

  8. From the Chloride of Tungsten to the Upper Limit of the Periodic Table of Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazan A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the physical chemical properties and the technology of manufac- turing chemically clean hexachloride of tungsten has led to unexpected results. It was found that each element of the Periodic Table of Elements has its own hyperbola in the graph “molecular mass — content of the element”. The hyperbolas differ according to the atomic mass of the elements. Lagrange’s theorem shows that the tops of the hyper- bolas approach to an upper limit. This upper limit means the heaviest element, which is possible in the Table. According to the calculation, its atomic mass is 411.66, while its number is 155.

  9. Effect of solvent composition on the limiting current of anodic dissolution of tungsten in aqueous-ethanol solutions of alkali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konoplyantseva, N.A.; L'vova, L.A.; Davydov, A.D.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehlektrokhimii)

    1987-01-01

    The effect of quantitative composition of solvent on tungsten anodic dissolution in aqueous-ethanol solutions of KOH is studied. It is shown that with an increase in ethanol content in aqueous-ethanol solutions of alkali the limiting current of tungsten anodic dissolution decreases. An increase in KOH concentration in certain limits (in ethanol solutions it is the range between 0.75 and 1.0 M KOH) results in the increase of the limiting current; with further increase in solution concentration the limiting current decreases, which can be related to the change of the limiting stage. An assumption is made that total reaction of tungsten anodic dissolution and the main reasons for the limiting current appearance do not change from aqueous to aqueous-ethanol and ethanol solutions of alkali

  10. Uniform lateral etching of tungsten in deep trenches utilizing reaction-limited NF3 plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofuji, Naoyuki; Mori, Masahito; Nishida, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    The reaction-limited etching of tungsten (W) with NF3 plasma was performed in an attempt to achieve the uniform lateral etching of W in a deep trench, a capability required by manufacturing processes for three-dimensional NAND flash memory. Reaction-limited etching was found to be possible at high pressures without ion irradiation. An almost constant etching rate that showed no dependence on NF3 pressure was obtained. The effect of varying the wafer temperature was also examined. A higher wafer temperature reduced the threshold pressure for reaction-limited etching and also increased the etching rate in the reaction-limited region. Therefore, the control of the wafer temperature is crucial to controlling the etching amount by this method. We found that the uniform lateral etching of W was possible even in a deep trench where the F radical concentration was low.

  11. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  12. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  13. FEM investigation and thermo-mechanic tests of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, Nikola; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New solid tungsten divertor for fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. • Design validation in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS (Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility). • FEA simulation. -- Abstract: A new solid tungsten divertor for the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade is under construction at present. A new divertor tile design has been developed to improve the thermal performance of the current divertor made of tungsten coated fine grain graphite. Compared to thin tungsten coatings, divertor tiles made of massive tungsten allow to extend the operational range and to study the plasma material interaction of tungsten in more detail. The improved design for the solid tungsten divertor was tested on different full scale prototypes with a hydrogen ion beam. The influence of a possible material degradation due to thermal cracking or recrystallization can be studied. Furthermore, intensive Finite Element Method (FEM) numerical analysis with the respective test parameters has been performed. The elastic–plastic calculation was applied to analyze thermal stress and the observed elastic and plastic deformation during the heat loading. Additionally, the knowledge gained by the tests and especially by the numerical analysis has been used to optimize the shape of the divertor tiles and the accompanying divertor support structure. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux tests and their numerical simulations. In addition, results from some special structural mechanic analysis by means of FEM tools are presented. Finally, first results from the numerical lifecycle analysis of the current tungsten tiles will be reported

  14. Further limitations on nuclear testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.S.

    1991-11-01

    This document addresses a number of subjects related to further constraints on nuclear testing, briefly discussing each of the following topics: the current political situation, the kinds of steps that might next be taken in test limitations and the impacts of further testing limits, the need for a test ban readiness program, some issues related to verification, and the possibility of confidence building measures as alternative, or near-term, steps to further test limitations

  15. Yield strengths of tungsten-base composites determined from bend tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukas, E.G.; Eash, D.T.

    1976-08-01

    The variation in yield strength with either strain rate or temperature was determined for a number of tungsten-base composites by use of the simple three-point bend test. The yield strengths were comparable with those obtained in standard tensile tests. Additional studies on 1019 steel, either in the as-rolled or annealed condition, gave results in agreement with handbook values, as did two aluminum alloys. These results demonstrate that the bend test deserves wider acceptance in materials testing programs

  16. Edge profiles and limiter tests in Extrap T2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsåker, H.; Hedin, G.; Ilyinsky, L.; Larsson, D.; Möller, A.

    New edge profile measurements, including calorimetric measurements of the parallel heat flux, were made in Extrap T2. Test limiters of pure molybdenum and the TZM molybdenum alloy have been exposed in the edge plasma. The surface damage was studied, mainly by microscopy. Tungsten coated graphite probes were also exposed, and the surfaces were studied by microscopy, ion beam analysis and XPS. In this case cracking and mixing of carbon and tungsten at the interface was observed in the most heated areas, whereas carbide formation at the surface was seen in less heated areas. In these tests pure Mo generally fared better than TZM, and thin and cleaner coatings fared better than thicker and less clean.

  17. High heat flux testing of TiC coated molybdenum with a tungsten intermediate layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitsuka, Masakazu; Fukutomi, Masao; Okada, Masatoshi

    1988-01-01

    The use of low atomic number (Z) material coatings for fusion reactor first-wall components has proved to be a valuable technique to reduce the plasma radiation losses. Molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. An interfacial reaction between the TiC film and the molybdenum substrate, however, causes a severe deterioration of the film at elevated temperatures. In order to solve this problem a TiC coated molybdenum with an intermediate tungsten layer was developed. High temperature properties of this material was evaluated by a newly devised electron beam heating apparatus. TiC coatings prepared on a vacuum-heat-treated molybdenum with a tungsten intermediate layer showed good high temperature stability and survived 2.0 s pulses of heating at a power density as high as 53 MW/m 2 . The melt area of the TiC coatings in high heat flux testings also markedly decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied. The melting mechanism of the TiC coatings with and without a tungsten intermediate layer was discussed by EPMA measurements. (author)

  18. Test and characterization of a prototype silicon–tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhuri, Sanjib, E-mail: sanjibmuhuri@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Chandratre, Vinay B.; Sukhwani, Menka [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Electronics Division, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jena, Satyajit [Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Nayak, Tapan K.; Saini, Jogender; Singaraju, Rama Narayana [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-11

    New generation high-energy physics experiments demand high precision tracking and accurate measurements of a large number of particles produced in the collisions of elementary particles and heavy-ions. Silicon–tungsten (Si–W) calorimeters provide the most viable technological option to meet the requirements of particle detection in high multiplicity environments. We report a novel Si–W calorimeter design, which is optimized for γ/π{sup 0} discrimination up to high momenta. In order to test the feasibility of the calorimeter, a prototype mini-tower was constructed using silicon pad detector arrays and tungsten layers. The performance of the mini-tower was tested using pion and electron beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). The experimental results are compared with the results from a detailed GEANT-4 simulation. A linear relationship between the observed energy deposition and simulated response of the mini-tower has been obtained, in line with our expectations.

  19. Thermal shock tests to qualify different tungsten grades as plasma facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2016-02-01

    The electron beam device JUDITH 1 was used to establish a testing procedure for the qualification of tungsten as plasma facing material. Absorbed power densities of 0.19 and 0.38 GW m-2 for an edge localized mode-like pulse duration of 1 ms were chosen. Furthermore, base temperatures of room temperature, 400 °C and 1000 °C allow investigating the thermal shock performance in the brittle, ductile and high temperature regime. Finally, applying 100 pulses under all mentioned conditions helps qualifying the general damage behaviour while with 1000 pulses for the higher power density the influence of thermal fatigue is addressed. The investigated reference material is a tungsten product produced according to the ITER material specifications. The obtained results provide a general overview of the damage behaviour with quantified damage characteristics and thresholds. In particular, it is shown that the damage strongly depends on the microstructure and related thermo-mechanical properties.

  20. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  1. Results of high heat flux tests and structural analysis of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaksic, Nikola, E-mail: nikola.jaksic@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht; Böswirth, Bernd; Vorbrugg, Stefan

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The main motivation for the HHF investigation of tungsten tiles was an untypical deformation of some specimens under thermal loading, observed during the previous tests in GLADIS test facility. • A nonlinear finite element (FE) model for simulations of the GLADIS tests has been built. • The unexpected plastic deformations are mainly caused by internal stresses due to the manufacturing process. The small discrepancies among the FEA investigated and measured plastic deformations are most likely caused, beside of the practical difficulties by measuring of low items, also by tile internal stresses. • The influences of the residual stresses caused by special production processes have to be taken into account by design of the structural part made of solid tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten as plasma-facing material for fusion devices is currently the most favorable candidate. In general solid tungsten is used for shielding the plasma chamber interior against the high heat generated from the plasma. For the purposes of implementation at ASDEX Upgrade and as a contribution to ITER the thermal performance of tungsten tiles has been extensively tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS during the development phase and beyond. These tests have been performed on full scale tungsten tile prototypes including their clamping and cooling structure. Simulating the adiabatically thermal loading due to plasma operation in ASDEX Upgrade, the tungsten tiles have been subjected to a thermal load with central heat flux of 10–24 MW/m{sup 2} and absorbed energy between 370 and 680 kJ. This loading results in maximum surface temperatures between 1300 °C and 2800 °C. The tests in GLADIS have been accompanied by intensive numerical investigations using FEA methods. For this purpose a multiple nonlinear finite element model has been set up. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux final tests and their numerical simulation. Moreover, first

  2. Results of high heat flux tests and structural analysis of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, Nikola; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht; Böswirth, Bernd; Vorbrugg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The main motivation for the HHF investigation of tungsten tiles was an untypical deformation of some specimens under thermal loading, observed during the previous tests in GLADIS test facility. • A nonlinear finite element (FE) model for simulations of the GLADIS tests has been built. • The unexpected plastic deformations are mainly caused by internal stresses due to the manufacturing process. The small discrepancies among the FEA investigated and measured plastic deformations are most likely caused, beside of the practical difficulties by measuring of low items, also by tile internal stresses. • The influences of the residual stresses caused by special production processes have to be taken into account by design of the structural part made of solid tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten as plasma-facing material for fusion devices is currently the most favorable candidate. In general solid tungsten is used for shielding the plasma chamber interior against the high heat generated from the plasma. For the purposes of implementation at ASDEX Upgrade and as a contribution to ITER the thermal performance of tungsten tiles has been extensively tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS during the development phase and beyond. These tests have been performed on full scale tungsten tile prototypes including their clamping and cooling structure. Simulating the adiabatically thermal loading due to plasma operation in ASDEX Upgrade, the tungsten tiles have been subjected to a thermal load with central heat flux of 10–24 MW/m"2 and absorbed energy between 370 and 680 kJ. This loading results in maximum surface temperatures between 1300 °C and 2800 °C. The tests in GLADIS have been accompanied by intensive numerical investigations using FEA methods. For this purpose a multiple nonlinear finite element model has been set up. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux final tests and their numerical simulation. Moreover, first results

  3. The Limited Test Ban Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, B.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the Limited Test Ban Treaty which came at the end of nearly five years of frustrated efforts to obtain a comprehensive test ban. Negotiations toward that end had begun in October 1958. At the same time a voluntary, informal moratorium on tests was initiated. The negotiations soon stalled over the Soviet Union's resistance to internationally supervised inspections on its soil. In April 1959 a phased ban that was to be limited at first to atmospheric tests conducted below an altitude of 50 kilometers. Such tests were thought to be easily verifiable. The Soviets rejected this idea and continued to insist that a complete test ban need not require numerous inspections. The two sides nevertheless appeared to be nearing agreement on a treaty to ban all but relatively small underground tests when, in May 1960, an U.S. U-2 reconnaissance plane was shot down over Soviet territory. After a thorough review of the U.S. position, the Kennedy administration proposed in April 1961 a draft treaty that made several concessions toward the Soviet position. Nevertheless, the Soviets, still disagreeing with the provisions for verification and with the makeup of the control organization, rejected it

  4. Results of high heat flux tests of tungsten divertor targets under plasma heat loads expected in ITER and tokamaks (review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaev, V. P., E-mail: budaev@mail.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Heat loads on the tungsten divertor targets in the ITER and the tokamak power reactors reach ~10MW m{sup −2} in the steady state of DT discharges, increasing to ~0.6–3.5 GW m{sup −2} under disruptions and ELMs. The results of high heat flux tests (HHFTs) of tungsten under such transient plasma heat loads are reviewed in the paper. The main attention is paid to description of the surface microstructure, recrystallization, and the morphology of the cracks on the target. Effects of melting, cracking of tungsten, drop erosion of the surface, and formation of corrugated and porous layers are observed. Production of submicron-sized tungsten dust and the effects of the inhomogeneous surface of tungsten on the plasma–wall interaction are discussed. In conclusion, the necessity of further HHFTs and investigations of the durability of tungsten under high pulsed plasma loads on the ITER divertor plates, including disruptions and ELMs, is stressed.

  5. Design, fabrication and testing of porous tungsten vaporizers for mercury ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R.; Kroeger, E.; Kami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersions in the characteristics, performance and reliability of vaporizers for early model 30-cm thrusters were investigated. The purpose of the paper is to explore the findings and to discuss the approaches that were taken to reduce the observed dispersion and present the results of a program which validated those approaches. The information that is presented includes porous tungsten materials specifications, a discussion of assembly procedures, and a description of a test program which screens both material and fabrication processes. There are five appendices providing additional detail in the areas of vaporizer contamination, nitrogen flow testing, bubble testing, porosimeter testing, and mercury purity. Four neutralizers, seven cathodes and five main vaporizers were successfully fabricated, tested, and operated on thrusters. Performance data from those devices is presented and indicates extremely repeatable results from using the design and fabrication procedures.

  6. High heat flux test of tungsten brazed mock-ups developed for KSTAR divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.M., E-mail: kyungmin@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, S.H.; Kim, H.T.; Park, S.H.; Park, H.K.; Ahn, H.J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.K.; Lee, D.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The tungsten (W) brazed flat type mock-up which consists of W, OFHC-Cu (oxygen-free high conductive copper) and CuCrZr alloy has been designed for KSTAR divertor in preparation for KSTAR upgrade with 17 MW heating power. For verification of the W brazed mock-up, the high heat flux test is performed at KoHLT-EB (Korea High Heat Load Test Facility-Electron Beam) in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Three mock-ups are tested for several thousand thermal cycles with absorbed heat flux up to 5 MW/m{sup 2} for 20 s duration. There is no evidence of the failure at the bonding joints of all mock-ups after HHF test. Finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to interpret the result of the test. As a result, it is considered that the local area in the water is in the subcooled boiling regime.

  7. Sputtering/redeposition analysis of alkali-based tungsten composites for limiter/divertor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Valentine, M.G.

    1986-07-01

    Composites of porous tungsten infiltrated with alkali metal-bearing alloys have been projected as a means of reducing plasma impurities and sputter erosion in magnetic fusion devices. Self-sustaining alkali metal overlayers have been observed to inhibit erosion of the underlying structural substrate by 2X to 10X. The alkali metal itself, insofar as it sputters as a secondary ion, is trapped at the surface by sheath potential and tangential magnetic fields. Self-regeneration of the alkali metal coating is obtained by thermal and radiation-induced segregation from the bulk

  8. A solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A; Greuner, H; Jaksic, N; Böswirth, B; Maier, H; Neu, R; Vorbrugg, S

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of a solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is presented. The Div-III design is compatible with the existing divertor structure. It re-establishes the energy and heat receiving capability of a graphite divertor and overcomes the limitations of tungsten coatings. In addition, a solid tungsten divertor allows us to investigate erosion and bulk deuterium retention as well as test castellation and target tilting. The design criteria as well as calculations of forces due to halo and eddy currents are presented. The thermal properties of the proposed sandwich structure are calculated with finite element method models. After extensive testing of a target tile in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS, two solid tungsten tiles were installed in AUG for in-situ testing.

  9. Development and Testing of Dispersion-Strengthened Tungsten Alloys via Spark Plasma Sinterin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eric; Madden, Nathan; Smith, Charles; Krogstad, Jessica; Allain, Jean Paul

    2017-10-01

    Tungsten (W) is a common plasma-facing component (PFC) material in the divertor region of tokamak fusion devices due to its high melting point and high sputter threshold. However, W is intrinsically brittle and is further embrittled under neutron irradiation, and the low recrystallization temperature pose complications in fusion environments. More ductile W alloys, such as dispersion-strengthened tungsten are being developed. In this work, W samples are processed via spark plasma sintering (SPS) with TiC, ZrC, and TaC dispersoids alloyed from 0.5 to 10 weight %. SPS is a powder compaction technique that provides high pressure and heating rates via electrical current, allowing for a lower final temperature and hold time for compaction. Initial testing of material properties, smicrostructure, and composition of specimens will be presented. Deuterium and helium irradiations have been performed in IGNIS, a multi-functional, in-situ irradiation and characterization facility at the University of Illinois. High-flux, low-energy exposures at the Magnum-PSI facility at DIFFER exposed samples to a D fluence of 1×1026 cm-2 and He fluence of 1x1025-1x1026 cm-2 at temperatures of 300-1000 C. In-situ chemistry changes via XPS and ex-situ morphology changes via SEM will be studied. Work supported by US DOE Contract DE-SC0014267.

  10. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong, E-mail: amosrxd@163.com; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China); Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-987, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  11. Numerical simulation of mechanical properties tests of tungsten mud waste geopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszek, Natalia; Krystek, Małgorzata

    2018-03-01

    Geopolymers are believed to become in the future an environmental friendly alternative for the concrete. The low CO2 emission during the production process and the possibility of ecological management of the industrial wastes are mentioned as main advantages of geopolymers. The main drawback, causing problems with application of geopolymers as a building material is the lack of the theoretical material model. Indicated problem is being solved now by the group of scientists from the Silesian University of Technology. The series of laboratory tests are carried out within the European research project REMINE. The paper introduces the numerical analyses of tungsten mud waste geopolymer samples which have been performed in the Atena software on the basis of the laboratory tests. Numerical models of bended and compressed samples of different shapes are presented in the paper. The results obtained in Atena software were compared with results obtained in Abaqus and Mafem3D software.

  12. Experiences with tungsten coatings in high heat flux tests and under plasma load in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A; Greuner, H; Fuchs, J C; Marne, P de; Neu, R

    2009-01-01

    ASDEX Upgrade was operated with about 6400 s plasma discharge during the scientific program in 2007/2008 exploring tungsten as a first wall material in tokamaks. In the first phase, the heating power was restricted to 10 MW. It was increased to 15 MW in the second phase. During this operational period, a delamination of the 200 μm W-VPS coating happened at 2 out of 128 tiles of the outer divertor and an unscheduled opening was required. In the third phase, ASDEX Upgrade was operated with partly predamaged tiles and up to 15 MW heating power. The target load was actively controlled by N 2 -seeding. This paper presents the screening test of target tiles in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS, experiences with operation and detected damages of the outer divertor as well as the heat load to the outer divertor and the reasons for the toroidal asymmetry of the divertor load.

  13. Tungsten ion implantation of aluminum for improved resistance to pitting corrosion -- electrochemical testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.P.; Buchanan, R.A.; Williams, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The greatly accelerated localized corrosion of aluminum in salt solutions has been observed and combated for many years. The susceptibility to pitting attack has been linked to the presence of chloride ions in the solution. Alloying additions to aluminum for improved corrosion resistance are restricted due to its limited solubility for passivating species such as chromium and molybdenum. However, many recent attempts to produce non-equilibrium alloys with these and other species, both through sputtering techniques and by rapid solidification, have met with very promising pitting resistance enhancements. The most dramatic increase in passivity is demonstrated by a thin co-sputtered film of Al and 9 atomic percent W, in which the pitting potential is increased by 2600 m V relative to pure Al. Recent efforts to extrapolate the promising W-Al thin film results to a bulk aluminum alloy using tungsten ion implantation are discussed here

  14. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  15. Development, characterization and testing of tungsten doped DLC coatings for dry rotary swaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasselbruch Henning

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of lubricant during rotary swaging is particularly required for a good surface finish of the work piece and the reduction of tool wear. Abandonment of lubricant would improve the ecological process-balance and could also accelerate for further work piece refinements. Also cleaning of the manufactured components becomes obsolete. Thus, a dry machining is highly innovative, consequently new strategies to substitute the lubricant functions become necessary. To encounter the changed tribological conditions due to dry rotary swaging, low friction, tungsten doped, hard DLC coatings and structured surfaces are the most promising approaches. In this work the development of hard coating by means of reactive magnetron sputtering is presented, a promising layer variant is deposited on a set of tools and then tested and investigated in real use.

  16. Stress-relaxation tests in the work-hardening regime of tungsten single crystals below 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of work hardening on the results of stress-relaxation tests was studied for highly pure tungsten single crystals isothermally deformed at four temperatures of 274, 241, 131, and 78 K. A method accounting for strong work hardening on the determination of the strain-rate sensitivity from stress-relaxation tests is introduced by establishing special diagrams of SR tests denoted as YX diagrams

  17. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, S D; Wong, F G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  18. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

    2006-01-01

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes

  19. Failure study of helium-cooled tungsten divertor plasma-facing units tested at DEMO relevant steady-state heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, G; Pintsuk, G; Linke, J; Hirai, T; Norajitra, P; Reiser, J; Giniyatulin, R; Makhankov, A; Mazul, I

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten was selected as armor material for the helium-cooled divertor in future DEMO-type fusion reactors and fusion power plants. After realizing the design and testing of them under cyclic thermal loads of up to ∼14 MW m -2 , the tungsten divertor plasma-facing units were examined by metallography; they revealed failures such as cracks at the thermal loaded and as-machined surfaces, as well as degradation of the brazing layers. Furthermore, in order to optimize the machining processes, the quality of tungsten surfaces prepared by turning, milling and using a diamond cutting wheel were examined. This paper presents a metallographic examination of the tungsten plasma-facing units as well as technical studies and the characterization on machining of tungsten and alternative brazing joints.

  20. Failure study of helium-cooled tungsten divertor plasma-facing units tested at DEMO relevant steady-state heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, G.; Hirai, T.; Norajitra, P.; Reiser, J.; Giniyatulin, R.; Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J.

    2009-12-01

    Tungsten was selected as armor material for the helium-cooled divertor in future DEMO-type fusion reactors and fusion power plants. After realizing the design and testing of them under cyclic thermal loads of up to ~14 MW m-2, the tungsten divertor plasma-facing units were examined by metallography; they revealed failures such as cracks at the thermal loaded and as-machined surfaces, as well as degradation of the brazing layers. Furthermore, in order to optimize the machining processes, the quality of tungsten surfaces prepared by turning, milling and using a diamond cutting wheel were examined. This paper presents a metallographic examination of the tungsten plasma-facing units as well as technical studies and the characterization on machining of tungsten and alternative brazing joints.

  1. High heat flux testing of EU tungsten monoblock mock-ups for the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavila, P.; Riccardi, B.; Pintsuk, G.; Ritz, G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Durocher, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • All the tested items sustained the ITER Full W divertor qualification program requirements. This confirms that the technology for the manufacturing of the first set of the ITER Divertor is available in Europe. • The surface roughening and local melting of the W surface under high heat flux was proven to be significantly reduced for an armour thickness lower or equal to 6 mm. • However, this campaign highlighted some specific areas of improvement to be implemented ideally before the upcoming ITER Divertor IVT serial production. • The issue of the self-castellation of the W monoblocks, which typically appears after a few tenths of cycles at 20 MW/m"2, is critical because it generates some uncontrolled defects at the amour to heat sink joints. Besides, they create a gap which exposure is almost perpendicular to the magnetic field lines and which might lead to local W melting in the strike point region. • This campaign also evidenced that the minimum IO requirements on the CuCrZr ductility could be revised to avoid the occurrence of rather early fatigue failures. Although the W material characterization program has been set up by the IO, the strategy on the CuCrZr still needs to be defined. - Abstract: With the aim to assess the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten divertor, an R&D program was launched in order to evaluate the performances of tungsten (W) armoured plasma facing components (PFCs) under high heat flux. The F4E program consisted in the manufacturing and high heat flux (HHF) testing of W monoblock mock-ups and medium scale prototypes up to 20 MW/m"2. During the test campaign, 26 W mock-ups and two medium scale prototypes manufactured by Plansee SE (Austria) and by Ansaldo Nucleare (Italy) have been tested at the FE200 (AREVA, Le Creusot, France) and ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) (Efremov Institute Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation) electron beam test facilities. The high heat flux (HHF) testing program

  2. High heat flux testing of EU tungsten monoblock mock-ups for the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavila, P., E-mail: pierre.gavila@f4e.europa.eu [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Riccardi, B. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Ritz, G. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique France, 71205 Le Creusot (France); Kuznetsov, V. [JCS “Efremov Institute”, Doroga na Metallostroy 3, Metallostroy, Saint-Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Durocher, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • All the tested items sustained the ITER Full W divertor qualification program requirements. This confirms that the technology for the manufacturing of the first set of the ITER Divertor is available in Europe. • The surface roughening and local melting of the W surface under high heat flux was proven to be significantly reduced for an armour thickness lower or equal to 6 mm. • However, this campaign highlighted some specific areas of improvement to be implemented ideally before the upcoming ITER Divertor IVT serial production. • The issue of the self-castellation of the W monoblocks, which typically appears after a few tenths of cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}, is critical because it generates some uncontrolled defects at the amour to heat sink joints. Besides, they create a gap which exposure is almost perpendicular to the magnetic field lines and which might lead to local W melting in the strike point region. • This campaign also evidenced that the minimum IO requirements on the CuCrZr ductility could be revised to avoid the occurrence of rather early fatigue failures. Although the W material characterization program has been set up by the IO, the strategy on the CuCrZr still needs to be defined. - Abstract: With the aim to assess the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten divertor, an R&D program was launched in order to evaluate the performances of tungsten (W) armoured plasma facing components (PFCs) under high heat flux. The F4E program consisted in the manufacturing and high heat flux (HHF) testing of W monoblock mock-ups and medium scale prototypes up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}. During the test campaign, 26 W mock-ups and two medium scale prototypes manufactured by Plansee SE (Austria) and by Ansaldo Nucleare (Italy) have been tested at the FE200 (AREVA, Le Creusot, France) and ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) (Efremov Institute Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation) electron beam test facilities. The high heat flux (HHF) testing

  3. Construction and test of a tungsten/Sci-Fi imaging calorimeter for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchesi, P S; Bagliesi, M G; Basti, A; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Ganel, O; Lee, M H; Lomtadze, T A; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) is a balloon-borne experiment designed to perform direct measurements of cosmic ray composition over the elemental range from proton to iron to the supernova energy scale of 10 **1**5eV in a series of balloon flights using the new Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) capability under development by NASA. The first flight of CREAM will take place at the end of 2004 from Antarctica. The instrument includes a sampling tungsten /scintillating fiber calorimeter preceded by a graphite target with scintillating fiber hodoscopes, a pixelated silicon charge detector, a transition radiation detector and a segmented timing-based particle-charge detector. The thin ionization calorimeter has been designed to operate in the range of energies from a few hundred GeV to 1 PeV providing imaging capability in the reconstruction of the showers originating from the interaction of primary nuclei in the carbon target. A twin calorimeter for the second CREAM payload has been built and tested at C...

  4. High pulse number thermal shock tests on tungsten with steady state particle background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Unterberg, B.; Wessel, E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal fatigue of metallic materials, which will be exposed to severe environmental conditions e.g. plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, is an important issue in order to predict the life time of complete wall components. Therefore experiments in the linear plasma device PSI-2 were performed to investigate the synergistic effects of high pulse number thermal shock events (L = 0.38 GW m-2, Δt = 0.5 ms) and stationary D/He (6%) plasma particle background on the thermal fatigue behavior of tungsten. Similar to experiments with pure thermal loads, the induced microstructural and surface modifications such as recrystallization and roughening as well as crack formation become more pronounced with increasing number of thermal shock events. However, the amount of damage significantly increases for synergistic loads showing severe surface roughening, plastic deformation and erosion resulting from the degradation of the mechanical properties caused by bombardment and diffusion of D/He to the surface and the bulk of the material. Additionally, D/He induced blistering and bubble formation were observed for all tested samples, which could change the thermal and mechanical properties of near surface regions.

  5. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: limits and opportunities of protecting the tungsten catalyzer from silicide with a cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigeri, P.A.; Nos, O.; Bengoechea, S.; Frevert, C.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J.

    2009-01-01

    Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) is one of the most promising techniques for depositing the intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layer for the production of micro-morph solar cells. However, the silicide formation at the colder ends of the tungsten wire drastically reduces the lifetime of the catalyzer, thus limiting its industrial exploitation. A simple but interesting strategy to decrease the silicide formation is to hide the electrical contacts of the catalyzer in a long narrow cavity which reduces the probability of the silane molecules to reach the colder ends of the wire. In this paper, the working mechanism of the cavity is elucidated. Measurements of the thickness profile of the silicon deposited in the internal walls of the cavity have been compared with those predicted using a simple diffusion model based on the assumption of Knudsen flow. A lifetime study of the protected and unprotected wires has been carried out. The different mechanisms which determine the deterioration of the catalyzer have been identified and discussed.

  6. Preliminary test results on tungsten tile with castellation structures in KSTAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Bang, E. N.; Lim, S. T.; Lee, J. Y.; Yang, S. J.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, M.; van den Berg, M. A.; Lho, T.; Park, C. R.; Kim, G. H.

    2014-01-01

    A bulk tungsten tile with conventional and shaped castellation structures was exposed to various plasmas in KSTAR during 2012 campaign, in order to verify the functions of the shaped castellation designed for ITER divertor. The thermal response of the tile during the campaign was measured by

  7. Testing hadronic interaction models using a highly granular silicon-tungsten calorimeter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilki, B.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Gallus, Petr; Havránek, Miroslav; Janata, Milan; Kvasnička, Jiří; Lednický, Richard; Marčišovský, Michal; Polák, Ivo; Popule, Jiří; Tomášek, Lukáš; Tomášek, Michal; Růžička, Pavel; Šícho, Petr; Smolík, Jan; Vrba, Václav; Zálešák, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 794, Sep (2015), s. 240-254 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electromagnetic silicon tungsten calorimeter * highly granular detectors * hadronic showers * data and simulations Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2015

  8. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  9. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  10. Preliminary test results on tungsten tile with castellation structures in KSTAR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hong, S.-H.; Bang, E.-N.; Lim, S.-T.; Lee, J.-Y.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Matveev, D.; Komm, Michael; van den Berg, M.; Lho, T.; Park, C.R.; Kim, G.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, 7-8 (2014), s. 1704-1708 ISSN 0920-3796. [International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology-11 (ISFNT-11). Barcelona, 15.09.2013-20.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * Plasma–surface interaction * Tungsten * Castellationa Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.152, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379614000349

  11. Recognizing limitations in eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Drunen, G.; Cecco, V.S.

    1981-11-01

    This paper addresses known limitations and constraints in eddy current nondestructive testing. Incomplete appreciation for eddy current limitations is believed to have contributed to both under-utilization and misapplication of the technique. Neither situation need arise if known limitations are recognized. Some, such as the skin depth effect, are inherent to electromagnetic test methods and define the role of eddy current testing. Others can be overcome with available technology such as surface probes to find circumferential cracks in tubes and magnetic saturation of ferromagnetic alloys to eliminate permeability effects. The variables responsible for limitations in eddy current testing are discussed and where alternative approaches exist, these are presented. Areas with potential for further research and development are also identified

  12. Force Limited Vibration Test of HESSI Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Deborah; Pankow, David; Thomsen, Knud

    2000-01-01

    The High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) is a solar x-ray and gamma-ray observatory scheduled for launch in November 2000. Vibration testing of the HESSI imager flight unit was performed in August 1999. The HESSI imager consists of a composite metering tube, two aluminum trays mounted to the tube on titanium flexure mounts, and nine modulation grids mounted on each tray. The vibration tests were acceleration controlled and force limited, in order to prevent overtesting. The force limited strategy reduced the shaker force and notched the acceleration at resonances. The test set-up, test levels, and results are presented. The development of the force limits is also discussed. The imager successfully survived the vibration testing.

  13. Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Bilki, B.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Deng, Z.; Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Yue, Q.; Yang, Z.; Eigen, G.; Mikami, Y.; Price, T.; Watson, N.K.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Carloganu, C.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Blazey, G.C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Lima, J.G.R.; Salcido, P.; Zutshi, V.; Boisvert, V.; Green, B.; Misiejuk, A.; Salvatore, F.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Tomita, T.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Apostolakis, J.; Folger, G.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Morin, L.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Krüger, K.; Lutz, B.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Lu, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Kaplan, A.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Kim, E.J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wing, M.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Besson, D.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Callier, S.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Doublet, Ph.; Dulucq, F.; Faucci-Giannelli, M.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; Kégl, B.; van der Kolk, N.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; de la Taille, Ch.; Pöschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouëne, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Magniette, F.; Matthieu, A.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Videau, H.; Augustin, J.-E.; David, J.; Ghislain, P.; Lacour, D.; Lavergne, L.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Jeans, D.; Götze, M.

    2015-09-11

    A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 600,000 selected negatively changed pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the GEANT4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. Although a reasonable overall description of the data is observed, there are significant quantitative discrepancies in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

  14. Investigation of the local fracture toughness and the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of NiAl and tungsten by means of micro-cantilever tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ast, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to get an improved understanding of the size dependence of the fracture toughness. For this purpose notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated ranging in dimensions from the submicron regime up to some tens of microns by means of a focused ion beam. B2-NiAl and tungsten were chosen as model materials as their brittle to ductile transition temperatures are well above room temperature. In that way, fracture processes accompanied by limited plastic deformation around the crack tip could be studied at the micro scale. For this size regime, new methods to describe the local elastic-plastic fracture behavior and to measure the fracture toughness were elaborated. Particular focus was set on the J-integral concept which was adapted to the micro scale to derive crack growth from stiffness measurements. This allowed a precise analysis of the transition from crack tip blunting to stable crack growth which is necessary to accurately measure the fracture toughness. Experiments in single crystalline NiAl showed for the two investigated crack systems, namely the hard and the soft orientation, that the fracture toughness at the micro scale is the same as the one known from macroscopic testing. Thus, size effects were not found for the tested length scale. The addition of little amounts of iron did not affect the fracture toughness considerably. Yet, it influenced the crack growth in those samples and consequently the resistance curve behavior. Concerning experiments in single crystalline tungsten, the fracture toughness showed a clear dependency on sample size. The smallest cantilevers fractured purely by cleavage. Larger samples exhibited stable crack growth along with plastic deformation which was recognizable in SEM-micrographs and quantified by means of EBSD measurements. Just as in macroscopic testing, the investigated crack system {100} demonstrated a dependency on loading rate with higher loading rates leading to a more brittle behavior. This

  15. Fractographic peculiarities of cermet tungsten fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of test temperature on fracture peculiarities of cermets tungsten with initial cellular structure of deformation is shown. Tungsten crack resistance increases at temperatures to Tsub(x) (ductile-brittle transition temperature) and decreases at temperatures above Tsub(x). The degree of ceramics tungsten plasticity realization depends on its crack resistance

  16. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  17. Application of stress relaxation testing in evaluation of creep strength of a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghavender Rao, G.; Gupta, O.P.; Pradhan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial isothermal stress relaxation tests (SRT) were performed on a tungsten-alloyed 10% Cr cast steel (G-X12Cr Mo W V Nb N 10 1 1) at temperatures of 580, 600 and 620 o C and initial strain levels of 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8%. Inelastic strain rates for different stresses were estimated from the stress versus time data generated from the tests. Conventional creep tests were also conducted on the same material at 580, 600 and 620 o C and at different stress levels. The strain rate data estimated from SRT were compared with minimum creep rates derived from the creep tests; the strain rates estimated from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in better agreement than those estimated from SRT with 0.2 and 0.5% initial strain levels. In order to ascertain the technique, stress relaxation behaviour was estimated from creep test data and compared with the stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT at corresponding temperatures. The stress relaxation curves obtained from SRT with 0.8% initial strain level are in good agreement with the stress relaxation curves estimated from the creep tests. It is concluded that the stress relaxation test with initial strain level of 0.8% could be considered as an appropriate short-term test technique for estimation of creep strength of newly developed materials.

  18. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  19. Dynamic tests on metallic impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagartz, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Three different types of metallic impact limiters were tested; plain fins, laterally stiffened fins and tubes whose axes were aligned with the direction of impact. All specimens were made of 304 stainless steel and were annealed before testing. A heavy steel drop table of variable mass and moving at about 13.4 m/s (44 ft/s) was used to impact the specimens which were mounted on a stationary base. Impact velocity, drop table acceleration vs. time and force vs. time were measured on each test and were used to calculate the energy absorbed by the impact limiters. Results showed that the peak stress that a plain fin can transmit to the cask body can be several times the static yield stress of the fin. Also as buckling proceeds the load in a plain fin drops significantly and the rate at which it absorbs energy falls off dramatically, making the fin a rather inefficient energy absorber overall. The laterally stiffened fin and the cylinders did not exhibit this rapid decrease in load-carrying capacity with deformation and hence were able to absorb relatively more energy per unit volume of material

  20. An investigation of tungsten by neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetsreni, R.

    1978-01-01

    This investigation used neutron from Plutonium-Beryllium source (5 curie) to analyse the amount of tungsten in tungsten oxide which was extracted from tungsten ores, slag and tungsten alloy of tungsten iron and carbon. The technique of neutron activation analysis with NaI(Tl) gamma detector 3'' x 3'' and 1024 multichannel analyzer. The dilution technique was used by mixing Fe 2 O 3 or pure sand into the sample before irradiation. In this study self shielding effect in the analysis of tungsten was solved and the detection limit of the tungsten in the sample was about 0.5%

  1. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  2. A bulk tungsten tile for JET: Heat flux tests in the MARION facility on the power-handling performance and validation of the thermal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, Ph.; Altmann, H.; Chaumet, P.; Joffrin, E.; Knaup, M.; Matthews, G.F.; Neubauer, O.; Nicolai, D.; Riccardo, V.; Tanchuk, V.; Thompson, V.; Uhlemann, R.; Samm, U.

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the ITER-like Wall (ILW) for the JET tokamak, a divertor row made of bulk tungsten material has been developed for the position where the outer strike point is located in most of the foreseen plasma configurations. In the absence of active cooling, this represents a formidable challenge when one considers the temperature reached by tungsten (T W,surf > 2000 deg. C) and the vertical gradient ∂T/∂z = 5 x 10 4 K/m. As the development is drawing to an end and most components are in production, actual 1:1 prototypes are exposed to an ion beam with a power density around 7 MW/m 2 on the plasma-facing surface. Advantage is taken of the flexibility of the MARION facility to bombard the tungsten stack under shallow angles of incidence (∼6 o ) with a powerful beam of ions and neutrals (>70 MW/m 2 on axis). The shallow angles are important, with respect to the toroidal wetted surface, for properly simulating the expected performance under actual tokamak conditions. The MARION tests have been used to validate for a few typical cases the thermal calculations that were steadily developed along with the tungsten tile and, at the same time, to gather information on the actual temperatures of individual components. The latter is an important factor to a finer estimation of the power handling capabilities.

  3. Effects of tungsten and titanium oxide nanoparticles on the diazotrophic growth and metals acquisition by Azotobacter vinelandii under molybdenum limiting condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Patrick; Darnajoux, Romain; Phalyvong, Karine; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2013-02-19

    The acquisition of essential metals, such as the metal cofactors (molybdenum (Mo) and iron (Fe)) of the nitrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonium, is critical to N(2) fixing bacteria in soil. The release of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) to the environment could be detrimental to N(2) fixing bacteria by introducing a new source of toxic metals and by interfering with the acquisition of essential metals such as Mo. Since Mo has been reported to limit nonsymbiotic N(2) fixation in many ecosystems from tropical to cold temperate, this question is particularly acute in the context of Mo limitation. Using a combination of microbiology and analytical chemistry techniques, we have evaluated the effect of titanium (Ti) and tungsten (W) oxide nanoparticles on the diazotrophic growth and metals acquisition in pure culture of the ubiquitous N(2) fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii under Mo replete and Mo limiting conditions. We report that under our conditions (≤10 mg·L(-1)) TiO(2) NPs have no effects on the diazotrophic growth of A. vinelandii while WO(3) NPs are highly detrimental to the growth especially under Mo limiting conditions. Our results show that the toxicity of WO(3) NPs to A. vinelandii is due to an interference with the catechol-metalophores assisted uptake of Mo.

  4. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    satisfactorily, such as: which tungsten mineral phase is present in soil and to what extent is adsorption important in regu- lating soil solution concentrations... soil solution rather than discrete mineral phases. Information provided in this report will assist the following organizations in future decision...the soil solution ERDC TR-11-1 43 must affect tungsten speciation in other ways. The precipitation of soil minerals also would limit tungsten

  5. Testing the limits of gradient sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinal Lakhani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect a chemical gradient is fundamental to many cellular processes. In multicellular organisms gradient sensing plays an important role in many physiological processes such as wound healing and development. Unicellular organisms use gradient sensing to move (chemotaxis or grow (chemotropism towards a favorable environment. Some cells are capable of detecting extremely shallow gradients, even in the presence of significant molecular-level noise. For example, yeast have been reported to detect pheromone gradients as shallow as 0.1 nM/μm. Noise reduction mechanisms, such as time-averaging and the internalization of pheromone molecules, have been proposed to explain how yeast cells filter fluctuations and detect shallow gradients. Here, we use a Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion model of ligand-receptor dynamics to test the effectiveness of these mechanisms and to determine the limits of gradient sensing. In particular, we develop novel simulation methods for establishing chemical gradients that not only allow us to study gradient sensing under steady-state conditions, but also take into account transient effects as the gradient forms. Based on reported measurements of reaction rates, our results indicate neither time-averaging nor receptor endocytosis significantly improves the cell's accuracy in detecting gradients over time scales associated with the initiation of polarized growth. Additionally, our results demonstrate the physical barrier of the cell membrane sharpens chemical gradients across the cell. While our studies are motivated by the mating response of yeast, we believe our results and simulation methods will find applications in many different contexts.

  6. Manufacturing and testing of self-passivating tungsten alloys of different composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Calvo

    2016-12-01

    Bulk W-15Cr, W-10Cr-2Ti and W-12Cr-0.5Y alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying followed by can encapsulation and HIP. This route resulted in fully dense materials with nano-structured grains. The ability of Ti and especially of Y to inhibit grain growth was observed in the W-10Cr-2Ti and W-12Cr-0.5Y alloys. Besides, Y formed Y-rich oxide nano-precipitates at the grain boundaries, and is thus expected to improve the mechanical behaviour of the Y-containing alloy. Isothermal oxidation tests at 800 ºC (1073K and oxidation tests under accident-like conditions revealed that the W-12Cr-0.5Y alloy exhibits the best oxidation behaviour of all alloys, especially in the accident-like scenario. Preliminary HHF tests performed at GLADIS indicated that the W-10Cr-2Ti alloy is able to withstand power densities of 2 MW/m2 without significant damage of the bulk structure. Thermo-shock tests at JUDITH-1 to simulate mitigated disruptions resulted in chipping of part of the surface of the as-HIPed W-10Cr-2Ti alloy. An additional thermal treatment at 1600 °C (1873K improves the thermo-shock resistance of the W-10Cr-2Ti alloy since only crack formation is observed.

  7. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  8. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  9. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-15

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  10. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  11. RadBall Technology Testing and MCNP Modeling of the Tungsten Collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Foley, Trevor Q; Coleman, J Rusty; Jannik, G Timothy; Holmes, Christopher J; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall(™), which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall(™) consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall(™) has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall(™) technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall(™) testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  12. RadBall™ Technology Testing and MCNP Modeling of the Tungsten Collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Coleman, J. Rusty; Jannik, G. Timothy; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall™, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall™ consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall™ has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall™ technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall™ testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL. PMID:21617740

  13. Limitations of ''margin'' in qualification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, R.L.; Gillen, K.T.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out investigations of polymer radiation degradation behaviors which have brought to light a number of reasons why this concept of margin can break down. First of all, we have found that dose-rate effects vary greatly in magnitude. Thus, based on high dose-rate testing, poor materials with large dose-rate effects may be selected over better materials with small effects. Also, in certain cases, material properties have been found to level out (as with PVC) or reverse trend (as with buna-n) at high doses, so that ''margin'' may be ineffective, misleading, or counterproductive. For Viton, the material properties were found to change in opposite directions at high and low dose rates, making ''margin'' inappropriate. The underlying problem with the concept of ''margin'' is that differences in aging conditions can lead to fundamental differences in degradation mechanisms

  14. Tungsten and tungsten alloys by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadjhamida, A.; German, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten has a historical link with powder metallurgy and there is continued progress in expanding the available compositions and processing options. This paper starts with an introduction to the history of tungsten powder metallurgy and use this as a basis for analyzing some of the current trends. The literature base in tungsten processing is expanding and includes new alloys, microstructures, and processing routes. A few examples will be emphasize here to produce a frame work for this program, including description of sintering mechanisms for tungsten, liquid phase sintering advances, hot consolidation fundamentals, and options for complex shaping using powder injection modeling. For this base, subsequent presentations will expand on these fundamental advances

  15. Impact of residual by-products from tungsten film deposition on process integration due to nonuniformity of the tungsten film

    CERN Document Server

    Sidhwa, A; Gandy, T; Melosky, S; Brown, W; Ang, S; Naseem, H; Ulrich, R

    2002-01-01

    The effects of residual by products from a tungsten film deposition process and their impact on process integration due to the nonuniformity of the tungsten film were investigated in this work. The tungsten film deposition process involves three steps: nucleation, stabilization, and tungsten bulk fill. Six experiments were conducted in search for a solution to the problem. The resulting data suggest that excess nitrogen left in the chamber following the tungsten nucleation step, along with residual by products, causes a shift in the tungsten film uniformity during the tungsten bulk fill process. Data reveal that, due to the residual by products, an abnormal grain growth occurs causing a variation in the tungsten thickness across the wafer during the bulk fill step. Although several possible solutions were revealed by the experiments, potential integration problems limited the acceptable solutions to one. The solution chosen was the introduction of a 10 s pumpdown immediately following the nucleation step. Thi...

  16. Toughness enhancement of tungsten reinforced with short tungsten fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, L.H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, Q.F., E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, T.; Wang, X.P.; Hao, T.; Liu, C.S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-06

    The feasibility and toughening efficiency of the short tungsten fibre reinforcement on tungsten were investigated in W{sub f}/W composites fabricated by powder metallurgy method of spark plasma sintering. Fibres in the composites presented a Z-free laminar structure. Partial recrystallization of fibre grains occurred but fibre crack or damage was not detected. Fracture energy of W{sub f}/W composites was estimated in tensile tests, and the results indicated great toughness improvement over pure tungsten in virtue of frictional pullout and plastic deformation of fibres, and matrix-fibres interfacial debonding since 873 K. The specimen with mass fraction of 10% and fibre diameter of 100 µm exhibits the largest elongation of 9±1.1% and the highest ultimate strength of 482±13 MPa at 873 K.

  17. The Model Identification Test: A Limited Verbal Science Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the production of a test with a low verbal load for use with elementary school science students. Animated films were used to present appropriate and inappropriate models of the behavior of particles of matter. (AL)

  18. Experimental tests concerning the use of the tungsten-copper couple design concept on the divertor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, F.; Ghiselli, P.; Tommei, G.; Piatti, G.; Schiller, P.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of brazing tungsten armour to the Cu heat sink to form divertor plates for the INTOR fusion reactor raises fabrication problems to bypass thermal stresses produced by the high thermal flux and the differences in the thermal expansion of the two components. To demonstrate that Cu-W structures are able to withstand the anticipated operating conditions, large Cu-W samples have been prepared by means of different techniques. Samples have been studied before and after thermal cycling (10 4 cycles). (author)

  19. Interpretation of the deep cracking phenomenon of tungsten monoblock targets observed in high-heat-flux fatigue tests at 20 MW/m"2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A theoretical interpretation is presented for deep crack of W monoblocks at 20 MW/m"2. • A consecutive process of crack initiation and growth was modeled in two stages. • The lifetime to crack initiation and the driving force of fracture are assessed. • Numerical predictions in this study agree well with the experimental findings. - Abstract: The HHF qualification tests conducted on the ITER divertor target prototypes showed that the tungsten monoblock armor suffered from deep cracking due to fatigue, when the applied high-heat-flux load approaches 20 MW/m"2. In spite of the critical implication of the deep cracking of armor on the structural integrity of a whole target component, no rigorous interpretation has been given to date. In this paper, a theoretical interpretation of the observed deep cracking feature is presented. A two-stage modeling approach is employed where deep cracking is thought to be a consecutive process of crack initiation and crack growth, which is assumed to be caused by plastic fatigue and brittle facture, respectively. The fatigue lifetime to crack initiation on the armor surface and the crack tip load of brittle fracture are assessed as a function of crack length and heat flux loads. The potential mechanisms of deep cracking are discussed for a typical slow transient high-heat-flux load cycle. It is shown that the quantitative predictions delivered in this study agree well with the observed findings offering insight into the nature of tungsten armor failure.

  20. Testing of low Z coated limiters in tokamak fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitely, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.; Langley, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive testing on a laboratory scale has been used to select those coatings most suitable for this environment. From this testing which included pulsed electron beam heating, low energy ion bombardment and arcing, chemical vapor deposited coating of TiB 2 and TiC on Poco graphite substrates have been selected and tested as limiters in ISX. Both limiter materials gave clean, stable, reproducible tokamak discharges the first day of operation. After one weeks exposure, the TiC limiter showed only superficial damage with no coating failure. The TiB 2 limiter had some small areas of coating failure. TiC coated graphite limiters have also been briefly tested in the tokamaks Alcator and PDX with favorable results

  1. Influences on and Limitations of Classical Test Theory Reliability Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Margery E.

    It is incorrect to say "the test is reliable" because reliability is a function not only of the test itself, but of many factors. The present paper explains how different factors affect classical reliability estimates such as test-retest, interrater, internal consistency, and equivalent forms coefficients. Furthermore, the limits of classical test…

  2. Microscopic mapping of specific contact resistances and long-term reliability tests on 4H-silicon carbide using sputtered titanium tungsten contacts for high temperature device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.-K.; Zetterling, C.-M.; Ostling, M.

    2002-07-01

    We report on the microscopic mapping of specific contact resistances (rhoc) and long-term reliability tests using sputtered titanium tungsten (TiW) ohmic contacts to highly doped n-type epilayers of 4H-silicon carbide. The TiW ohmic contacts showed good uniformity with low contact resistivity of 3.3 x10-5 Omega cm2. Microscopic mapping of the rhoc showed that the rhoc had a distribution that decreased from the center to the edge of the wafer. This distribution of the rhoc is caused by variation of the doping concentration of the wafer. Sacrificial oxidation at high temperature partially recovered inductively coupled plasma etch damage. TiW contacts with platinum and gold capping layers have stable specific contact resistance at 500 and 600 degC in a vacuum chamber for 308 h.

  3. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  4. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Han, Y; Höschen, T; Zhao, P; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Jasper, B; Linsmeier, Ch

    2016-01-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself. (paper)

  5. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Feichtmayer, A; Fuhr, M; Gietl, H; Höschen, T; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (W f /W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of W f /W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μ m as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μ m have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour. (paper)

  6. Initial testing of coated limiters in ISX-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Emerson, L.C.; Whitley, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Low-Z coatings on graphite substrates have been developed for testing as limiters in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. Laboratory and tokamak testings have been accomplished. The laboratory tests included thermal shock experiments by means of pulsed e-beam irradiation, arcing experiments, and hydrogen and xenon ion erosion experiments. The tokamak testing consisted of ohmically heated plasma exposures with energy depositions up to 10 kJ/discharge on the limiters. The coatings, applied by chemical vapor deposition, consisted of TiB 2 and TiC deposited on POCO graphite substrates

  7. Micro-powder injection moulding of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeep, B.

    2007-12-01

    For He-cooled Divertors as integral components of future fusion power plants, about 300000 complex shaped tungsten components are to be fabricated. Tungsten is the favoured material because of its excellent properties (high melting point, high hardness, high sputtering resistance, high thermal conductivity). However, the material's properties cause major problems for large scale production of complex shaped components. Due to the resistance of tungsten to mechanical machining, new fabrication technologies have to be developed. Powder injection moulding as a well established shaping technology for a large scale production of complex or even micro structured parts might be a suitable method to produce tungsten components for fusion applications but is not yet commercially available. The present thesis is dealing with the development of a powder injection moulding process for micro structured tungsten components. To develop a suitable feedstock, the powder particle properties, the binder formulation and the solid load were optimised. To meet the requirements for a replication of micro patterned cavities, a special target was to define the smallest powder particle size applicable for micro-powder injection moulding. To investigate the injection moulding performance of the developed feedstocks, experiments were successfully carried out applying diverse cavities with structural details in micro dimension. For debinding of the green bodies, a combination of solvent debinding and thermal debinding has been adopted for injection moulded tungsten components. To develop a suitable debinding strategy, a variation of the solvent debinding time, the heating rate and the binder formulation was performed. For investigating the thermal consolidation behaviour of tungsten components, sinter experiments were carried out applying tungsten powders suitable for micro-powder injection moulding. First mechanical tests of the sintered samples showed promising material properties such as a

  8. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Analyses and characterisation of tungsten foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Andreas; Yi Xiaoou; Armstrong, David E.J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been attempted for several years to synthesise a tungsten material with a low brittle-to-ductile transition temperature and a high fracture toughness that can be used for structural parts. It was shown in our previous work that tungsten foil is ductile at room temperature and that this ductility can be transformed to bulk by synthesising a tungsten laminate. In this work we want to focus on tungsten foil and assess the microstructure as well as the mechanical properties of the foil. The assessment of the microstructure of 0.1 mm tungsten foil will be performed using electron microscopy. It will be shown that the grains of the tungsten foil have a dimension of 0.5 μm × 3 μm × 15 μm and a clear texture in (1 0 0) 〈0 1 1〉. This texture becomes even more pronounced by annealing. Three-point-bending tests with tungsten foil, as-received, will define the barriers: ductile at room temperature and brittle in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C). This shows that the ductility is a thermally activated process. Recrystallised tungsten foil (annealed for 1 h/2700 °C) shows ductile material behaviour at 200 °C. The paper closes with a discussion on the reasons of the ductility of 0.1 mm tungsten foil. These might be the ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructure or, in other words, a nano microstructure (see tungsten foil as-received), the high amount of mobile edge dislocations, and/or the foil effect, which means that dislocations can move to the surface and are annihilated (see tungsten foil recrystallised).

  9. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L.M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Byun, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile. - Highlights: • Fusion reactors need a tough, ductile tungsten plasma-facing material. • The unirradiated tungsten-copper laminate is more ductile than tungsten alone. • After neutron irradiation, the composite has significantly less ductility. • The tungsten behavior appears to dominate the overall composite behavior.

  10. Tungsten metallizing alumina--yttria ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1977-03-01

    The ease with which high-alumina bodies may be metallized with tungsten is improved by additions of yttria to the alumina. Mechanisms of this bonding process were studied by use of optical and electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and tensile tests. Variables studied included yttria content of the body and the firing temperature during metallizing. The study showed that a reaction between the tungsten and the yttrogarnet grain boundary phase markedly improved adherence

  11. Verification methods for treaties limiting and banning nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, N.P.

    1998-01-01

    Treaty on limitation of underground nuclear weapon tests and treaty on world banning of nuclear tests contribute to and accompany the process of nuclear disarmament. Test ban in three (Moscow treaty of 1963) as well as the Threshold Test Ban up to 1991 was controlled only with national means. But since 1991 nuclear test threshold of 150 kt has been measured with hydrodynamic and tele seismic methods and checked by the inspection. Distinctive feature of this control is that control is that it is bilateral. This conforms to Treaty on limitation of underground nuclear weapon tests signed by two countries - USA and USSR. The inspection at the place of tests requires monitoring of the test site of the party conducting a test and geological information of rock in the area of explosion. In the treaty of the World Nuclear Test Ban the following ways of international control are provided for: - seismologic measurements; - radionuclide measurements; - hydro-acoustics measurements; - infra-sound measurements; - inspection at the place of the tests conduction

  12. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  13. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  14. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  15. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  16. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  19. Substitution of thoriated tungsten electrodes in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Piller, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten electrodes are frequently used for inert gas welding (TIG/WIG). The use of these electrodes can lead to doses which are well above the limit for the general population (1mSv/year). This has been shown by different investigations, for example from the ''Berufsgenossenschaft''. With these findings in mind, the regulatory authorities (Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) and Swiss National Accident Insurance Association (Suva)) started in 1999 to examine the justification of thoriated tungsten electrodes and a possible substitution with products containing no radioactive material. Up to this time, the use of thoriated tungsten electrodes could be justified since no thorium-free products leading to comparable results were available on the market. This was also the reason why the SFOPH approved several types of these electrodes. Discussions with formation centers for welding and inquiries made at welding shops, trading companies and producers showed that in the mean-time thorium-free products with comparable welding specifications and results became available on the market. Since the 1 January 2004, thoriated tungsten electrodes can only be used if the user has obtained the corresponding license from the SFOPH. The use of thoriated tungsten electrodes is thus not completely forbidden, but very strict conditions have to be fulfilled. Up to now and due to the involvement of the relevant partners, the substitution process has not met any problem. Neither trading companies nor users made any opposition and no request for obtaining a license for thoriated tungsten electrodes was made. (orig.)

  20. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  1. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  2. Juvenile food limitation in standard tests: a warning to ecotoxicologists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmer, E.I.; Jager, T.; Ducrot, V.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Standard ecotoxicological tests are as simple as possible and food sources are mainly chosen for practical reasons. Since some organisms change their food preferences during the life-cycle, they might be food limited at some stage if we do not account for such a switch. As organisms tend to respond

  3. Fracture peculiarities in ceramic tungsten at different temperatures in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Stress-strain diagrams and results of metallographic analyses are presented for the ceramic tungsten samples tested for fracture toughness under conditions of eccentric tension at different temperatures (20...1600 deg C) in vacuum. The tungsten fracture is shown to be of brittle nature within the whole temperature range studied, but the fracture process has its own peculiarities at different test temperatures

  4. Force Limited Random Vibration Test of TESS Camera Mass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlicek, Alexandra; Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Rey, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a spaceborne instrument consisting of four wide field-of-view-CCD cameras dedicated to the discovery of exoplanets around the brightest stars. As part of the environmental testing campaign, force limiting was used to simulate a realistic random vibration launch environment. While the force limit vibration test method is a standard approach used at multiple institutions including Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), it is still difficult to find an actual implementation process in the literature. This paper describes the step-by-step process on how the force limit method was developed and applied on the TESS camera mass model. The process description includes the design of special fixtures to mount the test article for properly installing force transducers, development of the force spectral density using the semi-empirical method, estimation of the fuzzy factor (C2) based on the mass ratio between the supporting structure and the test article, subsequent validating of the C2 factor during the vibration test, and calculation of the C.G. accelerations using the Root Mean Square (RMS) reaction force in the spectral domain and the peak reaction force in the time domain.

  5. Limited streamer chamber testing and quality evaluation in ASTRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzivino, G.; Bianco, S.; Casaccia, R.

    1991-01-01

    Limited streamer chambers are extensively used for high-energy and nuclear physics experiments in accelerator and underground laboratories. The tracking system of LVD, an underground experiment to study muons and nutrino astronomy, will use roughly 15000 limited streamer chambers and 100000 external pickup strips with digital readout electronics. In the article the different aspects of chamber operation that serve to establish a testing procedure and to define acceptance criteria for selecting reliable and long-life devices, are discussed. The procedures and the results obtained from a long-term test to evaluate streamer chamber quality, based upon a sample of 2900 items, are described. The selection tests and the long-term observations have been performed in the ASTRA laboratory, established at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati to carry out quality control procedures for streamer chambers on a large scale and in a controlled environment

  6. Fatigue evaluation of piping systems with limited vibration test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, S.N.

    1990-11-01

    The safety-related piping in a nuclear power plant may be subjected to pump- or fluid-induced vibrations that, in general, affect only local areas of the piping systems. Pump- or fluid-induced vibrations typically are characterized by low levels of amplitudes and a high number of cycles over the lifetime of plant operation. Thus, the resulting fatigue damage to the piping systems could be an important safety concern. In general, tests and/or analyses are used to evaluate and qualify the piping systems. Test data, however, may be limited because of lack of instrumentation in critical piping locations and/or because of difficulty in obtaining data in inaccessible areas. This paper describes and summarizes a method to use limited pipe vibration test data, along with analytical harmonic response results from finite-element analyses, to assess the fatigue damage of nuclear power plant safety-related piping systems. 5 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs

  7. Plasma etching of patterned tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franssila, S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma etching of tungsten is discussed from the viewpoint of thin film structure and integrated circuit process engineering. The emphasis is on patterned tungsten etching for silicon device and X-ray mask fabrication. After introducing tungsten etch chemistries and mechanisms, microstructural aspects of tungsten films (crystal structure, grain size, film density, defects, impurities) in relation to etching are discussed. Approaches to etch process optimization are presented, and the current state-of-the-art of patterned tungsten etching is reviewed. (orig.)

  8. NCAP test improvements with pretensioners and load limiters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Marie

    2004-03-01

    New Car Assessment Program (NCAP) test scores, measured by the United States Department of Transportation's (USDOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), were analyzed in order to assess the benefits of equipping safety belt systems with pretensioners and load limiters. Safety belt pretensioners retract the safety belt almost instantly in a crash to remove excess slack. They tie the occupant to the vehicle's deceleration early during the crash, reducing the peak load experienced by the occupant. Load limiters and other energy management systems allow safety belts to yield in a crash, preventing the shoulder belt from directing too much energy on the chest of the occupant. In NCAP tests, vehicles are crashed into a fixed barrier at 35 mph. During the test, instruments measure the accelerations of the head and chest, as well as the force on the legs of anthropomorphic dummies secured in the vehicle by safety belts. NCAP data from model year 1998 through 2001 cars and light trucks were examined. The combination of pretensioners and load limiters is estimated to reduce Head Injury Criterion (HIC) by 232, chest acceleration by an average of 6.6 g's, and chest deflection (displacement) by 10.6 mm, for drivers and right front passengers. The unit used to measure chest acceleration (g) is defined as a unit of force equal to the force exerted by gravity. All of these reductions are statistically significant. When looked at individually, pretensioners are more effective in reducing HIC scores for both drivers and right front passengers, as well as chest acceleration and chest deflection scores for drivers. Load limiters show greater reductions in chest acceleration and chest deflection scores for right front passengers. By contrast, in make-models for which neither load limiters nor pretensioners have been added, there is little change during 1998 to 2001 in HIC, chest acceleration, or chest deflection values in NCAP tests.

  9. Limited test data: The choice between confidence limits and inverse probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, P.

    1975-01-01

    For a unit which has been successfully designed to a high standard of reliability, any test programme of reasonable size will result in only a small number of failures. In these circumstances the failure rate estimated from the tests will depend on the statistical treatment applied. When a large number of units is to be manufactured, an unexpected high failure rate will certainly result in a large number of failures, so it is necessary to guard against optimistic unrepresentative test results by using a confidence limit approach. If only a small number of production units is involved, failures may not occur even with a higher than expected failure rate, and so one may be able to accept a method which allows for the possibility of either optimistic or pessimistic test results, and in this case an inverse probability approach, based on Bayes' theorem, might be used. The paper first draws attention to an apparently significant difference in the numerical results from the two methods, particularly for the overall probability of several units arranged in redundant logic. It then discusses a possible objection to the inverse method, followed by a demonstration that, for a large population and a very reasonable choice of prior probability, the inverse probability and confidence limit methods give the same numerical result. Finally, it is argued that a confidence limit approach is overpessimistic when a small number of production units is involved, and that both methods give the same answer for a large population. (author)

  10. WORKING MEMORY CAPACITY TEST REVEALS SUBJECTS DIFFICULTIES MANAGING LIMITED CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Ershova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Free recall consists of two separate stages: the emptying of working memory and reactivation [5]. The Tarnow Unchunkable Test (TUT, [7] uses double integer items to separate out only the first stage by making it difficult to reactivate items due to the lack of intra-item relationships.193 Russian college students were tested via the internet version of the TUT. The average number of items remembered in the 3 item test was 2.54 items. In the 4 item test, the average number of items decreased to 2.38. This, and a number of other qualitative distribution differences between the 3 and 4 item tests, indicate that the average capacity limit of working memory has been reached at 3 items. This provides the first direct measurement of the unchunkable capacity limit of number items.Difficulties in managing working memory occurred as most subjects remembered less as the number of items increased beyond capacity and failed to remember a single item in at least one out of three 4 item trials. The Pearson correlation between the total recall of 3 and 4 items was a small 38%.

  11. Design Aspects and Test of an Inductive Fault Current Limiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsénio Pedro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic shielding inductive fault current limiters with high temperature superconducting tapes are considered as emerging devices that provide technology for the advent of modern power grids. The development of such limiters requires magnetic iron cores and leads to several design challenges regarding the constitutive parts of the limiter, namely the primary and secondary windings. Preliminary tests in a laboratory scale prototype have been carried out considering an assembly designed for simplicity in which the optimization of the magnetic coupling between the primary and secondary was not the main focus. This work addresses the design configuration of an inductive current limiter prototype regarding the assembly of the primary and secondary windings in the core. The prototype is based on a closed magnetic core wound by a primary, built from a normal electric conductor, and a short-circuited secondary, built from first generation superconducting tape. Four different design configurations are considered. Through experimental tests, the performance of such prototype is discussed and compared, in terms of normal and fault operation regimes. The results show that all the configurations assure effective magnetic shielding at normal operation regime, however, at fault operation regime, there are differences among configurations.

  12. Test of a beryllium limiter in the tokamak UNITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackmann, J.; Uhlenbusch, J.

    1984-01-01

    Beryllium rail limiters are inserted into the tokamak UNITOR to study the compatibility of this material with the plasma. The power load onto the limiter surface is 1-2 kW/cm 2 during the plasma pulse length of 50 ms duration. The concentration of heavy (Cr) and light (O) impurities is monitored by means of spectroscopy. In comparison with other materials tested likewise (graphite, Ni, Al 2 O 3 , TiC, SiC, SS) the Be-experiments have shown the following improvements: (a) the concentration of heavy impurities is considerably reduced, (b) this reduction is preserved if the poloidal Be-limiters are retracted from the plasma, (c) the plasma resistivity is diminished, (d) the occurrence of disruptions decreases. A total amount of 6 mg beryllium was found distributed on the inner torus wall after 1500 shots. The decontamination of the apparatus was performed without major problems. Only very little volatile Be-dust was detected, and peripheric parts (pumps, mass spectrometer etc.) were not contaminated. The beryllium released from the limiters was found to be entirely deposited on the torus wall mainly in the vicinity of the limiters. (orig.)

  13. Characterization of plasma coated tungsten heavy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Kapoor, D.; Lankford, J. Jr.; Nicholls, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The detrimental environmental impact of Depleted Uranium-based penetrators have led to tremendous development efforts in the area of tungsten heavy alloy based penetrators. One line of investigation involves the coating of tungsten heavy alloys with materials that are prone to shear localization. Plasma spraying of Inconel 718 and 4340 steel have been used to deposit dense coatings on tungsten heavy alloy substrates. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the coating primarily in terms of its microstructure and a special push-out test. The paper describes the results of the push-out tests and analyzes some of the possible failure mechanisms by carrying out microstructural characterization of the failed rings obtained from the push out tests

  14. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States); Oksuz, Betul Akgol [Genome Technology Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Shen, Steven [Center for Health Informatics and Bioinformatics, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten's ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer-related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA sequencing. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data show the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. - Highlights: • Tungsten (W) induces cell transformation and increases migration in vitro. • W increases xenograft growth in nude mice. • W altered the expression of cancer-related genes such as those involved in leukemia. • Some of the dysregulated leukemia genes include, CD74, CTGF, MST4, and HOXB5. • For the first time, data is presented that demonstrates tungsten's carcinogenic potential.

  15. Kinetics of low pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten silicide from dichlorocilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, D.; Raupp, G.B.; Hillman, J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on experiments to determine the intrinsic surface reaction rate dependences and film properties' dependence on local reactant partial pressures and wafer temperature in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten silicide from dichlorosilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Films were deposited in a commercial-scale Spectrum CVD cold wall single wafer reactor under near differential, gradientless conditions. Over the range of process conditions investigated, deposition rate was found to be first order in dichlorosillane and negative second order in tungsten hexafluoride partial pressure. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction limited regime was found to be 70-120 kcal/mol. The silicon to tungsten ratio of as deposited silicide films ranged from 1.1 to 2.4, and increased with increasing temperature and dichlorosillane partial pressure, and decreased with increasing tungsten hexafluoride pressure. These results suggest that the apparent silicide deposition rate and composition are controlled by the relative rates of at least two competing reactions which deposit stoichiometric tungsten silicides and/or silicon

  16. Improvement of non destructive infrared test bed SATIR for examination of actively cooled tungsten armour Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignal, N., E-mail: nicolas.vignal@cea.fr; Desgranges, C.; Cantone, V.; Richou, M.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Magaud, Ph.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Non destructive infrared techniques for control ITER like PFCs. • Reflective surface such as W induce a measurement temperature error. • Numerical data processing by evaluation of the local emissivity. • SATIR test bed can control metallic surface with low and variable emissivity. -- Abstract: For steady state (magnetic) thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability and have to withstand heat fluxes in the range 10–20 MW m{sup −2}, advanced Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) have been developed. The importance of PFCs for operating tokamaks requests to verify their manufacturing quality before mounting. SATIR is an IR test bed validated and recognized as a reliable and suitable tool to detect cooling defaults on PFCs with CFC armour material. Current tokamak developments implement metallic armour materials for first wall and divertor; their low emissivity causes several difficulties for infrared thermography control. We present SATIR infrared thermography test bed improvements for W monoblocks components without defect and with calibrated defects. These results are compared to ultrasonic inspection. This study demonstrates that SATIR method is fully usable for PFCs with low emissivity armour material.

  17. Improvement of non destructive infrared test bed SATIR for examination of actively cooled tungsten armour Plasma Facing Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignal, N.; Desgranges, C.; Cantone, V.; Richou, M.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Magaud, Ph.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Non destructive infrared techniques for control ITER like PFCs. • Reflective surface such as W induce a measurement temperature error. • Numerical data processing by evaluation of the local emissivity. • SATIR test bed can control metallic surface with low and variable emissivity. -- Abstract: For steady state (magnetic) thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability and have to withstand heat fluxes in the range 10–20 MW m −2 , advanced Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) have been developed. The importance of PFCs for operating tokamaks requests to verify their manufacturing quality before mounting. SATIR is an IR test bed validated and recognized as a reliable and suitable tool to detect cooling defaults on PFCs with CFC armour material. Current tokamak developments implement metallic armour materials for first wall and divertor; their low emissivity causes several difficulties for infrared thermography control. We present SATIR infrared thermography test bed improvements for W monoblocks components without defect and with calibrated defects. These results are compared to ultrasonic inspection. This study demonstrates that SATIR method is fully usable for PFCs with low emissivity armour material

  18. Adhesion of non-selective CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, D.W.; Wilson, R.H.; Sanchez-Martinez, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion of non-selective, CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide is a critical issue in the development of tungsten as a metalization for VLSI circuitry. Without special adhesion promoters, tungsten deposited from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/ has typically failed a standard tape test over all types of silicon oxides and nitrides. The reasons for failure of thin films, and CVD tungsten in particular are explored along with standard techniques for improving adhesion of thin films. Experiments are reported which include a number of sputtered metals as adhesion promoters, as well as chemical and plasma treatment of the oxide surface. Sputtered molybdenum is clearly the superior adhesion promoting layer from these tests. Traditional adhesion layers such as chromium or titanium failed as adhesion layers for CVD tungsten possibly due to chemical reactions between the WF/sub 6/ and Cr or Ti

  19. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  20. Some Limits of Biocompatibility Testing for Lipophilic Leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne D. Lucas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical device standards recommend using both a polar and non-polar solvent to extract materials prior to in vitro testing. Testing lipophilic extract in cell culture systems is limited by the toxicity of the lipophilic solvents used in extraction. Use of agar overlay and direct contact methods do not directly address the problem of testing for highly lipophilic leachates from device or material extracts. This particular problem was approached by 1 use of hydrotropes, and 2 by sealing the suspended cells in dialysis tubing and placing it directly in oil or media. The use of hydrotropes to eliminate micelle formation and increase the solubility of lipophilic compounds was not useful as the hydrotropes themselves were toxic to the cells at concentrations that significantly increased analyte solubility. Diffusion of hydrophobic compounds from either peanut oil or cell culture media into the dialysis tubing where the test cells in media reside was significantly higher for the cell culture media than the peanut oil. There were significant differences in toxicity for cells in dialysis tubing from devices extracted between peanut oil and media. This study illustrates the importance of examining if cell toxicity due to micelle formation versus that of soluble chemicals for lipophilic extracts.

  1. The effect of tungsten on the tensile and creep rupture strength of 12 CrMoV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakes, G.; Orr, J.

    1978-01-01

    A collaborative project involving the Brown-Firth Research Laboratories, the Sheffield Laboratories of the British Steel Corporation and Tube Investments Limited has been carried out to assess the effect of a controlled tungsten addition (0.5%) on the tensile and rupture properties of 12 CrMoV steel. The results obtained indicate that 0.5% tungsten increases the tensile properties at room temperature by approximately 3% but this diminishes with increasing test temperature. The creep rupture properties of the tungsten-bearing material showed a marked short time (500-1000 hours) strength advantage over the tungsten-free material at temperatures up to 650 0 C. At longer times and higher temperatures this stress advantage was reduced considerably so that at times in the region of 10,000 to 15,000 hours it was approximately 5%. In view of the limited data generated, it was found impossible to extrapolate with confidence to longer times but there was, however, no indication that a significant strength advantage is to be anticipated at 100,000 hours for the tungsten-bearing material. (author)

  2. Sports drug testing using complementary matrices: Advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Tretzel, Laura; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2016-10-25

    Today, routine doping controls largely rely on testing whole blood, serum, and urine samples. These matrices allow comprehensively covering inorganic as well as low and high molecular mass organic analytes relevant to doping controls and are collecting and transferring from sampling sites to accredited anti-doping laboratories under standardized conditions. Various aspects including time and cost-effectiveness as well as intrusiveness and invasiveness of the sampling procedure but also analyte stability and breadth of the contained information have been motivation to consider and assess values potentially provided and added to modern sports drug testing programs by alternative matrices. Such alternatives could be dried blood spots (DBS), dried plasma spots (DPS), oral fluid (OF), exhaled breath (EB), and hair. In this review, recent developments and test methods concerning these alternative matrices and expected or proven contributions as well as limitations of these specimens in the context of the international anti-doping fight are presented and discussed, guided by current regulations for prohibited substances and methods of doping as established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Focusing on literature published between 2011 and 2015, examples for doping control analytical assays concerning non-approved substances, anabolic agents, peptide hormones/growth factors/related substances and mimetics, β 2 -agonists, hormone and metabolic modulators, diuretics and masking agents, stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, glucocorticoids, and beta-blockers were selected to outline the advantages and limitations of the aforementioned alternative matrices as compared to conventional doping control samples (i.e. urine and blood/serum). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Construction and testing of a large scale prototype of a silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter for a future lepton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouëné, Jérémy

    2013-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration is preparing large scale prototypes of highly granular calorimeters for detectors to be operated at a future linear electron positron collider. After several beam campaigns at DESY, CERN and FNAL, the CALICE collaboration has demonstrated the principle of highly granular electromagnetic calorimeters with a first prototype called physics prototype. The next prototype, called technological prototype, addresses the engineering challenges which come along with the realisation of highly granular calorimeters. This prototype will comprise 30 layers where each layer is composed of four 9×9 cm 2 silicon wafers. The front end electronics is integrated into the detector layers. The size of each pixel is 5×5 mm 2 . This prototype enters its construction phase. We present results of the first layers of the technological prototype obtained during beam test campaigns in spring and summer 2012. According to these results the signal over noise ratio of the detector exceeds the R and D goal of 10:1

  4. Tungsten behaviour under anodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas'ko, A.T.; Patsyuk, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical investigations have been carried out to identify the state of elements of the tungsten galvanic coating. Active zones on anode polarization curves in the hydrogen region of galvanic tungsten are established. The difference in the behaviour of monocrystal and galvanic tungsten electrodes is shown to be connected with the oxidation of hydrogen in the galvanic sediment

  5. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  6. Advantages and limitations of common testing methods for antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorati, R; Valgimigli, L

    2015-05-01

    Owing to the importance of antioxidants in the protection of both natural and man-made materials, a large variety of testing methods have been proposed and applied. These include methods based on inhibited autoxidation studies, which are better followed by monitoring the kinetics of oxygen consumption or of the formation of hydroperoxides, the primary oxidation products. Analytical determination of secondary oxidation products (e.g. carbonyl compounds) has also been used. The majority of testing methods, however, do not involve substrate autoxidation. They are based on the competitive bleaching of a probe (e.g. ORAC assay, β-carotene, crocin bleaching assays, and luminol assay), on reaction with a different probe (e.g. spin-trapping and TOSC assay), or they are indirect methods based on the reduction of persistent radicals (e.g. galvinoxyl, DPPH and TEAC assays), or of inorganic oxidizing species (e.g. FRAP, CUPRAC and Folin-Ciocalteu assays). Yet other methods are specific for preventive antioxidants. The relevance, advantages, and limitations of these methods are critically discussed, with respect to their chemistry and the mechanisms of antioxidant activity. A variety of cell-based assays have also been proposed, to investigate the biological activity of antioxidants. Their importance and critical aspects are discussed, along with arguments for the selection of the appropriate testing methods according to the different needs.

  7. Shear-limited test particle diffusion in 2-dimensional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, Francois; Driscoll, C. Fred; Dubin, Daniel H.E.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of test-particle diffusion in pure ion plasmas show 2D enhancements over the 3D rates, limited by shear in the plasma rotation ω E (r). The diffusion is due to 'long-range' ion-ion collisions in the quiescent, steady-state Mg + plasma. For short plasma length L p and low shear S≡r∂ω E /∂r, thermal ions bounce axially many times before shear separates them in θ, so the ions move in (r,θ) as bounce averaged 'rods' of charge (i.e. 2D point vortices). Experimentally, we vary the number of bounces over the range 0.2≤N b ≤10,000. For long plasmas with N b ≤1, we observe diffusion in quantitative agreement with the 3D theory of long-range ExB drift collisions. For shorter plasmas or lower shear, with N b >1, we measure diffusion rates enhanced by up to 100x. For exceedingly small she0ar, i.e. N b ≥1000, we observe diffusion rates consistent with the Taylor-McNamara estimates for a shear-free thermal plasma. Overall, the data shows fair agreement with Dubin's new theory of 2D diffusion in shear, which predicts an enhancement of D 2D /D 3D ≅N b up to the Taylor-McNamara limit

  8. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, J. de; Cadoret, K; Martinez, L.; Veillet, D.; Millot, F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La 2 O 3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  9. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  10. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  11. Comparison of four tungsten alloys for use as ultrasonic thermometer sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1975-06-01

    Four tungsten alloy materials were evaluated for use as ultrasonic sensors: (a) tungsten, (b) tungsten-1 percent thoria, (c) tungsten-2 percent thoria, and (d) tungsten-26 percent rhenium. Four parameters were checked: (1) temperature sensitivity, (2) signal attenuation as a function of temperature, (3) temperature sensitivity as a function of frequency, and (4) relative signal attenuation as a function of frequency. The temperature sensors were designed for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) and Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactors. (U.S.)

  12. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejado, E., E-mail: elena.tejado@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CIME, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Munoz, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III, Leganés (Spain); Dias, M. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-12-15

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W–5wt.%Ta and W–15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300–1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  13. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejado, E.; Carvalho, P.A.; Munoz, A.; Dias, M.; Correia, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W–5wt.%Ta and W–15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300–1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  14. The WEST project: Current status of the ITER-like tungsten divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlian, M.; Bucalossi, J.; Corre, Y.; Ferlay, F.; Firdaouss, M.; Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Languille, P.; Lipa, M.; Richou, M.; Tsitrone, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We presented the ITER-like W components occurred for the WEST divertor. • The main features including key elements of the design were detailed. • The main results of studies investigating the integration constraints or issues were reported. • The WEST ITER-like divertor design reached a mature stage to enable the launching of the procurement phase. - Abstract: The WEST (W – for tungsten – Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) project is an upgrade of Tore Supra from a limiter based tokamak with carbon PFCs into an X-point divertor tokamak with full-tungsten armour while keeping its long discharge capability. The WEST project will primarily offer the key capability of testing for the first time the ITER technology in real plasma environment. In particular, the main divertor (i.e. the lower divertor) of the WEST project will be based on actively cooled tungsten monoblock components and will follow as closely as possible the design and the assembling technology, foreseen for the ITER divertor units. The current design of WEST ITER-like tungsten divertor has now reached a mature stage following the 2013 WEST Final Design Review. This paper presents the key elements of the design, reports the technological requirements and reviews the main design and integration issues

  15. The WEST project: Current status of the ITER-like tungsten divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr; Bucalossi, J.; Corre, Y.; Ferlay, F.; Firdaouss, M.; Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J.; Languille, P.; Lipa, M.; Richou, M.; Tsitrone, E.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We presented the ITER-like W components occurred for the WEST divertor. • The main features including key elements of the design were detailed. • The main results of studies investigating the integration constraints or issues were reported. • The WEST ITER-like divertor design reached a mature stage to enable the launching of the procurement phase. - Abstract: The WEST (W – for tungsten – Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) project is an upgrade of Tore Supra from a limiter based tokamak with carbon PFCs into an X-point divertor tokamak with full-tungsten armour while keeping its long discharge capability. The WEST project will primarily offer the key capability of testing for the first time the ITER technology in real plasma environment. In particular, the main divertor (i.e. the lower divertor) of the WEST project will be based on actively cooled tungsten monoblock components and will follow as closely as possible the design and the assembling technology, foreseen for the ITER divertor units. The current design of WEST ITER-like tungsten divertor has now reached a mature stage following the 2013 WEST Final Design Review. This paper presents the key elements of the design, reports the technological requirements and reviews the main design and integration issues.

  16. Tungsten Ions in Plasmas: Statistical Theory of Radiative-Collisional Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model for calculations of the collisional-radiative processes in plasmas with tungsten impurity was developed. The electron structure of tungsten multielectron ions is considered in terms of both the Thomas-Fermi model and the Brandt-Lundquist model of collective oscillations of atomic electron density. The excitation or ionization of atomic electrons by plasma electron impacts are represented as photo-processes under the action of flux of equivalent photons introduced by E. Fermi. The total electron impact single ionization cross-sections of ions Wk+ with respective rates have been calculated and compared with the available experimental and modeling data (e.g., CADW. Plasma radiative losses on tungsten impurity were also calculated in a wide range of electron temperatures 1 eV–20 keV. The numerical code TFATOM was developed for calculations of radiative-collisional processes involving tungsten ions. The needed computational resources for TFATOM code are orders of magnitudes less than for the other conventional numerical codes. The transition from corona to Boltzmann limit was investigated in detail. The results of statistical approach have been tested by comparison with the vast experimental and conventional code data for a set of ions Wk+. It is shown that the universal statistical model accuracy for the ionization cross-sections and radiation losses is within the data scattering of significantly more complex quantum numerical codes, using different approximations for the calculation of atomic structure and the electronic cross-sections.

  17. Testing limits to airflow perturbation device (APD measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshidi Shaya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Airflow Perturbation Device (APD is a lightweight, portable device that can be used to measure total respiratory resistance as well as inhalation and exhalation resistances. There is a need to determine limits to the accuracy of APD measurements for different conditions likely to occur: leaks around the mouthpiece, use of an oronasal mask, and the addition of resistance in the respiratory system. Also, there is a need for resistance measurements in patients who are ventilated. Method Ten subjects between the ages of 18 and 35 were tested for each station in the experiment. The first station involved testing the effects of leaks of known sizes on APD measurements. The second station tested the use of an oronasal mask used in conjunction with the APD during nose and mouth breathing. The third station tested the effects of two different resistances added in series with the APD mouthpiece. The fourth station tested the usage of a flexible ventilator tube in conjunction with the APD. Results All leaks reduced APD resistance measurement values. Leaks represented by two 3.2 mm diameter tubes reduced measured resistance by about 10% (4.2 cmH2O·sec/L for control and 3.9 cm H2O·sec/L for the leak. This was not statistically significant. Larger leaks given by 4.8 and 6.4 mm tubes reduced measurements significantly (3.4 and 3.0 cm cmH2O·sec/L, respectively. Mouth resistance measured with a cardboard mouthpiece gave an APD measurement of 4.2 cm H2O·sec/L and mouth resistance measured with an oronasal mask was 4.5 cm H2O·sec/L; the two were not significantly different. Nose resistance measured with the oronasal mask was 7.6 cm H2O·sec/L. Adding airflow resistances of 1.12 and 2.10 cm H2O·sec/L to the breathing circuit between the mouth and APD yielded respiratory resistance values higher than the control by 0.7 and 2.0 cm H2O·sec/L. Although breathing through a 52 cm length of flexible ventilator tubing reduced the APD

  18. Study on the high temperature crack resistance of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of a multiple use of tungsten specimens in crack resistance tests in the temperature range of 600-2000 deg C is studied. It is established experimentally that the minimum length of growth of a main crack is 1x10 -4 m for the most effective repeated use of specimens. A flow diagram of mechanical tests is suggested for investigating high temperature tungsten crack resistance and estimating the degree of weakening the grain-boundary bond

  19. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  20. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructural evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible tritium

  1. Materials Survey: Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-12-01

    Columbia, from which tungsten production is planned approximately 60 miles east fromSkagway, were estimated at the end of 1951 to be Alaska. Reserves...of the principal mines inimportant producers. 1952 halted expansion programs planned by Production in Argentina reached a maxi- Patiffo Mines and...government.Concentrates International Mining Co. (W. R. Grace & from small producers are collected and Co.), La Paz; Chojlla Mine; type ore-- marketed by Banco Minero

  2. Prediction of limits of lubrication in strip reduction testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam; Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    2004-01-01

    Pick-up and galling due to lubricant film breakdown is a severe limitation in cold forming of tribologically difficult metals like stainless steel and aluminium. The present paper describes a method of combined experimental and numerical analysis to quantify the limits of lubrication in a dedicated...

  3. Crack resistance of tungsten strengthened by dispersed refractory oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation results are presented for crack resistance of commercial tungsten, obtained during specimen testing at temperatures of 20 deg C to Tsub(cr) (upper boundary of temperature range of ductile-brittle transition). Comparison of s-n diagrams and temperature dependences of crack resistance are conducted for commercial tungsten and tungsten strengthened by refractory oxides. It is shown that dispersion hardening increases crack resistance in the temperature range of 20 to 2000 deg C but the upper boundary of ductile-brittle shifts to the side of higher temperatures

  4. [Vision test device: possibilities and limits of LCD technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelt; Brandl, H; Zrenner, E; Lund, O E

    1991-01-01

    An automatic visual acuity test examining visual acuity at 5 m distance is presented. An LCD screen with 400 x 640 pixel is used for graphic display. The Landolt rings are selected randomly. The test presented here complies well with the criteria of DIN 58220. Accuracy estimates for representation of the Landolt rings in raster graphics are discussed. With the method suggested, the testing of visual acuity, one of the most important tests in ophthalmological practice, is simplified and its reliability and results are improved. The method allows tests at short time intervals to trace the time dependency of visual acuity. Furthermore, the test may be delegated to support personnel.

  5. What Are the Risks and Limitations of Genetic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the person who is tested. The possibility of genetic discrimination in employment or insurance is also a concern. (Refer to What is genetic discrimination? for additional information.) Genetic testing can provide only ...

  6. Pulse current electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on V–4Cr–4Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Xuliang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on vanadium alloy substrate. • Tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers. • Tungsten coatings plated at lower duty cycle has a better surface quality. • High heat flux property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Helium ion irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings with high (2 2 0)-orientation were formed on V alloy substrate by pulse current electrodeposition in air atmosphere. The coatings’ microstructure, crystal structure and adhesive strength between coatings and substrates were investigated. It could be observed the tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers with the inner tooth-like layer, and the outer columnar layer. The tungsten coatings deposited at lower duty cycle have a better surface quality with a little change in the adhesive strength. The tungsten coating was exposed to electron beam with power density of 200 MW/m 2 in the thermal shock test, the tungsten crystal grain surface melt, the microcracks are found among the crystal grains. Exfoliation, flaking and dense needle-like holes were observed on the tungsten coating after irradiation with helium ions at an energy of 65 keV and an implanted dose of 22.67 × 10 18 cm −2

  7. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  8. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  9. Limitations on tests of quantum flavour dynamics from quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietschmann, H.

    1989-01-01

    Quantum Flavour Dynamics is a theory of electroweak interactions. The Lagrangian is formulated for leptons and quarks. Since quarks are not directly accessible in experiment, predictions are model-dependent and the predictive power of the theory is limited. In view of these limitations QFD theory is formulated and confronted in several instances with experimental results: leptonic- and semi-leptonic processes, non-leptonic decay processes and radiative decay processes. 17 refs. (qui)

  10. Trends in tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L.

    Renewed interest in electrothermal atomic spectrometric methods based on tungsten coil atomizers is a consequence of a world wide increasing demand for fast, inexpensive, sensitive, and portable analytical methods for trace analysis. In this work, tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry (WCAAS) and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) are used to determine several different metals and even a non-metal at low levels in different samples. Improvements in instrumentation and new strategies to reduce matrix effects and background signals are presented. Investigation of the main factors affecting both WCAAS and WCAES analytical signals points to the importance of a reducing, high temperature gas phase in the processes leading to atomic cloud generation. Some more refractory elements such as V and Ti were determined for the first time by double tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (DWCAES). The higher temperatures provided by two atomizers in DWCAES also allowed the detection of Ag, Cu and Sn emission signals for the first time. Simultaneous determination of several elements by WCAES in relatively complex sample matrices was possible after a simple acid extraction. The results show the potential of this method as an alternative to more traditional, expensive methods for fast, more effective analyses and applications in the field. The development of a new metallic atomization cell is also presented. Lower limits of detection in both WCAAS and WCAES determinations were obtained due to factors such as better control of background signal, smaller, more isothermal system, with atomic cloud concentration at the optical path for a longer period of time. Tungsten coil-based methods are especially well suited to applications requiring low sample volume, low cost, sensitivity and portability. Both WCAAS and WCAES have great commercial potential in fields as diverse as archeology and industrial quality control. They are simple, inexpensive, effective

  11. The Advanced Limiter Test-I (ALT-I) variable-geometry pump limiter module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontau, A.E.; Malinowski, M.E.; Ver Berkmoes, A.A.; Guthrie, S.E.; Watson, R.D.; Goebel, D.M.; Campbell, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The ALT-I variable geometry module has been designed to address many of the issues not previously settled by earlier experiments. The goal is to study the basic processes involved in pump limiter operation as well as demonstrate its utility and effect on the plasma. The flexibility and extensive instrumentation of ALT-I will offer a unique opportunity to parameterize operation and facilitate the engineering design of future pump limiters. (orig.)

  12. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    Heating (ICRH) limiters on the injected ICRH power was used. The phase and amplitude of the inwardly propagating tungsten signal was then observed at the erosion site and at three radial positions in the main plasma, from which two were identified in the course of this work by a thorough investigation of the tungsten radiation features in the Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV) spectral range. The newly found observation sites are located right in the steep gradient region, close to the Edge Transport Barrier (ETB) and slightly further inside at the pedestal top of AUG H-mode discharges. Furthermore, the parallel flows in the SOL have been monitored by spectroscopical means and Langmuir probes. The experimental results were quite unexpected, since the ELM frequency had no influence on the tungsten concentration, and the sole actuator on this quantity was the gas injection rate. The evaluation of the modulated tungsten signal revealed that neither gas puffing nor plasma shape had an measureable influence on the radial tungsten transport processes. In addition, the tungsten erosion sources were only partially responsible for the observed tungsten behavior. These observations inspired a simple model, which balanced the tungsten outflux with the tungsten influx. In this model the impurity exhaust by ELMs is not diffusive, but turbulent and linked to the ELM size. The model predicted a linear dependence between the tungsten concentration and the parallel velocity in the SOL. This linear dependence was confirmed by the spectroscopical evaluation of the SOL parallel flows.

  13. Validating safeguards effectiveness given inherently limited test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicherman, A.

    1987-01-01

    A key issue in designing and evaluating nuclear safeguards systems is how to validate safeguards effectiveness against a spectrum of potential threats. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by a performance indicator such as the probability of defeating an adversary attempting a malevolent act. Effectiveness validation means a testing program that provides sufficient evidence that the performance indicator is at an acceptable level. Traditional statistical program when numerous independent system trials are possible. However, within the safeguards environment, many situations arise for which traditional statistical approaches may be neither feasible nor appropriate. Such situations can occur, for example, when there are obvious constraints on the number of possible tests due to operational impacts and testing costs. Furthermore, these tests are usually simulations (e.g., staged force-on-force exercises) rather than actual tests, and the system is often modified after each test. Under such circumstances, it is difficult to make and justify inferences about system performance by using traditional statistical techniques. In this paper, the authors discuss several alternative quantitative techniques for validating system effectiveness. The techniques include: (1) minimizing the number of required tests using sequential testing; (2) combining data from models inspections and exercises using Bayesian statistics to improve inferences about system performance; and (3) using reliability growth and scenario modeling to help specify which safeguards elements and scenarios to test

  14. Influence of recrystallization on thermal shock resistance of various tungsten grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uytdenhouwen, I.; Decreton, M.; Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Oost, G. van

    2007-01-01

    Thermal shock resistance of various tungsten grades (different manufacturing technologies and heat treatments) was examined under plasma disruption conditions, especially in the cracking regime, i.e. below the melting threshold. The tests have been simulated with the electron beam test facility JUDITH. The comparison of the thermal shock resistance showed that sintered tungsten appeared to be better than the deformed tungsten material and clear degradation after recrystallization was found. Damage processes linked to the mechanical properties of W are discussed

  15. Testing of Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Majeski; R. Kaita; M. Boaz; P. Efthimion; T. Gray; B. Jones; D. Hoffman; H. Kugel; J. Menard; T. Munsat; A. Post-Zwicker; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Spaleta; G. Taylor; J. Timberlake; R. Woolley; L. Zakharov; M. Finkenthal; D. Stutman; G. Antar; R. Doerner; S. Luckhardt; R. Seraydarian; R. Maingi; M. Maiorano; S. Smith; D. Rodgers

    2004-07-30

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid-metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid-lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm2, subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now be en performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments the liquid-lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm2. Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described.

  16. Testing of Liquid Lithium Limiters in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gray, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.; Rodgers, D.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid-metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid-lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm2, subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now be en performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments the liquid-lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm2. Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described

  17. Testing of liquid lithium limiters in CDX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kaita, R.; Boaz, M.; Efthimion, P.; Gray, T.; Jones, B.; Hoffman, D.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Spaleta, J.; Taylor, G.; Timberlake, J.; Woolley, R.; Zakharov, L.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Antar, G.; Doerner, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Maingi, R.; Maiorano, M.; Smith, S.; Rodgers, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the development of liquid metals as a first wall or divertor for reactor applications must involve the investigation of plasma-liquid metal interactions in a functioning tokamak. Most of the interest in liquid metal walls has focused on lithium. Experiments with lithium limiters have now been conducted in the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Initial experiments used a liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) built by the University of California at San Diego. Spectroscopic measurements showed some reduction of impurities in CDX-U plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. While no reduction in recycling was observed with the L3, which had a plasma-wet area of approximately 40 cm 2 , subsequent experiments with a larger area fully toroidal lithium limiter demonstrated significant reductions in both recycling and in impurity levels. Two series of experiments with the toroidal limiter have now been performed. In each series, the area of exposed, clean lithium was increased, until in the latest experiments, the liquid lithium plasma-facing area was increased to 2000 cm 2 . Under these conditions, the reduction in recycling required a factor of eight increase in gas fueling in order to maintain the plasma density. The loop voltage required to sustain the plasma current was reduced from 2 V to 0.5 V. This paper summarizes the technical preparations for lithium experiments and the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations. The mechanical response of the liquid metal to induced currents, especially through contact with the plasma, is discussed. The effect of the lithium-filled toroidal limiter on plasma performance is also briefly described

  18. Automated ultrasonic testing--capabilities, limitations and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, L.S.; Mikesell, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The requirements for precision and reproducibility of ultrasonic testing during inservice inspection of nuclear reactors are both quantitatively and qualitatively more severe than most current practice in the field can provide. An automated ultrasonic testing (AUT) system, which provides a significant advancement in field examination capabilities, is described. Properties of the system, its application, and typical results are discussed

  19. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  20. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  1. Limiting the testing of urea: Urea along with every plasma creatinine test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao-Ming; Guo, Xu-Xiao; Zhang, Guo-Ming

    2017-09-01

    We found that it is not necessary to simultaneously detect both creatinine (CREA) and urea until the concentration of CREA is lower than the certain level. To reduce urea testing, we suggest measuring urea only when CREA or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) exceeds a predetermined limit. CREA and urea data were analyzed consisting of almost all of people age above 65 years old check-up (n=95441) in Shuyang countryside, and inpatients (n=101631), outpatients (n=18474) and Routine Health Check-up (n=20509) in Shuyang People's Hospital. The proportions of elevated urea were derived. The data used in this study was generated from people more than 13 years old in both outpatients and inpatients. When the limits for initiating urea testing were used at 85 μmol/L CREA and 120 mL/min/1.73 m 2 eGFR, the percentage of unnecessary urea test are 94.5% and 64.7% (elderly health check-up), 67.9% and 84.5% (outpatients), 88.5% and 73.2% (inpatients), 92.2% and 81.7% (routine health check-up). The missing rate of urea are 1%, 2.5%, 4.6% and 9.2%, 0.1%, 0.4%, 0.9% and 1.8%, 0.4%, 0.8%, 1.4%, and 2.5%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 1.1%, and 0.8% of ureas exceeding 9.28 mmol/L and 8.3 mmol/L in above each group, respectively. If the CREA≤85 μmol/L or eGFR≥90 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , there is 97.5% urea urea missed is 2.5%. We suggest that the initiating urea testing should be based on the upper limit of Reference Intervals serum CREA of females or a 120 mL/min/1.73 m 2 eGFR limit. Conservatively, the urea testing would be reduced by 65% at least. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Limitation of using synthetic human odours to test mosquito repellents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbeyela Edgar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold-standard tests of mosquito repellents involve exposing human volunteers to host-seeking mosquitoes, to assess the protective efficacy of the repellents. These techniques are not exposure-free and cannot be performed prior to toxicological evaluation. It is postulated that synthetic lures could provide a useful assay that mimics in-vivo conditions for use in high-throughput screening for mosquito repellents. Methods This paper reports on a semi-field evaluation of repellents using a synthetic blend of human derived attractants for the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto Different concentrations of known repellents, N, N diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (deet and Para-methane-3, 8, diol (PMD were added into traps baited with the synthetic blend, and resulting changes in mosquito catches were measured. Results All test concentrations of deet (0.001% to 100% reduced the attractiveness of the synthetic blend. However, PMD was repellent only at 0.25%. Above this concentration, it significantly increased the attractiveness of the blend. There was no relationship between the repellent concentrations and the change in mosquito catches when either deet (r2 = 0.033, P = 0.302 or PMD (r2 = 0.020, P = 0.578 was used. Conclusion It is concluded that while some repellents may reduce the attractiveness of synthetic human odours, others may instead increase their attractiveness. Such inconsistencies indicate that even though the synthetic attractants may provide exposure-free and consistent test media for repellents, careful selection and multiple-repellent tests are necessary to ascertain their suitability for use in repellent screening. The synthetic odour blend tested here is not yet sufficiently refined to serve as replacement for humans in repellent testing, but may be developed further and evaluated in different formats for exposure free repellent testing purposes.

  3. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  4. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  5. Reduction of blue tungsten oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, T.; Wert, C.; Woodhouse, J.; Morcom, W.

    1975-01-01

    A significant portion of commercial tungsten is produced by hydrogen reduction of oxides. Although several modes of reduction are possible, hydrogen reduction is used where high purity tungsten is required and where the addition of other elements or compounds is desired for modification of the metal, as is done for filaments in the lamp industry. Although several investigations of the reduction of oxides have been reported (1 to 5), few principles have been developed which can aid in assessment of current commercial practice. The reduction process was examined under conditions approximating commercial practice. The specific objectives were to determine the effects of dopants, of water vapor in the reducing atmosphere, and of reduction temperature upon: (1) the rate of the reaction by which blue tungsten oxide is reduced to tungsten metal, (2) the intermediate oxides associated with reduction, and (3) the morphology of the resulting tungsten powder

  6. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    In comparative corrosion tests, the corrosion resistance of an Australian tungsten alloy (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe) was found to be superior to three other tungsten alloys and, under certain conditions, even more corrosion-resistant than pure tungsten. Corrosion resistance was evaluated after immersion in both distilled water and 5% sodium chloride solutions, and in cyclic humidity and salt mist environments. For all but the Australian alloy, the rate of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilated water. In all cases, alloys containing copper had the greatest corrosion rates. Corrosion mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope, analysis of corrosion products and galvanic corrosion studies. For the alloys, corrosion was attributed primarily to a galvanic reaction. Whether the tungsten or binder phase of the alloy became anodic, and thus was attacked preferentially, depended upon alloy composition and corrosion environment. 16 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shibin; Chang, Xueting; Li, Zhenjiang

    2010-01-01

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 o C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  8. Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shibin [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China); Chang, Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China); Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)

    2010-09-15

    Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 {sup o}C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

  9. A study of scandia and rhenium doped tungsten matrix dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinshu; Li, Lili; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yanchun; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Meiling

    2007-10-01

    Scandia and rhenium doped tungsten powders were prepared by solid-liquid doping combined with two-step reduction method. The experimental results show that scandia was distributed evenly on the surface of tungsten particles. The addition of scandia and rhenium could decrease the particle size of doped tungsten, for example, the tungsten powders doped with Sc 2O 3 and Re had the average size of about 50 nm in diameter. By using this kind of powder, scandia and rhenium doped tungsten matrix with the sub-micrometer sized tungsten grains was obtained. This kind of matrix exhibited good anti-bombardment insensitivity at high temperature. The emission property result showed that high space charge limited current densities of more than 60 A/cm 2 at 900 °C could be obtained for this cathode. A Ba-Sc-O multilayer about 100 nm in thickness formed at the surface of cathode after activation led to the high emission property.

  10. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Tielong [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dai, Yong, E-mail: yong.dai@psi.ch [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lee, Yongjoong [European Spallation Source, Tunavägen 24, 223 63 Lund (Sweden)

    2016-01-15

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250–300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten. - Highlights: • This work was conducted to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source. • The effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and tensile behaviour was studied with hot-rolled and hot-forged tungsten. • The tungsten materials were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile test in a temperature range of 25–500 °C. • The results indicate that the HR tungsten has better mechanical properties in terms of greater ductility and lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature.

  11. Power functional theory for the dynamic test particle limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brader, Joseph M; Schmidt, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    For classical Brownian systems both in and out of equilibrium we extend the power functional formalism of Schmidt and Brader (2013 J. Chem. Phys. 138 214101) to mixtures of different types of particles. We apply the framework to develop an exact dynamical test particle theory for the self and distinct parts of the van Hove function, which characterize tagged and collective particle motion. The memory functions that induce non-Markovian dynamics are related to functional derivatives of the excess (over ideal) free power dissipation functional. The method offers an alternative to the recently found nonequilibrium Ornstein–Zernike relation for dynamic pair correlation functions. (paper)

  12. Field measurement of albedo for limited extent test surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David J. [Portland State University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 751-ME, Portland, OR 97207 (United States); Resh, Kyle; Segura, Del [Tulane University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 400 Lindy Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A new method is introduced for field measurement of surface albedo. This method consists of the use of a cylindrical shade ring made of opaque fabric with a known (low) albedo placed over a test surface. The albedo measurement is accomplished using two small pyranometers situated so that the downward-facing pyranometer receives radiation only from the test surface and the shade ring. The upward-facing pyranometer simultaneously records the incoming solar radiation. The radiation received by the downward-facing pyramometer is a combination of reflected radiation from shaded and unshaded portions of these two surfaces, requiring detailed accounting of the resulting view factor geometries. The method presented here improves upon past approaches by allowing for smaller sample sizes, minimizing errors associated with reflective properties of the surroundings, and allowing for accurate measurements even under partially cloudy skies. In addition to these methodological improvements we introduce an approach for estimating the uncertainty in the resulting albedo measurements. Results from field measurements are presented to validate the measurement protocol, and to compare its accuracy with the accuracy of a published standard. (author)

  13. A limitation of the Cognitive Reflection Test: familiarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stieger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT; Frederick, 2005 is a frequently used measure of cognitive vs. intuitive reflection. It is also a frequently found entertaining ‘test’ on the Internet. In a large age-stratified community-based sample (N = 2,272, we analyzed the impact of having already performed the CRT or any similar task in the past. Indeed, we found that 44% of participants had experiences with these tasks, which was reflected in higher CRT scores (Cohen’s d = 0.41. Furthermore, experienced participants were different from naïve participants in regard to their socio-demographics (younger, higher educated, fewer siblings, more likely single or in a relationship than married, having no children. The best predictors of a high CRT score were the highest educational qualification (4.62% explained variance followed by the experience with the task (3.06%. Therefore, we suggest using more recent multi-item CRTs with newer items and a more elaborated test construction.

  14. Education in Japan: testing the limits of asian education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blake Willis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A re-imagining of education is taking place throughout the world with the 21st century in mind and nowhere is this being tested, probed, and critiqued more than in Asia. This new era sees social phenomena as polycentric and polycontextual rather than bilateral or unidirectional. Asia is first and foremost where education in the 21st century is seeing its most spectacular engagement and growth. We view the Japa- nese example with its multiple, textured approaches as one of the heralds of this new global conversation for an education that responds to the transnational, transcultural characteristics of the new age that has daw- ned upon us. Combining Confucian, North American, European, and global approaches – all of which are having an impact on other nations of Asia – Japan represents the cutting edge of a new wave for understan- ding education that has movement as a central motif and strategy.

  15. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  16. Experimental study of tungsten transport properties in T-10 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Sarychev, D. V.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.; Leontiev, D. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Grashin, S. A.; Ryjakov, D. V.; Sergeev, D. S.; Mustafin, N. A.; Trukhin, V. M.; Solomatin, R. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    First experimental results of tungsten transport investigation in OH and ECRH plasmas in the T-10 tokamak with W-limiter and movable Li-limiter are presented. It is shown that tungsten tends to accumulate (a joint process of cumulation and peaking) near the plasma axis in ohmic regimes. The cumulation of W is enhanced in discharges with high values of the parameter γ ={{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}\\centerdot {{\\bar{Z}}\\text{eff}}\\centerdot I\\text{pl}-1.5 that coincides with accumulation conditions of light and medium impurities in T-10 plasmas. Experiments with Li-limiter show the immeasurable level of Li3+ (0.3-0.5% of n e) of T-10 CXRS diagnostics because of the low inflow of Li with respect to other light impurities. Nevertheless, the strong influence of lithium on inflow of light and tungsten impurities is observed. In discharges with lithized walls, vanishing of light impurities occurs and values of {{Z}\\text{eff}}≈ 1 are obtained. It is also shown that the tungsten density in the plasma center decreases by 15 to 20 times while the W inflow reduces only by 2 to 4 times. In lithized discharges with high γ, the flattening of the tungsten density profile occurs and its central concentration decreases up to 10 times during the on-axis ECRH. This effect is observed together with the increase of the W inflow by 3 to 4 times at the ECRH stage.

  17. Tungsten and optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.

    2001-01-01

    High energy astronomy research requires accurate location to perform multiwavelength studies of the cosmic gamma-ray emitters. New technologies have been developed to achieve this goal, the use of large spatial signal multiplexing systems (Masks). The optical system based on the use of coded Masks together with solid stated pixelated planes provide a point source location capability of 1 arc min, that is 3600 times better than of the last NASA CGRO mission. Different materials were considered to modulate the high energy signals, tungsten was selected for implementing the codes due to both its high density and large atomic number that provide the required stooping power. An overview of the programme carried out to design and manufacture the coded Masks is provided. (nevyjel)

  18. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  19. Effect of bond coat and preheat on the microstructure, hardness, and porosity of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of tool steel materials. Bond coatings are commonly used as intermediate layers deposited on steel substrates (i.e. H13 tool steel) before the top coat is applied in order to enhance a number of critical performance criteria including adhesion of a barrier coating, limiting atomic migration of the base metal, and corrosion resistance. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of nickel bond coat and preheats temperatures (i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C) on microstructure, hardness, and porosity of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed by flame thermal coating. Micro-hardness, porosity and microstructure of tungsten carbide coatings are evaluated by using micro-hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nickel bond coatings reduce the susceptibility of micro crack formation at the bonding area interfaces. The percentage of porosity level on the tungsten carbide coatings with nickel bond coat decreases from 5.36 % to 2.78% with the increase of preheat temperature of the steel substrate of H13 from 200°C to 400°C. The optimum hardness of tungsten carbide coatings is 1717 HVN in average resulted from the preheat temperature of 300°C.

  20. Characterization of molecular and elemental impurities in tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streusand, B.J.; Yost, V.E.; Govorchin, S.W.; Fry, R.C.; Padula, F.J.; Hughes, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of WF 6 is a very difficult process because of the reactivity of the compound, the low detection limits required by its use in semiconductor processing, and by the presence of large amounts of tungsten in the analyte. It is not possible to perform elemental analysis with low detection limits directly on WF 6 or on hydrolyzed WF 6 . However, it is possible to remove the interfering tungsten by physical and chemical separation techniques. This paper discusses how the analysis of molecular impurities in WF 6 may be accomplished directly in the gas phase by infrared spectroscopy and by gas chromatography

  1. Development and optimisation of tungsten armour geometry for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Safronov, V.; Yablokov, N.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFC) of the future thermonuclear reactor in great extend determine the time of non-stop operation of the reactor. In current ITER project the most of the divertor PFC surfaces are covered by tungsten armour. Therefore selection of tungsten grade and attachment scheme for joining the tungsten armour to heat sink is a matter of great importance. Two attachment schemes for highly loaded components (up to 20 MW/m 2 ) are described in this paper. The small size mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested at heat fluxes up to 30 MW/m 2 in screening test and up to 20 MW/m 2 at thermal fatigue test. One mock-up with four different tungsten grades was tested by consequent thermal shock (15 MJ/m 2 at 50 μs) and thermal cycling loading (15 MW/m 2 ). The damages that could lead to mock-up failure were not found but the behaviour of tungsten grades was quite different. (author)

  2. Large area synthesis, characterization, and anisotropic etching of two dimensional tungsten disulfide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutlu, Zafer; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2016-01-01

    Emergent properties of tungsten disulfide at the quantum confinement limit hold promise for electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here we report on the large area synthesis of atomically thin tungsten disulfide films with strong photoluminescence properties via sulfurization of the pre-deposited tungsten films. Detailed characterization of the pre-deposited tungsten films and tungsten disulfide films are performed using microscopy and spectroscopy methods. By directly heating tungsten disulfide films in air, we have shown that the films tend to be etched into a series of triangular shaped pits with the same orientations, revealing the anisotropic etching behavior of tungsten disulfide edges. Moreover, the dimensions of the triangular pits increase with the number of layers, suggesting a thickness dependent behavior of etching in tungsten disulfide films. This method offers a promising new avenue for engineering the edge structures of tungsten disulfide films. - Highlights: • Large-scale synthesis of WS_2 films is achieved via sulfurization of W films. • Annealing of W films leads to a substantial improvement in the quality of WS_2 films. • WS_2 films show laser power dependent photoluminescence characteristics. • WS_2 films are etched with well-oriented triangular pits upon annealing in air. • Anisotropic oxidative etching is greatly affected by the thickness of WS_2 films.

  3. Separation of tungsten and rhenium on alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILOVAN SM. STOILJKOVIC

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the efficient separation of tungsten(VI and rhenium (VII on alumina were established. The distribution coefficients Kd for tungstate and perrhenate anions, as well as the separation factors a (a = KdWO42-/Kd ReO4- were determined using hydrochloric or nitric acid as the aqueous media. A solution of sodium chloride in the pH range 2–6 was also examined. Under all the tested experimental conditions, alumina is a much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The obtained results indicated that the best separation of these two elements is achieved when 0.01– 0.1 mol dm-3 HCl or 1.0 mol dm-3 HNO3 are used as the aqueous media. If NaCl is used as the aqueous phase, the best separation is achieved with 0.20 mol dm-3 NaCl, pH 4–6. Under these experimental conditions, the breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina for tungsten at pH 4 are 17 and 26 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively. With increasing pH, these values decrease. Thus, at pH 6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively.

  4. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  5. Mobility limitation in self-described well-functioning older adults : importance of endurance walk testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonsick, Eleanor M; Newman, Anne B; Visser, Marjolein; Goodpaster, Bret; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Rubin, Susan; Nevitt, Michael C; Harris, Tamara B

    BACKGROUND: Mobility limitations are prevalent, potentially reversible precursors to mobility loss that may go undetected in older adults. This study evaluates standardized administration of an endurance walk test for identifying unrecognized and impending mobility limitation in community elders.

  6. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  7. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  8. Correlation of microstructure and compressive properties of amorphous matrix composites reinforced with tungsten continuous fibers or porous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Chang-Young; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Lee, Sunghak

    2010-01-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten continuous fibers or porous foams were fabricated without pores or defects by liquid pressing process, and their microstructures and compressive properties were investigated. About 65-70 vol.% of tungsten reinforcements were homogeneously distributed inside the amorphous matrix. The compressive test results indicated that the tungsten-reinforced composites showed considerable plastic strain as the compressive load was sustained by fibers or foams. Particularly in the tungsten porous foam-reinforced composite, the compressive stress continued to increase according to the work hardening after the yielding, thereby leading to the maximum strength of 2764 MPa and the plastic strain of 39.4%. This dramatic increase in strength and ductility was attributed to the simultaneous and homogeneous deformation at tungsten foams and amorphous matrix since tungsten foams did not show anisotropy and tungsten/matrix interfaces were excellent.

  9. GA-4/GA-9 honeycomb impact limiter tests and analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koploy, M.A.; Taylor, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) has a test program underway to obtain data on the behavior of a honeycomb impact limiter. The program includes testing of small samples to obtain basic information, as well as testing of complete 1/4-scale impact limiters to obtain load-versus-deflection curves for different crush orientations. GA has used the test results to aid in the development of an analytical model to predict the impact limiter loads. The results also helped optimize the design of the impact limiters for the GA-4 and GA-9 Casks

  10. Price limits and stock market efficiency: Evidence from rolling bicorrelation test statistic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kian-Ping; Brooks, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Using the rolling bicorrelation test statistic, the present paper compares the efficiency of stock markets from China, Korea and Taiwan in selected sub-periods with different price limits regimes. The statistical results do not support the claims that restrictive price limits and price limits per se are jeopardizing market efficiency. However, the evidence does not imply that price limits have no effect on the price discovery process but rather suggesting that market efficiency is not merely determined by price limits.

  11. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  12. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  13. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  14. Study of Tungsten effect on CFETR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengyu; Xiang Gao Collaboration; Guoqiang Li Collaboration; Nan Shi Collaboration; Vincent Chan Collaboration; Xiang Jian Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    An integrated modeling workflow using OMFIT/TGYRO is constructed to evaluate W impurity effects on China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) performance. Self-consistent modeling of tungsten(W) core density profile, accounting for turbulence and neoclassical transport, is performed based on the CFETR steady-state scenario developed by D.Zhao (ZhaoDeng, APS, 2016). It's found that the fusion performance degraded in a limited level with increasing W concentration. The main challenge arises in sustainment of H-mode with significant W radiation. Assuming the power threshold of H-L back transition is approximately the same as that of L-H transition, using the scaling law of Takizuka (Takizuka etc, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2004), it is found that the fractional W concentration should not exceed 3e-5 to stay in H-mode for CFETR phase I. A future step is to connect this requirement to W wall erosion modeling. We are grateful to Dr. Emiliano Fable and Dr. Thomas Pütterich and Ms. Emily Belli for very helpful discussions and comments. We also would like to express our thanks to all the members of the CFETR Physics Group, and we appreciate the General Atomic Theory Group for permission to use the OMFIT framework and GA code suite, and for their valuable technical support. Numerical computations were performed on the ShenMa High Performance Computing Cluster in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This work was mainly supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB110001, 2014GB110002, 2014GB110003) and supported in part by the National ITER Plans Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB106001, 2013GB111002, 2015GB110001).

  15. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  16. 12 CFR 228.25 - Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Performance § 228.25 Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks. (a) Scope of test. The... performance of a wholesale or limited purpose bank pursuant to the following criteria: (1) The number and... performance rating. The Board rates a bank's community development performance as provided in appendix A of...

  17. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C. C.; Song, Y. T.; Peng, X. B.; Wei, Y. P.; Mao, X.; Li, W. X.; Qian, X. Y.

    2016-02-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads.

  18. On the limits of effort testing: symptom validity tests and severity of neurocognitive symptoms in nonlitigant patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merten, Thomas; Bossink, Linda; Schmand, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Modern symptom validity tests (SVTs) use empirical cutoffs for decision making. However, limits to the applicability of these cutoffs may arise when severe cognitive symptoms are present. The purpose of the studies presented here was to explore these limits of applicability. In Experiment 1, a group

  19. Emission property of scandia and Re doped tungsten matrix dispenser cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinshu; Wang Yanchun; Liu Wei; Li Lili; Wang Yiman; Zhou Meiling

    2008-01-01

    Scandia and rhenium doped tungsten powders have been prepared by solid-liquid doping combined with two-step reduction method. The experimental results show that scandia distributes evenly in the doped tungsten powder. Moreover, the addition of scandia and rhenium could decrease the particle size of tungsten. By using this kind of powder, scandia and rhenium doped tungsten matrix with sub-micrometer sized tungsten grains and a uniform distribution of Sc 2 O 3 together with high pore density has been obtained. The emission property result shows that high space charge limited current density of more than 30 A/cm 2 at 850 deg. C has been obtained for this cathode. This excellent emission capability results from an active layer uniformly covering the sub-micron structure framework of the cathodes

  20. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. Surface energy anisotropy of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R; Grenga, H E [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Chemical Engineering

    1976-10-01

    Field-ion microscopy was used to study the faceting behavior and/or surface energy anisotropy of tungsten in vacuum and in hydrogen. In vacuum below 1700 K the activation energy for (110) facet growth agreed with values previously reported for surface diffusion on tungsten. The observed anisotropy values at 0.5 Tsub(m), where Tsub(m) is the absolute melting temperature of tungsten (approximately 3680 K), were different from those previously reported at higher temperatures and more nearly agreed with broken bond calculations based on Mie potential using m=5, n=8, and a 1.5% lattice expansion. Hydrogen appeared to have a negligible effect on surface energy anisotropy, but did preferentially increase surface diffusion rates on (310) regions.

  2. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  3. Process for reclaiming tungsten from a hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, R.A.; MacInnis, M.B.; Miller, M.J.; Vanderpool, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed wherein tungsten is recovered from hazardous waste material containing said tungsten, arsenic, and other impurities which can consist of magnesium, phosphorus, and silicon and the resulting waste is treated to render it nonhazardous according to EPA standards for arsenic. Said process involves digesting said hazardous waste material in an aqueous solution of an alkali metal hydroxide, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to about 11.0 to about 13.0 with NaOH to precipitate essentially all of the magnesium and silicon species, filtering the digestion mix to remove the solids from said resulting solution which contains about 80 to about 100% of said tungsten and essentially none of said magnesium and said silicon, slurrying the hazardous solids in hot water, and adding to the slurry a ferric salt solution to precipitate ferric hydroxide, filtering this mixture to give a solid which passes the EPA standard test for solids with respect to arsenic

  4. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickstein, S.S.; Friedman, E.

    1979-10-01

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  5. Status of technology R&D for the ITER tungsten divertor monoblock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Escourbiac, F.; Barabash, V.; Durocher, A.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Merola, M.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arkhipov, N. [Project Center ITER, 1, Building 3, Kurchatov Sq., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetcov, V.; Volodin, A. [NIIEFA, 3 doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Suzuki, S.; Ezato, K.; Seki, Y. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Riccardi, B.; Bednarek, M.; Gavila, P. [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    In order to develop and validate the high performance tungsten monoblock technology, the full-tungsten divertor qualification program was defined. As the first step, small-scale mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested under the required high heat flux loads. The test results demonstrated that the technology is available in Japan and Europe. Post-tests observation of the loaded W monoblocks showed generation of self-castellation – a crack along coolant tube axis. The cause of the self-castellation was discussed and a tungsten material characterization program is being developed with the objective to understand mechanical properties that influence the occurrence of the self-castellation.

  6. Experiments to test an intra-island scoop limiter on TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Jackson, G.L.; Ohyabu, N.; Wootton, A.J.; Gentle, K.W.; Hodge, W.L.; McCool, S.C.; Phillips, P.E.; Rhodes, T.L.; Richards, B.; Ritz, C.P.; Rowan, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    An instrumented scoop limiter probe is being operated on TEXT to test the concept of limiter cooling and improved particle removal efficiencies using an externally-applied resonant magnetic field perturbation (the resonant helical divertor concept). Cooling of the limiter face has been demonstrated for limiter positions ranging from r L = 29.0 cm inward to r L = 25.5 cm (the TEXT primary poloidal hoop limiter radius r a = 27.0 cm). Pressure rises in the limiter throat of approximately 40% are observed under optimized conditions. Interchangable limiter heads with thicknesses of 1.0 cm and 0.3 cm have been used to examine particle ducting into the scoop aperture. Experimental results are discussed along with observations of the limiter floating potential, H α recycling emissions, pressure measurements, and edge density and temperature measurements. (orig.)

  7. Experiments to test an intra-island scoop limiter on TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; deGrassie, J.S.; Jackson, G.L.; Ohyabu, N.; Karger, F.; Haas, G.

    1986-07-01

    An instrumented scoop limiter probe is being operated on TEXT to test the concept of limiter cooling and improved particle removal efficiencies using an externally-applied resonant magnetic field perturbation (the resonant helical divertor concept). Cooling of the limiter face has been demonstrated for limiter positions ranging from γ/sub L/ = 29.0 cm inward to γ/sub L/ = 25.5 cm (the TEXT primary poloidal hoop limiter radius γ/sub a/ = 27.0 cm). Pressure rises in the limiter throat of approximately 40% are observed under optimized conditions. Interchangeable limiter heads with thicknesses of 1.0 cm and 0.3 cm have been used to examine particle ducting into the scoop aperture. Experimental results are discussed along with observations of the limiter floating potential, H/sub α/ recycling emissions, pressure measurements, and edge density and temperature measurements

  8. Self-castellation of tungsten monoblock under high heat flux loading and impact of material properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Panayotis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the full-tungsten divertor qualification program at ITER Organization, macro-cracks, so called self-castellation were found in a fraction of tungsten monoblocks during cyclic high heat flux loading at 20MW/m2. The number of monoblocks with macro-cracks varied with the tungsten products used as armour material. In order to understand correlation between the macro-crack appearance and W properties, an activity to characterize W monoblock materials was launched at the IO. The outcome highlighted that the higher the recrystallization resistance, the lower the number of cracks detected during high heat flux tests. Thermo-mechanical finite element modelling demonstrated that the maximum surface temperature ranges from 1800 °C to 2200 °C and in this range recrystallization of tungsten occurred. Furthermore, it indicated that loss of strength due to recrystallization is responsible for the development of macro-cracks in the tungsten monoblock.

  9. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  10. Investigation of the Impact of Transient Heat Loads Applied by Laser Irradiation on ITER-Grade Tungsten

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Alexander; Arakcheev, A.; Philipps, V.; Pintsuk, Gerald; Reinhart, Michael; Samm, Ulrich; Shoshin, A.; Schweer, Bernd; Unterberg, Bernhard; Zlobinski, M.; Sergienko, Gennady; Steudel, Isabel; Wirtz, Marius; Burdakov, A. V.; Coenen, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Cracking thresholds and crack patterns in tungsten targets after repetitive ITER-like edge localized mode (ELM) pulses have been studied in recent simulation experiments by laser irradiation. The tungsten specimens were tested under selected conditions to quantify the thermal shock response. A Nd:YAG laser capable of delivering up to 32 J of energy per pulse with a duration of 1 ms at the fundamental wavelength λ = 1064 nm has been used to irradiate ITER-grade tungsten samples with repetitive...

  11. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  12. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  13. Human Factors Assessment of the UH-60M Crew Station During the Limited User Test (LUT)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Havir, Thomas J; Durbin, David B; Frederick, Lorraine J; Hicks, Jamison S

    2006-01-01

    The utility helicopter (UH)-60M Product Manager requested the U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Human Research and Engineering Directorate to participate in the Limited User Test for the UH-60M Black Hawk...

  14. [The relationship between ischemic preconditioning-induced infarction size limitation and duration of test myocardial ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhin, I O; Galagudza, M M; Vlasov, T D; Nifontov, E M; Petrishchev, N N

    2008-07-01

    Traditionally infarction size reduction by ischemic preconditioning is estimated in duration of test ischemia. This approach limits the understanding of real antiischemic efficacy of ischemic preconditioning. Present study was performed in the in vivo rat model of regional myocardial ischemia-reperfusion and showed that protective effect afforded by ischemic preconditioning progressively decreased with prolongation of test ischemia. There were no statistically significant differences in infarction size between control and preconditioned animals when the duration of test ischemia was increased up to 1 hour. Preconditioning ensured maximal infarction-limiting effect in duration of test ischemia varying from 20 to 40 minutes.

  15. On the limits of toxicant-induced tolerance testing: cotolerance and response variation of antibiotic effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, Heike; Martinali, Bennie; Beelen, Patrick van; Seinen, Willem

    2006-01-01

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) as an ecotoxicological test system has been claimed to detect pollutant effects highly specifically and sensitively. However, the specificity might be limited by the occurrence of cotolerance. Another limitation of the application of any ecotoxicological

  16. Development and testing of bumper limiter of aluminum alloy vacuum vessel for reacting plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikawa, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Ioki, K.; Irie, T.; Nayama, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Onozuka, M.; Tomita, M.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of graphite bumper limiters were designed and trially fabricated for a reacting plasma device, R-tokamak. High heat load tests were conducted to examine thermal behavior and thermal shock resistance of the limiters by using a 100kW electron beam facility. The experimental data were compared with the results of 3-D thermal analysis

  17. Development and testing of bumper limiter of aluminum alloy vacuum vessel for reacting plasma experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchikawa, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Ioki, K.; Irie, T.; Nayama, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Onozuka, M.; Tomita, M.

    1985-07-01

    Two types of graphite bumper limiters were designed and trially fabricated for a reacting plasma device, R-tokamak. High heat load tests were conducted to examine thermal behavior and thermal shock resistance of the limiters by using a 100kW electron beam facility. The experimental data were compared with the results of 3-D thermal analysis.

  18. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  19. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading

  20. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  1. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  2. Research Problems Associated with Limiting the Applied Force in Vibration Tests and Conducting Base-Drive Modal Vibration Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1995-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to make a case for developing and conducting vibration tests which are both realistic and practical (a question of tailoring versus standards). Tests are essential for finding things overlooked in the analyses. The best test is often the most realistic test which can be conducted within the cost and budget constraints. Some standards are essential, but the author believes more in the individual's ingenuity to solve a specific problem than in the application of standards which reduce problems (and technology) to their lowest common denominator. Force limited vibration tests and base-drive modal tests are two examples of realistic, but practical testing approaches. Since both of these approaches are relatively new, a number of interesting research problems exist, and these are emphasized herein.

  3. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guebum, E-mail: hanguebum@live.co.kr [Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, Indiana 47803 (United States); Department of Mechanical Design and Robot Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Sok, E-mail: hsahn@seoultech.ac.kr [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Programme, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  4. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Guebum; Ahn, Hyo-Sok

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  5. Indiana Teachers' Perspectives on Testing Accommodations for Limited English Proficient Students Taking the Graduation Qualifying Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetler, Angela Dawn

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines teachers' perspectives on testing accommodations for Limited English Proficient (LEP) students taking Indiana's Graduation Qualifying Exam (GQE). The Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) states that the purpose of testing accommodations is to "level the playing field" between LEP students and their…

  6. Most experiments done so far with limited plants. Large-scale testing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Most experiments done so far with limited plants. Large-scale testing needs to be done with objectives such as: Apart from primary transformants, their progenies must be tested. Experiments on segregation, production of homozygous lines, analysis of expression levels in ...

  7. Exercise testing, limitation and training in patients with cystic fibrosis. A personalized approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise testing and training are cornerstones in regular CF care. However, no consensus exists in literature about which exercise test protocol should be used for individual patients. Furthermore, divergence exists in insights about both the dominant exercise limiting mechanisms and the

  8. Study of neutron induced outgassing from tungsten alloy for ATLAS FCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, C; Cheplakov, A P; Golikov, V; Golubyh, S M; Kulagin, E; Kukhtin, V; Luschikov, V

    1999-01-01

    The use of sintered tungsten alloy slugs as absorber in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) raised concern that it could possibly poison the liquid argon during the detector operation in the hard radiation environment expected at LHC. A vacuum container filled with tungsten slugs was exposed to the fast neutron fluence of 1.5$\\cdot$10$^{16}$~n~cm$^{-2}$ at the IBR-30 reactor of JINR, Dubna. The residual gas pressure was analysed. The study was completed by mass spectrometer measurements. An upper limit value of 0.1~ppm was determined for the pollution of liquid argon in FCAL due to outgassing from tungsten slugs under irradiation.

  9. Evaluating Diagnostic Point-of-Care Tests in Resource-Limited Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain, Paul K; Hyle, Emily P; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Wilson, Douglas; Bishai, William; Rodriguez, William; Bassett, Ingrid V

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic point-of-care (POC) testing is intended to minimize the time to obtain a test result, thereby allowing clinicians and patients to make an expeditious clinical decision. As POC tests expand into resource-limited settings (RLS), the benefits must outweigh the costs. To optimize POC testing in RLS, diagnostic POC tests need rigorous evaluations focused on relevant clinical outcomes and operational costs, which differ from evaluations of conventional diagnostic tests. Here, we reviewed published studies on POC testing in RLS, and found no clearly defined metric for the clinical utility of POC testing. Therefore, we propose a framework for evaluating POC tests, and suggest and define the term “test efficacy” to describe a diagnostic test’s capacity to support a clinical decision within its operational context. We also proposed revised criteria for an ideal diagnostic POC test in resource-limited settings. Through systematic evaluations, comparisons between centralized diagnostic testing and novel POC technologies can be more formalized, and health officials can better determine which POC technologies represent valuable additions to their clinical programs. PMID:24332389

  10. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-07-01

    sophisticated material tests at different surface temperatures. The steady-state thermal loading with superimposed transient thermal loading was induced by high frequency scanning of the electron beam. The steady-state thermal loading was performed with different power densities, surface temperatures and cycle numbers. The cracking threshold was investigated in a temperature range of 1000 to 1900 C. Once cracks occurred, the surface temperature had no impact on the crack network of the loaded surface. The cracks grew in depth with increasing the cycle number. However, under all loading conditions, crack depths were still limited in a shallow region, namely below 100 {mu}m. One disadvantage of tungsten is its high brittleness at room temperature which makes the manufacturing of tungsten parts challenging as it requires suitable machining techniques. The examination of the helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components revealed cracks in as-machined surfaces. For a better understanding of the performance of plasma-facing components it was necessary to estimate the impact of precracked surfaces on the components' degradation under high heat fluxes. Therefore, in the frame of the tungsten qualification program, specimens with defect-free and pre-cracked surfaces were exposed to high heat fluxes. Surface processing by electric discharge machining (EDM) led to pre-cracked surfaces and defect-free surfaces were achieved by polishing. EDM-pre-cracking resulted in a high crack density consisting of inter- and intra-granular cracks, which did not change after thermal loading. Even more, the cracks did not grow with the cycle number in contrast to thermo-mechanical induced cracks on polished surfaces which occurred at lower crack density. (orig.)

  11. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-01-01

    material tests at different surface temperatures. The steady-state thermal loading with superimposed transient thermal loading was induced by high frequency scanning of the electron beam. The steady-state thermal loading was performed with different power densities, surface temperatures and cycle numbers. The cracking threshold was investigated in a temperature range of 1000 to 1900 C. Once cracks occurred, the surface temperature had no impact on the crack network of the loaded surface. The cracks grew in depth with increasing the cycle number. However, under all loading conditions, crack depths were still limited in a shallow region, namely below 100 μm. One disadvantage of tungsten is its high brittleness at room temperature which makes the manufacturing of tungsten parts challenging as it requires suitable machining techniques. The examination of the helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components revealed cracks in as-machined surfaces. For a better understanding of the performance of plasma-facing components it was necessary to estimate the impact of precracked surfaces on the components' degradation under high heat fluxes. Therefore, in the frame of the tungsten qualification program, specimens with defect-free and pre-cracked surfaces were exposed to high heat fluxes. Surface processing by electric discharge machining (EDM) led to pre-cracked surfaces and defect-free surfaces were achieved by polishing. EDM-pre-cracking resulted in a high crack density consisting of inter- and intra-granular cracks, which did not change after thermal loading. Even more, the cracks did not grow with the cycle number in contrast to thermo-mechanical induced cracks on polished surfaces which occurred at lower crack density. (orig.)

  12. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Passoni, M; Pietralunga, S M; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500–710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W_1_8O_4_9-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO_3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 μm with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. (paper)

  13. Manufacturing and testing of actively cooled test limiters for TEXTOR made of the brazed joint SEPCARB-N11/TZM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohenauer, W.; Bolt, H.; Koppitz, T.; Linke, J.; Lison, R.; You, J.H.; Nickel, H.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the erosion and redepositon phenomena of fusion-related materials under stationary conditions, actively cooled test limiters were developed for TEXTOR (Tokamak Experiment for Technology Orientated Research). They allow experiments under stationary conditions within the plasma pulse length of 10 s. Heat loads of typically 10 MW m<-2 are removed by pressurised water: volume flow is 10 m 3 h -1, pressure 15 bar and the minimum coefficient of heat transfer is about 75000 W m-2 K. Prototype limiters were built as brazed composites of a C/C material (SEPCARB-N11) and a TZM substrate. The samples were successfully tested in screening tests in the ion beam facility MARION (Material Research Ion Beam Test Facility) with hydrogen beams. Maximum heat loads of up to 22 MW m<-2 were applied without any failure of the cooling system. Steady state of the surface temperature was measured within 5 s. An advanced brazing technique enabled the joining of hemispherically shaped C/C shells to a TZM heat sink without failure. An optimised test limiter was tested in TEXTOR. Analytical and numerical models describing the effects of the heat load distribution, spatial temperatures and stresses were experimentally verified. (orig.)

  14. Serrated flow behavior in tungsten heavy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Jiten, E-mail: das.jiten@gmail.com; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.

    2015-10-14

    Flow behavior of a tungsten heavy alloy of composition, 90.5 wt% W–7.1 wt% Ni–1.65 wt% Fe–0.5 wt% Co–0.25 wt% Mo was investigated in a temperature range of 223–973 K and strain rate range of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −2} s{sup −1}. In the temperature range of 773–873 K, the stress strain curves were characterized by jerky flow pointing towards Dynamic Strain Ageing (DSA)/Portevin Le-Chatelier's (PLC) effect. Characteristics of DSA were analyzed in detail. Based on the value of activation energy determined from the critical strain method, diffusion of interstitials (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen) were thought to be responsible for the DSA effect. The results were discussed in relation to information existing in this area in tungsten heavy alloys. The study of fracture surface of tensile tested samples (in the range of 823–973 K) showed that the fractographic features, mostly intergranular, predominantly govern the overall ductility of the alloy and do not change except for surface oxidation at relatively higher temperatures.

  15. Tungsten tetraboride, an inexpensive superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Lech, Andrew T.; Xie, Miao; Weaver, Beth E.; Yeung, Michael T.; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten tetraboride (WB4) is an interesting candidate as a less expensive member of the growing group of superhard transition metal borides. WB4 was successfully synthesized by arc melting from the elements. Characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicates that the as-synthesized material is phase pure. The zero-pressure bulk modulus, as measured by high-pressure X-ray diffraction for WB4, is 339 GPa. Mechanical testing using microindentation gives a Vickers hardness of 43.3 ± 2.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N. Various ratios of rhenium were added to WB4 in an attempt to increase hardness. With the addition of 1 at.% Re, the Vickers hardness increased to approximately 50 GPa at 0.49 N. Powders of tungsten tetraboride with and without 1 at.% Re addition are thermally stable up to approximately 400 °C in air as measured by thermal gravimetric analysis. PMID:21690363

  16. Fatigue behavior of rolled and forged tungsten at 25°, 280° and 480 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habainy, J.; Iyengar, S.; Lee, Y.; Dai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pure tungsten has been chosen as the target material at the European Spallation Source facility in Lund. Calculations show that the target temperature can reach 500 °C momentarily during the spallation process, leading to thermal fatigue. Target life estimations require fatigue data at different temperatures and this work focuses on generating such data for pure, unirradiated, rolled and forged tungsten in the range 25°–480 °C. For specimens oriented in the rolling direction, tensile tests at room temperature indicated Young's modulus values in the range 320–390 GPa, low levels of plasticity (<0.23%) and UTS values in the range 397 MPa (unpolished) and 705 MPa (Polished). UTS for forged specimens were around 500 MPa. Stress-controlled fatigue tests were conducted in the tensile regime, with a runout limit of 2 × 10"6 cycles. At 25 °C, unpolished specimens had fatigue limits of 150 MPa (rolling and transverse direction), and 175 MPa (forged). For polished specimens in the rolling direction, fatigue limits were higher at 237.5 MPa (25 °C) and 252.5 MPa (280 °C). The forged specimens showed slightly better fatigue properties and marginal cyclic hardening at 480 °C. - Highlights: • Stress & strain-controlled fatigue tests on pure tungsten at 25°, 280° & 480 °C. • Unirradiated, rolled and forged specimens in polished and unpolished condition. • Min. tensile strength (MPa): 397 (25 °C), 472 (280 °C) and 363 (480 °C). • Min. endurance limit (MPa): 137.5 (25 °C), 250 (280 °C) and 150 (480 °C). • Marginal cyclic hardening observed at 480 °C.

  17. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Thorben

    2018-02-01

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5-1.0 cm2 interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end ASIC (designed by the CALICE collaboration for ILC). In 2017, the setup has been extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype, a scinitillator based sampling calorimeter, and it was further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end ASIC was used for the first time. We highlight final results from our studies in 2016, including position resolution as well as precision timing-measurements. Furthermore, the extended setup in 2017 is discussed and first results from beam tests with electrons and pions are shown.

  18. Morphological characterisation and spectroscopic studies of the corrosion behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogundipe, A.; Greenberg, B.; Braida, W.; Christodoulatos, C.; Dermatas, D.

    2006-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys have been used in a wide variety of industrial and military applications. These alloys are composed mainly of tungsten (88-95%) with various combinations of nickel, cobalt, iron and copper usually making up the remaining fraction. The corrosion behaviours of five munitions grade tungsten alloys of interest have been examined using immersion tests and wet-dry cycle tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the release of the metallic components. Analyses carried out using SEM, EDS and grazing incidence XRD techniques, show the release of tungsten as well as alloying elements due to galvanic corrosion resulting from the difference in electrode potential between the tungsten phase and the binder phase in all cases studied. The extent of corrosion was directly related with the dissolution of tungsten in the binder phase during the sintering stage of manufacture. In W-Ni-Co-Fe alloys binder phase corrosion was observed while the relatively noble tungsten phase was less affected. The reverse was observed for a W-Cu alloy

  19. Tungsten migration studies by controlled injection of volatile compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Coenen, J. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Ivanova, D. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Möller, S. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Petersson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Volatile tungsten hexa-fluoride was locally injected into the TEXTOR tokamak as a marker for material migration studies. The injection was accompanied by puffing N-15 rare isotope as a nitrogen tracer in discharges with edge cooling by impurity seeding. The objective was to assess material balance by qualitative and quantitative determination of a global and local deposition pattern, material mixing effects and fluorine residence in plasma-facing components. Spectroscopy and ex situ ion beam analysis techniques were used. Tungsten was detected on all types of limiter tiles and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel. Over 80% of the injected W was identified. The largest tungsten concentration, 1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −2}, was in the vicinity of the gas inlet. Co-deposits contained tungsten and a mix of light isotopes: H, D, He-4, B-10, B-11, C-12, C-13, N-14, N-15, O-16 and small quantities of F-19 thus showing that both He and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning (He glow) and edge cooling.

  20. Determination of tungsten and tin ions after preconcentration by flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, U.; Kunze, S.

    1990-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective combined method of flotation followed by spectrophotometry/d.c. polarography for the determination of tungsten and tin ions in acid and alkaline waste waters and hydrometallurgical solutions is presented here. Both kinds of ions are coprecipitated in the analyte solution with zirconium hydroxide after addition of ZrOCl 2 solution and ammonia. Afterwards, the collector precipitate is separated from the aqueous phase and preconcentrated by flotation for which sodium oleate and a frother are added. The precipitate is dissolved in a small amount of acid, with the organic reagents being destroyed by oxidation. The enrichment factor of the proposed technique is 100, with variations possible. Recovery is 94 % for tungsten and 99 % for tin. Spectrophotometry of the thiocyanate complex and d.c. polarography are applied as determination techniques for tungsten and tin, respectively. Detection limits attainable by this technique are 6 ng.ml -1 for tungsten and 5 ng.ml -1 for tin for the initial sample. (Authors)

  1. Thermomechanical testing of beryllium for the JET/ISX-B beryllium limiter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Smith, M.F.; Whitley, J.B.; McDonald, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Materials testing of S-65-B beryllium has been conducted in support of the beryllium limiter experiment on the ISX-B tokamak. The S-65-B grade of hot-pressed beryllium was chosen over S-200-E because of its superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The testing has included measurement of tensile and yield strength, ductility, Young's Modulus, thermal conductivity, and specific heat from 50 0 C to 700 0 C. Thermal fatigue testing of a 2.5 cm beryllium cube was conducted using an electron beam to apply a heat flux of 2.5 kw/cm 2 for 0.3 second pulses for 1500 cycles. Results from the tests are compared to elastic-plastic finite element stress calculations. The testing indicates that the ISX-B beryllium limiter should survive the tokamak environment without serious structural failure, although some surface cracking is expected to occur. (author)

  2. Thermodynamics of the hydrogen-carbon-oxygen-tungsten system, as applied to the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the quaternary hydrogen-carbon oxygen-tungsten system and its binary and ternary sub-systems are reviewed. Published thermodynamic data are evaluated, and expression for free energies of formation are chosen. These expressions are integrated with and equilibrium-calculating algorithm, producing a powerful tool for understanding and improving the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide. Three examples are presented: reduction/carburization of tungstic oxide with hydrogen, carbon, and methane. (author)

  3. Precipitation formation in recrystallized nickel-plated non-sag tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that some metals, such as palladium and nickel, can easily penetrate into tungsten by fast diffusion via crystal defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. As a result of the fast penetration of these so called activators the recrystallization temperature of heavily drawn non-sag tungsten wire can be lower from about 2,000 C to about 1,000 C, thus the application of the tungsten wire, serving as reinforcement material in metal matrix composites used at high temperatures, is limited. An interesting question is in which form these activators exist in the recrystallized tungsten wire. It is generally believed that W-Ni intermediate compounds could form in the recrystallized material, presumably at grain boundaries. The free energy difference between the pure tungsten fibbers and the precipitating W(Ni) solid solution was suggested as the chemical driving force which governed the recrystallization process. The presence of nickel in small particles had also been observed in recrystallized grains of nickel plated tungsten wires using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These particles were considered to be nickel rich precipitates. However, a detailed investigation of the precipitation process has not been reported. In the present work an investigation of the structure, composition and distribution of nickel rich particles precipitated in recrystallized grains of nickel plated heavily drawn non-sage tungsten wires was carried out using analytical electron microscopy (AEM)

  4. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  5. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  6. arXiv Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00664095

    2018-02-26

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5–1.0 cm2 interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end ASIC (designed by the CALICE collaboration for ILC). In 2017, the setup has been extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype, a scinitillator based sampling calorimeter, and it was further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end ASIC was used for the first time. We highlight final results from our studies in 2016, including ...

  7. Construction and first beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is the technology choice of the CMS collaboration for the endcap calorimetry upgrade planned to cope with the harsh radiation and pileup environment at the High Luminosity-LHC. The HGCAL is realized as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 square centimetres interspersed with absorbers. Prototype modules, based on hexagonal silicon pad sensors, with 128 channels, have been constructed and tested in beams at FNAL and at CERN. The modules include many of the features required for this challenging detector, including a PCB glued directly to the sensor, using through-hole wire-bonding for signal readout and ~5mm spacing between layers - including the front-end electronics and all services. Tests in 2016 have used an existing front-end chip - Skiroc2 (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). We present results from first tests of these modules both in the laboratory and ...

  8. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten prototype modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Quast, Thorben

    2017-01-01

    As part of its HL-LHC upgrade program, CMS is developing a High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) to replace the existing endcap calorimeters. The HGCAL will be realised as a sampling calorimeter, including an electromagnetic compartment comprising 28 layers of silicon pad detectors with pad areas of 0.5 - 1.0 cm$^2$ interspersed with absorbers.Prototype modules, based on 6-inch hexagonal silicon pad sensors with 128 channels, have been constructed and include many of the features required for this challenging detector. In 2016, beam tests of sampling configurations made from these modules have been conducted both at FNAL and at CERN using the Skiroc2 front-end chip (designed for the CALICE experiment for ILC). This year, the setup is extended with CALICE's AHCAL prototype and it is further tested in dedicated beam tests at CERN. There, the new Skiroc2-CMS front-end chip is used for the first time.We present final results from our studies in 2016, including noise performance, calibration with MIPs, energy and p...

  9. Effect of grain boundary microcracks on crack resistance of annealed tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1984-01-01

    Effect of grain boundary microcracks in tungsten, produced by the method of powder sintering, on its crack resistance after annealing at T=2200 deg C, has been considered. On the basis of complex physncomechanical study of tungsten crack resistance it is shown, that the value of ultimate tensile stress does not depend on temperature. The presence of grain boundary cracks in such material (in the limits from 2 to 8%) does not produce effect on its crack resistance

  10. High precision tungsten cutting for optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Clemente, G.; Sanz-Tudanca, C.; Lopez, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained during the INTEGRAL masks development program an implementing the HURA and MURA codes on tungsten plates of different thickness are presented. Hard scientific requirements on pixels size and location tolerances (tenths of microns over large areas -1 m 2 - and thickness from 0.5 mm to 60 mm) required the set up of a dedicated program for testing cutting technologies: laser, photochemical milling, spark machining and electro discharge wire cutting. After a very intensive test campaign the wire cutting process was selected as the optimum technology for code manufacturing . Accuracies achieved an the code cutting fulfill scientific requirements. In fact, they are 5 times better than required. Pixel size and centroids location accuracies of 0.01 mm over a 1 m 2 area have been obtained for the 10,000 pixels on IBIS, 100 pixels on SPI and 24000 pixels on JEM-X masks. Comparative results among different cutting technologies are also discussed. (author)

  11. Optimization of armour geometry and bonding techniques for tungsten-armoured high heat flux components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giniyatulin, R.N.; Komarov, V.L.; Kuzmin, E.G.; Makhankov, A.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Yablokov, N.A.; Zhuk, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Joining of tungsten with copper-based cooling structure and armour geometry optimization are the major aspects in development of the tungsten-armoured plasma facing components (PFC). Fabrication techniques and high heat flux (HHF) tests of tungsten-armoured components have to reflect different PFC designs and acceptable manufacturing cost. The authors present the recent results of tungsten-armoured mock-ups development based on manufacturing and HHF tests. Two aspects were investigated--selection of armour geometry and examination of tungsten-copper bonding techniques. Brazing and casting tungsten-copper bonding techniques were used in small mock-ups. The mock-ups with armour tiles (20x5x10, 10x10x10, 20x20x10, 27x27x10) mm 3 in dimensions were tested by cyclic heat fluxes in the range of (5-20) MW/m 2 , the number of thermal cycles varied from hundreds to several thousands for each mock-up. The results of the tests show the applicability of different geometry and different bonding technique to corresponding heat loading. A medium-scale mock-up 0.6-m in length was manufactured and tested. HHF tests of the medium-scale mock-up have demonstrated the applicability of the applied bonding techniques and armour geometry for full-scale PFC's manufacturing

  12. Proposal of concentration limits for determining the hazard property HP 14 for waste using ecotoxicological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    Different ecotoxicological test batteries and concentration limits have been proposed to assess the hazard property (HP) HP 14 'Ecotoxic' for waste in the European Union and its member states. In test batteries, if the concentration of waste in the culture/dilution medium producing 50% of inhibitory biological effect in one or more test(s) is below the concentration limit of the test, the waste is classified as hazardous. A summarized review of the test batteries proposed since 1998 is presented. The last proposed test battery uses seven aquatic and terrestrial species with standardized methods, but with options and uniform concentration limits of 10% of waste eluate or solid waste in the culture/dilution medium. No attempt was made to match this hazard assessment with the classification made in the European List of Waste (LoW). The aim of this paper is to propose for the same test battery (reduced to 6 tests without options) concentration limits that match with the European List of Waste. This list was taken as reference (despite the fact that waste can be hazardous for other properties than the most frequent HP 14, and its partly political nature for some opinions). The concentration limits (CLs) for tests are the concentrations producing the highest ecotoxicological effects for each test observed in a non-hazardous waste set. Data from Germany, France and Belgium (from in total 5 different sources from 2009 to 2016) with the above-mentioned test battery (without options) were gathered for 81 samples, being the largest set ever published. In total, ten non-hazardous (NH) waste samples (as defined by the LoW and for most of them checked by chemical composition) were used to establish CLs. These CLs were then applied to 13 hazardous (H) waste by the LoW, and all were classified as hazardous. The matching of the resulting classification with the LoW is convincing. For the 58 'mirror entries' in the LoW (hazardous or not depending of the presence of hazardous

  13. The effect of tungsten on mechanical properties of the Ti-9% Al-3% Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartova, T.T.; Grigor'ev, I.P.; Stepanov, Yu.N.; Tarasova, O.B.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of tungsten (from 0 to 10 %) on mechanical properties of the ternary Ti-9 %, Al-3 % Zr alloy, has been studied. The microstructure, tensile properties at 20 and 600 deg C and Vickers hardness in as-forged and as-annealed states have been studied. The experiments have shown that the ultimate strength increases with tungsten content. Titanium alloys with 9 % Al and 3 % Zr in the case of varying tungsten content at 20 deg C fracture by brittle mechanism. The dUctility of the annealed alloy does not rise at 20 deg C, but at the test temperature of 600 deg C the alloy becomes ductile

  14. Development and characterisation of a tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, Johann

    2012-01-01

    In tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten, tungsten wire is combined with a tungsten matrix. The outstanding ductility of the fibres and extrinsic mechanisms of energy dissipation lead to an intense toughening. With extensive analytical and experimental investigations a manufacturing method based on chemical vapour infiltration is developed and first material is produced. The toughening mechanisms are shown by means of sophisticated mechanical experiments i.a. X-ray microtomography.

  15. Potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys with chromium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.; Ronen, S.; Levin, R.

    1977-05-01

    A method was developed for the potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys of different compositions. These were dissolved under conditions that enabled the tungsten content to be determined with chromium (II). Phosphoric acid was selected as a suitable complexing agent for the prevention of the precipitation of tungsten and tantalum compounds. The use of chromium (II) required an oxygen-tight system and therefore the work was carried out in suitable vessels for storage and tritation

  16. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  17. Simulation of cracks in tungsten under ITER specific heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschany, S.

    2006-01-01

    withstand high heat flux. Fusion Engineering and Design v. 81/1-7 pp. 275-279] has been applied. Originally the code has been developed for simulation of brittle destruction in CFC and graphites. It has been tested against plasma gun experiments and proved reliability of its predictions. Now it has been modified to simulate crack formation in tungsten using a model for crack generation in the resolidified surface layer and propagation of cracks in the bulk. The model assumes that initially the resolidified layer is stress-less at the melting temperature and then the tensile stress develops in the layer during its cooling down. First results of the simulations are reported. The simulations reproduce tungsten crack morphology and predict the crack densities and the cracks depth. (author)

  18. Determine ISS Soyuz Orbital Module Ballistic Limits for Steel Projectiles Hypervelocity Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Frankel

    2013-01-01

    A new orbital debris environment model (ORDEM 3.0) defines the density distribution of the debris environment in terms of the fraction of debris that are low-density (plastic), medium-density (aluminum) or high-density (steel) particles. This hypervelocity impact (HVI) program focused on assessing ballistic limits (BLs) for steel projectiles impacting the enhanced Soyuz Orbital Module (OM) micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configuration. The ballistic limit was defined as the projectile size on the threshold of failure of the OM pressure shell as a function of impact speeds and angle. The enhanced OM shield configuration was first introduced with Soyuz 30S (launched in May 2012) to improve the MMOD protection of Soyuz vehicles docked to the International Space Station (ISS). This test program provides HVI data on U.S. materials similar in composition and density to the Russian materials for the enhanced Soyuz OM shield configuration of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz OM penetration risk assessments. The objective of this hypervelocity impact test program was to determine the ballistic limit particle size for 440C stainless steel spherical projectiles on the Soyuz OM shielding at several impact conditions (velocity and angle combinations). This test report was prepared by NASA-JSC/ HVIT, upon completion of tests.

  19. Construction and beam-tests of silicon-tungsten and scintillator-SiPM modules for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yung-wei

    2018-01-01

    A High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is being designed to replace the existing endcap calorimeters in CMS for the HL-LHC era. It features unprecedented transverse and longitudinal segmentation for both electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) compartments, with silicon sensors being chosen for the high-pseudorapidity regions due to their radiation tolerance. The remainder of the HGCAL, in the lower radiation environment, will use plastic scintillator with on-tile SiPM readout. Prototype hexagonal silicon modules, featuring a new Skiroc2-CMS front-end chip, together with a modified version of the scintillator-SiPM CALICE AHCAL, have been built and tested in beams at CERN in 2017. In this poster, we present measurements of noise, calibration, shower shapes and performance with electrons, pions and muons.

  20. Information extraction from FN plots of tungsten microemitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussa, Khalil O. [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Mousa, Marwan S., E-mail: mmousa@mutah.edu.jo [Department of Physics, Mu' tah University, Al-Karak (Jordan); Fischer, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.fischer@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Institut für Physik, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-09-15

    particular introduces a new form of intercept correction factors. The results derived demonstrate the applicability of the applied method on needle shaped – i.e. non planar – emitters as well as its limits. - Highlights: • Tungsten emitters of various tip apex radii and coating materials were analyzed. • Extended FN theory for needle shaped emitters is applied. • Tip sizes extracted from SEM and FEM show interesting relation. • The area efficiency of coated tips is surprisingly high.

  1. Information extraction from FN plots of tungsten microemitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussa, Khalil O.; Mousa, Marwan S.; Fischer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    particular introduces a new form of intercept correction factors. The results derived demonstrate the applicability of the applied method on needle shaped – i.e. non planar – emitters as well as its limits. - Highlights: • Tungsten emitters of various tip apex radii and coating materials were analyzed. • Extended FN theory for needle shaped emitters is applied. • Tip sizes extracted from SEM and FEM show interesting relation. • The area efficiency of coated tips is surprisingly high

  2. The high temperature impact response of tungsten and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure polycrystalline tungsten and chromium at room and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.05 to 3 mm (tungsten) and from 0.1 to 2 mm (chromium). The use of fused silica windows in all but one experiment with chromium and in several high temperature experiments with tungsten led to the need for performing shock and optic characterization of these windows over the 300-1200 K temperature interval. Experiments with tungsten and chromium samples showed that annealing of the metals transforms the initial ramping elastic wave into a jump-like wave, substantially increasing the Hugoniot elastic limits of the metals. With increased annealing time, the spall strength of the two metals slightly increases. Both at room and at high temperatures, the elastic precursor in the two metals decays in two distinct regimes. At propagation distances smaller than ˜1 mm (tungsten) or ˜0.5 mm (chromium), decay is fast, with the dislocation motion and multiplication being controlled by phonon viscous drag. At greater distances, the rate of decay becomes much lower, with control of the plastic deformation being passed to the thermally activated generation and motion of dislocation double-kinks. The stress at which this transition takes place virtually coincides with the Peierls stress τP of the active glide system. Analysis of the annealing effects in both presently and previously studied BCC metals (i.e., Ta, V, Nb, Mo, W, and Cr) and of the dependencies of their normalized Peierls stresses τP(θ) /τP(0 ) on the normalized temperature θ=T /Tm allows one to conclude that the non-planar, split into several glide planes, structure of the dislocation core in these metals is mainly responsible for their plastic deformation features.

  3. Feasibility, Benefits, and Limitations of a Penicillin Allergy Skin Testing Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Prasanna P; Jeffres, Meghan N

    2017-06-01

    To critically examine the feasibility, benefits, and limitations of an inpatient penicillin skin testing service and how pharmacists can be utilized. A PubMed search was performed from July 2016 through September 2016 using the following search terms: penicillin skin testing, penicillin allergy, β-lactam allergy. Additional references were identified from a review of literature citations. All English-language studies assessing the use of penicillin skin testing as well as management and clinical outcomes of patients with a β-lactam allergy were evaluated. The prevalence of people self-identifying as penicillin allergic ranges from 10% to 20% in the United States. Being improperly labeled as penicillin allergic is associated with higher health care costs, worse clinical outcomes, and an increased prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections. Penicillin skin testing can be a tool used to clarify penicillin allergies and has been demonstrated to be a successful addition to antimicrobial stewardship programs in multiple health care settings. Prior to implementing a penicillin skin testing service, institutions will need to perform a feasibility analysis of who will supply labor and accept the financial burden as well as identify if the positive benefits of a penicillin skin testing service overcome the limitations of this diagnostic test. We conclude that institutions with high percentages of patients receiving non-β-lactams because of penicillin allergy labels would likely benefit the most from a penicillin skin testing service.

  4. Time Limits in Testing: An Analysis of Eye Movements and Visual Attention in Spatial Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Victoria A.; Fraser, Graham M.; Kryklywy, James H.; Mitchell, Derek G. V.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with an aptitude for interpreting spatial information (high mental rotation ability: HMRA) typically master anatomy with more ease, and more quickly, than those with low mental rotation ability (LMRA). This article explores how visual attention differs with time limits on spatial reasoning tests. Participants were assorted to two…

  5. 12 CFR 345.25 - Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FDIC rates a bank's community development performance as provided in Appendix A of this part. ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks. 345.25 Section 345.25 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION...

  6. 12 CFR 25.25 - Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the community development performance of a wholesale or limited purpose bank pursuant to the following... performance rating. The OCC rates a bank's community development performance as provided in appendix A of this... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Community development test for wholesale or...

  7. APPLICATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL METHODOLOGY IN THE OPTIMIZATION OF A TUNGSTEN CONCENTRATION PROCESS BY MICROEMULSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.S. RAMOS

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - In this work, we applied an experimental planning methodology in order to correlate the necessary amounts with the description of the a tungsten extraction process by microemulsions. The result is a mathematical modelling carried out using the Sheffe Net method, where the mixtures concentration values are represented inside an equilateral triangle. The tungsten concentration process occurs in two stages: extraction and reextraction. The extraction stage was determined by monitoring: phase relative volume (Vr, extraction percentage (%E and tungsten concentration in the microemulsion phase (Ctm e. The reextraction phase was determined by monitoring: reextraction percentage (%Re and tungsten concentration in the aqueous phase (Ctaq. Finally, we obtained equations that relate the extraction / reextraction properties to the composition of specific points inside the extraction region, obeying the error limits specified for the acceptance of each parameter. The results were evaluated through the construction of isoresponse diagrams and correlation graphics between experimental values and those obtained through use of equations.

  8. Aquatic toxicity testing of liquid hydrophobic chemicals – Passive dosing exactly at the saturation limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stibany, Felix; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Schäffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to develop a passive dosing approach for aquatic toxicity testing of liquid substances with very high Kow values and (2) to apply this approach to the model substance dodecylbenzene (DDB, Log Kow = 8.65). The first step was to design a new passive dosing...... format for testing DDB exactly at its saturation limit. Silicone O-rings were saturated by direct immersion in pure liquid DDB, which resulted in swelling of >14%. These saturated O-rings were used to establish and maintain DDB exposure exactly at the saturation limit throughout 72-h algal growth...... at chemical activity of unity was higher than expected relative to a reported hydrophobicity cut-off in toxicity, but lower than expected relative to a reported chemical activity range for baseline toxicity. The present study introduces a new effective approach for toxicity testing of an important group...

  9. Test results of fault current limiter using YBCO tapes with shunt protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldan, Carlos A; Lamas, Jerika S; Shigue, Carlos Y [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena, EEL USP, Lorena - SP (Brazil); Filho, Ernesto Ruppert, E-mail: cabaldan@gmail.co [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica, FEEC Unicamp, Campinas - SP (Brazil)

    2010-06-01

    A Fault Current Limiter (FCL) based on high temperature superconducting elements with four tapes in parallel were designed and tested in 220 V line for a fault current peak between 1 kA to 4 kA. The elements employed second generation (2G) HTS tapes of YBCO coated conductor with stainless steel reinforcement. The tapes were electrically connected in parallel with effective length of 0.4 m per element (16 elements connected in series) constituting a single-phase unit. The FCL performance was evaluated through over-current tests and its recovery characteristics under load current were analyzed using optimized value of the shunt protection. The projected limiting ratio achieved a factor higher than 4 during fault of 5 cycles without degradation. Construction details and further test results will be shown in the paper.

  10. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein; Tafti, Rooholla Azizi; Rahmani, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  11. Forming limit diagram of aluminum AA6063 tubes at high temperatures by bulge tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Naeini, Hassan Moslemi; Liaghat, Gholamhossein [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tafti, Rooholla Azizi [Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmani, Farzad [Kar Higher Education Institute, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A free bulge test and ductile fracture criteria were used to obtain the forming limit diagrams (FLD) of aluminum alloy AA6063 tubes at high temperatures. Ductile fracture criteria were calibrated using the results of uniaxial tension tests at various elevated temperatures and different strain rates through adjusting the Zener-Holloman parameter. High temperature free bulge test of tubes was simulated in finite element software Abaqus, and tube bursting was predicted using ductile fracture criteria under different loading paths. FLDs which were obtained from finite element simulation were compared to experimental results to select the most accurate criterion for prediction of forming limit diagram. According to the results, all studied ductile fracture criteria predict similarly when forming condition is close to the uniaxial tension, while Ayada criterion predicts the FLD at 473 K and 573 K very well.

  12. Tungsten thick coatings for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardi, B.; Pizzuto, A.; Orsini, A.; Libera, S.; Visca, E.; Bertamini, L.; Casadei, F.; Severini, E.; Montanari, R.; Litunovsky, N.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the R and D activity was to realize thick W coatings on CuCrZr hollow bars and to test the mock ups with respect to thermal fatigue. Eight mock ups provided of 4 mm thick W coating were finally manufactured. The bonding integrity between coating and substrate was checked by means of an Ultrasonic apparatus. Characterisation of coatings was performed in order to assess microstructure, impurity content, density, tensile strength, adhesion strength, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient. Macroscopic residual strain measurements were performed by means of 'hole drilling' technique. The activities performed demonstrated the feasibility of thick Tungsten coatings on geometries with more complex residual strain distribution. These coatings are reliable armour of medium heat flux plasma facing component. (author)

  13. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  14. Nitrogen implantation in tungsten and migration in the fusion experiment ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, Gerd Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The implantation of nitrogen ions into tungsten was studied in laboratory experiments to understand the interaction of nitrogen containing fusion plasmas with tungsten walls. The resulting model of W-N interaction was tested by experiments in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Using the measurements from these experiments as boundary condition, nitrogen transport and re-distribution in the plasma were modeled by self-consistent WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations.

  15. Assaying embryotoxicity in the test tube: current limitations of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) challenging its applicability domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling, Christian; Hayess, Katrin; Peters, Annelieke K; Steemans, Margino; Spielmann, Horst; Luch, Andreas; Seiler, Andrea E M

    2012-05-01

    Testing for embryotoxicity in vitro is an attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is such a method, and it has been formally validated by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. A number of recent studies have underscored the potential of this method. However, the EST performed well below the 78% accuracy expected from the validation study using a new set of chemicals and pharmaceutical compounds, and also of toxicity criteria, tested to enlarge the database of the validated EST as part of the Work Package III of the ReProTect Project funded within the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union. To assess the performance and applicability domain of the EST we present a detailed review of the substances and their effects in the EST being nitrofen, ochratoxin A, D-penicillamine, methylazoxymethanol, lovastatin, papaverine, warfarin, β-aminopropionitrile, dinoseb, furosemide, doxylamine, pravastatin, and metoclopramide. By delineation of the molecular mechanisms of the substances we identify six categories of reasons for misclassifications. Some of these limitations might also affect other in vitro methods assessing embryotoxicity. Substances that fall into these categories need to be included in future validation sets and in validation guidelines for embryotoxicity testing. Most importantly, we suggest conceivable improvements and additions to the EST which will resolve most of the limitations.

  16. In vitro profiling of epigenetic modifications underlying heavy metal toxicity of tungsten-alloy and its components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Ranjana; Xu, Xiufen; Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Olsen, Cara; Mears, David; Caretti, Giuseppina; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten-alloy has carcinogenic potential as demonstrated by cancer development in rats with intramuscular implanted tungsten-alloy pellets. This suggests a potential involvement of epigenetic events previously implicated as environmental triggers of cancer. Here, we tested metal induced cytotoxicity and epigenetic modifications including H3 acetylation, H3-Ser10 phosphorylation and H3-K4 trimethylation. We exposed human embryonic kidney (HEK293), human neuroepithelioma (SKNMC), and mouse myoblast (C2C12) cultures for 1-day and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures for 1-week to 50-200 μg/ml of tungsten-alloy (91% tungsten/6% nickel/3% cobalt), tungsten, nickel, and cobalt. We also examined the potential role of intracellular calcium in metal mediated histone modifications by addition of calcium channel blockers/chelators to the metal solutions. Tungsten and its alloy showed cytotoxicity at concentrations > 50 μg/ml, while we found significant toxicity with cobalt and nickel for most tested concentrations. Diverse cell-specific toxic effects were observed, with C2C12 being relatively resistant to tungsten-alloy mediated toxic impact. Tungsten-alloy, but not tungsten, caused almost complete dephosphorylation of H3-Ser10 in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with H3-hypoacetylation in C2C12. Dramatic H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation was found in all cobalt treated cultures with a decrease in H3 pan-acetylation in C2C12, SKNMC and HEK293. Trimethylation of H3-K4 was not affected. Both tungsten-alloy and cobalt mediated H3-Ser10 dephosphorylation were reversed with BAPTA-AM, highlighting the role of intracellular calcium, confirmed with 2-photon calcium imaging. In summary, our results for the first time reveal epigenetic modifications triggered by tungsten-alloy exposure in C2C12 and hippocampal primary neuronal cultures suggesting the underlying synergistic effects of tungsten, nickel and cobalt mediated by changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis and

  17. The detection limits of antimicrobial agents in cow's milk by a simple Yoghurt Culture Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadeh, M; Bahrainipour, A

    2008-09-15

    The aim of this study was to study performance of Yoghurt Culture Test (YCT) in the detection of antimicrobial residues in milk. For this purpose, the sensitivity of YCT for 15 antibiotics were determined. For each drug, 8 concentrations were tested. The detection limits of YCT at 2.5 h and 4 h incubation were determined (microg kg(-1)): 15 and 37.5, penicillin G; 4 and 5, ampicillin; 5 and 7.5, amoxycillin; 100 and 200, cephalexin; 80 and 100, cefazoline; 100 and 200, oxytetracycline; 500 and 100, chlortetracycline; 100 and 200, tetracycline; 150 and 200, doxycycline; 200 and 400, sulphadimidine; 500 and 1000, gentamycin; 1000 and 1500, spectinomycin; 400 and 500, erythromycin; 50 and 100, tylosin; 5000 and 10000, chloramphenicol. The YCT detection limits at 2.5 h incubation for ampicillin, cephalexin, tetracycline, oxytetracycline and tylosin are similar to those obtained as Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) according to Regulation 2377/90 EEC as set out by the European Union. In addition the detection limits of YCT for some antibiotics were lower than some of microbial inhibitor test.

  18. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  19. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  20. Current limitations and recommendations to improve testing for the environmental assessment of endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Katherine K.; Biever, Ronald C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Gross, Melanie; Guiney, Patrick D.; Holbech, Henrik; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Katsiadaki, Ioanna; Krueger, Hank; Levine, Steven L.; Maack, Gerd; Williams, Mike; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine active chemicals are described, and associated challenges are discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or to the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro, and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect apical data to detect possible adverse effects. These test systems are currently designed to robustly assess endocrine activity and/or adverse effects in the estrogen, androgen, and thyroid hormone signaling pathways; however, there are some limitations of current test systems for evaluating endocrine hazard and risk. These limitations include a lack of certainty regarding: 1) adequately sensitive species and life stages; 2) mechanistic endpoints that are diagnostic for endocrine pathways of concern; and 3) the linkage between mechanistic responses and apical, adverse outcomes. Furthermore, some existing test methods are resource intensive with regard to time, cost, and use of animals. However, based on recent experiences, there are opportunities to improve approaches to and guidance for existing test methods and to reduce uncertainty. For example, in vitro high-throughput screening could be used to prioritize chemicals for testing and provide insights as to the most appropriate assays for characterizing hazard and risk. Other recommendations include adding endpoints for elucidating connections between mechanistic effects and adverse outcomes, identifying potentially sensitive taxa for which test methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen, and thyroid

  1. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titretir, Serap [Department of Chemistry, Inoenue University, 44065 Malatya (Turkey); Kenduezler, Erdal [Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, 40100 Kirsehir (Turkey); Arslan, Yasin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kula, Ibrahim [Department of Chemistry, Mugla University, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Bakirdere, Sezgin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH{sub 3} is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 deg. C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 deg. C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH{sub 4} solutions, H{sub 2} and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l{sup -1} using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  2. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  3. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  4. The dynamical mechanical properties of tungsten under compression at working temperature range of divertors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, C.C.; Song, Y.T.; Peng, X.B.; Wei, Y.P.; Mao, X.; Li, W.X.; Qian, X.Y.

    2016-01-01

    In the divertor structure of ITER and EAST with mono-block module, tungsten plays not only a role of armor material but also a role of structural material, because electromagnetic (EM) impact will be exerted on tungsten components in VDEs or CQ. The EM loads can reach to 100 MN, which would cause high strain rates. In addition, directly exposed to high-temperature plasma, the temperature regime of divertor components is complex. Aiming at studying dynamical response of tungsten divertors under EM loads, an experiment on tungsten employed in EAST divertors was performed using a Kolsky bar system. The testing strain rates and temperatures is derived from actual working conditions, which makes the constitutive equation concluded by using John-Cook model and testing data very accurate and practical. The work would give a guidance to estimate the dynamical response, fatigue life and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under EM impact loads. - Graphical abstract: From the comparison between the experimental curves and the predicted curves calculated by adopting the corrected m, it is very clear that the new model is of great capability to explain the deformation behavior of the tungsten material under dynamic compression at high temperatures. (EC, PC and PCM refers to experimental curve, predicted curve and predicted curve with a corrected m. Different colors represent different scenarios.). - Highlights: • Test research on dynamic properties of tungsten at working temperature range and strain rate range of divertors. • Constitutive equation descrbing strain hardening, strain rate hardening and temperature softening. • A guidance to estimate dynamical response and damage evolution of tungsten divertor components under impact.

  5. R&D of the CEPC scintillator-tungsten ECAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    The circular electron and positron collider (CEPC) was proposed as a future Higgs factory. To meet the physics requirements, a particle flow algorithm-oriented calorimeter system with high energy resolution and precise reconstruction is considered. A sampling calorimeter with scintillator-tungsten sandwich structure is selected as one of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) options due to its good performance and relatively low cost. We present the design, the test and the optimization of the scintillator module read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), including the design and the development of the electronics. To estimate the performance of the scintillator and SiPM module for particles with different energy, the beam test of a mini detector prototype without tungsten shower material was performed at the E3 beams in Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The results are consistent with the expectation. These studies provide a reference and promote the development of particle flow electromagnetic calorimeter for the CEPC.

  6. Synthesis, Consolidation and Characterization of Sol-gel Derived Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel (SG) derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g·cm-3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

  7. Efficacy of Tantalum Tungsten Alloys for Diffusion Barrier Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, D. B.; Aimone, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally either Niobium, Tantalum or a combination of both have been used as diffusion barriers in Nb3Sn Multi-filament wire. Vanadium has also been used successfully but the ultimate RRR of the copper is limited unless an external shell of Niobium is included. Niobium is preferred over Tantalum when alternating current losses are not an issue as the Niobium will react to form Nb3Sn. Pure Tantalum tends to deform irregularly requiring extra starting thickness to ensure good barrier qualities. Our evaluations showed Tantalum lightly alloyed with 3 wt% Tungsten is compatible with the wire drawing process while deforming as well as or better than pure Niobium. Ta3wt%W has been processed as a single barrier and as a distributed barrier to fine dimensions. In addition, the higher modulus and strength of the Tantalum Tungsten alloy improves the overall tensile properties of the wire.

  8. Low-temperature transport in ultra-thin tungsten films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiatti, Olivio [Neue Materialien, Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (United Kingdom); Nash, Christopher; Warburton, Paul [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Tungsten-containing films, fabricated by focused-ion-beam-induced chemical vapour deposition, are known to have an enhanced superconducting transition temperature compared to bulk tungsten, and have been investigated previously for film thickness down to 25 nm. In this work, by using ion-beam doses below 50 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} on a substrate of amorphous silicon, we have grown continuous films with thickness below 20 nm. The electron transport properties were investigated at temperatures down to 350 mK and in magnetic fields up to 3 T, parallel and perpendicular to the films. The films in this work are closer to the limit of two-dimensional systems and are superconducting at low temperatures. Magnetoresistance measurements yield upper critical fields of the order of 1 T, and the resulting coherence length is smaller than the film thickness.

  9. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  10. Graphenated polyaniline-doped tungsten oxide nanocomposite sensor for real time determination of phenanthrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovide, Oluwakemi; Jaheed, Nazeem; Mohamed, Nurali; Nxusani, Ezo; Sunday, Christopher E.; Tsegaye, Abebaw; Ajayi, Rachel F.; Njomo, Njagi; Makelane, Hlamulo; Bilibana, Mawethu; Baker, Priscilla G.; Williams, Avril; Vilakazi, Sibulelo; Tshikhudo, Robert; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2014-01-01

    A graphenated polyaniline/tungsten oxide (PANI/WO 3 /GR) nanocomposite sensor was prepared by electropolymerisation of a mixture of aniline monomer and tungsten oxide on a graphene-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The PANI/WO 3 /GR/GCE nanocomposite electrode was tested as a sensor for the determination of phenanthrene. The direct electro-oxidation behaviour of phenanthrene on the PANI/WO 3 /GR modified GCE was carefully investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results indicated that the PANI/WO 3 /GR/GCE sensor was more sensitive to phenanthrene (with a dynamic linear range of 1.0 - 6.0 pM and a detection limit of 0.123 pM.) than GCE, PANI/GCE or PANI/WO 3 /GCE. The sensor exhibited excellent reproducibility and long-term stability. The sensor exhibits lower detection sensitivity than the WHO permissible level of 1.12 nM phenanthrene in wastewater

  11. The introduction of syphilis point of care tests in resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Mabey, David Cw

    2017-04-01

    Syphilis remains an important and preventable cause of stillbirth and neonatal mortality. About 1 million women with active syphilis become pregnant each year. Without treatment, 25% of them will deliver a stillborn baby and 33% a low birth weight baby with an increased chance of dying in the first month of life. Adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis can be prevented by screening pregnant women, and treating those who test positive with a single dose of penicillin before 28 weeks' gestation. Areas covered: This manuscript covers the impact of syphilis on pregnancy outcome, the diagnosis of syphilis, with a special focus on point of care (POC) tests, and challenges to the introduction of POC tests, and their potential impact on the control and prevention of syphilis in resource limited settings. Expert commentary: POC tests for syphilis are available which meet the ASSURED criteria, and could make syphilis screening accessible to all women anywhere in the world who attend an antenatal clinic. High quality dual POC tests for HIV and syphilis could ensure that well-funded programmes for the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV can contribute towards increased coverage of antenatal syphilis screening, and prevent more than 300,000 adverse pregnancy outcomes due to syphilis annually. Alongside investment to increase availability of syphilis POC tests, operational research is needed to understand how best to improve screening of pregnant women and to translate test availability into improved pregnancy outcomes.

  12. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  13. Reorientation measurements on tungsten isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J J; Saladin, J X; Baktash, C; Alessi, J G [Pittsburgh Univ., Pa. (USA)

    1977-11-14

    In a particle-..gamma.. coincidence experiment, a thick tungsten target, of natural isotopic abundance, was bombarded with ..cap alpha.. and /sup 16/O beams. From analysis of the deexcitation ..gamma..-rays following Coulomb excitation, the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the second 2/sup +/ state (the 2/sup +/' state) was determined for /sup 186/W and /sup 184/W. In a separate Coulomb excitation experiment a thin, isotopically enriched /sup 186/W target was bombarded with /sup 16/O ions. From analysis of projectiles scattered elastically and inelastically the quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state of /sup 186/W was extracted. The results of the two experiments are in good agreement. The quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state is found to be opposite in sign to that of the first 2/sup +/ state for both isotopes studied. However, its magnitude decreases rapidly in going from /sup 186/W to /sup 184/W, in contrast to the predictions of the rotation-vibration of asymmetric rotor models. The microscopic theory of Kumar and Baranger does predict the experimental trend, qualitatively. Thus the present results are interpreted as being evidence of strong coupling between ..beta.. and ..gamma.. degrees of freedom in the tungsten isotopes, which, according to the theory of Kumar and Baranger, is the source of the reduced value of the quadrupole moment.

  14. Cleaning and outgassing studies of machinable tungsten for beamline safety shutters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Ryding, D.; Nielsen, R.W.; Kruy, T.L.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    Machinable tungsten blocks are used as safety shutters in the front ends and the beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The machinable tungsten used is characterized as a UHV-compatible metal by the vendor and was developed through a joint research effort with the APS. However, because of the inherent porosity in the sintered tungsten metal, it may present a vacuum problem and has to be subjected to strict vacuum testing before it is put on the beamlines. We have chosen specially heat-treated machinable tungsten with a density of 18 g/cm 3 for safety shutters. In-house-developed, environmentally friendly vacuum cleaning procedures were used. In this paper, we present results of thermal outgassing tests for machinable tungsten safety shutter sets. Each set consists of five blocks and has a total area of 4500 cm 2 . A cleaning procedure using alkaline detergent ultrasonic washes, deionized water rinses, and a 500 degree C vacuum furnace baking was used before outgassing measurements. Outgassing rates 10 hours after initial pump down at room temperature reached ∼1.60x10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and ∼1.56x10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for the stainless steel vacuum chamber. The outgassing rate of machinable tungsten 24 hours after an in situ 48 h bake at 160 degree C is also comparable to that of the stainless steel vacuum chamber. The importance of a 500 degree C vacuum furnace baking has been confirmed by outgassing studies for machinable tungsten sets that were not subject to vacuum furnace baking. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  16. Information extraction from FN plots of tungsten microemitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussa, Khalil O; Mousa, Marwan S; Fischer, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Tungsten based microemitter tips have been prepared both clean and coated with dielectric materials. For clean tungsten tips, apex radii have been varied ranging from 25 to 500 nm. These tips were manufactured by electrochemical etching a 0.1 mm diameter high purity (99.95%) tungsten wire at the meniscus of two molar NaOH solution. Composite micro-emitters considered here are consisting of a tungsten core coated with different dielectric materials-such as magnesium oxide (MgO), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and zinc oxide (ZnO). It is worthwhile noting here, that the rather unconventional NaOH coating has shown several interesting properties. Various properties of these emitters were measured including current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the physical shape of the tips. A conventional field emission microscope (FEM) with a tip (cathode)-screen (anode) separation standardized at 10 mm was used to electrically characterize the electron emitters. The system was evacuated down to a base pressure of ∼10(-8) mbar when baked at up to ∼180 °C overnight. This allowed measurements of typical field electron emission (FE) characteristics, namely the IV characteristics and the emission images on a conductive phosphorus screen (the anode). Mechanical characterization has been performed through a FEI scanning electron microscope (SEM). Within this work, the mentioned experimental results are connected to the theory for analyzing Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plots. We compared and evaluated the data extracted from clean tungsten tips of different radii and determined deviations between the results of different extraction methods applied. In particular, we derived the apex radii of several clean and coated tungsten tips by both SEM imaging and analyzing FN plots. The aim of this analysis is to support the ongoing discussion on recently developed improvements of the theory for analyzing FN plots related to metal field electron emitters, which in particular

  17. Life Prediction on a T700 Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cylinder with Limited Accelerated Life Testing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An accelerated life testing investigation was conducted on a composite cylinder that consists of aluminum alloy and T700 carbon fiber. The ultimate failure stress predictions of cylinders were obtained by the mixing rule and verified by the blasting static pressure method. Based on the stress prediction of cylinder under working conditions, the constant stress accelerated life test of the cylinder was designed. However, the failure data cannot be sufficiently obtained by the accelerated life test due to the time limitation. Therefore, most of the data presented to be high censored in high stress level and zero-failure data in low stress level. When using the traditional method for rupture life prediction, the results showed to be of lower confidence. In this study, the consistency of failure mechanism for carbon fiber and cylinder was analyzed firstly. According to the analysis result, the statistical test information of carbon fiber could be utilized for the accelerated model constitution. Then, rupture life prediction method for cylinder was proposed based on the accelerated life test data and carbon fiber test data. In this way, the life prediction accuracy of cylinder could be improved obviously, and the results showed that the accuracy of this method increased by 35%.

  18. Dilution testing using rapid diagnostic tests in a HIV diagnostic algorithm: a novel alternative for confirmation testing in resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Leslie; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Abebe, Almaz; Piriou, Erwan; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Masiga, Johnson; Muluneh, Libsework; Wazome, Joseph; Ritmeijer, Koert; Klarkowski, Derryck

    2015-05-14

    Current WHO testing guidelines for resource limited settings diagnose HIV on the basis of screening tests without a confirmation test due to cost constraints. This leads to a potential risk of false positive HIV diagnosis. In this paper, we evaluate the dilution test, a novel method for confirmation testing, which is simple, rapid, and low cost. The principle of the dilution test is to alter the sensitivity of a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) by dilution of the sample, in order to screen out the cross reacting antibodies responsible for falsely positive RDT results. Participants were recruited from two testing centres in Ethiopia where a tiebreaker algorithm using 3 different RDTs in series is used to diagnose HIV. All samples positive on the initial screening RDT and every 10th negative sample underwent testing with the gold standard and dilution test. Dilution testing was performed using Determine™ rapid diagnostic test at 6 different dilutions. Results were compared to the gold standard of Western Blot; where Western Blot was indeterminate, PCR testing determined the final result. 2895 samples were recruited to the study. 247 were positive for a prevalence of 8.5 % (247/2895). A total of 495 samples underwent dilution testing. The RDT diagnostic algorithm misclassified 18 samples as positive. Dilution at the level of 1/160 was able to correctly identify all these 18 false positives, but at a cost of a single false negative result (sensitivity 99.6 %, 95 % CI 97.8-100; specificity 100 %, 95 % CI: 98.5-100). Concordance between the gold standard and the 1/160 dilution strength was 99.8 %. This study provides proof of concept for a new, low cost method of confirming HIV diagnosis in resource-limited settings. It has potential for use as a supplementary test in a confirmatory algorithm, whereby double positive RDT results undergo dilution testing, with positive results confirming HIV infection. Negative results require nucleic acid testing to rule out false

  19. Testing the Limits of Optimizing Dual-Task Performance in Younger and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobach, Tilo; Frensch, Peter; Müller, Herrmann Josef; Schubert, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Impaired dual-task performance in younger and older adults can be improved with practice. Optimal conditions even allow for a (near) elimination of this impairment in younger adults. However, it is unknown whether such (near) elimination is the limit of performance improvements in older adults. The present study tests this limit in older adults under conditions of (a) a high amount of dual-task training and (b) training with simplified component tasks in dual-task situations. The data showed that a high amount of dual-task training in older adults provided no evidence for an improvement of dual-task performance to the optimal dual-task performance level achieved by younger adults. However, training with simplified component tasks in dual-task situations exclusively in older adults provided a similar level of optimal dual-task performance in both age groups. Therefore through applying a testing the limits approach, we demonstrated that older adults improved dual-task performance to the same level as younger adults at the end of training under very specific conditions. PMID:22408613

  20. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Jay L.; Korte, Nic

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use

  1. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  2. REFINEMENT OF THE REVERSE EXTRUSION TEST TO DETERMINE THE TWO CONSISTENCY LIMITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil KAYABALI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Liquid limit (LL and plastic limit (PL are the two most commonly used index proper- ties of fine-grained soils. They have been used in not only classification of soils but also in correlation with certain engineering properties. Therefore, they have been subjected to numerous researches since they were first introduced by Atterberg in 1911. While their me- chanisms were well defined in many codes and they have been in use for decades, criticisms often arose pertinent to the uncertainties inherent to them. Incredible amount of effort has been exerted to invent more rational testing methods in place of both the Casagrande’s cup and bead rolling methods. Part of those efforts has been on devicing a single tool to measure the two relative index properties together. Recently, the reverse extrusion test was brought into the use of geotechnical engineers. It was shown that this tool has a potential of measu- ring LL, PL, and even the shrinkage limit (SL. The aim of this investigation is to reassess the ability of the reverse extrusion test to determine LL and PL with further refinement. In this regard 70 fine-grained soils covering a large range of plasticity were employed. Fall-cone method and rolling-device method were employed to determine LL and PL, res- pectively. The reverse extrusion tests were carried out at least five different water contents per soil sample. Extrusion pressures were plotted against water content and a curve fitting was applied to data pairs, from which the y-intercept (the coefficient a and the slope (the coefficieent b of the curve were determined. Those reverse extrusion coefficients were utilized to determine the representative extrusion pressures corresponding to LL and PL, as was done by the earlier researchers; however, the degree of success for the prediction of LL and PL using the representative extrusion pressures was not encouraging. Different from the previously proposed approaches, the reverse extrusion

  3. Advanced tungsten materials for plasma-facing components of DEMO and fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R.; Riesch, J.; Coenen, J.W.; Brinkmann, J.; Calvo, A.; Elgeti, S.; García-Rosales, C.; Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Holzner, G.; Klein, F.; Koch, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of W-fibre enhanced W-composites incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. • Production of a large sample (more than 2000 long fibres) for mechanical and thermal testing. • Even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms are still effective. • Emissions of volatile W-oxides can be suppressed by alloying W with elements forming stable oxides. • WCr10Ti2 has been successfully tested under accidental conditions and high heat fluxes. - Abstract: Tungsten is the major candidate material for the armour of plasma facing components in future fusion devices. To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten, which strongly limits its operational window, a W-fibre enhanced W-composite material (W_f/W) has been developed incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. Small W_f/W samples show a large increase in toughness. Recently, a large sample (50 mm × 50 mm × 3 mm) with more than 2000 long fibres has been successfully produced allowing further mechanical and thermal testing. It could be shown that even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms as crack bridging by intact fibres, as well as the energy dissipation by fibre-matrix interface debonding and crack deflection are still effective. A potential problem with the use of pure W in a fusion reactor is the formation of radioactive and highly volatile WO_3 compounds and their potential release under accidental conditions. It has been shown that the oxidation of W can be strongly suppressed by alloying with elements forming stable oxides. WCr10Ti2 alloy has been produced on a technical scale and has been successfully tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS. Recently, W-Cr-Y alloys have been produced on a lab-scale. They seem to have even improved properties compared to the previously investigated W alloys.

  4. Advanced tungsten materials for plasma-facing components of DEMO and fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, R., E-mail: Rudolf.Neu@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultät für Maschinenbau, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riesch, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brinkmann, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Calvo, A. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Elgeti, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Holzner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Klein, F. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Development of W-fibre enhanced W-composites incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. • Production of a large sample (more than 2000 long fibres) for mechanical and thermal testing. • Even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms are still effective. • Emissions of volatile W-oxides can be suppressed by alloying W with elements forming stable oxides. • WCr10Ti2 has been successfully tested under accidental conditions and high heat fluxes. - Abstract: Tungsten is the major candidate material for the armour of plasma facing components in future fusion devices. To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten, which strongly limits its operational window, a W-fibre enhanced W-composite material (W{sub f}/W) has been developed incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. Small W{sub f}/W samples show a large increase in toughness. Recently, a large sample (50 mm × 50 mm × 3 mm) with more than 2000 long fibres has been successfully produced allowing further mechanical and thermal testing. It could be shown that even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms as crack bridging by intact fibres, as well as the energy dissipation by fibre-matrix interface debonding and crack deflection are still effective. A potential problem with the use of pure W in a fusion reactor is the formation of radioactive and highly volatile WO{sub 3} compounds and their potential release under accidental conditions. It has been shown that the oxidation of W can be strongly suppressed by alloying with elements forming stable oxides. WCr10Ti2 alloy has been produced on a technical scale and has been successfully tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS. Recently, W-Cr-Y alloys have been produced on a lab-scale. They seem to have even improved properties compared to the previously investigated W alloys.

  5. High heat flux testing impact on the Tore Supra toroidal pumped limiter achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Cordier, J.J.; Mitteau, R.; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.

    2003-01-01

    The toroidal pumped limiter of Tore Supra is made of 576 elementary high heat flux (HHF) cooled plasma-facing components (PFCs) and designed to sustain 10 MW/m 2 in steady state. One of the main technical difficulties is to ensure a high quality of the bond between the carbon fiber composite armor tile and the water-cooled heat sink due to the high thermal stresses that develop at the bond during operation. Consequently, a HHF facility able to reproduce in service operation of PFCs is required all along the development and manufacturing route. In Europe, the FE200 facility (electron beam, 200 kW, France) operating since 1991, was extensively used for such a development. A first testing campaign in 1995 was devoted to the qualification of this bond: AMC technology from Plansee GmbH was selected. Afterwards, a second campaign on scale-one elements (1996) allowed an optimization of the element design and series production to be launched. During the mass production, a non-destructive control process - cheaper and faster than HHF testing - based on infrared characterization was routinely operated on 100% of the manufactured elements. Strong variability of the bond quality was observed and a repair process allowing the replacement of deficient tiles was developed. In 2000 and 2001, 2 campaigns of HHF testing were launched to correlate the non-destructive measurements and to optimize and validate the repair process. This was done, in two steps, with success. This yielded moreover interesting information for qualifying both tests across each other and also to analyze the fatigue evolution of the bond. The qualification and the achievement of the Tore Supra limiter has greatly been made possible by such HHF tests, which appears as essential before and during PFC manufacturing. (authors)

  6. Disposable glucose test strip for whole blood with integrated sensing/diffusion-limiting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zhencheng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Info-Physics and Geomatics Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Fang Cheng, E-mail: fangpingchuan@163.co [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Info-Physics and Geomatics Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang Hongyan; He Jishan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Info-Physics and Geomatics Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2009-12-30

    A disposable glucose test strip with an integrated sensing/diffusion-limiting layer was developed. A formulation containing filler, glucose oxidase and electronic mediator was screen-printed over two carbon electrodes to form an integrated sensing/diffusion-limiting layer. On rehydration, the integrated layer does not break up, but swells to form a gelled and three-dimensional meshy reaction zone on the surface of the underlying conductive elements in which reactants and mediator move freely, but interfering species such as red blood cells containing oxygenated hemoglobin are excluded. On the same time, the integrated layer maintains a rate of permeation of the analyte through it with a variation of less than 10% at temperatures ranging from 15 deg. C to 42 deg. C. This biosensor is substantially insensitive to interferents and essentially independent to relevant temperature, which provides a more reliable reading of actual blood glucose value in human whole blood.

  7. Hydrogen gas driven permeation through tungsten deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Keiichiro; Katayama, Kazunari; Date, Hiroyuki; Fukada, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H permeation tests for W layer formed by H plasma sputtering are performed. • H permeation flux through W layer is larger than that through W bulk. • H diffusivity in W layer is smaller than that in W bulk. • The equilibrium H concentration in W layer is larger than that in W bulk. - Abstract: It is important to evaluate the influence of deposition layers formed on plasma facing wall on tritium permeation and tritium retention in the vessel of a fusion reactor from a viewpoint of safety. In this work, tungsten deposition layers having different thickness and porosity were formed on circular nickel plates by hydrogen RF plasma sputtering. Hydrogen permeation experiment was carried out at the temperature range from 250 °C to 500 °C and at hydrogen pressure range from 1013 Pa to 101,300 Pa. The hydrogen permeation flux through the nickel plate with tungsten deposition layer was significantly smaller than that through a bare nickel plate. This indicates that a rate-controlling step in hydrogen permeation was not permeation through the nickel plate but permeation though the deposition layer. The pressure dependence on the permeation flux differed by temperature. Hydrogen permeation flux through tungsten deposition layer is larger than that through tungsten bulk. From analysis of the permeation curves, it was indicated that hydrogen diffusivity in tungsten deposition layer is smaller than that in tungsten bulk and the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in tungsten deposition layer is enormously larger than that in tungsten bulk at same hydrogen pressure.

  8. Conceptual Design for a Bulk Tungsten Divertor Tile in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, P.; Neubauer, O.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Hirai, T.; Sadakov, S.

    2006-01-01

    issues on forces and expected temperature distribution; but also on compliance with requirements of plasma-wall interaction, with the JET configuration and with remote handling possibilities. Material choices combining tungsten, TZM, Inconel and ceramics parts will be commented as well, with regard to routine plasma operation and to other scenarios that may prove to involve more risks for the component integrity. Tests with exposure to an electron beam or even to fusion plasmas were carried out in the JUDITH and TEXTOR (tokamak) facilities. The completed design has been wrapped up in the form of a recent proposal to the ILW project, with utmost ITER-relevance. (author)

  9. Combustion of powdery tungsten in pyrotechnic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, G.V.; Reshetov, A.A.; Viktorenko, A.M.; Surkov, V.G.; Karmadonov, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The basic regularities of tungsten burning (powder 2-5 μm) with oxidizers most typical for pyrotechnics: nitrates, lead and barium peroxides (powder, 2-8 μm) and potassium perchlorate (powder, 2-8 μm) are studied. Dependences of burning rate as a function of pressure and ratio of components are established. It is supposed that tungsten burning in mixtures with the mentioned nitrates is a complex and multistage process the rate of which is determined by tungsten dissolution in nitrate melts. Analysis of burning products using available methods is complex

  10. Characterization of porous tungsten by microhardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcuk, C.; Wood, J.V.; Morley, N.; Bentham, R.

    2001-01-01

    One of the applications of tungsten is as high current density dispenser cathode in the form of porous tungsten. It is used as a cathode after being impregnated with an electron emissive material so pore distribution in the part is the most important parameter for its function as a uniform and controlled porosity will lead to a better performance. In this study, application of microhardness as a characterization method for uniformity of the pore distribution and homogeneity of the structure is introduced. Optical microscopy and SEM is used to relate the results and porous tungsten structure for a better understanding of the method applied. (author)

  11. Electronic Structure Control of Tungsten Oxide Activated by Ni for Ultrahigh-Performance Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tian; Kou, Zongkui; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Hong, Xufeng; Li, Qingwei; Tang, Yongfu; Zhao, Yufeng; Liu, Shaojun; Mai, Liqiang; Mu, Shichun

    2018-04-17

    Tuning the electron structure is of vital importance for designing high active electrode materials. Here, for boosting the capacitive performance of tungsten oxide, an atomic scale engineering approach to optimize the electronic structure of tungsten oxide by Ni doping is reported. Density functional theory calculations disclose that through Ni doping, the density of state at Fermi level for tungsten oxide can be enhanced, thus promoting its electron transfer. When used as electrode of supercapacitors, the obtained Ni-doped tungsten oxide with 4.21 at% Ni exhibits an ultrahigh mass-specific capacitance of 557 F g -1 at the current density of 1 A g -1 and preferable durability in a long-term cycle test. To the best of knowledge, this is the highest supercapacitor performance reported so far in tungsten oxide and its composites. The present strategy demonstrates the validity of the electronic structure control in tungsten oxide via introducing Ni atoms for pseudocapacitors, which can be extended to other related fields as well. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux component asks for an increase of their operational range towards higher temperature in case of Cu/CuCrZr and lower temperatures for W. A remedy for both issues- brittleness of W and degrading strength of CuCrZr- could be the use of W fibres (Wf in W and Cu based composites. Fibre preforms could be manufactured with industrially viable textile techniques. Flat textiles with a combination of 150/70 µm W wires have been chosen for layered deposition of tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten (Wf/W samples and tubular multi-layered braidings with W wire thickness of 50 µm were produced as a preform for tungsten-fibre reinforced copper (Wf /Cu tubes. Cu melt infiltration was performed together with an industrial partner resulting in sample tubes without any blowholes. Property estimation by mean field homogenisation predicts strongly enhanced strength of the Wf/CuCrZr composite compared to its pure CuCrZr counterpart. Wf /W composites show very high toughness and damage tolerance even at room temperature. Cyclic load tests reveal that the extrinsic toughening mechanisms counteracting the crack growth are active and stable. FEM simulations of the Wf/W composite suggest that the influence of fibre debonding, which is an integral part of the toughening mechanisms, and reduced thermal conductivity of the fibre due to the necessary interlayers do not strongly influence the thermal properties of future components.

  13. Using Controlled Landslide Initiation Experiments to Test Limit-Equilibrium Analyses of Slope Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Iverson, R. M.; Brien, D. L.; Iverson, N. R.; Lahusen, R. G.; Logan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Most studies of landslide initiation employ limit equilibrium analyses of slope stability. Owing to a lack of detailed data, however, few studies have tested limit-equilibrium predictions against physical measurements of slope failure. We have conducted a series of field-scale, highly controlled landslide initiation experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume in Oregon; these experiments provide exceptional data to test limit equilibrium methods. In each of seven experiments, we attempted to induce failure in a 0.65m thick, 2m wide, 6m3 prism of loamy sand placed behind a retaining wall in the 31° sloping flume. We systematically investigated triggering of sliding by groundwater injection, by prolonged moderate-intensity sprinkling, and by bursts of high intensity sprinkling. We also used vibratory compaction to control soil porosity and thereby investigate differences in failure behavior of dense and loose soils. About 50 sensors were monitored at 20 Hz during the experiments, including nests of tiltmeters buried at 7 cm spacing to define subsurface failure geometry, and nests of tensiometers and pore-pressure sensors to define evolving pore-pressure fields. In addition, we performed ancillary laboratory tests to measure soil porosity, shear strength, hydraulic conductivity, and compressibility. In loose soils (porosity of 0.52 to 0.55), abrupt failure typically occurred along the flume bed after substantial soil deformation. In denser soils (porosity of 0.41 to 0.44), gradual failure occurred within the soil prism. All failure surfaces had a maximum length to depth ratio of about 7. In even denser soil (porosity of 0.39), we could not induce failure by sprinkling. The internal friction angle of the soils varied from 28° to 40° with decreasing porosity. We analyzed stability at failure, given the observed pore-pressure conditions just prior to large movement, using a 1-D infinite-slope method and a more complete 2-D Janbu method. Each method provides a static

  14. Investigation of the local fracture toughness and the elastic-plastic fracture behavior of NiAl and tungsten by means of micro-cantilever tests; Untersuchung der lokalen Bruchzaehigkeit und des elastisch-plastischen Bruchverhaltens von NiAl und Wolfram mittels Mikrobiegebalkenversuchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ast, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work was to get an improved understanding of the size dependence of the fracture toughness. For this purpose notched micro-cantilevers were fabricated ranging in dimensions from the submicron regime up to some tens of microns by means of a focused ion beam. B2-NiAl and tungsten were chosen as model materials as their brittle to ductile transition temperatures are well above room temperature. In that way, fracture processes accompanied by limited plastic deformation around the crack tip could be studied at the micro scale. For this size regime, new methods to describe the local elastic-plastic fracture behavior and to measure the fracture toughness were elaborated. Particular focus was set on the J-integral concept which was adapted to the micro scale to derive crack growth from stiffness measurements. This allowed a precise analysis of the transition from crack tip blunting to stable crack growth which is necessary to accurately measure the fracture toughness. Experiments in single crystalline NiAl showed for the two investigated crack systems, namely the hard and the soft orientation, that the fracture toughness at the micro scale is the same as the one known from macroscopic testing. Thus, size effects were not found for the tested length scale. The addition of little amounts of iron did not affect the fracture toughness considerably. Yet, it influenced the crack growth in those samples and consequently the resistance curve behavior. Concerning experiments in single crystalline tungsten, the fracture toughness showed a clear dependency on sample size. The smallest cantilevers fractured purely by cleavage. Larger samples exhibited stable crack growth along with plastic deformation which was recognizable in SEM-micrographs and quantified by means of EBSD measurements. Just as in macroscopic testing, the investigated crack system <100>{100} demonstrated a dependency on loading rate with higher loading rates leading to a more brittle behavior

  15. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A.; Donaldson, N.

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its ‘inertness’ and ‘stability’ common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W6+, typically represented by the orthotungstate WO42- (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal’s unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  16. Tungsten Oxide Photonic Crystals as Optical Transducer for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Wu, Xia; Wagner, Thorsten

    2018-01-26

    Some metal oxide semiconductors, such as tungsten trioxide or tin dioxide, are well-known as resistive transducers for gas sensing and offer high sensitivities down to the part per billion level. Electrical signal read-out, however, limits the information obtained on the electronic properties of metal oxides to a certain frequency range and its application because of the required electrical contacts. Therefore, a novel approach for building an optical transducer for gas reactions utilizing metal oxide photonic crystals is presented here. By the rational design of the structure and composition it is possible to synthesize a functional material which allows one to obtain insight into its electronic properties in the optical frequency range with simple experimental measures. The concept is demonstrated by tungsten trioxide inverse opal structure as optical transducer material for hydrogen sensing. The sensing behavior is analyzed in a temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C and in a wide hydrogen concentration range (3000 ppm to 10%). The sensing mechanism is mainly the refractive index change resulting from hydrogen intercalation in tungsten trioxide, but the back reaction has also impact on the optical properties of this system. Detailed chemical reaction studies provide suggestions for specific sensing conditions.

  17. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  18. 3D Modeling and Simulation for Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing- Problems and Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin; Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif

    2011-01-01

    Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) plays a critical role in nuclear power plants (NPPs) for life cycle management; such testing requires specialists with various NDT related expertise with specific equipment. This paper will discuss the importance of 3D modeling and simulation for electromagnetic NDT for critical and complex components in terms of engineering reasoning and physical trials. Results from simulation are presented which show the link established between the measurements and information relating to defects, such as 3D shape, size and location, which facilitates not only forward problem but also inverse modeling involving experimental system specification and configuration; and pattern recognition for 3D defect information. Subsequently, the problems and limitations pertinent to 3D modeling and simulation are then highlighted and areas of improvement are discussed. (author)

  19. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the future material testing reactor (JHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigitte Noel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The design of the future material testing reactor, named Jules Horowitz Reactor and dedicated to technological irradiations, will allow very high performances. The JHR will be cooled and moderated by light water. The preliminary core of JHR consists of 46 assemblies, arranged in a triangular lattice inside a rectangular aluminium matrix. It is boarded on two sides by a beryllium reflector. The other two sides are left free in order to introduce mobile irradiation devices. The JHR assembly would be composed of 3 x 6 cylindrical fuel plates maintained by 3 stiffeners. The external diameter of the assembly is close to 8 cm with a 600 mm heated length, coolant channels having a 1.8 mm gap width. The JHR core must be designed to accommodate high power densities using a high coolant mass flux and sub-cooling level at moderate pressure. The JHR core configuration with multi-channels is subject to a potential excursive instability, called flow redistribution, and is distinguished from a true critical heat flux which would occur at a fixed channel flow rate. At thermal-hydraulic conditions applicable to the JHR, the availability of experimental data for both flow redistribution and CHF is very limited. Consequently, a thermal-hydraulic test facility (SULTAN-RJH) was designed and built in CEA-Grenoble to simulate a full-length coolant sub-channel representative of the JHR core, allowing determination of both thermal limits under relevant thermal hydraulics conditions. The SULTAN-RJH test section simulates a single sub-channel in the JHR core with a cross section corresponding to a mean span (∼50 mm) that has a full reactor length (600 mm), the same flow channel gap (1.5 mm) and Inconel plates of 1 mm thickness. The tests with light water flowing vertically upward will investigate a heat flux range of 0-7 MW/m 2 , velocity range of 0.6-18 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.2-1.0 MPa and inlet temperature range of 25-180 deg. C. The test section

  20. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  1. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  2. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  3. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  4. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Tungsten Effects on Soil Microbial Communities BUILDING STRONG® Actinobacteria Bacteroidetes Firmicutes alpha-Proteobacteria beta-Proteobacteria gamma...Persistence of Actinobacteria & gamma- Proteobacteria • Actinobacteria – includes the actinomycetes  γ-Proteobacteria – includes a variety of microbes

  5. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  6. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  7. [Carbon monoxide tests in a steady state. Uptake and transfer capacity, normal values and lower limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonatxo, M; Préfaut, C; Guerrero, H; Moutou, H; Bansard, X; Chardon, G

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish data which would best demonstrate the variations of different tests using Carbon Monoxide as a tracer gas (total and partial functional uptake coefficient and transfer capacity) to establish mean values and lower limits of normal of these tests. Multivariate statistical analysis was used; in the first stage a connection was sought between the fractional uptake coefficient (partial and total) to other parameters, comparing subjects and data. In the second stage the comparison was refined by eliminating the least useful data, trying, despite a small loss of material, to reveal the most important connections, linear or otherwise. The fractional uptake coefficients varied according to sex, also the variation of the partial alveolar-expired fractional uptake equivalent (DuACO) was largely a function of respiratory rate and tidal volume. The alveolar-arterial partial fractional uptake equivalent (DuaCO) depended more on respiratory frequency and age. Finally the total fractional uptake coefficient (DuCO) and the transfer capacity corrected per liter of ventilation (TLCO/V) were functions of these parameters. The last stage of this work, after taking account of the statistical observations consistent with the facts of these physiological hypotheses led to a search for a better way of approaching the laws linking the collected data to the fractional uptake coefficient. The lower limits of normal were arbitrarily defined, separating those 5% of subjects deviating most strongly from the mean. As a result, the relationship between the lower limit of normal and the theoretical mean value was 90% for the partial and total fractional uptake coefficient and 70% for the transfer capacity corrected per liter of ventilation.

  8. Brazing molybdenum and tungsten for high temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Turner, W.C.; Hoffman, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop vacuum brazes for molybdenum and tungsten which can be used in seal joint applications up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F). Joints were attempted in molybdenum, tungsten and tungsten--molybdenum. The braze materials included: Ti--10Cr powder, Ti--30V wire, Ti--65V wire, V wire, Ni electroplate, MoB--50MoC powder mixture, V--50Mo powder mixture, Mo--15MoB 2 powder mixture and Mo--49V--15MoB 2 powder mixture. Braze temperature ranged from 1900 K (1627 C, 2961 F) to 2530 K, (2257 C, 4095 F), and leak-tight joints were made with all braze materials except Ti--10Cr. After heat treatments up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F) Kirkendall voiding was found to cause leakage of some of the joints made with only substitutional alloying elements. However, adding base metal powders to the braze or narrowing the root opening eliminated this problem. Kirkendall voiding was not a problem when interstitial elements were a major ingredient in the braze material. Shear testing of Ti--65V, V, MoB--50MoC and V--50Mo brazed molybdenum at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) indicated strengths equal to or better than the base metal. Ti--65V, V--50Mo and MoB--50MoC brazed joints were exposed to basalt at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) for 3 h without developing leaks

  9. Tungsten recrystallization and cracking under ITER-relevant heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaev, V.P., E-mail: Budaev@mail.ru [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, Yu.V. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karpov, A.V.; Belova, N.E. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klimov, N.S., E-mail: klimov@triniti.ru [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Barsuk, V.A.; Putrik, A.B.; Yaroshevskaya, A.D. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Giniyatulin, R.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation); SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khimchenko, L.N. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The tungsten surface structure was analyzed after the test in the QSPA-T under heat loads relevant to those expected in the ITER during disruptions. Repeated pulses lead to the melting and the resolidification of the tungsten surface layer of ∼50 μm thickness. There is ∼50 μm thickness intermediate layer between the original structure and the resolidified layer. The intermediate layer is recrystallized and has a random grains’ orientation whereas the resolidified layer and basic structure have texture with preferable orientation 〈1 0 0〉 normal to the surface. The cracks which were normal to the surface were observed in the resolidified layer as well as the cracks which were parallel to the surface at the depth up to 300 μm. Such cracks can result in the brittle destruction which is a hazard for the full tungsten divertor of the ITER. The theoretical analysis of the crack formation reasons and a possible consequence for the ITER are given.

  10. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450 degrees C to 1525 degrees C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%

  11. Problems of tungsten crack resistance optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Technically pure and precipitation-hardening tungsten is studied for its crack resistance in the initial and hardened states at the temperatures of 20...2000 deg C. Results of the study are presented. It is shown that hardening of tungsten base alloys in oil from the temperature corresponding to the upper boundary of the temperature region of ductile-brittle transition increases a crack propagation resistance of the studied materias at elevated and high temperatures

  12. Hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid surface treatment of tungsten for carbon fibre-reinforced composite hybrids in space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanerva, M., E-mail: Mikko.Kanerva@aalto.fi [Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics, P.O.B. 14300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Johansson, L.-S.; Campbell, J.M. [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Forest Products Technology, P.O.B. 16300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Revitzer, H. [Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemistry, P.O.B. 16300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Sarlin, E. [Tampere University of Technology, Department of Materials Science, P.O.B. 589, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Brander, T.; Saarela, O. [Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics, P.O.B. 14300, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • XPS and AFM analysis of the effect of hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid on tungsten. • Dreiling's model established 54.4% thinning of WO{sub 3} due to 67 s treatment. • Strain energy release rate increased ≈8.4 J/m{sup 2} at the interface. • Failure loci analysis expressed the oxide and carbon fibre surfaces as weak points. - Abstract: Hybrid material systems, such as combinations of tungsten foils and carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), are replacing metal alloy concepts in spacecraft enclosures. However, a good adhesion between the tungsten oxide scale and the epoxy resin used is required. Here, the effects of a hydrofluoric–nitric–sulphuric-acid (HFNS) treatment on tungsten oxides and subsequent adhesion to CFRP are analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fracture testing. The work shows that HFNS treatment results in decreased oxygen content, over 50% thinner tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) layer and increased nano-roughness on thin tungsten foils. Fracture testing established a 39% increase in the average critical strain for tungsten–CFRP specimens after HFNS treatment was carried out on tungsten. The effect of the oxide scale modification regarding the critical strain energy release rate was ΔG{sub c}≈ 8.4 J/m{sup 2}.

  13. Task 2 - Limits for High-Frequency Conducted Susceptibility Testing - CS114 (NRC-HQ-60-14-D-0015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ewing, Paul D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moses, Rebecca J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A principal focus of Task 2 under this project was for ORNL to evaluate the basis for susceptibility testing against high-frequency conducted interference and to establish recommendations to resolve concerns about the severity of test limits for the conducted susceptibility (CS) test, CS114, from MIL-STD-461. The primary concern about the test limit has been characterized by the EPRI EMI Working Group in the following terms: Demonstrating compliance with the CS114 test limits recommended in TR-102323 has proven to be problematic, even for components that have been tested to commercial standards and demonstrated proper operation in industrial applications [6]. Specifically, EPRI notes that the CS114 limits approved in regulatory documents are significantly higher than those invoked by the US military and similar commercial standards in the frequency range below 200 kHz. For this task, ORNL evaluated the original approach to establishing the test limit, EPRI technical findings from a review of the limit, and the regulatory basis through which the currently approved limits were accepted. Based on this analysis, strategies have been developed regarding changes to the CS114 limit that can resolve the technical concerns raised by the industry. Guided by the principles that reasonable assurance of safety must not be compromised but excessive conservatism should be reduced, recommendations on a suitable basis for a revised limit have been developed and can be incorporated into the planned Revision 2 of RG 1.180.

  14. Limitations of the inspection and testing concepts for pressurised components from the viewpoint of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.

    2001-01-01

    The role of in-service inspection and testing is to contribute to a safe and reliable operation of systems, structures and components. It is therefore the objective of inspections and tests to identify malfunctions and degradations at a stage early enough to avoid detrimental impacts on safety as well as on the reliability of the plant. Taking mostly the pressure boundary of German light-water reactors as an example, it is the intention of this paper to analyse how successful present inspection and testing requirements are and to discuss limitations. Based on a review of the world-wide operating experience the following questions of a more generic nature are addressed: - Are the relevant damage mechanisms being addressed in our codes and standards? - What are the criteria to develop a representative scope of inspection? - How to maintain a sufficient level of information for a decreasing number of nuclear power plants in operation? It can be concluded that the revision of codes and standards according to lessons learned from operating experience remains as an ongoing process. Furthermore, the criteria applied to derive a representative scope of inspection need to be addressed in more detail, specifically with respect to corrosion. The continuous evaluation of operating experience of a large number of plants is the most valuable source to identify beginning degradations. (author)

  15. Pipe bend wear - is tungsten carbide the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freinkel, D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the relative wear resistance of various grades of sintered tungsten carbide liners against a mild steel standard in a full-scale pneumatic conveying testing rig. Speciments ranging in cobalt content from 6 to 30 per cent and in grain size from 0,56 to 2,98 microns, including a mild steel standard, were placed on a specially designed holder which fitted into a tee type 100 mm diameter bend. The specimens were tested under various operating conditions, ie air velocity ranging from 28m/s to 52m/s, impact angles of 30 0 to 70 0 mass flow rates of 35kg/min to 83kg/min and phase densities of 1,2 to 2,9, using a 4 mm nominal size crushed granite rock. The experimental results show that the ultrafine-grained, low cobalt (6 per cent) tungsten carbide displays little sensitivity to varying velocities, impact angles, mass flow rates or phase densities, and consistently gave the best wear resistance under all testing conditions. It consistently showed the least wear resistance under all testing conditions and performed only slightly better than mild steel. The effect of the carbide grain size was found to be small, although the finer grain sizes displayed greater wear resistance than the coarse grains. The effect of cobalt content was such that the lower cobalt specimens (6 per cent range) consistently performed better than the higher cobalt contents (10 per cent, 15 per cent, 30 per cent) under all testing conditions; the wear resistance decreasing with increasing cobalt content. An empirical model for the prediction of wear for each type of material tested has been proposed, given the particular operating conditions. Microstructurally it has been shown that there is a definite relationship between erosion resistance and the inverse of the magnetic coercivity of the tungsten carbide alloys

  16. Force Limited Vibration Testing: Computation C2 for Real Load and Probabilistic Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijker, J. J.; de Boer, A.; Ellenbroek, M. H. M.

    2014-06-01

    To prevent over-testing of the test-item during random vibration testing Scharton proposed and discussed the force limited random vibration testing (FLVT) in a number of publications, in which the factor C2 is besides the random vibration specification, the total mass and the turnover frequency of the load(test item), a very important parameter. A number of computational methods to estimate C2 are described in the literature, i.e. the simple and the complex two degrees of freedom system, STDFS and CTDFS, respectively. Both the STDFS and the CTDFS describe in a very reduced (simplified) manner the load and the source (adjacent structure to test item transferring the excitation forces, i.e. spacecraft supporting an instrument).The motivation of this work is to establish a method for the computation of a realistic value of C2 to perform a representative random vibration test based on force limitation, when the adjacent structure (source) description is more or less unknown. Marchand formulated a conservative estimation of C2 based on maximum modal effective mass and damping of the test item (load) , when no description of the supporting structure (source) is available [13].Marchand discussed the formal description of getting C 2 , using the maximum PSD of the acceleration and maximum PSD of the force, both at the interface between load and source, in combination with the apparent mass and total mass of the the load. This method is very convenient to compute the factor C 2 . However, finite element models are needed to compute the spectra of the PSD of both the acceleration and force at the interface between load and source.Stevens presented the coupled systems modal approach (CSMA), where simplified asparagus patch models (parallel-oscillator representation) of load and source are connected, consisting of modal effective masses and the spring stiffnesses associated with the natural frequencies. When the random acceleration vibration specification is given the CMSA

  17. Development and Testing of a Transmission Voltage SuperLimiter™ Fault Current Limiter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanosky, Walter [American Superconductor Corporation, Devens, MA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes work by American Superconductor (AMSC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nexans, Siemens and Southern California Edison on a 138kV resistive type high temperature superconductor (HTS) fault current limiter (FCL) under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Phase 1A encompassed core technology development and system design and was previously reported (see summary that follows in Section 1.1 of the Introduction). This report primarily discusses work performed during Phase 1B, and addresses the fabrication and test of a single-phase prototype FCL. The results are presented along with a discussion of requirements/specifications and lessons learned to aid future development and product commercialization.

  18. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  19. Initial testing of TiB2 and TiC coated limiters in ISX-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, R.A.; Emerson, R.A.; Whitley, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.

    1980-01-01

    Low-Z coatings on graphite substrates have been developed for testing as limiters in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. Laboratory and tokamak testings have been accomplished. The laboratory tests included thermal shock experiments by means of pulsed e-beam irradiation, arcing experiments, and hydrogen and xenon ion erosion experiments. The tokamak testing consisted of ohmically heated plasma exposures with energy depositions up to 10 kJ/discharge on the limiters. The coatings, applied by chemical vapor deposition, consisted of TiB 2 and TiC deposited on POCO graphite substrates. The limiter samples were interchanged through the use of a transfer chamber without atmospheric exposure of the ISX-B tokamak. Limiter samples were baked out in the transfer chamber before use in the tokamak. Provisions for both heating and cooling the limiter during tokamak discharge were made. Initial testing of the limiter samples consisted of exposure to only ohmically heated plasma; subsequent testing will be performed in neutral-beam-heated plasmas having up to 3 MW of injected power. Bulk and surface temperatures of the samples were measured to allow the determination of energy deposition. Extensive plasma and edge diagnostics were used to evaluate the effect of the limiter on the plasma (e.g. vacuum ultraviolet spectrometry to determine plasma impurity concentrations, Thomson scattering to determine Z effective, IR camera to measure limiter surface temperature, and laser fluorescence spectrometry to determine neutral impurity concentration and velocity distribution in the limiter region). (orig.)

  20. Ferroelectric properties of tungsten bronze morphotropic phase boundary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, J.R.; Neurgaonkar, R.R.; Cross, L.E.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten bronze ferroelectrics which have a morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) can have a number or enhanced dielectric, piezoelectric, and electrooptic properties compared to more conventional ferroelectric materials. The structural and ferroelectric properties of several MPB bronze systems are presented, including data from sintered and hot-pressed ceramics, epitaxial thin films, and bulk single crystals. Included among these are three systems which had not been previously identified as morphotropic. The potential advantages and limitations of these MPB systems are discussed, along with considerations of the appropriate growth methods for their possible utilization in optical, piezoelectric, or pyroelectric device applications

  1. Multielement ultratrace analysis in tungsten using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhartitz, P.; Virag, A.; Friedbacher, G.; Grasserbauer, M.

    1987-01-01

    The ever increasing demands on properties of materials create a trend also towards ultrapure products. Characterization of these materials is only possible with modern, highly sophisticated analytical techniques such as activation analysis and mass spectrometry, particularly SSMS, SIMS and GDMS. Analytical strategies were developed for the determination of about 40 elements in a tungsten matrix with high-performance SIMS. Difficulties like the elimination of interferences had to be overcome. Extrapolated detection limits were established in the range of pg/g (alkali metals, halides) to ng/g (e.g. Ta, Th). Depth profiling and ion imaging gave additional information about the lateral and the depth distribution of the elements. (orig.)

  2. Load sharing in tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Bourke, Mark A.M.; Brown, Donald W.; Ustuendag, E.

    2006-01-01

    The load sharing in three tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal matrix composites (with fiber volume fractions of 10, 20 and 30%) have been determined using in situ neutron diffraction measurements. The expected iso-strain region was limited in the 20 and 30% composites due to thermal residual stresses. The experimental data have been used to validate the predictions of a unit-cell finite element model. The model was able to accurately predict the measured in situ loading data for all three composites using the same material properties for all calculations

  3. Load sharing in tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-12, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: clausen@lanl.gov; Bourke, Mark A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-8, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Brown, Donald W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MST-8, P.O. Box 1663, MS H805, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [California Institute of Technology, Keck Laboratory, M/C 138-78, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    The load sharing in three tungsten fiber reinforced Kanthal matrix composites (with fiber volume fractions of 10, 20 and 30%) have been determined using in situ neutron diffraction measurements. The expected iso-strain region was limited in the 20 and 30% composites due to thermal residual stresses. The experimental data have been used to validate the predictions of a unit-cell finite element model. The model was able to accurately predict the measured in situ loading data for all three composites using the same material properties for all calculations.

  4. Comparison of 2-Octanol and Tributyl Phosphate in Recovery of Tungsten from Sulfuric-Phosphoric Acid Leach Solution of Scheelite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yulong; Zhao, Zhongwei

    2018-04-01

    Tungsten was recovered from sulfuric-phosphoric acid leach solution of scheelite using 2-octanol and tributyl phosphate (TBP). Approximately 76% of the tungsten and less than 6.2% of the iron were extracted when using 70% 2-octanol, showing good selectivity for tungsten over iron; the tungsten extraction could not be significantly enhanced using a three-stage countercurrent simulation test. Moreover, more than 99.2% of the W and 91.0% of the Fe were extracted when using 70% TBP, showing poor selectivity, but after pretreating the leach solution with iron powder, less than 5.5% of the Fe was extracted. The loaded phases were stripped using deionized water and ammonia solution. The maximum stripping rate of tungsten from loaded 2-octanol was 45.6% when using water, compared with only 13.1% from loaded TBP. Tungsten was efficiently stripped from loaded phases using ammonia solution without formation of Fe(OH)3 precipitate. Finally, a flow sheet for recovery of tungsten with TBP is proposed.

  5. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Youyun, E-mail: lianyy@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng [China National R& D Center for Tungsten Technology, Xiamen Tungsten Co. Ltd, 361026 Xiamen (China); Chen, Jiming [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Thick CVD-W coatingswere deposited at a rapid growth rate. • The polished CVD-W coatings have highly textured structure and exhibited a very strong preferred orientation. • The polished CVD tungsten coatings show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings. • The crack formation of the polished CVD-W was almost suppressed at an elevated temperature. - Abstract: Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  6. Evaluation of eye shields made of tungsten and aluminum in high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Randi D.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To protect the lens and cornea of the eye when treating the eyelid with electrons, we designed a tungsten and aluminum eye shield that protected both the lens and cornea, and also limited the amount of backscatter to the overlying eyelid when using electron beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Custom curved tungsten eye shields, 2 mm and 3 mm thick, were placed on Kodak XV film on 8 cm polystyrene and irradiated to evaluate the transmission through the shields. To simulate the thickness of the eyelid and to hold the micro-TLDs, an aquaplast mold was made to match the curvature of the eye shields. Backscatter was measured by placing the micro-TLDs on the beam entrance side to check the dose to the underside of the eyelid. Measurements were done with no aluminum, 0.5, and 1.0 mm of aluminum on top of the tungsten eye shields. The measurements were repeated with 2- and 3-mm flat pieces of lead to determine both the transmission and the backscatter dose for this material. Results: Tungsten proved to be superior to lead for shielding the underlying structures and for reducing backscatter. At 6 MeV, a 3-mm flat slab of tungsten plus 0.5 mm of aluminum, resulted in .042 Gy under the shield when 1.00 Gy is delivered to d max . At 6 MeV for a 3-mm lead plus 0.5-mm aluminum, .046 Gy was measured beneath the shield, a 9.5% decrease with the tungsten. Backscatter was also decreased from 1.17 to 1.13 Gy, a 4% decrease, when using tungsten plus 0.5 mm of aluminum vs. the same thickness of lead. Measurements using 9 MeV were performed in the same manner. With 3 mm tungsten and 0.5 mm of aluminum, at 3 mm depth the dose was .048 Gy compared to .079 Gy with lead and aluminum (39% decrease). Additionally, the backscatter dose was 3% less using tungsten. Simulating the lens dose 3 mm beyond the shield for the 2-mm and 3-mm custom curved tungsten eye shields plus 0.5 mm of aluminum was .030 and .024 Gy, respectively, using 6 MeV (20% decrease). Using 9-MeV electrons, the dose

  7. High temperature diffusion of hafnium in tungsten and a tungsten-hafnium carbide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Zee, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Refractory metals and ceramics are used extensively in energy systems due to their high temperature properties. This is particularly important in direct conversion systems where thermal to electric conversion efficiency is a direct function of temperature. Tungsten, which has the highest melting temperature among elemental metals, does not possess sufficient creep resistance at temperature above 1,600 K. Different dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys have been developed to extend the usefulness of tungsten to higher temperatures. One of these alloys, tungsten with 0.4 mole percent of finely dispersed HfC particles (W-HfC), has the optimum properties for high temperature applications. Hafnium carbide is used as the strengthening agent due to its high chemical stability and its compatibility with tungsten. The presence of HfC particles retards the rate of grain growth as well as restricting dislocation motion. Both of which are beneficial for creep resistance. The long term behavior of this alloy depends largely on the evolution of its microstructure which is governed by the diffusion of its constituents. Data on the diffusion of carbon in tungsten and tungsten self-diffusion are available, but no direct measurements have been made on the diffusion of hafnium in tungsten. The only diffusion data available are estimated from a coarsening study and these data are highly unreliable. In this study, the diffusion behavior of hafnium in pure tungsten and in a W-HfC alloy was directly measured by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The selection of the W-HfC alloy is due to its importance in high temperature engineering applications, and its higher recrystallization temperature. The presence of HfC particles in tungsten restricts grain growth resulting in better high temperature creep resistance. The higher recrystallization temperature allows measurements to be made over a wider range of temperatures at a relatively constant grain size

  8. New nucleic acid testing devices to diagnose infectious diseases in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffert, P; Reverchon, S; Nasser, W; Rozand, C; Abaibou, H

    2017-10-01

    Point-of-care diagnosis based on nucleic acid testing aims to incorporate all the analytical steps, from sample preparation to nucleic acid amplification and detection, in a single device. This device needs to provide a low-cost, robust, sensitive, specific, and easily readable analysis. Microfluidics has great potential for handling small volumes of fluids on a single platform. Microfluidic technology has recently been applied to paper, which is already used in low-cost lateral flow tests. Nucleic acid extraction from a biological specimen usually requires cell filtration and lysis on specific membranes, while affinity matrices, such as chitosan or polydiacetylene, are well suited to concentrating nucleic acids for subsequent amplification. Access to electricity is often difficult in resource-limited areas, so the amplification step needs to be equipment-free. Consequently, the reaction has to be isothermal to alleviate the need for a thermocycler. LAMP, NASBA, HDA, and RPA are examples of the technologies available. Nucleic acid detection techniques are currently based on fluorescence, colorimetry, or chemiluminescence. For point-of-care diagnostics, the results should be readable with the naked eye. Nowadays, interpretation and communication of results to health professionals could rely on a smartphone, used as a telemedicine device. The major challenge of creating an "all-in-one" diagnostic test involves the design of an optimal solution and a sequence for each analytical step, as well as combining the execution of all these steps on a single device. This review provides an overview of available materials and technologies which seem to be adapted to point-of-care nucleic acid-based diagnosis, in low-resource areas.

  9. Local confidence limits for IMRT and VMAT techniques: a study based on TG119 test suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Chandroth, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a local confidence limit (CL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques used at Waikato Regional Cancer Centre. This work was carried out based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group (TG) 119 report. The AAPM TG 119 report recommends CLs as a bench mark for IMRT commissioning and delivery based on its multiple institutions planning and dosimetry comparisons. In this study the locally obtained CLs were compared to TG119 benchmarks. Furthermore, the same bench mark was used to test the capabilities and quality of the VMAT technique in our clinic. The TG 119 test suite consists of two primary and four clinical tests for evaluating the accuracy of IMRT planning and dose delivery systems. Pre defined structure sets contoured on computed tomography images were downloaded from AAPM website and were transferred to a locally designed phantom. For each test case two plans were generated using IMRT and VMAT optimisation. Dose prescriptions and planning objectives recommended by TG119 report were followed to generate the test plans in Eclipse Treatment Planning System. For each plan the point dose measurements were done using an ion chamber at high dose and low dose regions. The planar dose distribution was analysed for percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3 %/3 mm, for both the composite plan and individual fields of each plan. The CLs were generated based on the results from the gamma analysis and point dose measurements. For IMRT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.49 % at high dose region and 2.95 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 2.12 % for individual fields and 5.9 % for the composite plan. For VMAT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.56 % at high dose region and 2.6 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 1.46 % for individual fields and 0

  10. Highly sensitive and interference-free determination of bismuth in environmental samples by electrothermal vaporization atomic fluorescence spectrometry after hydride trapping on iridium-coated tungsten coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Wu Peng; Xu Kailai; Lv Yi; Hou Xiandeng

    2008-01-01

    Bismuthine was on-line trapped on tungsten coil and subsequently electrothermally vaporized for the determination by atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Several noble metals, including Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ir, were explored as permanent chemical modifier for tungsten coil on-line trapping. Investigation showed that Ir gave the best performance, in which bismuthine was on-line trapped on Ir-coated tungsten coil at 560 o C, and then released at 1550 o C for subsequent transfer to AFS by a mixture of Ar and H 2 . Under optimum instrumental conditions, the trapping efficiency was found to be 73 ± 3%. With 120 s (12 mL sample volume) trapping time, a limit of detection (LOD) of 4 ng L -1 was obtained, compared to conventional hydride generation AFS (0.09 μg L -1 ); the LOD can be lowered down to 1 ng L -1 by increasing the trapping time to 480 s. The LOD was found to be better or at least comparable to literature levels involving on-line trapping and some other sophisticated instrumental methods such as ICP-MS and GF-AAS. A comprehensive interference study involving conventional hydride-forming elements and some transition metals was carried out, and the result showed that the gas phase interference from other hydride-forming elements was largely reduced, thanks to the use of on-line tungsten coil trapping. Finally, the proposed method was applied to the determination of bismuth in several biological and environmental standard reference materials, and a t-test shows that the analytical results by the proposed method have no significant difference from the certified values at the confidence level of 95%

  11. Tape cast isotropic, fine-grained tungsten for thermo-cyclic loading applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerer, Mathias, E-mail: Mathias.Sommerer@tum.de [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstoffmechanik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Li, Muyuan [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasma Physik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Werner, Ewald [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstoffmechanik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Dewitz, Hubertus von; Walter, Steffen; Lampenscherf, Stefan [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81730 München (Germany); Arnold, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Henkestr. 127, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The tape casting process for tungsten is described. • A set-up of a HHF test facility for standing anodes is presented. • The thermo-cyclic behavior of tape cast tungsten and a reference is investigated. • The evolution of crack patterns is described in dependency of HHF-loadings. • The surface roughness of X-ray anodes is related to the microstructural evolution. - Abstract: This paper introduces tape casting as a new route for the production of isotropic and fine-grained tungsten components. Microstructural and thermal properties of tape cast tungsten samples are determined. Thermal shock behavior according to the thermo-cyclic loading of standing X-ray anodes is investigated and compared to the behavior of a rolled tungsten grade. The development of surface roughness during the thermal shock loading is discussed in relation to the development of the grain structure and crack pattern. The fine-grained and stable microstructure of the tape cast material exhibits less roughening under such test conditions.

  12. Coating of tips for electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy by means of silicon, magnesium, and tungsten oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Marco

    2010-09-01

    Different combinations of metal tips and oxide coatings have been tested for possible operation in electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy. Silicon and magnesium oxides have been thermally evaporated onto gold and platinum-iridium tips, respectively. Two different thickness values have been explored for both materials, namely, 40 and 120 nm for silicon oxide and 20 and 60 nm for magnesium oxide. Alternatively, tungsten oxide has been grown on tungsten tips via electrochemical anodization. In the latter case, to seek optimal results we have varied the pH of the anodizing electrolyte between one and four. The oxide coated tips have been first inspected by means of scanning electron microscopy equipped with microanalysis to determine the morphological results of the coating. Second, the coated tips have been electrically characterized ex situ for stability in time by means of cyclic voltammetry in 1 M aqueous KCl supporting electrolyte, both bare and supplemented with K3[Fe(CN)6] complex at 10 mM concentration in milliQ water as an analyte. Only the tungsten oxide coated tungsten tips have shown stable electrical behavior in the electrolyte. For these tips, the uncoated metal area has been estimated from the electrical current levels, and they have been successfully tested by imaging a gold grating in situ, which provided stable results for several hours. The successful tungsten oxide coating obtained at pH=4 has been assigned to the WO3 form.

  13. Influence of temperature and heat treatment on crack resistance of ceramic tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.; Bega, N.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of testing temperature in the range from 20 to 2000 deg C, and recrystallization annealing at 2200 deg C on crack resistance of ceramic tungsten in vacuum, is investigated. The extension diagrams thus obtained have been treated in accordance with the standard technique. The value of the critical crack loading and the stress intensity coefficient have been determined. Structural changes have been controlled with X-ray structural methods. Crack resistance of tungsten increases in the test temperature range from 20 deg C to Tsub(x) which is connected with the increase of mobility of screw components of dislocation loops. At the temperature more than Tsub(x) the plasticity growth of ceramic tungsten takes place simultaneously with grain boundary embrittlement. Recrystallization annealing at 2200 deg C creates the structure resistant to temperature effect; crack resistance being minimum

  14. Evaluation of the feasibility of joining titanium alloy to heavymet tungsten alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-07

    Information is presented on a program to select and evaluate methods of brazing and/or explosively welding Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy to Heavymet, a tungsten-base metal containing up to about 20% alloying elements (nickel, copper, etc.) to improve its ductility and other mechanical properties. Designs permitting the reliable production of joints between these base metals were of interest too. While this investigation was primarily concerned with an engineering study of the problems associated with joining these base metals in the required configuration, limited experimental studies were conducted also. The joining methods are reviewed individually. Recommendations for developing a viable titanium-tungsten joining procedure are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of the feasibility of joining titanium alloy to heavymet tungsten alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Information is presented on a program to select and evaluate methods of brazing and/or explosively welding Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy to Heavymet, a tungsten-base metal containing up to about 20% alloying elements (nickel, copper, etc.) to improve its ductility and other mechanical properties. Designs permitting the reliable production of joints between these base metals were of interest too. While this investigation was primarily concerned with an engineering study of the problems associated with joining these base metals in the required configuration, limited experimental studies were conducted also. The joining methods are reviewed individually. Recommendations for developing a viable titanium-tungsten joining procedure are discussed

  16. Construction of Tungsten Halogen, Pulsed LED, and Combined Tungsten Halogen-LED Solar Simulators for Solar Cell I-V Characterization and Electrical Parameters Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon Namin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I-V characterization of solar cells is generally done under natural sunlight or solar simulators operating in either a continuous mode or a pulse mode. Simulators are classified on three features of irradiance, namely, spectral match with respect to air mass 1.5, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. Commercial solar simulators use Xenon lamps and halogen lamps, whereas LED-based solar simulators are being developed. In this work, we build and test seven simulators for solar cell characterization, namely, one tungsten halogen simulator, four monochromatic (red, green, blue, and white LED simulators, one multicolor LED simulator, and one tungsten halogen-blue LED simulator. The seven simulators provide testing at nonstandard test condition. High irradiance from simulators is obtained by employing elevated supply voltage to tungsten halogen lamps and high pulsing voltages to LEDs. This new approach leads to higher irradiance not previously obtained from tungsten halogen lamps and LEDs. From I-V curves, electrical parameters of solar cell are made and corrected based on methods recommended in the IEC 60891 Standards. Corrected values obtained from non-STC measurements are in good agreement with those obtained from Class AAA solar simulator.

  17. Tungsten or Wolfram: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoroddu, Maria A; Medici, Serenella; Peana, Massimiliano; Nurchi, Valeria M; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Laulicht-Glickc, Freda; Costa, Max

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten or wolfram was regarded for many years as an enemy within the tin smelting and mining industry, because it conferred impurity or dirtiness in tin mining. However, later it was considered an amazing metal for its strength and flexibility, together with its diamond like hardness and its melting point which is the highest of any metal. It was first believed to be relatively inert and an only slightly toxic metal. Since early 2000, the risk exerted by tungsten alloys, its dusts and particulates to induce cancer and several other adverse effects in animals as well as humans has been highlighted from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Thus, it becomes necessary to take a careful look at all the most recent data reported in the scientific literature, covering the years 2001-2016. In fact, the findings indicate that much more attention should be devoted to thoroughly investigate the toxic effects of tungsten and the involved mechanisms of tungsten metal or tungsten metal ions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Surface morphologies of He-implanted tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, M.E., E-mail: bannisterme@ornl.gov [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Meyer, F.W.; Hijazi, H. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Garrison, L.M.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Surface morphologies of tungsten surfaces, both polycrystalline and single-crystal [1 1 0], were investigated using SEM and FIB/SEM techniques after implantations at elevated surfaces temperatures (1200–1300 K) using well-characterized, mono-energetic He ion beams with a wide range of ion energies (218 eV–250 keV). Nanofuzz was observed on polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) following implantation of 100-keV He ions at a flux threshold of 0.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, but not following 200-keV implantations with similar fluxes. No nanofuzz formation was observed on single-crystal [1 1 0] tungsten (SCW), despite fluxes exceeding those demonstrated previously to produce nanofuzz on polycrystalline tungsten. Pre-damaging the single-crystal tungsten with implanted C impurity interstitials did not significantly affect the surface morphologies resulting from the high-flux He ion implantations. The main factor leading to the different observed surface structures for the pristine and C-implanted single-crystal W samples appeared to be the peak He ion flux characterizing the different exposures. It was speculated that nanofuzz formation was not observed for any SCW target exposures because of increased incubation fluences required for such targets.

  19. Qualification and post-mortem characterization of tungsten mock-ups exposed to cyclic high heat flux loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintsuk, G., E-mail: g.pintsuk@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Euratom Association, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Bobin-Vastra, I.; Constans, S. [AREVA NP PTCMI-F, Centre Technique, Fusion, F-71200 Le Creusot (France); Gavila, P. [Fusion for Energy, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Rödig, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Euratom Association, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Riccardi, B. [Fusion for Energy, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We characterize tungsten mono-block components after exposure to ITER relevant heat loads. • We qualify the manufacturing technology, i.e., hot isostatic pressing and hot radial pressing, and repair technologies. • We determine the microstructural influences, i.e., rod vs. plate material, on the damage evolution. • Needle like microstructures increase the risk of deep crack formation due to a limited fracture strength. -- Abstract: In order to evaluate the option to start the ITER operation with a full tungsten (W) divertor, high heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility FE200, Le Creusot, France. Thereby, in total eight small-scale and three medium-scale monoblock mock-ups produced with different manufacturing technologies and different tungsten grades were exposed to cyclic steady state heat loads. The applied power density ranges from 10 to 20 MW/m{sup 2} with a maximum of 1000 cycles at each particular loading step. Finally, on a reduced number of tiles, critical heat flux tests in the range of 30 MW/m{sup 2} were performed. Besides macroscopic and microscopic images of the loaded surface areas, detailed metallographic analyses were performed in order to characterize the occurring damages, i.e., crack formation, recrystallization, and melting. Thereby, the different joining technologies, i.e., hot radial pressing (HRP) vs. hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of tungsten to the Cu-based cooling tube, were qualified showing a higher stability and reproducibility of the HIP technology also as repair technology. Finally, the material response at the loaded top surface was found to be depending on the material grade, microstructural orientation, and recrystallization state of the material. These damages might be triggered by the application of thermal shock loads during electron beam surface scanning and not by the steady state heat load only. However, the superposition of thermal fatigue loads and thermal shocks as also expected

  20. Loss of shear strength in polycrystalline tungsten under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reexamination of existing data on shock compression of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature indicates that tungsten may be an exception to the common belief that metals do not behave like elastic-isotropic solids under shock compression

  1. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limited short-wavelength optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman, Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-01-01

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-(angstrom) and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date

  2. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  3. Photorefractive Tungsten Bronze Crystals for Optical Limiters and Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    vector , X is the laser light wavelength, 0 is the half- angle between the two crossing laser beams, and k0 is the Debye screening wave vector given by...between the grating and the dielectric constant E’ = 950) such that the grating’ vector is interference pattern, the intensities of the output beams from...substituting Io, I, and Id into expression 0 ple d 2o0o 25i00 (8), we can calculate the phase shift between the grating and Applied Electric Feild in V

  4. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    OpenAIRE

    Neu, R.; Riesch, J.; Müller, A.v.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J.W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Li, M.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu) and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr) are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W) based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux comp...

  5. High temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, James S.K.-L., E-mail: james.gibson@materials.ox.ac.uk [Oxford University, Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Roberts, Steve G. [Oxford University, Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Armstrong, David E.J. [Oxford University, Department of Materials, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-11

    Nanoindentation has been performed on tungsten, unimplanted and helium-implanted to ~600 appm, at temperatures up to 750 °C. The hardening effect of the damage was 0.90 GPa at 50 °C, but is negligible above 450 °C. The hardness value at a given temperature did not change on re-testing after heating to 750 °C. This suggests that the helium is trapped in small vacancy complexes that are stable to at least 750 °C, but which can be bypassed due to increased dislocation mobility (cross slip or climb) above 450 °C.

  6. Tungsten-nanodiamond composite powders produced by ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.nunes@ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Mardolcar, U.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Moleculares e Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-07-15

    The major challenge in producing tungsten-nanodiamond composites by ball milling lies in successfully dispersing carbon nanoparticles in the metallic matrix while keeping carbide formation at a minimum. Processing windows for carbide minimization have been established through systematic variation of the nanodiamond fraction, milling energy and milling time. Materials characterization has been carried out by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microhardness testing. Nanostructured matrices with homogeneously dispersed particles that preserved the diamond structure have been produced. Differential thermal analysis has been used to evaluate the composites thermal stability.

  7. Determination coefficient distribution rhenium and tungsten using method extraction with solvent methyl ethyl ketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riftanio Natapratama Hidayat; Maria Christina Prihatiningsih; Duyeh Setiawan

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the distribution coefficient (K d ) of the rhenium and tungsten conducted for the purpose of knowing the value of K d of the two elements. K d value determination is applied to the process of separation rhenium-188 from target of tungsten-188 for the purposes purification of radioisotopes that are made to meet the radionuclide and radiochemical purity. The K d value determination using solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). Prior to the determination of K d values, determined beforehand the optimum conditions of extraction process based on the effect of agitation time, the volume of MEK, and the pH of the solution. Confirmation the results of the extraction was conducted using UV-Vis spectrophotometer with a complexing KSCN under acidic conditions and reductant SnCl 2 . The results showed that the optimum condition extraction process to feed each of 10 ppm is when the agitation for 10 minutes, the volume of MEK in 20 ml, and the pH below 5. Obtained the maximum recovery of rhenium are drawn to the organic phase as much as 9.545 ppm. However, the condition of the extraction process does not affect the migration of tungsten to the organic phase. Then the maximum K d values obtained at 2.7566 rhenium and tungsten maximum K d is 0.0873. Optimum conditions of extraction process can be further tested on radioactive rhenium and tungsten as an alternative to the separation of radioisotopes. (author)

  8. Effect of tungsten on tensile properties and flow behaviour of RAFM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanaja, J., E-mail: jvanaja@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Laha, K.; Nandagopal, M. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sam, Shiju [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India); Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-02-15

    Effect of tungsten in the range of 1–2 wt.% on tensile properties and flow behaviour of 9Cr–W–Ta–V Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated. The tungsten in the investigated range was found to have only minor effect on the tensile properties of the steel over the temperature range of 300–873 K and at a strain rate of 3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}. The tensile flow behaviour of the RAFM steels was adequately described by the Voce’s constitutive equation. The tensile strength of the steels were predicted well from the parameters of the Voce’s constitutive equation. The Voce’s strain hardening parameter ‘n{sub v}’ was found to be quite sensitive to the tungsten content and predicted the onset of dislocation climbing process at relatively higher testing temperature with the increase in tungsten content. The equivalence between tensile and creep deformations and the influence of tungsten have been discussed.

  9. Post-examination of helium-cooled tungsten components exposed to DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, G.; Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Norajitra, P.; Giniyatulin, R.; Singheiser, L.

    2009-01-01

    A concept of helium-cooled tungsten finger module was developed for the European DEMO divertor. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads up to 10 MW/m 2 . The modules were examined carefully before and after loading by metallography and microstructural analyses. While before loading mainly discrete and shallow cracks were found on the tungsten surface due to the manufacturing process, dense crack networks were observed at the loaded surfaces due to the thermal stress. In addition, cracks occurred in the structural, heat sink part and propagated along the grains orientation of the deformed tungsten material. Facilitated by cracking, the molten brazing metal between the tungsten plasma facing material and the W-La 2 O 3 heat sink, that could not withstand the operational temperatures, infiltrated the tungsten components and, due to capillary forces, even reached the plasma facing surface through the cracks. The formed cavity in the brazed layer reduced the heat conduction and the modules were further damaged due to overheating during the applied heat loads. Based on this detailed characterization and possible improvements of the design and of the manufacturing routes are discussed.

  10. Effect of tungsten on tensile properties and flow behaviour of RAFM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Nandagopal, M.; Sam, Shiju; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2013-01-01

    Effect of tungsten in the range of 1–2 wt.% on tensile properties and flow behaviour of 9Cr–W–Ta–V Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel has been investigated. The tungsten in the investigated range was found to have only minor effect on the tensile properties of the steel over the temperature range of 300–873 K and at a strain rate of 3 × 10 −3 s −1 . The tensile flow behaviour of the RAFM steels was adequately described by the Voce’s constitutive equation. The tensile strength of the steels were predicted well from the parameters of the Voce’s constitutive equation. The Voce’s strain hardening parameter ‘n v ’ was found to be quite sensitive to the tungsten content and predicted the onset of dislocation climbing process at relatively higher testing temperature with the increase in tungsten content. The equivalence between tensile and creep deformations and the influence of tungsten have been discussed

  11. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  12. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  13. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  14. RF induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhogntao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2009-01-01

    Irregularly-shaped tungsten powders (average granular sizes of 512 μm) have been spheroidized by radio frequency (RF)induction plasma. The effects of feed rate, mode of material dispersion, particle size on spheroidization efficiency are investigated. Experimental results show that the spheroidization efficiency decreases rapidly when the feed rate increases to more than 95 g/min. Only 30% spheroidization efficiency is gained at the feed rate of 135.75 g/min. The spheroidization efficiency is also affected by the flow rate of carrier gas. When the flow rate of carrier gas is 0.12 m 3 /h, the dispersion effect is the best, and the spheroidization efficiency is almost 100%. The apparent density of tungsten powders increases a bit with the increase of spheroidization efficiency. And the particle size uniformity of spheroidized tungsten powders is in accordance with that of original powders. (authors)

  15. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C.; DuBois, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies

  16. Process for recovering tungsten from alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozaki, S.; Nemoto, S.; Hazeyama, T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for recovering tungsten from an alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores. This invention comprises adjusting the pH of an alkaline leaching solution which is obtained by lixiviating ore containing tungsten with an alkaline solution to 7--8 with acid to oxidize molybdic acid ions in the solution, adding a sulfide donor, then precipitating molybdenum sulfide compounds by adjusting the pH value of the solution to 2--3. Tungstic acid ions are recovered as calcium tungstate by the addition of a calcium ion donor after the molybdenum sulfide compounds are separated

  17. Properties of multiple field ion emitters of tungsten and a simple method for improving their ionization efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Beckey, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ion emission properties of the multiple tungsten emitters developed recently for field ionization mass spectrometry were investigated with the aid of a sector type mass spectrometer at emitter-cathode voltages of 10-15 kV using acetone, n-heptane and benzene as test substances. The emitters, which comprised a 10-μm tungsten filament bearing thickly arrayed microneedles of tungsten, produced very weak and unstable signals at voltages of about 10 kV, but increasing the voltage to 14 kV led to intensifying ion currents high enough to yield mass spectra of satisfactory quality. During the course of the experiments, it was observed that nucleating tungsten carbide particles on the emitter surface by means of a high-field chemical reaction with benzene vapours can significanlty promote the field ionization of gas molecules, presumably as a result of the field enhancement resulting from roughening of the surface. (Auth.)

  18. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  19. Color in 'tungsten trioxide' thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Deneuville, A.; Hollinger, G.; Duc, Tran Minh

    1977-01-01

    We show that evaporated tungsten trioxide amorphous layers commonly used in electrochromic displays actually have the composition WO_2_._7H_y (0.2< y<0.5). We emphasize that coloration of virgin transparent films can be obtained without injection of any external ion into the layer, and further that around a critical substoichiometry by sputtering, namely, WO_2_._5, one can prepare blue virgin layers without any hydrogen. The effect of substoichiometry on the valence of tungsten atoms has been followed by XPS measurements of sputtered layers.

  20. Color in ''tungsten trioxide'' thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Deneuville, A.; Hollinger, G.; Tran Minh Duc

    1977-01-01

    We show that evaporated tungsten trioxide amorphous layers commonly used in electrochromic displays actually have the composition WO/sub 2.7/H/sub y/ (0.2< y<0.5). We emphasize that coloration of virgin transparent films can be obtained without injection of any external ion into the layer, and further that around a critical substoichiometry by sputtering, namely, WO/sub 2.5/, one can prepare blue virgin layers without any hydrogen. The effect of substoichiometry on the valence of tungsten atoms has been followed by XPS measurements of sputtered layers

  1. Tensile behavior of unnotched and notched tungsten--copper laminar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, C.A.

    1976-06-01

    Relations were studied between the tensile strengths of unnotched and of notched, and elastic moduli of unnotched laminar sheet or foil composites and the amounts of reinforcement. Tungsten was used as the reinforcement and copper as the matrix, and the tests were run at room temperature. Three thicknesses of tungsten (i.e., 0.00254, 0.0127, and 0.0254 cm (0.001, 0.005, and 0.010 in) were used, and the nominal volume fraction of tungsten was varied from about 0.05 to 0.95. It was found that the tensile strength of the unnotched specimens could be related to the amount of reinforcement, as could the elastic moduli, and that these values could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures. The tensile strengths of the notched laminar composites could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures using strengths for notched constituents, provided notch effects did not predominate. (Author)

  2. Damage process of high purity tungsten coatings by hydrogen beam heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Taniguchi, M.; Ezato, K.; Sato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.; Tsunekawa, Y.; Okumiya, M.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the synergistic effects of heat load and hydrogen irradiation, cyclic heat load tests with a hydrogen beam and a comparable electron beam were performed for high purity CVD-tungsten coatings. Surface modification was examined as a function of the peak temperature by changing the heat flux. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis showed that the surface damage caused by the hydrogen beam was more severe than that by the electron beam. In the hydrogen beam case, cracking at the surface occurred at all peak temperatures examined from 300 deg. C to 1600 deg. C. These results indicate that the injected hydrogen induces embrittlement for the CVD-tungsten coating

  3. Effect of temperature on the crack resistance of a molybdenum alloy with 30% tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.; D'yachkov, A.P.; Platonov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the effect of temperature on the crack resistance of molybdenum alloy with 30% tungsten (Mo - 30% W), and data are presented for the crack resistance of commercial-purity molybdenum and tungsten obtained by power metallurgy in the temperature range 20-1800 C. It was found that the nature of failure for Mo-30% W alloy depends on test temperature; in the temperature range 20 C-T /SUP d/ /SUB br/ (upper boundary for the temperature range of the ductile to brittle transition), failure is unstable in nature, and at temperatures exceeding this transition, it occurs by steady main crack development

  4. 3D MODELING OF INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE BUILDING USING COTSs SYSTEM: TEST, LIMITS AND PERFORMANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of UAV systems in applied geomatics is continuously increasing in several applications as inspection, surveying and geospatial data. This evolution is mainly due to two factors: new technologies and new algorithms for data processing. About technologies, from some years ago there is a very wide use of commercial UAV even COTSs (Commercial On-The-Shelf systems. Moreover, these UAVs allow to easily acquire oblique images, giving the possibility to overcome the limitations of the nadir approach related to the field of view and occlusions. In order to test potential and issue of COTSs systems, the Italian Society of Photogrammetry and Topography (SIFET has organised the SBM2017, which is a benchmark where all people can participate in a shared experience. This benchmark, called “Photogrammetry with oblique images from UAV: potentialities and challenges”, permits to collect considerations from the users, highlight the potential of these systems, define the critical aspects and the technological challenges and compare distinct approaches and software. The case study is the “Fornace Penna” in Scicli (Ragusa, Italy, an inaccessible monument of industrial architecture from the early 1900s. The datasets (images and video have been acquired from three different UAVs system: Parrot Bebop 2, DJI Phantom 4 and Flytop Flynovex. The aim of this benchmark is to generate the 3D model of the “Fornace Penna”, making an analysis considering different software, imaging geometry and processing strategies. This paper describes the surveying strategies, the methodologies and five different photogrammetric obtained results (sensor calibration, external orientation, dense point cloud and two orthophotos, using separately – the single images and the frames extracted from the video – acquired with the DJI system.

  5. D Modeling of Industrial Heritage Building Using COTSs System: Test, Limits and Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, M.; Di Pietra, V.; Visintini, D.

    2017-08-01

    The role of UAV systems in applied geomatics is continuously increasing in several applications as inspection, surveying and geospatial data. This evolution is mainly due to two factors: new technologies and new algorithms for data processing. About technologies, from some years ago there is a very wide use of commercial UAV even COTSs (Commercial On-The-Shelf) systems. Moreover, these UAVs allow to easily acquire oblique images, giving the possibility to overcome the limitations of the nadir approach related to the field of view and occlusions. In order to test potential and issue of COTSs systems, the Italian Society of Photogrammetry and Topography (SIFET) has organised the SBM2017, which is a benchmark where all people can participate in a shared experience. This benchmark, called "Photogrammetry with oblique images from UAV: potentialities and challenges", permits to collect considerations from the users, highlight the potential of these systems, define the critical aspects and the technological challenges and compare distinct approaches and software. The case study is the "Fornace Penna" in Scicli (Ragusa, Italy), an inaccessible monument of industrial architecture from the early 1900s. The datasets (images and video) have been acquired from three different UAVs system: Parrot Bebop 2, DJI Phantom 4 and Flytop Flynovex. The aim of this benchmark is to generate the 3D model of the "Fornace Penna", making an analysis considering different software, imaging geometry and processing strategies. This paper describes the surveying strategies, the methodologies and five different photogrammetric obtained results (sensor calibration, external orientation, dense point cloud and two orthophotos), using separately - the single images and the frames extracted from the video - acquired with the DJI system.

  6. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance; HAPL Team

    2005-12-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  7. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance

    2005-01-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  8. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  9. Corrosion resistance test based on electrochemical noise-limiting the number of long-lasting and costly climate chamber tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Aken, B.B.; Veldman, D.; Gouwen, R.J.; Bende, E.E.; Eerenstein, W.

    2013-10-15

    Damp-heat testing of PV modules is a time-consuming process, taking months. The electrochemical noise (EcN) set-up is a fast, direct corrosion measurement of solar cells, whereby results can be obtained within one hour. EcN measurements are presented for several solar cell concepts and different environments. It correlates with damp-heat degradation involving corrosion, which is rather common in EVA-encapsulated crystalline Si modules. Furthermore, the EcN test can be done as an evaluation tool when probing alternative brands, formulations or processing for metallisation pastes and as a screening test for new batches of metallisation paste.

  10. Substructure and electrical resistivity analyses of pure tungsten sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Sellers, C.H.; Anderl, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The substructure of pure tungsten sheet (0.025 mm thick) is examined and quantified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation populations and arrangements are evaluated for as-worked and various annealed conditions of the tungsten sheet. The worked (rolled) tungsten substructure was nonhomogeneous, consisting of areas of very high and low dislocation densities. These results are correlated to resistivity measurements of the tungsten sheet following thermal cycling to 1200 degrees C to determine the substructural changes as a function of temperature. The comparison between the two characterization techniques is used to examine the relationship between structural and electronic properties in tungsten. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Advanced Electrochemical Machining (ECM) for tungsten surface micro-structuring in blanket applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holstein, Nils, E-mail: nils.holstein@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Württemberg (Germany); Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Württemberg (Germany); Heuer, Simon; Weber, Thomas [Research Center Jülich, Institute of Energy- and Climate Research – Plasma Physics (IEK-4), D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical Machining is an appropriate tool for tungsten shaping. • Progress in shaping achieved by combination of ECM with advanced micro-lithography. • Application in First Wall for connection of plasma facing material to breeder blanket. • Successful development of adhesion promotors by ECM for plasma spraying interlayers. • Microstructure electrochemical manufacturing of tungsten in sizes of 100 μm achieved. - Abstract: Plasma facing components for fusion applications must have to exhibit long-term stability under extreme physical conditions, and therefore any material imperfections caused by mechanical and/or thermal stresses in the shaping processes cannot be tolerated due to a high risk of possible technical failures under fusion conditions. To avoid such defects, the method of Electrochemical Machining (ECM) enables a complete defect-free processing of removal of tungsten material during the desired shaping, also for high penetration depths. Furthermore, supported by lithographic mask pretreatment, three-dimensional distinct geometric structures can be positive-imaged via the directional galvanic dissolution applying M-ECM process into the tungsten bulk material. New required applications for tungsten components, e.g. as adhesion promotors in W-surfaces to enable sure grip and bonding of thick plasma-spraying layers for blanket components, will define the way of further miniaturization of well-established millimeter dimensioned M-ECM shaping processes to dimensions of 100 μm and furthermore down to 50 μm. Besides current M-ECM limits the article describes inevitable needs of further developments for mask resists, mask materials and the resulting ECM parameters, to reach the needed accuracy in tungsten microstructure. The achieved progress and observed correlations of processing parameters will be manifested by produced demonstrators made by the new “μM”-ECM process.

  12. Advanced Electrochemical Machining (ECM) for tungsten surface micro-structuring in blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, Nils; Krauss, Wolfgang; Konys, Jürgen; Heuer, Simon; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical Machining is an appropriate tool for tungsten shaping. • Progress in shaping achieved by combination of ECM with advanced micro-lithography. • Application in First Wall for connection of plasma facing material to breeder blanket. • Successful development of adhesion promotors by ECM for plasma spraying interlayers. • Microstructure electrochemical manufacturing of tungsten in sizes of 100 μm achieved. - Abstract: Plasma facing components for fusion applications must have to exhibit long-term stability under extreme physical conditions, and therefore any material imperfections caused by mechanical and/or thermal stresses in the shaping processes cannot be tolerated due to a high risk of possible technical failures under fusion conditions. To avoid such defects, the method of Electrochemical Machining (ECM) enables a complete defect-free processing of removal of tungsten material during the desired shaping, also for high penetration depths. Furthermore, supported by lithographic mask pretreatment, three-dimensional distinct geometric structures can be positive-imaged via the directional galvanic dissolution applying M-ECM process into the tungsten bulk material. New required applications for tungsten components, e.g. as adhesion promotors in W-surfaces to enable sure grip and bonding of thick plasma-spraying layers for blanket components, will define the way of further miniaturization of well-established millimeter dimensioned M-ECM shaping processes to dimensions of 100 μm and furthermore down to 50 μm. Besides current M-ECM limits the article describes inevitable needs of further developments for mask resists, mask materials and the resulting ECM parameters, to reach the needed accuracy in tungsten microstructure. The achieved progress and observed correlations of processing parameters will be manifested by produced demonstrators made by the new “μM”-ECM process.

  13. Thermal performance prediction of UO2 pellet partly containing 9%w tungsten network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwardi

    2008-01-01

    Sintered UO 2 exhibits very stable in reactor core compared to UC, UN, U metal and its alloys. However, its thermal conductivity is very low (2.about.5 W/m K), that limits its performance. UO 2 pellet containing Tungsten network invented by Song improves considerably its conductivity. The paper reports an analysis of thermal performance for UO 2 pellet that contains partly or wholly with 9% b. of Tungsten. The tungsten network having a high melting point and excellent thermal conductivity is continuously formed around UO 2 grains. Since the presence of network decreases the amount of fissile material and the burn up of fissile material is higher in the near surface zone of pellet but high temperature zone that releases low conductivity fission gas to the gap located in inner part of pellet, the analysis has been done for different outer radial-portion of tungsten-free pellet. The analysis takes into account the correction factor for pellet conductivity related to both pore and temperature distribution and high burn up effect. The gap conductance has been considered invariable since decrease caused by wider gap size related to lower pellet expansion is compensated by increase caused by fewer of refractory fission gas released. The results (47 kw/m, 40% burnup) show temperature decrease in all of pellet position containing W network. Pellet containing 9%b. tungsten network lower consecutively its center line temperature from 1578 to 1406, 1292, 1231, 1192, 1111, and 1038 deg C for 0, 50, 67, 75, 80, 90, and 100 % portion of network. An 80 to 90 % portion of inner pellet containing tungsten network can be considered a best fuel design. This preliminary analysis is prospective and more realistic one is recommended. (author)

  14. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Hatano, Y.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Hara, M.; Calderoni, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  15. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub

  16. Informed choice in direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTCGT) websites: a content analysis of benefits, risks, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Amanda; Erby, Lori Hamby; Foisie, Kathryn V; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-06-01

    An informed choice about health-related direct-to-consumer genetic testing (DTCGT) requires knowledge of potential benefits, risks, and limitations. To understand the information that potential consumers of DTCGT services are exposed to on company websites, we conducted a content analysis of 23 health-related DTCGT websites. Results revealed that benefit statements outweighed risk and limitation statements 6 to 1. The most frequently described benefits were: 1) disease prevention, 2) consumer education, 3) personalized medical recommendations, and 4) the ability to make health decisions. Thirty-five percent of websites also presented at least one risk of testing. Seventy-eight percent of websites mentioned at least one limitation of testing. Based on this information, potential consumers might get an inaccurate picture of genetic testing which could impact their ability to make an informed decision. Practices that enhance the presentation of balanced information on DTCGT company websites should be encouraged.

  17. Effect of composition on the high rate dynamic behaviour of tungsten heavy alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Kesemen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten heavy alloys are currently used as kinetic energy penetrators in military applications due to their high density and superior mechanical properties. In the literature, quasi-static properties of different tungsten heavy alloys based on W-Ni-Cu and W-Ni-Fe ternary systems are well documented and presented. However, comparison of the dynamic behaviour of these alloys in terms of the correlation between quasi-static mechanical characterization and dynamical properties is lacking. In the present study, dynamic properties of tungsten heavy alloys having different binder phase compositions (90W-7Ni-3Cu and 90W-8Ni-2Fe at different projectile velocities were investigated. The examined and tested alloys were produced through the conventional powder metallurgy route of mixing, cold compaction and sintering. Mechanical characterization of these alloys was performed. In the ballistic tests, cylindrical tungsten heavy alloys with L/D ratio of 3 were impacted to hardened steel target at different projectile velocities. After the ballistic tests, deformation characteristics of test specimens during dynamic loading were evaluated by comparing the change of length and diameter of the specimens versus kinetic energy densities. The study concluded that 90W-8Ni-2Fe alloy has better perforation characteristics than 90W-7Ni-3Cu alloy.

  18. Construction of testing facilities and verifying tests of a 22.9 kV/630 A class superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, S.-W.; Yu, S.-D.; Kim, H.-R.; Kim, M.-J.; Park, C.-R.; Yang, S.-E.; Kim, W.-S.; Hyun, O.-B.; Sim, J.; Park, K.-B.; Oh, I.-S.

    2010-11-01

    We have constructed and completed the preparation for a long-term operation test of a superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) in a Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) test grid. The SFCL with rating of 22.9 kV/630 A, 3-phases, has been connected to the 22.9 kV test grid equipped with reclosers and other protection devices in Gochang Power Testing Center of KEPCO. The main goals of the test are the verification of SFCL performance and protection coordination studies. A line-commutation type SFCL was fabricated and installed for this project, and the superconducting components were cooled by a cryo-cooler to 77 K in the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen pressurized by 3 bar of helium gas. The verification test includes un-manned - long-term operation with and without loads and fault tests. Since the test site is 170 km away from the laboratory, we will adopt the un-manned operation with real-time remote monitoring and controlling using high speed internet. For the fault tests, we will apply fault currents up to around 8 kArms to the SFCL using an artificial fault generator. The fault tests may allow us not only to confirm the current limiting capability of the SFCL, but also to adjust the SFCL - recloser coordination such as resetting over-current relay parameters. This paper describes the construction of the testing facilities and discusses the plans for the verification tests.

  19. Construction of testing facilities and verifying tests of a 22.9 kV/630 A class superconducting fault current limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, S.-W.; Yu, S.-D.; Kim, H.-R.; Kim, M.-J.; Park, C.-R.; Yang, S.-E.; Kim, W.-S.; Hyun, O.-B.; Sim, J.; Park, K.-B.; Oh, I.-S.

    2010-01-01

    We have constructed and completed the preparation for a long-term operation test of a superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) in a Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) test grid. The SFCL with rating of 22.9 kV/630 A, 3-phases, has been connected to the 22.9 kV test grid equipped with reclosers and other protection devices in Gochang Power Testing Center of KEPCO. The main goals of the test are the verification of SFCL performance and protection coordination studies. A line-commutation type SFCL was fabricated and installed for this project, and the superconducting components were cooled by a cryo-cooler to 77 K in the sub-cooled liquid nitrogen pressurized by 3 bar of helium gas. The verification test includes un-manned - long-term operation with and without loads and fault tests. Since the test site is 170 km away from the laboratory, we will adopt the un-manned operation with real-time remote monitoring and controlling using high speed internet. For the fault tests, we will apply fault currents up to around 8 kA rms to the SFCL using an artificial fault generator. The fault tests may allow us not only to confirm the current limiting capability of the SFCL, but also to adjust the SFCL - recloser coordination such as resetting over-current relay parameters. This paper describes the construction of the testing facilities and discusses the plans for the verification tests.

  20. Molecular complexes of tungsten oxotetrachloride with azomethins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, Yu.V.; Garnovskij, A.D.; Abramenko, V.A.; Medvedeva, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Series of new molecular complexes of tungsten oxotetrachloride with benza- and salicylalimines of equimolar compositions obtained. Substances are studied using element analysis, IR spectroscopy and conductometry. Octahedral structure of complexes with central atom coordination of benzalaniline molecules via azomethin nitrogen atom, and salicylalimines - via carbonyl oxygen atom of quinoid tantometric form of ligand is assumed

  1. Deuterium transport and trapping in polycrystalline tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Trybus, C.L.; Sellers, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that deuterium permeation studies for polycrystalline tungsten foil have been conducted to provide data for estimating tritium transport and trapping in tungsten-clad divertors proposed for advanced fusion-reactor concepts. Based on a detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization of the specimen material and on analyses of permeation data measured at temperatures ranging form 610 to 823 K for unannealed and annealed tungsten foil (25 μm thick), the authors note the following key results: deuterium transport in tungsten foil is dominated by extensive trapping that varies inversely with prior anneal temperatures of the foil material, the reduction in the trapped fraction correlates with a corresponding elimination of a high density of dislocations in cell-wall structures introduced during the foil fabrication process, trapping behavior in these foils can be modelled using trap energies between 1.3 eV and 1.5 eV and trap densities ranging from 1 x 10 -5 atom fraction

  2. Analytical methods for the determination of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topping, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    Methods developed and employed in the recent literature (1969 to 1975) for the detection and determination of tungsten in a wide variety of matrices are reviewed. This paper is a supplement to the books, monographs and review papers which deal with the earlier literature. (author)

  3. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Development of tungsten collimators for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varkey, P.A.; Verma, P.B.; Jayakumar, T.K.; Mammachan, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Collimators are essential components of industrial radiography set up as it provides radiation safety to persons involved in the radiography work. A collimator with optimum design features also helps in reducing the scattered radiation which in turn results in radiographs having better sensitivity. This papers describes the salient design features of the tungsten collimators developed by the BRIT, for industrial radiography. (author)

  5. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  6. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  7. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  8. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  9. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  10. Technique for investigation on tungsten crack resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of using the linear destruction mechanic for the estimation of tungsten crack resistance in a wide range of temperatures has been studied and grounded. Values critical of stress intensity factors in the 20-2000 deg C temperature range are given

  11. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  12. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu

  13. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  14. Property change of advanced tungsten alloys due to neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanno, Takashi; Nogami, Shuhei; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of neutron irradiation on the functional properties of pure tungsten (W) and advanced tungsten alloys (e.g., lanthanum (La)-doped W, potassium (K)-doped W, and ultra-fine-grained (UFG) W–TiC alloys) tested in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) or experimental fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperature and damage were in the range 804–1073 K and 0.15–0.47 dpa, respectively. TEM images of all samples after 0.42 dpa irradiation at 1023 K showed voids, black dots, and dislocation loops, indicating that similar damage structures were formed in pure W, La-doped W, K-doped W, and UFG W–0.5 wt% TiC. The electrical resistivity of all specimens increased following neutron irradiation. Nearly identical electrical resistivity and irradiation hardening were observed in pure W, La-doped W, and K-doped W. The electrical resistivity of UFG W–TiC was higher than that of other specimens before and after irradiation, which may be attributed to its ultra-fine-grain structure, as well as the presence of impurities introduced during the alloying process. Compared to the other specimens, the UFG W–TiC was more resistant to irradiation hardening

  15. Constitutive law for thermally-activated plasticity of recrystallized tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, Aleksandr; Terentyev, Dmitry; Dubinko, Andrii; Delannay, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A physically-based constitutive law relevant for ITER-specification tungsten grade in as-recrystallized state is proposed. The material demonstrates stages III and IV of the plastic deformation, in which hardening rate does not drop to zero with the increase of applied stress. Despite the classical Kocks-Mecking model, valid at stage III, the strain hardening asymptotically decreases resembling a hyperbolic function. The material parameters are fitted by relying on tensile test data and by requiring that the strain and stress at the onset of diffuse necking (uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength correspondingly) as well as the yield stress be reproduced. The model is then validated in the temperature range 300-600 °C with the help of finite element analysis of tensile tests which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental engineering curves up to the onset of diffuse necking, beyond which the development of ductile damage accelerates the material failure. This temperature range represents the low temperature application window for tungsten as divertor material in fusion reactor ITER.

  16. Testing the black disk limit in $pp$ collisions at very high energy

    OpenAIRE

    Brogueira, P.; de Deus, J. Dias

    2011-01-01

    We use geometric scaling invariant quantities to measure the approach, or not, of the imaginary and real parts of the elastic scattering amplitude, to the black disk limit, in $pp$ collisions at very high energy.

  17. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xie

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Bowen, David; Hinkel, Dan; Butera, R. E.; Krafft, Charles; Mayergoyz, Isaak

    2018-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  19. Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Surfacing Current Status and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Egerland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gas Shielded Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW – a process well-known providing highest quality weld results joined though by lower performance. Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW is frequently chosen to increase productivity along with broadly accepted quality. Those industry segments, especially required to produce high quality corrosion resistant weld surfacing e.g. applying nickel base filler materials, are regularly in consistent demand to comply with "zero defect" criteria. In this conjunction weld performance limitations are overcome employing advanced 'hot-wire' GTAW systems. This paper, from a Welding Automation perspective, describes the technology of such devices and deals with the current status is this field – namely the application of dual-cathode hot-wire electrode GTAW cladding; considerably broadening achievable limits.

  20. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Golubeva, A. V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A. A.; Roth, J.

    2009-06-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17-10 18 D/m 2s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  1. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M., E-mail: yury.gasparyan@ipp.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pisarev, A.A. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 mum thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D{sup +} ion beam with a flux of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} D/m{sup 2}s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 +- 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  2. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Golubeva, A.V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A.A.; Roth, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17 -10 18 D/m 2 s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  3. Elimination of Whole Effluent Toxicity NPDES Permit Limits through the Use of an Alternative Testing Species and Reasonable Potential Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAYNE, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    The cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia), is required by the State of South Carolina to be used in whole effluent toxicity (WET) compliance tests in order to meet limits contained within National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits. Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) experienced WET test failures for no clear reason over a long period of time. Toxicity identification examinations on effluents did not indicate the presence of toxicants; therefore, the WET test itself was brought under suspicion. Research was undertaken with an alternate cladoceran, Daphnia ambigua (D. ambigua). It was determined that this species survives better in soft water, so approval was obtained from regulating authorities to use this ''alternate'' species in WET tests. The result was better test results and elimination of non-compliances. The successful use of D. ambigua allowed WSRC to gain approval from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to remove WET limits from the NPDES permit

  4. Ultrasharp tungsten tips—characterization and nondestructive cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setvín, M.; Javorský, J.; Turčinková, D.; Matolínová, I.; Sobotík, P.; Kocán, P.; Ošt’ádal, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the treatment of ultrasharp tungsten tips used for applications in nanoscience and introduce a fast and simple method for estimation of the tip radius using a single measurement of the autoemission current. The method is based on a detailed investigation of the influence of an arrangement of electrodes on the electric field layout in close proximity of the tip apex. The electric field was calculated using Monte Carlo Floating Random Walk algorithm. The most frequently used cleaning procedures (heating the whole tip to high temperature, electron bombardment and self-sputtering) were investigated by electrical measurements and microscopy techniques (SEM, TEM) and the results of the particular methods are compared. We report on the effectiveness and limiting conditions of the cleaning methods with respect to the damage they cause to the tip apex. -- Highlights: ► The article describes methods how to prepare, characterize and clean ultrasharp tungsten tips. ► A novel method for estimating the tip radius based on a single measurement of autoemission current is described. ► MCFRW (Monte Carlo Floating Random Walk) method is used to calculate an electric field in proximity of the tip apex. ► The most frequently used tip cleaning procedures are investigated. ► Effectiveness and optimal cleaning conditions are discussed for each of the methods.

  5. The influence of recrystallization annealing and the state of stress on tungsten formability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greger, M.

    1995-01-01

    The submitted deals with the prediction of strain limits regarding the swaging procedures. An appearance of inhomogeneous localities and defect inward the forged bodies is assumed to be affected by plasticity of applied tungsten being strictly determined by chemical composition and thermomechanical conditions of the forging process. Chosen operation of swaging procedure were analysed in terms of hypothesis of maximum admissible strain, the calculated value of which at the critical area of forging had to be lesser than the strain limit

  6. Crash-Resistant Crewseat Limit-Load Optimization through Dynamic Testing with Cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    shell on each surface of the verte- bral centrum is referred to as the bony end plate. Facing this bony end plate is a thin layer of hyaline cartilage ...most realistically, two vertebrae with the included intervertebral disc and hyaline cartilage . This section is referred to as the intervertebral joint...strengths of vertebrae from various studies ......... ... .......................... 5 2 Sumary of the test matrix for the cadaver test program . 33 3 Test

  7. Soft X-ray Foucault test: A path to diffraction-limited imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A. K.; Ng, W.; Liang, S.; Cerrina, F.

    1994-08-01

    We present the development of a soft X-ray Foucault test capable of characterizing the imaging properties of a soft X-ray optical system at its operational wavelength and its operational configuration. This optical test enables direct visual inspection of imaging aberrations and provides real-time feedback for the alignment of high resolution soft X-ray optical systems. A first application of this optical test was carried out on a Mo-Si multilayer-coated Schwarzschild objective as part of the MAXIMUM project. Results from the alignment procedure are presented as well as the possibility for testing in the hard X-ray regime.

  8. Tracer tests - possibilities and limitations. Experience from SKB fieldwork: 1977-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, Martin; Crawford, James; Elert, Mark (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-09-15

    Tracer tests have played, and still play, a central role in investigations relating to the understanding of radionuclide retention processes in the field. At present there is a debate within the scientific community concerning how, and to what extent, tracer tests can be used to evaluate large-scale and long-term transport and retardation of radionuclides and other solutes of interest for Safety Assessment of repositories for spent nuclear fuel. In this report the SKB fieldwork on tracer tests performed at Swedish sites from 1977 to 2007 is described and discussed. Furthermore, the knowledge and process understanding evolved during the decades of radionuclide transport experiments and modelling within the SKB programme is summarised. One of the main objectives of this report is to discuss what data and knowledge can be extracted from different in situ tests in a robust fashion. Given the level of complexity associated with transport processes that may occur over the timescale of a tracer test, the utility of tracer tests is considered in the context of evidence-based interpretations of data which we characterise in the form of a sequence of questions of increasing complexity. The complexity of this sequence ranges from whether connection can be confirmed between injection and withdrawal points to whether quantitative data can be extrapolated from a tracer test to be subsequently used in Safety Assessment. The main findings of this report are that: Field scale tracer tests can confirm flow connectivity. Field scale tracer tests confirm the existence of retention. Field scale tracer tests alone can only broadly substantiate our process understanding. However, if performing extensive Site Characterisation and integrating the tracer test results with the full range of geoscientific information available, much support can be given to our process understanding. Field scale tracer tests can deliver the product of the material property group MPG and the F-factor, valid

  9. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  10. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malau, Viktor, E-mail: malau@ugm.ac.id; Ilman, Mochammad Noer, E-mail: noer-ilman@yahoo.com; Iswanto, Priyo Tri, E-mail: priyatri@yahoo.com; Jatisukamto, Gaguk, E-mail: gagukjtsk@yahoo.co.id [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University Jl. Grafika 2, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten thin film deposited on surface of AISI 410 steel has been performed. Tungsten thin film produced by dc magnetron sputtering method was deposited on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel substrates, and then the nitrogen ions were implanted on tungsten thin film. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of implantation deposition time on surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of nitrogen implanted on tungsten film. Magnetron sputtering process was performed by using plasma gas of argon (Ar) to bombardier tungsten target (W) in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of 7.6 x 10{sup −2} torr, a voltage of 300 V, a sputter current of 80 mA for sputtered time of 10 minutes. Nitrogen implantation on tungsten film was done with an initial pressure of 3x10{sup −6} mbar, a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, an energy of 100 keV and implantation deposition times of 0, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. The surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of the films were evaluated by surfcorder test, Vickers microhardness test, wear test and potentiostat (galvanostat) test respectively. The results show that the nitrogen ions implanted deposition time on tungsten film can modify the surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate. The minimum surface roughness, specific wear and corrosion rate can be obtained for implantation time of 20 minutes and the maximum microhardness of the film is 329 VHN (Vickers Hardness Number) for implantation time of 30 minutes. The specific wear and corrosion rate of the film depend directly on the surface roughness.

  11. Limits of the radiochemical and geochemical method for the test of nucleon stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergamasco, L [CNR, Laboratorio di Cosmo-Geofisica, Turin, Italy; Texas A and M University, College Station, Tex.); Cini, G [CNR, Laboratorio di Cosmo-Geofisica; Torino, Universita, Turin, Italy)

    1978-07-01

    An estimate is obtained for the limiting nucleon lifetime that can be determined by the radiochemical method of Steinberg and Evans (1977), which counts the Ar-37 production from reactions due to nucleon decay in a large sample of KC2H3O2. To estimate the background rate, processes due to the atmospheric muon component are considered. It is found that the asymptotic limit on the maximum value of the nucleon lifetime is 2 x 10/sup 30/years. This value cannot be increased by going to larger depths or by using a larger sample, but is inherent in the method itself. To improve the limit one would have to resort to methods based on multiparticle decay modes.

  12. Advanced limiter test (ALT-I) in the TEXTOR tokamak - concept and experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Grotz, S.P.; Prinja, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The concept and experimental design of a pump-limiter for the TEXTOR tokamak is described. The module is constructed of stainless steel with a compound curvature head designed to limit the maximum heat flux to 300 W/cm 2 . The head is made of TiC-coated graphite containing a variable aperture slot to admit plasma to a deflector plate for ballistic pumping action. The assembly is actively pumped using Zr-Al getters with an estimated hydrogen pumping speed of 2x10 4 1/s. The aspect ratio of the pump duct and the length of the plasma channel are both variable to permit study of plasma plugging, ballistic scattering, and enhanced gas conduction effects. The module can be moved radially by 10 cm to permit its operation either as the primary or secondary limiter. Major diagnostics include Langmuir and solid state probes, bolometers, infrared thermography, thermocouples, ion gauges, manometers, and a gas mass analyzer. (author)

  13. The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET): Descriptions, limitations, and the involvement of the space nuclear power community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Project and test planning for the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Project began in August 1990. Since the formalization of the contract agreement two years ago, the TOPAZ-II testing hardware was delivered in May 1992. In the months since the delivery of the test hardware, Russians and Americans working side-by-side installed the equipment and are preparing to begin testing in early 1993. The procurement of the Russian TOPAZ-II unfueled thermionic space nuclear power system (SNP) provides a unique opportunity to understand a complete thermionic system and enhances the possibility for further study of this type of power conversion for space applications. This paper will describe the program and test article, facility and test article limitations, and how the government and industry are encouraged to be involved in the program

  14. Testing and Prediction of Limits of Lubrication in Sheet Metal Forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, Ermanno; Bay, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Increasing focus on environmental issues in industrial production has urged a number of sheet metal forming companies to look for new tribo-systems, here meaning the combination of tool_material/workpiece_material/lubricant, in order to substitute hazardous lubricants such as chlorinated paraffin...... laboratory and production tests as well as numerical analyses in order to evaluate and compare performance of the new tribo-systems. A part is selected from industrial production and analyzed by this methodology in order to substitute the existing tribo-system with a new one....... oils. Testing of new tribo-systems under production conditions is, however, very costly. For preliminary testing it is more feasible to introduce laboratory tests. In this paper a new methodology for testing new tribo-systems is presented. The methodology describes a series of investigations combining...

  15. Effects of fusion relevant transient energetic radiation, plasma and thermal load on PLANSEE double forged tungsten samples in a low-energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ouyang, B.; Zhang, Z.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.; Rawat, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    appropriate intense fusion relevant pulses for testing the structural, morphological and mechanical changes on irradiated tungsten samples.

  16. Accelerated carbonation testing of mortar with supplementary cement materials. Limitation of the acceleration due to drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the design stage of a concrete structure, decisions have to be made on how to fulfil the required service life and consequently, what concrete composition to use. Concrete compositions can be chosen on account of known performances but this will limit the choice of compositions and materials to

  17. Structure of tungsten electrodeposited from oxide chloride-fluoride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskij, V.A.; Reznichenko, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation results on the influence of electrolysis parameters and electrolyte composition on tungsten cathode deposit structure are presented. The electrolysis was performed in NaCl-NaF-WO 3 molten salts using tungsten and tungsten coated molybdenum cathodes. Morphological and metallographic studies of tungsten crystals were carrier out. Tungsten deposits were obtained in the form of crystalline conglomerates, sponge and high dispersity powder

  18. AC over-current test results of YBCO conductor for YBCO power transformer with fault current limiting function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, A.; Otonari, T.; Ogata, T.; Iwakuma, M.; Okamoto, H.; Hayashi, H.; Iijima, Y.; Saito, T.; Gosho, Y.; Tanabe, K.; Izumi, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The single-layer coils with a diameter of 250 mm and 12 turns were manufactured with YBCO tapes with a CuNi- or Cu-Tape. The AC over-current tests were carried out in subcooled liquid nitrogen at 66 K and 74 K to develop power transformers with current limiting function. The AC over-current was two to seven times larger than the I c of conductor and it was reduced to the same level of I c . The I c of model coils did not degrade. The test results showed the possibility of YBCO superconducting transformers with current limiting function. We are developing elemental technology for 66 kV/6.9 kV 20 MVA-class YBCO power transformer. The YBCO transformer is considered to have a possibility to stabilize the power system by improving function of fault current limiting. Current limiting behavior functions over critical current flows. There is a possibility that superconducting characteristic may be damaged due to increase in temperature of YBCO tapes. Therefore, we have taken a measure to combine YBCO tape with CuNi tape or Cu Tape. We manufactured model coils using these conductors and conducted the AC over-current tests. The test current was two to seven times larger than the I c of conductor and it was damped with time from its maximum value according to the generation of conductor resistance. We verified the effectiveness of current limiting characteristics. In these tests, the I c of model coil did not degrade. We consider this conductor to be able to withstand AC over-current with the function of current limiting.

  19. Life Prediction on a T700 Carbon Fiber Reinforced Cylinder with Limited Accelerated Life Testing Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Xiaobing; Zhang Yongbo

    2015-01-01

    An accelerated life testing investigation was conducted on a composite cylinder that consists of aluminum alloy and T700 carbon fiber. The ultimate failure stress predictions of cylinders were obtained by the mixing rule and verified by the blasting static pressure method. Based on the stress prediction of cylinder under working conditions, the constant stress accelerated life test of the cylinder was designed. However, the failure data cannot be sufficiently obtained by the accelerated life ...

  20. The Statistic Test on Influence of Surface Treatment to Fatigue Lifetime with Limited Data

    OpenAIRE

    Suhartono, Agus

    2009-01-01

    Justifications on the influences of two or more parameters on fatigue strength are some times problematic due to the scatter nature of the fatigue data. Statistic test can facilitate the evaluation, whether the changes in material characteristics as a result of specific parameters of interest is significant. The statistic tests were applied to fatigue data of AISI 1045 steel specimens. The specimens are consisted of as received specimen, shot peened specimen with 15 and 16 Almen intensity as ...

  1. Oxidation behaviour of silicon-free tungsten alloys for use as the first wall material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F.; Brinkmann, J.; Lindig, S.; Mishra, T. P.; Linsmeier, Ch

    2011-12-01

    The use of self-passivating tungsten alloys as armour material of the first wall of a fusion power reactor may be advantageous concerning safety issues. In earlier studies good performance of the system W-Cr-Si was demonstrated. Thin films of such alloys showed a strongly reduced oxidation rate compared to pure tungsten. However, the formation of brittle tungsten silicides may be disadvantageous for the powder metallurgical production of bulk W-Cr-Si alloys if a good workability is needed. This paper shows the results of screening tests to identify suitable silicon-free alloys with distinguished self-passivation and a potentially good workability. Of all the tested systems W-Cr-Ti alloys showed the most promising results. The oxidation rate was even lower than the one of W-Cr-Si alloys, the reduction factor was about four orders of magnitude compared to pure tungsten. This performance could be conserved even if the content of alloying elements was reduced.

  2. Oxidation behaviour of silicon-free tungsten alloys for use as the first wall material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F; Brinkmann, J; Lindig, S; Mishra, T P; Linsmeier, Ch

    2011-01-01

    The use of self-passivating tungsten alloys as armour material of the first wall of a fusion power reactor may be advantageous concerning safety issues. In earlier studies good performance of the system W-Cr-Si was demonstrated. Thin films of such alloys showed a strongly reduced oxidation rate compared to pure tungsten. However, the formation of brittle tungsten silicides may be disadvantageous for the powder metallurgical production of bulk W-Cr-Si alloys if a good workability is needed. This paper shows the results of screening tests to identify suitable silicon-free alloys with distinguished self-passivation and a potentially good workability. Of all the tested systems W-Cr-Ti alloys showed the most promising results. The oxidation rate was even lower than the one of W-Cr-Si alloys, the reduction factor was about four orders of magnitude compared to pure tungsten. This performance could be conserved even if the content of alloying elements was reduced.

  3. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  4. Limits of clinical tests to screen autonomic function in diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, M; Bertram, D; Sagnol, I; Cerutti, C; Thivolet, C; Fauvel, J P

    2001-11-01

    A precocious detection of cardiac autonomic dysfunction is of major clinical interest that could lead to a more intensive supervision of diabetic patients. However, classical clinical exploration of cardiac autonomic function is not easy to undertake in a reproducible way. Thus, respective interests of autonomic nervous parameters provided by both clinical tests and computerized analysis of resting blood pressure were checked in type 1 diabetic patients without orthostatic hypotension and microalbuminuria. Thirteen diabetic subjects matched for age and gender to thirteen healthy subjects volunteered to participate to the study. From clinical tests (standing up, deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, handgrip test), autonomic function was scored according to Ewing's methodology. Analysis of resting beat to beat blood pressure provided autonomic indices of the cardiac function (spectral analysis or Z analysis). 5 of the 13 diabetic patients exhibited a pathological score (more than one pathological response) suggesting the presence of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. The most discriminative test was the deep breathing test. However, spectral indices of BP recordings and baro-reflex sensitivity (BRS) of these 5 subjects were similar to those of healthy subjects and of remaining diabetic subjects. Alteration in Ewing's score given by clinical tests may not reflect an alteration of cardiac autonomic function in asymptomatic type 1 diabetic patients, because spectral indices of sympathetic and parasympathetic (including BRS) function were within normal range. Our results strongly suggest to confront results provided by both methodologies before concluding to an autonomic cardiac impairment in asymptomatic diabetic patients.

  5. The limits of testing particle-mediated oxidative stress in vitro in predicting diverse pathologies; relevance for testing of nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulumian Mary

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In vitro studies with particles are a major staple of particle toxicology, generally used to investigate mechanisms and better understand the molecular events underlying cellular effects. However, there is ethical and financial pressure in nanotoxicology, the new sub-specialty of particle toxicology, to avoid using animals. Therefore an increasing amount of studies are being published using in vitro approaches and such studies require careful interpretation. We point out here that 3 different conventional pathogenic particle types, PM10, asbestos and quartz, which cause diverse pathological effects, have been reported to cause very similar oxidative stress effects in cells in culture. We discuss the likely explanation and implications of this apparent paradox, and its relevance for testing in nanotoxicology.

  6. A diffusion-limited reaction model for self-propagating Al/Pt multilayers with quench limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, D. E.; Yarrington, C. D.; Hobbs, M. L.; Abere, M. J.; Adams, D. P.

    2018-04-01

    A diffusion-limited reaction model was calibrated for Al/Pt multilayers ignited on oxidized silicon, sapphire, and tungsten substrates, as well as for some Al/Pt multilayers ignited as free-standing foils. The model was implemented in a finite element analysis code and used to match experimental burn front velocity data collected from several years of testing at Sandia National Laboratories. Moreover, both the simulations and experiments reveal well-defined quench limits in the total Al + Pt layer (i.e., bilayer) thickness. At these limits, the heat generated from atomic diffusion is insufficient to support a self-propagating wave front on top of the substrates. Quench limits for reactive multilayers are seldom reported and are found to depend on the thermal properties of the individual layers. Here, the diffusion-limited reaction model is generalized to allow for temperature- and composition-dependent material properties, phase change, and anisotropic thermal conductivity. Utilizing this increase in model fidelity, excellent overall agreement is shown between the simulations and experimental results with a single calibrated parameter set. However, the burn front velocities of Al/Pt multilayers ignited on tungsten substrates are over-predicted. Possible sources of error are discussed and a higher activation energy (from 41.9 kJ/mol.at. to 47.5 kJ/mol.at.) is shown to bring the simulations into agreement with the velocity data observed on tungsten substrates. This higher activation energy suggests an inhibited diffusion mechanism present at lower heating rates.

  7. Mechanical Testing of Polymeric Composites for Aircraft Applications: Standards, Requirements and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinchan, Levon; Shevtsov, Sergey; Soloviev, Arcady; Shevtsova, Varvara; Huang, Jiun-Ping

    The high-loaded parts of modern aircrafts and helicopters are often produced from polymeric composite materials. Such materials consist of reinforcing fibers, packed by layers with the different angles, and resin, which uniformly distributes the structural stresses between fibers. These composites should have an orthotropic symmetry of mechanical properties to obtain the desirable spatial distribution of elastic moduli consistent to the external loading pattern. Main requirements to the aircraft composite materials are the specified elastic properties (9 for orthotropic composite), long-term strength parameters, high resistance against the environmental influences, low thermal expansion to maintain the shape stability. These properties are ensured by an exact implementation of technological conditions and many testing procedures performed with the fibers, resin, prepregs and ready components. Most important mechanical testing procedures are defined by ASTM, SACMA and other standards. However in each case the wide diversity of components (dimensions and lay-up of fibers, rheological properties of thermosetting resins) requires a specific approach to the sample preparation, testing, and numerical processing of the testing results to obtain the veritable values of tested parameters. We pay the special attention to the cases where the tested specimens are cut not from the plates recommended by standards, but from the ready part manufactured with the specific lay-up, tension forces on the reinforcing fiber at the filament winding, and curing schedule. These tests can provide most useful information both for the composite structural design and to estimate a quality of the ready parts. We consider an influence of relation between specimen dimensions and pattern of the fibers winding (or lay-up) on the results of mechanical testing for determination of longitudinal, transverse and in-plane shear moduli, an original numerical scheme for reconstruction of in-plane shear

  8. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. V - Post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. L.; Ni, W.-T.; Caves, C. M.; Will, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    The post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory of gravity is evaluated and is shown to be identical to that of general relativity, except for the post-Newtonian parameter alpha sub 2 (which is related to the difference in propagation speeds for gravitational and electromagnetic waves). Both the value of alpha sub 2 and the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant depend on the present cosmological structure of the Universe. If the cosmological structure has a specific (but presumably special) form, the Newtonian gravitational constant assumes its current value, alpha sub 2 is zero, the post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory is identical to that of general relativity - and standard solar system experiments cannot distinguish between the two theories.

  9. Theoretical frameworks for testing relativistic gravity. 5: Post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. L.; Caves, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    The post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory of gravity is evaluated and is shown to be identical to that of general relativity, except for the PPN parameter alpha sub 2, which is related to the difference in propagation speeds for gravitational and electromagnetic waves. Both the value of alpha sub 2 and the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant depend on the present cosmological structure of the Universe. If the cosmological structure has a specific but presumably special form, the Newtonian gravitational constant assumes its current value, alpha sub 2 is zero, the post-Newtonian limit of Rosen's theory is identical to that of general relativity--and standard solar system experiments cannot distinguish between the two theories.

  10. On the Limitations of Government Borrowing: A Framework for Empirical Testing

    OpenAIRE

    James D. Hamilton; Marjorie A. Flavin

    1985-01-01

    This paper seeks to distinguish empirically between two views on the limitations of government borrowing. According to one view, nothing precludes the government from running a permanent budget deficit, paying interest due on the growing debt load simply by issuing new debt, An alternative perspective holds that creditors would be unwilling to purchase government debt unless the government made a credible commitment to balance its budget in present value terms. We show that distinguishing bet...

  11. The current limitations of in vitro genotoxicity testing and their relevance to the in vivo situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesslany, Fabrice

    2017-08-01

    The standard regulatory core battery of genotoxicity tests generally includes 2 or 3 validated tests with at least one in vitro test in bacteria and one in vitro test on cell cultures. However, limitations in in vitro genotoxicity testing may exist at many levels. The knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of genotoxicity is particularly useful to assess the level of relevance for the in vivo situation. In order to avoid wrong conclusions regarding the actual genotoxicity status of any test substance, it appears very important to be aware of the various origins of related bias leading to 'false positives and negatives' by using in vitro methods. Among these, mention may be made on the metabolic activation system, experimental (extreme) conditions, specificities of the test systems implemented, cell type used etc. The knowledge of the actual 'limits' of the in vitro test systems used is clearly an advantage and may contribute to avoid some pitfalls in order to better assess the level of relevance for the in vivo situation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  13. High-pressure synthesis of fully occupied tetragonal and cubic tungsten bronze oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, Yuya; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Tassel, Cedric; Goto, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Taito; Kageyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    A high-pressure reaction yielded the fully occupied tetragonal tungsten bronze K{sub 3}W{sub 5}O{sub 15} (K{sub 0.6}WO{sub 3}). The terminal phase shows an unusual transport property featuring slightly negative temperature-dependence in resistivity (dρ/dT<0) and a large Wilson ratio of R{sub W}=3.2. Such anomalous metallic behavior possibly arises from the low-dimensional electronic structure with a van Hove singularity at the Fermi level and/or from enhanced magnetic fluctuations by geometrical frustration of the tungsten sublattice. The asymmetric nature of the tetragonal tungsten bronze K{sub x}WO{sub 3}-K{sub 0.6-y}Ba{sub y}WO{sub 3} phase diagram implies that superconductivity for x≤0.45 originates from the lattice instability because of potassium deficiency. A cubic perovskite KWO{sub 3} phase was also identified as a line phase - in marked contrast to Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} and Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} with varying quantities of x (<1). This study presents a versatile method by which the solubility limit of tungsten bronze oxides can be extended. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Dislocation-mediated strain hardening in tungsten: Thermo-mechanical plasticity theory and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Xiao, Xiazi; Dubinko, A.; Bakaeva, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent thermo-mechanical model to study the strain-hardening behavior of polycrystalline tungsten was developed and validated by a dedicated experimental route. Dislocation-dislocation multiplication and storage, as well dislocation-grain boundary (GB) pinning were the major mechanisms underlying the evolution of plastic deformation, thus providing a link between the strain hardening behavior and material's microstructure. The microstructure of the polycrystalline tungsten samples has been thoroughly investigated by scanning and electron microscopy. The model was applied to compute stress-strain loading curves of commercial tungsten grades, in the as-received and as-annealed states, in the temperature range of 500-1000 °C. Fitting the model to the independent experimental results obtained using a single crystal and as-received polycrystalline tungsten, the model demonstrated its capability to predict the deformation behavior of as-annealed samples in a wide temperature range and applied strain. The relevance of the dislocation-mediated plasticity mechanisms used in the model have been validated using transmission electron microscopy examination of the samples deformed up to different amounts of strain. On the basis of the experimental validation, the limitations of the model are determined and discussed.

  15. Rapid limit tests for metal impurities in pharmaceutical materials by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using wavelet transform filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhantsev, Sergey; Li, Xiang; Kauffman, John F

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a new method for analysis of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra based on continuous wavelet transform filters, and the method is applied to the determination of toxic metals in pharmaceutical materials using hand-held XRF spectrometers. The method uses the continuous wavelet transform to filter the signal and noise components of the spectrum. We present a limit test that compares the wavelet domain signal-to-noise ratios at the energies of the elements of interest to an empirically determined signal-to-noise decision threshold. The limit test is advantageous because it does not require the user to measure calibration samples prior to measurement, though system suitability tests are still recommended. The limit test was evaluated in a collaborative study that involved five different hand-held XRF spectrometers used by multiple analysts in six separate laboratories across the United States. In total, more than 1200 measurements were performed. The detection limits estimated for arsenic, lead, mercury, and chromium were 8, 14, 20, and 150 μg/g, respectively.

  16. Increased Specificity of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition Matrix Reasoning Test Instructions and Time Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Andy M.; Atchison, Timothy B.; Engler, Rachel R.

    2009-01-01

    Instructions for the Matrix Reasoning Test (MRT) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition were modified by explicitly stating that the subtest was untimed or that a per-item time limit would be imposed. The MRT was administered within one of four conditions: with (a) standard administration instructions, (b) explicit instructions…

  17. Current Limitations and Recommendations to Improve Testing for the Environmental Assessment of Endocrine Active Substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coady, Katherine K; Biever, Ronald C; Denslow, Nancy D

    2017-01-01

    In this paper existing regulatory frameworks and test systems for assessing potential endocrine-active chemicals are described, and associated challenges discussed, along with proposed approaches to address these challenges. Regulatory frameworks vary somewhat across geographies, but all basically...... evaluate whether a chemical possesses endocrine activity and whether this activity can result in adverse outcomes either to humans or the environment. Current test systems include in silico, in vitro and in vivo techniques focused on detecting potential endocrine activity, and in vivo tests that collect...... methods currently do not exist, and addressing key endocrine pathways of possible concern in addition to those associated with estrogen, androgen and thyroid signaling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  18. The influence of Fe content on spreading ability of tungsten heavy alloys matrix on tungsten surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krzyńska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of tungsten spreading ability with W-Ni-Co-Fe matrix are presented. The aim of these investigations was to see how Fe concentration in W – Ni – Co matrix influences the wettability of tungsten grains during liquid phase sintering. Four green compact specimens containing 50%W, 10%Co and Ni + Fe = 40% but with different Ni to Fe ratio were prepared. The cylindrical specimen 5mm diameter and 5mm height were put on clean pure tungsten substrate and then 20 minutes heated at 1520oC in hydrogen atmosphere. After heating the specimens were carefully measured and then the specimens for structure observations were prepared. It was concluded, that increase of Fe content decrease the melting temperature of W – Ni – Co alloy. The melting point decrease caused by Fe content increase substantially the spreading ability of tungsten substrate with W – Ni – Co alloy. Metallography investigations showed some microstructure changes in “reaction zone” identified in tungsten substrate – (WNi40-xCo10Fex interface. The results of the study confirmed our earlier observations that even relative small Fe addition promotes Weight Heavy Alloys (WHA liquid phase sintering.

  19. Influence of grain boundaries on the fracture toughness of tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gludovatz, B.; Faleschini, M.; Pippan, R.; Hoffmann, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten and tungsten alloys are possible candidates for future fusion reactors because of their high melting points, high thermal conductivity and their high erosion resistance. Since these materials have a body-centered cubic (bcc) structure, they show a typical change in fracture behaviour from brittle at low temperatures to ductile at high temperatures. For that reason the fracture behaviour of pure tungsten (W), potassium doped tungsten (AKS) and tungsten with 1 wt% La 2 O 3 (WL10) was studied, taking into account the influence of temperature and fabrication condition. Especially AKS has been studied to investigate the longitudinal splitting of the AKS-wires, the crack propagation direction with the lowest fracture toughness. This alloy subjected to intense deformation leads to a material with an elongated grain structure after recrystallization because of the potassium bubbles. Fracture toughness has been investigated by means of 3-point bending (3PB) specimens, double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens and compact tension (CT) specimens. Tests were performed in the range -196 deg. C to more than 1000 deg. C. Though all these materials show an expected increase in fracture toughness with increasing temperature, influences like texture, chemical composition, grain boundary segregation and dislocation density seem to have an extreme influence on the obtained results. These influences can especially be seen in the fracture behaviour and morphology, where two kinds of fracture can occur: on one hand the trans-crystalline and on the other hand the intercrystalline fracture. Therefore techniques like electron backscatter diffraction, auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray line profile analysis were used to determine the parameter influencing fracture toughness. Also new testing techniques have been devised and successfully applied. Additional tests like an 'in-situ EBSD' technique for investigating the formation of dislocations during

  20. Experimental and numerical simulations of ELM-like transient damage behaviors to different grade tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang, E-mail: xliu@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Chen, Zhenkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Fan, Jinlian [Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Song, Jiupeng [Xiamen Honglu Tungsten & Molybdenum Industry Co., Ltd, Xiamen (China)

    2015-08-15

    Transient heat loads, such as plasma disruptions and ELMs, could induce plastic deformations, cracking, melting, even fatigue cracks and creep of tungsten (W) surface. A high purity W, CVD-W coating, TiC dispersion strengthened and K doped tungsten alloys were tested in a 60 kW electron-beam facility by simulating the transient load events under different base temperatures. It was found that CVD-W, W-TiC and W-K alloys have higher crack thresholds than high purity W, meanwhile CVD-W is more sensitive to the crack disappearing at elevated base temperatures. On the other hand, repetitive pulse loading like ELMs can induce serious network cracks even the power density was quite lower than the crack threshold determined by a single shot. The ABAQUS code was used to simulate the crack behaviors of ITER grade pure W by a single shot and a FE-SAFE code was adopted to estimate the fatigue life under ELMs-like loads. A good agreement with experiment results was found.

  1. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air......A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  2. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  3. Force Limited Vibration Testing and Subsequent Redesign of the Naval Postgraduate School CubeSat Launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Frequencies with FLVT Test Setup Measured Frequencies 4. Stress FEM The stress FEM was created purely to conduct a stress analysis on the NPSCuL- v2...California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA, 2009. [3] Pumpkin , Inc. (2007, January 1). 3D CAD design. [Online]. Available: http

  4. Diagnostic Limitations of 13C-Mixed Triglyceride Breath Test in Patients after Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Rusyn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of a comprehensive examination of 136 patients after cholecystectomy are provided. High efficiency and informativeness of the 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for determining exocrine pancreatic insufficiency at its early stages was noted in patients after cholecystectomy.

  5. The value and limitations of rechallenge in the guinea pig maximization test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankild, S; Basketter, D A; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    1996-01-01

    The guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) has played a primary rôle in the evaluation of potential skin contact sensitizers for 25 years. In the OECD Guideline 406 from 1993, it is specifically suggested that equivocal results from the initial challenge in the GPMT should be evaluated further...

  6. Testing the Limits: The Purposes and Effects of Additional, External Elementary Mathematics Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Karen Ann

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study focuses on the third through fifth grade classrooms at a public elementary school in a Midwestern urban school district where the Northwest Evaluation Association's (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessment is being implemented. According to the school district, the goals of these tests are: to show…

  7. Tuberculin skin testing in patients with HIV infection: limited benefit of reduced cutoff values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobelens, Frank G.; Egwaga, Saidi M.; van Ginkel, Tessa; Muwinge, Hemed; Matee, Mecky I.; Borgdorff, Martien W.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: When determining eligibility for isoniazid preventive therapy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the cutoff value of the tuberculin skin test (TST) is often reduced from an induration of 10 mm in diameter to one of 5 mm in diameter to compensate for loss of

  8. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI test...

  9. Uncertainty analysis of constant amplitude fatigue test data employing the six parameters random fatigue limit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonetti Davide

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimating and reducing uncertainty in fatigue test data analysis is a relevant task in order to assess the reliability of a structural connection with respect to fatigue. Several statistical models have been proposed in the literature with the aim of representing the stress range vs. endurance trend of fatigue test data under constant amplitude loading and the scatter in the finite and infinite life regions. In order to estimate the safety level of the connection also the uncertainty related to the amount of information available need to be estimated using the methods provided by the theory of statistic. The Bayesian analysis is employed to reduce the uncertainty due to the often small amount of test data by introducing prior information related to the parameters of the statistical model. In this work, the inference of fatigue test data belonging to cover plated steel beams is presented. The uncertainty is estimated by making use of Bayesian and frequentist methods. The 5% quantile of the fatigue life is estimated by taking into account the uncertainty related to the sample size for both a dataset containing few samples and one containing more data. The S-N curves resulting from the application of the employed methods are compared and the effect of the reduction of uncertainty in the infinite life region is quantified.

  10. Experimental investigations of the frictional and wear behavior of tungsten carbide cermet ball bearings under axial load in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes part of the R and D work performed on ball bearings operated in a liquid sodium environment and tested under conditions which are felt to be representative for high precision mechanisms in LMFBR's. After a short introduction, mainly dealing with the experimental results of other authors, a description will be given of the test facility, the test procedure, the ball bearings and the basis for the selection of the materials. The paper covers the experimental phase, which has been carried out in two steps. In the first phase material screening tests demonstrated the tungsten-carbide-cobalt cermet to be superior to the other materials tested with respect to friction and wear. This material, therefore, was selected for a more detailed parameter test programme during phase 2. Up to now a series of tests have been performed with bearing load and speed as parameters, indicating that fatigue is the life limiting factor. It shows that a life-load relationship, similar to that known for conventional ball bearing technology, also seems appropriate for the test conditions and environment investigated here

  11. D-shaped configurations in FTU for testing liquid lithium limiter: Preliminary studies and experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ramogida

    2017-08-01

    A possible alternative connection of the poloidal field coils in FTU is here proposed, with the aim of achieving a true X-point configuration with a magnetic single null well inside the plasma chamber and strike points on the lithium limiter. A preliminary assessment of this design allowed estimating the required power supply upgrade and showed its compatibility with the existing mechanical structure and cooling system, at least for plasmas with current up to 300 kA and flat-top duration up to 4s.

  12. Testing the limits of the 'joint account' model of genetic information: a legal thought experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Charles; Herring, Jonathan; Boyd, Magnus

    2015-05-01

    We examine the likely reception in the courtroom of the 'joint account' model of genetic confidentiality. We conclude that the model, as modified by Gilbar and others, is workable and reflects, better than more conventional legal approaches, both the biological and psychological realities and the obligations owed under Articles 8 and 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  14. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W"2"4"+ - W"3"2"+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W"2"2"+ - W"3"5"+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W"2"5"+ - W"2"8"+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p"54d"n"+"1 - 4p"64d"n, of W"2"9"+ - W"3"5"+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p"54d"n4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  15. EBIT spectroscopy of Pm-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Reyna Almandos, J.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Greier, A.; Neu, R.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of VUV electron beam ion trap (EBIT) spectroscopy are applied to the study of Pm-like tungsten (W 13+ ). These data show that theory appears well capable of dealing with these multi-electron (61) ions, at least for high ionization stages. A comparison of other spectroscopic methods applied to the study of other ions of the Pm I sequence is also given, and finally a search for the Pm-like W lines at the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak is mentioned

  16. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jixiu; Wan Baofei

    2006-01-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 deg. C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment

  17. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ji-xiu; Wan, Bao-fei

    2006-06-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 °C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment.

  18. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  19. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  20. Quality specifications for the extra-analytical phase of laboratory testing: Reference intervals and decision limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2017-07-01

    Reference intervals and decision limits are a critical part of the clinical laboratory report. The evaluation of their correct use represents a tool to verify the post analytical quality. Four elements are identified as indicators. 1. The use of decision limits for lipids and glycated hemoglobin. 2. The use, whenever possible, of common reference values. 3. The presence of gender-related reference intervals for at least the following common serum measurands (besides obviously the fertility relate hormones): alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatine kinase (CK), creatinine, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), IgM, ferritin, iron, transferrin, urate, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit (Hct). 4. The presence of age-related reference intervals. The problem of specific reference intervals for elderly people is discussed, but their use is not recommended; on the contrary it is necessary the presence of pediatric age-related reference intervals at least for the following common serum measurands: ALP, amylase, creatinine, inorganic phosphate, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, urate, insulin like growth factor 1, white blood cells, RBC, Hb, Hct, alfa-fetoprotein and fertility related hormones. The lack of such reference intervals may imply significant risks for the patients. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Global public health: international health is tested to its limits by the human influenza A epidemic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Giraldo, Alvaro; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    This article comes from the intense international pressure that follows a near-catastrophy, such as the human influenza A H1N1 epidemic, and the limited resources for confronting such events. The analysis covers prevailing 20th century trends in the international public health arena and the change-induced challenges brought on by globalization, the transition set in motion by what has been deemed the "new" international public health and an ever-increasing focus on global health, in the context of an international scenario of shifting risks and opportunities and a growing number of multinational players. Global public health is defined as a public right, based on a new appreciation of the public, a new paradigm centered on human rights, and altruistic philosophy, politics, and ethics that undergird the changes in international public health on at least three fronts: redefining its theoretical foundation, improving world health, and renewing the international public health system, all of which is the byproduct of a new form of governance. A new world health system, directed by new global public institutions, would aim to make public health a global public right and face a variety of staggering challenges, such as working on public policy management on a global scale, renewing and democratizing the current global governing structure, and conquering the limits and weaknesses witnessed by international health.

  2. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  3. Separation of Rhenium (VII) from Tungsten (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Lukic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Orlic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Examined were the conditions for an effective separation of tungsten (VI) and rhenium (VII) on alumina if the solution of 0.20 mol dm -3 NaCl, ph=2.6 is used as the aqueous phase. Under the given experimental conditions alumina was found to be much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina at pH=2 are 24 and 78 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 , respectively. With the increase of pH these values decrease. So, at pH=6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 respectively. The elution volume for rhenium for the given column dimensions and quantity of the adsorbent is about 16 ml. These results were confirmed by the experiments of the radiological separations. Tungsten-187 remains firmly bound to the alumina. The radionuclide purity of the eluted 186'188 Re at pH=2 is very high. (authors)

  4. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlgren, T., E-mail: tommy.ahlgren@helsinki.fi; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-15

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔV{sub m} ≈ 0.488 Å{sup 3}, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected. - Highlights: • The recommended value of 0.39 eV for the H in W migration barrier should be changed to 0.25 eV. • The random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position can be dealt with in diffusion simulations. • Hydrogen diffusion in tungsten is highly concentration dependent.

  5. Final steps to an all tungsten divertor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R.; Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Puetterich, Th.; Greuner, H.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Hopf, Ch.; Krieger, K.; Maggi, C.F.; Maier, H.; Mayer, M.; Rohde, V.; Schmid, K.; Suttrop, W.

    2007-01-01

    Currently 85% of the plasma facing components of ASDEX Upgrade are tungsten coated. Carbon influx from W PFCs is still observed but a reduction of the C content is found in plasma discharges and a lower C fraction is measured in deposited layers in agreement with modelling. W sputtering from the low field side guard and ICRF limiters is mainly due to fast particles from NBI as well as from ions accelerated in the rectified sheath during ICRF operation. The increase of the W source area is reflected in increased W concentrations. For medium to high density discharges the techniques developed so far, namely central heating and ELM pace-making, allow keeping the W concentration in the range of 10 -5 . Boronisation strongly reduces the W influxes and similarly the W content especially during ICRF operation, but this reduction is only temporary and equilibrium is reached already after about 100 discharges

  6. Stress reduction in tungsten films using nanostructured compliant layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabacak, Tansel; Picu, Catalin R.; Senkevich, Jay J.; Wang, G.-C.; Lu, T.-M.

    2004-01-01

    The residual stress in thin films is a major limiting factor for obtaining high quality films. We present a strategy for stress reduction in sputter deposited films by using a nanostructured compliant layer obtained by the oblique angle deposition technique, sandwiched between the film and the substrate. The technique is all in situ, does not require any lithography steps, and the nanostructured layer is made from the same material as the deposited thin film. By using this approach we were able to reduce stress values by approximately one order of magnitude in sputter deposited tungsten films. These lower stress thin films also exhibit stronger adhesion to the substrate, which retards delamination buckling. This technique allows the growth of much thicker films and has enhanced structural stability. A model is developed to explain the stress relief mechanism and the stronger adhesion associated with the presence of the nanostructured compliant layer

  7. Improved experimental determination of critical-point data for tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fucke, W.; Seydel, U.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that under certain conditions in resistive pulse-heating experiments, refractory liquid metals can be heated up to the limit of thermodynamic stability (spinodal) of the superheated liquid. Here, an explosion-like decomposition takes place which is directly monitored by measurements of expansion, surface radiation, and electric resistivity, thus allowing the determination of the temperature-pressure dependence of the spinodal transition. A comparison of the spinodal equation obtained this way with theoretical models yields the critical temperature Tsub(c), pressure psub(c), and volume vsub(c). A completely experimentally-determined set of the critical parameters for tungsten is presented: Tsub(c) = (13400 +- 1400) K, psub(c) = (3370 +- 850) bar, vsub(c) = (43 +- 4) cm 3 mol -1 . (author)

  8. Testing the limits: cautions and concerns regarding the new Wechsler IQ and Memory scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Bauer, Russell M

    2010-02-23

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) are 2 of the most common psychological tests used in clinical care and research in neurology. Newly revised versions of both instruments (WAIS-IV and WMS-IV) have recently been published and are increasingly being adopted by the neuropsychology community. There have been significant changes in the structure and content of both scales, leading to the potential for inaccurate patient classification if algorithms developed using their predecessors are employed. There are presently insufficient clinical data in neurologic populations to insure their appropriate application to neuropsychological evaluations. We provide a perspective on these important new neuropsychological instruments, comment on the pressures to adopt these tests in the absence of an appropriate evidence base supporting their incremental validity, and describe the potential negative impact on both patient care and continuing research applications.

  9. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazing these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.

  10. High temperature strengthening mechanism of hafnium carbide in a tungsten-rhenium matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, A.; Shin, K.S.; Jacobson, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    The interrelationship between the testing temperature and HfC strength increment of an arc-melted W-3.6Re-0.4HfC was determined from 1950 K to 2980 K in a vacuum of better than 1.3x10 -5 Pa (10 -7 torr). The present research was focused on the characteristic temperature at which the rapid coarsening of HfC particles occurred and the effect of the second-phase particle size on the high temperature strength properties of this material. It was found that the HfC particle strengthening was effective in a W-Re matrix up to a characteristic temperature of 2450 K in the short-term tensile test. Carbon was found to be the rate-limiting solute in the HfC particle growth. The strength of HfC strengthened alloy at temperature above 0.5 T m is proportional to the square root of particle volume fraction. The yield strengths of W-3.6Re-0.26HfC calculated based on the particle statistical distribution had good agreement with the experimental values from 1950 K to 2980 K. Besides, an addition of 0.26 percent HfC in tungsten resulted in about 28 percent increase in the activation energy of plastic deformation at high temperatures

  11. Thrombophilia testing has limited usefulness in clinical decision-making and should be used selectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Elna M; Lee, Raymond W; Okazaki, Ian J; Benyamini, Pouya; Kistner, Robert L

    2015-04-01

    Management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) includes evaluation for hypercoagulable state, especially if the VTE occurs in young patients, is recurrent, or is associated with a positive family history. These laboratory tests are costly, and surprisingly, there is little evidence showing that testing leads to improved clinical outcomes. Evidence based on observational prospective studies suggests that optimal duration of anticoagulation should be based on clinical risks resulting in VTE, such as transient, permanent, and idiopathic or unprovoked risks, and less on abnormal thrombophilia values. Thrombophilia screening is important in a subgroup of clinical scenarios, such as when there is clinical suspicion of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, heparin resistance, or warfarin necrosis; with thrombosis occurring in unusual sites (such as mesenteric or cerebral deep venous thrombosis); and for pregnant women or those seeking pregnancy or considering estrogen-based agents. Thrombophilia screening is not likely to be helpful in most cases of first-time unprovoked VTE in the setting of transient risks, active malignant disease, deep venous thrombosis of upper extremity veins or from central lines, two or more VTEs, or arterial thrombosis with pre-existing atherosclerotic risk factors. The desire by both patient and physician for a scientific explanation of the clotting event may alone lead to testing, and if so, it should be with the understanding that an abnormal test result will likely not change management, and normal results do not accurately exclude a thrombophilic defect because there are likely factors yet to be discovered. Such false assumptions may lead to shorter durations of treatment than are optimal. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tungsten/copper composite deposits produced by a cold spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ki; Kang, Suk Bong

    2003-01-01

    An agglomerated tungsten/copper composite powder was both cold sprayed and plasma sprayed onto a mild steel substrate for electronic package applications. Most pores resulting from the spraying were found in the vicinity of the tungsten-rich regions of the final product. The levels of porosity varied with the amount of tungsten present. No copper oxidation was found at the cold-sprayed deposit, but relatively high copper oxidation was observed at the plasma-sprayed deposit

  13. Validation of tungsten cross sections in the neutron energy region up to 100 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigni, Marco T.; Žerovnik, Gašper; Leal, Luiz. C.; Trkov, Andrej

    2017-09-01

    Following a series of recent cross section evaluations on tungsten isotopes performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), this paper presents the validation work carried out to test the performance of the evaluated cross sections based on lead-slowing-down (LSD) benchmarks conducted in Grenoble. ORNL completed the resonance parameter evaluation of four tungsten isotopes - 182,183,184,186W - in August 2014 and submitted it as an ENDF-compatible file to be part of the next release of the ENDF/B-VIII.0 nuclear data library. The evaluations were performed with support from the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program in an effort to provide improved tungsten cross section and covariance data for criticality safety sensitivity analyses. The validation analysis based on the LSD benchmarks showed an improved agreement with the experimental response when the ORNL tungsten evaluations were included in the ENDF/B-VII.1 library. Comparison with the results obtained with the JEFF-3.2 nuclear data library are also discussed.

  14. Nitridation of one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanostructures: Changes in structure and photoactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Tamás

    2017-10-12

    In the search for stable, visible light active photoelectrodes, hydrothermally synthesized tungsten oxide nanowires were modified via nitrogen incorporation into their structure. To this end, nanowires were heat-treated in ammonia/nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures. This procedure caused transitions in their structure that were investigated along with the photoelectrochemical properties of the samples. Results were subsequently compared to the reference samples treated in inert nitrogen atmosphere. Morphological changes and structural transitions were followed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Bandgap energies were determined from the UV–vis spectra of the materials, while photoelectrochemical properties were tested by linear sweep photovoltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Pristine tungsten oxide nanowires were first transformed into tungsten oxynitride and then tungsten nitride during high-temperature calcination in ammonia atmosphere. Electron microscopic investigation revealed that, along with phase transition, the initial fibrous morphology gradually converted into nanosheets. Simultaneously, bandgap energies significantly decreased in the calcination process, too. Photoelectrochemical measurements demonstrated that photoactivity in the treated samples was not improved by the decrease of the bandgap. This behavior might be explained with the deterioration of charge carrier transport properties of the materials due to the increased number of structural defects (acting as trap states), and current ongoing work aims to verify this notion.

  15. SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jonathan A.; Charit, Indrajit; Sparks, Cory; Butt, Darryl P.; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

  16. Characterization of ITER tungsten qualification mock-ups exposed to high cyclic thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintsuk, Gerald, E-mail: g.pintsuk@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Bednarek, Maja; Gavila, Pierre [Fusion for Energy, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Gerzoskovitz, Stefan [Plansee SE, Innovation Services, 6600 Reutte (Austria); Linke, Jochen [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Lorenzetto, Patrick; Riccardi, Bruno [Fusion for Energy, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Escourbiac, Frederic [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Mechanical deformation of CuCrZr in case a thermal barrier layer has been formed due to impurity content in the cooling water. • Crack formation at the W/Cu interface starting at the block edge. • Porosity formation in the pure Cu interlayer. • Microstructural changes in tungsten down to the W/Cu interface, which indicates also high temperatures for the pure Cu interlayer. • Macrocrack formation in tungsten which is assumed to be ductile at the initiation point and brittle when proceeding toward the cooling tube. - Abstract: High heat flux tested small-scale tungsten monoblock mock-ups (5000 cycles at 10 MW/m{sup 2} and up to 1000 cycles at 20 MW/m{sup 2}) manufactured by Plansee and Ansaldo were characterized by metallographic means. Therein, the macrocrack formation and propagation in tungsten, its recrystallization behavior and the surface response to different heat load facilities were investigated. Furthermore, debonding at the W/Cu interface, void formation in the soft copper interlayer and microcrack formation at the inner surface of the CuCrZr cooling tube were found.

  17. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  18. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  19. Limitations of predicting in vivo biostability of multiphase polyurethane elastomers using temperature-accelerated degradation testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padsalgikar, Ajay; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth; Gallagher, Genevieve; Touchet, Tyler; Iacob, Ciprian; Mellin, Lisa; Norlin-Weissenrieder, Anna; Runt, James

    2015-01-01

    Polyurethane biostability has been the subject of intense research since the failure of polyether polyurethane pacemaker leads in the 1980s. Accelerated in vitro testing has been used to isolate degradation mechanisms and predict clinical performance of biomaterials. However, validation that in vitro methods reproduce in vivo degradation is critical to the selection of appropriate tests. High temperature has been proposed as a method to accelerate degradation. However, correlation of such data to in vivo performance is poor for polyurethanes due to the impact of temperature on microstructure. In this study, we characterize the lack of correlation between hydrolytic degradation predicted using a high temperature aging model of a polydimethylsiloxane-based polyurethane and its in vivo performance. Most notably, the predicted molecular weight and tensile property changes from the accelerated aging study did not correlate with clinical explants subjected to human biological stresses in real time through 5 years. Further, DMTA, ATR-FTIR, and SAXS experiments on samples aged for 2 weeks in PBS indicated greater phase separation in samples aged at 85°C compared to those aged at 37°C and unaged controls. These results confirm that microstructural changes occur at high temperatures that do not occur at in vivo temperatures. In addition, water absorption studies demonstrated that water saturation levels increased significantly with temperature. This study highlights that the multiphase morphology of polyurethane precludes the use of temperature accelerated biodegradation for the prediction of clinical performance and provides critical information in designing appropriate in vitro tests for this class of materials. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The limits to pride: A test of the pro-anorexia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Talea; Blanton, Hart

    2016-01-01

    Many social psychological models propose that positive self-conceptions promote self-esteem. An extreme version of this hypothesis is advanced in "pro-anorexia" communities: identifying with anorexia, in conjunction with disordered eating, can lead to higher self-esteem. The current study empirically tested this hypothesis. Results challenge the pro-anorexia hypothesis. Although those with higher levels of pro-anorexia identification trended towards higher self-esteem with increased disordered eating, this did not overcome the strong negative main effect of pro-anorexia identification. These data suggest a more effective strategy for promoting self-esteem is to encourage rejection of disordered eating and an anorexic identity.