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Sample records for tungsten ions relevant

  1. EUV spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions relevant to hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Fuchs, T.; Fussmann, G.; Schwob, J.L.; Mandelbaum, P.; Doron, R.

    2001-01-01

    The radiation from tungsten ions in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region was investigated using a 2-m grazing-incidence spectrometer in conjunction with the Berlin electron beam ion trap. Operating EBIT at beam energies between 900 eV and 1.7 keV In-like W 25+ to Sr-like W 36+ ions could selectively be excited, and a bright emission band of about 2 A width was measured which shifts from 50 to 54 A when raising the charge state. The band of partially unresolved lines originates from 4l-4l' transitions of ions having an open 4d subshell. Atomic structure calculations with the HULLAC code package show that the narrowing and shift of the line band emission can be interpreted in the framework of the unresolved transition array using mixed configurations. The theoretical spectrum analysis applies a collisional-radiative model to account for the low electron density of EBIT and reproduces the variations of the observed emission pattern. (orig.)

  2. Hydrogen isotope transport across tungsten surfaces exposed to a fusion relevant He ion fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.

    2017-07-01

    Tungsten targets are exposed to controlled sequences of D2 and He, and He and D2 plasma in the Pisces-A linear plasma device, with a view to studying the outward and inward transport of D across a He implanted surface, using thermal desorption mass spectrometry. Differences in transport are interpreted from changes in peak desorption temperature and amplitude for D2 release, compared against that of control targets exposed to just D2 plasma. Desorption data are modeled with Tmap-7 to infer the nature by which He leads to the ‘reduced inventory’ effect for H isotope uptake. A dual segment (surface-30 nm, bulk) W Tmap-7 model is developed, that simulates both plasma exposure and thermal desorption. Good agreement between desorption data and model is found for D2 release from control targets provided that the implanted flux is reduced, similar to that reported by others. For He affected release, the H isotope transport properties of the surface segment are adjusted away from control target bulk values during the computation. Modeling that examines outward D transport through the He implanted layer suggests that a permeation barrier is active, but bubble induced porosity is insufficient to fully explain the barrier strength. Moderately increased diffusional migration energy in the model over the He affected region, however, gives a barrier strength consistent with experiment. The same model, applied to inward transport, predicts the reduced inventory effect, but a further reduction in the implanted D flux is necessary for precise agreement.

  3. X ray and EUV spectroscopic measurements of highly charged tungsten ions relevant to fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, R; Biedermann, C; Mandelbaum, P; Schwob, J L

    2007-01-01

    Using high-resolution x ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometry, the line emission of W 28+ - W 50+ ions was measured at the Berlin Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). Our study encompasses a wide range of wavelengths (5-800 A) and includes the observation of electric and magnetic dipole lines. The results of our measurements are compared with predicted transition wavelengths from ab initioatomic structure calculations

  4. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  5. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Thermal resistivity of tungsten grades under fusion relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). EURATOM Association

    2010-05-15

    Controlled nuclear fusion on earth is a very promising but also a very challenging task. Fusion devices like ITER and DEMO are major steps on the way of solving the energy problems of the future. However, the realisation of such thermonuclear fusion reactors still needs high efforts in many areas of research. One of the most critical issues is the field of in - vessel materials and components and in particular the plasma facing material (PFM). This not only has to be compatible to the heat sink material being able to withstand thermal fatigue loading conditions during steady state heat loading (up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}) but also has to withstand extreme thermal loads during transient events. The latter are divided into normal and off normal events, such as plasma disruptions or vertical displacement events (VDEs), resulting in irreversible damage of the material. Therefore they have to be avoided in future fusion devices by an improved plasma control. In contrast, edge localized modes (ELMs) occur during normal operation and are the result of complex plasma configuration. In the next step experiment ITER they are generated with a frequency of {>=} 1 Hz and a duration of 200 - 500 {mu}s depositing energies of {<=} 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. One of the most promising materials for the application as PFM in particular in the divertor region is tungsten. Its main advantages are a high thermal conductivity, a high melting temperature, a low tritium inventory and a low erosion rate. However there are some drawbacks like a high ductile to brittle transitions temperature (DBTT), its high atomic number Z and the remarkable neutron irradiation induced activation and degradation of its mechanical properties. The main aim of future R and D will be to understand the mechanisms of thermal induced damages and subsequently to minimize these types of damages. Therefore various tungsten grades have to be tested under fusion relevant conditions, e.g. by electron, ion or plasma beam exposure; the

  8. Tungsten recrystallization and cracking under ITER-relevant heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budaev, V.P., E-mail: Budaev@mail.ru [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Martynenko, Yu.V. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Karpov, A.V.; Belova, N.E. [NRC «Kurchatov Institute», Akademika Kurchatova pl., Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klimov, N.S., E-mail: klimov@triniti.ru [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podkovyrov, V.L.; Barsuk, V.A.; Putrik, A.B.; Yaroshevskaya, A.D. [SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Giniyatulin, R.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation); SRC RF TRINITI, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Khimchenko, L.N. [Institution «Project Center ITER», Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The tungsten surface structure was analyzed after the test in the QSPA-T under heat loads relevant to those expected in the ITER during disruptions. Repeated pulses lead to the melting and the resolidification of the tungsten surface layer of ∼50 μm thickness. There is ∼50 μm thickness intermediate layer between the original structure and the resolidified layer. The intermediate layer is recrystallized and has a random grains’ orientation whereas the resolidified layer and basic structure have texture with preferable orientation 〈1 0 0〉 normal to the surface. The cracks which were normal to the surface were observed in the resolidified layer as well as the cracks which were parallel to the surface at the depth up to 300 μm. Such cracks can result in the brittle destruction which is a hazard for the full tungsten divertor of the ITER. The theoretical analysis of the crack formation reasons and a possible consequence for the ITER are given.

  9. Determination of tungsten and tin ions after preconcentration by flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, U.; Kunze, S.

    1990-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective combined method of flotation followed by spectrophotometry/d.c. polarography for the determination of tungsten and tin ions in acid and alkaline waste waters and hydrometallurgical solutions is presented here. Both kinds of ions are coprecipitated in the analyte solution with zirconium hydroxide after addition of ZrOCl 2 solution and ammonia. Afterwards, the collector precipitate is separated from the aqueous phase and preconcentrated by flotation for which sodium oleate and a frother are added. The precipitate is dissolved in a small amount of acid, with the organic reagents being destroyed by oxidation. The enrichment factor of the proposed technique is 100, with variations possible. Recovery is 94 % for tungsten and 99 % for tin. Spectrophotometry of the thiocyanate complex and d.c. polarography are applied as determination techniques for tungsten and tin, respectively. Detection limits attainable by this technique are 6 ng.ml -1 for tungsten and 5 ng.ml -1 for tin for the initial sample. (Authors)

  10. High-flux He+ irradiation effects on surface damages of tungsten under ITER relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Dongping; Hong, Yi; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Bi, Zhenhua; Benstetter, Günther; Li, Shouzhe

    2016-01-01

    A large-power inductively coupled plasma source was designed to perform the continuous helium ions (He + ) irradiations of polycrystalline tungsten (W) under International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant conditions. He + irradiations were performed at He + fluxes of 2.3 × 10 21 –1.6 × 10 22 /m 2  s and He + energies of 12–220 eV. Surface damages and microstructures of irradiated W were observed by scanning electron microscopy. This study showed the growth of nano-fuzzes with their lengths of 1.3–2.0 μm at He + energies of >70 eV or He + fluxes of >1.3 × 10 22 /m 2  s. Nanometer-sized defects or columnar microstructures were formed in W surface layer due to low-energy He + irradiations at an elevated temperature (>1300 K). The diffusion and coalescence of He atoms in W surface layers led to the growth and structures of nano-fuzzes. This study indicated that a reduction of He + energy below 12–30 eV may greatly decrease the surface damage of tungsten diverter in the fusion reactor.

  11. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  12. EUV spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, H.A.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra was investigated for electron energy from 540 to 1370 eV. Previously unreported lines were presented in the EUV range, and comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations identified them. (author)

  13. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  14. Effects of fusion relevant transient energetic radiation, plasma and thermal load on PLANSEE double forged tungsten samples in a low-energy plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Ouyang, B.; Zhang, Z.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Salar Elahi, A.; Rawat, R. S.

    2018-06-01

    Tungsten is the leading candidate for plasma facing component (PFC) material for thermonuclear fusion reactors and various efforts are ongoing to evaluate its performance or response to intense fusion relevant radiation, plasma and thermal loads. This paper investigates the effects of hot dense decaying pinch plasma, highly energetic deuterium ions and fusion neutrons generated in a low-energy (3.0 kJ) plasma focus device on the structure, morphology and hardness of the PLANSEE double forged tungsten (W) samples surfaces. The tungsten samples were provided by Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), Germany via International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria. Tungsten samples were irradiated using different number of plasma focus (PF) shots (1, 5 and 10) at a fixed axial distance of 5 cm from the anode top and also at various distances from the top of the anode (5, 7, 9 and 11 cm) using fixed number (5) of plasma focus shots. The virgin tungsten sample had bcc structure (α-W phase). After PF irradiation, the XRD analysis showed (i) the presence of low intensity new diffraction peak corresponding to β-W phase at (211) crystalline plane indicating the partial structural phase transition in some of the samples, (ii) partial amorphization, and (iii) vacancy defects formation and compressive stress in irradiated tungsten samples. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed the distinctive changes to non-uniform surface with nanometer sized particles and particle agglomerates along with large surface cracks at higher number of irradiation shots. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated the reduction in relative tungsten oxide content and the increase in metallic tungsten after irradiation. Hardness of irradiated samples initially increased for one shot exposure due to reduction in tungsten oxide phase, but then decreased with increasing number of shots due to increasing concentration of defects. It is demonstrated that the plasma focus device provides

  15. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  16. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K; Tawada, Y; Kato, S; Sasao, M; Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M; Lee, H T; Ueda, Y; Tanaka, N; Kisaki, M; Nishiura, M; Matsumoto, Y; Yamaoka, H

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H + beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions. (paper)

  17. Damage studies on tungsten due to helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, N.J.; Buzarbaruah, N.; Mohanty, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Used plasma focus helium ion source to study radiation induced damage on tungsten. • Surface analyses confirm formation of micro-crack, bubbles, blisters, pinholes, etc. • XRD patterns confirm development of compressive stress due to thermal load. • Reduction in hardness value is observed in the case of exposed sample. - Abstract: Energetic and high fluence helium ions emitted in a plasma focus device have been used successfully to study the radiation induced damage on tungsten. The reference and irradiated samples were characterized by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by hardness testers. The micrographs of the irradiated samples at lower magnification show uniform mesh of cracks of micrometer width. However at higher magnification, various types of crystalline defects such as voids, pinholes, bubbles, blisters and microcracks are distinctly noticed. The prominent peaks in X-ray diffraction spectrum of irradiated samples are seen shifted toward higher Bragg angles, thus indicating accumulation of compressive stress due to the heat load delivered by helium ions. A marginal reduction in hardness of the irradiated sample is also noticed

  18. Multielement ultratrace analysis in tungsten using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhartitz, P.; Virag, A.; Friedbacher, G.; Grasserbauer, M.

    1987-01-01

    The ever increasing demands on properties of materials create a trend also towards ultrapure products. Characterization of these materials is only possible with modern, highly sophisticated analytical techniques such as activation analysis and mass spectrometry, particularly SSMS, SIMS and GDMS. Analytical strategies were developed for the determination of about 40 elements in a tungsten matrix with high-performance SIMS. Difficulties like the elimination of interferences had to be overcome. Extrapolated detection limits were established in the range of pg/g (alkali metals, halides) to ng/g (e.g. Ta, Th). Depth profiling and ion imaging gave additional information about the lateral and the depth distribution of the elements. (orig.)

  19. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  20. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ajlony, A., E-mail: montaserajlony@yahoo.com; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-05-15

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10{sup 24}–1.6 × 10{sup 25} ions m{sup −2}), and flux (2.0 × 10{sup 20}–5.5 × 10{sup 20} ion m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  1. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Golubeva, A. V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A. A.; Roth, J.

    2009-06-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17-10 18 D/m 2s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  2. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M., E-mail: yury.gasparyan@ipp.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pisarev, A.A. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 mum thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D{sup +} ion beam with a flux of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} D/m{sup 2}s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 +- 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  3. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Golubeva, A.V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A.A.; Roth, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17 -10 18 D/m 2 s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  4. In-situ field-ion microscope study of the recovery behavior of heavy metal ion-irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, C.H.

    1977-06-01

    Three field ion microscope (FIM) experiments were carried out to study the annealing behavior of heavy ion irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum. The first experiment dealt with the stage I long-range migration of tungsten self interstitial atoms (SIAs) in high purity tungsten of resistivity ratio, R = 24,000 (R = rho 300 /rho 4 . 2 , where rho 300 and rho 4 . 2 are the room temperature and 0 0 C resistivities). The FIM specimens were irradiated in situ at 18 K with 30 keV W + ions to an average dose of 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 and subsequently examined by the pulsed-field evaporation technique. The second experiment dealt with the phenomenon of impurity atom trapping of SIAs during long-range migration. It was shown that rhenium atoms in a tungsten matrix tend to capture tungsten SIAs and remain bound up to temperatures as high as 390 K. The final experiment was concerned with the low temperature annealing kinetics of irradiated molybdenum. High purity molybdenum of resistivity ratio R = 5700 was irradiated at 10 K with 30 keV Mo + ions to a dose of approximately 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . The results indicated that the electric field has only a minimal effect on the SIA annealing kinetics. This tends to strengthen the contention that the molybdenum SIA becomes mobile at 32 K

  5. Ion cyclotron resonance heating for tungsten control in various JET H-mode scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goniche, M.; Dumont, R. J.; Bobkov, V.; Buratti, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Challis, C.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Drewelow, P.; Fedorczak, N.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Graham, M.; Graves, J. P.; Hobirk, J.; Jacquet, P.; Lerche, E.; Mantica, P.; Monakhov, I.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Noble, C.; Nunes, I.; Pütterich, T.; Rimini, F.; Sertoli, M.; Valisa, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-05-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in the hydrogen minority scheme provides central ion heating and acts favorably on the core tungsten transport. Full wave modeling shows that, at medium power level (4 MW), after collisional redistribution, the ratio of power transferred to the ions and the electrons vary little with the minority (hydrogen) concentration n H/n e but the high-Z impurity screening provided by the fast ions temperature increases with the concentration. The power radiated by tungsten in the core of the JET discharges has been analyzed on a large database covering the 2013-2014 campaign. In the baseline scenario with moderate plasma current (I p = 2.5 MA) ICRH modifies efficiently tungsten transport to avoid its accumulation in the plasma centre and, when the ICRH power is increased, the tungsten radiation peaking evolves as predicted by the neo-classical theory. At higher current (3-4 MA), tungsten accumulation can be only avoided with 5 MW of ICRH power with high gas injection rate. For discharges in the hybrid scenario, the strong initial peaking of the density leads to strong tungsten accumulation. When this initial density peaking is slightly reduced, with an ICRH power in excess of 4 MW,very low tungsten concentration in the core (˜10-5) is maintained for 3 s. MHD activity plays a key role in tungsten transport and modulation of the tungsten radiation during a sawtooth cycle is correlated to the fishbone activity triggered by the fast ion pressure gradient.

  6. Trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Suzuki, Sachiko; Wang, Wanjing; Kurata, Rie; Kida, Katsuya; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Sagara, Akio; Yoshida, Naoaki

    2009-01-01

    The trapping behaviour of deuterium ions implanted into tungsten simultaneously with carbon ions was investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The D 2 TDS spectrum consisted of three desorption stages, namely desorption of deuterium trapped by intrinsic defects, ion-induced defects and carbon with the formation of the C-D bond. Although the deuterium retention trapped by intrinsic defects was almost constant, that by ion-induced defects increased as the ion fluence increased. The retention of deuterium with the formation of the C-D bond was saturated at an ion fluence of 0.5x10 22 D + m -2 , where the major process was changed from the sputtering of tungsten with the formation of a W-C mixture to the formation of a C-C layer, and deuterium retention as the C-D bond decreased. It was concluded that the C-C layer would enhance the chemical sputtering of carbon with deuterium with the formation of CD x and the chemical state of carbon would control the deuterium retention in tungsten under C + -D 2 + implantation.

  7. Plasma exposure of different tungsten grades with plasma accelerators under ITER-relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlaj, Vadym A; Garkusha, Igor E; Aksenov, Nikolay N; Byrka, Oleg V; Bazylev, Boris; Landman, Igor; Linke, Jochen; Wirtz, Marius; Malykhin, Sergey V; Pugachov, Anatoliy T; Sadowski, Marek J; Skladnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of tungsten irradiation experiments performed with three plasma facilities: the QSPA Kh-50 quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator, the PPA pulsed plasma gun and the magneto-plasma compressor. Targets made of different kinds of tungsten (sintered, rolled and deformed) were irradiated with powerful plasma streams at heat fluxes relevant to edge-localized modes in ITER. The irradiated targets were analyzed and two different meshes of cracks were identified. It has been shown that the major cracks do not depend on the tungsten grade. This has been attributed to ductile-to-brittle transition effects. Meshes of inter-granular micro-cracks were detected for energy loads above the melting threshold and these were probably caused by the re-solidification process. The blister-like and cellular-like structures were observed on sample surfaces exposed to helium and hydrogen plasmas. (paper)

  8. Near UV-visible line emission from tungsten highly-charged ions in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.A.; Murakami, I.; Goto, M.; Oishi, T.; Morita, S.; Fujii, K.; Nakamura, N.; Koike, F.; Sasaki, Akira; Ding, X.-B.; Dong, C.-Z.

    2015-01-01

    Wavelengths of emission lines from tungsten highly-charged ions have been precisely measured in near UV-visible range (320 - 356 nm and 382 - 402 nm) at Large Helical Device (LHD) by tungsten pellet injection. The tungsten emission lines were assigned based on its line-integrated intensity profiles on a poloidal cross section. The ground-term magnetic-dipole (M1) lines of W 26+,27+ and an M1 line of a metastable excited state of W 28+ , whose wavelengths have been determined by measurements using electron-beam-ion-traps (EBITs), are identified in the LHD spectra. The present results partially compliment wavelength data of tungsten highly-charged ions in the near UV-visible range. (author)

  9. Measurements of visible forbidden lines and ion distributions of tungsten highly charged ions at the LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.A.; Murakami, I.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Nakamura, N.; Koike, F.; Sasaki, Akira; Ding, X.-B.; Dong, C.-Z.

    2013-01-01

    Visible lines, which are presumably associated with forbidden lines from tungsten highly charged ions, were clearly observed in a spectrum of 370 - 410 nm recorded shortly after a tungsten pellet injection at the LHD. One of the measured lines has been assigned to a magnetic-dipole (M1) line of the ground-term fine-structure transition of W 26+ . Photon emission was observed at 44 lines of sight divided along the vertical direction of a horizontally elongated poloidal cross section of the LHD plasma. The line-integrated intensity of the lines along each line of sight indicates peaked profiles near the plasma center, while visible line emissions of neutral hydrogen and helium recoded in the same sampling time have a maximum located in the peripheral region of the poloidal cross section. (author)

  10. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  11. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  12. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, Erik Q.; Cafasso, Danielle E.; Lee, Karen W.M.; Pierce, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  13. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions - Atomic Spectroscopy and Fusion Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, Joel [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of highly charged tungsten ions have been investigated using x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. These heavy ions are of interest in relativistic atomic structure theory, where high-precision wavelength measurements benchmark theoretical approaches, and in magnetic fusion research, where the ions may serve to diagnose high-temperature plasmas. The work details spectroscopic investigations of highly charged tungsten ions measured at the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. Here, the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps have been employed to create, trap, and excite tungsten ions of M- and L-shell charge states. The emitted spectra have been studied in high resolution using crystal, grating, and x-ray calorimeter spectrometers. In particular, wavelengths of n = 0 M-shell transitions in K-like W55+ through Ne-like W64+, and intershell transitions in Zn-like W44+ through Co-like W47+ have been measured. Special attention is given to the Ni-like W46+ ion, which has two strong electric-dipole forbidden transitions that are of interest for plasma diagnostics. The EBIT measurements are complemented by spectral modeling using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC), and predictions for tokamak spectra are presented. The L-shell tungsten ions have been studied at electron-beam energies of up to 122 keV and transition energies measured in Ne-like W64+ through Li-like W71+. These spectra constitute the physics basis in the design of the ion-temperature crystal spectrometer for the ITER tokamak. Tungsten particles have furthermore been introduced into the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) spheromak in Livermore in order to investigate diagnostic possibilities of extreme ultraviolet tungsten spectra for the ITER divertor. The spheromak measurement and spectral modeling using FAC suggest that tungsten ions in charge states around Er-like W6+ could be useful for

  14. The Effect of Ion Energy and Substrate Temperature on Deuterium Trapping in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszell, John Patrick Town

    Tungsten is a candidate plasma facing material for next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER and there are major operational and safety issues associated with hydrogen (tritium) retention in plasma facing components. An ion gun was used to simulate plasma-material interactions under various conditions in order to study hydrogen retention characteristics of tungsten thus enabling better predictions of hydrogen retention in ITER. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) was used to measure deuterium retention from ion irradiation while modelling of TDS spectra with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to provide information about the trapping mechanisms involved in deuterium retention in tungsten. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to determine the depth resolved composition of specimens used for irradiation experiments. Carbon and oxygen atoms will be among the most common contaminants within ITER. C and O contamination in polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) specimens even at low levels (˜0.1%) was shown to reduce deuterium retention by preventing diffusion of deuterium into the bulk of the specimen. This diffusion barrier was also responsible for the inhibition of blister formation during irradiations at 500 K. These observations may provide possible mitigation techniques for problems associated with tritium retention and mechanical damage to plasma facing components caused by hydrogen implantation. Deuterium trapping in PCW and single crystal tungsten (SCW) was studied as a function of ion energy and substrate temperature. Deuterium retention was shown to decrease with decreasing ion energy below 100 eV/D+. Irradiation of tungsten specimens with 10 eV/D+ ions was shown to retain up to an order of magnitude less deuterium than irradiation with 500 eV/D+ ions. Furthermore, the retention mechanism for deuterium was shown to be consistent across the entire energy range studied (10-500 e

  15. Comparison of deuterium retention for ion-irradiated and neutron-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Kobayashi, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Shimada, Masashi; Calderoni, Pattrick; Oda, Takuji; Hara, Masanori; Hatano, Yuji; Watanabe, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of D retentions for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten with the damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 K and 550 K although that for neutron irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and addition desorption stage was found around 750 K. The desorption rate of major desorption stage at 550 K increased as the number of dpa by Fe 2+ irradiation increased. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450 K was only found for the damaged samples, indicating that the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe 2+ irradiation and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono vacancy leading to the lower activation energy, where the dislocation loop and vacancy was produced. The third one was only found for the neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by void or vacancy cluster and the diffusion effect is also contributed due to high FWHM of TDS spectrum. It can be said that the D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ -irradiated tungsten could not represent that for neutron-irradiated one, showing that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten has a difference from that for ion-irradiated one. (author)

  16. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  17. Tungsten Ions in Plasmas: Statistical Theory of Radiative-Collisional Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The statistical model for calculations of the collisional-radiative processes in plasmas with tungsten impurity was developed. The electron structure of tungsten multielectron ions is considered in terms of both the Thomas-Fermi model and the Brandt-Lundquist model of collective oscillations of atomic electron density. The excitation or ionization of atomic electrons by plasma electron impacts are represented as photo-processes under the action of flux of equivalent photons introduced by E. Fermi. The total electron impact single ionization cross-sections of ions Wk+ with respective rates have been calculated and compared with the available experimental and modeling data (e.g., CADW. Plasma radiative losses on tungsten impurity were also calculated in a wide range of electron temperatures 1 eV–20 keV. The numerical code TFATOM was developed for calculations of radiative-collisional processes involving tungsten ions. The needed computational resources for TFATOM code are orders of magnitudes less than for the other conventional numerical codes. The transition from corona to Boltzmann limit was investigated in detail. The results of statistical approach have been tested by comparison with the vast experimental and conventional code data for a set of ions Wk+. It is shown that the universal statistical model accuracy for the ionization cross-sections and radiation losses is within the data scattering of significantly more complex quantum numerical codes, using different approximations for the calculation of atomic structure and the electronic cross-sections.

  18. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  19. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-15

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  20. EBIT spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions relevant to hot plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-05-01

    An electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is a versatile device for studying highly charged ions. We have been using two types of EBITs for the spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions. One is a high-energy device called the Tokyo-EBIT, and another is a compact low-energy device called CoBIT. Complementary use of them enables us to obtain spectroscopic data for ions over a wide charge-state range interacting with electrons over a wide energy range. In this talk, we present EBIT spectra of highly charged ions for tungsten, iron, bismuth, etc., which are relevant to hot plasmas. Tungsten is considered to be the main impurity in the ITER (the next generation nuclear fusion reactor) plasma, and thus its emission lines are important for diagnosing and controlling the ITER plasma. We have observed many previously unreported lines to supply the lack of spectroscopic data of tungsten ions. Iron is one of the main components of the solar corona, and its spectra are used to diagnose temperature, density, etc. The diagnostics is usually done by comparing observed spectra with model calculations. An EBIT can provide spectra under a well-defined condition; they are thus useful to test the model calculations. Laser-produced bismuth plasma is one of the candidates for a soft x-ray source in the water window region. An EBIT has a narrow charge state distribution; it is thus useful to disentangle the spectra of laser-produced plasma containing ions with a wide charge-state range. Performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS09KOAJ003) and JSPS KAKENHI Number 23246165, and partly supported by the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the field of Plasma Physics.

  1. Direct observation of the vacancy structure of depleted zones in tungsten ion irradiated at 100K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.Y.; Seidman, D.N.

    1978-12-01

    The structure of depleted zones (DZs) created by the in-situ irradiation of tungsten specimens, at 10 0 K, with 30 keV W + , Mo + or Cr + ions has been studied by field-ion microscopy. As the mass of the 30 keV ion was decreased the following observations were made: (1) the spatial extent of the DZs increased; (2) the vacancy concentration within the DZs decreased; (3) the fraction of isolated monovacancies increased; and (4) subcascades formed within the DZs

  2. arXiv Charge reconstruction study of the DAMPE Silicon-Tungsten Tracker with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Rui; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Huan-Yu; Gong, Ke; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Xin; Azzarello, Phillip; Tykhonov, Andrii; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Gallo, Valentina; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Mazziotta, Nicola; De Mitri, Ivan

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is one of the four satellites within Strategic Pioneer Research Program in Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). DAMPE can detect electrons, photons in a wide energy range (5 GeV to 10 TeV) and ions up to iron (100GeV to 100 TeV). Silicon-Tungsten Tracker (STK) is one of the four subdetectors in DAMPE, providing photon-electron conversion, track reconstruction and charge identification for ions. Ion beam test was carried out in CERN with 60GeV/u Lead primary beams. Charge reconstruction and charge resolution of STK detectors were investigated.

  3. Dielectronic and radiative recombination of Si- to N-like tungsten ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biedermann, C; Radtke, R; Seidel, R; Behar, E

    2009-01-01

    We have performed x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the dielectronic recombination resonance strength for the LMn (n = 3, ..., 10) series of Si-like W 60+ to N-like W 67+ tungsten ions. Highly charged tungsten ions were produced, stored and excited with the Berlin electron beam ion trap and the emitted radiation was analyzed with a solid state detector. Information on the charge state abundance in the trap was extracted from a fit of the theoretical radiative recombination intensity to measured values. The fit procedure was only feasible when the fine structure, angular momentum of the recombination channels is taken into account. Our measurement of x-rays from n = 2-3, 2-4 and higher DR resonance transitions was compared to relativistic calculations of the DR cross sections and rate coefficients calculated with the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore Atomic Code (HULLAC). The previous theoretical predictions for Ne-like tungsten (W 64+ ) were extended with calculations for ions in adjacent charge states and compare well with the observed DR resonance structure.

  4. Electron Impact Excitation and Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwen Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation (EIE and dielectronic recombination (DR of tungsten ions are basic atomic processes in nuclear fusion plasmas of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER tokamak. Detailed investigation of such processes is essential for modeling and diagnosing future fusion experiments performed on the ITER. In the present work, we studied total and partial electron-impact excitation (EIE and DR cross-sections of highly charged tungsten ions by using the multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method. The degrees of linear polarization of the subsequent X-ray emissions from unequally-populated magnetic sub-levels of these ions were estimated. It is found that the degrees of linear polarization of the same transition lines, but populated respectively by the EIE and DR processes, are very different, which makes diagnosis of the formation mechanism of X-ray emissions possible. In addition, with the help of the flexible atomic code on the basis of the relativistic configuration interaction method, DR rate coefficients of highly charged W37+ to W46+ ions are also studied, because of the importance in the ionization equilibrium of tungsten plasmas under running conditions of the ITER.

  5. Ion sensing properties of vanadium/tungsten mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder Jose; Guerra, Elidia Maria; Mulato, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Vanadium/tungsten mixed oxide (V 2 O 5 /WO 3 ) sensing membranes were deposited on glassy carbon substrates and used as the H + sensor of the extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) device. X-ray diffractograms indicated a decrease of the interplanar spacing of V 2 O 5 after the insertion of WO 3 revealing that the lamellar structure is under compressive stress. The crystallinity increases with increasing WO 3 molar ratio. The film is not homogeneous, with more WO 3 material sitting at the surface. This influences the response of pH sensors using the EGFET configuration. The maximum sensitivity of 68 mV pH -1 was obtained for the sample with 5% WO 3 molar ratio. For higher WO 3 molar ratios, the behavior is not linear. It can be concluded that V 2 O 5 dominates for acidic solutions while WO 3 dominates for basic solutions. Therefore, the mixed oxide with low amount of WO 3 is the main candidate for further use as biosensor.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the role of electronic losses in damage creation of ion irradiated Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, P.N.; Deshpande, S.P

    2014-01-01

    Damage creation due to the irradiation of 14 MeV fusion neutrons and the subsequent mechanical failure and alteration of the fuel retention properties of tungsten plasma-facing materials is one of the major concerns of the fusion reactors. In addition to nuclear reactions and the subsequent transmutations, the energetic neutron impars its kinetic energy either partly or completely to a lattice tungsten atom thereby creating a primary knock-on atom (PKA) which, is considered as the onset of damage creation in the lattice. The PKA continues to undergo collisions with the lattice atoms which eventually leads to a collision cascade. In order to understand the collision process, one often simulates such systems using surrogate ions, such as energetic W ions itself, in particle accelerators and due to the experimental constraints (such as the stability of the beam) one often has to opt for high energetic ion beams (∼ 30 MeV) which surpasses the PKA energies created by neutron (∼100s of KeV) in W. Hence it is important to distinguish how the very high energetic tungsten atoms interact with the lattice atoms in comparison with the low energy PKA created by the neutron. One of the key difference is that at higher energies the electronic losses become important which decides the collision dynamics. In this presentation the effect of electronic losses in the damage creation using molecular dynamics simulations have been discussed

  7. Irradiation of tungsten with metallic diatomic molecular ions: atomic-resolution observations of depleted zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramanik, D.; Seidman, D.N.

    1982-08-01

    Direct evidence, on an atomic scale, is presented for the enhancement of damage production per projectile ion in diatomic metallic molecular ion (dimer) irradiations of tungsten as compared to monatomic metallic ion (monomer) irradiations. Irradiations were performed in situ at less than or equal to 10 K, in a field-ion microscope, employing 20 keV Ag + or W + monomer ions and the results are compared with 40 keV W 2 + or Ag 2 + dimer ion bombardments; the average energy per ion was 20 keV. First, in the near-surface region the depleted zones produced by the W 2 + dimer ions give rise to void-like contrast effects. The W + monomer ions do not produce this void-like damage. The existence of voids was explained employing a nucleation and diffusion-limited growth model which suggests that the growth can occur on a time scale -9 s, if the effective diffusivity of an atom in the fully-developed collision cascade is > 3 x 10 -4 cm 2 s -1 . Second, by counting the number of vacancies in individual depleted zones, produced by the different ions, it was demonstrated that the number of vacancies produced per incoming ion of the dimer is 1.55 times greater than the number of vacancies produced per monomer ion

  8. Properties of multiple field ion emitters of tungsten and a simple method for improving their ionization efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Beckey, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ion emission properties of the multiple tungsten emitters developed recently for field ionization mass spectrometry were investigated with the aid of a sector type mass spectrometer at emitter-cathode voltages of 10-15 kV using acetone, n-heptane and benzene as test substances. The emitters, which comprised a 10-μm tungsten filament bearing thickly arrayed microneedles of tungsten, produced very weak and unstable signals at voltages of about 10 kV, but increasing the voltage to 14 kV led to intensifying ion currents high enough to yield mass spectra of satisfactory quality. During the course of the experiments, it was observed that nucleating tungsten carbide particles on the emitter surface by means of a high-field chemical reaction with benzene vapours can significanlty promote the field ionization of gas molecules, presumably as a result of the field enhancement resulting from roughening of the surface. (Auth.)

  9. Suspended tungsten-based nanowires with enhanced mechanical properties grown by focused ion beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; María De Teresa, José

    2017-11-01

    The implementation of three-dimensional (3D) nano-objects as building blocks for the next generation of electro-mechanical, memory and sensing nano-devices is at the forefront of technology. The direct writing of functional 3D nanostructures is made feasible by using a method based on focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). We use this technique to grow horizontally suspended tungsten nanowires and then study their nano-mechanical properties by three-point bending method with atomic force microscopy. These measurements reveal that these nanowires exhibit a yield strength up to 12 times higher than that of the bulk tungsten, and near the theoretical value of 0.1 times the Young’s modulus (E). We find a size dependence of E that is adequately described by a core-shell model, which has been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and compositional analysis at the nanoscale. Additionally, we show that experimental resonance frequencies of suspended nanowires (in the MHz range) are in good agreement with theoretical values. These extraordinary mechanical properties are key to designing electro-mechanically robust nanodevices based on FIBID tungsten nanowires.

  10. Behavior of carbon readsorbed on tungsten during low energy Ar ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranevicius, L.; Pranevicius, L.L.; Milcius, D.; Templier, C.; Bobrovaite, B.

    2008-01-01

    A study of the behavior of carbon sputtered and readsorbed after scattering collisions with particles of surrounding gas on the tungsten surface affected by Ar ion irradiation with the flux equal to 2 x 10 16 cm -2 s -1 extracted from plasma under 300 V negative bias voltage in the temperature range 370-870 K was performed. The dependence of the W sample weight change on the working gas pressure in the range 0.1-10 Pa was registered and the information was deduced about prevailing sputtering-redeposition processes. The depth profiles of carbon at the tungsten surface were measured. We found that carbon distribution profiles in tungsten depend on the C redeposition rate for fixed ion irradiation parameters. Three regimes have been distinguished: (i) at working gas pressure equal to 5 Pa and more, the C redeposition rate prevails the sample surface erosion rate and the W surface is covered by continuous amorphous carbon film (the C film growth regime), (ii) at working gas pressure equal to about 1 Pa, the C redepostion rate is approximately equal to the erosion rate and the W surface is partially covered by redeposited carbon, and (iii) at working gas pressure less than 0.2 Pa, the erosion rate prevails the C redeposition rate (the W surface erosion regime). In the regime of balanced redeposition and erosion deep C penetration depth into nanocrystalline W was registered. It is suggested that under simultaneous C adsorption and ion irradiation at elevated temperature C adatoms are driven from the W surface into grain boundaries and into the bulk by the difference in chemical potentials between the activated W surface and grain boundaries. As the W surface is covered by amorphous C film, the grain boundaries are blocked and the efficiency of carbon transport decreases

  11. Formation of tungsten oxide nanowires by ion irradiation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Dong; Ren, Feng; Wu, Heng-Yi; Qin, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Here we reported the fabrication of tungsten oxide (WO3-x ) nanowires by Ar+ ion irradiation of WO3 thin films followed by annealing in vacuum. The nanowire length increases with increasing irradiation fluence and with decreasing ion energy. We propose that the stress-driven diffusion of the irradiation-induced W interstitial atoms is responsible for the formation of the nanowires. Comparing to the pristine film, the fabricated nanowire film shows a 106-fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, resulting from the high-density irradiation-induced vacancies on the oxygen sublattice. The nanostructure exhibits largely enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect due to the oxygen vacancy. Thus, ion irradiation provides a powerful approach for fabricating and tailoring the surface nanostructures of semiconductors.

  12. Charge reconstruction of the DAMPE Silicon-Tungsten Tracker: A preliminary study with ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Rui; Peng, Wen-Xi; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Huan-Yu; Gong, Ke; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Xin; Azzarello, Phillip; Tykhonov, Andrii; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Gallo, Valentina; Ambrosi, Giovanni

    2018-04-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is one of the four satellites within Strategic Pioneer Research Program in Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). DAMPE can detect electrons, photons in a wide energy range (5 GeV to 10 TeV) and ions up to iron (100 GeV to 100 TeV). The silicon-Tungsten Tracker (STK) is one of the four subdetectors in DAMPE, providing photon-electron conversion, track reconstruction and charge identification for ions. An ion beam test was carried out in CERN with 60 GeV/u Lead primary beams. Charge reconstruction and charge resolution of the STK detectors were investigated.

  13. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-07-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m{sup -2} as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m{sup -2}. The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform

  14. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m -2 as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m -2 . The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform sophisticated

  15. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  16. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, S.; Dong, C. F.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Hasuo, M.; Koike, F.; Nakamura, N.; Oishi, T.; Sasaki, A.; Wang, E. H.

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W+24-+33, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam (≤2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W44+) 4p-4s transition at 60.9Å based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5×1010cm-3 at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W26+) at 3893.7Å is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f23H5-3H4. The possibility of α particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  17. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I.; Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T.; Hasuo, M.; Koike, F.; Nakamura, N.; Sasaki, A.; Wang, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W +24-+33 , measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam (≤2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W 44+ ) 4p-4s transition at 60.9Å based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5×10 10 cm −3 at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W 26+ ) at 3893.7Å is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f 23 H 5 - 3 H 4 . The possibility of α particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed

  18. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malau, Viktor, E-mail: malau@ugm.ac.id; Ilman, Mochammad Noer, E-mail: noer-ilman@yahoo.com; Iswanto, Priyo Tri, E-mail: priyatri@yahoo.com; Jatisukamto, Gaguk, E-mail: gagukjtsk@yahoo.co.id [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University Jl. Grafika 2, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten thin film deposited on surface of AISI 410 steel has been performed. Tungsten thin film produced by dc magnetron sputtering method was deposited on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel substrates, and then the nitrogen ions were implanted on tungsten thin film. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of implantation deposition time on surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of nitrogen implanted on tungsten film. Magnetron sputtering process was performed by using plasma gas of argon (Ar) to bombardier tungsten target (W) in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of 7.6 x 10{sup −2} torr, a voltage of 300 V, a sputter current of 80 mA for sputtered time of 10 minutes. Nitrogen implantation on tungsten film was done with an initial pressure of 3x10{sup −6} mbar, a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, an energy of 100 keV and implantation deposition times of 0, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. The surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of the films were evaluated by surfcorder test, Vickers microhardness test, wear test and potentiostat (galvanostat) test respectively. The results show that the nitrogen ions implanted deposition time on tungsten film can modify the surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate. The minimum surface roughness, specific wear and corrosion rate can be obtained for implantation time of 20 minutes and the maximum microhardness of the film is 329 VHN (Vickers Hardness Number) for implantation time of 30 minutes. The specific wear and corrosion rate of the film depend directly on the surface roughness.

  19. Flux threshold measurements of He-ion beam induced nanofuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Unocic, K A; Garrison, L M; Parish, C M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the energy dependence of flux thresholds and incubation fluences for He-ion induced nano-fuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces at UHV conditions over a wide energy range using real-time sample imaging of tungsten target emissivity change to monitor the spatial extent of nano-fuzz growth, corroborated by ex situ SEM and FIB/SEM analysis, in conjunction with accurate ion-flux profile measurements. The measurements were carried out at the multicharged ion research facility (MIRF) at energies from 218 eV to 8.5 keV, using a high-flux deceleration module and beam flux monitor for optimizing the decel optics on the low energy MIRF beamline. The measurements suggest that nano-fuzz formation proceeds only if a critical rate of change of trapped He density in the W target is exceeded. To understand the energy dependence of the observed flux thresholds, the energy dependence of three contributing factors: ion reflection, ion range and target damage creation, were determined using the SRIM simulation code. The observed energy dependence can be well reproduced by the combined energy dependences of these three factors. The incubation fluences deduced from first visual appearance of surface emissivity change were (2–4) × 10 23 m −2 at 218 eV, and roughly a factor of 10 less at the higher energies, which were all at or above the displacement energy threshold. The role of trapping at C impurity sites is discussed. (paper)

  20. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentecoste, Lucile [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Thomann, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.thomann@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex2 (France)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (10{sup 11}–10{sup 14} ions.cm{sup 2}.s{sup −1}) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He{sup +}), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  1. Tungsten melt layer erosion due to J x B force under conditions relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.ua; Bazylev, B.N. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bandura, A.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Byrka, O.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kulik, N.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Makhlaj, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Petrov, Yu.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Solyakov, D.G. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Tereshin, V.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2007-06-15

    The behavior of tungsten under repetitive hydrogen plasma impacts causing surface melting in conditions of an applied J x B force of up to 20 MN/m{sup 3} is studied with the plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. Tungsten samples of EU trademark have been exposed to up to 100 pulses simulating ITER ELMs of the energy load 0.7 MJ/m{sup 2} and the duration 0.25 ms. An electric current J flows across the magnetic field B of 1.4 T, and the resulting J x B force produces a displacement of the melt with formation of an erosion crater and an inclination of the surface profile along the force. Surface morphology and the damage by surface cracks are discussed. Comparisons of experimental results with numerical simulations of the code MEMOS-1.5D are presented.

  2. Analytical expressions for thermophysical properties of solid and liquid tungsten relevant for fusion applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tolias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The status of the literature is reviewed for several thermophysical properties of pure solid and liquid tungsten which constitute input for the modelling of intense plasma-surface interaction phenomena that are important for fusion applications. Reliable experimental data are analyzed for the latent heat of fusion, the electrical resistivity, the specific isobaric heat capacity, the thermal conductivity and the mass density from the room temperature up to the boiling point of tungsten as well as for the surface tension and the dynamic viscosity across the liquid state. Analytical expressions of high accuracy are recommended for these thermophysical properties that involved a minimum degree of extrapolations. In particular, extrapolations were only required for the surface tension and viscosity.

  3. Tungsten ion implantation of aluminum for improved resistance to pitting corrosion -- electrochemical testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.P.; Buchanan, R.A.; Williams, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The greatly accelerated localized corrosion of aluminum in salt solutions has been observed and combated for many years. The susceptibility to pitting attack has been linked to the presence of chloride ions in the solution. Alloying additions to aluminum for improved corrosion resistance are restricted due to its limited solubility for passivating species such as chromium and molybdenum. However, many recent attempts to produce non-equilibrium alloys with these and other species, both through sputtering techniques and by rapid solidification, have met with very promising pitting resistance enhancements. The most dramatic increase in passivity is demonstrated by a thin co-sputtered film of Al and 9 atomic percent W, in which the pitting potential is increased by 2600 m V relative to pure Al. Recent efforts to extrapolate the promising W-Al thin film results to a bulk aluminum alloy using tungsten ion implantation are discussed here

  4. Mechanical properties of tungsten following rhenium ion and helium plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Corr

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of Tungsten (W samples irradiated with 2 MeV Rhenium (Re ions and helium (He plasma were investigated using nanoindentation. It was found that there was an increase in hardness for all samples following separate irradiation with both Re ion and He plasma. A slight increase in hardness was obtained for combined exposures. A comparable increase in hardness was observed for a pure He plasma with a sample temperature of 473 K and 1273 K. Optical interferometry was employed to compare surface modification of the samples. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering confirmed He nano-bubble formation of approximately 1 nm diameter in the higher temperature sample, which was not observed with samples at the lower temperatures.

  5. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta [IEK - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (Netherlands); Ghent University (Belgium); Temmerman, Greg de [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (Netherlands); Reinhart, Michael; Matveev, Dmitry; Unterberg, Bernhard; Wienhold, Peter; Breuer, Uwe; Kreter, Arkadi [IEK - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Oost, Guido van [Ghent University (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten is to be used as plasma-facing material for the ITER divertor due to its favourable thermal properties, low erosion and fuel retention. Bombardment of tungsten by low energy ions of hydrogen isotopes, at different surface temperature, can lead to surface modifications and influence the fuel accumulation in the material. This contribution will assess the impact of material microstructure and the correlation between the particle flux, surface modifications and deuterium retention in tungsten. Tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasma at a surface temperature of 510 K, 670 K and 870 K, ion energy of 40 eV and ion fluence of 10{sup 26} m{sup -2}. The high and low ion flux ranges were in the order 10{sup 24} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Depth profiling of deuterium in all the samples was done by secondary ion mass spectroscopy technique and a scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the surface modifications. Modelling of the D desorption spectra with the coupled reaction diffusion system model will be also presented.

  6. Observation of reduction of secondary electron emission from helium ion impact due to plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E M; Doerner, R P; Nishijima, D; Pigarov, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Growth of nanostructured fuzz on a tungsten target in a helium plasma is found to cause a significant (∼3×) reduction in ion impact secondary electron emission in a linear plasma device. The ion impact secondary electron emission is separated from the electron impact secondary electron emission by varying the target bias voltage and fitting to expected contributions from electron impact, both thermal and non-thermal; with the non-thermal electron contribution being modeled using Monte-Carlo simulations. The observed (∼3×) reduction is similar in magnitude to the (∼2×) reduction observed in previous work for the effect of tungsten fuzz formation on secondary electron emission due to electron impact. It is hypothesized that the observed reduction results from re-absorption of secondary electrons in the tungsten fuzz. (paper)

  7. Field ion microscopy study of depleted zones in tungsten after proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnum, D.J.; Sommer, W.F.; Inal, O.T.; Yu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Depleted zones in tungsten, that resulted from medium-energy proton irradiations, were studied using the Field Ion Microscope (FIM). The shapes and sizes of depleted zones is an important aspect of basic radiation damage. These data can be compared to models that have been suggested as well as aid development of new models. These depleted volumes are of interest not only for an understanding of basic radiation effects, but also because they affect material properties and can act as nucleation sites for voids or gas bubbles. Depleted zones were produced in annealed tungsten wires by irradiation with 600 to 800 MeV protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. The defects observed in the irradiated samples included vacancies, depleted zones, grain boundaries, and dislocations. Single vacancies were the most commonly observed defect. Of the samples ''imaged,'' over 50 depleted zones were found within the area of high resolution in the area between the prominent [112] poles in a [110] oriented sample. The number of layers photographed in each sample was dependent upon the initial shape of the tip and ranged from 60 to 200 [110] sequential layers

  8. The detection of He in tungsten following ion implantation by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G.; Bannister, M.; Biewer, T. M.; Martin, M. Z.; Meyer, F.; Wirth, B. D.

    2018-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) results are presented that provide depth-resolved identification of He implanted in polycrystalline tungsten (PC-W) targets by a 200 keV He+ ion beam, with a surface temperature of approximately 900 °C and a peak fluence of 1023 m-2. He retention, and the influence of He on deuterium and tritium recycling, permeation, and retention in PC-W plasma facing components are important questions for the divertor and plasma facing components in a fusion reactor, yet are difficult to quantify. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability of LIBS to identify helium in tungsten; to investigate the sensitivity of laser parameters including, laser energy and gate delay, that directly influence the sensitivity and depth resolution of LIBS; and to perform a proof-of-principle experiment using LIBS to measure relative He intensities as a function of depth. The results presented demonstrate the potential not only to identify helium but also to develop a methodology to quantify gaseous impurity concentration in PC-W as a function of depth.

  9. On the interpretation of the intense emission of tungsten ions at about 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonauskas, V; Kucas, S; Karazija, R

    2007-01-01

    The origin of the intense emission band at about 5 nm, dominating the emission spectra of tungsten ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and EBIT, is discussed. It is shown that the emission spectra of various ions calculated taking into account only the excitations from the ground level agree fairly well with the results obtained in the collisional-radiative model; thus, the contribution of the excitations from the other levels is small. Though the excitation spectrum for all sequence of ions W 29+ -W 37+ corresponds to the same transitions 4p 6 4d N → 4p 5 4d N+1 + 4p 6 4d N-1 4f, its energetic width essentially changes going on from the charge of ion q = 34 to q = 35. It is caused by the appearance of the excitations 4p 1/2 -4d 3/2 to the open 4d N 3/2 subshell, which are not quenched by configuration mixing. The satellite line at about 4.5 nm is explained by the transitions of the same type, although between configurations with one spectator 5s electron. The existence of one more group of intense lines in the region of 2 nm, corresponding to 5s-4p transitions, is predicted

  10. Role of carbon impurities on the surface morphology evolution of tungsten under high dose helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon impurities on the surface evolution (e.g., fuzz formation) of tungsten (W) surface during 300 eV He ions irradiation was studied. Several tungsten samples were irradiated by He ion beam with a various carbon ions percentage. The presence of minute carbon contamination within the He ion beam was found to be effective in preventing the fuzz formation. At higher carbon concentration, the W surface was found to be fully covered with a thick graphitic layer on the top of tungsten carbide (WC) layer that cover the sample surface. Lowering the ion beam carbon percentage was effective in a significant reduction in the thickness of the surface graphite layer. Under these conditions the W surface was also found to be immune for the fuzz formation. The effect of W fuzz prevention by the WC formation on the sample surface was more noticeable when the He ion beam had much lower carbon (C) ions content (0.01% C). In this case, the fuzz formation was prevented on the vast majority of the W sample surface, while W fuzz was found in limited and isolated areas. The W surface also shows good resistance to morphology evolution when bombarded by high flux of pure H ions at 900 °C. - Highlights: • Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. • The effect of adding various percentage of carbon impurity to the He ion beam on the trend of W fuzz formation was studied. • Mitigation of W fuzz formation due to addition of small percentage of carbon to the He ion beam is reported. • The formation of long W nanowires due to He ion beam irradiation mixed with 0.01% carbon ions is reported.

  11. Ion-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten under simultaneous helium and deuterium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.T.; Tanaka, H.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Ueda, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Ion-driven permeation of D through tungsten under simultaneous irradiation with He-D was measured as a function of temperature, flux, and energy. He reduced the permeation flux with the reduction increasing with decreasing temperature. The reduction in permeation flux followed a linear dependence to the incident flux at T > 1000 K, but shifted to a square root dependence at T < 1000 K. The results were interpreted as shifts from diffusion limited to recombination limited H transport according to Doyle and Brice's theory. Arrhenius functions of front diffusivity and recombination coefficients were derived and used to calculate the transport parameter W. The effect of He can be interpreted as changes to the front diffusivity that approaches H diffusion behavior in the absence of traps. The reduction in total concentration results in a shallower concentration gradient that can describe the observed decrease in permeation.

  12. Tritium absorption and desorption in ITER relevant materials: comparative study of tungsten dust and massive samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisolia, C., E-mail: christian.grisolia@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hodille, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chene, J.; Garcia-Argote, S.; Pieters, G.; El-Kharbachi, A. [CEA Saclay, SCBM, iBiTec-S, PC n° 108, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette (France); Marchetti, L.; Martin, F.; Miserque, F. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vrel, D.; Redolfi, M. [LSPM, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UPR 3407 CNRS, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Malard, V. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Lab Biochim System Perturb, Bagnols-sur-Cèze F-30207 (France); Dinescu, G.; Acsente, T. [NILPRP, 409 Atomistilor Street, 77125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Gensdarmes, F.; Peillon, S. [IRSN, PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, 91192 (France); Pegourié, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Rousseau, B. [CEA Saclay, SCBM, iBiTec-S, PC n° 108, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette (France)

    2015-08-15

    Tritium adsorption and desorption from well characterized tungsten dust are presented. The dust used are of different types prepared by planetary milling and by aggregation technique in plasma. For the milled powder, the surface specific area (SSA) is 15.5 m{sup 2}/g. The particles are poly-disperse with a maximum size of 200 nm for the milled powder and 100 nm for the aggregation one. Prior to tritiation the particles are carefully de-oxidized. Both samples are experiencing a high tritium inventory from 5 GBq/g to 35 GBq/g. From comparison with massive samples and considering that tritium inventory increases with SSA, it is shown that surface effects are predominant in the tritium trapping process. Extrapolation to the ITER environment is undertaken with the help of a Macroscopic Rate Equation model. It is shown that, during the life time of ITER, these particles can exceed rapidly 1 GBq/g.

  13. The spectrum of seven times ionized tungsten (W VIII) relevant to tokamak divertor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabtsev, A N; Kononov, E Ya; Kildiyarova, R R; Tchang-Brillet, W-Ü L; Wyart, J-F

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra excited in the vacuum sparks of different setups and electric circuits were recorded on two high-resolution vacuum spectrographs. For the region 190–500 Å, a 10 m normal incidence spectrograph with a 3600 lines/mm grating was used in the Meudon Observatory. In the region below 350 Å, a set of spectra was produced using a 3 m grazing incidence spectrograph with a 3600 lines/mm grating in the Institute of Spectroscopy in Troitsk. A total of 187 lines in the region 160–271 Å were identified as transitions to the low-lying odd configurations 4f 13 5s 2 5p 6 and 4f 14 5s 2 5p 5 from the interacting excited even 4f 12 5s 2 5p 6 5d + 4f 13 5s 2 5p 5 (5d + 6s) + 4f 14 5s 2 5p 4 (5d + 6s) + 4f 14 5s5p 6 configurations. It was found that 4f 13 5s 2 5p 6 2 F 7/2 is the ground level of W VIII. The fine structure splitting and relative positions of the odd terms were established, and 98 levels of the excited even configurations were found. (paper)

  14. Thermal–stress analysis on the crack formation of tungsten during fusion relevant transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future fusion devices, ELMs-induced transient heat flux may lead to the surface cracking of tungsten (W based plasma-facing materials (PFMs. In theory, the cracking is related to the material fracture toughness and the thermal stress-strain caused by transient heat flux. In this paper, a finite element model was successfully built to realize a theoretical semi infinite space. The temperature and stress-strain distribution as well as evolution of W during a single heating-cooling cycle of transient heat flux were simulated and analyzed. It showed that the generation of plastic deformation during the brittle temperature range between room temperature and DBTT (ductile to brittle transition temperature, ∼400 °C caused the cracking of W during the cooling phase. The cracking threshold for W under transient heat flux was successfully obtained by finite element analysis, to some extent, in consistent with the similar experimental results. Both the heat flux factors (FHF = P·t0.5 and the maximum surface temperatures at cracking thresholds were almost invariant for the transient heat fluxes with different pulse widths and temporal distributions. This method not only identified the theoretical conclusion but also obtained the detail values for W with actual temperature-dependent properties.

  15. Light emission from sputtered or backscattered atoms on tungsten surfaces under ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Nogami, Keisuke; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kenmotsu, Takahiko; Furuya, Kenji; Motohashi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    We measured the intensity of light emission from sputtered atoms on tungsten surfaces under the irradiations of Kr"+ ion and Ar"+ ion, as a function of the perpendicular distance from the surface. Using the analysis of decay curve, we estimated the mean vertical velocity component in direction normal to the surface. We found that the estimated mean velocity had much differences according to the excited state. For example, although the estimated mean vertical velocity component normal to the surface from the 400.9 nm line((5d"5(6S)6p "7p_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_3 transition) was 5.6±1.7 km/sec, that from the 386.8 nm line((5d"4(6S)6p "7D_4→(5d"5(6S)6s "7S_4 transition) was 2.8±1.0 km/sec. However, for different projectiles and energies, we found no remarkable changes in the velocity. (author)

  16. The effects of ion irradiation on the micromechanical fracture strength and hardness of a self-passivating tungsten alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessmann, Moritz T., E-mail: mor.lessmann@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sudić, Ivan; Fazinić, Stjepko; Tadić, Tonči [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Calvo, Aida [Ceit-IK4 and Tecnun (University of Navarra), San Sebastian (Spain); Hardie, Christopher D.; Porton, Michael [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); García-Rosales, Carmen [Ceit-IK4 and Tecnun (University of Navarra), San Sebastian (Spain); Mummery, Paul M. [School of Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    An ultra-fine grained self-passivating tungsten alloy (W88-Cr10-Ti2 in wt.%) has been implanted with iodine ions to average doses of 0.7 and 7 dpa, as well as with helium ions to an average concentration of 650 appm. Pile-up corrected Berkovich nanoindentation reveals significant irradiation hardening, with a maximum hardening of 1.9 GPa (17.5%) observed. The brittle fracture strength of the material in all implantation conditions was measured through un-notched cantilever bending at the microscopic scale. All cantilever beams failed catastrophically in an intergranular fashion. A statistically confirmed small decrease in strength is observed after low dose implantation (−6%), whilst the high dose implantation results in a significant increase in fracture strength (+9%), further increased by additional helium implantation (+16%). The use of iodine ions as the implantation ion type is justified through a comparison of the hardening behaviour of pure tungsten under tungsten and iodine implantation.

  17. Electron and molecular ion collisions relevant to divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, H.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of the multi-channel quantum defect theory (MQDT) and show the outline of the MQDT newly extended to include the dissociative states. We investigate some molecular processes relevant to the divertor plasma by using the MQDT: the dissociative recombination, dissociative excitation, and rotation-vibrational transition in the hydrogen molecular ion and electron collisions. (author)

  18. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and ∼5.10 17 ions/cm 2 fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co 3 W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load

  19. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min -1 can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected

  20. Effect of an intermediate tungsten layer on thermal properties of TiC coatings ion plated onto molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Shikama, T.; Okada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Among the various low-Z coating-substrate systems proposed for fusion reactor first-wall applications, molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. The thermal stabilities of TiC layers ion plated onto the molybdenum substrate are discussed with particular reference to the interfacial reaction between the TiC coating and molybdenum. The deposition of an intermediate tungsten layer was found to be very effective in suppressing the formation of reaction layers, resulting in a marked improvement in thermal stabilities of TiC--Mo systems. Thermal shock test using a pulsed electron beam showed that the TiC coatings remained adherent to the molybdenum substrates during energy depositions high enough to melt the substrates within the area of beam deposition. The melt area of the TiC coatings apparently decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied

  1. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  2. Evolution of transiently melt damaged tungsten under ITER-relevant divertor plasma heat loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardin, S., E-mail: s.bardin@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Glad, X. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    A high-repetition-rate ELM simulation system was used at both the Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI linear plasma devices to investigate the nature of W damage under multiple shallow melt events and the subsequent surface evolution under ITER relevant plasma fluence and high ELM number. First, repetitive shallow melting of two W monoblocks separated by a 0.5 mm gap was obtained by combined pulsed/steady-state hydrogen plasma loading at normal incidence in the Pilot-PSI device. Surface modifications including melting, cracking and strong net-reshaping of the surface are obtained. During the second step, the pre-damaged W sample was exposed to a high flux plasma regime in the Magnum-PSI device with a grazing angle of 35°. SEM analysis indicates no measurable change to the surface state after the exposure in Magnum-PSI. An increase in transient-induced temperature rise of 40% is however observed, indicating a degradation of thermal properties over time.

  3. Tungsten Recovery from Spent SCR Catalyst Using Alkaline Leaching and Ion Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of tungsten (W from a honeycomb-type spent selective catalytic reduction (SCR catalyst using an alkaline leaching–ion exchange method was investigated. Spent SCR catalyst mainly consists of TiO2 and other oxides (6.37% W, 1.57% vanadium (V, and 2.81% silicon (Si, etc.. The ground catalyst was leached at the optimal conditions, as follows: NaOH concentration of 0.3 kg/kg of catalyst, pulp density of 3%, leaching temperature of 70 °C, particle size of −74 μm, and leaching time of 30 min. In this study, the leaching rate values of V and W under the above conditions were 87 wt %, and 91 wt %, respectively. The pregnant solution was then passed through a strong base anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA900. At high pH conditions, the use of strong base anion exchange resin led to selective loading of divalent WO42− from the solution, because the fraction of two adjacent positively-charged sites on the IRA900 resin was higher and separate from the coexisting VO43−. The adsorbed W could then be eluted with 1 M NaCl + 0.5 M NaOH. The final concentrated W solution had 8.4 g/L of W with 98% purity. The application of this process in industry is expected to have an important impact on the recovery of W from secondary sources of these metals.

  4. An in-situ field ion microscope study of irradiated tungsten and tungsten alloys. II. The recovery behavior in Stages I and II: experimental results. Report No. 2347

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, K.L.; Seidman, D.N.

    1974-12-01

    The low temperature FIM isochronal annealing spectrum of four different purity levels of tungsten (resistivity ratios R of 5 . 10 4 , 1.5 . 10 4 , 50 and 15), irradiated in-situ with 30 keV W + ions to a dose of 5 . 10 12 ion cm -2 at 18 K, consisted of distinct recovery peaks at approximately 38, 50, 65 and 80 K with a small amount of recovery observed up to 120 K. The spectra were essentially identical between 18 and 120 K, but a fifth group of W specimens with approximately equal to 5 began to exhibit some deviations from the standard spectrum. This result indicates that the distribution of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced by the ion irradiations in the W FIM tips was such that the SIA-SIA reaction dominated the recovery behavior. The isochronal peak width at half-maximum for the 38 K long-range SIA migration peak and the Stage II peaks in pure W were shown to be approximately equal to the value predicted by a diffusion model. The isochronal recovery spectra for W--0.5 at. per cent and 3 at. per cent Re alloys were radically different from the isochronal recovery spectra of pure W. For both W--Re alloys, the amount of recovery for the long-range migration peak was suppressed, and, for the 3 at. per cent Re alloy, it was almost eliminated. High-purity W (R = 5 . 10 4 ), doped with 50-100 appm carbon, showed a 20 per cent reduction in the amount of recovery observed for the long-range migration peak at 38 K. (U.S.)

  5. Fusion-Related Ionization and Recombination Data for Tungsten Ions in Low to Moderately High Charge States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Müller

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Collisional processes and details of atomic structure of heavy many-electron atoms and ions are not yet understood in a fully satisfying manner. Experimental studies are required for guiding new theoretical approaches. In response to fusion-related needs for collisional and spectroscopic data on tungsten atoms in all charge states, a project has been initiated in which electron-impact and photon-induced ionization as well as photorecombination of Wq+ ions are studied. Cross sections and rate coefficients were determined for charge states q ranging from q = 1 to q = 5 for photoionization, for q = 1 up to q = 19 for electron-impact ionization and for q = 18 to q = 21 for electron-ion recombination. An overview, together with a critical assessment of the methods and results is provided.

  6. Label-free tungsten disulfide quantum dots as a fluorescent sensing platform for highly efficient detection of copper (II) ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xuan; He Da-Wei; Wang Yong-Sheng; Hu Yin; Fu Chen; Li Xue

    2017-01-01

    A fluorescent probe for the sensitive and selective determination of copper ion (Cu 2+ ) is presented. It is based on the use of tungsten disulfide quantum dots (WS 2 QDs) which is independent of the pH of solution and emits strong blue fluorescence. Copper ions could cause aggregation of the WS 2 QDs and lead to fluorescence quenching of WS 2 QDs. The change of fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of Cu 2+ , and the limit of detection is 0.4 μM. The fluorescent probe is highly selective for Cu 2+ over some potentially interfering ions. These results indicate that WS 2 QDs, as a fluorescent sensing platform, can meet the selective requirements for biomedical and environmental application. (paper)

  7. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  8. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C; Bondì, M; Cavallaro, M; Carbone, D; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Abou-Haidar, Z; Alvarez, M A G; Bocci, A; Aumann, T; Durante, M; Balestra, F; Battistoni, G; Bohlen, T T; Boudard, A; Brunetti, A; Carpinelli, M; Cappuzzello, F; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Napoli, M De

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) carbon target.

  9. Peculiarity of deuterium ions interaction with tungsten surface in the condition imitating combination of normal operation with plasma disruption in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guseva, M.I. E-mail: martyn@nfi.kiae.ru; Vasiliev, V.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Khirpunov, B.I.; Korshunov, S.N.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Strunnikov, V.N.; Stolyarova, V.G.; Zatekin, V.V.; Litnovsky, A.M

    2001-03-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for the ITER divertor. For the simulation of ITER normal operation conditions in combination with plasma disruptions samples of various types of tungsten were exposed to both steady-state and high power pulsed deuterium plasmas. Tungsten samples were first exposed in a steady-state plasma with an ion current density {approx}10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} up to a dose of 10{sup 25} m{sup -2} at a temperature of 770 K. The energy of deuterium ions was 150 eV. The additional exposure of the samples to 10 pulses of deuterium plasma was performed in the electrodynamical plasma accelerator with an energy flux 0.45 MJ/m{sup 2} per pulse. Samples of four types of tungsten (W-1%La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, W-13I, monocrystalline W(1 1 1) and W-10%Re) were investigated. The least destruction of the surface was observed for W(1 1 1). The concentration of retained deuterium in tungsten decreased from 2.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} to 1.07x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} (for W(1 1 1)) as a result of the additional pulsed plasma irradiation. Investigation of the tungsten erosion products after the high power pulsed plasma shots was also carried out.

  10. Precipitation and ion floatation of molybdenum, tungsten, copper, and cobalt compounds by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strizhko, V.S.; Shekhirev, D.V.; Ignatkina, V.A.; Alimova, R.Eh.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on application of ion-flotation in purification of low-concentration (less than 10 -3 M) acid solutions from molybdenum, tungsten, copper and cobalt ions. Two collectors, i.e. DEDC and CTMAB have been tested, their optimal consumption is determined. It is shown that CTMAB provides for selective purification from Mo and W ions and allows foam product with little water on flotation in a column to be obtained. But the achieved residual W and Mo concentration of 20 to 10 mg/l require deeper finishing purification in order to meet a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value employing other methods. DEDC provides for sufficient purification from nonferrous metal ions but does not possess selectivity with respect to some metals. The obtained results have shown the possibility to apply ion-flotation in concentration of metal ions in foam product in the process of waste water purification with further finishing purification up to a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Field ion emission from tungsten wires covered with organic micro needles of benzyl nitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, A.I.; Zahran, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    Benzyl nitrile micro needles are grown on the surface of a 10 um tungsten wire. The activated wires are used as field anodes in field ionization source. The activation time using benzyl nitrile as an activator is much shorter than the corresponding time required for benzo nitrile activation. Field ionization mass spectra of benzo- and benzyl-nitriles are measured by the new emitters

  12. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  13. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  14. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  15. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  16. Interaction of atomic and low-energy deuterium with tungsten pre-irradiated with self-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Toussaint, U. von

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline tungsten (W) specimens were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create identical samples with high density of defects up to ∼2.5 μm near the surface. Then, W specimens were exposed to either thermal atomic deuterium (D) beam with an incident energy of ∼0.2 eV or low energy D plasma with the incident energy varied between 5 and 200 eV at different sample temperatures. Each sample was exposed once at certain temperature and fluence. The D migration and accumulation in W were studied post-mortem by nuclear reaction method. It was shown that the rate of the D to occupy radiation-induced defects increases with increasing the incident energy, ion flux, and temperature. Experimental investigation was accompanied by modelling using the rate-equation model. Moreover, the analytical model was developed and benchmarked against numerical model. The calculations of the deuterium diffusion with trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten by analytical model are consistent with numerical calculations using rate-equation model. The data of reflection and penetration of atomic and low-energy D were taking from calculations using molecular dynamics (MD) with Juslin interatomic potentials and a binary collision code TRIM. MD calculations show an agreement with a binary collision code TRIM only in a very narrow range of deuterium energies between 1 and 20 eV. Incorporation of the data of reflection and penetration of deuterium in the macroscopic modelling has been done to verify the range of validity of calculations using MD and binary collision code TRIM by comparison of modelling results with experimental data. Modelling results are consistent with experiments using reflection and penetration data of D obtained from TRIM code for incident ion energy above 1 eV. Otherwise, the parameters obtained from MD should be incorporated in the rate-equation model to have a good agreement with the experiments

  17. In Situ Synthesis of Tungsten-Doped SnO2 and Graphene Nanocomposites for High-Performance Anode Materials of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Shi, Liyi; Chen, Guorong; Ba, Chaoqun; Wang, Zhuyi; Zhu, Jiefang; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Meihong; Yuan, Shuai

    2017-05-24

    The composite of tungsten-doped SnO 2 and reduced graphene oxide was synthesized through a simple one-pot hydrothermal method. According to the structural characterization of the composite, tungsten ions were doped in the unit cells of tin dioxide rather than simply attaching to the surface. Tungsten-doped SnO 2 was in situ grown on the surface of graphene sheet to form a three-dimensional conductive network that enhanced the electron transportation and lithium-ion diffusion effectively. The issues of SnO 2 agglomeration and volume expansion could be also avoided because the tungsten-doped SnO 2 nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed on a graphene sheet. As a result, the nanocomposite electrodes of tungsten-doped SnO 2 and reduced graphene oxide exhibited an excellent long-term cycling performance. The residual capacity was still as high as 1100 mA h g -1 at 0.1 A g -1 after 100 cycles. It still remained at 776 mA h g -1 after 2000 cycles at the current density of 1A g -1 .

  18. PMR investigation of configuration and mobility of H5O2+ ions in certain tungsten heteropolyacid hexahydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvaev, V.F.; Barash, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    PMR-method of wide bands has been used to investigate hexahydrates of tungsten typical heteropolyacids (HPA): H 3 PW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O, H 4 SiW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O, H 5 BW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O. The results are considered from the viewpoint of existing ideas on formation of H 5 O 2+ diaquohydrogen ions in the HPA structure. SoMe problems of stabilization of low-level hydrates of tungsten and molybdenum HPA are considered as well. The data of PMR low-temperature (80K) spectra have been used to identify the H 3 O + ions, H 2 O mole-- cules and small number of free protons in the investigated HPA. Taking this into account the H 5 O 2+ under the conditions of solid lattice is characterized as static distribution of proton between two molecules of the water of H 3 O + xH 2 O group. Dependence of the PMR spectra on temperature detects two transition regions, caused by mobility of the H 5 O 2+ elements. In the region of first transition (up to 250 K) the H 3 O + xH 2 O static configuration became dynamical, because of quick proton fluctuation along the 0...0 bond and librations of the H 2 O molequles. Then, higher than 250K, the H 5 O 2+ motion became more isotopic and then diffusion. Dynamical state of the H 5 O 2+ in H 3 PW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O and H 4 SiW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O hexahydrates in the wide temperature range is of limited nature, caused by specific of the H 5 O 2+ localizetion in the HPA structure

  19. Operation of ASDEX Upgrade with tungsten coated walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.

    2002-01-01

    An alternative for low-Z materials in the main chamber of a future fusion device are high-Z materials, but the maximal tolerable concentration in the plasma core is restricted. A step by step approach to employ tungsten at the central column of ASDEX Upgrade was started in 1999. Meanwhile almost the whole central column is covered with tiles, which were coated by PVD with tungsten. Up to now 9000 s of plasma discharge covering all relevant scenarios were performed. Routine operation of ASDEX Upgrade was not affected by the tungsten. Typical concentrations below 10 -5 were found. The tungsten concentration is mostly connected to the transport into the core plasma, not to the tungsten erosion. It can be demonstrated, that additional central heating can eliminate the tungsten accumulation. These experiments demonstrate the compatibility of fusion plasmas with W plasma facing components under reactor relevant conditions. The erosion pattern found by post mortem analysis indicates that the main effect is ion sputtering. The main erosion of tungsten seems to occur during plasma ramp-up and ramp-down. (author)

  20. Breaking the power law: Multiscale simulations of self-ion irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miaomiao; Permann, Cody; Short, Michael P.

    2018-06-01

    The initial stage of radiation defect creation has often been shown to follow a power law distribution at short time scales, recently so with tungsten, following many self-organizing patterns found in nature. The evolution of this damage, however, is dominated by interactions between defect clusters, as the coalescence of smaller defects into clusters depends on the balance between transport, absorption, and emission to/from existing clusters. The long-time evolution of radiation-induced defects in tungsten is studied with cluster dynamics parameterized with lower length scale simulations, and is shown to deviate from a power law size distribution. The effects of parameters such as dose rate and total dose, as parameters affecting the strength of the driving force for defect evolution, are also analyzed. Excellent agreement is achieved with regards to an experimentally measured defect size distribution at 30 K. This study provides another satisfactory explanation for experimental observations in addition to that of primary radiation damage, which should be reconciled with additional validation data.

  1. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  2. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  3. Design, fabrication and testing of porous tungsten vaporizers for mercury ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R.; Kroeger, E.; Kami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersions in the characteristics, performance and reliability of vaporizers for early model 30-cm thrusters were investigated. The purpose of the paper is to explore the findings and to discuss the approaches that were taken to reduce the observed dispersion and present the results of a program which validated those approaches. The information that is presented includes porous tungsten materials specifications, a discussion of assembly procedures, and a description of a test program which screens both material and fabrication processes. There are five appendices providing additional detail in the areas of vaporizer contamination, nitrogen flow testing, bubble testing, porosimeter testing, and mercury purity. Four neutralizers, seven cathodes and five main vaporizers were successfully fabricated, tested, and operated on thrusters. Performance data from those devices is presented and indicates extremely repeatable results from using the design and fabrication procedures.

  4. Effect of periodic deuterium ion irradiation on deuterium retention and blistering in Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of periodic irradiation on Deuterium (D retention and blistering in Tungsten (W was investigated. W samples were exposed to D plasma at a fixed fluence while varying the irradiation cycle number (1-shot, 2-shots and 3-shots. Exposure energy and flux were ∼50eV and ∼1 ×1022 D m−2 s−1, respectively. Sample temperatures were 537K and 643K. At 573K, D retention and blister density decreased with increasing number of irradiation cycle. In contrast at 643K, D retention showed no dependence on number of irradiation cycle. Therefore, sample temperature during irradiation is an important parameter in comparing the results of continuous and periodic irradiation, especially in studies involving extremely-high-flux (>1024 D m−2 s−1 irradiation and fluence dependency of D retention.

  5. Effect of Tungsten Nanolayer Coating on Si Electrode in Lithium-ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Dae; Lee, Jun Kyu; Yoon, Woo Young

    2018-02-01

    Tungsten (W) was coated onto a silicon (Si) anode at the nanoscale via the physical vaporization deposition method (PVD) to enhance its electrochemical properties. The characteristics of the electrode were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. With the electrochemical property analysis, the first charge capacities of the W-coated and uncoated electrode cells were 2558 mAh g- 1 and 1912 mAh g- 1, respectively. By the 50th cycle, the capacity ratios were 61.1 and 25.5%, respectively. Morphology changes in the W-coated Si anode during cycling were observed using SEM and TEM, and electrochemical characteristics were examined through impedance analysis. Owing to its conductivity and mechanical properties from the atomic W layer coating through PVD, the electrode improved its cyclability and preserved its structure from volumetric demolition.

  6. Surface mechanical attrition treatment of tungsten and its behavior under low energy deuterium plasma implantation relevant to ITER divertor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.Y.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B.Q.; Godfrey, A.; Liu, W. [Tsinghua Univ.. Lab. of Advanced Materials, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.B. [Technical Univ. og Denmark. DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Tao, N.R. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China)

    2012-11-01

    In the light of a foreseen application for tungsten (W) as an ITER divertor material samples have been plastically deformed by a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) and by cold rolling. The resistance to blister formation by low energy deuterium implantation in these samples has been examined, with the result that the structure is significantly improved as the structural scale is reduced to the nanometer range in the SMAT sample. The distribution of blisters in this sample is however bimodal, due to the formation of several very large blisters, which are heterogeneously distributed. The observations suggest that process optimization must be a next step in the development with a view to the application of plastically deformed W in a fusion reactor. (Author)

  7. Experimental investigations of ablation stream interaction dynamics in tungsten wire arrays: Interpenetration, magnetic field advection, and ion deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Pickworth, L.; De Grouchy, P.; Skidmore, J.; Khoory, E.; Suttle, L.; Bennett, M.; Hare, J. D.; Clayson, T.; Bland, S. N.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N. H.; Patankar, S.; Robinson, T. S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Harvey-Thompson, A. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States); Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); and others

    2016-05-15

    Experiments have been carried out to investigate the collisional dynamics of ablation streams produced by cylindrical wire array z-pinches. A combination of laser interferometric imaging, Thomson scattering, and Faraday rotation imaging has been used to make a range of measurements of the temporal evolution of various plasma and flow parameters. This paper presents a summary of previously published data, drawing together a range of different measurements in order to give an overview of the key results. The paper focuses mainly on the results of experiments with tungsten wire arrays. Early interferometric imaging measurements are reviewed, then more recent Thomson scattering measurements are discussed; these measurements provided the first direct evidence of ablation stream interpenetration in a wire array experiment. Combining the data from these experiments gives a view of the temporal evolution of the tungsten stream collisional dynamics. In the final part of the paper, we present new experimental measurements made using an imaging Faraday rotation diagnostic. These experiments investigated the structure of magnetic fields near the array axis directly; the presence of a magnetic field has previously been inferred based on Thomson scattering measurements of ion deflection near the array axis. Although the Thomson and Faraday measurements are not in full quantitative agreement, the Faraday data do qualitatively supports the conjecture that the observed deflections are induced by a static toroidal magnetic field, which has been advected to the array axis by the ablation streams. It is likely that detailed modeling will be needed in order to fully understand the dynamics observed in the experiment.

  8. Spectroscopic study of Pr3+ ions doped Zinc Lead Tungsten Tellurite glasses for visible photonic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritu; Rao, A. S.; Deopa, Nisha; Venkateswarlu, M.; Jayasimhadri, M.; Haranath, D.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

    2018-04-01

    Zinc Lead Tungsten Tellurite (ZnPbWTe) glasses doped with different Pr3+ ion concentrations having the composition 5ZnO + 15PbO + 20WO3 + (60-x)TeO2 + xPr6O11 (where x = 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 mol%) were prepared by using sudden quenching technique and characterized to understand their visible emission characteristic features using spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, excitation and emission. The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory has been applied to the absorption spectral features with an aim to evaluate various radiative properties for the prominent fluorescent levels of Pr3+ions in the as-prepared glasses. The emission spectra recorded for the as-prepared glasses under 468 nm excitation show three prominent emission transitions 3P0→3H6, 3P0→3F2 and 3P1→3F4, of which 3P0→3F2 observed in visible red region (648 nm), is relatively more intense. The intensity of 3P0→3F2 emission transition in the titled glasses increases up to 1mol% of Pr3+ ions and beyond concentration quenching is observed. Branching ratios (βR) and emission cross-sections (σse) were estimated for 3P0→3F2 transition to understand the luminescence efficiency in visible red region (648 nm). The CIE chromaticity coordinates were also evaluated in order to understand the suitability of these glasses for visible red luminescence devices. From the emission cross-sections, quantum efficiency and CIE coordinates, it was concluded that 1mol% of Pr3+ ions in ZnPbWTe glasses are quite suitable for preparing visible reddish orange luminescent devices.

  9. Object kinetic Monte Carlo model for neutron and ion irradiation in tungsten: Impact of transmutation and carbon impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castin, N.; Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Sand, A. E.; Terentyev, D.

    2018-03-01

    We upgrade our object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model, aimed at describing the microstructural evolution in tungsten (W) under neutron and ion irradiation. Two main improvements are proposed based on recently published atomistic data: (a) interstitial carbon impurities, and their interaction with radiation-induced defects (point defect clusters and loops), are more accurately parameterized thanks to ab initio findings; (b) W transmutation to rhenium (Re) upon neutron irradiation, impacting the diffusivity of radiation defects, is included, also relying on recent atomistic data. These essential amendments highly improve the portability of our OKMC model, providing a description for the formation of SIA-type loops under different irradiation conditions. The model is applied to simulate neutron and ion irradiation in pure W samples, in a wide range of fluxes and temperatures. We demonstrate that it performs a realistic prediction of the population of TEM-visible voids and loops, as compared to experimental evidence. The impact of the transmutation of W to Re, and of carbon trapping, is assessed.

  10. Aqueous vanadium ion dynamics relevant to bioinorganic chemistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustin, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of the four highest vanadium oxidation states exhibit four diverse colors, which only hint at the diverse reactions that these ions can undergo. Cationic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands; anionic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands and self-react to form isopolyanions. All vanadium species undergo oxidation-reduction reactions. With a few exceptions, elucidation of the dynamics of these reactions awaited the development of fast reaction techniques before the kinetics of elementary ligation, condensation, reduction, and oxidation of the aqueous vanadium ions could be investigated. As the biological roles played by endogenous and therapeutic vanadium expand, it is appropriate to bring the results of the diverse kinetics studies under one umbrella. To achieve this goal this review presents a systematic examination of elementary aqueous vanadium ion dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.B., E-mail: ahmad.rabilal@gmail.com [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McNeill, F.E., E-mail: fmcneill@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Byun, S.H., E-mail: soohyun@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Prestwich, W.V., E-mail: prestwic@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Seymour, C., E-mail: seymouc@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Mothersill, C.E., E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca [Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, University of McMaster, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced 'bystander effects' studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2} s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, and 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cps for wavelengths of 280 {+-} 5 nm, 320 {+-} 5 nm and 340 {+-} 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a 'damage cross section' of the order of 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  12. In situ investigation of helium fuzz growth on tungsten in relation to ion flux, fluence, surface temperature and ion energy using infrared imaging in PSI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, S; Kachko, O; Rasinski, M; Kreter, A; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for plasma-facing components in nuclear fusion reactors. In operation it will face temperatures >800 K together with an influx of helium ions. Previously, the evolution of special surface nanostructures called fuzz was found under these conditions in a limited window of surface temperature, ion flux and ion energy. Fuzz potentially leads to lower heat load tolerances, enhanced erosion and dust formation, hence should be avoided in a fusion reactor. Here the fuzz growth is reinvestigated in situ during its growth by considering its impact on the surfaces infrared emissivity at 4 μ m wavelength with an infrared camera in the linear plasma device PSI-2. A hole in the surface serves as an emissivity reference to calibrate fuzz thickness versus infrared emissivity. Among new data on the above mentioned relations, a lower fuzz growth threshold of 815 ± 24 K is found. Fuzz is seen to grow on rough and polished surfaces and even on the hole’s side walls alike. Literature scalings for thickness, flux and time relations of the fuzz growth rate could not be reproduced, but for the temperature scaling a good agreement to the Arrhenius equation was found. (paper)

  13. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  14. Ion surface collisions on surfaces relevant for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasul, B.; Endstrasser, N.; Zappa, F.; Grill, V.; Scheier, P.; Mark, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: One of the great challenges of fusion research is the compatibility of reactor grade plasmas with plasma facing materials coating the inner walls of a fusion reactor. The question of which surface coating should be used is of particular interest for the design of ITER. The impact of energetic plasma particles leads to sputtering of wall material into the plasma. A possible solution for the coating of plasma facing walls would be the use of special carbon surfaces. Investigations of these various surfaces have been started at BESTOF ion-surface collision apparatus. Experiment beam of singly charged molecular ions of hydrocarbon molecules, i.e. C 2 H + 4 , is generated in a Nier-type electron impact ionization source at an electron energy of about 70 eV. In the first double focusing mass spectrometer the ions are mass and energy analyzed and afterwards refocused onto a surface. The secondary reaction products are monitored using a Time Of Flight mass spectrometer. The secondary ion mass spectra are recorded as a function of the collision energy for different projectile ions and different surfaces. A comparison of these spectra show for example distinct changes in the survival probability of the same projectile ion C 2 H + 4 for different surfaces. (author)

  15. Deuterium permeation measurements on tungsten using ion-beam-based detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapser, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Manhard, Armin; Toussaint, Udo von [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Tungsten (W) is promising for the inner wall of a future fusion reactor, where it will be exposed to high fluxes of hydrogen (H) isotopes. Knowledge of their diffusion in W is important for safety and economic considerations, particularly concerning tritium. A common method to investigate H diffusion in metals are permeation experiments. Typically, gas loading and mass-spectrometric detection are used. Information about the diffusion can be gained from the temporal evolution of the permeation flux, whose magnitude is determined by the permeability (product of diffusivity and solubility). However, for low-permeability metals, the permeation flux can be unmeasurably small. For W this is the case near room temperature. We present a method that circumvents this problem. It is an improved version of experiments on nickel and stainless steel. The W is exposed to deuterium (D) plasma on one side and the permeating D is accumulated in a getter on the other side. A cover prevents D gettering from the gas phase. The amount in the getter is analysed by the nuclear reaction D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He.

  16. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Industrial Research Inst. of Ishikawa (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L [RIKEN, Saitama (Japan)

    1992-04-15

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C{sub 6}H{sub 6} gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2}. The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.).

  17. Effects of ion beam bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto tungsten carbide and tool steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awazu, Kaoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masaya; Guzman, L.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of argon ion bombardment of carbon thin films deposited onto WC and tool steels. Carbon thin film deposition was performed at various temperatures ranging from 200degC to 350degC, using C 6 H 6 gas. Argon ion beam bombardment of the films was carried out at an energy of 150 keV with a dose of 1x10 16 ions cm -2 . The hardness and adhesion of the films were measured by means of Knoop hardness and scratch tests respectively. The structure of the carbon films was estimated by laser Raman spectroscopy, and the relations were investigated between the mechanical properties and the structure of the films. The hardness of carbon thin films increases as their deposition temperature decreases; this tendency corresponds to the increase in amorphous structure estimated by Raman spectra. Argon ion bombardment results in constant hardness and fraction of amorphous structure. Argon ion beam bombardment of films prior to additional carbon deposition may cause the adhesion of the subsequently deposited films to improve. It is concluded that argon ion beam bombardment is useful for improving the properties of carbon films deposited onto WC and tool steels. (orig.)

  18. Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Masashi, E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Oya, Y. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Hara, M. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kobayashi, M. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watanabe, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tyburska-Pueschel, B. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Institute fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Calderoni, P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Okuno, K. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. A recent MIT report (PSFC/RR-10-4, An assessment of the current data affecting tritium retention and its use to project towards T retention in ITER, Lipschultz et al., 2010) summarizes the observations from high-energy ion bombardment studies and illustrates the saturation trend in deuterium concentration due to damage from ion irradiation in tungsten and molybdenum above 1 displacement per atom (dpa). While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in plasma facing components (PFCs), it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high primary knock-on atom (PKA) energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influences the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron-irradiation. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at.% purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by fission neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), at 50 and 300 Degree-Sign C to 0.025, 0.3, and 2.4 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten was performed in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe{sup 2+}, 20 MeV W{sup 2+}, and 700 keV H{sup -}) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

  19. Sputtering of molybdenum and tungsten nano rods and nodules irradiated with 150 eV argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, N.M.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Neff, Anton L.; Allain, Jean-Paul; Williams, Brian; Sharghi-Moshtaghin, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The work was motivated by the idea of designing material surface architecture, using the CVD process, that can result in a reduction in the surface sputtering rate as compared to planar surfaces. • We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering, amorphization of near-surface layers, and the formation of surface ripples in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. • We show that the sputtering rate decreases in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. • We discovered that energy deposition in the near surface layer in W leads to its amorphization at room temperature, to a depth of 5–10 nm. • We also show that surfaces of nano rods become rippled as a result of an ion-induced roughening instability. - Abstract: The influence of surface nano architecture on the sputtering and erosion of tungsten and molybdenum is discussed. We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. Measurements of the sputtering rate from Mo and W surfaces with nano architecture indicate that the surface topology plays an important role in the mechanism of surface erosion and restructuring. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is utilized as a material processing route to fabricate nano-architectures on the surfaces of W and Mo substrates. First, Re dendrites form as needles with cross-sections that have hexagonal symmetry, and are subsequently employed as scaffolding for further deposition of W and Mo to create nano rod surface architecture. The sputtering of surface atoms in these samples shows a marked dependence on their surface architecture. The sputtering rate is shown to decrease at normal ion incidence in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. Moreover, and unlike an increase in sputtering of planar crystalline surfaces, the

  20. Ion beam irradiation of ceramics at fusion relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic materials are required at a variety of locations in proposed fusion reactors where significant ionizing and displacive fields may be present. Energetic ion beams are a useful tool for probing the effects of irradiation on the structure and electrical properties of ceramics over a wide range of experimental conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using ion beams to provide information on anticipated ceramic radiation effects in a fusion reactor environment are discussed. In this paper particular emphasis is placed on microstructural changes and how the high helium generation rates associated with DT fusion neutrons affect cavity swelling

  1. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.D.; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    Experimental studies of ultra-fine aerosol nucleation in clean atmospheric air, containing trace amounts of ozone, sulphur dioxide, and water vapour suggest that the production rate of critical clusters is sensitive to ionisation. To assess this sensitivity numerical simulations of the initial...... stages of particle coagulation and condensation have been performed and compared with the experimental results. The simulations indicate that a stable distribution of sub 3nm particles exists that cannot be detected using standard techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosol, and that the nucleation rate...... of critical clusters generating this distribution is a function of the number of ions present. This provides a set of boundary conditions, which constrain the properties of a possible microphysical mechanism. The role of ions in the nucleation process of critical clusters provides a source for new aerosol...

  2. Dielectronic recombination of lowly charged tungsten ions Wq+(q = 5 - 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Duck-Hee

    2018-03-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the ground levels of low ionization state Wq+ (q = 5 - 10) ions have been obtained by an ab-inito level-by-level calculation using the flexible atomic code (FAC) based on relativistic jj coupling scheme and independent process, isolated resonance, distorted wave approximation. The radiative transition calculation in the original FAC has been adapted into parallel programming for time effective dealing with so many resonance levels of the complex open 4f, 5p, or 5d-shell structure ion. Core excitations Δnc = 0 , 1 of 4f, 5p, and 5d (W5+), Δnc = 2 of 4f, and Δnc = 0 of 4d (W7+), and 5s (W8+) are included to the total DR rate coefficient. The core excitations Δnc = 0 , 5p → 5l and Δnc = 1 , 4f → 5l mainly contribute to the total DR rate coefficients. The strong resonances involved in the DR are analyzed and the total DR rate coefficients are compared with available previous ab-initio predictions and with ADAS data by a simple semiempirical formula.

  3. Failure study of helium-cooled tungsten divertor plasma-facing units tested at DEMO relevant steady-state heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, G; Pintsuk, G; Linke, J; Hirai, T; Norajitra, P; Reiser, J; Giniyatulin, R; Makhankov, A; Mazul, I

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten was selected as armor material for the helium-cooled divertor in future DEMO-type fusion reactors and fusion power plants. After realizing the design and testing of them under cyclic thermal loads of up to ∼14 MW m -2 , the tungsten divertor plasma-facing units were examined by metallography; they revealed failures such as cracks at the thermal loaded and as-machined surfaces, as well as degradation of the brazing layers. Furthermore, in order to optimize the machining processes, the quality of tungsten surfaces prepared by turning, milling and using a diamond cutting wheel were examined. This paper presents a metallographic examination of the tungsten plasma-facing units as well as technical studies and the characterization on machining of tungsten and alternative brazing joints.

  4. Failure study of helium-cooled tungsten divertor plasma-facing units tested at DEMO relevant steady-state heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, G.; Hirai, T.; Norajitra, P.; Reiser, J.; Giniyatulin, R.; Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J.

    2009-12-01

    Tungsten was selected as armor material for the helium-cooled divertor in future DEMO-type fusion reactors and fusion power plants. After realizing the design and testing of them under cyclic thermal loads of up to ~14 MW m-2, the tungsten divertor plasma-facing units were examined by metallography; they revealed failures such as cracks at the thermal loaded and as-machined surfaces, as well as degradation of the brazing layers. Furthermore, in order to optimize the machining processes, the quality of tungsten surfaces prepared by turning, milling and using a diamond cutting wheel were examined. This paper presents a metallographic examination of the tungsten plasma-facing units as well as technical studies and the characterization on machining of tungsten and alternative brazing joints.

  5. Surface morphology changes to tungsten under exposure to He ions from an electron cyclotron resonance plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, David; Maan, Anurag; Duran, Jonah; Buchenauer, Dean; Whaley, Josh

    2015-11-01

    Exposure of tungsten to low energy (ALMT ITER grade tungsten samples. A similar He plasma exposure stage has now been developed at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville with an improved compact ECR plasma source. Status of the new UTK exposure stage will be discussed as well as planned experiments and new material characterization techniques (EBSD, GIXRD). Work supported by US DOE Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and the PSI Science Center.

  6. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in radiation defects formed in tungsten by neutron and ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Shimada, M. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Alimov, V.Kh.; Shi, J.; Hara, M.; Nozaki, T. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Okuno, K. [Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Yoshida, N.; Futagami, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Sugiyama, K.; Roth, J.; Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Dorner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Takagi, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hatakeyama, M.; Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-15

    Retention of D in neutron-irradiated W and desorption were examined after plasma exposure at 773 K. Deuterium was accumulated at a relatively high concentration up to a large depth of 50–100 μm due to the trapping effects of defects uniformly induced in the bulk. A significant D release in a vacuum continued to temperatures ⩾1173 K because of the small effective diffusion coefficient and the long diffusion distance. Exposure of ion-irradiated W to D{sub 2} gas showed a clear correlation between concentrations of trapped and solute D as determined by the trapping–detrapping equilibrium. These observations indicated that the accumulation of tritium in high concentrations is possible even at high temperatures if the concentration of solute tritium is high, and baking at moderate temperatures is ineffective for removal of tritium deeply penetrating into the bulk. Nevertheless, clear enhancement of D release was observed under the presence of solute H.

  7. Performance of a dual-process PVD/PS tungsten coating structure under deuterium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunmyung; Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Sung Hwan [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae-Min [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • D{sup +} irradiation performance of a dual-process PVD/PS W coating was evaluated. • Low-energy plasmas exposure of 100 eV D{sup +} with 1.17 × 10{sup 21} D/s{sup −1} m{sup 2} flux was applied. • After D ion irradiation, flakes were observed on the surface of the simple PS coating. • While, sub-μm size protrusions were observed for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. • Height of D spike in depth profile was lower for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. - Abstract: A dual-process coating structure was developed on a graphite substrate to improve the performance of the coating structure under anticipated operating condition of fusion devices. A thin multilayer W/Mo coating (6 μm) was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method with a variation of Mo interlayer thickness on plasma spray (PS) W coating (160 μm) of a graphite substrate panel. The dual-process PVD/PS W coatings then were exposed to 3.08 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2} of 100 eV D ions with a flux of 1.71 × 10{sup 21} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) chamber. After irradiation, surface morphology and D depth profiles of the dual-process coating were analyzed and compared to those of the simple PS W coating. Both changes in surface morphology and D retention were strongly dependent on the microstructure of surface coating. Meanwhile, the existence of Mo interlayer seemed to have no significant effect on the retention of deuterium.

  8. A field ion microscope study of the surface reaction of tungsten with n-octanol under an applied positive voltage: reaction conditions for the 'splitting' of (110) plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, T.; Iwatsu, F.; Morikawa, H.

    1993-01-01

    Field ion microscopy is a powerful tool for the study of surface phenomena on an atomic scale, especially when they are crystal plane dependent, because the microscope shows many crystal planes of the sample tip simultaneously. Although a large number of FIM studies on vapor deposition, surface diffusion and surface reactions at a metal-gas interface have been reported, those on reactions at a metal-liquid interface are few. The authors have studied the corrosion or tungsten with aqueous solutions and found that water corroded the tungsten tips very severely to reduce the radius of curvature of the tip cap drastically. The reaction was so severe that it was not possible to trace it back to the very initial stages. They adopted, as a weaker reagent, one of the higher alcohols, n-octanol(C 8 H 17 OH), and found that it reacted with tungsten tips when an electrical pulse with a positive voltage between 5 and 10V was applied to the tip, giving very interesting field ion images in which the central (110) plane was divided into two parts located side by side across the [001] zone line. This means that some anisotropic surface reaction occurred which made a groove along the [001] zone line going through the (110) plane, usually the most stable plane chemically for bcc metals. They named this phenomenon 'splitting'. This reaction was less severe than that with water and some results on the morphology of the groove and on the reaction sequence have been reported. In the present paper more detailed reaction conditions which give rise to the splitting are described

  9. Impact and effects of simultaneous MeV-ion irradiation and helium plasma exposure to the formation of tungsten nano-tendrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Graham; Kesler, Leigh Ann; Whyte, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    The extrusion of nano-tendrils from high temperature (>1000 K) tungsten (W) targets exposed to helium (He) plasma ions remains a concern for future fusion reactors. Previous work on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak has demonstrated it is possible to form these structures in a tokamak environment. However, one area where Alcator C-Mod and a fusion reactor differ is total neutron flux at the wall and the displacement damage these neutrons produce in the plasma-facing materials. This dsiplacement damage may affect the size and number He bubbles precipitating in the W target, which is a key factor in the formation and growth of the nano-tendrils. The DIONISOS experiment directly measures the impact of the displacement damage by simultaneously bombarding high temperature W targets with MeV-range ions (to simulate the displacement damage caused by neutron flux) and high flux of He plasma ions. Different combinations of irradiating ion species and W target temperatures are used to vary the different processes and rates that are involved such as He trapping rate, vacancy production and annealing rates, and nano-tendril growth rate. The nano-tendril growth is characterized by SEM imaging and focused ion beam (FIB) cross-sectioning and compared to nano-tendril formation without the presence of the irradiating ion beam. This work is supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060.

  10. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, C.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m−2) and

  11. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, A.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; M. B. Ward,

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to

  12. Relevance of quantum mechanics on some aspects of ion channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Sisir; Llinás, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of ionic diffusion along K ion channels indicates that such diffusion is oscillatory, at the weak non-Markovian limit. This finding leads us to derive a Schrödinger–Langevin equation for this kind of system within the framework of stochastic quantization. The Planck’s constant is shown to be relevant to the Lagrangian action at the level of a single ion channel. This sheds new light on the issue of applicability of quantum formalism to ion channel dynamics and to the phy...

  13. Electron and ion currents relevant to accurate current integration in MeV ion backscattering spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The magnitude and characteristics of the currents which flow in the target and the chamber of an MeV ion backscattering spectrometer are examined. Measured energy distributions and the magnitude of high-energy secondary electron currents are reported. An empirical universal curve is shown to fit the energy distribution of secondary electrons for several combinations of ion energy, targets and ion species. The magnitude of tertiary electron currents which arise at the vacuum vessel walls is determined for various experimental situations and is shown to be non-negligible in many cases. An experimental arrangement is described which permits charge integrations to 1% arruracy without restricting access to the target as a Faraday cage does. (Auth.)

  14. Temperature Dependent Surface Modification of Tungsten Exposed to High-Flux Low-Energy Helium Ion Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Damico, Antony Q; Tripathi, Jitendra K; Novakowski, Theodore J; Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a great potential energy source that can provide a relatively safe and clean limitless supply of energy using hydrogen isotopes as fuel material. ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) is the world first fusion reactor currently being built in France. Tungsten (W) is a prime candidate material as plasma facing component (PFC) due to its excellent mechanical properties, high melting point, and low erosion rate. However, W undergoes a severe surface morphology...

  15. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  16. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  17. Modeling of fuel retention in the pre-damaged tungsten with MeV W ions after exposure to D plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhou Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of high-Z ion irradiated-induced damages on fuel retention inside tungsten (W material has been performed in this work. The upgraded Hydrogen Isotope Inventory Processes Code (HIIPC is applied to model the deuterium (D retention inside pre-damaged W during exposed to low-energy D flux, and the W is pre-irradiated by 20 MeV W-ion before exposed to D flux. Three types of trap, i.e. mono-vacancies, dislocations and grain boundary vacancies, are considered in the present model. The mono-vacancy defects induced by energetic W ions are calculated by SRIM code. First, the model is validated against the available experimental data under the same D flux exposure conditions, showing the reasonable agreement. Then, the effect of radiation-induced defects produced by pre-exposed energetic W-ion with different energy and fluence on the fuel retention are studied, confirming that the irradiation-induced traps play a dominated role on the fuel retention in the surface of the material (∼ micrometer. Finally, the effects of different type of defect, D fluence, and wall temperature on the fuel retention are discussed systemically, and these modeling results are in well agreement with the previous studies.

  18. Thickness-modulated tungsten-carbon superconducting nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition for vortex pinning up to high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ismael García; Sesé, Javier; Guillamón, Isabel; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, Sebastián; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; De Teresa, José María

    2016-01-01

    We report efficient vortex pinning in thickness-modulated tungsten-carbon-based (W-C) nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). By using FIBID, W-C superconducting films have been created with thickness modulation properties exhibiting periodicity from 60 to 140 nm, leading to a strong pinning potential for the vortex lattice. This produces local minima in the resistivity up to high magnetic fields (2.2 T) in a broad temperature range due to commensurability effects between the pinning potential and the vortex lattice. The results show that the combination of single-step FIBID fabrication of superconducting nanostructures with built-in artificial pinning landscapes and the small intrinsic random pinning potential of this material produces strong periodic pinning potentials, maximizing the opportunities for the investigation of fundamental aspects in vortex science under changing external stimuli (e.g., temperature, magnetic field, electrical current).

  19. Oxygen-ion-migration-modulated bipolar resistive switching and complementary resistive switching in tungsten/indium tin oxide/gold memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinghui; Zhang, Qiuhui; Cui, Nana; Xu, Weiwei; Wang, Kefu; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Qixing

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we report our investigation of room-temperature-fabricated tungsten/indium tin oxide/gold (W/ITO/Au) resistive random access memory (RRAM), which exhibits asymmetric bipolar resistive switching (BRS) behavior. The device displays good write/erase endurance and data retention properties. The device shows complementary resistive switching (CRS) characteristics after controlling the compliance current. A WO x layer electrically formed at the W/ITO in the forming process. Mobile oxygen ions within ITO migrate toward the electrode/ITO interface and produce a semiconductor-like layer that acts as a free-carrier barrier. The CRS characteristic here can be elucidated in light of the evolution of an asymmetric free-carrier blocking layer at the electrode/ITO interface.

  20. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a large area (Asource,ITER = 0.9 × 2 m2) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (Asource,BATMAN ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m2) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child-Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion-ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated extracted currents, both ions

  1. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochalskyy, S; Wünderlich, D; Ruf, B; Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Minea, T

    2014-01-01

    The development of a large area (A source,ITER  = 0.9 × 2 m 2 ) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (A source,BATMAN  ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m 2 ) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child–Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion–ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated

  2. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  3. Towards a realistic 3D simulation of the extraction region in ITER NBI relevant ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2015-03-01

    The development of negative ion (NI) sources for ITER is strongly accompanied by modelling activities. The ONIX code addresses the physics of formation and extraction of negative hydrogen ions at caesiated sources as well as the amount of co-extracted electrons. In order to be closer to the experimental conditions the code has been improved. It includes now the bias potential applied to first grid (plasma grid) of the extraction system, and the presence of Cs+ ions in the plasma. The simulation results show that such aspects play an important role for the formation of an ion-ion plasma in the boundary region by reducing the depth of the negative potential well in vicinity to the plasma grid that limits the extraction of the NIs produced at the Cs covered plasma grid surface. The influence of the initial temperature of the surface produced NI and its emission rate on the NI density in the bulk plasma that in turn affects the beam formation region was analysed. The formation of the plasma meniscus, the boundary between the plasma and the beam, was investigated for the extraction potentials of 5 and 10 kV. At the smaller extraction potential the meniscus moves closer to the plasma grid but as in the case of 10 kV the deepest meniscus bend point is still outside of the aperture. Finally, a plasma containing the same amount of NI and electrons (nH- =ne =1017 m-3) , representing good source conditioning, was simulated. It is shown that at such conditions the extracted NI current can reach values of ˜32 mA cm-2 using ITER-relevant extraction potential of 10 kV and ˜19 mA cm-2 at 5 kV. These results are in good agreement with experimental measurements performed at the small scale ITER prototype source at the test facility BATMAN.

  4. Mechanical and tribological properties of carbon thin film with tungsten interlayer prepared by Ion beam assisted deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Tolde, Z.; Sepitka, J.; Gregora, Ivan; Daniš, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, FEB (2013) ISSN 2314-4874 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon coatings * ion beam deposition * XRD * nanoindentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/630156

  5. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  6. Effects of sequential helium and hydrogen ion irradiation on the nucleation and evolution of bubbles in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zhenyu; Zheng, Zhongcheng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Luo, Fengfeng [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Science, Nanchang, 330029 (China); Hu, Wenhui [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, 230031 (China); Zhang, Weiping [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Guo, Liping, E-mail: guolp@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China); Ren, Yaoyao [Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430072 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The effect of H{sup +} irradiation on formation and evolution of helium bubbles is explored. • The growth of hydrogen bubbles under He{sup +} irradiation is observed. • Mechanism of synergistic effect between He and H is discussed. - Abstract: Irradiations of He{sup +} and H{sup +} have been performed to investigate the effect of H{sup +} irradiation on existing helium bubbles and the effect of pre-irradiation of H{sup +} on the formation of helium bubbles in tungsten. The specimens were irradiated at 800 °C with either 10kev-H{sup +}, 20kev-He{sup +}, or sequentially irradiated with both H{sup +} and He{sup +}. After H{sup +} irradiation, the growth of existing helium bubbles was observed. It was also found that pre- or post- irradiation of H{sup +} enhanced the nucleation of helium bubbles. The growth of hydrogen bubbles was also observed after post irradiation of He{sup +}. The possible mechanism is discussed.

  7. Use of ion exchange during preparation of raw materials for production of molybdenum and tungsten of high purify

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Taushkanov, V.P.; Maksimkov, S.M.; Majorov, D.Yu.; Pak, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The data on the application of selective ionites for the steep purification of ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions, are given. It is shown that to purify molybdenum and ammonium tungstate solutions from the impuerities of alkali earth and two- and threevalent transition metals, iminodiacetate ampholites of the ANKB-35 type are the most effective sorbents. To purify from phosphorus, silicon and arsenic impurities composition ionites on the base of hydrated oxides of multivalent metals introduced in the granules of porous cationites should be used. To extract phosphorus, silicon, arsenic impurities from ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions and tungsten from ammonium molybdate solutions the method of their coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide can also be used. The best results on the purification of ammonium molybdate from tungstate provides for the application of structural organomineral ionites as well as weak-basicity anionites of the AN-31 type and its different modifications containing hydroxyl groups along with aminogroups. To purity ammonium tungstate solutions from molybdate a method is developed which transforms molybdenum in the form of thiocomplexes and the following selective sorption by strong-basicity anionites. The data on the quality of molybdenum monocrystals which are taken from the raw material purified using ionites, are given

  8. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  9. Process for recovering tungsten from alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozaki, S.; Nemoto, S.; Hazeyama, T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for recovering tungsten from an alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores. This invention comprises adjusting the pH of an alkaline leaching solution which is obtained by lixiviating ore containing tungsten with an alkaline solution to 7--8 with acid to oxidize molybdic acid ions in the solution, adding a sulfide donor, then precipitating molybdenum sulfide compounds by adjusting the pH value of the solution to 2--3. Tungstic acid ions are recovered as calcium tungstate by the addition of a calcium ion donor after the molybdenum sulfide compounds are separated

  10. Inactivation of the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of silver ions by biologically relevant compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Mulley

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge in the use of silver as an antimicrobial agent in a wide range of domestic and clinical products, intended to prevent or treat bacterial infections and reduce bacterial colonization of surfaces. It has been reported that the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of silver are affected by the assay conditions, particularly the type of growth media used in vitro. The toxicity of Ag+ to bacterial cells is comparable to that of human cells. We demonstrate that biologically relevant compounds such as glutathione, cysteine and human blood components significantly reduce the toxicity of silver ions to clinically relevant pathogenic bacteria and primary human dermal fibroblasts (skin cells. Bacteria are able to grow normally in the presence of silver nitrate at >20-fold the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC if Ag+ and thiols are added in a 1:1 ratio because the reaction of Ag+ with extracellular thiols prevents silver ions from interacting with cells. Extracellular thiols and human serum also significantly reduce the antimicrobial activity of silver wound dressings Aquacel-Ag (Convatec and Acticoat (Smith & Nephew to Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli in vitro. These results have important implications for the deployment of silver as an antimicrobial agent in environments exposed to biological tissue or secretions. Significant amounts of money and effort have been directed at the development of silver-coated medical devices (e.g. dressings, catheters, implants. We believe our findings are essential for the effective design and testing of antimicrobial silver coatings.

  11. Phase diagram, thermodynamic investigations, and modelling of systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuertauer, Siegfried; Beutl, Alexander; Flanorfer, Hans; Henriques, David; Giel, Hans; Markus, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on two consecutive joint projects titled ''Experimental Thermodynamics and Phase Relations of New Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries'', which were performed in the framework of the WenDeLIB 1473 priority program ''Materials with new Design for Lithium Ion Batteries''. Hundreds of samples were synthesized using experimental techniques specifically developed to deal with highly reactive lithium and lithium-containing compounds to generate electrochemical, phase diagram and crystal structure data in the Cu-Li, Li-Sn, Li-Sb, Cu-Li-Sn, Cu-Li-Sb and selected oxide systems. The thermochemical and phase diagram data were subsequently used to develop self-consistent thermodynamic descriptions of several binary systems. In the present contribution, the experimental techniques, working procedures, results and their relevance to the development of new electrode materials for lithium ion batteries are discussed and summarized. The collaboration between the three groups has resulted in more than fifteen (15) published articles during the six-year funding period.

  12. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity of clinically relevant cobalt nanoparticles and ions on macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Xia Zhidao; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Beard, David; Gill, Harinderjit S; Murray, David W, E-mail: young-min.kwon@ndos.ox.ac.u [Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Despite the satisfactory short-term implant survivorship of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, periprosthetic soft-tissue masses such as pseudotumours are being increasingly reported. Cytotoxic effects of cobalt or chromium have been suggested to play a role in its aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant metal nanoparticles and ions on the viability of macrophages in vitro. A RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line was cultured in the presence of either: (1) cobalt, chromium and titanium nanoparticles sized 30-35 nm; or (2) cobalt sulphate and chromium chloride. Two methods were used to quantify cell viability: Alamar Blue assay and Live/Dead assay. The cytotoxicity was observed only with cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles and ions demonstrated dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on macrophages in vitro: the cytotoxic concentrations of nanoparticles and ions were 1 x 10{sup 12} particles ml{sup -1} and 1000 {mu}M, respectively. The high concentration of cobalt nanoparticles required for cytotoxicity of macrophages in vitro suggests that increased production of cobalt nanoparticles in vivo, due to excessive MoM implant wear, may lead to local adverse biological effects. Therefore, cytotoxicity of high concentrations of metal nanoparticles phagocytosed by macrophages located in the periprosthetic tissues may be an important factor in pathogenesis of pseudotumours.

  13. Phase diagram, thermodynamic investigations, and modelling of systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuertauer, Siegfried; Beutl, Alexander; Flanorfer, Hans [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry - Functional Materials; Li, Dajian; Cupid, Damian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP); Henriques, David; Giel, Hans; Markus, Thorsten [Mannheim Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany). Inst. for Thermo- and Fluiddynamics

    2017-11-15

    This article reports on two consecutive joint projects titled ''Experimental Thermodynamics and Phase Relations of New Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries'', which were performed in the framework of the WenDeLIB 1473 priority program ''Materials with new Design for Lithium Ion Batteries''. Hundreds of samples were synthesized using experimental techniques specifically developed to deal with highly reactive lithium and lithium-containing compounds to generate electrochemical, phase diagram and crystal structure data in the Cu-Li, Li-Sn, Li-Sb, Cu-Li-Sn, Cu-Li-Sb and selected oxide systems. The thermochemical and phase diagram data were subsequently used to develop self-consistent thermodynamic descriptions of several binary systems. In the present contribution, the experimental techniques, working procedures, results and their relevance to the development of new electrode materials for lithium ion batteries are discussed and summarized. The collaboration between the three groups has resulted in more than fifteen (15) published articles during the six-year funding period.

  14. Towards a realistic 3D simulation of the extraction region in ITER NBI relevant ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of negative ion (NI) sources for ITER is strongly accompanied by modelling activities. The ONIX code addresses the physics of formation and extraction of negative hydrogen ions at caesiated sources as well as the amount of co-extracted electrons. In order to be closer to the experimental conditions the code has been improved. It includes now the bias potential applied to first grid (plasma grid) of the extraction system, and the presence of Cs + ions in the plasma. The simulation results show that such aspects play an important role for the formation of an ion–ion plasma in the boundary region by reducing the depth of the negative potential well in vicinity to the plasma grid that limits the extraction of the NIs produced at the Cs covered plasma grid surface. The influence of the initial temperature of the surface produced NI and its emission rate on the NI density in the bulk plasma that in turn affects the beam formation region was analysed. The formation of the plasma meniscus, the boundary between the plasma and the beam, was investigated for the extraction potentials of 5 and 10 kV. At the smaller extraction potential the meniscus moves closer to the plasma grid but as in the case of 10 kV the deepest meniscus bend point is still outside of the aperture. Finally, a plasma containing the same amount of NI and electrons (n H − =n e =10 17 m −3 ), representing good source conditioning, was simulated. It is shown that at such conditions the extracted NI current can reach values of ∼32 mA cm −2 using ITER-relevant extraction potential of 10 kV and ∼19 mA cm −2 at 5 kV. These results are in good agreement with experimental measurements performed at the small scale ITER prototype source at the test facility BATMAN. (paper)

  15. Modelling of interplanetary pickup ion fluxes and relevance for LISM parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahr, H.J.; Rucinski, D.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known for many years that neutral interstellar atoms enter the solar system from the upwind side and penetrate deep into the inner heliosphere. Helium atoms, in particular, advance towards very small solar distances before they are ionized and then again convected as He - pickup ions outwards with the solar wind. Since these ions were recently detected in space, we concentrate here on calculations of He + production rates and He + fluxes. It is shown that inside 1 a.u., the He - production is essentially determined both by solar e.u.v. photoionization and by electron impact ionization. We calculate He + production rates as a function of space coordinates, taking into account the core-halo structure of the energy distribution of solar wind electrons and their temperature distribution with distance according to relevant solar wind models. For this purpose, a newly developed program to compute He densities was used. In contrast to the production of H + , the He - production rates are found to be higher on the downwind axis than on the upwind axis by a factor of 5. We also determine partial and total He + ion fluxes as a function of solar distance and longitude. It is interesting to note that only the values for total fluxes agree well with the integrated He + fluxes measured by the SULEICA experiment aboard the AMPTE satellite. This indicates that pickup ions under the influence of the intrinsic MHD wave turbulence in the solar wind change their primary seed distribution function by rapid pitch-angle scattering and subsequent adiabatic cooling. To interpret the He + intensity profile along the orbit of the Earth in terms of LISM helium parameters, we point to the need to take into account carefully electron impact ionization in order to prevent misinterpretations. (author)

  16. Surface energy anisotropy of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R; Grenga, H E [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Chemical Engineering

    1976-10-01

    Field-ion microscopy was used to study the faceting behavior and/or surface energy anisotropy of tungsten in vacuum and in hydrogen. In vacuum below 1700 K the activation energy for (110) facet growth agreed with values previously reported for surface diffusion on tungsten. The observed anisotropy values at 0.5 Tsub(m), where Tsub(m) is the absolute melting temperature of tungsten (approximately 3680 K), were different from those previously reported at higher temperatures and more nearly agreed with broken bond calculations based on Mie potential using m=5, n=8, and a 1.5% lattice expansion. Hydrogen appeared to have a negligible effect on surface energy anisotropy, but did preferentially increase surface diffusion rates on (310) regions.

  17. Studies on ion scattering and sputtering processes relevant to ion beam sputter deposition of multicomponent thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.; Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Results from computer simulation and experiments on ion scattering and sputtering processes in ion beam sputter deposition of high Tc superconducting and ferroelectric thin films are presented. It is demonstrated that scattering of neutralized ions from the targets can result in undesirable erosion of, and inert gas incorporation in, the growing films, depending on the ion/target atom ass ratio and ion beam angle of incidence/target/substrate geometry. The studies indicate that sputtering Kr + or Xe + ions is preferable to the most commonly used Ar + ions, since the undesirable phenomena mentioned above are minimized for the first two ions. These results are used to determine optimum sputter deposition geometry and ion beam parameters for growing multicomponent oxide thin films by ion beam sputter-deposition. 10 refs., 5 figs

  18. Fragmentation of toxicologically relevant drugs in positive-ion liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, W M A

    2011-01-01

    The identification of drugs and related compounds by LC-MS-MS is an important analytical challenge in several application areas, including clinical and forensic toxicology, doping control analysis, and environmental analysis. Although target-compound based analytical strategies are most frequently applied, at some point the information content of the MS-MS spectra becomes relevant. In this article, the positive-ion MS-MS spectra of a wide variety of drugs and related substances are discussed. Starting point was an MS-MS mass spectral library of toxicologically relevant compounds, available on the internet. The positive-ion MS-MS spectra of ∼570 compounds were interpreted by chemical and therapeutic class, thus involving a wide variety of drug compound classes, such benzodiazepines, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, phenothiazines, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, diuretics, local anesthetics, vasodilators, as well as various subclasses of anti-diabetic, antidepressant, analgesic, and antihistaminic drugs. In addition, the scientific literature was searched for available MS-MS data of these compound classes and the interpretation thereof. The results of this elaborate study are presented in this article. For each individual compound class, the emphasis is on class-specific fragmentation, as discussing fragmentation of all individual compounds would take far too much space. The recognition of class-specific fragmentation may be quite informative in determining the compound class of a specific unknown, which may further help in the identification. In addition, knowledge on (class-specific) fragmentation may further help in the optimization of the selectivity in targeted analytical approaches of compounds of one particular class. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Tuning Piezo ion channels to detect molecular-scale movements relevant for fine touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kate; Herget, Regina; Lapatsina, Liudmila; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Lewin, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    In sensory neurons, mechanotransduction is sensitive, fast and requires mechanosensitive ion channels. Here we develop a new method to directly monitor mechanotransduction at defined regions of the cell-substrate interface. We show that molecular-scale (~13 nm) displacements are sufficient to gate mechanosensitive currents in mouse touch receptors. Using neurons from knockout mice, we show that displacement thresholds increase by one order of magnitude in the absence of stomatin-like protein 3 (STOML3). Piezo1 is the founding member of a class of mammalian stretch-activated ion channels, and we show that STOML3, but not other stomatin-domain proteins, brings the activation threshold for Piezo1 and Piezo2 currents down to ~10 nm. Structure–function experiments localize the Piezo modulatory activity of STOML3 to the stomatin domain, and higher-order scaffolds are a prerequisite for function. STOML3 is the first potent modulator of Piezo channels that tunes the sensitivity of mechanically gated channels to detect molecular-scale stimuli relevant for fine touch. PMID:24662763

  20. A study of the effect of helium concentration and displacement damage on the microstructure of helium ion irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. W.; Greaves, G.; Hinks, J. A.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2017-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in-situ He ion irradiation has been used to examine the damage microstructure of W when varying the helium concentration to displacement damage ratio, irradiation temperature and total dose. Irradiations employed 15, 60 or 85 keV He ions, at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C up to doses of ∼3.0 DPA. Once nucleated and grown to an observable size in the TEM, bubble diameter as a function of irradiation dose did not measurably increase at irradiation temperatures of 500 °C between 1.0 and 3.0 DPA; this is attributed to the low mobility of vacancies and He/vacancy complexes at these temperatures. Bubble diameter increased slightly for irradiation temperatures of 750 °C and rapidly increased when irradiated at 1000 °C. Dislocation loops were observed at irradiation temperatures of 500 and 750 °C and no loops were observed at 1000 °C. Burgers vectors of the dislocations were determined to be b = ±½ type only and both vacancy and interstitial loops were observed. The proportion of interstitial loops increased with He-appm/DPA ratio and this is attributed to the concomitant increase in bubble areal density, which reduces the vacancy flux for both the growth of vacancy-type loops and the annihilation of interstitial clusters.

  1. Deuterium accumulation in tungsten at high fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Balden, Martin; Matej, Matej [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bystrov, Kirill; Morgan, Thomas [FOM Institute DIFFER, De Zaale 20, 5612 AJ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-07-01

    The data on the deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) at high fluences (≥ 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}) are scarce and the existing results are contradictory. Since retention in W is known to be flux-dependent, the laboratory experiments addressing this issue should be carried out in reactor-relevant conditions (high fluxes of low-energy ions). In this work the samples made of polycrystalline W were exposed to D plasmas in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI at temperatures ranging from 360 K to 1140 K to fluences in the range of 0.3-8.7 x 10{sup 27} D/m{sup 2}. It was observed that at exposure temperatures of 360 K and 580 K the D retention was only slightly dependent on the ion fluence. In addition, the presence of blister-like structures was found after the exposures, and their density and size distributions were also only weakly dependent on the fluence. In the case of exposure at 1140 K no surface modifications of the samples after plasma exposure were detected and the concentrations of retained D were very small. At all temperatures used the total amounts of retained D were smaller compared to those obtained by other researchers at lower ion flux densities, which indicates that the incident ion flux may play an important role in the total D retention in W.

  2. Surface morphologies of He-implanted tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, M.E., E-mail: bannisterme@ornl.gov [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Meyer, F.W.; Hijazi, H. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Garrison, L.M.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Surface morphologies of tungsten surfaces, both polycrystalline and single-crystal [1 1 0], were investigated using SEM and FIB/SEM techniques after implantations at elevated surfaces temperatures (1200–1300 K) using well-characterized, mono-energetic He ion beams with a wide range of ion energies (218 eV–250 keV). Nanofuzz was observed on polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) following implantation of 100-keV He ions at a flux threshold of 0.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, but not following 200-keV implantations with similar fluxes. No nanofuzz formation was observed on single-crystal [1 1 0] tungsten (SCW), despite fluxes exceeding those demonstrated previously to produce nanofuzz on polycrystalline tungsten. Pre-damaging the single-crystal tungsten with implanted C impurity interstitials did not significantly affect the surface morphologies resulting from the high-flux He ion implantations. The main factor leading to the different observed surface structures for the pristine and C-implanted single-crystal W samples appeared to be the peak He ion flux characterizing the different exposures. It was speculated that nanofuzz formation was not observed for any SCW target exposures because of increased incubation fluences required for such targets.

  3. Tungsten and tungsten alloys by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadjhamida, A.; German, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten has a historical link with powder metallurgy and there is continued progress in expanding the available compositions and processing options. This paper starts with an introduction to the history of tungsten powder metallurgy and use this as a basis for analyzing some of the current trends. The literature base in tungsten processing is expanding and includes new alloys, microstructures, and processing routes. A few examples will be emphasize here to produce a frame work for this program, including description of sintering mechanisms for tungsten, liquid phase sintering advances, hot consolidation fundamentals, and options for complex shaping using powder injection modeling. For this base, subsequent presentations will expand on these fundamental advances

  4. Tailoring of the PS surface with low energy ions: Relevance to growth and adhesion of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporojtchenko, V.; Zekonyte, J.; Wille, S.; Schuermann, U.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    Ion-polymer interaction induces different phenomena in the near surface layer of polymers, and promotes its adhesion to metals. Using XPS, TEM and AFM, polystyrene surface was examined after 1 keV ion-beam treatments with oxygen, nitrogen and argon ions in the ion fluence range from 10 12 to 10 16 cm -2 to clarify the following points: chemical reaction after treatment in vacuum and after exposure to air, identification of adsorption-relevant species for metal atoms, formation of cross-links in the outermost polymer layer. The early stages of metal-polymer interface formation during metallization play a crucial role in the metal-polymer adhesion. Therefore, the influence of the ion fluence and ion chemistry on the condensation of noble metals, film growth and peel strength were measured. The peel strength showed a maximum at a certain fluence depending on ion chemistry. For example, the surface treatment with very low fluence of oxygen ions improved the adhesion between copper and polystyrene by two orders of magnitude without significantly increasing the surface roughness measured with AFM. The locus of failure changed at the same time from interfacial failure for untreated polymer surfaces to cohesive failure in the polymer for modified surfaces. A multilayer model of the metal-polymer interface after ion treatment is suggested

  5. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  6. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-01-01

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  7. EBIT spectroscopy of Pm-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Reyna Almandos, J.; Biedermann, C.; Radtke, R.; Greier, A.; Neu, R.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of VUV electron beam ion trap (EBIT) spectroscopy are applied to the study of Pm-like tungsten (W 13+ ). These data show that theory appears well capable of dealing with these multi-electron (61) ions, at least for high ionization stages. A comparison of other spectroscopic methods applied to the study of other ions of the Pm I sequence is also given, and finally a search for the Pm-like W lines at the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak is mentioned

  8. Electron stripping cross sections for light impurity ions in colliding with atomic hydrogens relevant to fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, H.

    1992-04-01

    Electron stripping (ionization) cross sections for impurity (carbon) ions with various charge states in collisions with atomic hydrogens have been surveyed. It has been found that these data are relatively limited both in collision energy and charge state and, in particular those necessary for high energy neutral beam injection (NBI) heating in fusion plasma research are scarce. Some relevant cross sections for carbon ions, C q+ (q = 0-5) have been estimated, based upon the existing data, empirical behavior and electron impact ionization data. (author)

  9. Electro-Analytical Study of Material Interfaces Relevant for Chemical Mechanical Planarization and Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Michael C.

    galvanic corrosions in chemically controlled low-pressure CMP. The CMP specific functions of the slurry components are characterized in the tribo-electro-analytical approach by using voltammetry, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence as well as in the absence of surface abrasion, both with and without the inclusion of colloidal silica (SiO2) abrasives. The results are used to understand the reaction mechanisms responsible for supporting material removal and corrosion suppression. The project carried out in the area of Li ion batteries (LIBs) uses electro-analytical techniques to probe electrolyte characteristics as well as electrode material performance. The investigation concentrates on optimizing a tactically chosen set of electrolyte compositions for low-to-moderate temperature applications of lithium titanium oxide (LTO), a relatively new anode material for such batteries. For this application, mixtures of non-aqueous carbonate based solvents are studied in combination with lithium perchlorate. The temperature dependent conductivities of the electrolytes are rigorously measured and analyzed using EIS. The experimental considerations and the working principle of this EIS based approach are carefully examined and standardized in the course of this study. These experiments also investigate the effects of temperature variations (below room temperature) on the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation characteristics of LTO in the given electrolytes. This dissertation is organized as follows: Each experimental system and its relevance for practical applications are briefly introduced in each chapter. The experimental approach and the motivation for carrying out the investigation are also noted in that context. The experimental details specific to the particular study are described. This is followed by the results and their discussion, and subsequently, by the specific conclusions drawn from the given

  10. High temperature diffusion of hafnium in tungsten and a tungsten-hafnium carbide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Zee, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Refractory metals and ceramics are used extensively in energy systems due to their high temperature properties. This is particularly important in direct conversion systems where thermal to electric conversion efficiency is a direct function of temperature. Tungsten, which has the highest melting temperature among elemental metals, does not possess sufficient creep resistance at temperature above 1,600 K. Different dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys have been developed to extend the usefulness of tungsten to higher temperatures. One of these alloys, tungsten with 0.4 mole percent of finely dispersed HfC particles (W-HfC), has the optimum properties for high temperature applications. Hafnium carbide is used as the strengthening agent due to its high chemical stability and its compatibility with tungsten. The presence of HfC particles retards the rate of grain growth as well as restricting dislocation motion. Both of which are beneficial for creep resistance. The long term behavior of this alloy depends largely on the evolution of its microstructure which is governed by the diffusion of its constituents. Data on the diffusion of carbon in tungsten and tungsten self-diffusion are available, but no direct measurements have been made on the diffusion of hafnium in tungsten. The only diffusion data available are estimated from a coarsening study and these data are highly unreliable. In this study, the diffusion behavior of hafnium in pure tungsten and in a W-HfC alloy was directly measured by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The selection of the W-HfC alloy is due to its importance in high temperature engineering applications, and its higher recrystallization temperature. The presence of HfC particles in tungsten restricts grain growth resulting in better high temperature creep resistance. The higher recrystallization temperature allows measurements to be made over a wider range of temperatures at a relatively constant grain size

  11. Assessment of potential advantages of relevant ions for particle therapy: A model based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca, E-mail: r.gruen@gsi.de [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Different ion types offer different physical and biological advantages for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this work is to assess the advantages of the most commonly used ions in particle therapy, i.e., carbon ({sup 12}C), helium ({sup 4}He), and protons ({sup 1}H) for different treatment scenarios. Methods: A treatment planning analysis based on idealized target geometries was performed using the treatment planning software TRiP98. For the prediction of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) that is required for biological optimization in treatment planning the local effect model (LEM IV) was used. To compare the three ion types, the peak-to-entrance ratio (PER) was determined for the physical dose (PER{sub PHY} {sub S}), the RBE (PER{sub RBE}), and the RBE-weighted dose (PER{sub BIO}) resulting for different dose-levels, field configurations, and tissue types. Further, the dose contribution to artificial organs at risk (OAR) was assessed and a comparison of the dose distribution for the different ion types was performed for a patient with chordoma of the skull base. Results: The study showed that the advantages of the ions depend on the physical and biological properties and the interplay of both. In the case of protons, the consideration of a variable RBE instead of the clinically applied generic RBE of 1.1 indicates an advantage in terms of an increased PER{sub RBE} for the analyzed configurations. Due to the fact that protons show a somewhat better PER{sub PHY} {sub S} compared to helium and carbon ions whereas helium shows a higher PER{sub RBE} compared to protons, both protons and helium ions show a similar RBE-weighted dose distribution. Carbon ions show the largest variation of the PER{sub RBE} with tissue type and a benefit for radioresistant tumor types due to their higher LET. Furthermore, in the case of a two-field irradiation, an additional gain in terms of PER{sub BIO} is observed when using an orthogonal field configuration

  12. Experimental and theoretical data on ion-molecule-reactions relevant for plasma modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, A.; Praxmarer, C.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the fact that the rate coefficients of hundreds of ion-molecule-reactions have been published in the literature, much more data are required for the purpose of plasma modelling. Many ion molecule reactions have rate coefficients, k, as large as the collisional limiting value, k c , i.e. the rate coefficients k c at which ion-neutral collision complexes are formed are close to the actual rate coefficients observed. In the case of the interaction of an ion with a non polar molecule, k c , is determined by the Langevin limiting value k L being typically 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . However, when ions react with polar molecules k c is predicted by the average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. These classical theories yield accurate rate coefficients at thermal and elevated temperatures for practically all proton transfer as well as for many charge transfer and hydrogen abstraction reactions. The agreement between experimental and calculated values is usually better than ±20% and in the case of proton transfer reactions the agreement seems to be even better as recent investigations have shown. Even the interaction of the permanent ion dipole with non polar and polar neutrals can be taken into account to predict reaction rate coefficients as has been shown very recently in reactions of the highly polar ion ArH 3 + with various neutrals

  13. When is thermodynamics relevant to ion-induced atomic rearrangements in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Cheng, Y.T.; Van Rossum, M.; Nicolet, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    The problem of ion-induced mixing of metal bilayers is examined in the limit of heavy metals (Z > 20) and heavy energetic ions (E > 100 keV) and in the absence of delayed effects such as radiation enhanced thermal diffusion. Thermochemical effects are shown to play an important role in biasing the random walk process of mixing. A universal mixing equation is derived which predicts the evolution of the concentration profile as a function of ion dose. Finally, a model is presented which allows one to predict what metallurgical phases are formed during the mixing process. Criteria for amorphous phase formation are particularly emphasized

  14. A Pilot Study of Ion - Molecule Reactions at Temperatures Relevant to the Atmosphere of Titan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zymak, Illia; Žabka, Ján; Polášek, Miroslav; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2016), s. 533-538 ISSN 0169-6149 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19693S Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1308 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titan ionosphere * variable temperature selected ions flow tube * ion-molecule reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2016

  15. Substitution of thoriated tungsten electrodes in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Piller, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten electrodes are frequently used for inert gas welding (TIG/WIG). The use of these electrodes can lead to doses which are well above the limit for the general population (1mSv/year). This has been shown by different investigations, for example from the ''Berufsgenossenschaft''. With these findings in mind, the regulatory authorities (Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) and Swiss National Accident Insurance Association (Suva)) started in 1999 to examine the justification of thoriated tungsten electrodes and a possible substitution with products containing no radioactive material. Up to this time, the use of thoriated tungsten electrodes could be justified since no thorium-free products leading to comparable results were available on the market. This was also the reason why the SFOPH approved several types of these electrodes. Discussions with formation centers for welding and inquiries made at welding shops, trading companies and producers showed that in the mean-time thorium-free products with comparable welding specifications and results became available on the market. Since the 1 January 2004, thoriated tungsten electrodes can only be used if the user has obtained the corresponding license from the SFOPH. The use of thoriated tungsten electrodes is thus not completely forbidden, but very strict conditions have to be fulfilled. Up to now and due to the involvement of the relevant partners, the substitution process has not met any problem. Neither trading companies nor users made any opposition and no request for obtaining a license for thoriated tungsten electrodes was made. (orig.)

  16. Final Technical Report: Targeting DOE-Relevant Ions with Supramolecular Strategies, DE-SC0010555

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman-James, Kristin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-13

    The effectiveness of three popular supramolecular strategies to selectively target negatively charged ions (anions) was evaluated. Ions of interest included oxo anions, particularly sulfate, that hamper nuclear waste remediation. Three objectives were pursued using a simple building block strategies and by strategically placing anion-binding sites at appropriate positions on organic host molecules. The goal of the first objective was to assess the influence of secondary, tertiary and quaternized amines on binding tetrahedral anions using mixed amide/amine macrocyclic and urea/amine hosts containing aromatic or heteroaromatic spacers. Objective 2 focused on the design of ion pair hosts, using mixed macrocyclic anion hosts joined through polyether linkages. Objective 3 was to explore the synthesis of new metal-linked extended macrocyclic frameworks to leverage anion binding. Key findings were that smaller 24-membered macrocycles provided the most complementary binding for sulfate ion and mixed urea/amine chelates showed enhanced binding over amide corollaries in addition to being highly selective for SO42- in the presence of small quantities of water. In addition to obtaining prototype metal-linked macrocyclic anion hosts, a new dipincer ligand was designed that can be used to link macrocyclic or other supramolecular hosts in extended frameworks. When the tetraamide-based pincers are bound to two metal ions, an interesting phenomenon occurs. Upon deprotonation of the amides, two new protons appear between adjacent carbonyl pairs on the ligand, which may modify the chemistry, and metal-metal interactions in the complexes. Gel formation occurred for some of these extended hosts, and the physical properties are currently under investigation. The new tetracarboxamide-based pincers can also provide basic frameworks for double macrocycles capable of binding ion pairs as well as for binding metal ions and exploring intermetallic interactions through

  17. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  18. Color in 'tungsten trioxide' thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Deneuville, A.; Hollinger, G.; Duc, Tran Minh

    1977-01-01

    We show that evaporated tungsten trioxide amorphous layers commonly used in electrochromic displays actually have the composition WO_2_._7H_y (0.2< y<0.5). We emphasize that coloration of virgin transparent films can be obtained without injection of any external ion into the layer, and further that around a critical substoichiometry by sputtering, namely, WO_2_._5, one can prepare blue virgin layers without any hydrogen. The effect of substoichiometry on the valence of tungsten atoms has been followed by XPS measurements of sputtered layers.

  19. Color in ''tungsten trioxide'' thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Deneuville, A.; Hollinger, G.; Tran Minh Duc

    1977-01-01

    We show that evaporated tungsten trioxide amorphous layers commonly used in electrochromic displays actually have the composition WO/sub 2.7/H/sub y/ (0.2< y<0.5). We emphasize that coloration of virgin transparent films can be obtained without injection of any external ion into the layer, and further that around a critical substoichiometry by sputtering, namely, WO/sub 2.5/, one can prepare blue virgin layers without any hydrogen. The effect of substoichiometry on the valence of tungsten atoms has been followed by XPS measurements of sputtered layers

  20. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Aneeqa, E-mail: aneeqa.khan-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); De Temmerman, Gregory [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046 - 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Morgan, Thomas W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ward, Michael B. [Institute for Materials Research, School of Chemical Process Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  1. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aneeqa; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas W.; Ward, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  2. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  3. Commissioning and first results of the ITER-relevant negative ion beam test facility ELISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Heinemann, B.; Fantz, U.; Wünderlich, D.; Kraus, W.; Fröschle, M.; Martens, C.; Riedl, R.; Nocentini, R.; Masiello, A.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.

    2013-01-01

    The test facility ELISE which was constructed in the last three years at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching, is an important intermediate step of the development of the neutral beam system for ITER. ELISE allows gaining an early experience of the performance and operation of large RF driven sources for negative hydrogen ions and will give an important input for the commissioning and the design of the SPIDER and MITICA test facilities at Padua and the ITER neutral beam system. ELISE has gone recently into operation with first plasma and beam pulses. The experiments aim at the demonstration of an ion beam at the required parameters within 2 years of operation until end of 2014, the end of the service contract with F4E for the establishment and exploitation of ELISE

  4. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  5. Collision of H- with Aq+ ions and their relevance for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzborn, E.

    1993-01-01

    Employing the crossed-beams technique, we have measured absolute cross sections for single- and double-electron removal from H - in collisions with ions Ar q+ and Xe q+ (q ≤ 8) at cm-energies between 20 keV and 200 keV. The single-electron removal cross sections are in excellent agreement with quantum calculations by Presnyakov and Uskov based on a generalization of the Keldysh theory for multi-photon ionization. The data allows, for the first time, a realistic modelling of plasma neutralizers proposed for efficient production of powerful H 0 beams via neutralization of energetic H - ion beams. Multi-megawatt neutral beam injection is a proven technique for auxiliary heating of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The next fusion tokamak ITER calls for a total of 75 MW neutral beam heating based on 1.3 MeV D 0 beams

  6. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunklev, M.

    1999-03-01

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  7. Selective CVD tungsten on silicon implanted SiO/sub 2/

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessy, W.A.; Ghezzo, M.; Wilson, R.H.; Bakhru, H.

    1988-01-01

    The application range of selective CVD tungsten is extended by its coupling to the ion implantation of insulating materials. This article documents the results of selective CVD tungsten using silicon implanted into SiO/sub 2/ to nucleate the tungsten growth. The role of implant does, energy, and surface preparation in achieving nucleation are described. SEM micrographs are presented to demonstrate the selectivity of this process. Measurements of the tungsten film thickness and sheet resistance are provided for each of the experimental variants corresponding to successful deposition. RBS and XPS analysis are discussed in terms of characterizing the tungsten/oxide interface and to evaluate the role of the silicon implant in the CVD tungsten mechanism. Utilizing this method a desired metallization pattern can be readily defined with lithography and ion implantation, and accurately replicated with a layer of CVD tungsten. This approach avoids problems usually associated with blanket deposition and pattern transfer, which are particularly troublesome for submicron VLSI technology

  8. Erosion and migration of tungsten employed at the central column heat shield of ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K.; Gong, X.; Balden, M.; Hildebrandt, D.; Maier, H.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Schneider, W.

    2002-01-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade, tungsten was employed as plasma facing material at the central column heat shield in the plasma main chamber. The campaign averaged tungsten erosion flux was determined by measuring the difference of the W-layer thickness before and after the experimental campaign using ion beam analysis methods. The observed lateral variation and the total amount of eroded tungsten are attributed to erosion by impact of ions from the scrape-off layer plasma. Migration and redeposition of eroded tungsten were investigated by quantitative analysis of deposited tungsten on collector probes and wall samples. The obtained results, as well as the spectroscopically observed low tungsten plasma penetration probability, indicate that a major fraction of the eroded tungsten migrates predominantly through direct transport channels in the outer plasma scrape-off layer without entering the confined plasma

  9. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 México DF (Mexico); DuBois, R.D. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies.

  10. Study of tungsten based positron moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucio, O.G. de; Pérez, M.; Mendoza, U.; Morales, J.G.; Cruz, J.C.; DuBois, R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Positrons and how they interact with matter has a growing interest in many fields. Most of their uses require the production of slow positron beams with a well-defined energy, but since these particles are usually generated by means of a radioactive source, they are fast and with a broad distribution of energies. For this reason it is necessary to moderate them to lower energies via inelastic collisions. Then, they can be accelerated to the desired energies. This requires the use of a moderator. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods of producing transmission tungsten-based moderators, with particular interest in a combination of tungsten thin foils and grids. We also show results about the characterization of these moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques along with their relative moderation efficiencies

  11. Accelerator-Based Studies of Heavy Ion Interactions Relevant to Space Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Zeitlin, C.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the effects of space radiation on the crews of long duration space missions must take into account the interactions of high energy atomic nuclei in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding and in the bodies of the astronauts. These heavy ions (i.e. heavier than hydrogen), while relatively small in number compared to the total galactic cosmic ray (GCR) charged particle flux, can produce disproportionately large effects by virtue of their high local energy deposition: a single traversal by a heavy charged particle can kill or, what may be worse, severely damage a cell. Research into the pertinent physics and biology of heavy ion interactions has consequently been assigned a high priority in a recent report by a task group of the National Research Council. Fragmentation of the incident heavy ions in shielding or in the human body will modify an initially well known radiation field and thereby complicate both spacecraft shielding design and the evaluation of potential radiation hazards. Since it is impractical to empirically test the radiation transport properties of each possible shielding material and configuration, a great deal of effort is going into the development of models of charged particle fragmentation and transport. Accurate nuclear fragmentation cross sections (probabilities), either in the form of measurements with thin targets or theoretical calculations, are needed for input to the transport models, and fluence measurements (numbers of fragments produced by interactions in thick targets) are needed both to validate the models and to test specific shielding materials and designs. Fluence data are also needed to characterize the incident radiation field in accelerator radiobiology experiments. For a number of years, nuclear fragmentation measurements at GCR-like energies have been carried out at heavy ion accelerators including the LBL Bevalac, Saturne (France), the Synchrophasotron and Nuklotron (Dubna, Russia), SIS-18 (GSI, Germany), the

  12. Low-energy ion bombardment of frozen bacterial spores and its relevance to interplanetary space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuleta, M.; Gabla, L.; Szkarlat, A.

    2005-01-01

    The panspermia hypothesis is concerned with the dissemination of life in space in the form of simple micro-organisms. During an interplanetary journey the micro-organisms are subjected to the action of, among others, the solar wind. We have simulated experimentally such conditions bombarding frozen bacterial spores with low-energy hydrogen ions. On the basis of the results obtained and our earlier research, a new look at the panspermia hypothesis is discussed. The general conclusion is that unprotected naked spores, their conglomerates and protected spores can survive attack of the solar wind, although to various degrees. (authors)

  13. Low-energy ion bombardment of frozen bacterial spores and its relevance to interplanetary space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuleta, M.; Gabla, L. [Jagiellonian Univ., Institute of Physics, Cracow (Poland); Szkarlat, A. [Clinical Children' s Hospital of the Jagiellonian Univ., Medical College, Lab. of Microbiology, Cracow (Poland)

    2005-04-01

    The panspermia hypothesis is concerned with the dissemination of life in space in the form of simple micro-organisms. During an interplanetary journey the micro-organisms are subjected to the action of, among others, the solar wind. We have simulated experimentally such conditions bombarding frozen bacterial spores with low-energy hydrogen ions. On the basis of the results obtained and our earlier research, a new look at the panspermia hypothesis is discussed. The general conclusion is that unprotected naked spores, their conglomerates and protected spores can survive attack of the solar wind, although to various degrees. (authors)

  14. Formation of carbon containing layers on tungsten test limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubel, M.; Philipps, V.; Huber, A.; Tanabe, T.

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten test limiters of mushroom shape and a plasma facing area of approximately 100 cm 2 were exposed at the TEXTOR-94 tokamak to a number of deuterium fuelled discharges performed under various operation conditions. Two types of limiters were tested: a sole tungsten limiter and a twin limiter consisting of two halves, one made of tungsten and another of graphite. The exposed surfaces were examined with ion beam analysis methods and laser profilometry. The formation of some deposition zones was observed near the edges of the limiters. The deuterium-to-carbon concentration ratio was in the range from 0.04 to 0.11 and around 0.2 for the sole tungsten and the twin limiter, respectively. Significant amounts of the co-deposited tungsten and silicon atoms were found on the graphite part of the twin limiter indicating the formation of mixed W-C-Si compounds. (orig.)

  15. Tungsten or Wolfram: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoroddu, Maria A; Medici, Serenella; Peana, Massimiliano; Nurchi, Valeria M; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Laulicht-Glickc, Freda; Costa, Max

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten or wolfram was regarded for many years as an enemy within the tin smelting and mining industry, because it conferred impurity or dirtiness in tin mining. However, later it was considered an amazing metal for its strength and flexibility, together with its diamond like hardness and its melting point which is the highest of any metal. It was first believed to be relatively inert and an only slightly toxic metal. Since early 2000, the risk exerted by tungsten alloys, its dusts and particulates to induce cancer and several other adverse effects in animals as well as humans has been highlighted from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Thus, it becomes necessary to take a careful look at all the most recent data reported in the scientific literature, covering the years 2001-2016. In fact, the findings indicate that much more attention should be devoted to thoroughly investigate the toxic effects of tungsten and the involved mechanisms of tungsten metal or tungsten metal ions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Plasma etching of patterned tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franssila, S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma etching of tungsten is discussed from the viewpoint of thin film structure and integrated circuit process engineering. The emphasis is on patterned tungsten etching for silicon device and X-ray mask fabrication. After introducing tungsten etch chemistries and mechanisms, microstructural aspects of tungsten films (crystal structure, grain size, film density, defects, impurities) in relation to etching are discussed. Approaches to etch process optimization are presented, and the current state-of-the-art of patterned tungsten etching is reviewed. (orig.)

  17. Performance of multi-aperture grid extraction systems for an ITER-relevant RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, P.; Gutser, R.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; McNeely, P.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Stäbler, A.; Wünderlich, D.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam system requires a negative hydrogen ion beam of 48 A with an energy of 0.87 MeV, and a negative deuterium beam of 40 A with an energy of 1 MeV. The beam is extracted from a large ion source of dimension 1.9 × 0.9 m2 by an acceleration system consisting of seven grids with 1280 apertures each. Currently, apertures with a diameter of 14 mm in the first grid are foreseen. In 2007, the IPP RF source was chosen as the ITER reference source due to its reduced maintenance compared with arc-driven sources and the successful development at the BATMAN test facility of being equipped with the small IPP prototype RF source ( {\\sim}\\frac{1}{8} of the area of the ITER NBI source). These results, however, were obtained with an extraction system with 8 mm diameter apertures. This paper reports on the comparison of the source performance at BATMAN of an ITER-relevant extraction system equipped with chamfered apertures with a 14 mm diameter and 8 mm diameter aperture extraction system. The most important result is that there is almost no difference in the achieved current density—being consistent with ion trajectory calculations—and the amount of co-extracted electrons. Furthermore, some aspects of the beam optics of both extraction systems are discussed.

  18. Performance of multi-aperture grid extraction systems for an ITER-relevant RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Gutser, R.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; McNeely, P.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Staebler, A.; Wuenderlich, D.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER neutral beam system requires a negative hydrogen ion beam of 48 A with an energy of 0.87 MeV, and a negative deuterium beam of 40 A with an energy of 1 MeV. The beam is extracted from a large ion source of dimension 1.9 x 0.9 m 2 by an acceleration system consisting of seven grids with 1280 apertures each. Currently, apertures with a diameter of 14 mm in the first grid are foreseen. In 2007, the IPP RF source was chosen as the ITER reference source due to its reduced maintenance compared with arc-driven sources and the successful development at the BATMAN test facility of being equipped with the small IPP prototype RF source ( ∼ 1/8 of the area of the ITER NBI source). These results, however, were obtained with an extraction system with 8 mm diameter apertures. This paper reports on the comparison of the source performance at BATMAN of an ITER-relevant extraction system equipped with chamfered apertures with a 14 mm diameter and 8 mm diameter aperture extraction system. The most important result is that there is almost no difference in the achieved current density-being consistent with ion trajectory calculations-and the amount of co-extracted electrons. Furthermore, some aspects of the beam optics of both extraction systems are discussed.

  19. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lipowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologically-relevant saliva concentrations. The sample and fluorescent reagent solutions are placed in a specially-designed, lightweight device that excludes ambient light and concentrates 470-nm excitation light, from a low-power photodiode, within the sample through non-axially-symmetric refraction. The study found that smartphone cameras and post-image processing quantitated sodium ion concentration in water over the range of 0.5–10 mM, yielding best-fit regressions of the data that agree well with a data regression of microplate luminometer results. The data suggest that fluorescence can be used for the measurement of salivary sodium ion concentrations in low-resource or point-of-care settings. With further fluorescent assay testing, the device may find application in a variety of enzymatic or chemical assays.

  20. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hankins, M.R.; Longhurst, G.R.; Neiser, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D + 3 ion beam with fluxes of similar 6.5x10 19 D/m 2 s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity. ((orig.))

  1. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Pawelko, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Hankins, M.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Longhurst, G.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Neiser, R.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D[sup +][sub 3] ion beam with fluxes of similar 6.5x10[sup 19] D/m[sup 2] s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity. ((orig.))

  2. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Pawelko, R. J.; Hankins, M. R.; Longhurst, G. R.; Neiser, R. A.

    1994-09-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D 3+ ion beam with fluxes of ˜6.5 × 10 19 D/m 2 s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity.

  3. Measuring deuterium permeation through tungsten near room temperature under plasma loading using a getter layer and ion-beam based detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kapser

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A method to measure deuterium permeation through tungsten near room temperature under plasma loading is presented. The permeating deuterium is accumulated in a getter layer of zirconium, titanium or erbium, respectively, on the unexposed side of the sample. Subsequently, the amount of deuterium in the getter is measured ex-situ using nuclear reaction analysis. A cover layer system on the getter prevents direct loading of the getter with deuterium from the gas phase during plasma loading. In addition, it enables the distinction of deuterium in the getter and at the cover surface. The method appears promising to add additional permeation measurement capabilities to deuterium retention experiments, also in other plasma devices, without the need for a complex in-situ permeation measurement setup.

  4. Calculation of deuterium retention in, re-emission and reflection from a tungsten material under D+ ions irradiation with ACAT-DIFFUSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, T.; Muramoto, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Kawamura, T.

    2008-08-01

    We calculated, with a dynamic Monte Carlo code ACAT-DIFFUSE, fluxes of thermal D 2 re-emission, reflection and self-sputtering from a wrought tungsten material during a time sequence of 100 eV D + implantation, post-implanted isothermal out-gassing and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The obtained result agreed well with an existing experiment, where diffusion was considered in the calculations from the beginning of implantation. The three fluxes in the implantation period were shown to be almost comparable. The integrated deuterium flux released in the same period was estimated. The depth profiles of deuterium retained at 300 K in that period indicate that, while their maximum locations did not move, the profiles were broadened out because of fast diffusion. The amount of deuterium retained at 300 K was one order of magnitude higher than that at 473 K. (author)

  5. Pulse current electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on V–4Cr–4Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Fan; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Xuliang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on vanadium alloy substrate. • Tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers. • Tungsten coatings plated at lower duty cycle has a better surface quality. • High heat flux property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Helium ion irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings with high (2 2 0)-orientation were formed on V alloy substrate by pulse current electrodeposition in air atmosphere. The coatings’ microstructure, crystal structure and adhesive strength between coatings and substrates were investigated. It could be observed the tungsten coatings consisted of two sub-layers with the inner tooth-like layer, and the outer columnar layer. The tungsten coatings deposited at lower duty cycle have a better surface quality with a little change in the adhesive strength. The tungsten coating was exposed to electron beam with power density of 200 MW/m 2 in the thermal shock test, the tungsten crystal grain surface melt, the microcracks are found among the crystal grains. Exfoliation, flaking and dense needle-like holes were observed on the tungsten coating after irradiation with helium ions at an energy of 65 keV and an implanted dose of 22.67 × 10 18 cm −2

  6. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  7. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W"2"4"+ - W"3"2"+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W"2"2"+ - W"3"5"+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W"2"5"+ - W"2"8"+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p"54d"n"+"1 - 4p"64d"n, of W"2"9"+ - W"3"5"+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p"54d"n4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of electrode materials pyrochlore tungsten trioxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingdong; Li, Yingjeng James; Stanley Whittingham, M.

    Hydrothermal synthesis methods have been successfully used to prepare new transition-metal oxides for cathodes in electrochemical devices such as lithium batteries and electrochromic windows. The tungsten oxides were the first studied, but the method has been extended to the oxides of molybdenum, vanadium and manganese. Sodium tungsten oxide films with the pyrochlore structure have been prepared on gold/alumina and indium-doped tin oxide substrates. These films reversibly and rapidly intercalate lithium and hydrogen ions.

  9. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructural evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible tritium

  10. Reorientation measurements on tungsten isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J J; Saladin, J X; Baktash, C; Alessi, J G [Pittsburgh Univ., Pa. (USA)

    1977-11-14

    In a particle-..gamma.. coincidence experiment, a thick tungsten target, of natural isotopic abundance, was bombarded with ..cap alpha.. and /sup 16/O beams. From analysis of the deexcitation ..gamma..-rays following Coulomb excitation, the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the second 2/sup +/ state (the 2/sup +/' state) was determined for /sup 186/W and /sup 184/W. In a separate Coulomb excitation experiment a thin, isotopically enriched /sup 186/W target was bombarded with /sup 16/O ions. From analysis of projectiles scattered elastically and inelastically the quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state of /sup 186/W was extracted. The results of the two experiments are in good agreement. The quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state is found to be opposite in sign to that of the first 2/sup +/ state for both isotopes studied. However, its magnitude decreases rapidly in going from /sup 186/W to /sup 184/W, in contrast to the predictions of the rotation-vibration of asymmetric rotor models. The microscopic theory of Kumar and Baranger does predict the experimental trend, qualitatively. Thus the present results are interpreted as being evidence of strong coupling between ..beta.. and ..gamma.. degrees of freedom in the tungsten isotopes, which, according to the theory of Kumar and Baranger, is the source of the reduced value of the quadrupole moment.

  11. From Heavy-Ion Collisions to Compact Stars: Equation of State and Relevance of the System Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Mogliacci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we start by presenting state-of-the-art methods allowing us to compute moments related to the globally conserved baryon number, by means of first principle resummed perturbative frameworks. We focus on such quantities for they convey important properties of the finite temperature and density equation of state, being particularly sensitive to changes in the degrees of freedom across the quark-hadron phase transition. We thus present various number susceptibilities along with the corresponding results as obtained by lattice quantum chromodynamics collaborations, and comment on their comparison. Next, omitting the importance of coupling corrections and considering a zero-density toy model for the sake of argument, we focus on corrections due to the small size of heavy-ion collision systems, by means of spatial compactifications. Briefly motivating the relevance of finite size effects in heavy-ion physics, in opposition to the compact star physics, we present a few preliminary thermodynamic results together with the speed of sound for certain finite size relativistic quantum systems at very high temperature.

  12. Alkali Metal Ion Complexes with Phosphates, Nucleotides, Amino Acids, and Related Ligands of Biological Relevance. Their Properties in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal ions play very important roles in all biological systems, some of them are essential for life. Their concentration depends on several physiological factors and is very variable. For example, sodium concentrations in human fluids vary from quite low (e.g., 8.2 mmol dm(-3) in mature maternal milk) to high values (0.14 mol dm(-3) in blood plasma). While many data on the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) in various fluids are available, the information on other alkali metal cations is scarce. Since many vital functions depend on the network of interactions occurring in various biofluids, this chapter reviews their complex formation with phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, and related ligands of biological relevance. Literature data on this topic are quite rare if compared to other cations. Generally, the stability of alkali metal ion complexes of organic and inorganic ligands is rather low (usually log K  Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). For example, for citrate it is: log K ML = 0.88, 0.80, 0.48, 0.38, and 0.13 at 25 °C and infinite dilution. Some considerations are made on the main aspects related to the difficulties in the determination of weak complexes. The importance of the alkali metal ion complexes was also studied in the light of modelling natural fluids and in the use of these cations as probes for different processes. Some empirical relationships are proposed for the dependence of the stability constants of Na(+) complexes on the ligand charge, as well as for correlations among log K values of NaL, KL or LiL species (L = generic ligand).

  13. Influence of copper ions on the viability and cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under conditions relevant to drinking water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwidjosiswojo, Zenyta; Richard, Jessica; Moritz, Miriam M; Dopp, Elke; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2011-11-01

    Copper plumbing materials can be the source of copper ions in drinking water supplies. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of copper ions on the viability and cytotoxicity of the potential pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa that presents a health hazard when occurring in building plumbing systems. In batch experiments, exposure of P. aeruginosa (10(6)cells/mL) for 24h at 20°C to copper-containing drinking water from domestic plumbing systems resulted in a loss of culturability, while total cell numbers determined microscopically did not decrease. Addition of the chelator diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to copper-containing water prevented the loss of culturability. When suspended in deionized water with added copper sulfate (10 μM), the culturability of P. aeruginosa decreased by more than 6 log units, while total cell counts, the concentration of cells with intact cytoplasmic membranes, determined with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit, and the number of cells with intact 16S ribosomal RNA, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization, remained unchanged. When the chelator DDTC was added to copper-stressed bacteria, complete restoration of culturability was observed to occur within 14 d. Copper-stressed bacteria were not cytotoxic towards Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-9) cells, while untreated and resuscitated bacteria caused an almost complete decrease of the concentration of viable CHO-9 cells within 24 h. Thus, copper ions in concentrations relevant to drinking water in plumbing systems seem to induce a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in P. aeruginosa accompanied by a loss of culturability and cytotoxicity, and VBNC cells can regain both culturability and cytotoxicity, when copper stress is abolished. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Calculation of deuterium retention, re-emission and reflection from a tungsten material under D+ ions irradiation with ACAT-DIFFUSE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Muramoto, T.; Kawamura, T.

    2009-01-01

    We calculated, with a dynamic Monte Carlo code ACAT-DIFFUSE, fluxes of thermal D 2 re-emission, reflection and segregated self-sputtering of D from a D + implanted wrought tungsten material during a time sequence of l00 eV D + implantation, post-implanted isothermal out-gassing and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The obtained result was in good agreement with an existing experiment if two different trap sites with de-trapping energy of 0.85 eV and 2.2 eV and density fraction of 0.05 D/W and 0.01 D/W were assumed to exist. The re-emission, reflection and self-sputtering fluxes in the implantation period were shown to be almost comparable. The integrated deuterium flux released in the same period was estimated. The amount of deuterium retained at 300 K was nearly six times higher than that at 473 K, which reflects the result that mobile atoms and atoms trapped in 0.85 eV trap existed abundantly at 300 K but scarcely at 473 K.

  15. Gas-driven permeation of deuterium through tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean A., E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fang, Zhigang Zak; Ren, Chai [University of Utah, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Oya, Yasuhisa [Shizuoka University, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamauchi, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Third Division of Quantum Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sapporo (Japan); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Energy Innovation Department, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and performed initial studies on a high temperature gas-driven permeation cell capable of operating at temperatures up to 1150 °C and at pressures between 0.1–1 atm. • Permeation measurements on ITER grade tungsten compare well with past studies by Frauenfelder and Zahkarov in the temperature range from 500 to 1000 °C. • First permeation measurements on Ti dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grained tungsten show higher permeation at 500 °C, but very similar permeation with ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. Diffusion along grain boundaries may be playing a role for this type of material. - Abstract: To address the transport and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, several permeation experiments are being pursued at both Sandia National Laboratories (deuterium gas-driven permeation) and Idaho National Laboratories (tritium gas- and plasma-driven tritium permeation). These experiments are in part a collaboration between the US and Japan to study the performance of tungsten at divertor relevant temperatures (PHENIX). Here we report on the development of a high temperature (≤1150 °C) gas-driven permeation cell and initial measurements of deuterium permeation in several types of tungsten: high purity tungsten foil, ITER-grade tungsten (grains oriented through the membrane), and dispersoid-strengthened ultra-fine grain (UFG) tungsten being developed in the US. Experiments were performed at 500–1000 °C and 0.1–1.0 atm D{sub 2} pressure. Permeation through ITER-grade tungsten was similar to earlier W experiments by Frauenfelder (1968–69) and Zaharakov (1973). Data from the UFG alloy indicates marginally higher permeability (< 10×) at lower temperatures, but the permeability converges to that of the ITER tungsten at 1000 °C. The permeation cell uses only ceramic and graphite materials in the hot zone to reduce the possibility for oxidation of the sample membrane. Sealing pressure is applied externally, thereby allowing for elevation

  16. Tungsten behaviour under anodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas'ko, A.T.; Patsyuk, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical investigations have been carried out to identify the state of elements of the tungsten galvanic coating. Active zones on anode polarization curves in the hydrogen region of galvanic tungsten are established. The difference in the behaviour of monocrystal and galvanic tungsten electrodes is shown to be connected with the oxidation of hydrogen in the galvanic sediment

  17. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  18. Heterogeneous reactions between ions NH3+and NH+andhydrocarbons adsorbed on a tungsten surface.Formation of HCN+in NH+-surface hydrocarbon collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harnisch, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 392, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 139-144 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion-surface collisions * NH3+ and NH+projectiles * surface hydrocarbons Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  19. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  20. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  1. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  2. Performance of the linear ion trap Orbitrap mass analyzer for qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, L.; Emke, E.; Hernández, F.; de Voogt, P.

    2013-01-01

    This work illustrates the potential of liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier Transform Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water. The developed methodology consisted of

  3. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  4. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  5. Materials Survey: Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-12-01

    Columbia, from which tungsten production is planned approximately 60 miles east fromSkagway, were estimated at the end of 1951 to be Alaska. Reserves...of the principal mines inimportant producers. 1952 halted expansion programs planned by Production in Argentina reached a maxi- Patiffo Mines and...government.Concentrates International Mining Co. (W. R. Grace & from small producers are collected and Co.), La Paz; Chojlla Mine; type ore-- marketed by Banco Minero

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 1: Workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, K.N.; Alonso, J.

    1994-10-01

    The workshop reviewed the ion-source requirements for high-power accelerator-driven spallation neutron facilities, and the performance of existing ion sources. Proposals for new facilities in the 1- to 5-MW range call for a widely differing set of ion-source requirements. For example, the source peak current requirements vary from 40 mA to 150 mA, while the duty factor ranges from 1% to 9%. Much of the workshop discussion centered on the state-of-the-art of negative hydrogen ion source (H - ) technology and the present experience with Penning and volume sources. In addition, other ion source technologies, for positive ions or CW applications were reviewed. Some of these sources have been operational at existing accelerator complexes and some are in the source-development stage on test stands

  7. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  8. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Temmerman, Greg De; Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker; Oost, Guido Van; Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10 23 D + /m 2 s and low: 9 · 10 21 D + /m 2 s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10 26 D + /m 2 and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion

  9. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  10. Tungsten ion implantation into copper by use of metal arc-plasma electro-magnetically accelerated to several km s{sup -1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, A.; Aso, Y.; Hosoya, H.; Kiritani, M

    2003-06-15

    A coaxial plasma gun was designed for the injection of W into Cu, by employment of the high speed of W ions attained by electro-magnetic acceleration. Under acceleration at 5 kV, W atoms could be injected into a Cu substrate at depths up to about 30 {mu}m, whereas under acceleration at 4 kV no injection was observed. The injected W was observed to have nonuniform spatial distribution provably forming clusters or small groups of particles. Under acceleration at 5 kV, the first plasma to arrive at the substrate has a velocity of 10 km s{sup -1}, which is much higher than that of initial plasma under acceleration at 4 kV. Immediately after the initial plasma, the relationship between the velocities of the respective plasmas reverses, so that average velocity at 5 kV is lower than that at 4 kV. Maximum plasma velocity plays a major role in the injection of W; i.e. the depth of W injection may depend on the velocity of initially generated plasma. The subsequent plasma forms a W layer on the surface of the substrate.

  11. Tungsten and carbon surface change under high dose plasma exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, Y.V.; Khripunov, B.I.; Petrov, V.B.

    2009-01-01

    Study of surface composition dynamics has been made on the LENTA linear plasma simulator. Experiments have been made on tungsten and carbon materials subjected to steady-state plasma exposure. The achieved ion doses on the surface were 10 21 ion cm -2 . WL 10 tungsten containing 1% of La2O3 oxide and titanium-doped graphite RG-T were studied. The following experimental conditions were varied in these experiments: energy of ions, surface temperature, working gas. Irradiations of tungsten WL 10 were executed in deuterium plasma at low ion energies (about 20 eV) and at 200 eV for temperatures below 340 K. Graphite RG-T was exposed at 1300 K. Elevated surface temperature (about 1050K) was also characteristic of experiments on tungsten sample under nitrogen plasma impact (simulated inter-ELMs condition). Surface microstructure modification has been observed and surface composition changes were found on the materials showing influence of high dose plasma irradiations on element redistribution in the near surface layers. (author)

  12. Controlled nanostructuration of polycrystalline tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, B. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Institut de Recherche en Genie Civil et Mecanique (UMR CNRS 6183), LUNAM Universite, Universite de Nantes, Centrale Nantes, CRTT, 37 Bd de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint-Nazaire Cedex (France); Eyidi, D.; Goudeau, P.; Guerin, P.; Bourhis, E. Le; Renault, P.-O. [Institut P' (UPR 3346 CNRS), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, Bd Pierre et Marie Curie, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Sauvage, T. [CEMHTI/CNRS (UPR 3079 CNRS), Universite d' Orleans, 3A rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-05-07

    Nanostructured tungsten thin films have been obtained by ion beam sputtering technique stopping periodically the growing. The total thickness was maintained constant while nanostructure control was obtained using different stopping periods in order to induce film stratification. The effect of tungsten sublayers' thicknesses on film composition, residual stresses, and crystalline texture evolution has been established. Our study reveals that tungsten crystallizes in both stable {alpha}- and metastable {beta}-phases and that volume proportions evolve with deposited sublayers' thicknesses. {alpha}-W phase shows original fiber texture development with two major preferential crystallographic orientations, namely, {alpha}-W<110> and unexpectedly {alpha}-W<111> texture components. The partial pressure of oxygen and presence of carbon have been identified as critical parameters for the growth of metastable {beta}-W phase. Moreover, the texture development of {alpha}-W phase with two texture components is shown to be the result of a competition between crystallographic planes energy minimization and crystallographic orientation channeling effect maximization. Controlled grain size can be achieved for the {alpha}-W phase structure over 3 nm stratification step. Below, the {beta}-W phase structure becomes predominant.

  13. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  14. Ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The specifications of a set of point-shape electrodes of non-corrodable material that can hold a film of liquid material of equal thickness is described. Contained in a jacket, this set forms an ion source. The electrode is made of tungsten with a glassy carbon layer for insulation and an outer layer of aluminium-oxide ceramic material

  15. IMP-8 observations of the spectra, composition, and variability of solar heavy ions at high energies relevant to manned space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.

    1999-01-01

    In more than 25 years of almost continuous observations, the University of Chicago's Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) on IMP-8 has amassed a unique database on high-energy solar heavy ions of potential relevance to manned spaceflight. In the very largest particle events, IMP-8/CRT has even observed solar Fe ions above the Galactic cosmic ray background up to ∼800 MeV/nucleon, an energy sufficiently high to penetrate nearly 25 g/cm 2 of shielding. IMP-8/CRT observations show that high-energy heavy-ion spectra are often surprisingly hard power laws, without the exponential roll-offs suggested by stochastic acceleration fits to lower energy measurements alone. Also, in many solar particle events the Fe/O ratio grows with increasing energy, contrary to the notion that ions with higher mass-to-charge ratios should be less abundant at higher energies. Previous studies of radiation hazards for manned spaceflight have often assumed heavy-ion composition and steeply-falling energy spectra inconsistent with these observations. Conclusions based on such studies should therefore be re-assessed. The significant event-to-event variability observed in the high-energy solar heavy ions also has important implications for strategies in building probabilistic models of solar particle radiation hazards

  16. Simulation for evaluation of the multi-ion-irradiation Laboratory of TechnoFusion facility and its relevance for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Rey, D.; Mota, F.; Vila, R.; Ibarra, A.; Ortiz, Christophe J.; Martinez-Albertos, J.L.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion requires the development of several research facilities, in addition to ITER, needed to advance the technologies for future fusion reactors. TechnoFusion will focus in some of the priority areas identified by international fusion programmes. Specifically, the TechnoFusion Area of Irradiation of Materials aims at surrogating experimentally the effects of neutron irradiation on materials using a combination of ion beams. This paper justifies this approach using computer simulations to validate the multi-ion-irradiation Laboratory. The planned irradiation facility will investigate the effects of high energetic radiations on reactor-relevant materials. In a second stage, it will also be used to analyze the performance of such materials and evaluate newly designed materials. The multi-ion-irradiation Laboratory, both triple irradiation and high-energy proton irradiation, can provide valid experimental techniques to reproduce the effect of neutron damage in fusion environment.

  17. Production And Characterization Of Tungsten-Based Positron Moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucio, O. G. de; Morales, J. G.; Cruz-Manjarrez, H.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments of interest in Atomic Physics require production of well-defined low-energy positron beams through a moderation process of high-energy positrons, which can be produced by either the use of a radioactive source or by accelerator based pair production process. Tungsten is one of the most commonly used moderator materials because of its reasonable efficiency, high work function and relatively low cost. In this work we present different methods to produce tungsten-based candidate moderators in a variety of shapes. We also present results from characterizing these candidate moderators by ion beam analysis and microscopy techniques.

  18. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  19. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  20. Use of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory to Conduct Charged Particle Radiobiology Studies Relevant to Ion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathryn D; Blakely, Eleanor A; Story, Michael D; Lowenstein, Derek I

    2016-06-01

    Although clinical studies with carbon ions have been conducted successfully in Japan and Europe, the limited radiobiological information about charged particles that are heavier than protons remains a significant impediment to exploiting the full potential of particle therapy. There is growing interest in the U.S. to build a cancer treatment facility that utilizes charged particles heavier than protons. Therefore, it is essential that additional radiobiological knowledge be obtained using state-of-the-art technologies and biological models and end points relevant to clinical outcome. Currently, most such ion radiotherapy-related research is being conducted outside the U.S. This article addresses the substantial contributions to that research that are possible at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is the only facility in the U.S. at this time where heavy-ion radiobiology research with the ion species and energies of interest for therapy can be done. Here, we briefly discuss the relevant facilities at NSRL and how selected charged particle biology research gaps could be addressed using those facilities.

  1. Reduction of blue tungsten oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, T.; Wert, C.; Woodhouse, J.; Morcom, W.

    1975-01-01

    A significant portion of commercial tungsten is produced by hydrogen reduction of oxides. Although several modes of reduction are possible, hydrogen reduction is used where high purity tungsten is required and where the addition of other elements or compounds is desired for modification of the metal, as is done for filaments in the lamp industry. Although several investigations of the reduction of oxides have been reported (1 to 5), few principles have been developed which can aid in assessment of current commercial practice. The reduction process was examined under conditions approximating commercial practice. The specific objectives were to determine the effects of dopants, of water vapor in the reducing atmosphere, and of reduction temperature upon: (1) the rate of the reaction by which blue tungsten oxide is reduced to tungsten metal, (2) the intermediate oxides associated with reduction, and (3) the morphology of the resulting tungsten powder

  2. Ion and electron swarm studies of relevance to plasma processing: positive ion-molecule and electron-molecule studies of SF6 and derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atterbury, C.; Kennedy, R.A.; Critchley, A.D.J.; Mayhew, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Many sequential and parallel chemical reactions involving charged species occur in a plasma. Data needed to model plasma's chemical and physical environment includes cross-section, rate coefficients, and product ion distribution of electron-molecule and ion-molecule processes. Such reactions are studied by our group away from the complexity of the plasma environment, with experimental techniques that allow us to concentrate on a single process, where usually only one or two species are involved. A molecule commonly used in plasma etching applications is SF 6 1,2 . We have performed a series of positive ion-molecule and electron attachment studies on SF 6 and related molecules, including SeF 6 , TeF 6 (i.e. XF 6 molecules), SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl (i.e. SF 5 X molecules) 3- (. The studies of ion reactions with and electron attachment to SF 6 and physically similar molecules are of value when seeking to understand the ion and electron chemistry occurring in SF 6 containing plasma. The result of these studies are presented in this poster. Ion-molecule reactions. Rate coefficients and ion product branching ratios have been determined with the Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) at room temperature (300 K) for reactions of SF 5 X with the following twenty-two cations; Ne + , F + , Ar + , N 2 + , N + , CO + , CO 2 + , O + , N 2 O + , O 2 + , SF 4 + , CF 2 + , SF + , SF 2 + , NO 2 + , SF 5 + , NO + , CF + , CF 3 + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + (listed in order of decreasing recombination energy). SF 2 + , NO 2 + , NO + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + are found to be unreacted with both SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl. The majority of the other reactions proceed with rate coefficients that are close to the capture value. Those found to occur at rates significantly less than the capture mechanism value re the reactions of O 2 + , SF + , SF 5 + , and CF 3 + with SF 5 CF 3 , and SF 4 + and SF 5 + with SF 5 Cl. Several distinction processes are observed among the large number of reactions studied, including

  3. Surface tungsten reduction during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere: A paradox?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fait, Martin J.G.; Radnik, Jörg; Lunk, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Detection of reduced tungsten ions at the solid’s surface in oxidising atmosphere. • Detection of gaseous ammonia liberated as oxidising agent. • Detection of ammonia’s oxidation products. • Quantification of the ammonia/tungsten redox process. - Abstract: The interaction of ammonia, liberated during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere, with tungsten has been studied employing a conventional microbalance combined with MS (Setaram’s instrument Sensys). Applying XPS a partial reduction of tungsten at the surface with the minimal tungsten oxidation number of +5.3 for a sample generated at 293 °C was detected. The balancing oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen/nitrogen oxides has been proven by MS. An amount of 0.049 mol e"− per mol W was transferred which resulted in an ammonia conversion degree from 2.1 mol% (NO_2 formation) to 3.0 mol% (N_2 formation).

  4. Tungsten and optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.

    2001-01-01

    High energy astronomy research requires accurate location to perform multiwavelength studies of the cosmic gamma-ray emitters. New technologies have been developed to achieve this goal, the use of large spatial signal multiplexing systems (Masks). The optical system based on the use of coded Masks together with solid stated pixelated planes provide a point source location capability of 1 arc min, that is 3600 times better than of the last NASA CGRO mission. Different materials were considered to modulate the high energy signals, tungsten was selected for implementing the codes due to both its high density and large atomic number that provide the required stooping power. An overview of the programme carried out to design and manufacture the coded Masks is provided. (nevyjel)

  5. Conceptual design for a bulk tungsten divertor tile in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, Ph.; Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Neubauer, O.; Pintsuk, G.; Philipps, V.; Sadakov, S.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER-like Wall project (ILW) for JET aims at providing the plasma chamber of the tokamak with an environment of mixed materials which will be relevant for the actual first wall construction on ITER. Tungsten plays a key role in the divertor cladding. For the central tile, also called LB-SRP for 'load-bearing septum replacement plate', bulk tungsten is envisaged in order to cope with the high heat loads expected (up to 10 MW/m 2 for 10 s). The outer strike-point in the divertor will be positioned on this tile for the most relevant configurations. Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ) has developed a conceptual design based on an assembly of tungsten blades or lamellae. An appropriate interface with the base carrier of JET, on which modules of two tiles are positioned and fixed by remote handling procedures, is a substantial part of the integral design. Important issues are the electromagnetic forces and expected temperature distributions. Material choices combine tungsten, TZM TM , Inconel and ceramic parts. The completed design has been finalised in a proposal to the ILW project, with utmost ITER-relevance

  6. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Lipowicz, Michelle; Garcia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia) for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologi...

  7. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  8. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  9. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  10. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  11. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  12. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: amitk@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ali, Manjoor [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ningthoujam, Raghumani S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gaikwad, Pallavi [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Solid State, Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Bimalendu B. [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Pandey, Badri N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  13. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S.; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B.; Pandey, Badri N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  14. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  15. Nitrogen implantation in tungsten and migration in the fusion experiment ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, Gerd Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The implantation of nitrogen ions into tungsten was studied in laboratory experiments to understand the interaction of nitrogen containing fusion plasmas with tungsten walls. The resulting model of W-N interaction was tested by experiments in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Using the measurements from these experiments as boundary condition, nitrogen transport and re-distribution in the plasma were modeled by self-consistent WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations.

  16. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 x 10 21 m -2 s -1 , ion fluence: 4 x 10 25 m -2 ) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  17. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  18. Emission characteristics of dispenser cathodes with a fine-grained tungsten top layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, S.; Higuchi, T.; Ouchi, Y.; Uda, E.; Nakamura, O.; Sudo, T.; Koyama, K.

    1997-02-01

    In order to improve the emission stability of the Ir-coated dispenser cathode under ion bombardment, a fine-grained tungsten top layer was applied on the substrate porous tungsten plug before Ir coating. The emission characteristics were studied after being assembled in a CRT gun. Cathode current was measured under pulse operation in a range of 0.1-9% duty. Remarkable anti-ion bombardment characteristics were observed over the range of 1-6% duty. The improved cathode showed 1.5 times higher emission current than that of a conventional Ir-coated dispenser cathode at 4% duty. AES analysis showed that the recovering rates of surface Ba and O atoms after ion bombardment were 2.5 times higher. From these results it is confirmed that the Ir coated cathode with a fine-grained tungsten top layer is provided with a good tolerance against the ion bombardment.

  19. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  20. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  1. Low-temperature transport in ultra-thin tungsten films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiatti, Olivio [Neue Materialien, Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (United Kingdom); Nash, Christopher; Warburton, Paul [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Tungsten-containing films, fabricated by focused-ion-beam-induced chemical vapour deposition, are known to have an enhanced superconducting transition temperature compared to bulk tungsten, and have been investigated previously for film thickness down to 25 nm. In this work, by using ion-beam doses below 50 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} on a substrate of amorphous silicon, we have grown continuous films with thickness below 20 nm. The electron transport properties were investigated at temperatures down to 350 mK and in magnetic fields up to 3 T, parallel and perpendicular to the films. The films in this work are closer to the limit of two-dimensional systems and are superconducting at low temperatures. Magnetoresistance measurements yield upper critical fields of the order of 1 T, and the resulting coherence length is smaller than the film thickness.

  2. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  3. Online Capacity Estimation of Lithium-Ion Batteries Based on Novel Feature Extraction and Adaptive Multi-Kernel Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Prognostics is necessary to ensure the reliability and safety of lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles or satellites. This process can be achieved by capacity estimation, which is a direct fading indicator for assessing the state of health of a battery. However, the capacity of a lithium-ion battery onboard is difficult to monitor. This paper presents a data-driven approach for online capacity estimation. First, six novel features are extracted from cyclic charge/discharge cycles and used as indirect health indicators. An adaptive multi-kernel relevance machine (MKRVM based on accelerated particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to determine the optimal parameters of MKRVM and characterize the relationship between extracted features and battery capacity. The overall estimation process comprises offline and online stages. A supervised learning step in the offline stage is established for model verification to ensure the generalizability of MKRVM for online application. Cross-validation is further conducted to validate the performance of the proposed model. Experiment and comparison results show the effectiveness, accuracy, efficiency, and robustness of the proposed approach for online capacity estimation of lithium-ion batteries.

  4. An integrated unscented kalman filter and relevance vector regression approach for lithium-ion battery remaining useful life and short-term capacity prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Fang, Huajing

    2015-01-01

    The gradual decreasing capacity of lithium-ion batteries can serve as a health indicator for tracking the degradation of lithium-ion batteries. It is important to predict the capacity of a lithium-ion battery for future cycles to assess its health condition and remaining useful life (RUL). In this paper, a novel method is developed using unscented Kalman filter (UKF) with relevance vector regression (RVR) and applied to RUL and short-term capacity prediction of batteries. A RVR model is employed as a nonlinear time-series prediction model to predict the UKF future residuals which otherwise remain zero during the prediction period. Taking the prediction step into account, the predictive value through the RVR method and the latest real residual value constitute the future evolution of the residuals with a time-varying weighting scheme. Next, the future residuals are utilized by UKF to recursively estimate the battery parameters for predicting RUL and short-term capacity. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is validated and compared to other predictors with the experimental data. According to the experimental and analysis results, the proposed approach has high reliability and prediction accuracy, which can be applied to battery monitoring and prognostics, as well as generalized to other prognostic applications. - Highlights: • An integrated method is proposed for RUL prediction as well as short-term capacity prediction. • Relevance vector regression model is employed as a nonlinear time-series prediction model. • Unscented Kalman filter is used to recursively update the states for battery model parameters during the prediction. • A time-varying weighting scheme is utilized to improve the accuracy of the RUL prediction. • The proposed method demonstrates high reliability and prediction accuracy.

  5. Toughness enhancement of tungsten reinforced with short tungsten fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, L.H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, Q.F., E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, T.; Wang, X.P.; Hao, T.; Liu, C.S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-06

    The feasibility and toughening efficiency of the short tungsten fibre reinforcement on tungsten were investigated in W{sub f}/W composites fabricated by powder metallurgy method of spark plasma sintering. Fibres in the composites presented a Z-free laminar structure. Partial recrystallization of fibre grains occurred but fibre crack or damage was not detected. Fracture energy of W{sub f}/W composites was estimated in tensile tests, and the results indicated great toughness improvement over pure tungsten in virtue of frictional pullout and plastic deformation of fibres, and matrix-fibres interfacial debonding since 873 K. The specimen with mass fraction of 10% and fibre diameter of 100 µm exhibits the largest elongation of 9±1.1% and the highest ultimate strength of 482±13 MPa at 873 K.

  6. Performance of the linear ion trap Orbitrap mass analyzer for qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Emke, Erik; Hernández, Félix; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-03-20

    This work illustrates the potential of liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier Transform Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water. The developed methodology consisted of automatic solid-phase extraction using Oasis HLB cartridges, chromatographic separation of the targeted drugs, full-scan accurate mass data acquisition under positive electrospray ionization mode over an m/z range of 50-600Da at a resolution of 30,000 FWHM and simultaneous MS(n) measurements to obtain information of fragment ions generated in the linear ion trap. Accurate mass of the protonated molecule, together with at least one nominal mass product ion and retention time allowed the confident identification of the compounds detected in these complex matrices. In addition to the highly reliable qualitative analysis, Orbitrap analyzer also proved to have satisfactory potential for quantification at sub-ppb analyte levels, a possibility that has been very little explored in the literature until now. The limits of quantification ranged from 4 to 68ngL(-1) in influent sewage water, and from 2 to 35ngL(-1) in effluent, with the exception of MDA, morphine and THC that presented higher values as a consequence of the high ionization suppression in this type of samples. Satisfactory recoveries (70-120%) and precision (abuse could be identified and quantified, mainly MDMA, benzoylecgonine, codeine, oxazepam and temazepam. Orbitrap also showed potential for retrospective investigation of ketamine metabolites in the samples without the need of additional analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactions of nitriles in ices relevant to Titan, comets, and the interstellar medium: formation of cyanate ion, ketenimines, and isonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.

    2004-12-01

    Motivated by detections of nitriles in Titan's atmosphere, cometary comae, and the interstellar medium, we report laboratory investigations of the low-temperature chemistry of acetonitrile, propionitrile, acrylonitrile, cyanoacetylene, and cyanogen (CH 3CN, CH 3CH 2CN, CH 2CHCN, HCCCN, and NCCN, respectively). A few experiments were also done on isobutyronitrile and trimethylacetonitrile ((CH 3) 2CHCN and (CH 3) 3CCN, respectively). Trends were sought, and found, in the photo- and radiation chemical products of these molecules at 12-25 K. In the absence of water, all of these molecules isomerized to isonitriles, and CH 3CN, CH 3CH 2CN, and (CH 3) 2CHCN also formed ketenimines. In the presence of H 2O, no isonitriles were detected but rather the cyanate ion (OCN -) was seen in all cases. Although isonitriles, ketenimines, and OCN - were the main focus of our work, we also describe cases of hydrogen loss, to make smaller nitriles, and hydrogen addition (reduction), to make larger nitriles. HCN formation also was seen in most experiments. The results are presented in terms of nitrile ice chemistry on Titan, in cometary ice, and in the interstellar medium. Possible connections to prebiotic chemistry are briefly discussed.

  8. Dithiolato complexes of molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwpoort, A.

    1975-01-01

    The synthesis of eight-coordinated and six-coordinated tungsten and molybdenum complexes with dithioligands is described. Molecular and crystal structures are determined and bond angles, bond lengths and structural parameters tabulated. Infrared spectra of dithiocarbamato complexes are discussed more extensively. Redox reactions are studied by voltammetry and electron transfer properties derived. Properties of the d electrons of the metal ion are interpreted in the ligand field model with data from electronic and e.s.r. spectra and magnetic susceptibilities. The result of molecular orbital calculations with the extended Hueckel-LCAO method are presented for eight-coordinated d 1 and d 2 systems, the six-coordinated complexes, and the free ligands

  9. Tungsten migration studies by controlled injection of volatile compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Coenen, J. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Ivanova, D. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Möller, S. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Petersson, P. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B. [IEK-4, Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Volatile tungsten hexa-fluoride was locally injected into the TEXTOR tokamak as a marker for material migration studies. The injection was accompanied by puffing N-15 rare isotope as a nitrogen tracer in discharges with edge cooling by impurity seeding. The objective was to assess material balance by qualitative and quantitative determination of a global and local deposition pattern, material mixing effects and fluorine residence in plasma-facing components. Spectroscopy and ex situ ion beam analysis techniques were used. Tungsten was detected on all types of limiter tiles and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel. Over 80% of the injected W was identified. The largest tungsten concentration, 1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −2}, was in the vicinity of the gas inlet. Co-deposits contained tungsten and a mix of light isotopes: H, D, He-4, B-10, B-11, C-12, C-13, N-14, N-15, O-16 and small quantities of F-19 thus showing that both He and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning (He glow) and edge cooling.

  10. Helium-induced hardening effect in polycrystalline tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanhang; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Ailin; Peng, Shixiang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, helium induced hardening effect of tungsten was investigated. 50 keV He2+ ions at fluences vary from 5 × 1015 cm-2 to 5 × 1017 cm-2 were implanted into polycrystalline tungsten at RT to create helium bubble-rich layers near the surface. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the irradiated specimens were studied by TEM and nano-indentor. Helium bubble rich layers are formed in near surface region, and the layers become thicker with the rise of fluences. Helium bubbles in the area of helium concentration peak are found to grow up, while the bubble density is almost unchanged. Obvious hardening effect is induced by helium implantation in tungsten. Micro hardness increases rapidly with the fluence firstly, and more slowly when the fluence is above 5 × 1016 cm-2. The hardening effect of tungsten can be attributed to helium bubbles, which is found to be in agreement with the Bacon-Orowan stress formula. The growing diameter is the major factor rather than helium bubbles density (voids distance) in the process of helium implantation at fluences below 5 × 1017 cm-2.

  11. Unusual Application Of Ion Beam Analysis For The Study Of Surface Layers On Materials Relevant To Cultural Heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, F.; Salomon, J.; Aucouturier, M.; Trocellier, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recently a new thematic of research -- intentional patinas on antic copper-base objects -- lead the AGLAE (Accelerateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire) team of the C2RMF (Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France) to improve its methods of analyzing thin surface layers both in their elemental composition and in-depth elemental distribution. A new beam extraction set-up containing a particle detector has been developed in order to use a 6 MeV alpha beam both in PIXE and RBS mode and to monitor precisely the ion dose received by the sample. Both RBS and ionization cross sections were assessed in order to make sure that the analysis can be quantitative. This set up allows great progresses in the understanding of both nature and structure of this very particular oxide layer obtained in the antiquity by chemical treatment on copper alloys, containing gold and/or silver and presenting very interesting properties of color and stability.Besides the non destructive properties of the IBA in external beam mode, this method of analyzing allows the study of samples in interaction with its environment. This was used to study the high temperature oxidation of Cu-Sn alloys using a furnace developed in order to heat a sample and analyze it in RBS mode at the same time. This new way of studying the growth of oxide layers permits to understand the oxidation mechanism of this system and to propose an experimental model for the identification of oxide layers due to an exposition to a high temperature, model needed for a long time by curators in charge of the study and the conservation of archaeological bronzes

  12. Development of two highly sensitive immunoassays for detection of copper ions and a suite of relevant immunochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongwei; Nan Tiegui; Tan Guiyu; Gao Wei; Cao Zhen; Sun Shuo; Li Zhaohu; Li, Qing X.; Wang Baomin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Two highly sensitive immunoassays for determination of Cu(II) at sub ppb levels. · The heterologous competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for heavy metals. · Haptenated protein directly conjugated with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity. - Abstract: Availability of highly sensitive assays for metal ions can help monitor and manage the environmental and food contamination. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against Copper(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was used to develop two sensitive ELISAs for Cu(II) analysis. Cobalt(II)-EDTA-BSA was the coating antigen in a heterologous indirect competitive ELISA (hicELISA), whereas Co(II)-EDTA-BSA-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was the enzyme tracer in a heterologous direct competitive ELISA (hdcELISA). Both ELISAs were validated for detecting the content of Cu(II) in environmental waters. The ELISA data agreed well with those from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The methods of developing the Cu(II) hicELISA and hdcELISA are potentially applicable for developing ELISAs for other metals. The chelator-protein complexes such as EDTA-BSA and EDTA-BSA-HRP can form a suite of metal complexes having the consistent hapten density, location and orientation on the conjugates except the difference of the metal core, which can be used as ideal reagents to investigate the relationship between assay sensitivity and antibody affinities for the haptens and the analytes. The strategy of conjugating a haptenated protein directly with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity during the conjugation reaction and thus can be applicable for the development of ELISAs for small molecules.

  13. Development of two highly sensitive immunoassays for detection of copper ions and a suite of relevant immunochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hongwei [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Nan Tiegui; Tan Guiyu; Gao Wei; Cao Zhen; Sun Shuo; Li Zhaohu [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Li, Qing X., E-mail: qingl@hawaii.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wang Baomin, E-mail: wbaomin@263.com [College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2011-09-19

    Highlights: {center_dot} Two highly sensitive immunoassays for determination of Cu(II) at sub ppb levels. {center_dot} The heterologous competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for heavy metals. {center_dot} Haptenated protein directly conjugated with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity. - Abstract: Availability of highly sensitive assays for metal ions can help monitor and manage the environmental and food contamination. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody against Copper(II)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was used to develop two sensitive ELISAs for Cu(II) analysis. Cobalt(II)-EDTA-BSA was the coating antigen in a heterologous indirect competitive ELISA (hicELISA), whereas Co(II)-EDTA-BSA-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was the enzyme tracer in a heterologous direct competitive ELISA (hdcELISA). Both ELISAs were validated for detecting the content of Cu(II) in environmental waters. The ELISA data agreed well with those from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy. The methods of developing the Cu(II) hicELISA and hdcELISA are potentially applicable for developing ELISAs for other metals. The chelator-protein complexes such as EDTA-BSA and EDTA-BSA-HRP can form a suite of metal complexes having the consistent hapten density, location and orientation on the conjugates except the difference of the metal core, which can be used as ideal reagents to investigate the relationship between assay sensitivity and antibody affinities for the haptens and the analytes. The strategy of conjugating a haptenated protein directly with HRP can reduce the loss of HRP activity during the conjugation reaction and thus can be applicable for the development of ELISAs for small molecules.

  14. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, T.J., E-mail: tjpetty@liv.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Khan, A. [Pariser Building-G11, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Heil, T. [NiCaL, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL (United Kingdom); Bradley, J.W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10{sup 23}–3.0 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ{sup 1/2} relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  15. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, T.J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10 23 –3.0 × 10 24  m −2 , the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10 24  m −2 , and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ 1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  16. Precipitation formation in recrystallized nickel-plated non-sag tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that some metals, such as palladium and nickel, can easily penetrate into tungsten by fast diffusion via crystal defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. As a result of the fast penetration of these so called activators the recrystallization temperature of heavily drawn non-sag tungsten wire can be lower from about 2,000 C to about 1,000 C, thus the application of the tungsten wire, serving as reinforcement material in metal matrix composites used at high temperatures, is limited. An interesting question is in which form these activators exist in the recrystallized tungsten wire. It is generally believed that W-Ni intermediate compounds could form in the recrystallized material, presumably at grain boundaries. The free energy difference between the pure tungsten fibbers and the precipitating W(Ni) solid solution was suggested as the chemical driving force which governed the recrystallization process. The presence of nickel in small particles had also been observed in recrystallized grains of nickel plated tungsten wires using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These particles were considered to be nickel rich precipitates. However, a detailed investigation of the precipitation process has not been reported. In the present work an investigation of the structure, composition and distribution of nickel rich particles precipitated in recrystallized grains of nickel plated heavily drawn non-sage tungsten wires was carried out using analytical electron microscopy (AEM)

  17. Fractographic peculiarities of cermet tungsten fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of test temperature on fracture peculiarities of cermets tungsten with initial cellular structure of deformation is shown. Tungsten crack resistance increases at temperatures to Tsub(x) (ductile-brittle transition temperature) and decreases at temperatures above Tsub(x). The degree of ceramics tungsten plasticity realization depends on its crack resistance

  18. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  19. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    temperature on an Instron load frame with a 222.41 kN (50 kip) load cell . The samples were compressed at the same strain rate as on the Gleeble...ID % RE Initial Density (cm 3 ) Density after Compression (cm 3 ) % Change in Density Test Temperature NT1 0 18.08 18.27 1.06 1000 NT3 0...4.1 Nano-Tungsten The results for the compression of the nano-tungsten samples are shown in tables 2 and 3 and figure 5. During testing, sample NT1

  20. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  1. Effect of rhenium irradiations on the mechanical properties of tungsten for nuclear fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Aneeqa, E-mail: aneeqa.khan-3@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Elliman, Robert; Corr, Cormac [Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Lim, Joven J.H.; Forrest, Andrew [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mummery, Paul [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Evans, Llion M. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    As-received and annealed tungsten samples were irradiated at a temperature of 400 °C with Re and W ions to peak concentrations of 1600 appm (atomic parts per million) and damage levels of 40 dpa (displacements per atom). Mechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation, and the orientation and depth dependence of irradiation damage was investigated using Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). Following irradiation there was a 13% increase in hardness in the as received sheet and a 23% increase in the annealed material for both tungsten and rhenium irradiation. The difference between the tungsten and rhenium irradiated samples was negligible, suggesting that for the concentrations and damage levels employed, the presence of rhenium does not have a significant effect on the hardening mechanism. Energy dependent EBSD of annealed samples provided information about the depth distribution of the radiation damage in individual tungsten grains and confirmed that the radiation damage is orientation dependant.

  2. Effect of Organic Solvents and Biologically Relevant Ions on the Light-Induced DNA Cleavage by Pyrene and Its Amino and Hydroxy Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yu

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are a class of carcinogenic compounds that are both naturally and artificially produced. Many PAHs are pro-carcinogens that require metabolic activation. Recently, it has been shown that PAH can induce DNA single strand cleavage and formation of PAH-DNA covalent adduct upon irradiation with UVA light. The light-induced DNA cleavage parallels phototoxicity in one instance. The DNA photocleavage efficiency depends on the structure of the PAHs. This article reports the effect of both organic solvents and the presence of biologically relevant ions, Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn+2, Mn2+, and I-, on the light-induced DNA cleavage by pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-aminopyrene. Since both 1-hydroxypyrene (0.6 μM and 1-aminopyrene (6 μM dissolve well in the minimum organic solvents used (2% methanol, dimethylsulfoxide, and dimethylformamide, increasing the amount of the organic solvent resulted in the decrease of the amount of DNA single strand cleavage caused by the combination effect of 1-hydroxy or 1-aminopyrene and UVA light. The result with the less watersoluble pyrene shows that increase of the amount of the organic solvent can increase the amount of DNA single strand DNA photocleavage cause by the combination of pyrene and UVA light. Therefore, there are two effects by the organic solvents: (i to dissolve PAH and (ii to quench DNA photocleavage. The presence of Fe3+ and Zn2+ enhances, while the presence of Ca2+ and Mn2+ inhibits the DNA photocleavage caused by 1-aminopyrene and UVA light. Other metal ions have minimal effect. This means that the effect of ions on DNA photocleavage by PAHs is complex. The presence of KI enhances DNA photocleavage. This indicates that the triplet-excited state of 1-aminopyrene is involved in causing DNA cleavage

  3. Preliminary result on quantitative analysis using Zn-like tungsten EUV spectrum in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru; Dong, Chunfeng; Wang, Erhui

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten study through visible, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy has been recently started in Large Helical Device (LHD) for developing the diagnostic method in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and understanding the tungsten transport in helical system. In order to study the tungsten spectra from core plasmas of LHD, several tungsten spectra are observed in EUV range by injecting a carbon pellet with tungsten. Zn-like tungsten spectrum with 4p-4s transition is clearly identified at 60.9Å in high-temperature phase (T_e ≥ 2.3 keV) of NBI discharges in addition to several unresolved transition arrays with 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d, 5g-4f, 4f-4d and 4d-4p transitions in range of 10-70Å. Radial profile of the Zn-like tungsten is also successfully observed with enough intensity in order of 10"1"6 photons.cm"-"2.s"-"1. The radial emissivity profile reconstructed from the chord-integrated intensity profile is analyzed with combination of HULLAC code for emission coefficient calculation of the Zn-like transition and impurity transport code included ADPAK code for calculation of ionization and recombination rate coefficients. Thus, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5x10"1"0 cm"-"3 at the plasma center is reasonably obtained in discharge with central electron density of 4x10"1"3 cm"-"3 as the first experimental trial. The present result demonstrates that the Zn-like 4p-4s transition is applicable to the tungsten diagnostics in high-temperature plasmas. (author)

  4. Smart tungsten alloys as a material for the first wall of a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Du, H.; Mayer, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Calvo, A.; Ordas, N.

    2017-06-01

    Tungsten is currently deemed as a promising plasma-facing material (PFM) for the future power plant DEMO. In the case of an accident, air can get into contact with PFMs during the air ingress. The temperature of PFMs can rise up to 1200 °C due to nuclear decay heat in the case of damaged coolant supply. Heated neutron-activated tungsten forms a volatile radioactive oxide which can be mobilized into the atmosphere. New self-passivating ‘smart’ alloys can adjust their properties to the environment. During plasma operation the preferential sputtering of lighter alloying elements will leave an almost pure tungsten surface facing the plasma. During an accident the alloying elements in the bulk are forming oxides thus protecting tungsten from mobilization. Good plasma performance and the suppression of oxidation are required for smart alloys. Bulk tungsten (W)-chroimum (Cr)-titanium (Ti) alloys were exposed together with pure tungsten (W) samples to the steady-state deuterium plasma under identical conditions in the linear plasma device PSI 2. The temperature of the samples was ~576 °C-715 °C, the energy of impinging ions was 210 eV matching well the conditions expected at the first wall of DEMO. Weight loss measurements demonstrated similar mass decrease of smart alloys and pure tungsten samples. The oxidation of exposed samples has proven no effect of plasma exposure on the oxidation resistance. The W-Cr-Ti alloy demonstrated advantageous 3-fold lower mass gain due to oxidation than that of pure tungsten. New yttrium (Y)-containing thin film systems are demonstrating superior performance in comparison to that of W-Cr-Ti systems and of pure W. The oxidation rate constant of W-Cr-Y thin film is 105 times less than that of pure tungsten. However, the detected reactivity of the bulk smart alloy in humid atmosphere is calling for a further improvement.

  5. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  6. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading

  7. Corrosion of tungsten microelectrodes used in neural recording applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Erin; Orazem, Mark E; Sanchez, Justin C; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2011-06-15

    In neuroprosthetic applications, long-term electrode viability is necessary for robust recording of the activity of neural populations used for generating communication and control signals. The corrosion of tungsten microwire electrodes used for intracortical recording applications was analyzed in a controlled bench-top study and compared to the corrosion of tungsten microwires used in an in vivo study. Two electrolytes were investigated for the bench-top electrochemical analysis: 0.9% phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and 0.9% PBS containing 30 mM of hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation and reduction reactions responsible for corrosion were found by measurement of the open circuit potential and analysis of Pourbaix diagrams. Dissolution of tungsten to form the tungstic ion was found to be the corrosion mechanism. The corrosion rate was estimated from the polarization resistance, which was extrapolated from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data. The results show that tungsten microwires in an electrolyte of PBS have a corrosion rate of 300-700 μm/yr. The corrosion rate for tungsten microwires in an electrolyte containing PBS and 30 mM H₂O₂ is accelerated to 10,000-20,000 μm/yr. The corrosion rate was found to be controlled by the concentration of the reacting species in the cathodic reaction (e.g. O₂ and H₂O₂). The in vivo corrosion rate, averaged over the duration of implantation, was estimated to be 100 μm/yr. The reduced in vivo corrosion rate as compared to the bench-top rate is attributed to decreased rate of oxygen diffusion caused by the presence of a biological film and a reduced concentration of available oxygen in the brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The separation of tungsten and molybdenum by the formation of sulphide complexes and extraction into a weak-base resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The separation of molybdenum from tungten can be achieved if a solution containing molybdate and tungstate ions is reacted with sulphide ions, and the molybdenum sulphide is extracted with an anion-exchangeresin. The separation between molybdenum and tungsten is influenced byfactors such as the pH value of the solution, the concentrations of sulphide and resin in the solution, and the period of contact between theresin and the metal ions in solution. A fundamental study of the interaction between sulphide ions and molybdate or tungstate ions confirmed a mechanism proposed recently in the literature: MeOsup(2-)sub(4)+nHSsup(-)+nHsup(+) is equivalent to MeO 4 sub(-n)Ssub(n)sup(2-)+nH 2 O, where Me = molybdenum or tungsten and n = 1, 2, 3, or 4. In these reaction sequences, each successive step in the reaction (sulphur being substituted for oxygen) is slower than the preceding one, and the molybdate reactions with sulphide are several orders of magnitude faster than the analogous tungsten reactions. As a result, the extent of the complexing of tungsten with sulphide is minimal compared with that of molybdenum in the time span of the extraction experiments. However, the current investigation shows that this is not the cause of the selectivity of anion-exchange resins for molybdenum in this system, and that the separation factor between molybdenum and tungsten is much the same for the precursor tungstate anion as it is for the various tungsten sulphide anions. The selectivity of the resin for molybdenum apparently originates from a thermodynamic preference of the amine functional group on the resin for molybdenum sulphide anions over tungstate or tungsten sulphide anions. It is shown that, under optimum conditions, a separation factor of about 30 between molybdenum and tungsten can be achieved in this system

  9. Deuterium inventory in tungsten after plasma exposure. A microstructural survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manhard, Armin

    2012-09-01

    Tungsten is a promising material for armouring the plasma-facing wall of future nuclear fusion experiments and power plants. It has a very high melting point, good thermal conductivity and is highly resistant against physical sputtering by energetic particles from the plasma. It also has a very low solubility for hydrogen isotopes. This is important both for safety and also for economic reasons, in particular with regard to the radioactive fusion fuel tritium. Due to this low solubility, the retention of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials after exposure to a plasma is dominated by the trapping of hydrogen isotopes at tungsten lattice defects. Therefore, a strong dependence of the hydrogen isotope retention on the microstructure of the tungsten is to be expected. This work describes a survey study of tungsten with different microstructures exposed to deuterium plasmas under a wide range of different plasma exposure conditions. The isotope deuterium was used because its natural abundance is much smaller than that of hydrogen (i.e., 1 H). This allows detecting even very small amounts retained in the tungsten practically without background signal. Furthermore, the use of deuterium allows utilising the nuclear reaction 2 D( 3 He,p) 4 He for depth-resolved quantification of the deuterium inventory up to depths of several microns. In order to standardise the specimens as far as possible, they were all cut from the same initial material from a single manufacturing batch. After a chemo-mechanical polishing procedure, which produces a well-defined surface, the specimens were annealed at either of four different temperatures in order to modify the grain structure and the dislocation density. These were then characterised by scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were subsequently exposed in a fully characterised deuterium plasma source at different specimen temperatures, ion energies and deuterium fluences. In addition

  10. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Feichtmayer, A; Fuhr, M; Gietl, H; Höschen, T; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (W f /W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of W f /W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μ m as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μ m have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour. (paper)

  11. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  12. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.

  14. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinlay, A.F.; Whillock, M.J.; Meulemans, C.C.E.

    1989-07-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard. (author)

  15. Hydrogen trapping in and release from tungsten: modeling and comparison with graphite with regard to its use as fusion reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Plank, H.; Alimov, V.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    Trapping and release of deuterium implanted in tungsten is investigated by modeling the results of reemission, thermal and isothermal desorption experiments. Rate coefficients and activation energies for diffusion, trapping and detrapping are derived. Hydrogen atoms are able to diffuse deep into tungsten, establishing a solute amount of the same order of magnitude as the trapped one. This 'diffusion zone' exceeds the implantation zone by more than two orders of magnitude, even at room temperature. The solute amount of hydrogen in tungsten depends only slightly on the incident ion energy, but scales with implantation fluence. This high amount of solute hydrogen is the main difference of tungsten compared to graphite where nearly all hydrogen is trapped in the implantation zone, the solute amount being orders of magnitude lower. The resulting unlimited accumulation of hydrogen in tungsten deep in the material down to the backward surface disadvantages tungsten as fusion reactor material with regard to hydrogen recycling properties. (orig.)

  16. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng [Beijing University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-04-15

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC–Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC–Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F{sup −}) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} via N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.Graphical AbstractA new hydrothermal system was designed to recycle waste hardmetal with low cobalt content. Through this method, waste hardmetal was refined into WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O nanosheets which shows excellent adsorption capacities toward methylene blue and lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}).

  17. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Passoni, M; Pietralunga, S M; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500–710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W_1_8O_4_9-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO_3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 μm with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. (paper)

  18. FEM investigation and thermo-mechanic tests of the new solid tungsten divertor tile for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaksic, Nikola; Greuner, Henri; Herrmann, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New solid tungsten divertor for fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. • Design validation in the high heat flux (HHF) test facility GLADIS (Garching Large Divertor Sample Test Facility). • FEA simulation. -- Abstract: A new solid tungsten divertor for the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade is under construction at present. A new divertor tile design has been developed to improve the thermal performance of the current divertor made of tungsten coated fine grain graphite. Compared to thin tungsten coatings, divertor tiles made of massive tungsten allow to extend the operational range and to study the plasma material interaction of tungsten in more detail. The improved design for the solid tungsten divertor was tested on different full scale prototypes with a hydrogen ion beam. The influence of a possible material degradation due to thermal cracking or recrystallization can be studied. Furthermore, intensive Finite Element Method (FEM) numerical analysis with the respective test parameters has been performed. The elastic–plastic calculation was applied to analyze thermal stress and the observed elastic and plastic deformation during the heat loading. Additionally, the knowledge gained by the tests and especially by the numerical analysis has been used to optimize the shape of the divertor tiles and the accompanying divertor support structure. This paper discusses the main results of the high heat flux tests and their numerical simulations. In addition, results from some special structural mechanic analysis by means of FEM tools are presented. Finally, first results from the numerical lifecycle analysis of the current tungsten tiles will be reported

  19. Tungsten erosion under plasma heat loads typical for ITER type I Elms and disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)]. E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.ua; Bandura, A.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Byrka, O.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Makhlaj, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Marchenko, A.K. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Solyakov, D.G. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Tereshin, V.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Trubchaninov, S.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Tsarenko, A.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2005-03-01

    The behavior of pure sintered tungsten under repetitive plasma heat loads of {approx}1 MJ/m{sup 2} (which is relevant to ITER ELMs) and 25 MJ/m{sup 2} (ITER disruptions) is studied with the quasi-steady-state plasma accelerator QSPA Kh-50. The ELM relevant heat loads have resulted in formation of two kinds of crack networks, with typical sizes of 10-20 {mu}m and {approx}1 mm, at the surface. Tungsten preheating to 600 deg. C indicates that fine intergranular cracks are probably caused by thermal stresses during fast resolidification of the melt, whereas large cracks are the result of ductile-to-brittle transition. For several hundreds of ELM-like exposures, causing surface melting, the melt motion does not dominate the profile of the melt spot. The disruption relevant experiments demonstrated that melt motion became the main factor of tungsten damage.

  20. Thermodynamics of the hydrogen-carbon-oxygen-tungsten system, as applied to the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the quaternary hydrogen-carbon oxygen-tungsten system and its binary and ternary sub-systems are reviewed. Published thermodynamic data are evaluated, and expression for free energies of formation are chosen. These expressions are integrated with and equilibrium-calculating algorithm, producing a powerful tool for understanding and improving the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide. Three examples are presented: reduction/carburization of tungstic oxide with hydrogen, carbon, and methane. (author)

  1. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  2. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  3. Conceptual Design for a Bulk Tungsten Divertor Tile in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, P.; Neubauer, O.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Samm, U.; Hirai, T.; Sadakov, S.

    2006-01-01

    With ITER on the verge of being build, the ITER-like Wall project (ILW) for JET aims at providing the plasma chamber of the tokamak with an environment of mixed materials which will be relevant to the support of decisions to the first wall construction and, from the point of view of plasma physics, to the corresponding investigations of possible plasma configuration and plasma-wall interaction. In both respects, tungsten plays a key role in the divertor cladding whereas beryllium will be used for the vessel's first wall. For the central tile, also called LB-SRP for '' Load-Bearing Septum Replacement Plate '', resort to bulk tungsten is envisaged in order to cope with the high loads expected (up to 10 MW/m 2 for about 10 s). This is indeed the preferred plasma-facing component for positioning the outer strike-point in the divertor. Forschungszentrum Juelich has developed a conceptual design for this tile, based on an assembly of tungsten blades or lamellae. It was selected in the frame of an extensive R-and-D study in search of a suitable, inertially cooled component(T. Hirai et al., R-and-D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET ITER-like Wall Project: this conference). As reported elsewhere, the design is actually driven by electromagnetic considerations in the first place(S. Sadakov et al., Detailed electromagnetic analysis for optimisation of a tungsten divertor plate for JET: this conference). The lamellae are grouped in four stacks per tile which are independently attached to an equally re-designed supporting structure. A so-called adapter plate, also a new design, takes care of an appropriate interface to the base carrier of JET, onto which modules of two tiles are positioned and screwed by remote handling (RH) procedures. The compatibility of the design on the whole with RH requirements is another essential ingredient which was duly taken into account throughout. The concept and the underlying philosophy will be presented along with important

  4. Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Hatano, Y.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Hara, M.; Calderoni, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

  5. Development and characterisation of a tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, Johann

    2012-01-01

    In tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten, tungsten wire is combined with a tungsten matrix. The outstanding ductility of the fibres and extrinsic mechanisms of energy dissipation lead to an intense toughening. With extensive analytical and experimental investigations a manufacturing method based on chemical vapour infiltration is developed and first material is produced. The toughening mechanisms are shown by means of sophisticated mechanical experiments i.a. X-ray microtomography.

  6. Potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys with chromium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.; Ronen, S.; Levin, R.

    1977-05-01

    A method was developed for the potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys of different compositions. These were dissolved under conditions that enabled the tungsten content to be determined with chromium (II). Phosphoric acid was selected as a suitable complexing agent for the prevention of the precipitation of tungsten and tantalum compounds. The use of chromium (II) required an oxygen-tight system and therefore the work was carried out in suitable vessels for storage and tritation

  7. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    satisfactorily, such as: which tungsten mineral phase is present in soil and to what extent is adsorption important in regu- lating soil solution concentrations... soil solution rather than discrete mineral phases. Information provided in this report will assist the following organizations in future decision...the soil solution ERDC TR-11-1 43 must affect tungsten speciation in other ways. The precipitation of soil minerals also would limit tungsten

  8. Hot tungsten plate based ionizer for cesium plasma in a multi-cusp field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Amitkumar D.; Sharma, Meenakshee; Ramasubramanian, Narayanan; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2015-01-01

    In a newly proposed basic experiment, contact-ionized cesium ions will be confined by a multi cups magnetic field configuration. The cesium ion will be produced by impinging collimated neutral atoms on an ionizer consisting of the hot tungsten plate. The temperature of the tungsten plate will also be made high enough (∼2700 K) such that it will contribute electrons also to the plasma. It is expected that at this configuration the cesium plasma would be really quiescent and would be free from even the normal drift waves observed in the classical Q-machines. For the ionizer a design based on F. F. Chen's design was made. This ionizer is very fine machining and exotic material like Tungsten plate, Molybdenum screws, rings, and Boron Nitride ceramics etc. The fine and careful machining of these materials was very hard. In this paper, the experience about to join the tungsten wire to molybdenum plate and alloy of tantalum and molybdenum ring is described. In addition experimental investigations have been made to measure 2D temperature distribution profile of the Tungsten hot plate using infrared camera and the uniformity of temperature distribution over the hot plate surface is discussed. (author)

  9. Effect of Annealing on Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Acetone Gas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11

    Abstract: The gas sensing properties and topology of tungsten oxide thin films ..... Figure 3: Atomic force microscopy images of sensing film for (a) as-deposited (a) .... the surface, it forms compounds with the oxygen ions species present on the ...

  10. Hydrogen evolution at nanoporous gold/tungsten sulfide composite film and its optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xinxin; Engelbrekt, Christian; Li, Zheshen

    2015-01-01

    Development of efficient and economical electrochemical systems for water splitting is a key part of renewable energy technology. Amorphous films of tungsten sulfide have been deposited by electrochemical reduction of tetrathiotungstate ions (WS42-) on dealloyed nanoporous gold (NPG) for electroc......-term stability. The measured Tafel slope of 74 mV dec-1 implies an underlying Volmer-Heyrovsky HER mechanism....

  11. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A.; Donaldson, N.

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its ‘inertness’ and ‘stability’ common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W6+, typically represented by the orthotungstate WO42- (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal’s unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  12. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi E-mail: nakamura@tpl.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-09-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 {mu}m thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10{sup 18}-1.1x10{sup 19} D{sup +}/m{sup 2}s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten.

  13. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 μm thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10 18 -1.1x10 19 D + /m 2 s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten

  14. OEDGE modeling for the planned tungsten ring experiment on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Elder

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The OEDGE code is used to model tungsten erosion and transport for experiments with toroidal rings of high-Z metal tiles in the DIII-D tokamak. Such modeling is needed for both experimental and diagnostic design to have estimates of the expected core and edge tungsten density and to understand the various factors contributing to the uncertainties in these calculations. OEDGE simulations are performed using the planned experimental magnetic geometries and plasma conditions typical of both L-mode and inter-ELM H-mode discharges in DIII-D. OEDGE plasma reconstruction based on specific representative discharges for similar geometries is used to determine the plasma conditions applied to tungsten plasma impurity simulations. A new model for tungsten erosion in OEDGE was developed which imports charge-state resolved carbon impurity fluxes and impact energies from a separate OEDGE run which models the carbon production, transport and deposition for the same plasma conditions as the tungsten simulations. These values are then used to calculate the gross tungsten physical sputtering due to carbon plasma impurities which is then added to any sputtering by deuterium ions; tungsten self-sputtering is also included. The code results are found to be dependent on the following factors: divertor geometry and closure, the choice of cross-field anomalous transport coefficients, divertor plasma conditions (affecting both tungsten source strength and transport, the choice of tungsten atomic physics data used in the model (in particular ionization rate for W-atoms, and the model of the carbon flux and energy used for calculating the tungsten source due to sputtering. Core tungsten density is found to be of order 1015m−3 (excluding effects of any core transport barrier and with significant variability depending on the other factors mentioned with density decaying into the scrape off layer. For the typical core density in the plasma conditions examined of 2 to 4

  15. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan; Xu, Yu-Ping; Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Oya, Yasuhisa; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Min; Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  16. Current status of nanostructured tungsten-based materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, H; Matsuo, S; Arakawa, H; Hatakeyama, M; Shikama, T; Sakamoto, T; Kobayashi, S; Nakai, K; Okano, H; Watanabe, H; Yoshida, N; Torikai, Y; Hatano, Y; Takida, T; Kato, M; Ikegaya, A; Ueda, Y

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured tungsten (W)-based materials offer many advantages for use as plasma facing materials and components exposed to heavy thermal loads combined with irradiation with high-energy neutron and low-energy ion. This paper first presents the recent progress in nanostructured toughened, fine grained, recrystallized W materials. Thermal desorption spectrometry apparatus equipped with an ion gun has been installed in the radiation controlled area in our Center at Tohoku University to systematically investigate the effects of displacement damage due to high-energy neutron irradiation on hydrogen isotope retention in connection with the nano- or micro-structures in W-based materials. In this paper, the effects of high-energy heavy ion irradiation on deuterium retention in W with different microstructures are described as a preliminary work with the prospective view of neutron irradiation effects. (paper)

  17. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Xu, Yu-Ping [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Zhao, Ming-Zhong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Mao, Hong-Min [Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-Nan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  18. Dielectronic recombination rate coefficients of initially rubidium-like tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, Y.; Dong, C.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2015-01-01

    Dielectric recombination (DR) is a dominant electron recombination process in plasmas. Tungsten ions are expected to be prominent impurities in fusion plasmas so the knowledge of DR rate coefficient of tungsten ions is important to model fusion plasmas. Ab initio calculations of DR rate coefficients of initially rubidium-like W 37+ ions have been performed for the electron temperatures from 1 eV to 5*10 4 eV, by using the Flexible Atomic Code based on the relativistic configuration-interaction method. Special attention has been paid to the partial contributions to total DR rate coefficients as associated with the excitation of individual subshells. A detailed comparison of the calculations shows that the excitation from 4p subshell dominates total DR rate coefficients followed by the excitations from 4s and 4d subshells, while the contribution of excitations from 3l (l = s, p, d) subshells becomes important only at high temperatures. Besides, it is found that the electron excitations associated with Δn = 0, 1 dominate at low-temperature plasmas, however, the excitations associated with Δn ≥ 2 become non-negligible at high-temperature ones

  19. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  20. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  1. Photoionization of the valence shells of the neutral tungsten atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2015-04-01

    Results from large-scale theoretical cross section calculations for the total photoionization (PI) of the 4f, 5s, 5p and 6s orbitals of the neutral tungsten atom using the Dirac Coulomb R-matrix approximation (DARC: Dirac-atomic R-matrix codes) are presented. Comparisons are made with previous theoretical methods and prior experimental measurements. In previous experiments a time-resolved dual laser approach was employed for the photo-absorption of metal vapours and photo-absorption measurements on tungsten in a solid, using synchrotron radiation. The lowest ground state level of neutral tungsten is 5{{p}6}5{{d}4}6{{s}2}{{ }5}{{D}J}, with J = 0, and requires only a single dipole matrix for PI. To make a meaningful comparison with existing experimental measurements, we statistically average the large-scale theoretical PI cross sections from the levels associated with the ground state 5{{p}6}5{{d}4}6{{s}2}{{ }5}{{D}J} (J = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4) levels and the 5{{d}5}6{{s} 7}{{S}3} excited metastable level. As the experiments have a self-evident metastable component in their ground state measurement, averaging over the initial levels allows for a more consistent and realistic comparison to be made. In the wider context, the absence of many detailed electron-impact excitation (EIE) experiments for tungsten and its multi-charged ion stages allows current PI measurements and theory to provide a road-map for future EIE, ionization and di-electronic cross section calculations by identifying the dominant resonance structure and features across an energy range of hundreds of eV.

  2. WE-H-BRA-09: Application of a Modified Microdosimetric-Kinetic Model to Analyze Relative Biological Effectiveness of Ions Relevant to Light Ion Therapy Using the Particle Heavy Ion Transport System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkus, M [Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Palmer, T [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose and biological effectiveness of various ions that could potentially be used for actively scanned particle therapy. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code paired with a microscopic analytical function was used to determine probability distribution functions of the lineal energy in 0.3µm diameter spheres throughout a water phantom. Twenty million primary particles for 1H beams and ten million particles for 4He, 7Li, 10B, 12C, 14N, 16O, and 20Ne were simulated for 0.6cm diameter pencil beams. Beam energies corresponding to Bragg peak depths of 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300mm were used and evaluated transversely every millimeter and radially in annuli with outer radius of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.2, 3.4, 3.6, 4.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0 and 25.0mm. The acquired probability distributions were reduced to dose-mean lineal energies and applied to the modified microdosimetric kinetic model for five different cell types to calculate relative biological effectiveness (RBE) compared to 60Co beams at the 10% survival threshold. The product of the calculated RBEs and the simulated physical dose was taken to create biological dose and comparisons were then made between the various ions. Results: Transversely, the 10B beam was seen to minimize relative biological dose in both the constant and accelerated dose change regions, proximal to the Bragg Peak, for all beams traveling greater than 50mm. For the 50mm beam, 7Li was seen to provide the most optimal biological dose profile. Radially small fluctuations (<4.2%) were seen in RBE while physical dose was greater than 1% for all beams. Conclusion: Even with the growing usage of 12C, it may not be the most optimal ion in all clinical situations. Boron was calculated to have slightly enhanced RBE characteristics, leading to lower relative biological doses.

  3. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  4. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  5. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  6. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  7. A problem to be solved for tungsten diagnostics through EUV spectroscopy in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Dong, C.F.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Oishi, T.; Huang, X.L.; Wang, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength ranges of 10-650Å. When the electron temperature is less than 2keV, the EUV spectra from plasma core are dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) composing of a lot of spectral lines, e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W"+"2"4"-"+"3"3 in 15-35Å. In order to understand the UTA spectrum, the EUV spectra measured from LHD plasmas are compared to those measured from Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT), in which the electron beam is operated with monoenergetic energy of E_e ≤ 2keV. The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The collisional-radiative (C-R) model has been developed to explain the UTA spectra from LHD in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. If the electron temperature is higher than 2keV, Zn-like WXLV (W"4"4"+) and Cu-like WXLVI (W"4"5"+) spectra can be observed in LHD. Such ions of W"4"4"+ and W"4"5"+ can exhibit much simpler atomic configuration compared to other ionization stages of tungsten. Quantitative analysis of the tungsten density is attempted for the first time on the radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W"4"4"+) 4p-4s transition measured at 60.9Å, based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5x10"1"0 cm"-"3 at the plasma center of LHD is reasonably obtained. Finally, the present problem for tungsten diagnostics in fusion plasmas is summarized. (author)

  8. Study of the tungsten bronze Ag0.01WO3 using positron annihilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.; Placzek, A.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the positron annihilation and the Seebeck effect was performed on silver doped tungsten trioxide of composition Ag 0.01 WO 3 and the tungsten trioxide phase: WO 2.90 (W 20 O 58 ). Both methods point out that there are some clusters of Ag + ions in the first compound and oxygen vacancies in the second case. The clusters have some internal substructure. The measurements of the Seebeck effect showed that Ag 0.01 WO 3 is normal n-type semiconductor whereas WO 2.90 exhibits metal-like properties

  9. Construction of thermionic alkali-ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which singly charged alkali ions of K, Na, Li, Rb and Cs are produced by heating ultra-pure chemical salts of different alkali metals on tungsten filaments without employing a temperature measuring device. The character of alkali-ion currents at different heating powers and the remarkably constant ion emission current for prolonged periods are discussed. (author)

  10. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  11. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  12. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  13. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  14. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Han, Y; Höschen, T; Zhao, P; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Jasper, B; Linsmeier, Ch

    2016-01-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself. (paper)

  15. Toward Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components in KSTAR: Research on Plasma-Metal Wall Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Kim, K. M.; Song, J. H.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, H. T.; Lee, K. S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D. C.; van den Berg, M. A.; Lee, H. H.; Kang, C. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Juhn, J. W.; Son, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G. N.; Choe, W. H.; Komm, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main missions of KSTAR is to develop long-pulse operation capability relevant to the production of fusion energy. After a full metal wall configuration was decided for ITER, a major upgrade for KSTAR was planned, to a tungsten first wall similar to the JET ITER-like wall (coatings and

  16. In situ observation of structural change of nanostructured tungsten during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Miyuki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Kajita, Shin; Tokitani, Masayuki; Baba, Tomotsugu; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    Deformation of fiberform nanostructure and the dynamic behavior of helium (He) bubbles in fuzz tungsten (W) during annealing have been investigated by means of in situ cross-section observation using transmission electron microscopy and He desorption rate observation using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Thermal recovery of the nanostructure, such as shrinkage and coalescence of fine structure, annihilation of He bubbles, and large desorption of He gas, occurred around 1073–1173 K. The activation energy of He was estimated from a TDS peak that appeared around 300–400 K by using the Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose model-free-kinetics method. In addition, the TDS results of fiberform nanostructured tungsten were compared with those of tungsten samples irradiated with a high-energy He ion beam

  17. Micro-powder injection moulding of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeep, B.

    2007-12-01

    For He-cooled Divertors as integral components of future fusion power plants, about 300000 complex shaped tungsten components are to be fabricated. Tungsten is the favoured material because of its excellent properties (high melting point, high hardness, high sputtering resistance, high thermal conductivity). However, the material's properties cause major problems for large scale production of complex shaped components. Due to the resistance of tungsten to mechanical machining, new fabrication technologies have to be developed. Powder injection moulding as a well established shaping technology for a large scale production of complex or even micro structured parts might be a suitable method to produce tungsten components for fusion applications but is not yet commercially available. The present thesis is dealing with the development of a powder injection moulding process for micro structured tungsten components. To develop a suitable feedstock, the powder particle properties, the binder formulation and the solid load were optimised. To meet the requirements for a replication of micro patterned cavities, a special target was to define the smallest powder particle size applicable for micro-powder injection moulding. To investigate the injection moulding performance of the developed feedstocks, experiments were successfully carried out applying diverse cavities with structural details in micro dimension. For debinding of the green bodies, a combination of solvent debinding and thermal debinding has been adopted for injection moulded tungsten components. To develop a suitable debinding strategy, a variation of the solvent debinding time, the heating rate and the binder formulation was performed. For investigating the thermal consolidation behaviour of tungsten components, sinter experiments were carried out applying tungsten powders suitable for micro-powder injection moulding. First mechanical tests of the sintered samples showed promising material properties such as a

  18. Synthesis and optical properties of Au decorated colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Nemat; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanoparticles were prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA). • A very fine metallic Au particles or coating are decorated on the surface of tungsten oxide nanoparticles. • UV–Vis spectroscopy shows an absorption peak at ∼530 nm which is due to SPR effect of gold. • After exposing to hydrogen gas, Au/WO_3 colloidal nanoparticles show excellent gasochromic coloring. - Abstract: In this study, colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation of tungsten target using the first harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) in deionized water. After ablation, a 0.33 g/lit HAuCl_4 aqueous solution was added into as-prepared colloidal nanoparticles. In this process, Au"3"+ ions were reduced to decorate gold metallic state (Au"0) onto colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles surface. The morphology and chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied by AFM, XRD, TEM and XPS techniques. UV–Vis analysis reveals a distinct absorption peak at ∼530 nm. This peak can be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au and confirms formation of gold state. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that Au ions’ reduction happens after adding HAuCl_4 solution into as-prepared colloidal tungsten oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscope shows that an Au shell has been decorated onto colloidal WO_3 nanoparticles. Noble metal decorated tungsten oxide nanostructure could be an excellent candidate for photocatalysis, gas sensing and gasochromic applications. Finally, the gasochromic behavior of the synthesized samples was investigated by H_2 and O_2 gases bubbling into the produced colloidal Au/WO_3 nanoparticles. Synthesized colloidal nanoparticles show excellent coloration contrast (∼80%) through NIR spectra.

  19. Fragmentation pathways of tungsten hexacarbonyl clusters upon electron ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neustetter, M.; Jabbour Al Maalouf, E.; Denifl, S., E-mail: Stephan.Denifl@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: Stephan.Denifl@uibk.ac.at, E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2016-08-07

    Electron ionization of neat tungsten hexacarbonyl (W(CO){sub 6}) clusters has been investigated in a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment coupled with a mass spectrometer system. The molecule is used for nanofabrication processes through electron beam induced deposition and ion beam induced deposition techniques. Positive ion mass spectra of W(CO){sub 6} clusters formed by electron ionization at 70 eV contain the ion series of the type W(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 6) and W{sub 2}(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 12). In addition, a series of peaks are observed and have been assigned to WC(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 3) and W{sub 2}C(CO){sub n}{sup +} (0 ≤ n ≤ 10). A distinct change of relative fragment ion intensity can be observed for clusters compared to the single molecule. The characteristic fragmentation pattern obtained in the mass spectra can be explained by a sequential decay of the ionized organometallic, which is also supported by the study of the clusters when embedded in helium nanodroplets. In addition, appearance energies for the dissociative ionization channels for singly charged ions have been estimated from experimental ion efficiency curves.

  20. An investigation of tungsten by neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetsreni, R.

    1978-01-01

    This investigation used neutron from Plutonium-Beryllium source (5 curie) to analyse the amount of tungsten in tungsten oxide which was extracted from tungsten ores, slag and tungsten alloy of tungsten iron and carbon. The technique of neutron activation analysis with NaI(Tl) gamma detector 3'' x 3'' and 1024 multichannel analyzer. The dilution technique was used by mixing Fe 2 O 3 or pure sand into the sample before irradiation. In this study self shielding effect in the analysis of tungsten was solved and the detection limit of the tungsten in the sample was about 0.5%

  1. Tritium retention properties of tungsten, graphite and co-deposited carbon film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobuta, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Matsuyama, M.; Abe, S.; Akamaru, S.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hino, T.; Suzuki, S.; Akiba, M.

    2014-01-01

    DT + ion irradiation was performed on polycrystalline tungsten, graphite and carbon film and both the amount of retained tritium and the reduction of retained tritium after preservation in vacuum were investigated using an IP technique and BIXS. In addition, the relationship between the retention properties of tritium and the microstructure of graphite and carbon film were studied with Raman spectroscopy. The amount of retained tritium in tungsten was smaller than in both graphite and carbon film. After 1 keV of DT + irradiation, graphite showed no reduction of the amount of retained tritium after six months preservation while that of carbon film decreased by approximately 20% after 40 days preservation. It was suggested that this difference might be associated with differences in the microstructure between graphite and carbon film. In tungsten, the amount of retained tritium decreased to approximately half after 18 days preservation. As the incident energy of implanted tritium to tungsten increased, the decrease in tritium retention during preservation became slower. Tungsten's properties of releasing tritium while preserved in vacuum would be a useful tool for the reduction/removal of retained tritium

  2. Surface tungsten reduction during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere: A paradox?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fait, Martin J.G., E-mail: martin.fait@catalysis.de [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Radnik, Jörg [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V., Albert-Einstein-Strasse 29a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Lunk, Hans-Joachim [2858 Lake RD, Towanda, PA 18848 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • Detection of reduced tungsten ions at the solid’s surface in oxidising atmosphere. • Detection of gaseous ammonia liberated as oxidising agent. • Detection of ammonia’s oxidation products. • Quantification of the ammonia/tungsten redox process. - Abstract: The interaction of ammonia, liberated during thermal decomposition of ammonium paratungstate tetrahydrate in oxidising atmosphere, with tungsten has been studied employing a conventional microbalance combined with MS (Setaram’s instrument Sensys). Applying XPS a partial reduction of tungsten at the surface with the minimal tungsten oxidation number of +5.3 for a sample generated at 293 °C was detected. The balancing oxidation of ammonia to nitrogen/nitrogen oxides has been proven by MS. An amount of 0.049 mol e{sup −} per mol W was transferred which resulted in an ammonia conversion degree from 2.1 mol% (NO{sub 2} formation) to 3.0 mol% (N{sub 2} formation).

  3. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Jay L.; Korte, Nic

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use

  4. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  5. Combustion of powdery tungsten in pyrotechnic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, G.V.; Reshetov, A.A.; Viktorenko, A.M.; Surkov, V.G.; Karmadonov, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The basic regularities of tungsten burning (powder 2-5 μm) with oxidizers most typical for pyrotechnics: nitrates, lead and barium peroxides (powder, 2-8 μm) and potassium perchlorate (powder, 2-8 μm) are studied. Dependences of burning rate as a function of pressure and ratio of components are established. It is supposed that tungsten burning in mixtures with the mentioned nitrates is a complex and multistage process the rate of which is determined by tungsten dissolution in nitrate melts. Analysis of burning products using available methods is complex

  6. Characterization of porous tungsten by microhardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcuk, C.; Wood, J.V.; Morley, N.; Bentham, R.

    2001-01-01

    One of the applications of tungsten is as high current density dispenser cathode in the form of porous tungsten. It is used as a cathode after being impregnated with an electron emissive material so pore distribution in the part is the most important parameter for its function as a uniform and controlled porosity will lead to a better performance. In this study, application of microhardness as a characterization method for uniformity of the pore distribution and homogeneity of the structure is introduced. Optical microscopy and SEM is used to relate the results and porous tungsten structure for a better understanding of the method applied. (author)

  7. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  8. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  9. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  10. A solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A; Greuner, H; Jaksic, N; Böswirth, B; Maier, H; Neu, R; Vorbrugg, S

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of a solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is presented. The Div-III design is compatible with the existing divertor structure. It re-establishes the energy and heat receiving capability of a graphite divertor and overcomes the limitations of tungsten coatings. In addition, a solid tungsten divertor allows us to investigate erosion and bulk deuterium retention as well as test castellation and target tilting. The design criteria as well as calculations of forces due to halo and eddy currents are presented. The thermal properties of the proposed sandwich structure are calculated with finite element method models. After extensive testing of a target tile in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS, two solid tungsten tiles were installed in AUG for in-situ testing.

  11. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  12. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Tungsten Effects on Soil Microbial Communities BUILDING STRONG® Actinobacteria Bacteroidetes Firmicutes alpha-Proteobacteria beta-Proteobacteria gamma...Persistence of Actinobacteria & gamma- Proteobacteria • Actinobacteria – includes the actinomycetes  γ-Proteobacteria – includes a variety of microbes

  13. Tungsten metallizing alumina--yttria ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1977-03-01

    The ease with which high-alumina bodies may be metallized with tungsten is improved by additions of yttria to the alumina. Mechanisms of this bonding process were studied by use of optical and electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and tensile tests. Variables studied included yttria content of the body and the firing temperature during metallizing. The study showed that a reaction between the tungsten and the yttrogarnet grain boundary phase markedly improved adherence

  14. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450 degrees C to 1525 degrees C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%

  15. Problems of tungsten crack resistance optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Technically pure and precipitation-hardening tungsten is studied for its crack resistance in the initial and hardened states at the temperatures of 20...2000 deg C. Results of the study are presented. It is shown that hardening of tungsten base alloys in oil from the temperature corresponding to the upper boundary of the temperature region of ductile-brittle transition increases a crack propagation resistance of the studied materias at elevated and high temperatures

  16. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Analyses and characterisation of tungsten foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Andreas; Yi Xiaoou; Armstrong, David E.J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been attempted for several years to synthesise a tungsten material with a low brittle-to-ductile transition temperature and a high fracture toughness that can be used for structural parts. It was shown in our previous work that tungsten foil is ductile at room temperature and that this ductility can be transformed to bulk by synthesising a tungsten laminate. In this work we want to focus on tungsten foil and assess the microstructure as well as the mechanical properties of the foil. The assessment of the microstructure of 0.1 mm tungsten foil will be performed using electron microscopy. It will be shown that the grains of the tungsten foil have a dimension of 0.5 μm × 3 μm × 15 μm and a clear texture in (1 0 0) 〈0 1 1〉. This texture becomes even more pronounced by annealing. Three-point-bending tests with tungsten foil, as-received, will define the barriers: ductile at room temperature and brittle in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C). This shows that the ductility is a thermally activated process. Recrystallised tungsten foil (annealed for 1 h/2700 °C) shows ductile material behaviour at 200 °C. The paper closes with a discussion on the reasons of the ductility of 0.1 mm tungsten foil. These might be the ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructure or, in other words, a nano microstructure (see tungsten foil as-received), the high amount of mobile edge dislocations, and/or the foil effect, which means that dislocations can move to the surface and are annihilated (see tungsten foil recrystallised).

  17. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  18. Vacuum hot-pressed beryllium and TiC dispersion strengthened tungsten alloy developments for ITER and future fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang, E-mail: xliu@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Chen, Jiming; Lian, Youyun; Wu, Jihong; Xu, Zengyu; Zhang, Nianman; Wang, Quanming; Duan, Xuro [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Zhanhong; Zhong, Jinming [Northwest Rare Metal Material Research Institute, CNMC, Ningxia Orient Group Co. Ltd.,No.119 Yejin Road, Shizuishan City, Ningxia,753000 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Beryllium and tungsten have been selected as the plasma facing materials of the ITER first wall (FW) and divertor chamber, respectively. China, as a participant in ITER, will share the manufacturing tasks of ITER first-wall mockups with the European Union and Russia. Therefore ITER-grade beryllium has been developed in China and a kind of vacuum hot-pressed (VHP) beryllium, CN-G01, was characterized for both physical, and thermo-mechanical properties and high heat flux performance, which indicated an equivalent performance to U.S. grade S-65C beryllium, a reference grade beryllium of ITER. Consequently CN-G01 beryllium has been accepted as the armor material of ITER-FW blankets. In addition, a modification of tungsten by TiC dispersion strengthening was investigated and a W–TiC alloy with TiC content of 0.1 wt.% has been developed. Both surface hardness and recrystallization measurements indicate its re-crystallization temperature approximately at 1773 K. Deuterium retention and thermal desorption behaviors of pure tungsten and the TiC alloy were also measured by deuterium ion irradiation of 1.7 keV energy to the fluence of 0.5–5 × 10{sup 18} D/cm{sup 2}; a main desorption peak at around 573 K was found and no significant difference was observed between pure tungsten and the tungsten alloy. Further characterization of the tungsten alloy is in progress.

  19. Separation of tungsten from molybdenum by liquid-liquid extraction and extraction chromatography using thiocyanate and a quarternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, C.; Onishi, H.

    1977-01-01

    Methods were developed for the separation of tungsten from molybdenum by liquid-liquid extraction and extraction chromatography using thiocyanate and a quaternary ammonium salt, Zephiramine. Tungsten was extracted into chloroform as an ion associate of tungsten(V)-thiocyanate complex and Zephiramine cation was retained on a column of Teflon powder coated with Zephiramine, but molybdenum(III) was neither extracted nor retained. The extraction chromatographic method was succesfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of tungsten in molybdenum by neutron activation analysis. The γ-ray spectrum, observed with the Ge(Li) detector, of tungsten fraction separated from irradiated molybdenum are shown. The peaks of 99 Mo, sup(99m)Tc, and sup(99m)Nb (produced by 92 Mo(n,p)sup(99m)Nb) were seen, but these nuclides did nit interfere with the determination of tungsten using a NaI(Tl) detector. The results of the neutron activation analysis of a sample of ammonium molybdate agreed quite well with that of the spectrophotometric determination after extraction chromatographic separation. (T.G.)

  20. OEDGE Modeling of Collector Probe measurements in L-mode from the DIII-D tungsten ring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Unterberg, Z.; Donovan, D.; Wampler, W. R.; Watkins, J.; Abrams, T.; McLean, A. G.

    2017-10-01

    During the tungsten ring campaign on DIII-D, a collector probe system with multiple diameter, dual-facing collector rods was inserted into the far scrape off layer (SOL) near the outer midplane to measure the plasma tungsten content. For most probes more tungsten was observed on the side connected along field lines to the inner divertor, with the larger probes showing largest divertor-facing asymmetries The OEDGE code is used to model the tungsten erosion, transport and deposition. It has been enhanced with (i) a peripheral particle transport and deposition model to record the impurity content in the peripheral region outside the regular mesh, and (ii) a collector probe model. The OEDGE results approximately reproduce both the divertor-facing asymmetries and the radial decay of each collector probe profile. The effect of changing impurity transport assumptions and wall location are examined. The measured divertor-facing asymmetries imply a higher tungsten density in the plasma upstream of the probe; this was expected theoretically from the effect of the parallel ion temperature gradient force driving upstream transport of tungsten from the outer divertor and was also found in the code analysis. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-NA0003525, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  2. Macroscopic rate equation modeling of trapping/detrapping of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodille, E.A., E-mail: etienne.hodille@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bonnin, X. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisson, R.; Angot, T. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Becquart, C.S. [Université Lille I, UMET, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq cédex France (France); Layet, J.M. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    Relevant parameters for trapping of Hydrogen Isotopes (HIs) in polycrystalline tungsten are determined with the MHIMS code (Migration of Hydrogen Isotopes in MaterialS) which is used to reproduce Thermal Desorption Spectrometry experiments. Three types of traps are found: two intrinsic traps (detrapping energy of 0.87 eV and 1.00 eV) and one extrinsic trap created by ion irradiation (detrapping energy of 1.50 eV). Then MHIMS is used to simulate HIs retention at different fluences and different implantation temperatures. Simulation results agree well with experimental data. It is shown that at 300 K the retention is limited by diffusion in the bulk. For implantation temperatures above 500 K, the retention is limited by trap creation processes. Above 600 K, the retention drops by two orders of magnitude as compared to the retention at 300 K. With the determined detrapping energies, HIs outgassing at room temperature is predicted. After ions implantation at 300 K, 45% of the initial retention is lost to vacuum in 300 000 s while during this time the remaining trapped HIs diffuse twice as deep into the bulk. - Highlights: • Code development to solve numerically the model equations of diffusion and trapping of hydrogen in metals. • Parametrization of the model trapping parameters (detrapping energies and density): fitting of experimental TDS spectrum. • Confrontation model/experiment: evolution of retention with fluence and implantation temperature. • Investigation of period of rest between implantation and TDS on retention and depth profile.

  3. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loarte, A.; Polevoi, A. R.; Hosokawa, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Reinke, M. L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Chilenski, M.; Howard, N.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Köchl, F. [Technische Universität Wien, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria); Pütterich, T.; Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmanstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zhogolev, V. E. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute,” Kurchatov Square 1, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    Experiments in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas in the Enhanced D-alpha H-mode regime with ITER-like mid-radius plasma density peaking and Ion Cyclotron Resonant heating, in which tungsten is introduced by the laser blow-off technique, have demonstrated that accumulation of tungsten in the central region of the plasma does not take place in these conditions. The measurements obtained are consistent with anomalous transport dominating tungsten transport except in the central region of the plasma where tungsten transport is neoclassical, as previously observed in other devices with dominant neutral beam injection heating, such as JET and ASDEX Upgrade. In contrast to such results, however, the measured scale lengths for plasma temperature and density in the central region of these Alcator C-Mod plasmas, with density profiles relatively flat in the core region due to the lack of core fuelling, are favourable to prevent inter and intra sawtooth tungsten accumulation in this region under dominance of neoclassical transport. Simulations of ITER H-mode plasmas, including both anomalous (modelled by the Gyro-Landau-Fluid code GLF23) and neoclassical transport for main ions and tungsten and with density profiles of similar peaking to those obtained in Alcator C-Mod show that accumulation of tungsten in the central plasma region is also unlikely to occur in stationary ITER H-mode plasmas due to the low fuelling source by the neutral beam injection (injection energy ∼ 1 MeV), which is in good agreement with findings in the Alcator C-Mod experiments.

  4. Effect of sputtering on self-damaged ITER-grade tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitsenya, V.S., E-mail: voitseny@ipp.kharkov.ua [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bardamid, A.F. [Taras Shevchenko National University, 01033 Kiev (Ukraine); Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical University “Kharkov Polytechnical Institute”, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Bondarenko, V.N.; Skoryk, O.O.; Shtan’, A.F.; Solodovchenko, S.I. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Sterligov, V.A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, NAS of Ukraine, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Tyburska-Püschel, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Simulation of neutron irradiation and sputtering on ITER-grade tungsten was studied. The effects of neutron-induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Bombardment by Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV was used as imitation of impact of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The sputtering process was interrupted to perform in between measurements of the optical properties of the eroded surface and the mass loss. After sputtering was finished, the surface was thoroughly investigated by different methods for characterizing the surface relief developed due to sputtering. The damaging to, at least, the level that would be achieved in ITER does not lead to a decisive additional contribution to the processes under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  5. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Masashi, E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hatano, Y. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Calderoni, P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhang, K. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kolasinski, R. [Hydrogen and Metallurgical Science Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Sharpe, J.P. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, ion fluence: 4 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  6. Thermal oxidation of tungsten-based sputtered coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, C.; Cavaleiro, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of the addition of nickel, titanium, and nitrogen on the air oxidation behavior of W-based sputtered coatings in the temperature range 600 to 800 C was studied. In some cases these additions significantly improved the oxidation resistance of the tungsten coatings. As reported for bulk tungsten, all the coatings studied were oxidized by layers following a parabolic law. Besides WO 3 and WO x phases detected in all the oxidized coatings, TiO 2 and NiWO 4 were also detected for W-Ti and W-Ni films, respectively. WO x was present as an inner protective compact layer covered by the porous WO 3 oxide. The best oxidation resistance was found for W-Ti and W-N-Ni coatings which also presented the highest activation energies (E a = 234 and 218 kJ/mol, respectively, as opposed to E a ∼ 188 kJ/mol for the other coatings). These lower oxidation weight gains were attributed to the greater difficulty of the inward diffusion of oxygen ions for W-Ti films, owing to the formation of fine particles of TiO 2 , and the formation of the external, more protective layer of NiWO 4 for W-N-Ni coatings

  7. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  8. Trace detection of organic compounds in complex sample matrixes by single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry: real-time detection of security-relevant compounds and online analysis of the coffee-roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Elisabeth; Kürten, Andreas; Hölzer, Jasper; Mitschke, Stefan; Mühlberger, Fabian; Sklorz, Martin; Wieser, Jochen; Ulrich, Andreas; Pütz, Michael; Schulte-Ladbeck, Rasmus; Schultze, Rainer; Curtius, Joachim; Borrmann, Stephan; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    An in-house-built ion trap mass spectrometer combined with a soft ionization source has been set up and tested. As ionization source, an electron beam pumped vacuum UV (VUV) excimer lamp (EBEL) was used for single-photon ionization. It was shown that soft ionization allows the reduction of fragmentation of the target analytes and the suppression of most matrix components. Therefore, the combination of photon ionization with the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) capability of an ion trap yields a powerful tool for molecular ion peak detection and identification of organic trace compounds in complex matrixes. This setup was successfully tested for two different applications. The first one is the detection of security-relevant substances like explosives, narcotics, and chemical warfare agents. One test substance from each of these groups was chosen and detected successfully with single photon ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (SPI-ITMS) MS/MS measurements. Additionally, first tests were performed, demonstrating that this method is not influenced by matrix compounds. The second field of application is the detection of process gases. Here, exhaust gas from coffee roasting was analyzed in real time, and some of its compounds were identified using MS/MS studies.

  9. CO2/CH4 Separation Performance of Ionic-Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Ion Gel Membranes under Mixed Feed Conditions Relevant to Biogas Processing.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friess, K.; Lanč, M.; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Fíla, V.; Vopička, O.; Sedláková, Zuzana; Cowan, M.G.; McDaniel, W.M.; Noble, R.D.; Gin, D.L.; Izák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 528, APRIL (2017), s. 64-71 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA MŠk LH14006; GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : epoxy-amine-based ion gel membranes * biogas processing * humid mixed-gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 6.035, year: 2016

  10. Loss of shear strength in polycrystalline tungsten under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reexamination of existing data on shock compression of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature indicates that tungsten may be an exception to the common belief that metals do not behave like elastic-isotropic solids under shock compression

  11. Final steps to an all tungsten divertor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R.; Bobkov, V.; Dux, R.; Kallenbach, A.; Puetterich, Th.; Greuner, H.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Hopf, Ch.; Krieger, K.; Maggi, C.F.; Maier, H.; Mayer, M.; Rohde, V.; Schmid, K.; Suttrop, W.

    2007-01-01

    Currently 85% of the plasma facing components of ASDEX Upgrade are tungsten coated. Carbon influx from W PFCs is still observed but a reduction of the C content is found in plasma discharges and a lower C fraction is measured in deposited layers in agreement with modelling. W sputtering from the low field side guard and ICRF limiters is mainly due to fast particles from NBI as well as from ions accelerated in the rectified sheath during ICRF operation. The increase of the W source area is reflected in increased W concentrations. For medium to high density discharges the techniques developed so far, namely central heating and ELM pace-making, allow keeping the W concentration in the range of 10 -5 . Boronisation strongly reduces the W influxes and similarly the W content especially during ICRF operation, but this reduction is only temporary and equilibrium is reached already after about 100 discharges

  12. Colour centres in amorphous tungsten trioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.J.; Cikmach, P.D.; Lusis, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, optical, and electrical properties of thin tungsten trioxide (a-WO 3 ) films obtained on substrates with different temperatures and annealed in air and vacuum are investigated. On the basis of these results and recent structural investigations a structure model of the a-WO 3 film is given: a spatial network of tightly bounded clusters which are built from hydrated WO 6 octahedra. These octahedra contain terminal oxygens and being axially distorted they are the sites for localization of injected electrons. The colour centres formed are paramagnetic (ESR signal from W 5+ ) and their optical absorption is satisfactorily described by the intervalence charge transfer between the localized states of W 5+ and W 6+ ions. (author)

  13. Constitutive law for thermally-activated plasticity of recrystallized tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, Aleksandr; Terentyev, Dmitry; Dubinko, Andrii; Delannay, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A physically-based constitutive law relevant for ITER-specification tungsten grade in as-recrystallized state is proposed. The material demonstrates stages III and IV of the plastic deformation, in which hardening rate does not drop to zero with the increase of applied stress. Despite the classical Kocks-Mecking model, valid at stage III, the strain hardening asymptotically decreases resembling a hyperbolic function. The material parameters are fitted by relying on tensile test data and by requiring that the strain and stress at the onset of diffuse necking (uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength correspondingly) as well as the yield stress be reproduced. The model is then validated in the temperature range 300-600 °C with the help of finite element analysis of tensile tests which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental engineering curves up to the onset of diffuse necking, beyond which the development of ductile damage accelerates the material failure. This temperature range represents the low temperature application window for tungsten as divertor material in fusion reactor ITER.

  14. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  15. Chemical and microstructural changes at high temperature in tungsten wire reinforced metal-matrix composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, H.C.; Norden, H.

    1985-01-01

    Tungsten wire reinforced metal-matrix composites have been developed as a gas turbine blade material. Initially it was thought desirable to employ nickel or iron based superalloys as the matrix material due to their demonstrated reliability in applications where a high degree of dimensional stability, and thermal and mechanical fatigue resistance are required. It has been found, however, that deleterious fiber/matrix interactions occur in these systems under in-service conditions. These interactions seriously degrade the mechanical properties, and there is an effective lowering of the recrystallization temperature of the tungsten to the degree that grain structure changes can take place at unusually low temperatures. The present communication reports a study of the early stages of these interactions. Several microscopic and analytical techniques are used: TEM, SIMS, FIM, and the field ion atom probe. The nickel/tungsten interaction is thought to involve solute atom transport along grain boundaries. The grain boundary chemistry after short exposures to nickel at 1100 0 C is determined. In this manner the precursor interaction mechanisms are observed. These observations suggest that the strong nickel/tungsten grain boundary interactions do not involve the formation of distinct alloy phases, but instead involve rapid diffusion of essentially unalloyed nickel along the grain boundaries

  16. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  17. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  18. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  19. Characterization of plasma coated tungsten heavy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Kapoor, D.; Lankford, J. Jr.; Nicholls, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The detrimental environmental impact of Depleted Uranium-based penetrators have led to tremendous development efforts in the area of tungsten heavy alloy based penetrators. One line of investigation involves the coating of tungsten heavy alloys with materials that are prone to shear localization. Plasma spraying of Inconel 718 and 4340 steel have been used to deposit dense coatings on tungsten heavy alloy substrates. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the coating primarily in terms of its microstructure and a special push-out test. The paper describes the results of the push-out tests and analyzes some of the possible failure mechanisms by carrying out microstructural characterization of the failed rings obtained from the push out tests

  20. RF induction plasma spheroidization of tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Zhogntao; Ye Gaoying; Liu Chuandong; Tong Honghui

    2009-01-01

    Irregularly-shaped tungsten powders (average granular sizes of 512 μm) have been spheroidized by radio frequency (RF)induction plasma. The effects of feed rate, mode of material dispersion, particle size on spheroidization efficiency are investigated. Experimental results show that the spheroidization efficiency decreases rapidly when the feed rate increases to more than 95 g/min. Only 30% spheroidization efficiency is gained at the feed rate of 135.75 g/min. The spheroidization efficiency is also affected by the flow rate of carrier gas. When the flow rate of carrier gas is 0.12 m 3 /h, the dispersion effect is the best, and the spheroidization efficiency is almost 100%. The apparent density of tungsten powders increases a bit with the increase of spheroidization efficiency. And the particle size uniformity of spheroidized tungsten powders is in accordance with that of original powders. (authors)

  1. Affinity of Smectite and Divalent Metal Ions (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+)) with L-leucine: An Experimental and Theoretical Approach Relevant to Astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pramod; Pant, Chandra Kala; Gururani, Kavita; Arora, Priyanka; Pandey, Neetu; Bhatt, Preeti; Sharma, Yogesh; Negi, Jagmohan Singh; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2015-12-01

    Earth is the only known planet bestowed with life. Several attempts have been made to explore the pathways of the origin of life on planet Earth. The search for the chemistry which gave rise to life has given answers related to the formation of biomonomers, and their adsorption on solid surfaces has gained much attention for the catalysis and stabilization processes related to the abiotic chemical evolution of the complex molecules of life. In this communication, surface interactions of L-leucine (Leu) on smectite (SMT) group of clay (viz. bentonite and montmorillonite) and their divalent metal ion (Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cu(2+)) incorporated on SMT has been studied to find the optimal conditions of time, pH, and concentration at ambient temperature (298 K). The progress of adsorption was followed spectrophotometrically and further characterized by FTIR, SEM/EDS and XRD. Leu, a neutral/non polar amino acid, was found to have more affinity in its zwitterionic form towards Cu(2+)- exchanged SMT and minimal affinity for Mg(2+)- exchanged SMT. The vibrational frequency shifts of -NH3 (+) and -COO(-) favor Van der Waal's forces during the course of surface interaction. Quantum calculations using density functional theory (DFT) have been applied to investigate the absolute value of metal ion affinities of Leu (Leu-M(2+) complex, M = Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+)) with the help of their physico-chemical parameters. The hydration effect on the relative stability and geometry of the individual species of Leu-M(2+) × (H2O)n, (n =2 and 4) has also been evaluated within the supermolecule approach. Evidence gathered from investigations of surface interactions, divalent metal ions affinities and hydration effects with biomolecules may be important for better understanding of chemical evolution, the stabilization of biomolecules on solid surfaces and biomolecular-metal interactions. These results may have implications for understanding the origin of life and the preservation of

  2. Impact of residual by-products from tungsten film deposition on process integration due to nonuniformity of the tungsten film

    CERN Document Server

    Sidhwa, A; Gandy, T; Melosky, S; Brown, W; Ang, S; Naseem, H; Ulrich, R

    2002-01-01

    The effects of residual by products from a tungsten film deposition process and their impact on process integration due to the nonuniformity of the tungsten film were investigated in this work. The tungsten film deposition process involves three steps: nucleation, stabilization, and tungsten bulk fill. Six experiments were conducted in search for a solution to the problem. The resulting data suggest that excess nitrogen left in the chamber following the tungsten nucleation step, along with residual by products, causes a shift in the tungsten film uniformity during the tungsten bulk fill process. Data reveal that, due to the residual by products, an abnormal grain growth occurs causing a variation in the tungsten thickness across the wafer during the bulk fill step. Although several possible solutions were revealed by the experiments, potential integration problems limited the acceptable solutions to one. The solution chosen was the introduction of a 10 s pumpdown immediately following the nucleation step. Thi...

  3. Effect of helium irradiation on deuterium permeation behavior in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Yuki; Sakurada, Shodai; Fujita, Hiroe; Azuma, Keisuke; Zhou, Quilai [Graduate School of Science & Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga, Shizuoka, 422-8529 Japan (Japan); Hatano, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama, 930-8555 Japan (Japan); Yoshida, Naoaki; Watanabe, Hideo [Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka, 816-8580 Japan (Japan); Oyaizu, Makoto; Isobe, Kanetsugu [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, 2166 Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori, 039-3212 Japan (Japan); Shimada, Masashi [Idaho National Laboratory, 1955 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories, Chemistry, Combustion and Materials Center, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Chikada, Takumi [Graduate School of Science & Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga, Shizuoka, 422-8529 Japan (Japan); Oya, Yasuhisa, E-mail: oya.yasuhisa@shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science & Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga, Shizuoka, 422-8529 Japan (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we measured deuterium (D) gas-driven permeation through tungsten (W) foils that had been pre-damaged by helium ions (He{sup +}). The goal of this work was to determine how ion-induced damage affects hydrogen isotope permeation. At 873 K, the D permeability for W irradiated by 3.0 keV He{sup +} was approximately one order of magnitude lower than that for un-damaged W. This difference diminished with increasing temperature. Even after heating to 1173 K, the permeability returned to less than half of the value measured for un-damaged W. We propose that this is due to nucleation of He bubbles near the surface which potentially serve as a barrier to diffusion deeper into the bulk. Exposure at higher temperatures shows that the D permeability and diffusion coefficients return to levels observed for undamaged material. It is possible that these effects are linked to annealing of defects introduced by ion damage, and whether the defects are stabilized by the presence of trapped He.

  4. Measurement of track opening contours of oblique incident 4He and 7Li-ions in CR-39: Relevance for calculation of track formation parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, D.; Reichelt, U.

    2010-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) irradiated in realistic radiation fields exhibits after chemical etching very complex track images resulting from different species of particles and their energy spectra and randomly distributed angles of incidence or emission. Reading out such an etched detector surface with a light microscope, quite different track opening contours are observed. Beside the number of tracks, typically their major and minor axes are measured. In this work following problems arising from such experimental situations will be investigated: ·the measurement of track contour parameters for oblique incident 4 He and 7 Li-ions of different energies and angles in CR-39 detectors ·the theoretical description of the angular variation of both axes. ·the possibility to extract physical and spectroscopic information from major and minor track axes. This analysis is based on an intensive experimental program and the comprehensive study of theoretical models available for description of track revealing processes in CR-39.

  5. Genetic changes in progeny of bystander human fibroblasts after microbeam irradiation with X-rays, protons or carbon ions: the relevance to cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Konishi, Teruaki; Usami, Noriko; Funayama, Tomoo; Azzam, Edouard I; Murakami, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects have important implications in radiotherapy. Their persistence in normal cells may contribute to risk of health hazards, including cancer. This study investigates the role of radiation quality and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in the propagation of harmful effects in progeny of bystander cells. Confluent human skin fibroblasts were exposed to microbeam radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) at mean absorbed doses of 0.4 Gy by which 0.036-0.4% of the cells were directly targeted by radiation. Following 20 population doublings, the cells were harvested and assayed for micronucleus formation, gene mutation and protein oxidation. Our results showed that expression of stressful effects in the progeny of bystander cells is dependent on LET. The progeny of bystander cells exposed to X-rays (LET ∼6 keV/μm) or protons (LET ∼11 keV/μm) showed persistent oxidative stress, which correlated with increased micronucleus formation and mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) locus. Such effects were not observed after irradiation by carbon ions (LET ∼103 keV/μm). Interestingly, progeny of bystander cells from cultures exposed to protons or carbon ions under conditions where GJIC was inhibited harbored reduced oxidative and genetic damage. This mitigating effect was not detected when the cultures were exposed to X-rays. These findings suggest that cellular exposure to proton and heavy charged particle with LET properties similar to those used here can reduce the risk of lesions associated with cancer. The ability of cells to communicate via gap junctions at the time of irradiation appears to impact residual damage in progeny of bystander cells.

  6. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  7. Demonstration of multi-generational growth of tungsten nanoparticles in hydrogen plasma using in situ laser extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, K.; Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that tungsten (W) nanoparticles (NPs) are created when a tungsten target is exposed to low-pressure, high density hydrogen plasma. The plasma was generated using a novel dual plasma system combining a microwave discharge and a pulsed direct-current (DC) discharge. The tungsten surface originates in the multi-generational formation of a significant population of 30-70 nm diameter particles when the W cathode is biased at ~  -1 kV and submitted to ~1020 m2 s-1 H+/H2+ /H3+ ions flux. The evidenced NPs formation should be taking into account as one of the consequence of the plasma surface interaction outcomes, especially for fusion applications.

  8. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li 2 TiO 3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 x 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li 2 CO 3 are embedded in the Li 2 TiO 3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively

  9. Dislocation-mediated strain hardening in tungsten: Thermo-mechanical plasticity theory and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Xiao, Xiazi; Dubinko, A.; Bakaeva, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent thermo-mechanical model to study the strain-hardening behavior of polycrystalline tungsten was developed and validated by a dedicated experimental route. Dislocation-dislocation multiplication and storage, as well dislocation-grain boundary (GB) pinning were the major mechanisms underlying the evolution of plastic deformation, thus providing a link between the strain hardening behavior and material's microstructure. The microstructure of the polycrystalline tungsten samples has been thoroughly investigated by scanning and electron microscopy. The model was applied to compute stress-strain loading curves of commercial tungsten grades, in the as-received and as-annealed states, in the temperature range of 500-1000 °C. Fitting the model to the independent experimental results obtained using a single crystal and as-received polycrystalline tungsten, the model demonstrated its capability to predict the deformation behavior of as-annealed samples in a wide temperature range and applied strain. The relevance of the dislocation-mediated plasticity mechanisms used in the model have been validated using transmission electron microscopy examination of the samples deformed up to different amounts of strain. On the basis of the experimental validation, the limitations of the model are determined and discussed.

  10. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-07-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li2TiO3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 × 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li2CO3 are embedded in the Li2TiO3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively.

  11. Experimental studies on tungsten-armor impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.; Nakao, M.; Verzilov, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Wada, M.; Kubota, N.; Kondo, K.; Yamauchi, M.; Enoeda, M.; Nishitani, T.

    2005-01-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armor impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed by using DT neutrons at Fusion Neutron Source (FNS) facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are constructed by a set of layers consisting of 0 - 25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li 2 TiO 3 and 100 - 200mm thick beryllium with cross-section of 660 x 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li 2 CO 3 are embedded inside the Li 2 TiO 3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5, 12.6 and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armors, sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2, 3 and 6 % relative to the case without the armor, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. Calculation results for sum of the integrated tritium productions in the case with the tungsten armor agree well with the experiment data within 4% and 19% under condition without and with a neutron reflector, respectively. (author)

  12. Substructure and electrical resistivity analyses of pure tungsten sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trybus, C.L.; Sellers, C.H.; Anderl, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The substructure of pure tungsten sheet (0.025 mm thick) is examined and quantified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Dislocation populations and arrangements are evaluated for as-worked and various annealed conditions of the tungsten sheet. The worked (rolled) tungsten substructure was nonhomogeneous, consisting of areas of very high and low dislocation densities. These results are correlated to resistivity measurements of the tungsten sheet following thermal cycling to 1200 degrees C to determine the substructural changes as a function of temperature. The comparison between the two characterization techniques is used to examine the relationship between structural and electronic properties in tungsten. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Molecular complexes of tungsten oxotetrachloride with azomethins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, Yu.V.; Garnovskij, A.D.; Abramenko, V.A.; Medvedeva, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Series of new molecular complexes of tungsten oxotetrachloride with benza- and salicylalimines of equimolar compositions obtained. Substances are studied using element analysis, IR spectroscopy and conductometry. Octahedral structure of complexes with central atom coordination of benzalaniline molecules via azomethin nitrogen atom, and salicylalimines - via carbonyl oxygen atom of quinoid tantometric form of ligand is assumed

  14. Deuterium transport and trapping in polycrystalline tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Trybus, C.L.; Sellers, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that deuterium permeation studies for polycrystalline tungsten foil have been conducted to provide data for estimating tritium transport and trapping in tungsten-clad divertors proposed for advanced fusion-reactor concepts. Based on a detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) microstructural characterization of the specimen material and on analyses of permeation data measured at temperatures ranging form 610 to 823 K for unannealed and annealed tungsten foil (25 μm thick), the authors note the following key results: deuterium transport in tungsten foil is dominated by extensive trapping that varies inversely with prior anneal temperatures of the foil material, the reduction in the trapped fraction correlates with a corresponding elimination of a high density of dislocations in cell-wall structures introduced during the foil fabrication process, trapping behavior in these foils can be modelled using trap energies between 1.3 eV and 1.5 eV and trap densities ranging from 1 x 10 -5 atom fraction

  15. Analytical methods for the determination of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topping, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    Methods developed and employed in the recent literature (1969 to 1975) for the detection and determination of tungsten in a wide variety of matrices are reviewed. This paper is a supplement to the books, monographs and review papers which deal with the earlier literature. (author)

  16. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. Development of tungsten collimators for industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varkey, P.A.; Verma, P.B.; Jayakumar, T.K.; Mammachan, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    Collimators are essential components of industrial radiography set up as it provides radiation safety to persons involved in the radiography work. A collimator with optimum design features also helps in reducing the scattered radiation which in turn results in radiographs having better sensitivity. This papers describes the salient design features of the tungsten collimators developed by the BRIT, for industrial radiography. (author)

  18. OPAL Example Segment of Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  19. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  20. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  1. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  2. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  3. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  4. Technique for investigation on tungsten crack resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    The possibility of using the linear destruction mechanic for the estimation of tungsten crack resistance in a wide range of temperatures has been studied and grounded. Values critical of stress intensity factors in the 20-2000 deg C temperature range are given

  5. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  6. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  7. Kinetics of low pressure chemical vapor deposition of tungsten silicide from dichlorocilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, D.; Raupp, G.B.; Hillman, J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report on experiments to determine the intrinsic surface reaction rate dependences and film properties' dependence on local reactant partial pressures and wafer temperature in low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of tungsten silicide from dichlorosilane reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Films were deposited in a commercial-scale Spectrum CVD cold wall single wafer reactor under near differential, gradientless conditions. Over the range of process conditions investigated, deposition rate was found to be first order in dichlorosillane and negative second order in tungsten hexafluoride partial pressure. The apparent activation energy in the surface reaction limited regime was found to be 70-120 kcal/mol. The silicon to tungsten ratio of as deposited silicide films ranged from 1.1 to 2.4, and increased with increasing temperature and dichlorosillane partial pressure, and decreased with increasing tungsten hexafluoride pressure. These results suggest that the apparent silicide deposition rate and composition are controlled by the relative rates of at least two competing reactions which deposit stoichiometric tungsten silicides and/or silicon

  8. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu

  9. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  10. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polášek, J.; Mašek, K.; Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O"− ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  11. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polášek, J., E-mail: xpolasekj@seznam.cz [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Mašek, K. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J. [HVM Plasma Ltd., Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, CZ-158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-30

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O{sup −} ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  12. Investigation of structural, optical, magnetic and electrical properties of tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn nano-ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Abhilash; Bhardwaj, Sanjay; Thakur, Shyam Singh; Mattei, Jean-Luc; Queffelec, Patrick; Panina, Larissa V.; Thakur, Preeti; Thakur, Atul

    2018-02-01

    Tungsten substituted nickel-zinc ferrite nanoparticles with chemical composition of Ni0.5Zn0.5WxFe2-xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 & 1.0) were successfully synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared ferrites were pre sintered at 850 °C and then annealed at 1000 °C in a muffle furnace for 3 h each. This sintered powder was inspected by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to study the structural, optical, and magnetic properties. XRD measurement revealed the phase purity of all the nanoferrite samples with cubic spinel structure. The estimated crystallite size by X-ray line broadening is found in the range of 49-62 nm. FTIR spectra of all the samples have observed two prominent absorption bands in the range 400-700 cm-1 arising due to tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrations. Vibrating sample magnetometer experiments showed that the saturation magnetizations (MS) decreased with an increase in non-magnetic tungsten ion doping. The electrical resistivity of tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn nano ferrites were examined extensively as a function of temperature. With an increase in tungsten composition, resistivity was found to decrease from 2.2 × 105 Ω cm to 1.9 × 105 Ω cm which indicates the semiconducting behavior of the ferrite samples. The activation energy also decreased from 0.0264 to 0.0221 eV at x = 0.0 to x = 1.0. These low coercive field tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn ferrites are suitable for hyperthermia and sensor applications. These observations are explained in detail on the basis of various models and theories.

  13. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  14. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xie

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  16. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements of the spin Hall effect in tungsten films by using iron-coated tungsten tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting; Dreyer, Michael; Bowen, David; Hinkel, Dan; Butera, R. E.; Krafft, Charles; Mayergoyz, Isaak

    2018-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy experiments using iron-coated tungsten tips and current-carrying tungsten films have been conducted. An asymmetry of the tunneling current with respect to the change of the direction of the bias current through a tungsten film has been observed. It is argued that this asymmetry is a manifestation of the spin Hall effect in the current-carrying tungsten film. Nanoscale variations of this asymmetry across the tungsten film have been studied by using the scanning tunneling microscopy technique.

  17. Study of the temperature dependent nitrogen retention in tungsten surfaces by XPS-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, Ulrike [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Schellingstrasse 4, D-80799 Muenchen (Germany); Meisl, Gerd; Hoeschen, Till [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To reduce the power load on the divertor of fusion experiments, nitrogen (N) is puffed into the plasma. As a side effect, nitrogen gets implanted into the tungsten (W) walls of the reactor and forms nitride layers. Their formation and, therefore, the N accumulation in W showed an unexpected temperature dependence in previous experiments. To study the nitrogen retention, we implanted N ions with an energy of 300 eV into W and observed the evolution of the surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We find that the N content does not change when the sample is annealed up to 800 K after implantation at lower temperatures. In contrast, the N concentration decreases with increasing implantation temperature. At 800 K implantation temperature, the N saturation level is about 5 times lower compared to 300 K implantation. A possible explanation for this difference is an enhanced diffusion during ion bombardment due to changes in the structure or in the chemical state of the tungsten nitride system. Ongoing tungsten nitride erosion experiments shall help to clarify whether the strong temperature dependence is the result of enhanced diffusion or of phase changes.

  18. Trends in tungsten coil atomic spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, George L.

    Renewed interest in electrothermal atomic spectrometric methods based on tungsten coil atomizers is a consequence of a world wide increasing demand for fast, inexpensive, sensitive, and portable analytical methods for trace analysis. In this work, tungsten coil atomic absorption spectrometry (WCAAS) and tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (WCAES) are used to determine several different metals and even a non-metal at low levels in different samples. Improvements in instrumentation and new strategies to reduce matrix effects and background signals are presented. Investigation of the main factors affecting both WCAAS and WCAES analytical signals points to the importance of a reducing, high temperature gas phase in the processes leading to atomic cloud generation. Some more refractory elements such as V and Ti were determined for the first time by double tungsten coil atomic emission spectrometry (DWCAES). The higher temperatures provided by two atomizers in DWCAES also allowed the detection of Ag, Cu and Sn emission signals for the first time. Simultaneous determination of several elements by WCAES in relatively complex sample matrices was possible after a simple acid extraction. The results show the potential of this method as an alternative to more traditional, expensive methods for fast, more effective analyses and applications in the field. The development of a new metallic atomization cell is also presented. Lower limits of detection in both WCAAS and WCAES determinations were obtained due to factors such as better control of background signal, smaller, more isothermal system, with atomic cloud concentration at the optical path for a longer period of time. Tungsten coil-based methods are especially well suited to applications requiring low sample volume, low cost, sensitivity and portability. Both WCAAS and WCAES have great commercial potential in fields as diverse as archeology and industrial quality control. They are simple, inexpensive, effective

  19. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Ne q+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for ''trampoline effect''

  20. Electron emission from tungsten surface induced by neon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongfeng; Zeng, Lixia; Zhao, Yongtao; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Xiaoan; Ren, Jieru; Zhou, Xianming; Wang, Xing; Lei, Yu; Li, Yongfeng; Yu, Yang; Liu, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqing; Li, Fuli

    2014-04-01

    The electron emission from W surface induced by Neq+ has been measured. For the same charge state, the electron yield gradually increases with the projectile velocity. Meanwhile, the effect of the potential energy of projectile has been found obviously. Our results give the critical condition for "trampoline effect".

  1. New Insights into the Role of Pb-BHA Complexes in the Flotation of Tungsten Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tong; Han, Haisheng; Hu, Yuehua; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Runqing; Gao, Zhiyong; Wang, Li; Chen, Pan; Zhang, Chenyang; Tian, Mengjie

    2017-11-01

    Lead ions (lead nitrate) were introduced to modify the surface properties of tungsten minerals, effectively improving the floatability, with benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) serving as the collector. Flotation tests indicated that Pb-BHA complexes were the active species responsible for flotation of the tungsten minerals. The developed Pb-BHA complexes and the novel flotation process effectively increased the recovery of scheelite and wolframite, simplified the technological process, and led to reduced costs. Fourier transform infrared spectra data showed the presence of adsorbed Pb-BHA complexes on the surface of the minerals. The characteristic peaks of BHA shifted by a considerable extent, indicating that chemical adsorption plays an important role in the flotation process. Zeta potential results confirmed physical adsorption of the positively charged Pb-BHA complexes on the mineral surfaces. The synergistic effect between chemical and physical adsorption facilitated the maximum flotation recovery of scheelite and wolframite.

  2. Effects of Si3+ and H+ Irradiation on Tungsten Evaluated by Internal Friction Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jing; Wang Xianping; Fang Qianfeng; Liu Changsong; Zhang Yanwen; Zhao Ziqiang

    2013-01-01

    Effects of Si 3+ and H + irradiation on tungsten were investigated by internal friction (IF) technique. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that sequential dual Si+H irradiation resulted in more serious damage than single Si irradiation. After irradiation, the IF background was significantly enhanced. Besides, two obvious IF peaks were initially found in temperature range of 70∼330 K in the sequential Si+H irradiated tungsten sample. The mechanism of increased IF background for the irradiated samples was suggested to originate from the high density dislocations induced by ion irradiation. On the other hand, the relaxation peak P L and non-relaxation peak P H in the Si+H irradiated sample were ascribed to the interaction process of hydrogen atoms with mobile dislocations and transient processes of hydrogen redistribution, respectively. The obtained experimental results verified the high sensitivity of IF method on the irradiation damage behaviors in nuclear materials

  3. Test and characterization of a prototype silicon–tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhuri, Sanjib, E-mail: sanjibmuhuri@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Chandratre, Vinay B.; Sukhwani, Menka [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Electronics Division, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jena, Satyajit [Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Nayak, Tapan K.; Saini, Jogender; Singaraju, Rama Narayana [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-11-11

    New generation high-energy physics experiments demand high precision tracking and accurate measurements of a large number of particles produced in the collisions of elementary particles and heavy-ions. Silicon–tungsten (Si–W) calorimeters provide the most viable technological option to meet the requirements of particle detection in high multiplicity environments. We report a novel Si–W calorimeter design, which is optimized for γ/π{sup 0} discrimination up to high momenta. In order to test the feasibility of the calorimeter, a prototype mini-tower was constructed using silicon pad detector arrays and tungsten layers. The performance of the mini-tower was tested using pion and electron beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS). The experimental results are compared with the results from a detailed GEANT-4 simulation. A linear relationship between the observed energy deposition and simulated response of the mini-tower has been obtained, in line with our expectations.

  4. On-chip microplasma reactors using carbon nanofibres and tungsten oxide nanowires as electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agiral, Anil; Groenland, Alfons W; Han Gardeniers, J G E; Chinthaginjala, J Kumar; Seshan, K; Lefferts, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and tungsten oxide (W 18 O 49 ) nanowires have been incorporated into a continuous flow type microplasma reactor to increase the reactivity and efficiency of the barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. CNFs and tungsten oxide nanowires were characterized by high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nanodiffraction methods. Field emission of electrons from those nanostructures supplies free electrons and ions during microplasma production. Reduction in breakdown voltage, higher number of microdischarges and higher energy deposition were observed at the same applied voltage when compared with plane electrodes at atmospheric pressure in air. Rate coefficients of electron impact reaction channels to decompose CO 2 were calculated and it was shown that CO 2 consumption increased using CNFs compared with plane electrode in the microplasma reactor.

  5. An equilibrium model for tungsten fuzz in an eroding plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.P.; Baldwin, M.J.; Stangeby, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    A model equating the growth rate of tungsten fuzz on a plasma-exposed surface to the erosion rate of the fuzzy surface is developed to predict the likelihood of tungsten fuzz formation in the steady-state environment of toroidal confinement devices. To date this question has not been answered because the operational conditions in existing magnetic confinement machines do not necessarily replicate those expected in future fusion reactors (i.e. high-fluence operation, high temperature plasma-facing materials and edge plasma relatively free of condensable impurities). The model developed is validated by performing plasma exposure experiments at different incident ion energies (thereby varying the erosion rate) and measuring the resultant fuzz layer thickness. The results indicate that if the conditions exist for fuzz development in a steady-state plasma (surface temperature and energetic helium flux), then the erosion rate will determine the equilibrium thickness of the surface fuzz layer.

  6. Simulation of tungsten erosion and transport near the divertor plate during ELMs by a kinetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhenyue; Sang, Chaofeng; Hu, Wanpeng; Du, Hailong; Wang, Dezhen, E-mail: wangdez@dlut.edu.cn

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A kinetic method is used to simulate tungsten erosion and transport during ELMs. • The erosion of tungsten plate by different species (deuterium and carbon ions) is shown. • The charge states of sputtered tungsten particles are given statistically. - Abstract: Tungsten (W) is fore seen as one of the most important candidates of the plasma-facing materials (PFM) for future fusion devices, due to its beneficial properties. However, the high-Z characteristic makes it a potential contamination to the core plasma. Divertor is the main component that directly contacts the plasma, therefore, it is very important to understand the erosion of W divertor plate and the corresponding transport of the eroded wall impurity, especially during edge localized modes (ELMs). In this work, a one-dimension-in-space and three-dimensions-in-velocity particle-in-cell code (EPPIC1D) is used to simulate the erosion of W divertor plate, and the transport of eroded W impurity near the divertor plate is studied by a Monte Carlo code. Benefiting from the kinetic simulation, energy/particle flux to the target could be calculated accurately, and the erosion of W plate by different species is simulated during ELMs. The trajectories and distributions of eroded W impurity particles are demonstrated, which shows us a basic idea of how these impurity particles are generated and transported. It is found that C{sup 3+} plays a dominated role on the erosion of W divertor plate during ELMs even when its concentration is low. Both W atoms and ions distribute mainly near the divertor plate, indicating only a very small fraction of W impurity particles could escape from divertor region and penetrate into the core plasma.

  7. Relevance of LiPF6 as Etching Agent of LiMnPO4 Colloidal Nanocrystals for High Rate Performing Li-ion Battery Cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Dilena, Enrico; Paolella, Andrea; Bertoni, Giovanni; Ansaldo, Alberto; Colombo, Massimo; Marras, Sergio; Scrosati, Bruno; Manna, Liberato; Monaco, Simone

    2016-02-17

    LiMnPO4 is an attractive cathode material for the next-generation high power Li-ion batteries, due to its high theoretical specific capacity (170 mA h g(-1)) and working voltage (4.1 V vs Li(+)/Li). However, two main drawbacks prevent the practical use of LiMnPO4: its low electronic conductivity and the limited lithium diffusion rate, which are responsible for the poor rate capability of the cathode. The electronic resistance is usually lowered by coating the particles with carbon, while the use of nanosize particles can alleviate the issues associated with poor ionic conductivity. It is therefore of primary importance to develop a synthetic route to LiMnPO4 nanocrystals (NCs) with controlled size and coated with a highly conductive carbon layer. We report here an effective surface etching process (using LiPF6) on colloidally synthesized LiMnPO4 NCs that makes the NCs dispersible in the aqueous glucose solution used as carbon source for the carbon coating step. Also, it is likely that the improved exposure of the NC surface to glucose facilitates the formation of a conductive carbon layer that is in intimate contact with the inorganic core, resulting in a high electronic conductivity of the electrode, as observed by us. The carbon coated etched LiMnPO4-based electrode exhibited a specific capacity of 118 mA h g(-1) at 1C, with a stable cycling performance and a capacity retention of 92% after 120 cycles at different C-rates. The delivered capacities were higher than those of electrodes based on not etched carbon coated NCs, which never exceeded 30 mA h g(-1). The rate capability here reported for the carbon coated etched LiMnPO4 nanocrystals represents an important result, taking into account that in the electrode formulation 80% wt is made of the active material and the adopted charge protocol is based on reasonable fast charge times.

  8. Effects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umashankar A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abhishek Umashankar,1,2,* Mandi J Corenblum,1,* Sneha Ray,1,2,* Michel Valdez,3 Eriko S Yoshimaru,3 Theodore P Trouard,3,4 Lalitha Madhavan1,4 1Department of Neurology, 2Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Undergraduate Program, Undergraduate Biology Research Program, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4Evelyn F McKnight Brain Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An essential component of developing successful neural stem cell (NSC-based therapies involves the establishment of methodologies to noninvasively monitor grafted NSCs within brain tissues in real time. In this context, ex vivo labeling with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO particles has been shown to enable efficient tracking of transplanted NSCs via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. However, whether and how USPIO labeling affects the intrinsic biology of NSCs is not thoroughly understood, and remains an active area of investigation. Here, we perform a comprehensive examination of rat NSC survival and regenerative function upon labeling with the USPIO, Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB, which allows for dual magnetic resonance and optical imaging. After optimization of labeling efficiency, two specific doses of MIRB (20 and 50 µg/mL were chosen and were followed for the rest of the study. We observed that both MIRB doses supported the robust detection of NSCs, over an extended period of time in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into the striata of host rats, using MRI and post hoc fluorescence imaging. Both in culture and after neural transplantation, the higher 50 µg/mL MIRB dose significantly reduced the survival, proliferation, and differentiation rate of the NSCs. Interestingly, although the lower 20 µg/mL MIRB labeling did not produce overtly negative effects, it increased the proliferation and glial differentiation of the NSCs. Additionally, application of this dose also changed the

  9. Effects of the iron oxide nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B on the viability and regenerative function of neural stem cells: relevance to clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umashankar, Abhishek; Corenblum, Mandi J; Ray, Sneha; Valdez, Michel; Yoshimaru, Eriko S; Trouard, Theodore P; Madhavan, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    An essential component of developing successful neural stem cell (NSC)-based therapies involves the establishment of methodologies to noninvasively monitor grafted NSCs within brain tissues in real time. In this context, ex vivo labeling with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles has been shown to enable efficient tracking of transplanted NSCs via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, whether and how USPIO labeling affects the intrinsic biology of NSCs is not thoroughly understood, and remains an active area of investigation. Here, we perform a comprehensive examination of rat NSC survival and regenerative function upon labeling with the USPIO, Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB), which allows for dual magnetic resonance and optical imaging. After optimization of labeling efficiency, two specific doses of MIRB (20 and 50 μg/mL) were chosen and were followed for the rest of the study. We observed that both MIRB doses supported the robust detection of NSCs, over an extended period of time in vitro and in vivo after transplantation into the striata of host rats, using MRI and post hoc fluorescence imaging. Both in culture and after neural transplantation, the higher 50 μg/mL MIRB dose significantly reduced the survival, proliferation, and differentiation rate of the NSCs. Interestingly, although the lower 20 μg/mL MIRB labeling did not produce overtly negative effects, it increased the proliferation and glial differentiation of the NSCs. Additionally, application of this dose also changed the morphological characteristics of neurons and glia produced after NSC differentiation. Importantly, the transplantation of NSCs labeled with either of the two MIRB doses upregulated the immune response in recipient animals. In particular, in animals receiving the 50 μg/mL MIRB-labeled NSCs, this immune response consisted of an increased number of CD68(+)-activated microglia, which appeared to have phagocytosed MIRB particles and cells contributing to an

  10. Properties of deposited layer formed by interaction with Be seeded D–He mixture plasma and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, K., E-mail: tokunaga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Baldwin, M.J.; Nishijima, D.; Doerner, R.P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0417 (United States); Nagata, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tsuchiya, B. [Department of General Education, Faculty of Science and Technology, Meiji University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya, 468-8502 (Japan); Kurishita, H. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, IMR, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Fujiwara, T.; Araki, K.; Miyamoto, Y. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ohno, N. [School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Be-seeded, high-flux, deuterium/helium mixture plasma exposure experiments on tungsten target materials have been performed to simulate ITER all tungsten divertor erosion/modification and deposition phenomena. The exposure conditions are kept fixed at a typical low-ion-energy of 60 eV and a flux of 3–6 × 10{sup 22}/m{sup 2}/s. Sample temperature is 1123 K and plasma exposure times spanning 1050–10,100 s are explored. The typical ratio of He/D ions is 0.2 and Be content is 0.2%. A He-induced nanostructure layer is formed on the exposure surfaces of tungsten materials and the surface of the nanostructure is covered by a thin layer of Be and O. A fraction of the re-eroded Be from the target is deposited on a glassy carbon plate with line of sight to the tungsten target. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses show that the Be redeposit layer is in the form of laminae. Small amounts of Mo, W and C are also found in the redeposited Be layer. Elastic recoil detection analyses show that D, He and H are also included in the redeposited Be layer.

  11. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L.M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Byun, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile. - Highlights: • Fusion reactors need a tough, ductile tungsten plasma-facing material. • The unirradiated tungsten-copper laminate is more ductile than tungsten alone. • After neutron irradiation, the composite has significantly less ductility. • The tungsten behavior appears to dominate the overall composite behavior.

  12. Structure of tungsten electrodeposited from oxide chloride-fluoride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskij, V.A.; Reznichenko, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation results on the influence of electrolysis parameters and electrolyte composition on tungsten cathode deposit structure are presented. The electrolysis was performed in NaCl-NaF-WO 3 molten salts using tungsten and tungsten coated molybdenum cathodes. Morphological and metallographic studies of tungsten crystals were carrier out. Tungsten deposits were obtained in the form of crystalline conglomerates, sponge and high dispersity powder

  13. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  14. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Tungsten at Temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colgan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that were submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.

  15. The influence of Fe content on spreading ability of tungsten heavy alloys matrix on tungsten surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krzyńska

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of tungsten spreading ability with W-Ni-Co-Fe matrix are presented. The aim of these investigations was to see how Fe concentration in W – Ni – Co matrix influences the wettability of tungsten grains during liquid phase sintering. Four green compact specimens containing 50%W, 10%Co and Ni + Fe = 40% but with different Ni to Fe ratio were prepared. The cylindrical specimen 5mm diameter and 5mm height were put on clean pure tungsten substrate and then 20 minutes heated at 1520oC in hydrogen atmosphere. After heating the specimens were carefully measured and then the specimens for structure observations were prepared. It was concluded, that increase of Fe content decrease the melting temperature of W – Ni – Co alloy. The melting point decrease caused by Fe content increase substantially the spreading ability of tungsten substrate with W – Ni – Co alloy. Metallography investigations showed some microstructure changes in “reaction zone” identified in tungsten substrate – (WNi40-xCo10Fex interface. The results of the study confirmed our earlier observations that even relative small Fe addition promotes Weight Heavy Alloys (WHA liquid phase sintering.

  16. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    is to act both as a diffusion barrier for chromium and provide better protection against high temperature oxidation than a pure cobalt coating. This work presents a characterization of a cobalt-tungsten alloy coating electrodeposited on the ferritic steel Crofer 22 H which subsequently was oxidized in air......A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  17. Effect of electrode materials on a negative ion production in a cesium seeded negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Morishita, Takutoshi; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Hanada, Masaya; Iga, Takashi; Inoue, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Imai, Tsuyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Effects of plasma grid materials on the negative ion production efficiency in a cesium seeded ion source have been experimentally studied. Grid materials of Au, Ag, Cu, Ni, and Mo were examined. A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source was utilized in the experiment to avoid contamination of tungsten from filament cathode. Relations between the negative ion currents and work functions of the grid were measured for these materials. Influence of the contamination by tungsten on the grid was also investigated. If was clarified that the negative ion production efficiency was determined only by the work function of the grid. The efficiency did not depend on the material itself. The lowest work function of 1.42 eV was obtained for Au grid with Cs, and a high H{sup -} production efficiency of 20.7 mA/kW was measured. This efficiency is about 1.3 times larger than that of Cs/Mo and Cs/Cu. Further improvement of the production efficiency was observed by covering the plasma grid with tungsten and cesium simultaneously. Such co-deposition of W and Cs on the plasma grid produced the negative ion production efficiency of 1.7 times higher than that from the tungsten grid simply covered with Cs. (author)

  18. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  19. Tungsten dust remobilization under steady-state and transient plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ratynskaia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Remobilization is one of the most prominent unresolved fusion dust-relevant issues, strongly related to the lifetime of dust in plasma-wetted regions, the survivability of dust on hot plasma-facing surfaces and the formation of dust accumulation sites. A systematic cross-machine study has been initiated to investigate the remobilization of tungsten micron-size dust from tungsten surfaces implementing a newly developed technique based on controlled pre-adhesion by gas dynamics methods. It has been utilized in a number of devices and has provided new insights on remobilization under steady-state and transient conditions. The experiments are interpreted with contact mechanics theory and heat conduction models.

  20. The study of optimal conditions of electrochemical etching of tunnel electron microscopy tungsten tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguiano, E.; Aguilar, M.; Olivar, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained during the study made in the electrochemical etching of tunneling electron microscopy tungsten tips. The experiments was made using DC and two usual electrolytes: KOH and NaOH. For the tip preparation we used a electrochemical cell with stainless steel cathode and the tungsten wire as anode. the electrodes was introduced in a glass recipient containing the electrolytic solution. We study the effects of applied voltage, polish time, tip length and electrolyte concentration as process relevant parameters. The best condition for tip preparation was obtained with a metallurgical microscope and with a SEM.EDX and Auger analysis was made. The results shown the better tips was made with KOH as electrolyte with a limited concentration range (2-4 normal) and applied voltage (2-6 volts) (Author) 20 refs

  1. Surface hardening induced by high flux plasma in tungsten revealed by nano-indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terentyev, D., E-mail: dterenty@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Bakaeva, A. [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Pardoen, T.; Favache, A. [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2 L5.02.02, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Zhurkin, E.E. [Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Faculty of Physics and Mechanics, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytekhnicheskaya str., 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-01

    Surface hardness of tungsten after high flux deuterium plasma exposure has been characterized by nanoindentation. The effect of plasma exposure was rationalized on the basis of available theoretical models. Resistance to plastic penetration is enhanced within the 100 nm sub-surface region, attributed to the pinning of geometrically necessary dislocations on nanometric deuterium cavities – signature of plasma-induced defects and deuterium retention. Sub-surface extension of thereby registered plasma-induced damage is in excellent agreement with the results of alternative measurements. The study demonstrates suitability of nano-indentation to probe the impact of deposition of plasma-induced defects in tungsten on near surface plasticity under ITER-relevant plasma exposure conditions.

  2. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jixiu; Wan Baofei

    2006-01-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 deg. C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment

  3. The tungsten powder study of the dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ji-xiu; Wan, Bao-fei

    2006-06-01

    The intercorrelation of tungsten powder properties, such as grain size, distribution and morphology, and porous matrix parameters with electron emission capability and longevity of Ba dispenser cathodes has been investigated for the different grain morphologies. It is shown that a fully cleaning step of the tungsten powder is so necessary that the tungsten powder will be reduction of oxide in hydrogen atmosphere above 700 °C. The porosity of the tungsten matrix distributes more even and the closed pore is fewer, the average granule size of the tungsten powder distributes more convergent. The porosity of the tungsten matrix and the evaporation of the activator are bigger and the pulse of the cathode is smaller when the granularity is bigger by the analysis of the electronic microscope and diode experiment.

  4. Synthesis and electrical characterization of tungsten oxide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Rui; Zhu Jing; Yu Rong

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires of diameters ranging from 7 to 200 nm are prepared on a tungsten rod substrate by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method with vapour-solid (VS) mechanism. Tin powders are used to control oxygen concentration in the furnace, thereby assisting the growth of the tungsten oxide nanowires. The grown tungsten oxide nanowires are determined to be of crystalline W18O49. Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves are measured by an in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) to investigate the electrical properties of the nanowires. All of the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curves observed are symmetric, which reveals that the tungsten oxide nanowires are semiconducting. Quantitative analyses of the experimental I V curves by using a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) model give some intrinsic parameters of the tungsten oxide nanowires, such as the carrier concentration, the carrier mobility and the conductivity.

  5. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  6. Separation of tungsten and rhenium on alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILOVAN SM. STOILJKOVIC

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the efficient separation of tungsten(VI and rhenium (VII on alumina were established. The distribution coefficients Kd for tungstate and perrhenate anions, as well as the separation factors a (a = KdWO42-/Kd ReO4- were determined using hydrochloric or nitric acid as the aqueous media. A solution of sodium chloride in the pH range 2–6 was also examined. Under all the tested experimental conditions, alumina is a much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The obtained results indicated that the best separation of these two elements is achieved when 0.01– 0.1 mol dm-3 HCl or 1.0 mol dm-3 HNO3 are used as the aqueous media. If NaCl is used as the aqueous phase, the best separation is achieved with 0.20 mol dm-3 NaCl, pH 4–6. Under these experimental conditions, the breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina for tungsten at pH 4 are 17 and 26 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively. With increasing pH, these values decrease. Thus, at pH 6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al2O3, respectively.

  7. Separation of Rhenium (VII) from Tungsten (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Lukic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Orlic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Examined were the conditions for an effective separation of tungsten (VI) and rhenium (VII) on alumina if the solution of 0.20 mol dm -3 NaCl, ph=2.6 is used as the aqueous phase. Under the given experimental conditions alumina was found to be much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina at pH=2 are 24 and 78 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 , respectively. With the increase of pH these values decrease. So, at pH=6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 respectively. The elution volume for rhenium for the given column dimensions and quantity of the adsorbent is about 16 ml. These results were confirmed by the experiments of the radiological separations. Tungsten-187 remains firmly bound to the alumina. The radionuclide purity of the eluted 186'188 Re at pH=2 is very high. (authors)

  8. Concentration dependent hydrogen diffusion in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlgren, T., E-mail: tommy.ahlgren@helsinki.fi; Bukonte, L.

    2016-10-15

    The diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten is studied as a function of temperature, hydrogen concentration and pressure using Molecular Dynamics technique. A new analysis method to determine diffusion coefficients that accounts for the random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position is presented. The results indicate that the hydrogen migration barrier of 0.25 eV should be used instead of the presently recommended value of 0.39 eV. This conclusion is supported by both experiments and density functional theory calculations. Moreover, the migration volume at the saddle point for H in W is found to be positive: ΔV{sub m} ≈ 0.488 Å{sup 3}, leading to a decrease in the diffusivity at high pressures. At high H concentrations, a dramatic reduction in the diffusion coefficient is observed, due to site blocking and the repulsive H-H interaction. The results of this study indicates that high flux hydrogen irradiation leads to much higher H concentrations in tungsten than expected. - Highlights: • The recommended value of 0.39 eV for the H in W migration barrier should be changed to 0.25 eV. • The random oscillation of atoms around the equilibrium position can be dealt with in diffusion simulations. • Hydrogen diffusion in tungsten is highly concentration dependent.

  9. Tungsten/copper composite deposits produced by a cold spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ki; Kang, Suk Bong

    2003-01-01

    An agglomerated tungsten/copper composite powder was both cold sprayed and plasma sprayed onto a mild steel substrate for electronic package applications. Most pores resulting from the spraying were found in the vicinity of the tungsten-rich regions of the final product. The levels of porosity varied with the amount of tungsten present. No copper oxidation was found at the cold-sprayed deposit, but relatively high copper oxidation was observed at the plasma-sprayed deposit

  10. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States); Oksuz, Betul Akgol [Genome Technology Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Shen, Steven [Center for Health Informatics and Bioinformatics, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Costa, Max, E-mail: Max.Costa@nyumc.org [Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY 10987 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten's ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer-related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA sequencing. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data show the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. - Highlights: • Tungsten (W) induces cell transformation and increases migration in vitro. • W increases xenograft growth in nude mice. • W altered the expression of cancer-related genes such as those involved in leukemia. • Some of the dysregulated leukemia genes include, CD74, CTGF, MST4, and HOXB5. • For the first time, data is presented that demonstrates tungsten's carcinogenic potential.

  11. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  12. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  13. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  14. Kinetics of carbide formation in the molybdenum-tungsten coatings used in the ITER-like Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, H.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Balden, M.; Elgeti, S.; Ruset, C.; Matthews, G. F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of tungsten carbide formation was investigated for tungsten coatings on carbon fibre composite with a molybdenum interlayer as they are used in the ITER-like Wall in JET. The coatings were produced by combined magnetron sputtering and ion implantation. The investigation was performed by preparing focused ion beam cross sections from samples after heat treatment in argon atmosphere. Baking of the samples was done at temperatures of 1100 °C, 1200 °C, and 1350 °C for hold times between 30 min and 20 h. It was found that the data can be well described by a diffusional random walk with a thermally activated diffusion process. The activation energy was determined to be (3.34 ± 0.11) eV. Predictions for the isothermal lifetime of this coating system were computed from this information.

  15. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A. I., E-mail: aibelyaeva@mail.ru; Savchenko, A. A. [National Technical University “Kharkov Politechnical Institute”, Kharkov, 61002 (Ukraine); Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kharkov, 61024 (Ukraine)

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20 MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600 eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  16. 2s 2p 3P10 → 2s21S0 intercombination line in beryllium-like krypton, molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Transition probabilities are evaluated for the 2s 2p 3 P 1 0 → 2s 2 1 S 0 transition in beryllium-like ions for krypton, molybdenum and tungsten, using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The importance of the 2s 3p 1 P 1 0 configuration is considered

  17. Studies of plasma interactions with tungsten targets in PF-1000U facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladygina Maryna S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of experimental studies of tungsten samples of 99.95% purity, which were irradiated by intense plasma-ion streams. The behaviour of tungsten, and particularly its structural change induced by high plasma loads, is of great importance for fusion technology. The reported measurements were performed within a modified PF-1000U plasma-focus facility operated at the IFPiLM in Warsaw, Poland. The working gas was pure deuterium. In order to determine the main plasma parameters and to study the behaviour of impurities at different instants of the plasma discharge, the optical emission spectroscopy was used. The dependence of plasma parameters on the initial charging voltage (16, 19 and 21 kV was studied. Detailed optical measurements were performed during interactions of a plasma stream with the tungsten samples placed at the z-axis of the facility, at a distance of 6 cm from the electrode outlets. The recorded spectra showed distinct WI and WII spectral lines. Investigation of a target surface morphology, after its irradiation by intense plasma streams, was performed by means of an optical microscope. The observations revealed that some amounts of the electrodes material (mainly copper were deposited upon the irradiated sample surface. In all the cases, melted zones were observed upon the irradiated target surface, and in experiments performed at the highest charging voltage there were formed some cracks.

  18. Possibilities of chemical isolation of element 106 from aqueous solutions according to the model experiments with short lived tungsten isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeglowski, Z.; Bruchertseifer, H.; Brudanin, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    A rapid method for continuous separation of short-lived tungsten isotopes from the lanthanides has been developed. It consists in transforming nuclear reaction products from the target by an aerosol jet to an absorber where the KCl particulates are dissolved in 0.2 M HF and percolating the product solution through three successively linked columns filled with ion exchange resins Dowex 50X8 (cationite), Dowex 1X8 (anionite) and again Dowex 50X8. 3 refs

  19. Analysis of magnetic-dipole transitions in tungsten plasmas using detailed and configuration-average descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Xieyu; Poirier, Michel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of transition arrays of magnetic-dipole (M1) type in highly charged ions. Such transitions play a significant role in highly ionized plasmas, for instance in the tungsten plasma present in tokamak devices. Using formulas recently published and their implementation in the Flexible Atomic Code for M1-transition array shifts and widths, absorption and emission spectra arising from transitions inside the 3*n complex of highly-charged tungsten ions are analyzed. A comparison of magnetic-dipole transitions with electric-dipole (E1) transitions shows that, while the latter are better described by transition array formulas, M1 absorption and emission structures reveal some insufficiency of these formulas. It is demonstrated that the detailed spectra account for significantly richer structures than those predicted by the transition array formalism. This is due to the fact that M1 transitions may occur between levels inside the same relativistic configuration, while such inner configuration transitions are not accounted for by the currently available averaging expression. In addition, because of configuration interaction, transition processes involving more than one electron jump, such as 3p1/23d5/2 → 3p3/23d3/2, are possible but not accounted for in the transition array formulas. These missing transitions are collected in pseudo-arrays using a post-processing method described in this paper. The relative influence of inner- and inter-configuration transitions is carefully analyzed in cases of tungsten ions with net charge around 50. The need for an additional theoretical development is emphasized.

  20. Fracture and Residual Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Cobalt Coatings on High Strength Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Donald S

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt coatings applied via high velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray deposition are essentially anisotropic composite structures with aggregates of tungsten carbide particles bonded...

  1. On the origin, properties, and implications of asymmetries in the tungsten impurity density in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odstrcil, Tomas

    2017-07-03

    In this thesis, the transport of tungsten ions is studied in the plasma of ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma facing components of the fusion reactors are expected to be built from high-Z materials such as W, Mo or Fe. These materials provide advantages like a high melting point, small erosion rates, and low tritium retention. However, due to the interaction of the plasma with the wall, ions of this material will be inevitably present also in the main plasma. These ions are not entirely stripped even at fusion plasma temperatures, and therefore emit strong line radiation, which can significantly degrade the performance of the fusion plasma. Thus the understanding and control of impurity transport are of critical importance to the success of fusion. The high mass and charge of the heavy impurities make them susceptible to some of the forces acting upon the plasma, resulting in a poloidal variation of their density. The most prominent are the centrifugal force arising from the plasma rotation and the electric force caused by magnetically trapped non-thermal ions. Furthermore, the poloidal asymmetries should have a significant impact on the radial transport of heavy ions, which was widely ignored up to date. In the present work, the poloidal asymmetries in the heavy impurity density were inferred from the soft X-ray radiation using a newly developed tomographic method. The high accuracy of the tomography and of the model for the centrifugal force allowed to identify for the first time in an experiment the effect of the fast ion distribution produced by neutral beam injection on the poloidal asymmetry of the tungsten density. The measured asymmetry was compared to several fast ion models, and the best match was found with the Monte Carlo code in the TRANSP code suite that includes finite orbits effects of the fast ions. Similarly, fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron heating and localized mainly in the outboard side of the plasma due to a magnetic trapping and produce

  2. Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couëdel, L., E-mail: lenaic.couedel@univ-amu.fr; Kumar, K. Kishor; Arnas, C. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2014-12-15

    Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.

  3. Iso-nuclear tungsten dielectronic recombination rates for use in magnetically-confined fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D.-H.; Lee, W.; Preval, S.; Ballance, C. P.; Behar, E.; Colgan, J.; Fontes, C. J.; Nakano, T.; Li, B.; Ding, X.; Dong, C. Z.; Fu, Y. B.; Badnell, N. R.; O'Mullane, M.; Chung, H.-K.; Braams, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Center and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, our assembled group of authors has reviewed the current state of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for various ion stages of tungsten (W). Subsequent recommendations were based upon available experimental data, first-principle calculations carried out in support of this paper and from available recombination data within existing atomic databases. If a recommendation was possible, data were compiled, evaluated and fitted to a functional form with associated uncertainty information retained, where available. This paper also considers the variation of the W fractional abundance due to the underlying atomic data when employing different data sets.

  4. Sputtering/redeposition analysis of alkali-based tungsten composites for limiter/divertor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Valentine, M.G.

    1986-07-01

    Composites of porous tungsten infiltrated with alkali metal-bearing alloys have been projected as a means of reducing plasma impurities and sputter erosion in magnetic fusion devices. Self-sustaining alkali metal overlayers have been observed to inhibit erosion of the underlying structural substrate by 2X to 10X. The alkali metal itself, insofar as it sputters as a secondary ion, is trapped at the surface by sheath potential and tangential magnetic fields. Self-regeneration of the alkali metal coating is obtained by thermal and radiation-induced segregation from the bulk

  5. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  6. Developments toward the use of tungsten as armour material in plasma facing components promoted by Euratom-CEA Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitteau, R.; Missiaen, J.M.; Brustolin, P.

    2006-01-01

    developed for tungsten coating. The coatings are manufactured by MEdC-Euratom Association using Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation and Thermo-ionic Vacuum Arc. The coating morphology is characterised by an electron microscope using a focused ion beam. The adhesion between the coating and substrate is studied. The thermal lock-in technique is investigated to develop a non destructive test allowing to check the coating homogeneity, and its adhesion to the substrate. (author)

  7. Behavior of tungsten carbide in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 213-220 ISSN 1335-8987 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water stabilized plasma * tungsten carbide * tungsten hemicarbide * decarburization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Charge-density-wave instabilities expected in monophosphate tungsten bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadell, E.; Whangbo, M.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of tight-binding band calculations, we examined the electronic structures of the tungsten oxide layers found in the monophosphate tungsten bronze (MPTB) phases. The Fermi surfaces of these MPTB phases consist of five well-nested one- and two-dimensional pieces. We calculated the nesting vectors of these Fermi surfaces and discussed the expected charge-density-wave instabilities

  9. Vapor-transport of tungsten and its geologic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibue, Y [Hyogo Univ. of Teacher Education, Hyogo (Japan)

    1988-11-10

    The volatility of tungsten in a hydrous system at elevated temperatures and pressures was examined, and a tentative model for the enrichment of tungsten in hydrothermal solutions for the deposits related to granitic activities was proposed. To produce vapor-saturated solution, 17 or 15ml of 20wt% NaCl solution was introduced into an autoclave. Ca(OH){sub 2} for tungsten and H{sub 2}WO{sub 4} for base metals were used as vapor-captures, and run products were identified by X-ray powder diffractometry. The results suggested that the ratio of tungsten to base metals was higher in a vapor phase than in a liquid phase, and more enrichment of tungsten in the vapor phase occurred at higher temperature and pressure under the coexistence of the vapor and liquid phase. The tentative model emphasizing the vapor-transport of tungsten could explain the presence of tungsten deposits without large mineralization of base metals. Geological schematic model for the generation of the hydrothermal solution enriched in tungsten compared with base metals was illustrated based on above mentioned results. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Chromium and molybdenum diffusion in tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotsman, S.M.; Koloskov, V.M.; Osetrov, S.V.; Polikarpova, I.P.; Tatarinova, G.N.; Timofeev, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of measuring temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients of homovalent impurities of chromium and molybdenum in tungsten single crystals. It is concluded that the difference of activation energies of selfdiffusion and impurity diffusion in the system 'tungsten-homovalent impurity' is conditioned by interaction of screened potentials of impurity and vacancy with Lazarus-Le Claire model

  11. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  12. Processing of tungsten scrap into powders by electroerosion disintegration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fominskii, L.P.; Leuchuk, M.V.; Myuller, A.S.; Tarabrina, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    Utilization of tungsten and tungsten alloy swarf and other waste and also of rejected and worn parts is a matter of great importance in view of the shortage of this metal. The authors examine the electroerosion (EE) disintegration of tungsten in water as a means of utilizing swarf and other loose waste. Unlike chemical methods, EE disintegration ensures ecological purity since there are no effluent waters or toxic discharges. Swarf and trimmings of rods of diameters up to 20 mm obtained after the lathe-turning of tungsten bars sintered from PVN and PVV tungsten powders were disintegrated in water at room temperature between tungsten electrodes. The phase composition of the powder was studied using FeK /SUB alpha/ radiation, by x-ray diffraction methods in a DRON-2 diffractometer with a graphite monochromator on the secondary beam. When tungsten is heated to boiling during EE disintegration, the impurities present in it can evaporate and burn out. Thus, tungsten powder produced by EE disintegration can be purer than the starting metal

  13. Thermal Spray Coating of Tungsten for Tokamak Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xianliang; Gitzhofer, F; Boulos, M I

    2006-01-01

    Thermal spray, such as direct current (d.c.) plasma spray or radio frequency induced plasma spray, was used to deposit tungsten coatings on the copper electrodes of a tokamak device. The tungsten coating on the outer surface of one copper electrode was formed directly through d.c. plasma spraying of fine tungsten powder. The tungsten coating/lining on the inner surface of another copper electrode could be formed indirectly through induced plasma spraying of coarse tungsten powder. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the cross section and the interface of the tungsten coating. Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) was used to analyze the metallic elements attached to a separated interface. The influence of the particle size of the tungsten powder on the density, cracking behavior and adhesion of the coating is discussed. It is found that the coarse tungsten powder with the particle size of 45 ∼ 75 μm can be melted and the coating can be formed only by using induced plasma. The coating deposited from the coarse powder has much higher cohesive strength, adhesive strength and crack resistance than the coating made from the fine powder with a particle size of 5 μm

  14. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  15. Fracture peculiarities in ceramic tungsten at different temperatures in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Stress-strain diagrams and results of metallographic analyses are presented for the ceramic tungsten samples tested for fracture toughness under conditions of eccentric tension at different temperatures (20...1600 deg C) in vacuum. The tungsten fracture is shown to be of brittle nature within the whole temperature range studied, but the fracture process has its own peculiarities at different test temperatures

  16. Development and qualification of a bulk tungsten divertor row for JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Ph.; Altmann, H.; Hirai, T.; Philipps, V.; Pintsuk, G.; Rapp, J.; Riccardo, V.; Schweer, B.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Samm, U.

    2009-06-01

    A bulk tungsten divertor row has been developed in the frame of the ITER-like Wall project at JET. It consists of 96 tiles grouped in 48 modules around the torus. The outer strike point is located on those tiles for most of the ITER-relevant, high triangularity plasmas. High power loads (locally up to 10-20 MW/m 2) and erosion rates are expected, even a risk of melting, especially with the transients or ELM loads. These are demanding conditions for an inertially cooled design as prescribed. A lamella design has been selected for the tungsten, arranged to control the eddy and halo current flows. The lamellae must also withstand high temperature gradients (2200 to 220 °C over 40 mm height), without overheating the supporting carrier (600-700 °C maximum). As a consequence of the tungsten emissivity, the radiative cooling drops appreciably in comparison with the current CFC tiles, calling for interleaved plasma scenarios in terms of performance. The compromise between shadowing and power handling is discussed, as well as the consequences for operation. Prototypes have been exposed in TEXTOR and in an electron beam facility (JUDITH-2) to the nominal power density of 7 MW/m 2 for 10 s and, in addition, to higher loads leading to surface temperatures above 2000 °C.

  17. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingchen Cao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup, while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  18. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity......, applicability to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of aligned CNT forests, and electrochemical performance are investigated. Experiments include culturing of NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells on TiW coated silicon scaffolds, CNT growth on TiW substrates with nickel catalyst, and cyclic...

  20. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  1. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C. [Lab. of Special Ceramic and P/M, University of Science and Technology, 100083 Beijing (China); Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G. [FZJ-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association Euratom-FZJ, Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Postfach 1913, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Song, S.X. [Research Center on Fusion Materials (RCFM), University of Science and Technology Beijing (USTB), 100083 Beijing (China)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 {mu}m, 1 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m{sup 2} respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2}. Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 {mu}m size at 0.33 GW/m{sup 2} and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 {mu}m size at 0.55 GW/m{sup 2}. The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 {mu}m size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m{sup 2}. The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 {mu}m size has

  2. Atomic structure calculations for F-like tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunny, Aggarwal

    2014-09-01

    Energy levels, wavefunction compositions and lifetimes have been computed for all levels of 1s22s22p5, 1s22s2p6, 1s22s22p43s, 1s22s22p43p, and 1s22s22p43d configurations in highly charged F-like tungsten ion. The multiconfigurational Dirac—Fock method (MCDF) is adopted to generate the wavefunctions. We have also presented the transition wavelengths, oscillator strengths, transition probabilities, and line strengths for the electric dipole (E1) and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transition from the 1s22s22p5 ground configuration. We have performed parallel calculations with the flexible atomic code (FAC) for comparing the atomic data. The reliability of present data is assessed by comparison with other theoretical and experimental data available in the literature. Good agreement is found between our results and those obtained using different approaches confirm the quality of our results. Additionally, we have predicted some new atomic data for F-like W that were not available so far and may be important for plasma diagnostic analysis in fusion plasma.

  3. Investigation of tungsten coatings on graphite and CFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, R; Maier, H; Gauthier, E; Greuner, H; Hirai, T; Hopf, Ch; Likonen, J; Maddaluno, G; Matthews, G F; Mitteau, R; Philipps, V; Piazza, G; Ruset, C

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of JET's ITER-like wall (ILW) project tungsten coatings on carbon fibre reinforced carbon substrates will be used in the divertor and highly loaded areas in the main chamber. Fourteen different types of samples were produced by physical or chemical vapour deposition and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) with coating thickness of 4, 10 and 200 μm. Similarly, three different VPS W coatings (200 μm) on two different graphite substrates, were produced for use at the strike-point regions of ASDEX Upgrade. All coatings were subjected to thermal screening and thermal cycling tests in the ion beam facility GLADIS. Additionally, the coatings intended for the ILW project were exposed to edge localized mode (ELM)-like thermal loads in the electron beam facility JUDITH. A general failure mode with the CFC substrate is crack formation upon cool-down, whereas the coatings on graphite do not show any crack formation. Additionally, metallographic investigations, x-ray diffraction measurements, adhesion testing as well as measurements on the contents of light impurities were performed

  4. Adhesion of non-selective CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, D.W.; Wilson, R.H.; Sanchez-Martinez, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion of non-selective, CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide is a critical issue in the development of tungsten as a metalization for VLSI circuitry. Without special adhesion promoters, tungsten deposited from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/ has typically failed a standard tape test over all types of silicon oxides and nitrides. The reasons for failure of thin films, and CVD tungsten in particular are explored along with standard techniques for improving adhesion of thin films. Experiments are reported which include a number of sputtered metals as adhesion promoters, as well as chemical and plasma treatment of the oxide surface. Sputtered molybdenum is clearly the superior adhesion promoting layer from these tests. Traditional adhesion layers such as chromium or titanium failed as adhesion layers for CVD tungsten possibly due to chemical reactions between the WF/sub 6/ and Cr or Ti

  5. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  6. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, J. de; Cadoret, K; Martinez, L.; Veillet, D.; Millot, F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La 2 O 3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  7. The gate oxide integrity of CVD tungsten polycide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.W.; Su, W.D.; Chang, S.W.; Tseng, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    CVD tungsten polycide has been demonstrated as a good gate material in recent very large scale integration (VLSI) technology. CVD tungsten silicide offers advantages of low resistivity, high temperature stability and good step coverage. On the other hand, the polysilicon underlayer preserves most characteristics of the polysilicon gate and acts as a stress buffer layer to absorb part of the thermal stress origin from the large thermal expansion coefficient of tungsten silicide. Nevertheless, the gate oxide of CVD tungsten polycide is less stable or reliable than that of polysilicon gate. In this paper, the gate oxide integrity of CVD tungsten polycide with various thickness combinations and different thermal processes have been analyzed by several electrical measurements including breakdown yield, breakdown fluence, room temperature TDDB, I-V characteristics, electron traps and interface state density

  8. Solvent extraction in analytical chemistry of tungsten (Review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.M.; Busev, A.I.; Sokolova, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of extraction for isolating and concentrating tungsten with subsequent determination by various methods is considered. For tungsten extractants of all types are employed: neutral, basic and acidic. Neutral extractants are used for isolating and concentrating tungsten, basic and acidic ones are employed, as a rule, for the isolation and subsequent determination of tungsten. This type of extractants is highly promising, since, selectively extracting tungsten, they allow its simultaneous determination. Neutral extractants are oxygen-containing solvents, TBP; basic extractants are aniline, pyridine, 1-naphthylamine, trialkylbenzylammoniumanitrate. As acidic reagents use is made of 8-oxyquinoline and its derivatives, oximes and hydroxamic acids, β-diketones, carbaminates. In the extraction radioactive isotope 185 W is employed

  9. A new fully automatic PIM tool to replicate two component tungsten DEMO divertor parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Steffen; Commin, Lorelei; Heneka, Jochen; Piotter, Volker; Plewa, Klaus; Walter, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a fully automatic 2C-PIM tool. • Replicate fusion relevant components in one step without additional brazing. • No cracks or gaps in the seam of the joining zone visible. • For both material combinations a solid bond of the material interface was achieved. • PIM is a powerful process for mass production as well as for joining even complex shaped parts. -- Abstract: At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), divertor design concepts for future nuclear fusion power plants beyond ITER are intensively investigated. One promising KIT divertor design concept for the future DEMO power reactor is based on modular He-cooled finger units. The manufacturing of such parts by mechanical machining such as milling and turning, however, is extremely cost and time intensive because tungsten is very hard and brittle. Powder Injection Molding (PIM) has been adapted to tungsten processing at KIT since a couple of years. This production method is deemed promising in view of large-scale production of tungsten parts with high near-net-shape precision, hence, offering an advantage of cost-saving process compared to conventional machining. The properties of the effectively and successfully manufactured divertor part tile consisting only of pure tungsten are a microstructure without cracks and a high density (>98% T.D.). Based on the achieved results a new fully automatic multicomponent PIM tool was developed and allows the replication and joining without brazing of fusion relevant components of different materials in one step and the creation of composite materials. This contribution describes the process route to design and engineer a new fully automatic 2C-PIM tool, including the filling simulation and the implementing of the tool. The complete technological fabrication process of tungsten 2C-PIM, including material and feedstock (powder and binder) development, injection molding, and heat-treatment of real DEMO divertor parts is outlined

  10. Polaron interaction energies in reduced tungsten trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, E.; Salje, E.; Tilley, R.J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration of the properties of reduced tungsten trioxide suggest that the mobile charge carriers are polarons. As it is uncertain how the presence of polarons will influence the microstructures of the crystallographic shear (CS) planes present in reduced tungsten trioxide we have calculated both the polaron-CS plane and polaron-polaron interaction energy for a variety of circumstances. Three CS plane geometries were considered, (102), (103), and (001) CS plane arrays, and the nominal compositions of the crystals ranged from WO 2 70 to WO 3 0 . The polarons were assumed to have radii from 0.6 to 1.0 nm and the polaron-CS plane electrostatic interaction was assumed to be screened. The results suggest that for the most part the total interaction energy is small and is unlikely to be of major importance in controlling the microstructures found in CS planes. However, at very high polaron densities the interaction energy could be appreciable and may have some influence on the existence range of CS phases

  11. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  12. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  13. Serrated flow behavior in tungsten heavy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Jiten, E-mail: das.jiten@gmail.com; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.

    2015-10-14

    Flow behavior of a tungsten heavy alloy of composition, 90.5 wt% W–7.1 wt% Ni–1.65 wt% Fe–0.5 wt% Co–0.25 wt% Mo was investigated in a temperature range of 223–973 K and strain rate range of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −2} s{sup −1}. In the temperature range of 773–873 K, the stress strain curves were characterized by jerky flow pointing towards Dynamic Strain Ageing (DSA)/Portevin Le-Chatelier's (PLC) effect. Characteristics of DSA were analyzed in detail. Based on the value of activation energy determined from the critical strain method, diffusion of interstitials (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen) were thought to be responsible for the DSA effect. The results were discussed in relation to information existing in this area in tungsten heavy alloys. The study of fracture surface of tensile tested samples (in the range of 823–973 K) showed that the fractographic features, mostly intergranular, predominantly govern the overall ductility of the alloy and do not change except for surface oxidation at relatively higher temperatures.

  14. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Caretta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440  GeV/c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ∼45  μm diameter spheres (not compacted reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45  μm grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250  μm mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared wit