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Sample records for tungsten ions relevant

  1. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  2. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  5. Spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions with Electron Beam Ion Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Morita, Shigeru; Murakami, Izumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra is investigated of electron energies from 490 to 1440 eV. Previously unreported lines are presented in the EUV range, and some of them are identified by comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations. (author)

  6. EUV spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in electron beam ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaue, H.A.; Kato, D.; Murakami, I.; Nakamura, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present spectra of highly charged tungsten ions in the extreme ultra-violet (EUV) by using electron beam ion traps. The electron energy dependence of spectra was investigated for electron energy from 540 to 1370 eV. Previously unreported lines were presented in the EUV range, and comparing the wavelengths with theoretical calculations identified them. (author)

  7. High-flux He+ irradiation effects on surface damages of tungsten under ITER relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Dongping; Hong, Yi; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Yang, Qi; Bi, Zhenhua; Benstetter, Günther; Li, Shouzhe

    2016-01-01

    A large-power inductively coupled plasma source was designed to perform the continuous helium ions (He + ) irradiations of polycrystalline tungsten (W) under International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) relevant conditions. He + irradiations were performed at He + fluxes of 2.3 × 10 21 –1.6 × 10 22 /m 2  s and He + energies of 12–220 eV. Surface damages and microstructures of irradiated W were observed by scanning electron microscopy. This study showed the growth of nano-fuzzes with their lengths of 1.3–2.0 μm at He + energies of >70 eV or He + fluxes of >1.3 × 10 22 /m 2  s. Nanometer-sized defects or columnar microstructures were formed in W surface layer due to low-energy He + irradiations at an elevated temperature (>1300 K). The diffusion and coalescence of He atoms in W surface layers led to the growth and structures of nano-fuzzes. This study indicated that a reduction of He + energy below 12–30 eV may greatly decrease the surface damage of tungsten diverter in the fusion reactor.

  8. Radiative Recombination and Photoionization Data for Tungsten Ions. Electron Structure of Ions in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvina B. Trzhaskovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies of tungsten ions in plasmas are presented. New calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization cross-sections, as well as radiative recombination and radiated power loss rate coefficients have been performed for 54 tungsten ions for the range W6+–W71+. The data are of importance for fusion investigations at the reactor ITER, as well as devices ASDEX Upgrade and EBIT. Calculations are fully relativistic. Electron wave functions are found by the Dirac–Fock method with proper consideration of the electron exchange. All significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The radiative recombination rates and the radiated power loss rates are determined provided the continuum electron velocity is described by the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution. The impact of the core electron polarization on the radiative recombination cross-section is estimated for the Ne-like iron ion and for highly-charged tungsten ions within an analytical approximation using the Dirac–Fock electron wave functions. The effect is shown to enhance the radiative recombination cross-sections by ≲20%. The enhancement depends on the photon energy, the principal quantum number of polarized shells and the ion charge. The influence of plasma temperature and density on the electron structure of ions in local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas is investigated. Results for the iron and uranium ions in dense plasmas are in good agreement with previous calculations. New calculations were performed for the tungsten ion in dense plasmas on the basis of the average-atom model, as well as for the impurity tungsten ion in fusion plasmas using the non-linear self-consistent field screening model. The temperature and density dependence of the ion charge, level energies and populations are considered.

  9. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K; Tawada, Y; Kato, S; Sasao, M; Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M; Lee, H T; Ueda, Y; Tanaka, N; Kisaki, M; Nishiura, M; Matsumoto, Y; Yamaoka, H

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H + beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions. (paper)

  10. Low energy helium ion irradiation induced nanostructure formation on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the low energy helium ion irradiation induced surface morphology changes on tungsten (W) surfaces under extreme conditions. Surface morphology changes on W surfaces were monitored as a function of helium ion energy (140–300 eV), fluence (2.3 × 10 24 –1.6 × 10 25 ions m −2 ), and flux (2.0 × 10 20 –5.5 × 10 20 ion m −2 s −1 ). All the experiments were performed at 900° C. Our study shows significant effect of all the three ion irradiation parameters (ion flux, fluence, and energy) on the surface morphology. However, the effect of ion flux is more pronounced. Variation of helium ion fluence allows to capture the very early stages of fuzz growth. The observed fuzz growth and morphology changes were understood in the realm of various possible phenomena. The study has relevance and important impact in the current and future nuclear fusion applications. - Highlights: •Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. •Observing the very early stages for the W-Fuzz formation. •Tracking the surface morphological evolution during the He irradiation. •Discussing in depth our observation and drawing a possible scenario that explain this phenomenon. •Studying various ions irradiation parameters such as flux, fluence, and ions energy.

  11. In-situ field-ion microscope study of the recovery behavior of heavy metal ion-irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, C.H.

    1977-06-01

    Three field ion microscope (FIM) experiments were carried out to study the annealing behavior of heavy ion irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum. The first experiment dealt with the stage I long-range migration of tungsten self interstitial atoms (SIAs) in high purity tungsten of resistivity ratio, R = 24,000 (R = rho 300 /rho 4 . 2 , where rho 300 and rho 4 . 2 are the room temperature and 0 0 C resistivities). The FIM specimens were irradiated in situ at 18 K with 30 keV W + ions to an average dose of 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 and subsequently examined by the pulsed-field evaporation technique. The second experiment dealt with the phenomenon of impurity atom trapping of SIAs during long-range migration. It was shown that rhenium atoms in a tungsten matrix tend to capture tungsten SIAs and remain bound up to temperatures as high as 390 K. The final experiment was concerned with the low temperature annealing kinetics of irradiated molybdenum. High purity molybdenum of resistivity ratio R = 5700 was irradiated at 10 K with 30 keV Mo + ions to a dose of approximately 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . The results indicated that the electric field has only a minimal effect on the SIA annealing kinetics. This tends to strengthen the contention that the molybdenum SIA becomes mobile at 32 K

  12. Near UV-visible line emission from tungsten highly-charged ions in Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.A.; Murakami, I.; Goto, M.; Oishi, T.; Morita, S.; Fujii, K.; Nakamura, N.; Koike, F.; Sasaki, Akira; Ding, X.-B.; Dong, C.-Z.

    2015-01-01

    Wavelengths of emission lines from tungsten highly-charged ions have been precisely measured in near UV-visible range (320 - 356 nm and 382 - 402 nm) at Large Helical Device (LHD) by tungsten pellet injection. The tungsten emission lines were assigned based on its line-integrated intensity profiles on a poloidal cross section. The ground-term magnetic-dipole (M1) lines of W 26+,27+ and an M1 line of a metastable excited state of W 28+ , whose wavelengths have been determined by measurements using electron-beam-ion-traps (EBITs), are identified in the LHD spectra. The present results partially compliment wavelength data of tungsten highly-charged ions in the near UV-visible range. (author)

  13. Measurements of visible forbidden lines and ion distributions of tungsten highly charged ions at the LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, D.; Sakaue, H.A.; Murakami, I.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Nakamura, N.; Koike, F.; Sasaki, Akira; Ding, X.-B.; Dong, C.-Z.

    2013-01-01

    Visible lines, which are presumably associated with forbidden lines from tungsten highly charged ions, were clearly observed in a spectrum of 370 - 410 nm recorded shortly after a tungsten pellet injection at the LHD. One of the measured lines has been assigned to a magnetic-dipole (M1) line of the ground-term fine-structure transition of W 26+ . Photon emission was observed at 44 lines of sight divided along the vertical direction of a horizontally elongated poloidal cross section of the LHD plasma. The line-integrated intensity of the lines along each line of sight indicates peaked profiles near the plasma center, while visible line emissions of neutral hydrogen and helium recoded in the same sampling time have a maximum located in the peripheral region of the poloidal cross section. (author)

  14. Evidence for catalytic formation of benzene from ethylene on tungsten ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christian; Kaiser, Sabine; Schindler, Thomas; Kronseder, Christian; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon; Bondybey, Vladimir E.

    1994-12-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of tungsten cations with ethylene was investigated by means of Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The ethylene adsorbs on the W + with partial dehy drogenation, forming W (C 2 H 2) n+ cluster ions. Up to nine ethylenes can be consecutively added, n = 1-9. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments provide evidence that a dehydrogenative oligomerization and formation of benzene takes place on the tungsten cation. The dominating fragmentation channel of the WC 6H 6+ ion results in appearance of the bare metal ion, suggesting that a C 6H 6 fragment, most likely benzene, was formed.

  15. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  16. Simulation study on retention and reflection from tungsten carbide under high fluence of helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, T.; Yamamura, Y.; Kawamura, T.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2000-08-01

    We have studied, by a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT-DIFFUSE, the fluence-dependence of the amount of retained helium atoms in tungsten carbide at room temperature under helium ion bombardment. The retention behavior may be understood qualitatively in terms of irradiation-dependent diffusion coefficient assumed and range. The emission processes from tungsten carbide under helium ion irradiation derived were compared with each other. We have discussed the retention curves for incident energy of 5 keV at incident angles of 0deg and 80deg and of 500 eV at 0deg. The energy spectra of helium atoms reflected from tungsten carbide for incident energy of 500 eV at 0deg and 80deg were compared with those from graphite and tungsten. (author)

  17. Flux threshold determination for tungsten nano-fuzz formation using an 80 eV He-ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fred W.; Bannister, Mark E.; Parish, Chad M.

    2017-10-01

    At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), we have extended our investigation of flux thresholds for He-ion induced nano-fuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces down to plasma-edge-relevant energies of 80 eV. We measured the size of the incident ion beam by accurate flux-profile measurements, and the size of the region where tungsten nano-fuzz was formed by post-exposure SEM surface analysis and real-time monitoring of the hot W surface-emissivity change throughout the beam exposure. If tungsten nano-fuzz formation had a fluence threshold, the size of the observed nano-fuzz region would be expected to increase with exposure time, eventually filling the entire ion beam spot. Instead, we found that the region of nano-fuzz formation (1) was always smaller than the beam spot itself and (2) did not increase in size with time, i.e. with accumulated He ion fluence. By comparison of the flux profile and the spatial extent of the fuzz region we determined a flux threshold of 9.5 +-3×1019/m2s at 80 eV He ion impact energy. We show that the observed flux-threshold energy dependence for nano-fuzz formation, which we have now mapped out from 80 eV to 8.5 keV, is well reproduced by the combined energy dependences of He-ion reflection, He-ion range and target-damage creation, determined using SRIM. Research sponsored by the LDRD program at ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle for the USDOE, and by the DOE OFES.

  18. Measurement of ion species produced due to bombardment of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with hydrocarbons-covered surface of tungsten: Formation of tungsten nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Bhatt, P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Singh, B.K.; Singh, B.; Prajapati, S. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Shanker, R., E-mail: shankerorama@gmail.com [Atomic Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-08-01

    A laboratory experiment has been performed to study the ions that are produced due to collisions of 450 eV N{sub 2}{sup +} ions with a hydrocarbons-covered surface of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature. Using a TOF mass spectrometry technique, the product ions formed in these collisions have been detected, identified and analyzed. Different ion–surface reaction processes, namely, neutralization, reflection, surface induced dissociation, surface induced chemical reactions and desorption are observed and discussed. Apart from the presence of desorbed aliphatic hydrocarbon and other ions, the mass spectra obtained from the considered collisions show the formation and sputtering of tungsten nitride (WN). A layer of WN on tungsten surface is known to decrease the sputtering of bulk tungsten in fusion devices more effectively than when the tungsten is bombarded with other seeding gases (He, Ar). It is further noted that there is a negligible diffusion of N in the bulk tungsten at room temperature.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions - Atomic Spectroscopy and Fusion Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clementson, Joel [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    The spectra of highly charged tungsten ions have been investigated using x-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy. These heavy ions are of interest in relativistic atomic structure theory, where high-precision wavelength measurements benchmark theoretical approaches, and in magnetic fusion research, where the ions may serve to diagnose high-temperature plasmas. The work details spectroscopic investigations of highly charged tungsten ions measured at the Livermore electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility. Here, the EBIT-I and SuperEBIT electron beam ion traps have been employed to create, trap, and excite tungsten ions of M- and L-shell charge states. The emitted spectra have been studied in high resolution using crystal, grating, and x-ray calorimeter spectrometers. In particular, wavelengths of n = 0 M-shell transitions in K-like W55+ through Ne-like W64+, and intershell transitions in Zn-like W44+ through Co-like W47+ have been measured. Special attention is given to the Ni-like W46+ ion, which has two strong electric-dipole forbidden transitions that are of interest for plasma diagnostics. The EBIT measurements are complemented by spectral modeling using the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC), and predictions for tokamak spectra are presented. The L-shell tungsten ions have been studied at electron-beam energies of up to 122 keV and transition energies measured in Ne-like W64+ through Li-like W71+. These spectra constitute the physics basis in the design of the ion-temperature crystal spectrometer for the ITER tokamak. Tungsten particles have furthermore been introduced into the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) spheromak in Livermore in order to investigate diagnostic possibilities of extreme ultraviolet tungsten spectra for the ITER divertor. The spheromak measurement and spectral modeling using FAC suggest that tungsten ions in charge states around Er-like W6+ could be useful for

  20. Retention of ion-implanted deuterium in tungsten pre-irradiated with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, V.Kh.; Ertl, K.; Roth, J.; Schmid, K.

    2000-01-01

    Deuterium (D) ion implantation and retention at room temperature was studied in pure and carbon (C) implanted tungsten single crystals. Pre-implantation with C was done at 40 keV and D implantation at 10 keV with the range confined in the carbon modified layer and at 100 keV with the range exceeding the carbon modified layer. The range distributions were investigated in situ using 1 MeV 3 He ions analysing the energy distributions of α particles from the D( 3 He,p)α reaction while the total amount of retained D was obtained from the p-integral. The range distribution of carbon was obtained from the backscattered 3 He energy distribution. C pre-impantation influences the D retention only if the range of the D ions is confined within the carbon modified surface layer. In this case, D diffusion beyond the ion range distribution does not occur and the retained D amount is smaller than in the pure W crystal. At D energies exceeding the carbon modified layer the retention occurs in the dislocation zone up to 1 μm and the total retained amount is the same for carbon implanted and pure W samples

  1. Comparison of deuterium retention for ion-irradiated and neutron-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Kobayashi, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji; Shimada, Masashi; Calderoni, Pattrick; Oda, Takuji; Hara, Masanori; Hatano, Yuji; Watanabe, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of D retentions for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten with the damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 K and 550 K although that for neutron irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and addition desorption stage was found around 750 K. The desorption rate of major desorption stage at 550 K increased as the number of dpa by Fe 2+ irradiation increased. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450 K was only found for the damaged samples, indicating that the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe 2+ irradiation and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono vacancy leading to the lower activation energy, where the dislocation loop and vacancy was produced. The third one was only found for the neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by void or vacancy cluster and the diffusion effect is also contributed due to high FWHM of TDS spectrum. It can be said that the D 2 TDS spectra for Fe 2+ -irradiated tungsten could not represent that for neutron-irradiated one, showing that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten has a difference from that for ion-irradiated one. (author)

  2. Effect of noble gas ion pre-irradiation on deuterium retention in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; Zhao, Z. H.; De Temmerman, G.; Yuan, Y.; Morgan, T. W.; Guo, L. P.; Wang, B.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B. Y.; Zhang, P.; Cao, X. Z.; Lu, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Impurity seeding of noble gases is an effective way of decreasing the heat loads onto the divertor targets in fusion devices. To investigate the effect of noble gases on deuterium retention, tungsten targets have been implanted by different noble gas ions and subsequently exposed to deuterium

  3. Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten irradiated sequentially with low-energy deuterium and protium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimov, V. K.; Tyburska-Puschel, B.; Hoen, Mhjt; Roth, J.; Hatano, Y.; Isobe, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten was investigated at various temperatures both after sequential exposure to low-energy deuterium (D) and protium (H) plasmas and after sequential irradiation with low-energy D and H ions. The methods used were thermal desorption spectroscopy, and the D((3)He,

  4. Accurate modeling of benchmark x-ray spectra from highly charged ions of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yuri; Tan, Joseph N.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Pomeroy, Joshua M.; Silver, Eric

    2006-01-01

    We present detailed collisional-radiative modeling for a benchmark x-ray spectrum of highly charged tungsten ions in the range between 3 and 10 A ring produced in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) with a beam energy of 4.08 keV. Remarkably good agreement between calculated and measured spectra was obtained without adjustable parameters, highlighting the well-controlled experimental conditions and the sophistication of the kinetic simulation of the non-Maxwellian tungsten plasma. This agreement permitted the identification of spectral lines from Cu-like W 45+ and Ni-like W 46+ ions, led to the reinterpretation of a previously known line in Ni-like ion as an overlap of electric-quadrupole and magnetic-octupole lines, and revealed subtle features in the x-ray spectrum arising from the dominance of forbidden transitions between excited states. The importance of level population mechanisms specific to the EBIT plasma is discussed as well

  5. Dielectronic recombination experiments with tungsten ions at the test storage ring and development of a single-particle detector at the cryogenic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruck, Kaija

    2015-05-01

    This work is about electron-ion collision experiments at the ion storage rings of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. Absolute recombination rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions featuring an open 4-f-shell structure have been measured at the heavy-ion storage ring TSR. The resulting plasma rate coefficients have been used to probe the significance of newly developed theoretical approaches. Plasma rate coefficients of highly-charged tungsten ions are in particular interesting for the development of plasma models for nuclear fusion reactors, since tungsten is a foreseeable impurity in the fusion plasma. In the relevant temperature range, the experimental results exceed the theoretical data used so far by up to a factor of 10, showing the need for more reliable theoretical calculations. Furthermore, based on the design of the detectors which have been used in the experiments at TSR, a movable single-particle detector for electron-ion recombination studies at the cryogenic storage ring CSR has been developed and installed within the scope of this work. The device has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the CSR regarding low ion energies and cryogenic ambient temperature conditions. In a series of experiments, the detector was carefully characterised and successfully tested for its compatibility with these requirements. The detector was part of the infrastructure used for the room-temperature commissioning of CSR (2014) and is currently operated as a single-particle counter during the first cryogenic operation of CSR in 2015.

  6. arXiv Charge reconstruction study of the DAMPE Silicon-Tungsten Tracker with ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, Rui; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhao, Hao; Wang, Huan-Yu; Gong, Ke; Zhang, Fei; Wu, Xin; Azzarello, Phillip; Tykhonov, Andrii; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Gallo, Valentina; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Mazziotta, Nicola; De Mitri, Ivan

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is one of the four satellites within Strategic Pioneer Research Program in Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS). DAMPE can detect electrons, photons in a wide energy range (5 GeV to 10 TeV) and ions up to iron (100GeV to 100 TeV). Silicon-Tungsten Tracker (STK) is one of the four subdetectors in DAMPE, providing photon-electron conversion, track reconstruction and charge identification for ions. Ion beam test was carried out in CERN with 60GeV/u Lead primary beams. Charge reconstruction and charge resolution of STK detectors were investigated.

  7. Electron Impact Excitation and Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwen Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation (EIE and dielectronic recombination (DR of tungsten ions are basic atomic processes in nuclear fusion plasmas of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER tokamak. Detailed investigation of such processes is essential for modeling and diagnosing future fusion experiments performed on the ITER. In the present work, we studied total and partial electron-impact excitation (EIE and DR cross-sections of highly charged tungsten ions by using the multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock method. The degrees of linear polarization of the subsequent X-ray emissions from unequally-populated magnetic sub-levels of these ions were estimated. It is found that the degrees of linear polarization of the same transition lines, but populated respectively by the EIE and DR processes, are very different, which makes diagnosis of the formation mechanism of X-ray emissions possible. In addition, with the help of the flexible atomic code on the basis of the relativistic configuration interaction method, DR rate coefficients of highly charged W37+ to W46+ ions are also studied, because of the importance in the ionization equilibrium of tungsten plasmas under running conditions of the ITER.

  8. Response of tungsten surfaces to helium and hydrogen plasma exposure under ITER relevant steady state and repetitive transient conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Huisman, A. E.; Bardin, S.; Morgan, T. W.; Rasinski, M.; Pitts, R. A.; Van Oost, G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of helium (He) plasma exposure, and associated surface modifications, on the thermal shock resistance of tungsten (W) under ITER relevant steady state and transient heat and particle loads was studied. W samples were exposed to steady state and pulsed He plasmas at surface base

  9. Collisions of low-energy ions Ar+ and N2 + with room-temperature and heated surfaces of tungsten, beryllium, and a mixed beryllium–tungsten thin film

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keim, A.; Harnish, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    354-355, SI (2013), s. 78-86 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion–surface collisions * Mass spectra of product ions * Tungsten Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  10. Response of tungsten surfaces to helium and hydrogen plasma exposure under ITER relevant steady state and repetitive transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Huisman, A. E.; Bardin, S.; Morgan, T. W.; Rasinski, M.; Pitts, R. A.; Van Oost, G.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of helium (He) plasma exposure, and associated surface modifications, on the thermal shock resistance of tungsten (W) under ITER relevant steady state and transient heat and particle loads was studied. W samples were exposed to steady state and pulsed He plasmas at surface base temperatures from 670 to 1170 K. The same exposures were repeated in hydrogen (H) to allow a direct comparison of the role of the ion species on the thermal shock resistance. Exposure to He plasma pulses caused the formation of fine cracking network on W samples which occurred at a higher density and smaller depths compared to H pulsed plasma irradiation. The peak temperature reached during an ELM-like plasma pulse increased by a factor ~1.45 over the 100 s of He plasma exposure, indicating a deterioration of the thermal properties. Transient loading experiments were also performed using a high power pulsed laser during He plasma exposure, showing a significant modification of the target thermal response caused by the surface damage. The effect of He-induced morphology changes on the thermal response modification was found to be very small compared to that of transient-induced damage.

  11. Properties of multiple field ion emitters of tungsten and a simple method for improving their ionization efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Beckey, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ion emission properties of the multiple tungsten emitters developed recently for field ionization mass spectrometry were investigated with the aid of a sector type mass spectrometer at emitter-cathode voltages of 10-15 kV using acetone, n-heptane and benzene as test substances. The emitters, which comprised a 10-μm tungsten filament bearing thickly arrayed microneedles of tungsten, produced very weak and unstable signals at voltages of about 10 kV, but increasing the voltage to 14 kV led to intensifying ion currents high enough to yield mass spectra of satisfactory quality. During the course of the experiments, it was observed that nucleating tungsten carbide particles on the emitter surface by means of a high-field chemical reaction with benzene vapours can significanlty promote the field ionization of gas molecules, presumably as a result of the field enhancement resulting from roughening of the surface. (Auth.)

  12. X-Ray and EUV Spectroscopy of Highly-Charged Ions of Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralchenko, Yu.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Pomeroy, J. M.; Reader, J.; Tan, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    We report on recent measurements and collisional-radiative simulations of x-ray and EUV spectra from multiply-charged ions of tungsten produced with the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The spectra were recorded in the ranges of 0.3 nm to 1 nm and 4 nm to 20 nm for beam energies varied between 2 and 4.3 keV. A quantum microcalorimeter was used for x-ray measurements while the EUV spectra were recorded with a grazing incidence spectrometer. of 4.08 keV. The uncertainties of our measured wavelengths range from 0.002 to 0.010 nm. Remarkably good agreement between calculated and measured spectra was obtained without adjustable parameters, highlighting the well-controlled experimental conditions and the sophistication of the kinetic simulation of the non-Maxwellian tungsten plasma. This agreement permitted the identification of new spectral lines from W39+, W44+, W45+, W46+, and W47+ ions, led to the reinterpretation of a previously known line in the Ni-like ion as an overlap of electric-quadrupole and magnetic-octupole lines, and revealed subtle features in the spectra arising from the dominance of forbidden transitions between excited states. The importance of level population mechanisms specific to the EBIT plasmas is discussed as well

  13. Suspended tungsten-based nanowires with enhanced mechanical properties grown by focused ion beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Rosa; Lorenzoni, Matteo; Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; María De Teresa, José

    2017-11-01

    The implementation of three-dimensional (3D) nano-objects as building blocks for the next generation of electro-mechanical, memory and sensing nano-devices is at the forefront of technology. The direct writing of functional 3D nanostructures is made feasible by using a method based on focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). We use this technique to grow horizontally suspended tungsten nanowires and then study their nano-mechanical properties by three-point bending method with atomic force microscopy. These measurements reveal that these nanowires exhibit a yield strength up to 12 times higher than that of the bulk tungsten, and near the theoretical value of 0.1 times the Young’s modulus (E). We find a size dependence of E that is adequately described by a core-shell model, which has been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and compositional analysis at the nanoscale. Additionally, we show that experimental resonance frequencies of suspended nanowires (in the MHz range) are in good agreement with theoretical values. These extraordinary mechanical properties are key to designing electro-mechanically robust nanodevices based on FIBID tungsten nanowires.

  14. Formation of tungsten oxide nanowires by ion irradiation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Dong; Ren, Feng; Wu, Heng-Yi; Qin, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Here we reported the fabrication of tungsten oxide (WO3-x ) nanowires by Ar+ ion irradiation of WO3 thin films followed by annealing in vacuum. The nanowire length increases with increasing irradiation fluence and with decreasing ion energy. We propose that the stress-driven diffusion of the irradiation-induced W interstitial atoms is responsible for the formation of the nanowires. Comparing to the pristine film, the fabricated nanowire film shows a 106-fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, resulting from the high-density irradiation-induced vacancies on the oxygen sublattice. The nanostructure exhibits largely enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect due to the oxygen vacancy. Thus, ion irradiation provides a powerful approach for fabricating and tailoring the surface nanostructures of semiconductors.

  15. Diffusion, trapping, and isotope exchange of plasma implanted deuterium in ion beam damaged tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Joseph Lincoln

    Tritium accumulation in nuclear fusion reactor materials is a major concern for practical and safe fusion energy. This work examines hydrogen isotope exchange as a tritium removal technique, analyzes the effects of neutron damage using high energy copper ion beams, and introduces a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the concentration of trapped atoms. Tungsten samples were irradiated with high energy (0.5 - 5 MeV) copper ions for controlled levels of damage - 10-3 to 10-1 displacements per atom (dpa) - at room temperature. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma at constant temperature (˜ 380 K) to a high fluence of 1024 ions/m2, where retention is at is maximized (i.e. saturated). By then subsequently exposing these samples to fractions of this fluence with hydrogen plasma, isotope exchange rates were observed. The resulting deuterium still trapped in the tungsten is then measured post mortem. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) gives the depth resolved deuterium retention profile with the 3He(D,p) 4He reaction, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) gives the total amount of deuterium trapped in the tungsten by heating a sample in vacuum up to 1200 K and measuring the evaporated gas molecules with a residual gas analyzer. Isotope exchange data show that hydrogen atoms can displace trapped deuterium atoms efficiently only up to the first few microns, but does not affect the atoms trapped at greater depths. In ion damaged tungsten, measurements showed a significant increase in retention in the damage region proportional to dpa 0.66, which results in a significant spike in total retention, and isotope exchange in damaged samples is still ineffective at depths greater than a few microns. Thus, isotope exchange is not an affective tritium removal technique; however, these experiments have shown that trapping in material defects greatly affects diffusion. These experiments lead to a simplified diffusion model with defect densities as the only free

  16. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  17. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I.; Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T.; Hasuo, M.; Koike, F.; Nakamura, N.; Sasaki, A.; Wang, E. H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W +24-+33 , measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam (≤2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W 44+ ) 4p-4s transition at 60.9Å based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5×10 10 cm −3 at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W 26+ ) at 3893.7Å is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f 23 H 5 - 3 H 4 . The possibility of α particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed

  18. Simulation of neutron-induced damage in tungsten by irradiation with energetic self-ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Gann, V.

    2015-05-01

    A direct comparison of the deuterium (D) decoration of radiation-induced damage in polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with self-ions [present work] and neutrons in the high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) (Hatano et al., 2013) shows a reasonably good agreement at least up to 0.3 displacement per atom indicating that MeV heavy ions can be a good proxy to simulate neutron-produced damage at room temperature and low dpa. The coefficient of similarity between two kinds of irradiation was obtained experimentally to be Kexp ∼ 0.65 ± 0.1 in the case of the deuterium decoration of both kinds of radiation-induced defects with low and high de-trapping energies for deuterium. We introduced the theoretical estimation for coefficient of similarity between neutron- and self-ion-irradiations, which is a fraction of common area under the curves of two overlapping damage energy spectra of primary knock-on atom (PKA) produced in tungsten by these two types of irradiation. In other words, Ksim is a part of displaced atoms produced in the similar conditions under two different types of irradiation. The theoretical values of Ksim = 0.34 and Ksim = 0.29 were obtained for tungsten target irradiated with 20 MeV self-ions in comparison to irradiation with neutrons in HFIR reactor (>0.1 MeV) and 14 MeV neutrons, respectively. The theoretical value of Ksim = 0.34 is about two times less than the experimental value of Kexp = 0.65. It means that high energy PKAs can play more important role in the production of similar damage structure by irradiation with self-ions and neutrons which is responsible for deuterium retention. The model assuming that all cascades with an energy higher than Tc = 150 keV split into identical sub-cascades gives the value of Ksim = 0.64 ± 0.01 for the coefficient of similarity between HFIR-neutron and 20 MeV self-ion irradiations that is in an agreement with experimental value of Kexp = 0.65 ± 0.1. Consequently, splitting of high-energy part of cascades might take

  19. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentecoste, Lucile [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Thomann, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.thomann@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal [GREMI, CNRS/Université d’Orléans, 14 rue d’Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex2 (France); Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex2 (France)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (10{sup 11}–10{sup 14} ions.cm{sup 2}.s{sup −1}) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He{sup +}), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  20. Flux threshold measurements of He-ion beam induced nanofuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F W; Hijazi, H; Bannister, M E; Unocic, K A; Garrison, L M; Parish, C M

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of the energy dependence of flux thresholds and incubation fluences for He-ion induced nano-fuzz formation on hot tungsten surfaces at UHV conditions over a wide energy range using real-time sample imaging of tungsten target emissivity change to monitor the spatial extent of nano-fuzz growth, corroborated by ex situ SEM and FIB/SEM analysis, in conjunction with accurate ion-flux profile measurements. The measurements were carried out at the multicharged ion research facility (MIRF) at energies from 218 eV to 8.5 keV, using a high-flux deceleration module and beam flux monitor for optimizing the decel optics on the low energy MIRF beamline. The measurements suggest that nano-fuzz formation proceeds only if a critical rate of change of trapped He density in the W target is exceeded. To understand the energy dependence of the observed flux thresholds, the energy dependence of three contributing factors: ion reflection, ion range and target damage creation, were determined using the SRIM simulation code. The observed energy dependence can be well reproduced by the combined energy dependences of these three factors. The incubation fluences deduced from first visual appearance of surface emissivity change were (2–4) × 10 23 m −2 at 218 eV, and roughly a factor of 10 less at the higher energies, which were all at or above the displacement energy threshold. The role of trapping at C impurity sites is discussed. (paper)

  1. KLL dielectronic recombination resonant strengths of He-like up to O-like tungsten ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, B.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Yang, Y.; Lu, D.; Xu, T. H.; Li, W. X.; Chen, C. Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Zheng, C.; Huang, L. Y.; Hutton, R.; Wang, X.; Yao, K., E-mail: keyao@fudan.edu.cn; Zou, Y., E-mail: zouym@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai EBIT Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, and the Key Laboratory of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Chinese Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, B. H.; Tang, Y. J. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is an important process in hot plasma physics as well as in atomic structure and collision theory. This work reports the studies of the KLL DR resonance strengths of He-, Li-, Be-, B-, C-, N-, and O-like tungsten ions, through both experiment and calculation. The experimental resonance strengths were determined within uncertainty below 11% at the Shanghai electron beam ion trap by employing a fast electron beam-energy scanning technique. A fully relativistic configuration interaction method implemented in the flexible atomic code was employed to calculate DR process and also radiative recombination (RR). The consideration of the interference effect between DR and RR was revealed to be necessary to determine the resonance strength.

  2. Mechanical properties of tungsten following rhenium ion and helium plasma exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Corr

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of Tungsten (W samples irradiated with 2 MeV Rhenium (Re ions and helium (He plasma were investigated using nanoindentation. It was found that there was an increase in hardness for all samples following separate irradiation with both Re ion and He plasma. A slight increase in hardness was obtained for combined exposures. A comparable increase in hardness was observed for a pure He plasma with a sample temperature of 473 K and 1273 K. Optical interferometry was employed to compare surface modification of the samples. Grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering confirmed He nano-bubble formation of approximately 1 nm diameter in the higher temperature sample, which was not observed with samples at the lower temperatures.

  3. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-07-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m{sup -2} as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m{sup -2}. The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform

  4. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m -2 as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m -2 . The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform sophisticated

  5. Observation of reduction of secondary electron emission from helium ion impact due to plasma-generated nanostructured tungsten fuzz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollmann, E M; Doerner, R P; Nishijima, D; Pigarov, A Yu

    2017-01-01

    Growth of nanostructured fuzz on a tungsten target in a helium plasma is found to cause a significant (∼3×) reduction in ion impact secondary electron emission in a linear plasma device. The ion impact secondary electron emission is separated from the electron impact secondary electron emission by varying the target bias voltage and fitting to expected contributions from electron impact, both thermal and non-thermal; with the non-thermal electron contribution being modeled using Monte-Carlo simulations. The observed (∼3×) reduction is similar in magnitude to the (∼2×) reduction observed in previous work for the effect of tungsten fuzz formation on secondary electron emission due to electron impact. It is hypothesized that the observed reduction results from re-absorption of secondary electrons in the tungsten fuzz. (paper)

  6. Analytical expressions for thermophysical properties of solid and liquid tungsten relevant for fusion applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tolias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The status of the literature is reviewed for several thermophysical properties of pure solid and liquid tungsten which constitute input for the modelling of intense plasma-surface interaction phenomena that are important for fusion applications. Reliable experimental data are analyzed for the latent heat of fusion, the electrical resistivity, the specific isobaric heat capacity, the thermal conductivity and the mass density from the room temperature up to the boiling point of tungsten as well as for the surface tension and the dynamic viscosity across the liquid state. Analytical expressions of high accuracy are recommended for these thermophysical properties that involved a minimum degree of extrapolations. In particular, extrapolations were only required for the surface tension and viscosity.

  7. Plasma sprayed tungsten-based coatings and their performance under fusion relevant conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Koza, Y.; Weinzettl, Vladimír

    75-79, č. 0 (2005), s. 395-399 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium of Fusion Technology/23rd./. Venice, 20.9.2004-24.9.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma spraying * tungsten * plasma facing components Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.981, year: 2005 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379605000712

  8. Observation of a helium ion energy threshold for retention in tungsten exposed to hydrogen/helium mixture plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, M.; Deslandes, A.; Morgan, T. W.; Elliman, R. G.; De Temmerman, G.; Kluth, P.; Riley, D.; Corr, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Helium retention is measured in tungsten samples exposed to mixed H/He plasma in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device. It is observed that there is very little He retention below helium ion impact energies of 9.0 +- 1.4 eV, indicating the existence of a potential barrier which must be overcome for

  9. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Mica, I., E-mail: isabella.mica@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Barbarossa, F., E-mail: fbarbarossa87@gmail.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Galbiati, A., E-mail: amos.galbiati@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Grasso, S., E-mail: salvatore.grasso-r2@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Soncini, V., E-mail: vsoncini@micron.com [Micron, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF{sub 2} implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF{sub 2} implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  10. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Soncini, V.

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF2 implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF2 implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  11. On the interpretation of the intense emission of tungsten ions at about 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonauskas, V; Kucas, S; Karazija, R

    2007-01-01

    The origin of the intense emission band at about 5 nm, dominating the emission spectra of tungsten ions in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak and EBIT, is discussed. It is shown that the emission spectra of various ions calculated taking into account only the excitations from the ground level agree fairly well with the results obtained in the collisional-radiative model; thus, the contribution of the excitations from the other levels is small. Though the excitation spectrum for all sequence of ions W 29+ -W 37+ corresponds to the same transitions 4p 6 4d N → 4p 5 4d N+1 + 4p 6 4d N-1 4f, its energetic width essentially changes going on from the charge of ion q = 34 to q = 35. It is caused by the appearance of the excitations 4p 1/2 -4d 3/2 to the open 4d N 3/2 subshell, which are not quenched by configuration mixing. The satellite line at about 4.5 nm is explained by the transitions of the same type, although between configurations with one spectator 5s electron. The existence of one more group of intense lines in the region of 2 nm, corresponding to 5s-4p transitions, is predicted

  12. Role of carbon impurities on the surface morphology evolution of tungsten under high dose helium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Tripathi, J.K.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of carbon impurities on the surface evolution (e.g., fuzz formation) of tungsten (W) surface during 300 eV He ions irradiation was studied. Several tungsten samples were irradiated by He ion beam with a various carbon ions percentage. The presence of minute carbon contamination within the He ion beam was found to be effective in preventing the fuzz formation. At higher carbon concentration, the W surface was found to be fully covered with a thick graphitic layer on the top of tungsten carbide (WC) layer that cover the sample surface. Lowering the ion beam carbon percentage was effective in a significant reduction in the thickness of the surface graphite layer. Under these conditions the W surface was also found to be immune for the fuzz formation. The effect of W fuzz prevention by the WC formation on the sample surface was more noticeable when the He ion beam had much lower carbon (C) ions content (0.01% C). In this case, the fuzz formation was prevented on the vast majority of the W sample surface, while W fuzz was found in limited and isolated areas. The W surface also shows good resistance to morphology evolution when bombarded by high flux of pure H ions at 900 °C. - Highlights: • Reporting formation of W nanostructure (fuzz) due to low energy He ion beam irradiation. • The effect of adding various percentage of carbon impurity to the He ion beam on the trend of W fuzz formation was studied. • Mitigation of W fuzz formation due to addition of small percentage of carbon to the He ion beam is reported. • The formation of long W nanowires due to He ion beam irradiation mixed with 0.01% carbon ions is reported.

  13. Early stage damage of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials exposed to low energy helium ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, S.; Suslov, S.; Efe, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T.; Bystrov, K.; Hattar, K.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as a plasma facing component in the divertor region of the International Thermonuclear Experiment Reactor (ITER). High flux, high fluence helium (He) exposure of tungsten surfaces induces severe morphology changes and nanostructure formation, which may eventually erode

  14. Comparison of Deuterium Retention in Tungsten Pre-damaged with Energetic Electrons, Self-ions and Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Gann, V. V.; Zibrov, M. S.; Gasparyan, Yu. M.

    The objective of this work is to compare the deuterium retention in tungsten pre-damaged with electron (e) beam, ions and neutrons. Self-ion irradiation was performed at IPP (Garching) and e-beam irradiation at MEPhI (Moscow). Neutron irradiation was done at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) by Hatano et al. (2013). After pre-damaging, specimens were exposed to deuterium plasma in well-defined laboratory conditions.

  15. Tritium absorption and desorption in ITER relevant materials: comparative study of tungsten dust and massive samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisolia, C., E-mail: christian.grisolia@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Hodille, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chene, J.; Garcia-Argote, S.; Pieters, G.; El-Kharbachi, A. [CEA Saclay, SCBM, iBiTec-S, PC n° 108, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette (France); Marchetti, L.; Martin, F.; Miserque, F. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Vrel, D.; Redolfi, M. [LSPM, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UPR 3407 CNRS, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Malard, V. [CEA, DSV, IBEB, Lab Biochim System Perturb, Bagnols-sur-Cèze F-30207 (France); Dinescu, G.; Acsente, T. [NILPRP, 409 Atomistilor Street, 77125 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Gensdarmes, F.; Peillon, S. [IRSN, PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, 91192 (France); Pegourié, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Rousseau, B. [CEA Saclay, SCBM, iBiTec-S, PC n° 108, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette (France)

    2015-08-15

    Tritium adsorption and desorption from well characterized tungsten dust are presented. The dust used are of different types prepared by planetary milling and by aggregation technique in plasma. For the milled powder, the surface specific area (SSA) is 15.5 m{sup 2}/g. The particles are poly-disperse with a maximum size of 200 nm for the milled powder and 100 nm for the aggregation one. Prior to tritiation the particles are carefully de-oxidized. Both samples are experiencing a high tritium inventory from 5 GBq/g to 35 GBq/g. From comparison with massive samples and considering that tritium inventory increases with SSA, it is shown that surface effects are predominant in the tritium trapping process. Extrapolation to the ITER environment is undertaken with the help of a Macroscopic Rate Equation model. It is shown that, during the life time of ITER, these particles can exceed rapidly 1 GBq/g.

  16. Tritium Retention and Permeation in Ion- and Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten under US-Japan PHENIX Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a FNSF, a DEMO and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to intense heat and neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while minimizing in-vessel inventories and ex-vessel permeation of tritium. Recent work at Tritium Plasma Experiment demonstrated that tritium diffuses in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. US-Japan PHENIX collaboration (2013-2019) investigates irradiation response on tritium behavior in tungsten, and performs one-of-a-kind neutron-irradiation with Gd thermal neutron shield at High Flux Isotope Reactor, ORNL. This presentation describes the challenge in elucidating tritium behavior in neutron-irradiated PFCs, the PHENIX plans for neutron-irradiation and post irradiation examination, and the recent findings on tritium retention and permeation in 14MeV neutron-irradiated and Fe ion irradiated tungsten. This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  17. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and ∼5.10 17 ions/cm 2 fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co 3 W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load

  18. In situ NRA study of hydrogen isotope exchange in self-ion damaged tungsten exposed to neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelj, S.; Založnik, A.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Vavpetič, P.; Pelicon, P.; Čadež, I.

    2016-01-01

    Isotope exchange was studied in-situ by Nuclear Reaction Analysis in the bulk of self-ion damaged tungsten at 600 K. Both variations of isotope exchange of H by D and of D by H were measured. The deuterium isothermal desorption was also studied and evaluated in order to be able to resolve the self-desorption from the isotope exchange at 600 K. The isotope exchange was also studied on the surface by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis at 480 K and 380 K. The exchange mechanism was effective both on the surface and in the bulk of damaged tungsten. A simple model was introduced to describe the exchange efficiency on the surface and in the bulk obtaining the exchange cross sections on the surface and in bulk. In both cases an isotope effect was observed, where the exchange of H atoms by D atoms was more efficient than for the reverse sequence. - Highlights: • First study of isotope exchange on surface and in bulk of self-ion damaged tungsten by exposure to neutral atoms. • In situ study by ion beam techniques NRA and ERDA. • Modelling of the isotope exchange mechanism.

  19. EBIT spectroscopy of highly charged heavy ions relevant to hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ding Xiaobin; Dong Chenzhong [North West Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Koike, Fumihiro [School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan); Nakano, Tomohide [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Institute for Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Watanabe, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University, Aichi 487-8501 (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    We present spectra of highly charged iron, gadolinium, and tungsten ions obtained with electron beam ion traps. Spectroscopic studies of these ions are important to diagnose and control hot plasmas in several areas. For iron ions, the electron density dependence of the line intensity ratio in extreme ultraviolet spectra is investigated for testing the model calculation used in solar corona diagnostics. Soft x-ray spectra of gadolinium are studied to obtain atomic data required in light source development for future lithography. Tungsten is considered to be the main impurity in the ITER plasma, and thus visible and soft x-ray spectra of tungsten have been observed to explore the emission lines useful for the spectroscopic diagnostics of the ITER plasma.

  20. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min -1 can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected

  1. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 1. Basis of ion exchange selectivity for cesium and strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Christopher S; Luca, Vittorio; Hanna, John V; Pike, Kevin J; Smith, Mark E; Thorogood, Gordon S

    2009-07-06

    The structural basis of selectivity for cesium and strontium of microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phase Na(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O has been studied using X-ray and neutron diffraction techniques, 1D and 2D (23)Na magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and radiochemical ion exchange investigations. For the HTB system, this study has shown that scattering techniques alone provide an incomplete description of the disorder and rapid exchange of water (with tunnel cations) occurring in this system. However, 1D and 2D (23)Na MAS NMR has identified three sodium species within the HTB tunnels-species A, which is located at the center of the hexagonal window and is devoid of coordinated water, and species B and C, which are the di- and monohydrated variants, respectively, of species A. Although species B accords with the traditional crystallographic model of the HTB phase, this work is the first to propose and identify the anhydrous species A and monohydrate species C. The population (total) of species B and C decreases in comparison to that of species A with increasing exchange of either cesium or strontium; that is, species B and C appear more exchangeable than species A. Moreover, a significant proportion of tunnel water is redistributed by these cations. Multiple ion exchange investigations with radiotracers (137)Cs and (85)Sr have shown that for strontium there is a definite advantage in ensuring that any easily exchanged sodium is removed from the HTB tunnels prior to exchange. The decrease in selectivity (wrt cesium) is most probably due to the slightly smaller effective size of Sr(2+); namely, it is less of a good fit for the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. The selectivity of the HTB framework for cesium has been shown unequivocally to be defined by the structure of the hexagonal window, ion exchange site. Compromising the geometry of this window even in the slightest way by either (1) varying the cell volume through

  2. Effect of an intermediate tungsten layer on thermal properties of TiC coatings ion plated onto molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Shikama, T.; Okada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Among the various low-Z coating-substrate systems proposed for fusion reactor first-wall applications, molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. The thermal stabilities of TiC layers ion plated onto the molybdenum substrate are discussed with particular reference to the interfacial reaction between the TiC coating and molybdenum. The deposition of an intermediate tungsten layer was found to be very effective in suppressing the formation of reaction layers, resulting in a marked improvement in thermal stabilities of TiC--Mo systems. Thermal shock test using a pulsed electron beam showed that the TiC coatings remained adherent to the molybdenum substrates during energy depositions high enough to melt the substrates within the area of beam deposition. The melt area of the TiC coatings apparently decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied

  3. In situ NRA study of hydrogen isotope exchange in self-ion damaged tungsten exposed to neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelj, S.; Založnik, A.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Vavpetič, P.; Pelicon, P.; Čadež, I.

    2016-02-01

    Isotope exchange was studied in-situ by Nuclear Reaction Analysis in the bulk of self-ion damaged tungsten at 600 K. Both variations of isotope exchange of H by D and of D by H were measured. The deuterium isothermal desorption was also studied and evaluated in order to be able to resolve the self-desorption from the isotope exchange at 600 K. The isotope exchange was also studied on the surface by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis at 480 K and 380 K. The exchange mechanism was effective both on the surface and in the bulk of damaged tungsten. A simple model was introduced to describe the exchange efficiency on the surface and in the bulk obtaining the exchange cross sections on the surface and in bulk. In both cases an isotope effect was observed, where the exchange of H atoms by D atoms was more efficient than for the reverse sequence.

  4. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  5. Tungsten Recovery from Spent SCR Catalyst Using Alkaline Leaching and Ion Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cheng Wu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of tungsten (W from a honeycomb-type spent selective catalytic reduction (SCR catalyst using an alkaline leaching–ion exchange method was investigated. Spent SCR catalyst mainly consists of TiO2 and other oxides (6.37% W, 1.57% vanadium (V, and 2.81% silicon (Si, etc.. The ground catalyst was leached at the optimal conditions, as follows: NaOH concentration of 0.3 kg/kg of catalyst, pulp density of 3%, leaching temperature of 70 °C, particle size of −74 μm, and leaching time of 30 min. In this study, the leaching rate values of V and W under the above conditions were 87 wt %, and 91 wt %, respectively. The pregnant solution was then passed through a strong base anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA900. At high pH conditions, the use of strong base anion exchange resin led to selective loading of divalent WO42− from the solution, because the fraction of two adjacent positively-charged sites on the IRA900 resin was higher and separate from the coexisting VO43−. The adsorbed W could then be eluted with 1 M NaCl + 0.5 M NaOH. The final concentrated W solution had 8.4 g/L of W with 98% purity. The application of this process in industry is expected to have an important impact on the recovery of W from secondary sources of these metals.

  6. Radiative recombination data for tungsten ions: III.  W{sup 14+}–W{sup 23+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M.B., E-mail: Trzhask@MT5605.spb.edu [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Nikulin, V.K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    This paper completes the cycle of our calculations of the radiative recombination and photoionization data for tungsten ions. Presented here are the photoionization and radiative recombination cross sections, radiative recombination rate coefficients, and radiated power loss rate coefficients for ten tungsten impurity ions from W{sup 14+} to W{sup 23+}. These data are required in diagnostics and modeling fusion plasmas studied in such devices as ITER, ASDEX Upgrade, and EBIT. Partial photoionization cross sections have been fitted by an analytical expression with five fit parameters tabulated here. Total radiative recombination cross sections are presented in the electron energy range from 1 eV to ∼80 keV. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are given in the temperature range from 10{sup 4}  K to 10{sup 9}  K. Calculations have been performed on the basis of the fully relativistic treatment of photoionization and radiative recombination taking into account all significant multipoles of the radiative field. Electron wave functions have been obtained by the Dirac–Fock method with the proper consideration of the electron exchange. The relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution of continuum electrons has been used in calculations of radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates. This decreases values of the rates noticeably at a high temperature as compared to the usual non-relativistic Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution. -- Highlights: •Radiative recombination data for ten tungsten ions W{sup 14+}–W{sup 23+} are presented. •Photoionization cross sections are also given. •Calculations are fully relativistic including all multipoles of the radiative field. •We use the Dirac–Fock method to obtain the electron wave functions. •The data are required for diagnostics and modeling fusion plasmas studied in ITER.

  7. Precipitation and ion floatation of molybdenum, tungsten, copper, and cobalt compounds by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strizhko, V.S.; Shekhirev, D.V.; Ignatkina, V.A.; Alimova, R.Eh.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on application of ion-flotation in purification of low-concentration (less than 10 -3 M) acid solutions from molybdenum, tungsten, copper and cobalt ions. Two collectors, i.e. DEDC and CTMAB have been tested, their optimal consumption is determined. It is shown that CTMAB provides for selective purification from Mo and W ions and allows foam product with little water on flotation in a column to be obtained. But the achieved residual W and Mo concentration of 20 to 10 mg/l require deeper finishing purification in order to meet a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value employing other methods. DEDC provides for sufficient purification from nonferrous metal ions but does not possess selectivity with respect to some metals. The obtained results have shown the possibility to apply ion-flotation in concentration of metal ions in foam product in the process of waste water purification with further finishing purification up to a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  8. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  9. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agodi, C; Bondì, M; Cavallaro, M; Carbone, D; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Abou-Haidar, Z; Alvarez, M A G; Bocci, A; Aumann, T; Durante, M; Balestra, F; Battistoni, G; Bohlen, T T; Boudard, A; Brunetti, A; Carpinelli, M; Cappuzzello, F; Cortes-Giraldo, M A; Napoli, M De

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8 mm) carbon target.

  10. FIRST experiment: Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, C.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Balestra, F.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Bohlen, T. T.; Bondì, M.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Carbone, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Finck, C.; Foti, A.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Juliani, D.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Lavagno, A.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rosso, V.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Spiriti, E.; Stuttge, L.; Tropea, S.; Younis, H.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear fragmentation processes are relevant in different fields of basic research and applied physics and are of particular interest for tumor therapy and for space radiation protection applications. The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment at SIS accelerator of GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, has been designed for the measurement of different ions fragmentation cross sections at different energies between 100 and 1000 MeV/nucleon. The experiment is performed by an international collaboration made of institutions from Germany, France, Italy and Spain. The experimental apparatus is partly based on an already existing setup made of the ALADIN magnet, the MUSIC IV TPC, the LAND2 neutron detector and the TOFWALL scintillator TOF system, integrated with newly designed detectors in the interaction Region (IR) around the carbon removable target: a scintillator Start Counter, a Beam Monitor drift chamber, a silicon Vertex Detector and a Proton Tagger for detection of light fragments emitted at large angles (KENTROS). The scientific program of the FIRST experiment started on summer 2011 with the study of the 400 MeV/nucleon 12C beam fragmentation on thin (8mm) carbon target.

  11. A Room Temperature Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Based on a Copper-Ion-Doped Polyaniline/Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shih-Han; Shen, Chi-Yen; Su, Jian-Ming; Chang, Shiang-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The parts-per-billion-level nitric oxide (NO) gas sensing capability of a copper-ion-doped polyaniline/tungsten oxide nanocomposite (Cu2+/PANI/WO3) film coated on a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave device was investigated. The sensor developed in this study was sensitive to NO gas at room temperature in dry nitrogen. The surface morphology, dopant distribution, and electric properties were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, and Hall effect measurements, respectively. The Cu2+/PANI/WO3 film exhibited high NO gas sensitivity and selectivity as well as long-term stability. At 1 ppb of NO, a signal with a frequency shift of 4.3 ppm and a signal-to-noise ratio of 17 was observed. The sensor exhibited distinct selectivity toward NO gas with no substantial response to O2, NH3 and CO2 gases. PMID:25811223

  12. Design, fabrication and testing of porous tungsten vaporizers for mercury ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R.; Kroeger, E.; Kami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersions in the characteristics, performance and reliability of vaporizers for early model 30-cm thrusters were investigated. The purpose of the paper is to explore the findings and to discuss the approaches that were taken to reduce the observed dispersion and present the results of a program which validated those approaches. The information that is presented includes porous tungsten materials specifications, a discussion of assembly procedures, and a description of a test program which screens both material and fabrication processes. There are five appendices providing additional detail in the areas of vaporizer contamination, nitrogen flow testing, bubble testing, porosimeter testing, and mercury purity. Four neutralizers, seven cathodes and five main vaporizers were successfully fabricated, tested, and operated on thrusters. Performance data from those devices is presented and indicates extremely repeatable results from using the design and fabrication procedures.

  13. Effect of periodic deuterium ion irradiation on deuterium retention and blistering in Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of periodic irradiation on Deuterium (D retention and blistering in Tungsten (W was investigated. W samples were exposed to D plasma at a fixed fluence while varying the irradiation cycle number (1-shot, 2-shots and 3-shots. Exposure energy and flux were ∼50eV and ∼1 ×1022 D m−2 s−1, respectively. Sample temperatures were 537K and 643K. At 573K, D retention and blister density decreased with increasing number of irradiation cycle. In contrast at 643K, D retention showed no dependence on number of irradiation cycle. Therefore, sample temperature during irradiation is an important parameter in comparing the results of continuous and periodic irradiation, especially in studies involving extremely-high-flux (>1024 D m−2 s−1 irradiation and fluence dependency of D retention.

  14. Effect of Tungsten Nanolayer Coating on Si Electrode in Lithium-ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Dae; Lee, Jun Kyu; Yoon, Woo Young

    2018-02-01

    Tungsten (W) was coated onto a silicon (Si) anode at the nanoscale via the physical vaporization deposition method (PVD) to enhance its electrochemical properties. The characteristics of the electrode were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. With the electrochemical property analysis, the first charge capacities of the W-coated and uncoated electrode cells were 2558 mAh g- 1 and 1912 mAh g- 1, respectively. By the 50th cycle, the capacity ratios were 61.1 and 25.5%, respectively. Morphology changes in the W-coated Si anode during cycling were observed using SEM and TEM, and electrochemical characteristics were examined through impedance analysis. Owing to its conductivity and mechanical properties from the atomic W layer coating through PVD, the electrode improved its cyclability and preserved its structure from volumetric demolition.

  15. Effect of Tungsten Nanolayer Coating on Si Electrode in Lithium-ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Byung Dae; Lee, Jun Kyu; Yoon, Woo Young

    2018-02-21

    Tungsten (W) was coated onto a silicon (Si) anode at the nanoscale via the physical vaporization deposition method (PVD) to enhance its electrochemical properties. The characteristics of the electrode were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. With the electrochemical property analysis, the first charge capacities of the W-coated and uncoated electrode cells were 2558 mAh g - 1 and 1912 mAh g - 1 , respectively. By the 50th cycle, the capacity ratios were 61.1 and 25.5%, respectively. Morphology changes in the W-coated Si anode during cycling were observed using SEM and TEM, and electrochemical characteristics were examined through impedance analysis. Owing to its conductivity and mechanical properties from the atomic W layer coating through PVD, the electrode improved its cyclability and preserved its structure from volumetric demolition.

  16. Spectroscopic study of Pr3+ ions doped Zinc Lead Tungsten Tellurite glasses for visible photonic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritu; Rao, A. S.; Deopa, Nisha; Venkateswarlu, M.; Jayasimhadri, M.; Haranath, D.; Prakash, G. Vijaya

    2018-04-01

    Zinc Lead Tungsten Tellurite (ZnPbWTe) glasses doped with different Pr3+ ion concentrations having the composition 5ZnO + 15PbO + 20WO3 + (60-x)TeO2 + xPr6O11 (where x = 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 mol%) were prepared by using sudden quenching technique and characterized to understand their visible emission characteristic features using spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, excitation and emission. The Judd-Ofelt (J-O) theory has been applied to the absorption spectral features with an aim to evaluate various radiative properties for the prominent fluorescent levels of Pr3+ions in the as-prepared glasses. The emission spectra recorded for the as-prepared glasses under 468 nm excitation show three prominent emission transitions 3P0→3H6, 3P0→3F2 and 3P1→3F4, of which 3P0→3F2 observed in visible red region (648 nm), is relatively more intense. The intensity of 3P0→3F2 emission transition in the titled glasses increases up to 1mol% of Pr3+ ions and beyond concentration quenching is observed. Branching ratios (βR) and emission cross-sections (σse) were estimated for 3P0→3F2 transition to understand the luminescence efficiency in visible red region (648 nm). The CIE chromaticity coordinates were also evaluated in order to understand the suitability of these glasses for visible red luminescence devices. From the emission cross-sections, quantum efficiency and CIE coordinates, it was concluded that 1mol% of Pr3+ ions in ZnPbWTe glasses are quite suitable for preparing visible reddish orange luminescent devices.

  17. In situ investigation of helium fuzz growth on tungsten in relation to ion flux, fluence, surface temperature and ion energy using infrared imaging in PSI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möller, S; Kachko, O; Rasinski, M; Kreter, A; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten is a candidate material for plasma-facing components in nuclear fusion reactors. In operation it will face temperatures >800 K together with an influx of helium ions. Previously, the evolution of special surface nanostructures called fuzz was found under these conditions in a limited window of surface temperature, ion flux and ion energy. Fuzz potentially leads to lower heat load tolerances, enhanced erosion and dust formation, hence should be avoided in a fusion reactor. Here the fuzz growth is reinvestigated in situ during its growth by considering its impact on the surfaces infrared emissivity at 4 μ m wavelength with an infrared camera in the linear plasma device PSI-2. A hole in the surface serves as an emissivity reference to calibrate fuzz thickness versus infrared emissivity. Among new data on the above mentioned relations, a lower fuzz growth threshold of 815 ± 24 K is found. Fuzz is seen to grow on rough and polished surfaces and even on the hole’s side walls alike. Literature scalings for thickness, flux and time relations of the fuzz growth rate could not be reproduced, but for the temperature scaling a good agreement to the Arrhenius equation was found. (paper)

  18. Deuterium retention in tungsten after heavy ion damage and hydrogen isotope exchange in PISCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. L.; Wang, Y. Q.; Dittmar, T.; Doerner, R. P.; Tynan, G. R.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of H isotope exchange and radiation damage on the retention of D in W was examined in the PISCES linear plasma device. W samples were treated with D plasma at low sample temperatures (473 K), with a fluence of 1026 ions/m2 and ion energies of 150 eV. Each sample was then exposed to varying doses of H plasma with similar sample temperature and plasma conditions to fluences ranging from 0 to 1026 ions/m2, to examine the effectiveness of isotope exchange as a means of tritium removal. The D(3He, p)4He nuclear reaction was used to measure D concentration profiles up to a depth of 7.7 μm. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was used to determine the D retained throughout the bulk of the sample. Isotope exchange allows for a unique study of atomic migration by separately examining the diffusion of implanted atoms from those bombarding the surface. D atoms are exchanged out of traps as a result of H plasma bombardment and diffuse until either falling into another trap or reaching the surface to recombine and escape. Radiation damage at levels of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 displacements per atom (dpa) was carried out before plasma exposure on some samples with 2 MeV Cu ions as a surrogate for damage caused by fusion neutrons. The Cu ion damage was compared to damage induced by 6 MeV W ions to see if there is an effect of Cu contamination on retention. We saw little difference in Cu versus W ion damage at low dpa, but at 1 dpa, where Cu content reached 65 appm, contamination seems to be significant. Retention measurements showed that ion damage has little effectiveness on isotope removal at these sample temperatures; however, there is evidence to suggest that the trapping mechanisms in W change as damage is increased.

  19. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  20. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  1. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  2. Sputtering of molybdenum and tungsten nano rods and nodules irradiated with 150 eV argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, N.M.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Neff, Anton L.; Allain, Jean-Paul; Williams, Brian; Sharghi-Moshtaghin, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The work was motivated by the idea of designing material surface architecture, using the CVD process, that can result in a reduction in the surface sputtering rate as compared to planar surfaces. • We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering, amorphization of near-surface layers, and the formation of surface ripples in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. • We show that the sputtering rate decreases in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. • We discovered that energy deposition in the near surface layer in W leads to its amorphization at room temperature, to a depth of 5–10 nm. • We also show that surfaces of nano rods become rippled as a result of an ion-induced roughening instability. - Abstract: The influence of surface nano architecture on the sputtering and erosion of tungsten and molybdenum is discussed. We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. Measurements of the sputtering rate from Mo and W surfaces with nano architecture indicate that the surface topology plays an important role in the mechanism of surface erosion and restructuring. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is utilized as a material processing route to fabricate nano-architectures on the surfaces of W and Mo substrates. First, Re dendrites form as needles with cross-sections that have hexagonal symmetry, and are subsequently employed as scaffolding for further deposition of W and Mo to create nano rod surface architecture. The sputtering of surface atoms in these samples shows a marked dependence on their surface architecture. The sputtering rate is shown to decrease at normal ion incidence in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. Moreover, and unlike an increase in sputtering of planar crystalline surfaces, the

  3. Structural evolution of tungsten surface exposed to sequential low-energy helium ion irradiation and transient heat loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sinclair

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural damage due to high flux particle irradiation can result in significant changes to the thermal strength of the plasma facing component surface (PFC during off-normal events in a tokamak. Low-energy He+ ion irradiation of tungsten (W, which is currently the leading candidate material for future PFCs, can result in the development of a fiber form nanostructure, known as “fuzz”. In the current study, mirror-finished W foils were exposed to 100eV He+ ion irradiation at a fluence of 2.6 ×1024ionsm−2 and a temperature of 1200K. Then, samples were exposed to two different types of pulsed heat loading meant to replicate type-I edge-localized mode (ELM heating at varying energy densities and base temperatures. Millisecond (ms laser exposure done at 1200K revealed a reduction in fuzz density with increasing energy density due to the conglomeration and local melting of W fibers. At higher energy densities (∼ 1.5MJm−2, RT exposures resulted in surface cracking, while 1200K exposures resulted in surface roughening, demonstrating the role of base temperature on the crack formation in W. Electron beam heating presented similar trends in surface morphology evolution; a higher penetration depth led to reduced melt motion and plasticity. In situ mass loss measurements obtained via a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM found an exponential increase in particle emission for RT exposures, while the prevalence of melting from 1200K exposures yielded no observable trend.

  4. Aqueous vanadium ion dynamics relevant to bioinorganic chemistry: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustin, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of the four highest vanadium oxidation states exhibit four diverse colors, which only hint at the diverse reactions that these ions can undergo. Cationic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands; anionic vanadium ions form complexes with ligands and self-react to form isopolyanions. All vanadium species undergo oxidation-reduction reactions. With a few exceptions, elucidation of the dynamics of these reactions awaited the development of fast reaction techniques before the kinetics of elementary ligation, condensation, reduction, and oxidation of the aqueous vanadium ions could be investigated. As the biological roles played by endogenous and therapeutic vanadium expand, it is appropriate to bring the results of the diverse kinetics studies under one umbrella. To achieve this goal this review presents a systematic examination of elementary aqueous vanadium ion dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling of the soft X-ray tungsten spectra expected to be registered by GEM detection system for WEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syrocki Łukasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, the interaction between the plasma and the tungsten chosen as the plasma-facing wall material imposes that the hot central plasma loses energy by X-ray emission from tungsten ions. On the other hand, the registered X-ray spectra provide alternative diagnostics of the plasma itself. Highly ionized tungsten emits extremely complex X-ray spectra that can be understood only after exhaustive theoretical studies. The detailed analyses will be useful for proper interpretation of soft X-ray plasma radiation expected to be registered on ITER-like machines, that is, Tungsten (W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak (WEST. The simulations of the soft X-ray spectra structures for tungsten ions have been performed using the flexible atomic code (FAC package within the framework of collisional-radiative (CR model approach for electron temperatures and densities relevant to WEST tokamak.

  6. Relevance of the proximity potential to light-ion scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabor, S.L.; Goldberg, D.A.; Hurizenga, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Because optical-model potentials are relatively well determined by light-ion elastic scattering, we have compared such potentials with the proximity potential, which was developed for heavy-ion reactions. After the real, nuclear potentials determined by p, d, 3 He, and α scattering at 30--35 MeV/amu are transformed into the universal proximity form they are rather similar to each other and are in rough agreement with a theoretical proximity potential

  7. Dielectronic recombination of lowly charged tungsten ions Wq+(q = 5 - 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Duck-Hee

    2018-03-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the ground levels of low ionization state Wq+ (q = 5 - 10) ions have been obtained by an ab-inito level-by-level calculation using the flexible atomic code (FAC) based on relativistic jj coupling scheme and independent process, isolated resonance, distorted wave approximation. The radiative transition calculation in the original FAC has been adapted into parallel programming for time effective dealing with so many resonance levels of the complex open 4f, 5p, or 5d-shell structure ion. Core excitations Δnc = 0 , 1 of 4f, 5p, and 5d (W5+), Δnc = 2 of 4f, and Δnc = 0 of 4d (W7+), and 5s (W8+) are included to the total DR rate coefficient. The core excitations Δnc = 0 , 5p → 5l and Δnc = 1 , 4f → 5l mainly contribute to the total DR rate coefficients. The strong resonances involved in the DR are analyzed and the total DR rate coefficients are compared with available previous ab-initio predictions and with ADAS data by a simple semiempirical formula.

  8. Performance of a dual-process PVD/PS tungsten coating structure under deuterium ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunmyung; Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Sung Hwan [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae-Min [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Changheui, E-mail: chjang@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • D{sup +} irradiation performance of a dual-process PVD/PS W coating was evaluated. • Low-energy plasmas exposure of 100 eV D{sup +} with 1.17 × 10{sup 21} D/s{sup −1} m{sup 2} flux was applied. • After D ion irradiation, flakes were observed on the surface of the simple PS coating. • While, sub-μm size protrusions were observed for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. • Height of D spike in depth profile was lower for dual-process PVD/PS W coating. - Abstract: A dual-process coating structure was developed on a graphite substrate to improve the performance of the coating structure under anticipated operating condition of fusion devices. A thin multilayer W/Mo coating (6 μm) was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method with a variation of Mo interlayer thickness on plasma spray (PS) W coating (160 μm) of a graphite substrate panel. The dual-process PVD/PS W coatings then were exposed to 3.08 × 10{sup 24} D m{sup −2} of 100 eV D ions with a flux of 1.71 × 10{sup 21} D m{sup −2} s{sup −1} in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) chamber. After irradiation, surface morphology and D depth profiles of the dual-process coating were analyzed and compared to those of the simple PS W coating. Both changes in surface morphology and D retention were strongly dependent on the microstructure of surface coating. Meanwhile, the existence of Mo interlayer seemed to have no significant effect on the retention of deuterium.

  9. New Ion-Nucleation Mechanism Relevant for the Earth's Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enghoff, Martin Andreas Bødker; Svensmark, Henrik; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    An experiment has been set up in order to investigate the role of ionization in Earth's climate. We have chosen to start our investigation at the smallest scales, namely by studying the effect of cosmic ray produced ions on atmospheric aerosol nucleation and growth processes. This experiment...... is conducted at the Danish National Space Center, Center for Sun-Climate Research. It comprises a 7 m3 reaction chamber where atmospheric conditions can be simulated. The number of ions can be increased by exposure to radioactive sources and decreased by applying an electric field; this will enable experiments...

  10. Ion beam irradiation of ceramics at fusion relevant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Ceramic materials are required at a variety of locations in proposed fusion reactors where significant ionizing and displacive fields may be present. Energetic ion beams are a useful tool for probing the effects of irradiation on the structure and electrical properties of ceramics over a wide range of experimental conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using ion beams to provide information on anticipated ceramic radiation effects in a fusion reactor environment are discussed. In this paper particular emphasis is placed on microstructural changes and how the high helium generation rates associated with DT fusion neutrons affect cavity swelling

  11. Multi-species ion transport in ICF relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, Erik; Kagan, Grigory; Simakov, Andrei; Molvig, Kim; Yin, Lin; Albright, Brian

    2017-10-01

    Classical transport theory based on Chapman-Enskog methods provides self consistent approximations for kinetic fluxes of mass, heat and momentum for each ion species in a multi-ion plasma characterized with a small Knudsen number. A numerical method for solving the classic forms of multi-ion transport, self-consistently including heat and species mass fluxes relative to the center of mass, is given in [Kagan-Baalrud, arXiv '16] and similar transport coefficients result from recent derivations [Simakov-Molvig, PoP, '16]. We have implemented a combination of these methods in a standalone test code and in xRage, an adaptive-mesh radiation hydrodynamics code, at LANL. Transport mixing is examined between a DT fuel and a CH capsule shell in ICF conditions. The four ion species develop individual self-similar density profiles under the assumption of P-T equilibrium in 1D and show interesting early time transient pressure and center of mass velocity behavior when P-T equilibrium is not enforced. Some 2D results are explored to better understand the transport mix in combination with convective flow driven by macroscopic fluid instabilities at the fuel-capsule interface. Early transient and some 2D behaviors from the fluid transport are compared to kinetic code results. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  12. Impact tests of the tungsten coated stainless steels prepared by using magnetron sputtering with ion beam mixing or electron beam alloying treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yu; Zhan, Chang-Yong; Yang, Bin; Wu, Jian-Chun

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) with ion beam mixing (IBM) or electron beam alloying (EBA) treatment. The ductile-brittle transition behaviors of the specimens were investigated by means of instrumented Charpy impact test at a series of temperature, and SEM was used to observe the morphology of the cross section. Impact tests show that different treatment methods with W films do not have much influence on crack initiation, while EBA treatment with W films can more effectively prevent crack propagation, namely improve the impact toughness of SS than using IBM treatment. The reason that caused this difference was discussed.

  13. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; M. Reinhart,; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, C.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m−2) and

  14. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  15. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  16. A mass spectrometric system for analyzing thermal desorption spectra of ion-implanted argon and cesium in tungsten. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A mass spectrometric system for determining the characteristics of materials used in instrumental development and aerospace applications was developed. The desorption spectra of cesium that was ion-implanted into polycrystalline tungsten and the effects on the spectra of bombardment of the tungsten by low energy (70 eV) electrons were investigated. Work function changes were measured by the retarding potential diode method. Flash desorption characteristics were observed and gas-reaction mechanisms of the surface of heated metal filaments were studied. Desorption spectra were measured by linearly increasing the sample temperature at a selected rate, the temperature cycling being generated from a ramp-driven dc power supply, with the mass spectrometer tuned to a mass number of interest. Results of the study indicate an anomolous desorption mechanism following an electron bombardment of the sample surface. The enhanced spectra are a function of the post-bombardment time and energy and are suggestive of an increased concentration of cesium atoms, up to 10 or more angstroms below the surface.

  17. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2012-01-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloys-W-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1), ion energy at the biased target similar to 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed

  18. Collisions of slow hydrocarbon ions CD4radical dot+, CD5+, C2D4radical dot+, and C2H5+ with room temperature and heated tungsten surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pysanenko, Andriy; Žabka, Ján; Märk, T. D.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 277, 1-3 (2008), s. 229-235 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040405; GA AV ČR IAA400400702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surface-induced process * hydrocarbon ion * tungsten surfaces * ion survival probability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.445, year: 2008

  19. Thickness-modulated tungsten-carbon superconducting nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition for vortex pinning up to high magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ismael García; Sesé, Javier; Guillamón, Isabel; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, Sebastián; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; De Teresa, José María

    2016-01-01

    We report efficient vortex pinning in thickness-modulated tungsten-carbon-based (W-C) nanostructures grown by focused ion beam induced deposition (FIBID). By using FIBID, W-C superconducting films have been created with thickness modulation properties exhibiting periodicity from 60 to 140 nm, leading to a strong pinning potential for the vortex lattice. This produces local minima in the resistivity up to high magnetic fields (2.2 T) in a broad temperature range due to commensurability effects between the pinning potential and the vortex lattice. The results show that the combination of single-step FIBID fabrication of superconducting nanostructures with built-in artificial pinning landscapes and the small intrinsic random pinning potential of this material produces strong periodic pinning potentials, maximizing the opportunities for the investigation of fundamental aspects in vortex science under changing external stimuli (e.g., temperature, magnetic field, electrical current).

  20. Emittance studies of high intensity negative ion sources equipped with continuous surface cylindrical and spherical geometry tungsten ionizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; McConnell, J.W.; Tajima, S.; Nelson, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    A digitally controlled emittance measurement, data acquisition and processing system has been designed, implemented and used to determine emittances of negative ion beams extracted from high-intensity negative-ion sources equipped with cylindrical and spherical geometry cesium surface ionizers. Comparative studies indicate that the emittances of ion beams extracted from the source equipped with a spherical geometry ionizer are lower by 13% to 21% than those extracted from the source equipped with a cylindrical geometry ionizer. This difference may be attributable to geometric factors rather than differences in the sizes of the emission areas at the points of negative-ion generation. Studies reveal that the emittances of these sources are independent of ion mass for most of the materials investigated and independent of ion current over the range of ion currents used in these investigations (4μA to 12 μA)

  1. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  2. Fragmentation of 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions in thick targets relevant for space exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Tessa, Chiara; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Heilbronn Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Sihver, Lembit; Zeitlin, Cary

    2005-01-01

    We have measured charged nuclear fragments produced by 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions interacting with aluminium, polyethylene and lead. These materials are relevant for assessment of radiation risk for manned space flight. The data will be presented in a form suitable for comparison with models of nuclear fragmentation and transport, including linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum, fluence for iron and fragments, event-tack- and event-dose-averaged LET, total dose and iron contribution to dose

  3. New oxidation-resistant tungsten alloys for use in the nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Mao, Y.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Bram, M.

    2017-12-01

    Smart tungsten-based alloys are under development as plasma-facing components for a future fusion power plant. Smart alloys are planned to adjust their properties depending on environmental conditions: acting as a sputter-resistant plasma-facing material during plasma operation and suppressing the sublimation of radioactive tungsten oxide in case of an accident on the power plant. New smart alloys containing yttrium are presently in the focus of research. Thin film smart alloys are featuring an remarkable 105-fold suppression of mass increase due to an oxidation as compared to that of pure tungsten at 1000 °C. Newly developed bulk smart tungsten alloys feature even better oxidation resistance compared to that of thin films. First plasma test of smart alloys under DEMO-relevant conditions revealed the same mass removal as for pure tungsten due to sputtering by plasma ions. Exposed smart alloy samples demonstrate the superior oxidation performance as compared to tungsten-chromium-titanium systems developed earlier.

  4. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a large area (Asource,ITER = 0.9 × 2 m2) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (Asource,BATMAN ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m2) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child-Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion-ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated extracted currents, both ions

  5. Use of ion exchange during preparation of raw materials for production of molybdenum and tungsten of high purify

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Taushkanov, V.P.; Maksimkov, S.M.; Majorov, D.Yu.; Pak, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The data on the application of selective ionites for the steep purification of ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions, are given. It is shown that to purify molybdenum and ammonium tungstate solutions from the impuerities of alkali earth and two- and threevalent transition metals, iminodiacetate ampholites of the ANKB-35 type are the most effective sorbents. To purify from phosphorus, silicon and arsenic impurities composition ionites on the base of hydrated oxides of multivalent metals introduced in the granules of porous cationites should be used. To extract phosphorus, silicon, arsenic impurities from ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions and tungsten from ammonium molybdate solutions the method of their coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide can also be used. The best results on the purification of ammonium molybdate from tungstate provides for the application of structural organomineral ionites as well as weak-basicity anionites of the AN-31 type and its different modifications containing hydroxyl groups along with aminogroups. To purity ammonium tungstate solutions from molybdate a method is developed which transforms molybdenum in the form of thiocomplexes and the following selective sorption by strong-basicity anionites. The data on the quality of molybdenum monocrystals which are taken from the raw material purified using ionites, are given

  6. Mechanical and tribological properties of carbon thin film with tungsten interlayer prepared by Ion beam assisted deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Tolde, Z.; Sepitka, J.; Gregora, Ivan; Daniš, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, FEB (2013) ISSN 2314-4874 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon coatings * ion beam deposition * XRD * nanoindentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/630156

  7. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  8. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  9. Towards a realistic 3D simulation of the extraction region in ITER NBI relevant ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2015-03-01

    The development of negative ion (NI) sources for ITER is strongly accompanied by modelling activities. The ONIX code addresses the physics of formation and extraction of negative hydrogen ions at caesiated sources as well as the amount of co-extracted electrons. In order to be closer to the experimental conditions the code has been improved. It includes now the bias potential applied to first grid (plasma grid) of the extraction system, and the presence of Cs+ ions in the plasma. The simulation results show that such aspects play an important role for the formation of an ion-ion plasma in the boundary region by reducing the depth of the negative potential well in vicinity to the plasma grid that limits the extraction of the NIs produced at the Cs covered plasma grid surface. The influence of the initial temperature of the surface produced NI and its emission rate on the NI density in the bulk plasma that in turn affects the beam formation region was analysed. The formation of the plasma meniscus, the boundary between the plasma and the beam, was investigated for the extraction potentials of 5 and 10 kV. At the smaller extraction potential the meniscus moves closer to the plasma grid but as in the case of 10 kV the deepest meniscus bend point is still outside of the aperture. Finally, a plasma containing the same amount of NI and electrons (nH- =ne =1017 m-3) , representing good source conditioning, was simulated. It is shown that at such conditions the extracted NI current can reach values of ˜32 mA cm-2 using ITER-relevant extraction potential of 10 kV and ˜19 mA cm-2 at 5 kV. These results are in good agreement with experimental measurements performed at the small scale ITER prototype source at the test facility BATMAN.

  10. A study of the effect of helium concentration and displacement damage on the microstructure of helium ion irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. W.; Greaves, G.; Hinks, J. A.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2017-11-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with in-situ He ion irradiation has been used to examine the damage microstructure of W when varying the helium concentration to displacement damage ratio, irradiation temperature and total dose. Irradiations employed 15, 60 or 85 keV He ions, at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C up to doses of ∼3.0 DPA. Once nucleated and grown to an observable size in the TEM, bubble diameter as a function of irradiation dose did not measurably increase at irradiation temperatures of 500 °C between 1.0 and 3.0 DPA; this is attributed to the low mobility of vacancies and He/vacancy complexes at these temperatures. Bubble diameter increased slightly for irradiation temperatures of 750 °C and rapidly increased when irradiated at 1000 °C. Dislocation loops were observed at irradiation temperatures of 500 and 750 °C and no loops were observed at 1000 °C. Burgers vectors of the dislocations were determined to be b = ±½ type only and both vacancy and interstitial loops were observed. The proportion of interstitial loops increased with He-appm/DPA ratio and this is attributed to the concomitant increase in bubble areal density, which reduces the vacancy flux for both the growth of vacancy-type loops and the annihilation of interstitial clusters.

  11. Inactivation of the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of silver ions by biologically relevant compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Mulley

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge in the use of silver as an antimicrobial agent in a wide range of domestic and clinical products, intended to prevent or treat bacterial infections and reduce bacterial colonization of surfaces. It has been reported that the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of silver are affected by the assay conditions, particularly the type of growth media used in vitro. The toxicity of Ag+ to bacterial cells is comparable to that of human cells. We demonstrate that biologically relevant compounds such as glutathione, cysteine and human blood components significantly reduce the toxicity of silver ions to clinically relevant pathogenic bacteria and primary human dermal fibroblasts (skin cells. Bacteria are able to grow normally in the presence of silver nitrate at >20-fold the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC if Ag+ and thiols are added in a 1:1 ratio because the reaction of Ag+ with extracellular thiols prevents silver ions from interacting with cells. Extracellular thiols and human serum also significantly reduce the antimicrobial activity of silver wound dressings Aquacel-Ag (Convatec and Acticoat (Smith & Nephew to Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli in vitro. These results have important implications for the deployment of silver as an antimicrobial agent in environments exposed to biological tissue or secretions. Significant amounts of money and effort have been directed at the development of silver-coated medical devices (e.g. dressings, catheters, implants. We believe our findings are essential for the effective design and testing of antimicrobial silver coatings.

  12. Phase diagram, thermodynamic investigations, and modelling of systems relevant to lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuertauer, Siegfried; Beutl, Alexander; Flanorfer, Hans [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry - Functional Materials; Li, Dajian; Cupid, Damian [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Applied Materials - Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP); Henriques, David; Giel, Hans; Markus, Thorsten [Mannheim Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany). Inst. for Thermo- and Fluiddynamics

    2017-11-15

    This article reports on two consecutive joint projects titled ''Experimental Thermodynamics and Phase Relations of New Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries'', which were performed in the framework of the WenDeLIB 1473 priority program ''Materials with new Design for Lithium Ion Batteries''. Hundreds of samples were synthesized using experimental techniques specifically developed to deal with highly reactive lithium and lithium-containing compounds to generate electrochemical, phase diagram and crystal structure data in the Cu-Li, Li-Sn, Li-Sb, Cu-Li-Sn, Cu-Li-Sb and selected oxide systems. The thermochemical and phase diagram data were subsequently used to develop self-consistent thermodynamic descriptions of several binary systems. In the present contribution, the experimental techniques, working procedures, results and their relevance to the development of new electrode materials for lithium ion batteries are discussed and summarized. The collaboration between the three groups has resulted in more than fifteen (15) published articles during the six-year funding period.

  13. Studies on ion scattering and sputtering processes relevant to ion beam sputter deposition of multicomponent thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auciello, O.; Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Results from computer simulation and experiments on ion scattering and sputtering processes in ion beam sputter deposition of high Tc superconducting and ferroelectric thin films are presented. It is demonstrated that scattering of neutralized ions from the targets can result in undesirable erosion of, and inert gas incorporation in, the growing films, depending on the ion/target atom ass ratio and ion beam angle of incidence/target/substrate geometry. The studies indicate that sputtering Kr + or Xe + ions is preferable to the most commonly used Ar + ions, since the undesirable phenomena mentioned above are minimized for the first two ions. These results are used to determine optimum sputter deposition geometry and ion beam parameters for growing multicomponent oxide thin films by ion beam sputter-deposition. 10 refs., 5 figs

  14. The effect of ion flux on plasma-induced modification and deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten–tantalum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayachuk, Y., E-mail: yevhen.zayachuk@materials.ox.ac.uk [SCK-CEN, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Manhard, A. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hoen, M.H.J. ' t [FOM Institute DIFFER, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jacob, W. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A. [FOM Institute DIFFER, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Aviation Academy, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Weesperzijde 190, 1097 DZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, St. Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of deuterium retention in W and W–Ta alloy that were exposed to first-wall relevant low flux (∼10{sup 20} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) deuterium plasma in the ECR plasma generator PlaQ. Subsequent analysis included surface imaging by optical microscopy, deuterium depth profiling by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and measurements of deuterium content by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It was found that under investigated exposure conditions the deuterium content was higher in W–Ta alloy than in W. Combined with the previously reported results showing that under high-flux (∼10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}) retention is higher in W instead, this gives rise to a peculiar flux effect – dependence of relative retention between different materials on exposure flux. We interpret this effect as evidence that at different flux ranges different populations of trapping sites determine the retention, namely pre-existing microstructural traps at low-flux exposure and plasma-induced ones at high-flux exposure.

  15. Fragmentation of toxicologically relevant drugs in positive-ion liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, W M A

    2011-01-01

    The identification of drugs and related compounds by LC-MS-MS is an important analytical challenge in several application areas, including clinical and forensic toxicology, doping control analysis, and environmental analysis. Although target-compound based analytical strategies are most frequently applied, at some point the information content of the MS-MS spectra becomes relevant. In this article, the positive-ion MS-MS spectra of a wide variety of drugs and related substances are discussed. Starting point was an MS-MS mass spectral library of toxicologically relevant compounds, available on the internet. The positive-ion MS-MS spectra of ∼570 compounds were interpreted by chemical and therapeutic class, thus involving a wide variety of drug compound classes, such benzodiazepines, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, phenothiazines, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, diuretics, local anesthetics, vasodilators, as well as various subclasses of anti-diabetic, antidepressant, analgesic, and antihistaminic drugs. In addition, the scientific literature was searched for available MS-MS data of these compound classes and the interpretation thereof. The results of this elaborate study are presented in this article. For each individual compound class, the emphasis is on class-specific fragmentation, as discussing fragmentation of all individual compounds would take far too much space. The recognition of class-specific fragmentation may be quite informative in determining the compound class of a specific unknown, which may further help in the identification. In addition, knowledge on (class-specific) fragmentation may further help in the optimization of the selectivity in targeted analytical approaches of compounds of one particular class. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  17. Slowing down of heavy ions in ionized target. Relevance to the heavy ion inertial fusion and experimental study proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, Renato.

    1981-07-01

    By using a simplified model we have analyzed the influence of the main target (Tsub(e), n, Zsub(p)) and incoming ion parameters (Zsub(f), Esub(f)) on the heavy ion slowing down in ionized metal targets. This model is used to define an experimental set up consisting of a heavy ion probe crossing a laser created plasma target. The energy output of the heavy ion probe appears to be a sensitive parameter of the target characteristics [fr

  18. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  19. Correlations between Survival Probabilities and Ionization Energies of Slow Ions Colliding with Room-Temperature and Heated Surfaces of Carbon, Tungsten, and Beryllium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herman, Zdeněk; Žabka, Ján; Pysanenko, Andriy

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 52 (2009), s. 14838-14844 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040405; GA AV ČR IAA400400702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : surface * carbon * tungsten * survival probabilities Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2009

  20. Tailoring of the PS surface with low energy ions: Relevance to growth and adhesion of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaporojtchenko, V.; Zekonyte, J.; Wille, S.; Schuermann, U.; Faupel, F.

    2005-01-01

    Ion-polymer interaction induces different phenomena in the near surface layer of polymers, and promotes its adhesion to metals. Using XPS, TEM and AFM, polystyrene surface was examined after 1 keV ion-beam treatments with oxygen, nitrogen and argon ions in the ion fluence range from 10 12 to 10 16 cm -2 to clarify the following points: chemical reaction after treatment in vacuum and after exposure to air, identification of adsorption-relevant species for metal atoms, formation of cross-links in the outermost polymer layer. The early stages of metal-polymer interface formation during metallization play a crucial role in the metal-polymer adhesion. Therefore, the influence of the ion fluence and ion chemistry on the condensation of noble metals, film growth and peel strength were measured. The peel strength showed a maximum at a certain fluence depending on ion chemistry. For example, the surface treatment with very low fluence of oxygen ions improved the adhesion between copper and polystyrene by two orders of magnitude without significantly increasing the surface roughness measured with AFM. The locus of failure changed at the same time from interfacial failure for untreated polymer surfaces to cohesive failure in the polymer for modified surfaces. A multilayer model of the metal-polymer interface after ion treatment is suggested

  1. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  2. Electro-Analytical Study of Material Interfaces Relevant for Chemical Mechanical Planarization and Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Michael C.

    galvanic corrosions in chemically controlled low-pressure CMP. The CMP specific functions of the slurry components are characterized in the tribo-electro-analytical approach by using voltammetry, open circuit potential (OCP) measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence as well as in the absence of surface abrasion, both with and without the inclusion of colloidal silica (SiO2) abrasives. The results are used to understand the reaction mechanisms responsible for supporting material removal and corrosion suppression. The project carried out in the area of Li ion batteries (LIBs) uses electro-analytical techniques to probe electrolyte characteristics as well as electrode material performance. The investigation concentrates on optimizing a tactically chosen set of electrolyte compositions for low-to-moderate temperature applications of lithium titanium oxide (LTO), a relatively new anode material for such batteries. For this application, mixtures of non-aqueous carbonate based solvents are studied in combination with lithium perchlorate. The temperature dependent conductivities of the electrolytes are rigorously measured and analyzed using EIS. The experimental considerations and the working principle of this EIS based approach are carefully examined and standardized in the course of this study. These experiments also investigate the effects of temperature variations (below room temperature) on the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation characteristics of LTO in the given electrolytes. This dissertation is organized as follows: Each experimental system and its relevance for practical applications are briefly introduced in each chapter. The experimental approach and the motivation for carrying out the investigation are also noted in that context. The experimental details specific to the particular study are described. This is followed by the results and their discussion, and subsequently, by the specific conclusions drawn from the given

  3. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  4. Assessment of potential advantages of relevant ions for particle therapy: A model based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grün, Rebecca, E-mail: r.gruen@gsi.de [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390 (Germany); Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032 (Germany); Friedrich, Thomas; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, University of Applied Sciences Gießen, Gießen 35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt 64291, Germany and Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, Darmstadt 64289 (Germany); Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita [Medical Faculty of Philipps-University Marburg, Marburg 35032, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Marburg 35043 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Different ion types offer different physical and biological advantages for therapeutic applications. The purpose of this work is to assess the advantages of the most commonly used ions in particle therapy, i.e., carbon ({sup 12}C), helium ({sup 4}He), and protons ({sup 1}H) for different treatment scenarios. Methods: A treatment planning analysis based on idealized target geometries was performed using the treatment planning software TRiP98. For the prediction of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) that is required for biological optimization in treatment planning the local effect model (LEM IV) was used. To compare the three ion types, the peak-to-entrance ratio (PER) was determined for the physical dose (PER{sub PHY} {sub S}), the RBE (PER{sub RBE}), and the RBE-weighted dose (PER{sub BIO}) resulting for different dose-levels, field configurations, and tissue types. Further, the dose contribution to artificial organs at risk (OAR) was assessed and a comparison of the dose distribution for the different ion types was performed for a patient with chordoma of the skull base. Results: The study showed that the advantages of the ions depend on the physical and biological properties and the interplay of both. In the case of protons, the consideration of a variable RBE instead of the clinically applied generic RBE of 1.1 indicates an advantage in terms of an increased PER{sub RBE} for the analyzed configurations. Due to the fact that protons show a somewhat better PER{sub PHY} {sub S} compared to helium and carbon ions whereas helium shows a higher PER{sub RBE} compared to protons, both protons and helium ions show a similar RBE-weighted dose distribution. Carbon ions show the largest variation of the PER{sub RBE} with tissue type and a benefit for radioresistant tumor types due to their higher LET. Furthermore, in the case of a two-field irradiation, an additional gain in terms of PER{sub BIO} is observed when using an orthogonal field configuration

  5. Experimental and theoretical data on ion-molecule-reactions relevant for plasma modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansel, A.; Praxmarer, C.; Lindinger, W.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the fact that the rate coefficients of hundreds of ion-molecule-reactions have been published in the literature, much more data are required for the purpose of plasma modelling. Many ion molecule reactions have rate coefficients, k, as large as the collisional limiting value, k c , i.e. the rate coefficients k c at which ion-neutral collision complexes are formed are close to the actual rate coefficients observed. In the case of the interaction of an ion with a non polar molecule, k c , is determined by the Langevin limiting value k L being typically 10 -9 cm 3 s -1 . However, when ions react with polar molecules k c is predicted by the average dipole orientation (ADO) theory. These classical theories yield accurate rate coefficients at thermal and elevated temperatures for practically all proton transfer as well as for many charge transfer and hydrogen abstraction reactions. The agreement between experimental and calculated values is usually better than ±20% and in the case of proton transfer reactions the agreement seems to be even better as recent investigations have shown. Even the interaction of the permanent ion dipole with non polar and polar neutrals can be taken into account to predict reaction rate coefficients as has been shown very recently in reactions of the highly polar ion ArH 3 + with various neutrals

  6. Effect of rhenium addition on tungsten fuzz formation in helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aneeqa; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas W.; Ward, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the addition of rhenium to tungsten on the formation of a nanostructure referred to as ‘fuzz’ when exposed to helium plasmas at fusion relevant ion fluxes was investigated in the Magnum and Pilot PSI devices at the FOM Institute DIFFER. The effect rhenium had on fuzz growth was seen to be dependent on time, temperature and flux. Initial fuzz growth was seen to be highly dependent on grain orientation, with rhenium having little effect. Once the fuzz was fully developed, the effect of grain orientation disappeared and the rhenium had an inhibiting effect on growth. This could be beneficial for inhibiting fuzz growth in a future fusion reactor, where transmutation of tungsten to rhenium is expected. It also appears that erosion or annealing of the fuzz is limiting growth of fuzz at higher temperatures in the range of ∼1340 °C.

  7. A Pilot Study of Ion - Molecule Reactions at Temperatures Relevant to the Atmosphere of Titan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zymak, Illia; Žabka, Ján; Polášek, Miroslav; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2016), s. 533-538 ISSN 0169-6149 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19693S Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1308 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titan ionosphere * variable temperature selected ions flow tube * ion-molecule reactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2016

  8. Longitudinal instabilities of the experimentally generated laser accelerated ion beam relevant to fast ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbinfar, S.

    2017-11-01

    The advent of laser-assisted ion acceleration technology promises an alternative candidate to conventional accelerator drivers used in inertial confinement fusion. The experimental generation of quasi-monoenergetic heavier ion species i.e. carbon and aluminum, applicable to fast ignition studies has been recently reported. The propagation of these energetic ions may impact on the proper ignition phase through growing of micro-instabilities of beam-plasma system. The growth of flow-aligned instabilities is much more important for heavier ions transport in the dense plasma. Here, we have presented a general non-relativistic one-dimensional dispersion relation of cold fluid model as well as corresponding kinetic theory of incident ion beam with atomic number, Zb enters into a fast ignition DT plasma. The longitudinal instabilities of some selected average energies of experimentally generated C6+ (EC=50, 100 and 200 MeV with δE/E ∼ 10 %) and Al11+ (EAl=150 and 300 MeV with δE/E ∼25%) quasi-monoenergetic beams were examined and beam-plasma system stable configuration have been then derived. It has been shown that in the kinetic theory framework, carbon and aluminum ions may be completely stabilized by the combination of beam to plasma density ratio (αb) and plasma temperature (Tp) of ignition phase parameters. Moreover, in complete stabilization, αb parameter of aluminum beam is an order of magnitude lower than carbon.

  9. Investigations on Cs-free alternatives for negative ion formation in a low pressure hydrogen discharge at ion source relevant parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurutz, U.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-07-01

    Caesium (Cs) is applied in high power negative hydrogen ion sources to reduce a converter surface’s work function and thus enabling an efficient negative ion surface formation. Inherent drawbacks with the usage of this reactive alkali metal motivate the search for Cs-free alternative materials for neutral beam injection systems in fusion research. In view of a future DEMOnstration power plant, a suitable material should provide a high negative ion formation efficiency and comply with the RAMI issues of the system: reliability, availability, maintainability, inspectability. Promising candidates, like low work function materials (molybdenum doped with lanthanum (MoLa) and LaB6), as well as different non-doped and boron-doped diamond samples were investigated in this context at identical and ion source relevant parameters at the laboratory experiment HOMER. Negative ion densities were measured above the samples by means of laser photodetachment and compared with two reference cases: pure negative ion volume formation with negative ion densities of about 1× {10}15 {{{m}}}-3 and the effect of H- surface production using an in situ caesiated stainless steel sample which yields 2.5 times higher densities. Compared to pure volume production, none of the diamond samples did exhibit a measurable increase in H- densities, while showing clear indications of plasma-induced erosion. In contrast, both MoLa and LaB6 produced systematically higher densities (MoLa: ×1.60 LaB6: ×1.43). The difference to caesiation can be attributed to the higher work functions of MoLa and LaB6 which are expected to be about 3 eV for both compared to 2.1 eV of a caesiated surface.

  10. Polymorphism in ion channel genes of Dirofilaria immitis: Relevant knowledge for future anthelmintic drug design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangadurai Mani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dirofilaria immitis, a filarial parasite, causes cardiopulmonary dirofilariasis in dogs, cats and wild canids. The macrocyclic lactone (ML class of drugs has been used to prevent heartworm infection. There is confirmed ML resistance in D. immitis and thus there is an urgent need to find new anthelmintics that could prevent and/or control the disease. Targeting ion channels of D. immitis for drug design has obvious advantages. These channels, present in the nematode nervous system, control movement, feeding, mating and respond to environmental cues which are necessary for survival of the parasite. Any new drug that targets these ion channels is likely to have a motility phenotype and should act to clear the worms from the host. Many of the successful anthelmintics in the past have targeted these ion channels and receptors. Knowledge about genetic variability of the ion channel and receptor genes should be useful information for drug design as receptor polymorphism may affect responses to a drug. Such information may also be useful for anticipation of possible resistance development. A total of 224 ion channel genes/subunits have been identified in the genome of D. immitis. Whole genome sequencing data of parasites from eight different geographical locations, four from ML-susceptible populations and the other four from ML-loss of efficacy (LOE populations, were used for polymorphism analysis. We identified 1762 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP sites (1508 intronic and 126 exonic in these 224 ion channel genes/subunits with an overall polymorphic rate of 0.18%. Of the SNPs found in the exon regions, 129 of them caused a non-synonymous type of polymorphism. Fourteen of the exonic SNPs caused a change in predicted secondary structure. A few of the SNPs identified may have an effect on gene expression, function of the protein and resistance selection processes.

  11. Final Technical Report: Targeting DOE-Relevant Ions with Supramolecular Strategies, DE-SC0010555

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman-James, Kristin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-13

    The effectiveness of three popular supramolecular strategies to selectively target negatively charged ions (anions) was evaluated. Ions of interest included oxo anions, particularly sulfate, that hamper nuclear waste remediation. Three objectives were pursued using a simple building block strategies and by strategically placing anion-binding sites at appropriate positions on organic host molecules. The goal of the first objective was to assess the influence of secondary, tertiary and quaternized amines on binding tetrahedral anions using mixed amide/amine macrocyclic and urea/amine hosts containing aromatic or heteroaromatic spacers. Objective 2 focused on the design of ion pair hosts, using mixed macrocyclic anion hosts joined through polyether linkages. Objective 3 was to explore the synthesis of new metal-linked extended macrocyclic frameworks to leverage anion binding. Key findings were that smaller 24-membered macrocycles provided the most complementary binding for sulfate ion and mixed urea/amine chelates showed enhanced binding over amide corollaries in addition to being highly selective for SO42- in the presence of small quantities of water. In addition to obtaining prototype metal-linked macrocyclic anion hosts, a new dipincer ligand was designed that can be used to link macrocyclic or other supramolecular hosts in extended frameworks. When the tetraamide-based pincers are bound to two metal ions, an interesting phenomenon occurs. Upon deprotonation of the amides, two new protons appear between adjacent carbonyl pairs on the ligand, which may modify the chemistry, and metal-metal interactions in the complexes. Gel formation occurred for some of these extended hosts, and the physical properties are currently under investigation. The new tetracarboxamide-based pincers can also provide basic frameworks for double macrocycles capable of binding ion pairs as well as for binding metal ions and exploring intermetallic interactions through

  12. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  13. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W 24+ - W 32+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W 22+ - W 35+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W 25+ - W 28+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p 5 4d n+1 - 4p 6 4d n , of W 29+ - W 35+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p 5 4d n 4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  14. A novel ion pairing LC/MS metabolomics protocol for study of a variety of biologically relevant polar metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Jose M; Rzezniczak, Teresa Z; Barsch, Aiko; Guo, Kevin Z; Merritt, Thomas J S

    2013-10-01

    We report a method of ion-pairing liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (IP-LC-MS) that we have developed for the sensitive detection and quantification of a variety of biologically relevant polar molecules. We use the ion-pairing agent diamyl ammonium to improve chromatographic resolution of polar compounds, such as nucleotide cofactors, sugar phosphates, and organic acids, that are generally poorly retained by conventional reverse phase chromatographic methods. This method showed good linearity (average R value of 0.996) and reproducibility (generally RSD values <10%). We demonstrate the utility of this method by investigating the metabolomic signature of three distinct biological systems: the metabolic response to lack of superoxide dismutase activity and to paraquat induced oxidative stress, and the metabolic profiles of four different Drosophila species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructural evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible tritium

  16. Solid State Structures of Alkali Metal Ion Complexes Formed by Low-Molecular-Weight Ligands of Biological Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuyuki; Murayama, Kazutaka; Hu, Ning-Hai

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides structural data, mainly metal binding sites/modes, observed in crystal structures of alkali metal ion complexes containing low-molecular-weight ligands of biological relevance, mostly obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (the CSD version 5.35 updated to February 2014). These ligands include (i) amino acids and small peptides, (ii) nucleic acid constituents (excluding quadruplexes and other oligonucleotides), (iii) simple carbohydrates, and (iv) naturally occurring antibiotic ionophores. For some representative complexes of these ligands, some details on the environment of the metal coordination and structural characteristics are described.

  17. Point Defect Calculations in Tungsten

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danilowicz, Ronald

    1968-01-01

    .... The vacancy migration energy for tungsten was calculated. The calculated value of 1.73 electron volts, together with experimental data, suggests that vacancies migrate in stage III recovery in tungsten...

  18. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowicz, Michelle; Garcia, Antonio

    2015-06-02

    The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia) for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologically-relevant saliva concentrations. The sample and fluorescent reagent solutions are placed in a specially-designed, lightweight device that excludes ambient light and concentrates 470-nm excitation light, from a low-power photodiode, within the sample through non-axially-symmetric refraction. The study found that smartphone cameras and post-image processing quantitated sodium ion concentration in water over the range of 0.5-10 mM, yielding best-fit regressions of the data that agree well with a data regression of microplate luminometer results. The data suggest that fluorescence can be used for the measurement of salivary sodium ion concentrations in low-resource or point-of-care settings. With further fluorescent assay testing, the device may find application in a variety of enzymatic or chemical assays.

  19. Handheld Device Adapted to Smartphone Cameras for the Measurement of Sodium Ion Concentrations at Saliva-Relevant Levels via Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lipowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of saliva sampling as a minimally-invasive means for drug testing and monitoring physiology is a subject of great interest to researchers and clinicians. This study describes a new optical method based on non-axially symmetric focusing of light using an oblate spheroid sample chamber. The device is simple, lightweight, low cost and is easily attached to several different brands/models of smartphones (Apple, Samsung, HTC and Nokia for the measurement of sodium ion levels at physiologically-relevant saliva concentrations. The sample and fluorescent reagent solutions are placed in a specially-designed, lightweight device that excludes ambient light and concentrates 470-nm excitation light, from a low-power photodiode, within the sample through non-axially-symmetric refraction. The study found that smartphone cameras and post-image processing quantitated sodium ion concentration in water over the range of 0.5–10 mM, yielding best-fit regressions of the data that agree well with a data regression of microplate luminometer results. The data suggest that fluorescence can be used for the measurement of salivary sodium ion concentrations in low-resource or point-of-care settings. With further fluorescent assay testing, the device may find application in a variety of enzymatic or chemical assays.

  20. Performance of multi-aperture grid extraction systems for an ITER-relevant RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, P.; Gutser, R.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; McNeely, P.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Stäbler, A.; Wünderlich, D.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam system requires a negative hydrogen ion beam of 48 A with an energy of 0.87 MeV, and a negative deuterium beam of 40 A with an energy of 1 MeV. The beam is extracted from a large ion source of dimension 1.9 × 0.9 m2 by an acceleration system consisting of seven grids with 1280 apertures each. Currently, apertures with a diameter of 14 mm in the first grid are foreseen. In 2007, the IPP RF source was chosen as the ITER reference source due to its reduced maintenance compared with arc-driven sources and the successful development at the BATMAN test facility of being equipped with the small IPP prototype RF source ( {\\sim}\\frac{1}{8} of the area of the ITER NBI source). These results, however, were obtained with an extraction system with 8 mm diameter apertures. This paper reports on the comparison of the source performance at BATMAN of an ITER-relevant extraction system equipped with chamfered apertures with a 14 mm diameter and 8 mm diameter aperture extraction system. The most important result is that there is almost no difference in the achieved current density—being consistent with ion trajectory calculations—and the amount of co-extracted electrons. Furthermore, some aspects of the beam optics of both extraction systems are discussed.

  1. Relevance of lysine snorkeling in the outer transmembrane domain of small viral potassium ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Manuela; Henkes, Leonhard M; Tayefeh, Sascha; Hertel, Brigitte; Greiner, Timo; Van Etten, James L; Baumeister, Dirk; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Kast, Stefan M; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-07-17

    Transmembrane domains (TMDs) are often flanked by Lys or Arg because they keep their aliphatic parts in the bilayer and their charged groups in the polar interface. Here we examine the relevance of this so-called "snorkeling" of a cationic amino acid, which is conserved in the outer TMD of small viral K(+) channels. Experimentally, snorkeling activity is not mandatory for Kcv(PBCV-1) because K29 can be replaced by most of the natural amino acids without any corruption of function. Two similar channels, Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325), lack a cytosolic N-terminus, and neutralization of their equivalent cationic amino acids inhibits their function. To understand the variable importance of the cationic amino acids, we reanalyzed molecular dynamics simulations of Kcv(PBCV-1) and N-terminally truncated mutants; the truncated mutants mimic Kcv(ATCV-1) and Kcv(MT325). Structures were analyzed with respect to membrane positioning in relation to the orientation of K29. The results indicate that the architecture of the protein (including the selectivity filter) is only weakly dependent on TMD length and protonation of K29. The penetration depth of Lys in a given protonation state is independent of the TMD architecture, which leads to a distortion of shorter proteins. The data imply that snorkeling can be important for K(+) channels; however, its significance depends on the architecture of the entire TMD. The observation that the most severe N-terminal truncation causes the outer TMD to move toward the cytosolic side suggests that snorkeling becomes more relevant if TMDs are not stabilized in the membrane by other domains.

  2. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  3. Heterogeneous reactions between ions NH3+and NH+andhydrocarbons adsorbed on a tungsten surface.Formation of HCN+in NH+-surface hydrocarbon collisions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harnisch, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 392, DEC 2015 (2015), s. 139-144 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ion-surface collisions * NH3+and NH+ projectile s * surface hydrocarbons Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  4. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  5. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  6. Calculation of electric field-induced detachment rate of electrons from mononegative ions; relevance to gaseous dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweinler, H.C.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    This model for the mononegative atomic or molecular ion in its effect on the most loosely bound electron is a spherical square well (constant positive inner potential within a sphere of radius r/sub 0/ and zero potential outside). From it we have calculated by quantum mechanics the emission rate w/sub ..nu..lm/ of electrons from the ..nu../sup th/ excited state (of orbital angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers l and m and energy E/sub ..nu..l/ < 0) under the influence of a constant electric field F. The calculation is conceptionally simple (involving time-dependent perturbation theory) but technically complicated (requiring an eleven-fold integration), and leads to a surprisingly simple final expression. The relevance of our calculations to gaseous dielectrics is discussed.

  7. From Heavy-Ion Collisions to Compact Stars: Equation of State and Relevance of the System Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Mogliacci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we start by presenting state-of-the-art methods allowing us to compute moments related to the globally conserved baryon number, by means of first principle resummed perturbative frameworks. We focus on such quantities for they convey important properties of the finite temperature and density equation of state, being particularly sensitive to changes in the degrees of freedom across the quark-hadron phase transition. We thus present various number susceptibilities along with the corresponding results as obtained by lattice quantum chromodynamics collaborations, and comment on their comparison. Next, omitting the importance of coupling corrections and considering a zero-density toy model for the sake of argument, we focus on corrections due to the small size of heavy-ion collision systems, by means of spatial compactifications. Briefly motivating the relevance of finite size effects in heavy-ion physics, in opposition to the compact star physics, we present a few preliminary thermodynamic results together with the speed of sound for certain finite size relativistic quantum systems at very high temperature.

  8. Influence of copper ions on the viability and cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa under conditions relevant to drinking water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwidjosiswojo, Zenyta; Richard, Jessica; Moritz, Miriam M; Dopp, Elke; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost

    2011-11-01

    Copper plumbing materials can be the source of copper ions in drinking water supplies. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of copper ions on the viability and cytotoxicity of the potential pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa that presents a health hazard when occurring in building plumbing systems. In batch experiments, exposure of P. aeruginosa (10(6)cells/mL) for 24h at 20°C to copper-containing drinking water from domestic plumbing systems resulted in a loss of culturability, while total cell numbers determined microscopically did not decrease. Addition of the chelator diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to copper-containing water prevented the loss of culturability. When suspended in deionized water with added copper sulfate (10 μM), the culturability of P. aeruginosa decreased by more than 6 log units, while total cell counts, the concentration of cells with intact cytoplasmic membranes, determined with the LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit, and the number of cells with intact 16S ribosomal RNA, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization, remained unchanged. When the chelator DDTC was added to copper-stressed bacteria, complete restoration of culturability was observed to occur within 14 d. Copper-stressed bacteria were not cytotoxic towards Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-9) cells, while untreated and resuscitated bacteria caused an almost complete decrease of the concentration of viable CHO-9 cells within 24 h. Thus, copper ions in concentrations relevant to drinking water in plumbing systems seem to induce a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in P. aeruginosa accompanied by a loss of culturability and cytotoxicity, and VBNC cells can regain both culturability and cytotoxicity, when copper stress is abolished. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Alkali Metal Ion Complexes with Phosphates, Nucleotides, Amino Acids, and Related Ligands of Biological Relevance. Their Properties in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Foti, Claudia; Lando, Gabriele; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Alkali metal ions play very important roles in all biological systems, some of them are essential for life. Their concentration depends on several physiological factors and is very variable. For example, sodium concentrations in human fluids vary from quite low (e.g., 8.2 mmol dm(-3) in mature maternal milk) to high values (0.14 mol dm(-3) in blood plasma). While many data on the concentration of Na(+) and K(+) in various fluids are available, the information on other alkali metal cations is scarce. Since many vital functions depend on the network of interactions occurring in various biofluids, this chapter reviews their complex formation with phosphates, nucleotides, amino acids, and related ligands of biological relevance. Literature data on this topic are quite rare if compared to other cations. Generally, the stability of alkali metal ion complexes of organic and inorganic ligands is rather low (usually log K  Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). For example, for citrate it is: log K ML = 0.88, 0.80, 0.48, 0.38, and 0.13 at 25 °C and infinite dilution. Some considerations are made on the main aspects related to the difficulties in the determination of weak complexes. The importance of the alkali metal ion complexes was also studied in the light of modelling natural fluids and in the use of these cations as probes for different processes. Some empirical relationships are proposed for the dependence of the stability constants of Na(+) complexes on the ligand charge, as well as for correlations among log K values of NaL, KL or LiL species (L = generic ligand).

  10. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  11. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  12. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  13. Selective formation of tungsten nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bien Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a process for fabricating self-aligned tungsten (W nanowires with polycrystalline silicon core. Tungsten nanowires as thin as 10 nm were formed by utilizing polysilicon sidewall transfer technology followed by selective deposition of tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD using WF6 as the precursor. With selective CVD, the process is self-limiting whereby the tungsten formation is confined to the polysilicon regions; hence, the nanowires are formed without the need for lithography or for additional processing. The fabricated tungsten nanowires were observed to be perfectly aligned, showing 100% selectivity to polysilicon and can be made to be electrically isolated from one another. The electrical conductivity of the nanowires was characterized to determine the effect of its physical dimensions. The conductivity for the tungsten nanowires were found to be 40% higher when compared to doped polysilicon nanowires of similar dimensions.

  14. Operation of ASDEX Upgrade with tungsten coated walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.; Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Geier, A.; Gong, X.; Kallenbach, A.; Krieger, K.; Lindig, S.; Maier, H.; Mueller, W.; Pugno, R.; Schneider, W.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998 a step by step approach to investigate high-Z material at the main chamber walls of the ASDEX Upgrade divertor tokamak was followed, resulting in 7.1 m 2 of tungsten coated tiles at the central column during the 2001-02 campaign. Despite this large area, plasma operation was not hampered in any way by tungsten radiation. Results obtained from a variety of confinement regimes indicate that the core tungsten concentration depends mostly on core transport rather than on the tungsten erosion source. For medium density H-mode discharges tungsten concentration ∼ 1·10 -6 are found. Higher concentrations are observed only under discharge conditions where neoclassical accumulation becomes dominant as in case of strong background plasma peaking. On the other hand, core accumulation can be effectively controlled without noticeable confinement degradation by applying central heating. Unexpected high average tungsten erosion due to ions could be attributed to transient limiter phases, especially during plasma ramp-down. (author)

  15. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  16. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices

  17. An update to the toxicological profile for water-soluble and sparingly soluble tungsten substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Ranulfo; Venezia, Carmen F

    2015-05-01

    Tungsten is a relatively rare metal with numerous applications, most notably in machine tools, catalysts, and superalloys. In 2003, tungsten was nominated for study under the National Toxicology Program, and in 2011, it was nominated for human health assessment under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System. In 2005, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) issued a toxicological profile for tungsten, identifying several data gaps in the hazard assessment of tungsten. By filling the data gaps identified by the ATSDR, this review serves as an update to the toxicological profile for tungsten and tungsten substances. A PubMed literature search was conducted to identify reports published during the period 2004-2014, in order to gather relevant information related to tungsten toxicity. Additional information was also obtained directly from unpublished studies from within the tungsten industry. A systematic approach to evaluate the quality of data was conducted according to published criteria. This comprehensive review has gathered new toxicokinetic information and summarizes the details of acute and repeated-exposure studies that include reproductive, developmental, neurotoxicological, and immunotoxicological endpoints. Such new evidence involves several relevant studies that must be considered when regulators estimate and propose a tungsten reference or concentration dose.

  18. Tungsten ion implantation into copper by use of metal arc-plasma electro-magnetically accelerated to several km s-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, A.; Aso, Y.; Hosoya, H.; Kiritani, M.

    2003-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun was designed for the injection of W into Cu, by employment of the high speed of W ions attained by electro-magnetic acceleration. Under acceleration at 5 kV, W atoms could be injected into a Cu substrate at depths up to about 30 μm, whereas under acceleration at 4 kV no injection was observed. The injected W was observed to have nonuniform spatial distribution provably forming clusters or small groups of particles. Under acceleration at 5 kV, the first plasma to arrive at the substrate has a velocity of 10 km s -1 , which is much higher than that of initial plasma under acceleration at 4 kV. Immediately after the initial plasma, the relationship between the velocities of the respective plasmas reverses, so that average velocity at 5 kV is lower than that at 4 kV. Maximum plasma velocity plays a major role in the injection of W; i.e. the depth of W injection may depend on the velocity of initially generated plasma. The subsequent plasma forms a W layer on the surface of the substrate

  19. Dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The molar conductance values measured in DMF indicate the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes (table 2). Ion-exchange studies show that the complexes are neutral. .... molydbenum and tungsten complexes respectively. The second step consists of the decomposition of the organic moiety and the formation of MO3.

  20. Deuterium removal from radiation damage in tungsten by isotopic exchange with hydrogen atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    The tungsten samples were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create radiation-induced defects and then exposed to the deuterium atomic beam. The deuterium removal was studied by isotopic exchange with atomic hydrogen beam. Modification of the deuterium depth profile in self-ion irradiated tungsten under isotopic exchange up to a depth of 6 μm was measured in- situ by nuclear reaction analysis. The total deuterium retention after isotopic exchange was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that the efficiency of the deuterium removal increases with increasing of the hydrogen incident flux, incident energy and temperature of the tungsten sample.

  1. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  2. Performance of the linear ion trap Orbitrap mass analyzer for qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, L.; Emke, E.; Hernández, F.; de Voogt, P.

    2013-01-01

    This work illustrates the potential of liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier Transform Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water. The developed methodology consisted of

  3. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  4. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  5. Arsenic(3) extraction from fluoride-iodide solutions. Extraction-photometric determination of arsenic in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, V.A.; Spivakov, B.Ya.; Sharova, N.A.; Malyutina, T.M.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1977-01-01

    For developing a rapid and sensitive method of determining arsenic in tungsten, extraction of arsenic and tungsten from fluoride-chloride-iodide and fluoride-iodide solutions with the aid of carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, benzene, toluene and amyl acetate has been studied. It is established that optimum extractant for separating arsenic from tungsten and fluoride ions is CCl 4 . Since in the presence of HCl considerable quantity of HF and tungsten passes into the organic phase, introducing of HCl had to be renounced. Extraction of arsenic with carbon tetrachloride increases with the growth of KI concentration and with an increase of HF concentration in the aqueous phase. A procedure is given for extraction-photometric determination of arsenic in tungsten, based on extraction of arsenic with carbon tetrachloride and subsequent determination of arsenic in the form of reduced molybdoarsenic heteropolyacid. Arsenic detection limit is 1-10 -5 %. Relative standard deviation is 0.1 to 0.2

  6. Preparation method of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of tungsten carbide in powder form from tungsten oxide powder in which the tungsten oxide is heated to 800-1,050 0 C, preferably to 850 0 C, and is reduced by the addition of carbon monoxide. The partial pressure of the CO 2 then formed must be kept below a necessary equilibrium value for the formation of the carbide. The waste gas (with max. 20 Vol% CO 2 ) is hardly reduced and is recycled in the circuit. (UWI) [de

  7. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    length of the sample. Density measurements were also taken before and after testing using Archimedes principle . Samples were also tested at room...commonly seen in body centered cubic (BCC) metals and can be attributed to dislocation mobility theories (8). The basic principles are that the...processing of nano-tungsten and nano-tungsten alloys to achieve superior strength, ductility, and fracture toughness for room temperature applications

  8. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  9. R and D on tungsten plasma facing components for the JET ITER-like wall project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piazza, G. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giovanni.piazza@jet.efda.org; Matthews, G.F. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pamela, J. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Altmann, H. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coad, J.P. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hirai, T. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Lioure, A. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maier, H. [Association EURATOM-IPP Garching, P.O. Box 1322, D-85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Mertens, Ph. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Philipps, V. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Riccardo, V. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-VR, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Villedieu, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, Cadarache, DSM/DRFC, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-08-01

    Currently, the primary ITER materials choice is a full beryllium main wall with carbon fibre composite at the divertor strike points and tungsten on the upper vertical targets and dome. The full tungsten divertor option is a possibility for the subsequent D-T phase. Neither of the ITER material combinations of first wall and divertor materials has ever been tested in a tokamak. To collect operational experience at JET with ITER relevant material combination (Be, C and W) would reduce uncertainties and focus the preparation for ITER operations. Therefore, the ITER-like wall project has been launched to install in JET a tungsten divertor and a beryllium main wall. This paper describes the R and D activities carried out for the project to develop an inertially cooled bulk tungsten divertor tile, to fully characterise tungsten coating technologies for CFC divertor tiles and to develop erosion markers for use as diagnostics on beryllium tiles.

  10. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  11. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  12. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  13. Ion and electron swarm studies of relevance to plasma processing: positive ion-molecule and electron-molecule studies of SF6 and derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atterbury, C.; Kennedy, R.A.; Critchley, A.D.J.; Mayhew, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Many sequential and parallel chemical reactions involving charged species occur in a plasma. Data needed to model plasma's chemical and physical environment includes cross-section, rate coefficients, and product ion distribution of electron-molecule and ion-molecule processes. Such reactions are studied by our group away from the complexity of the plasma environment, with experimental techniques that allow us to concentrate on a single process, where usually only one or two species are involved. A molecule commonly used in plasma etching applications is SF 6 1,2 . We have performed a series of positive ion-molecule and electron attachment studies on SF 6 and related molecules, including SeF 6 , TeF 6 (i.e. XF 6 molecules), SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl (i.e. SF 5 X molecules) 3- (. The studies of ion reactions with and electron attachment to SF 6 and physically similar molecules are of value when seeking to understand the ion and electron chemistry occurring in SF 6 containing plasma. The result of these studies are presented in this poster. Ion-molecule reactions. Rate coefficients and ion product branching ratios have been determined with the Selected Ion Flow Tube (SIFT) at room temperature (300 K) for reactions of SF 5 X with the following twenty-two cations; Ne + , F + , Ar + , N 2 + , N + , CO + , CO 2 + , O + , N 2 O + , O 2 + , SF 4 + , CF 2 + , SF + , SF 2 + , NO 2 + , SF 5 + , NO + , CF + , CF 3 + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + (listed in order of decreasing recombination energy). SF 2 + , NO 2 + , NO + , SF 3 + , and H 3 O + are found to be unreacted with both SF 5 CF 3 and SF 5 Cl. The majority of the other reactions proceed with rate coefficients that are close to the capture value. Those found to occur at rates significantly less than the capture mechanism value re the reactions of O 2 + , SF + , SF 5 + , and CF 3 + with SF 5 CF 3 , and SF 4 + and SF 5 + with SF 5 Cl. Several distinction processes are observed among the large number of reactions studied, including

  14. Comprehensive track-structure based evaluation of DNA damage by light ions from radiotherapy-relevant energies down to stopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, W.; Schmitt, E.; Kundrát, P.; Dingfelder, M.; Baiocco, G.; Barbieri, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Track structures and resulting DNA damage in human cells have been simulated for hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and neon ions with 0.25–256 MeV/u energy. The needed ion interaction cross sections have been scaled from those of hydrogen; Barkas scaling formula has been refined, extending its applicability down to about 10 keV/u, and validated against established stopping power data. Linear energy transfer (LET) has been scored from energy deposits in a cell nucleus; for very low-energy ions, it has been defined locally within thin slabs. The simulations show that protons and helium ions induce more DNA damage than heavier ions do at the same LET. With increasing LET, less DNA strand breaks are formed per unit dose, but due to their clustering the yields of double-strand breaks (DSB) increase, up to saturation around 300 keV/μm. Also individual DSB tend to cluster; DSB clusters peak around 500 keV/μm, while DSB multiplicities per cluster steadily increase with LET. Remarkably similar to patterns known from cell survival studies, LET-dependencies with pronounced maxima around 100–200 keV/μm occur on nanometre scale for sites that contain one or more DSB, and on micrometre scale for megabasepair-sized DNA fragments. PMID:28345622

  15. Nitrogen implantation in tungsten and migration in the fusion experiment ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisl, Gerd Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    The implantation of nitrogen ions into tungsten was studied in laboratory experiments to understand the interaction of nitrogen containing fusion plasmas with tungsten walls. The resulting model of W-N interaction was tested by experiments in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Using the measurements from these experiments as boundary condition, nitrogen transport and re-distribution in the plasma were modeled by self-consistent WallDYN-DIVIMP simulations.

  16. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  17. Physical and Mechanical Properties of W-Ni-Fe-Co Metal Foam Modified by Titanium Tungsten Carbide Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, A. N.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Afanas'eva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Biryukov, Yu. A.; Burkin, V. V.; D'yachkovskii, A. S.; Rogaev, K. S.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Yugov, N. T.

    2018-02-01

    The paper studies physical and mechanical properties of tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt metal foam alloyed with titanium tungsten carbide. Test specimens are obtained by the liquid phase sintering of powder materials, including those containing tungsten nanopowders. High porosity metal foams are prepared through varying the porosity of powder specimens and the content of filling material. The penetration capability of cylinder projectiles made of new alloys is explored in this paper. It is shown that their penetration depth exceeds that of the prototype with relevant weight and size, made of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy, other factors being equal.

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  19. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  20. Extreme Ultraviolet Spectra of Few-Times Ionized Tungsten for Divertor Plasma Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Clementson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The extreme ultraviolet (EUV emission from few-times ionized tungsten atoms has been experimentally studied at the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility. The ions were produced and confined during low-energy operations of the EBIT-I electron beam ion trap. By varying the electron-beam energy from around 30–300 eV, tungsten ions in charge states expected to be abundant in tokamak divertor plasmas were excited, and the resulting EUV emission was studied using a survey spectrometer covering 120–320 Å. It is found that the emission strongly depends on the excitation energy; below 150 eV, it is relatively simple, consisting of strong isolated lines from a few charge states, whereas at higher energies, it becomes very complex. For divertor plasmas with tungsten impurity ions, this emission should prove useful for diagnostics of tungsten flux rates and charge balance, as well as for radiative cooling of the divertor volume. Several lines in the 194–223 Å interval belonging to the spectra of five- and seven-times ionized tungsten (Tm-like W VI and Ho-like W VIII were also measured using a high-resolution spectrometer.

  1. Effect of Co-Existing Biologically Relevant Molecules and Ions on DNA Photocleavage Caused by Pyrene and its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic ions, coenzymes, amino acids, and saccharides could co-exist with toxic environmental chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, in the cell. The presence of these co-existing chemicals can modulate the toxicity of the PAHs. One of the genotoxic effects by PAHs is light-induced cleavage, or photocleavage, of DNA. The effect of inorganic ions I-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ and biological molecules riboflavin, histidine, mannitol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, glutathione, and glutamic acid on the DNA photocleavage by pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP, and 1-aminopyrene (1-AP, is studied. The non-transition metal ions Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, usually have very little inhibitory effects, while the transition metal ions Fe3+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ enhance, Mn2+ inhibits the DNA photocleavage. The effect by biological molecules is complex, depending on the photochemical reaction mechanisms of the compounds tested (1-AP, 1-HP and pyrene and on the chemical nature of the added biological molecules. Riboflavin, histidine, and mannitol enhance DNA photocleavage by all three compounds, except that mannitol has no effect on the photocleavage of DNA by pyrene. Glutathione inhibits the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP and 1-HP, but has no effect on that by pyrene. NAD enhances the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP, but has no effect on that by 1-HP and pyrene. Glutamic acid enhances the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP and pyrene, but inhibits that by 1-HP. These results show that the co-existing chemicals may have a profound effect on the toxicity of PAHs, or possibly on the toxicity of many other chemicals. Therefore, if one studies the toxic effects of PAHs or other toxic chemicals, the effect of the co-existing chemicals or ions needs to be considered.

  2. Survey of ion-acoustic-instability particle simulations and relevance to laser-fusion thermal-transport inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Ion acoustic turbulence is examined as one mechanism which could contribute to the inhibition of electron thermal transport which has been inferred from many laser-plasma experiments. The behavior of the ion acoustic instability is discussed from the viewpoint of the literature of 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Simulation techniques, limitations, and reported saturation mechanisms and levels are discussed. A scaling law for the effective collision frequency ν* can be fit to several workers' results to within an order-of-magnitude. The inferred ν* is shown to be 1-2 orders-of-magnitude too small to account for the transport inhibition seen in Nd-laser-produced plasmas. Several differences between the simulation conditions and laser-produced plasma conditions are noted

  3. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng

    2016-04-01

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC-Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H2O2 served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC-Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F-) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO3·0.33H2O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m2 g-1 via N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb2+) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.

  4. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... shipped in an overpack that meets the provisions of § 173.40. (b) In place of the volumetric expansion... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9, 2009...

  5. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, T.J., E-mail: tjpetty@liv.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Khan, A. [Pariser Building-G11, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Heil, T. [NiCaL, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL (United Kingdom); Bradley, J.W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10{sup 23}–3.0 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ{sup 1/2} relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  6. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, T.J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10 23 –3.0 × 10 24  m −2 , the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10 24  m −2 , and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ 1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  7. Precipitation formation in recrystallized nickel-plated non-sag tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that some metals, such as palladium and nickel, can easily penetrate into tungsten by fast diffusion via crystal defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. As a result of the fast penetration of these so called activators the recrystallization temperature of heavily drawn non-sag tungsten wire can be lower from about 2,000 C to about 1,000 C, thus the application of the tungsten wire, serving as reinforcement material in metal matrix composites used at high temperatures, is limited. An interesting question is in which form these activators exist in the recrystallized tungsten wire. It is generally believed that W-Ni intermediate compounds could form in the recrystallized material, presumably at grain boundaries. The free energy difference between the pure tungsten fibbers and the precipitating W(Ni) solid solution was suggested as the chemical driving force which governed the recrystallization process. The presence of nickel in small particles had also been observed in recrystallized grains of nickel plated tungsten wires using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These particles were considered to be nickel rich precipitates. However, a detailed investigation of the precipitation process has not been reported. In the present work an investigation of the structure, composition and distribution of nickel rich particles precipitated in recrystallized grains of nickel plated heavily drawn non-sage tungsten wires was carried out using analytical electron microscopy (AEM)

  8. Anodic oxide films on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, A.; Di Quarto, F.; Sunseri, C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphology of anodic oxide films on tungsten, obtained in various conditions of anodization. Studies were made of the growth of porous films, whose thickness increases with time and depends upon the current density. Temperature and electrolyte composition influence the film morphology. Gravimetric measurements of film dissolution at 70 0 C show that after a transient time, the rate of metal dissolution and that of film formation coincide. The porous films thicken because tungsten dissolves as WO 2 2+ and precipitates as WO 3 .H 2 O. (author)

  9. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  10. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Ali, Manjoor; Ningthoujam, Raghumani S.; Gaikwad, Pallavi; Kumar, Mukesh; Nath, Bimalendu B.; Pandey, Badri N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  11. The interaction of actinide and lanthanide ions with hemoglobin and its relevance to human and environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit, E-mail: amitk@barc.gov.in [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ali, Manjoor [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ningthoujam, Raghumani S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Gaikwad, Pallavi [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Solid State, Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Nath, Bimalendu B. [Department of Zoology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007, Mumbai (India); Pandey, Badri N. [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The sites of Ln and An interaction in Hb depend upon their charge-to-ionic-radii ratio. • Th(IV), Ce(IV) and U(VI) altered structure and oxygen-binding of Hb. • Spectroscopic studies determined binding characteristics of actinides. • Metal–Hb interaction was tested in an environmentally-important aquatic midge, Chironomus. - Abstract: Due to increasing use of lanthanides/actinides in nuclear and civil applications, understanding the impact of these metal ions on human health and environment is a growing concern. Hemoglobin (Hb), which occurs in all the kingdom of living organism, is the most abundant protein in human blood. In present study, effect of lanthanides and actinides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] on the structure and function of Hb has been investigated. Results showed that these metal ions, except Ce(IV) interacted with carbonyl and amide groups of Hb, which resulted in the loss of its alpha-helix conformation. However, beyond 75 μM, these ions affected heme moiety. Metal–heme interaction was found to affect oxygen-binding of Hb, which seems to be governed by their closeness with the charge-to-ionic-radius ratio of iron(III). Consistently, Ce(IV) being closest to iron(III), exhibited a greater effect on heme. Binding constant and binding stoichiometry of Th(IV) were higher than that of U(VI). Experiments using aquatic midge Chironomus (possessing human homologous Hb) and human blood, further validated metal–Hb interaction and associated toxicity. Thus, present study provides a biochemical basis to understand the actinide/lanthanide-induced interference in heme, which may have significant implications for the medical and environmental management of lanthanides/actinides toxicity.

  12. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  13. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  14. Online Capacity Estimation of Lithium-Ion Batteries Based on Novel Feature Extraction and Adaptive Multi-Kernel Relevance Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Prognostics is necessary to ensure the reliability and safety of lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles or satellites. This process can be achieved by capacity estimation, which is a direct fading indicator for assessing the state of health of a battery. However, the capacity of a lithium-ion battery onboard is difficult to monitor. This paper presents a data-driven approach for online capacity estimation. First, six novel features are extracted from cyclic charge/discharge cycles and used as indirect health indicators. An adaptive multi-kernel relevance machine (MKRVM based on accelerated particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to determine the optimal parameters of MKRVM and characterize the relationship between extracted features and battery capacity. The overall estimation process comprises offline and online stages. A supervised learning step in the offline stage is established for model verification to ensure the generalizability of MKRVM for online application. Cross-validation is further conducted to validate the performance of the proposed model. Experiment and comparison results show the effectiveness, accuracy, efficiency, and robustness of the proposed approach for online capacity estimation of lithium-ion batteries.

  15. Smart tungsten alloys as a material for the first wall of a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Du, H.; Mayer, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Calvo, A.; Ordas, N.

    2017-06-01

    Tungsten is currently deemed as a promising plasma-facing material (PFM) for the future power plant DEMO. In the case of an accident, air can get into contact with PFMs during the air ingress. The temperature of PFMs can rise up to 1200 °C due to nuclear decay heat in the case of damaged coolant supply. Heated neutron-activated tungsten forms a volatile radioactive oxide which can be mobilized into the atmosphere. New self-passivating ‘smart’ alloys can adjust their properties to the environment. During plasma operation the preferential sputtering of lighter alloying elements will leave an almost pure tungsten surface facing the plasma. During an accident the alloying elements in the bulk are forming oxides thus protecting tungsten from mobilization. Good plasma performance and the suppression of oxidation are required for smart alloys. Bulk tungsten (W)-chroimum (Cr)-titanium (Ti) alloys were exposed together with pure tungsten (W) samples to the steady-state deuterium plasma under identical conditions in the linear plasma device PSI 2. The temperature of the samples was ~576 °C-715 °C, the energy of impinging ions was 210 eV matching well the conditions expected at the first wall of DEMO. Weight loss measurements demonstrated similar mass decrease of smart alloys and pure tungsten samples. The oxidation of exposed samples has proven no effect of plasma exposure on the oxidation resistance. The W-Cr-Ti alloy demonstrated advantageous 3-fold lower mass gain due to oxidation than that of pure tungsten. New yttrium (Y)-containing thin film systems are demonstrating superior performance in comparison to that of W-Cr-Ti systems and of pure W. The oxidation rate constant of W-Cr-Y thin film is 105 times less than that of pure tungsten. However, the detected reactivity of the bulk smart alloy in humid atmosphere is calling for a further improvement.

  16. Performance of the linear ion trap Orbitrap mass analyzer for qualitative and quantitative analysis of drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Lubertus; Emke, Erik; Hernández, Félix; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-03-20

    This work illustrates the potential of liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier Transform Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of abuse and relevant metabolites in sewage water. The developed methodology consisted of automatic solid-phase extraction using Oasis HLB cartridges, chromatographic separation of the targeted drugs, full-scan accurate mass data acquisition under positive electrospray ionization mode over an m/z range of 50-600Da at a resolution of 30,000 FWHM and simultaneous MS(n) measurements to obtain information of fragment ions generated in the linear ion trap. Accurate mass of the protonated molecule, together with at least one nominal mass product ion and retention time allowed the confident identification of the compounds detected in these complex matrices. In addition to the highly reliable qualitative analysis, Orbitrap analyzer also proved to have satisfactory potential for quantification at sub-ppb analyte levels, a possibility that has been very little explored in the literature until now. The limits of quantification ranged from 4 to 68ngL(-1) in influent sewage water, and from 2 to 35ngL(-1) in effluent, with the exception of MDA, morphine and THC that presented higher values as a consequence of the high ionization suppression in this type of samples. Satisfactory recoveries (70-120%) and precision (abuse could be identified and quantified, mainly MDMA, benzoylecgonine, codeine, oxazepam and temazepam. Orbitrap also showed potential for retrospective investigation of ketamine metabolites in the samples without the need of additional analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Feichtmayer, A.; Fuhr, M.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2017-12-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of Wf/W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μm as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μm have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour.

  18. ions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (MP2 B2). In order to draw the final conclusion about the content of the isomers of pentaatomic ions in saturated vapor over cesium chloride, we have taken into account the entropy factor. We considered the isomerization reactions which are given below: Cs3Cl2. + (V-shaped) = Cs3Cl2. + (cyclic or bipyramidal). (1). Cs2Cl3.

  19. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  20. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  1. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  2. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.

  3. Unusual Application Of Ion Beam Analysis For The Study Of Surface Layers On Materials Relevant To Cultural Heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, F.; Salomon, J.; Aucouturier, M.; Trocellier, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recently a new thematic of research -- intentional patinas on antic copper-base objects -- lead the AGLAE (Accelerateur Grand Louvre pour l'Analyse Elementaire) team of the C2RMF (Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France) to improve its methods of analyzing thin surface layers both in their elemental composition and in-depth elemental distribution. A new beam extraction set-up containing a particle detector has been developed in order to use a 6 MeV alpha beam both in PIXE and RBS mode and to monitor precisely the ion dose received by the sample. Both RBS and ionization cross sections were assessed in order to make sure that the analysis can be quantitative. This set up allows great progresses in the understanding of both nature and structure of this very particular oxide layer obtained in the antiquity by chemical treatment on copper alloys, containing gold and/or silver and presenting very interesting properties of color and stability.Besides the non destructive properties of the IBA in external beam mode, this method of analyzing allows the study of samples in interaction with its environment. This was used to study the high temperature oxidation of Cu-Sn alloys using a furnace developed in order to heat a sample and analyze it in RBS mode at the same time. This new way of studying the growth of oxide layers permits to understand the oxidation mechanism of this system and to propose an experimental model for the identification of oxide layers due to an exposition to a high temperature, model needed for a long time by curators in charge of the study and the conservation of archaeological bronzes

  4. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng [Beijing University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-04-15

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC–Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC–Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F{sup −}) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} via N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.Graphical AbstractA new hydrothermal system was designed to recycle waste hardmetal with low cobalt content. Through this method, waste hardmetal was refined into WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O nanosheets which shows excellent adsorption capacities toward methylene blue and lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}).

  5. Tungsten carbide cobalt nanoparticles exert hypoxia-like effects on the gene expression level in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Schirmer, Kristin; Scholz, Stefan

    2010-01-27

    Tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles are of occupational health relevance because of the increasing usage in hard metal industries. Earlier studies showed an enhanced toxic potential for WC-Co compared to WC or cobalt ions alone. Therefore, we investigated the impact of these particles, compared to cobalt ions applied as CoCl(2), on the global gene expression level in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. WC nanoparticles exerted very little effects on the transcriptomic level after 3 hours and 3 days of exposure. In contrast, WC-Co nanoparticles caused significant transcriptional changes that were similar to those provoked by CoCl(2). However, CoCl(2) exerted even more pronounced changes in the transcription patterns. Gene set enrichment analyses revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to hypoxia response, carbohydrate metabolism, endocrine pathways, and targets of several transcription factors. The role of the transcription factor HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor 1) is particularly highlighted and aspects of downstream events as well as the role of other transcription factors related to cobalt toxicity are considered. This study provides extensive data useful for the understanding of nanoparticle and cobalt toxicity. It shows that WC nanoparticles caused low transcriptional responses while WC-Co nanoparticles are able to exert responses similar to that of free cobalt ions, particularly the induction of hypoxia-like effects via interactions with HIF1alpha in human keratinocytes. However, the enhanced toxicity of WC-Co particles compared to CoCl(2) could not be explained by differences in gene transcription.

  6. Tungsten carbide cobalt nanoparticles exert hypoxia-like effects on the gene expression level in human keratinocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticles are of occupational health relevance because of the increasing usage in hard metal industries. Earlier studies showed an enhanced toxic potential for WC-Co compared to WC or cobalt ions alone. Therefore, we investigated the impact of these particles, compared to cobalt ions applied as CoCl2, on the global gene expression level in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) in vitro. Results WC nanoparticles exerted very little effects on the transcriptomic level after 3 hours and 3 days of exposure. In contrast, WC-Co nanoparticles caused significant transcriptional changes that were similar to those provoked by CoCl2. However, CoCl2 exerted even more pronounced changes in the transcription patterns. Gene set enrichment analyses revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to hypoxia response, carbohydrate metabolism, endocrine pathways, and targets of several transcription factors. The role of the transcription factor HIF1 (hypoxia inducible factor 1) is particularly highlighted and aspects of downstream events as well as the role of other transcription factors related to cobalt toxicity are considered. Conclusions This study provides extensive data useful for the understanding of nanoparticle and cobalt toxicity. It shows that WC nanoparticles caused low transcriptional responses while WC-Co nanoparticles are able to exert responses similar to that of free cobalt ions, particularly the induction of hypoxia-like effects via interactions with HIF1α in human keratinocytes. However, the enhanced toxicity of WC-Co particles compared to CoCl2 could not be explained by differences in gene transcription. PMID:20105288

  7. Tungsten monocrystal cutting without distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudkin, A.Yu.; Matveev, I.V.; Cheremisin, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrolyte with high electric current localization, containing 1-3 % KOH and 2-10 % NH 3 , is suggested to use for electrochemical cutting of tungsten. A cutting device is described which includes a cathode feed mechanism based on electric heating and a circuit of automatic control of an interelectrode gap. Laue patterns obtained from a cut surface are practically the same as ones from the initial monocrystal

  8. Adsorption and condensation of bismuth on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, T.; Sidorski, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The bismuth-tungsten system was studied by means of field emission microscopy. The average work function changes induced by the bismuth adsorption were measured for different amounts of adsorbed bismuth. It was found that the adsorption of bismuth changes the work function of tungsten only slightly. The penetration of bismuth into the tungsten substrate was observed. The growth of bismuth single crystals was studied when bismuth was deposited with a rate of about 6 monolayers per minute onto the tungsten substrate and kept at 470 K. Bismuth single crystals with two-fold symmetry occurred most often on the (100) tungsten planes. On the (111) tungsten plane bismuth crystals with three-fold symmetry were observed. An explanation of the observed phenomena is proposed. (Auth.)

  9. Retrospective screening of relevant pesticide metabolites in food using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry and accurate-mass databases of parent molecules and diagnostic fragment ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, László; García-Reyes, Juan F; Fodor, Péter; Gyepes, Attila; Dernovics, Mihály; Abrankó, László; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2012-08-03

    In recent years, the detection and characterization of relevant pesticide metabolites in food is an important task in order to evaluate their formation, kinetics, stability, and toxicity. In this article, a methodology for the systematic screening of pesticides and their main metabolites in fruit and vegetable samples is described, using LC-HRMS and accurate-mass database search of parent compounds and their diagnostic fragment ions. The approach is based on (i) search for parent pesticide molecules; (ii) search for their metabolites in the positive samples, assuming common fragmentation pathways between the metabolites and parent pesticide molecules; and (iii) search for pesticide conjugates using the data from both parent species and diagnostic fragment ions. An accurate-mass database was constructed consisting of 1396 compounds (850 parent compounds, 447 fragment ions and 99 metabolites). The screening process was performed by the software in an automated fashion. The proposed methodology was evaluated with 29 incurred samples and the output obtained was compared to standard pesticide testing methods (targeted LC-MS/MS). Examples on the application of the proposed approach are shown, including the detection of several pesticide glycosides derivatives, which were found with significantly relevant intensities. Glucose-conjugated forms of parent compounds (e.g., fenhexamid-O-glucoside) and those of metabolites (e.g., despropyl-iprodione-N-glycoside) were detected. Facing the lack of standards for glycosylated pesticides, the study was completed with the synthesis of fenhexamid-O-glucoside for quantification purposes. In some cases the pesticide derivatives were found in a relatively high ratio, drawing the attention to these kinds of metabolites and showing that they should not be neglected in multi-residue methods. The global coverage obtained on the 29 analyzed samples showed the usefulness and benefits of the proposed approach and highlights the practical

  10. Numerical analysis of tungsten transport in drift-optimized stellarator with ergodic and nonergodic plasma configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyshkin, Oleg A.; Schneider, Ralf; Beidler, Craig D.

    2007-11-01

    The radial transport of tungsten ions in a fusion plasma of the HELIAS stellarator with five magnetic field periods is studied by means of a new numerical code. The code solves guiding center equations for test particles (tungsten ions) with the use of a Runge-Kutta integrating scheme. Coulomb scattering of the tungsten ions on the background plasma particles (electrons, deuterons and tritons) is simulated by means of a discretized collision operator based on the binomial distribution and presented in terms of pitch-angle scattering and energy slowing down and scattering. The coronal model is used to determine the mean charge state of the tungsten ion ensemble langZ(Te, ne)rang as a function of background electron temperature and density. Two plasma configurations with and without ergodic confinement regions and both with finite plasma pressure of β = 3% are considered. The nonergodic configuration possesses closed nested magnetic surfaces throughout the entire confinement volume. The ergodic magnetic field configuration is represented through additional magnetic field perturbations. Comparative analysis of the radial transport is performed for a time interval greater by a factor of 15 than the energy confinement time τE = 1.62 s required for the HELIAS reactor. In spite of the fact that the tendency of impurities to penetrate towards the plasma core is observed in both cases, the stochastic scenario exhibits reduced inward impurity flux.

  11. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A; Donaldson, N

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its 'inertness' and 'stability' common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W 6+ , typically represented by the orthotungstate [Formula: see text] (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal's unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  12. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Bombaci, S.A.; Garrard, W.N.C.; Moore, B.T.; Smith, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of tungsten and high-density tungsten alloys (W ≥ 90 weight %) has been examined electrochemically through anodic polarization measurements, instantaneous corrosion rate measurements, galvanic coupling, and surface potential mapping. In the anodic polarization tests, pure tungsten and the four alloys studied underwent transitions from an active state to a state where any further increase in potential produced no further increase in current. The presence of chloride ions increased corrosion rates. Predictions of likely trends in corrosion rates from the above electrochemical tests were not in complete agreement with those obtained by the long-term immersion tests. Similarly, a consistent prediction of the likely nature of the corrosion products that would result from long-term immersion testing was not obtained from the above studies. Predictions about which alloys would be susceptible to a crevice effect were in agreement with the immersion testing results, namely those alloys not containing Cu would be the most susceptible. Some insight into the nature of the corrosion mechanism is afforded by the work on galvanic coupling and surface potential mapping. This supported the view that galvanic corrosion plays a part in the corrosion process. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 19 figs

  13. Deuterium retention in tungsten films after different heat treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Jacob, W.; Elgeti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten films deposited by magnetron sputtering on polycrystalline tungsten substrates were used as a model system to study the influence of the film microstructure on deuterium retention behavior. Different microstructures were produced by annealing the films up to recrystallization temperature and the corresponding structural changes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning. The influence of the induced structural changes on D retention was investigated by both nuclear reaction analysis and temperature-programmed desorption. D concentration in the investigated W films is higher than in polycrystalline bulk tungsten by a factor of 3. D retention in the films decreases as a function of annealing temperature. After annealing at 2000 K, FIB cross-section images reveal that cavities appeared at the grain boundaries within the film and at the initial interface between the W film and W substrate. This new microstructure strongly affects the D depth profile and leads to the increase of D retention. Although a further increase of the holding time at 2000 K or an increase of the annealing temperature to 2150 K lead to the reduction of the retained D amount, the D concentration in the recrystallized W films cannot be reduced to a level as low as that of bulk W recrystallized at 2000 K for 30 min.

  14. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A.; Donaldson, N.

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its ‘inertness’ and ‘stability’ common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W6+, typically represented by the orthotungstate WO42- (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal’s unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  15. OEDGE modeling for the planned tungsten ring experiment on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D. Elder

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The OEDGE code is used to model tungsten erosion and transport for experiments with toroidal rings of high-Z metal tiles in the DIII-D tokamak. Such modeling is needed for both experimental and diagnostic design to have estimates of the expected core and edge tungsten density and to understand the various factors contributing to the uncertainties in these calculations. OEDGE simulations are performed using the planned experimental magnetic geometries and plasma conditions typical of both L-mode and inter-ELM H-mode discharges in DIII-D. OEDGE plasma reconstruction based on specific representative discharges for similar geometries is used to determine the plasma conditions applied to tungsten plasma impurity simulations. A new model for tungsten erosion in OEDGE was developed which imports charge-state resolved carbon impurity fluxes and impact energies from a separate OEDGE run which models the carbon production, transport and deposition for the same plasma conditions as the tungsten simulations. These values are then used to calculate the gross tungsten physical sputtering due to carbon plasma impurities which is then added to any sputtering by deuterium ions; tungsten self-sputtering is also included. The code results are found to be dependent on the following factors: divertor geometry and closure, the choice of cross-field anomalous transport coefficients, divertor plasma conditions (affecting both tungsten source strength and transport, the choice of tungsten atomic physics data used in the model (in particular ionization rate for W-atoms, and the model of the carbon flux and energy used for calculating the tungsten source due to sputtering. Core tungsten density is found to be of order 1015m−3 (excluding effects of any core transport barrier and with significant variability depending on the other factors mentioned with density decaying into the scrape off layer. For the typical core density in the plasma conditions examined of 2 to 4

  16. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan; Xu, Yu-Ping; Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Oya, Yasuhisa; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Min; Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  17. Imaging of radiation damage using complementary field ion microscopy and atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagan, Michal; Hanna, Luke R.; Xu, Alan; Roberts, Steve G.; Smith, George D.W.; Gault, Baptiste; Edmondson, Philip D.; Bagot, Paul A.J.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage in tungsten and a tungsten–tantalum alloy, both of relevance to nuclear fusion research, has been characterized using a combination of field ion microscopy (FIM) imaging and atom probe tomography (APT). While APT provides 3D analytical imaging with sub-nanometer resolution, FIM is capable of imaging the arrangements of single atoms on a crystal lattice and has the potential to provide insights into radiation induced crystal damage, all the way down to its smallest manifestation – a single vacancy. This paper demonstrates the strength of combining these characterization techniques. In ion implanted tungsten, it was found that atomic scale lattice damage is best imaged using FIM. In certain cases, APT reveals an identifiable imprint in the data via the segregation of solute and impurities and trajectory aberrations. In a W–5 at%Ta alloy, a combined APT–FIM study was able to determine the atomic distribution of tantalum inside the tungsten matrix. An indirect method was implemented to identify tantalum atoms inside the tungsten matrix in FIM images. By tracing irregularities in the evaporation sequence of atoms imaged with FIM, this method enables the benefit of FIM's atomic resolution in chemical distinction between the two species. - Highlights: • Complementary FIM and APT was used to study nanoscale radiation damage in tungsten. • Trajectory aberrations in APT revealed extended lattice damage which FIM confirmed. • Nano scale features were detected indirectly with APT via segregation of impurities. • Induced damage at the scale of a single vacancy could only be detected via FIM. • 3DFIM characterized W–5Ta atomic distribution with improved detection efficiency.

  18. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  19. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten substrates from atomic fluxes of boron and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovskiy, Y.; Begrambekov, L.; Ayrapetov, A.; Gretskaya, I.; Grunin, A.; Dyachenko, M.; Puntakov, N.

    2016-09-01

    A device used for both coating deposition and material testing is presented in the paper. By using lock chambers, sputtering targets are easily exchanged with sample holder thus allowing testing of deposited samples with high power density electron or ion beams. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on tungsten samples. Methods of increasing coating adhesion are described in the paper. 2 μm boron carbide coatings sustained 450 heating cycles from 100 to 900 C. Ion beam tests have shown satisfactory results.

  20. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Effects on Flora & Fauna • Geochemistry • Soil microbial communities • Plants • Soil invertebrates • Higher order animals • Additional studies BUILDING...Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten

  1. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  2. International strategic mineral issues summary report: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Antony B.T.; Sinclair, W. David; Amey, Earle B.

    1998-01-01

    Scheelite and wolframite are the principal minerals currently mined for tungsten. Both occur in hard-rock deposits; wolframite is also recovered from placer deposits. Most current mine production of tungsten is from vein/stockwork, skarn, porphyry, and strata-bound deposits. Minor amounts are produced from disseminated, pegmatite, breccia, and placer deposits.

  3. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  4. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY .............................. 1 2 MATERIAL SELECTION .................................. 3 3...Metallographic Examination .. 41 - iv - 1. INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY This is the. Final Report on a Phase I SBIR Program entitled "Development of Tungsten Based...m = - -𔃺 S (l- 1- =11 = (t) 011CU ’a . 4) woj .- :2 01w c L .0 u .-. 0C 0 goa - L 0d MCDM . 3 -X - z 1 m- L. S.1 MCDM -z3-2: S - m 1 o. 01 In 0,10Lnw

  5. A problem to be solved for tungsten diagnostics through EUV spectroscopy in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Dong, C.F.; Goto, M.; Kato, D.; Oishi, T.; Huang, X.L.; Wang, E.H.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength ranges of 10-650Å. When the electron temperature is less than 2keV, the EUV spectra from plasma core are dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) composing of a lot of spectral lines, e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W +24-+33 in 15-35Å. In order to understand the UTA spectrum, the EUV spectra measured from LHD plasmas are compared to those measured from Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT), in which the electron beam is operated with monoenergetic energy of E e ≤ 2keV. The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The collisional-radiative (C-R) model has been developed to explain the UTA spectra from LHD in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. If the electron temperature is higher than 2keV, Zn-like WXLV (W 44+ ) and Cu-like WXLVI (W 45+ ) spectra can be observed in LHD. Such ions of W 44+ and W 45+ can exhibit much simpler atomic configuration compared to other ionization stages of tungsten. Quantitative analysis of the tungsten density is attempted for the first time on the radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W 44+ ) 4p-4s transition measured at 60.9Å, based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5x10 10 cm -3 at the plasma center of LHD is reasonably obtained. Finally, the present problem for tungsten diagnostics in fusion plasmas is summarized. (author)

  6. Impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source (IV): Extraction of Si, Ge, Sb by using eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.; Gotoh, Y.; Tsuji, H.; Ishikawa, J.; Takagi, T.

    1985-01-01

    An impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source has been developed in which a sintered porous tungsten tip is used. There has been an increasing interest in liquid metal ion source to obtain focused ion beams. The focused ion beam can perform three useful process steps: direct-write ion implantation to semiconductor, ion sputtering to make thin films and ion exposure to define resist. It is necessary to extract various ions for this purpose. It is possible to extract ions of Ga, Au, and Ag with impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source. For micro-electronic application, ions of Si, Ge and Sb are desirable for doping, but their high melting points or high vapour pressures prohibit their use in elemental form. The purpose of the present investigation is to fabricate eutectic alloys which can be used in impregnated-electrode-type liquid metal ion source. The authors have been successful to obtain ions of Si, Ge and Sb, and revealed relevant basic ion source parameters such as current-voltage characteristics, mass spectra and life time

  7. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  8. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  9. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  10. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  11. Construction of thermionic alkali-ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, F.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique is described by which singly charged alkali ions of K, Na, Li, Rb and Cs are produced by heating ultra-pure chemical salts of different alkali metals on tungsten filaments without employing a temperature measuring device. The character of alkali-ion currents at different heating powers and the remarkably constant ion emission current for prolonged periods are discussed. (author)

  12. In situ observation of structural change of nanostructured tungsten during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yajima, Miyuki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Kajita, Shin; Tokitani, Masayuki; Baba, Tomotsugu; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2014-01-01

    Deformation of fiberform nanostructure and the dynamic behavior of helium (He) bubbles in fuzz tungsten (W) during annealing have been investigated by means of in situ cross-section observation using transmission electron microscopy and He desorption rate observation using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Thermal recovery of the nanostructure, such as shrinkage and coalescence of fine structure, annihilation of He bubbles, and large desorption of He gas, occurred around 1073–1173 K. The activation energy of He was estimated from a TDS peak that appeared around 300–400 K by using the Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose model-free-kinetics method. In addition, the TDS results of fiberform nanostructured tungsten were compared with those of tungsten samples irradiated with a high-energy He ion beam

  13. Toward Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components in KSTAR: Research on Plasma-Metal Wall Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, S. H.; Kim, K. M.; Song, J. H.; Bang, E. N.; Kim, H. T.; Lee, K. S.; Litnovsky, A.; Hellwig, M.; Seo, D. C.; van den Berg, M. A.; Lee, H. H.; Kang, C. S.; Lee, H. Y.; Hong, J. H.; Bak, J. G.; Kim, H. S.; Juhn, J. W.; Son, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Douai, D.; Grisolia, C.; Wu, J.; Luo, G. N.; Choe, W. H.; Komm, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Pitts, R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main missions of KSTAR is to develop long-pulse operation capability relevant to the production of fusion energy. After a full metal wall configuration was decided for ITER, a major upgrade for KSTAR was planned, to a tungsten first wall similar to the JET ITER-like wall (coatings and

  14. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  15. Sputtering effects on mirrors made of different tungsten grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsenya, V. S.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Bardamid, A. F.; Bondarenko, V. N.; Konovalov, V. G.; Lytvyn, P. M.; Marot, L.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Shtan', A. F.; Skoryk, O. O.; Solodovchenko, S. I.

    2018-03-01

    Because tungsten (W) is used in present fusion devices and it is a reference material for ITER divertor and possible plasma-facing material for DEMO, we strive to understand the response of different W grades to ion bombardment. In this study, we investigated the behavior of mirrors made of four polycrystalline W grades under long-term ion sputtering. Argon (Ar) and deuterium (D) ions extracted from a plasma were used to investigate the effect of projectile mass on surface modification. Depending on the ion fluence, the reflectance measured at normal incidence was very different for different W grades. The lowest degradation rate of the reflectance was measured for the mirror made of recrystallized W. The highest degradation rate was found for one of the ITER-grade W samples. Pre-irradiation of a mirror with 20-MeV W6+ ions, as simulation of neutron irradiation in ITER, had no noticeable influence on reflectance degradation under sputtering with either Ar or D ions.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of swift heavy ion irradiated tungsten-bearing delta-phase oxides Y6W1O12 and Yb6W1O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M.; Wynn, T. A.; Patel, M. K.; Won, J.; Monnet, I.; Pivin, J. C.; Mara, N. A.; Sickafus, K. E.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of complex oxides whose structures are derivatives of fluorite, following irradiation with swift heavy ion (92 MeV Xe) which approximately simulates fission product irradiation, where the electronic energy loss dominates. The two compounds of interest in this paper are Y6W1O12 and Yb6W1O12. These compounds possess an ordered, fluorite derivative crystal structure known as the delta (δ) phase, a rhombohedral structure belonging to space group R3¯. Structural changes induced by irradiation were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD investigations indicated an irradiation-induced amorphization in these compounds. This result is consistent with our previous study on Y6W1O12 under displacive radiation environment in which the nuclear energy loss is dominant. High resolution TEM also revealed that individual ion tracks was amorphized. The mechanical properties of both irradiated compounds, were determined by cross-sectional nano-indentation measurements as a function of ion penetration depth. The decreases in Young's modulus, E, and hardness, H (both by about 40% at the irradiated surface) suggest amorphization beyond simple defect accumulation occurs under this irradiation condition.

  17. Study of the mechanisms of heavy-ion induced desorption on accelerator-relevant materials; Untersuchung der Mechanismen schwerioneninduzierter Desorption an beschleunigerrelevanten Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Markus

    2008-02-22

    The ion beam loss induced desorption is a performance limitation for low charge state heavy ion accelerators. If charge exchanged projectile ions get lost onto the beam pipe, desorption of gas is stimulated resulting in a pressure increase inside of the synchrotron and thus, a dramatically reduction of the beam life time. To minimize the amount of desorbed gas an experimental program has been started to measure the desorption yields (released gas molecules per incident ion) of various materials and different projectile ions. The present work is a contribution to the understanding of the physical processes behind the ion beam loss induced desorption. The yield measurements by the pressure rise method have been combined for the rst time with in situ ion beam analysis technologies such as ERDA and RBS. With this unique method the desorption behavior of a sample can be correlated to its surface and bulk properties. The performed experiments with 1,4 MeV/u Xenon-Ions show that the ion induced desorption is mainly a surface effect. Sputtered oxide layers or impurities do not contribute to the desorbed gas significantly. Nevertheless bulk properties play an important role in the desorption strength. Pure metallic samples desorb less gas than isolating materials under swift heavy ion irradiation. From the experimental results it was possible to estimate the desorption yields of various materials under ion bombardment by means of an extended inelastic thermal-spike-model. The extension is the combination of the thermal-spike's temperature map with thermal desorption. Within this model the ion induced desorption can be regarded as the release of adsorbates from a transient overheated spot on the samples surface around the ion impact. Finally a copper substrate with a gold coated surface was developed and proposed as a suitable material for a beam loss collimator with minimum desorption to ensure the performance of GSI's SIS18 in high current beam operation. (orig.)

  18. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  19. Toxic and transcriptional responses of PC12 cells to soluble tungsten alloy surrogates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.H. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that metals have a role in the etiology of diverse neurological diseases. This study used PC12 cells as an in vitro model to examine the toxicity of tungsten alloys that have important military applications. Initially, the relative concentrations of tungsten (W, nickel (Ni, and cobalt (Co mobilized from pellets of a weapons-grade tungsten alloy incubated in physiologically relevant solutions were determined. Dosing solutions of soluble metal salts that were equivalent in ratio to those mobilized from these alloy pellets were used to treat nerve growth factor (NGF differentiated PC12 cells. Treatments consisted of single (W, Ni or Co, paired (W/Ni, W/Co or Ni/Co or complete (W/Ni/Co metal exposures for 24 h followed by measurement of cytotoxicity, viability, and microarray analysis to examine their impact on survival and viability, global gene expression, and biological processes. Gene expression changed dramatically with addition of NGF. Addition of Ni or Co either singly or in combination further impacted gene expression. An observed additive effect of Ni and Co on gene expression was unaffected by the addition of W. The work showed that tungsten, as found in this tungsten alloy, had minimal relative toxicity as compared to the other alloy components when used either alone or in combination.

  20. Production of thulium-167 for medical use by irradiation of lutetium, hafnium, tantalum and tungsten with 590-MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, K.L.; Sodd, V.J.; Blue, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of producing high-purity 167 Tm by spallation for use in nuclear medicine was investigated. Lutetium-oxide powder and hafnium, tantalum and tungsten foils were irradiated with 590-MeV protons. Cross sections for the formation of 167 Tm and contaminating 168 Tm were determined; the best target material was tungsten with cross sections averaging 49 and 0.39 mbarns for 167 Tm and 168 Tm, respectively. The average amount of 168 Tm from the tungsten target was 0.09% of the 167 Tm activity and this equals the lowest contamination achieved with low-energy proton and 4 He-ion-induced reactions. (author)

  1. The enhancement of wear resistance for nitrogen-implanted tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sunmog; Kim, Yong-Gi

    2015-02-01

    The enhancement of the wear resistance for tungsten carbide (WC-Co) is investigated by using an ion implantation technique. A ball-on-disc-type tribometer confirmed that the wear resistance was systematically increased with increasing dose and implantation energy of the nitrogen ions. In accordance with the increase in the wear resistance, the nano-indentation measurements showed that the hardness for the nitrogen-implanted WC-Co with an energy of 120 keV (dose: 1 × 1018 ions/cm2) was increased by about 2.8 times compared to that for as-received WC-Co.

  2. Stopping power for particle therapy: the generic library libdEdx and clinically relevant stopping-power ratios for light ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Toftegaard, Jakob; Kantemiris, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    of the stopping power and to provide data for an extended number of target materials. The STPR for SOBP for different ions are found to be qualitatively the same which may allow for an analytical description valid for all ions. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/09553002.2011.595877...

  3. OEDGE Modeling of Collector Probe measurements in L-mode from the DIII-D tungsten ring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Unterberg, Z.; Donovan, D.; Wampler, W. R.; Watkins, J.; Abrams, T.; McLean, A. G.

    2017-10-01

    During the tungsten ring campaign on DIII-D, a collector probe system with multiple diameter, dual-facing collector rods was inserted into the far scrape off layer (SOL) near the outer midplane to measure the plasma tungsten content. For most probes more tungsten was observed on the side connected along field lines to the inner divertor, with the larger probes showing largest divertor-facing asymmetries The OEDGE code is used to model the tungsten erosion, transport and deposition. It has been enhanced with (i) a peripheral particle transport and deposition model to record the impurity content in the peripheral region outside the regular mesh, and (ii) a collector probe model. The OEDGE results approximately reproduce both the divertor-facing asymmetries and the radial decay of each collector probe profile. The effect of changing impurity transport assumptions and wall location are examined. The measured divertor-facing asymmetries imply a higher tungsten density in the plasma upstream of the probe; this was expected theoretically from the effect of the parallel ion temperature gradient force driving upstream transport of tungsten from the outer divertor and was also found in the code analysis. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-NA0003525, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  5. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  6. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  8. Colour centres in amorphous tungsten trioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.J.; Cikmach, P.D.; Lusis, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, optical, and electrical properties of thin tungsten trioxide (a-WO 3 ) films obtained on substrates with different temperatures and annealed in air and vacuum are investigated. On the basis of these results and recent structural investigations a structure model of the a-WO 3 film is given: a spatial network of tightly bounded clusters which are built from hydrated WO 6 octahedra. These octahedra contain terminal oxygens and being axially distorted they are the sites for localization of injected electrons. The colour centres formed are paramagnetic (ESR signal from W 5+ ) and their optical absorption is satisfactorily described by the intervalence charge transfer between the localized states of W 5+ and W 6+ ions. (author)

  9. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  10. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  11. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  12. Constitutive law for thermally-activated plasticity of recrystallized tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, Aleksandr; Terentyev, Dmitry; Dubinko, Andrii; Delannay, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A physically-based constitutive law relevant for ITER-specification tungsten grade in as-recrystallized state is proposed. The material demonstrates stages III and IV of the plastic deformation, in which hardening rate does not drop to zero with the increase of applied stress. Despite the classical Kocks-Mecking model, valid at stage III, the strain hardening asymptotically decreases resembling a hyperbolic function. The material parameters are fitted by relying on tensile test data and by requiring that the strain and stress at the onset of diffuse necking (uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength correspondingly) as well as the yield stress be reproduced. The model is then validated in the temperature range 300-600 °C with the help of finite element analysis of tensile tests which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental engineering curves up to the onset of diffuse necking, beyond which the development of ductile damage accelerates the material failure. This temperature range represents the low temperature application window for tungsten as divertor material in fusion reactor ITER.

  13. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  14. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  15. Demonstration of multi-generational growth of tungsten nanoparticles in hydrogen plasma using in situ laser extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, K.; Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.

    2018-03-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate that tungsten (W) nanoparticles (NPs) are created when a tungsten target is exposed to low-pressure, high density hydrogen plasma. The plasma was generated using a novel dual plasma system combining a microwave discharge and a pulsed direct-current (DC) discharge. The tungsten surface originates in the multi-generational formation of a significant population of 30-70 nm diameter particles when the W cathode is biased at ~  -1 kV and submitted to ~1020 m2 s-1 H+/H2+ /H3+ ions flux. The evidenced NPs formation should be taking into account as one of the consequence of the plasma surface interaction outcomes, especially for fusion applications.

  16. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-07-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li2TiO3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 × 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li2CO3 are embedded in the Li2TiO3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively.

  17. Experimental studies on tungsten-armour impact on nuclear responses of solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Nakao, Makoto; Verzilov, Yury; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Kubota, Naoyoshi; Kondo, Keitaro; Yamauchi, Michinori; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-01-01

    In order to experimentally evaluate the tungsten armour impact on tritium production of the solid breeding blanket being developed by JAERI for tokamak-type DEMO reactors, neutronics integral experiments have been performed using DT neutrons at the Fusion Neutron Source facility of JAERI. Solid breeding blanket mockups relevant to the DEMO blanket have been applied in this study. The mockups are made of a set of layers consisting of 0-25.2 mm thick tungsten, 16 mm thick F82H, 12 mm thick Li 2 TiO 3 and 100-200 mm thick beryllium with a cross-section of 660 x 660 mm in maximum. Pellets of Li 2 CO 3 are embedded in the Li 2 TiO 3 layers to measure the tritium production rate. By installing the 5 mm, 12.6 mm and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armours, the sum of the integrated tritium productions at the pellets are reduced by about 2.1%, 2.5% and 6.1% relative to the case without the armour, respectively. Numerical calculations have been conducted using the Monte Carlo code. In the case of the mockups with the tungsten armour, calculation results for the sum of the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 4% and 19% in the experiments without and with a neutron reflector, respectively

  18. Dislocation-mediated strain hardening in tungsten: Thermo-mechanical plasticity theory and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Xiao, Xiazi; Dubinko, A.; Bakaeva, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent thermo-mechanical model to study the strain-hardening behavior of polycrystalline tungsten was developed and validated by a dedicated experimental route. Dislocation-dislocation multiplication and storage, as well dislocation-grain boundary (GB) pinning were the major mechanisms underlying the evolution of plastic deformation, thus providing a link between the strain hardening behavior and material's microstructure. The microstructure of the polycrystalline tungsten samples has been thoroughly investigated by scanning and electron microscopy. The model was applied to compute stress-strain loading curves of commercial tungsten grades, in the as-received and as-annealed states, in the temperature range of 500-1000 °C. Fitting the model to the independent experimental results obtained using a single crystal and as-received polycrystalline tungsten, the model demonstrated its capability to predict the deformation behavior of as-annealed samples in a wide temperature range and applied strain. The relevance of the dislocation-mediated plasticity mechanisms used in the model have been validated using transmission electron microscopy examination of the samples deformed up to different amounts of strain. On the basis of the experimental validation, the limitations of the model are determined and discussed.

  19. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon

  20. Copper-Tungsten Composites Sprayed by HVOF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Zahálka, F.; Bensch, Jan; Chi, W.; Sedláček, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2008), s. 177-180 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermally sprayed coatings * tungsten * copper * HVOF Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2008 http://www.springerlink.com/content/120439/

  1. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  2. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  3. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Scott O' Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  4. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  5. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  6. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  7. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  8. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  9. CALICE silicon–tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  10. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  11. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  12. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  13. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu

  14. CO2/CH4 Separation Performance of Ionic-Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Ion Gel Membranes under Mixed Feed Conditions Relevant to Biogas Processing.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friess, K.; Lanč, M.; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Fíla, V.; Vopička, O.; Sedláková, Zuzana; Cowan, M.G.; McDaniel, W.M.; Noble, R.D.; Gin, D.L.; Izák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 528, APRIL (2017), s. 64-71 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA MŠk LH14006; GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : epoxy-amine-based ion gel membranes * biogas processing * humid mixed-gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 6.035, year: 2016

  15. CO2/CH4 Separation Performance of Ionic-Liquid-Based Epoxy-Amine Ion Gel Membranes under Mixed Feed Conditions Relevant to Biogas Processing.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Friess, K.; Lanč, M.; Pilnáček, Kryštof; Fíla, V.; Vopička, O.; Sedláková, Zuzana; Cowan, M.G.; McDaniel, W.M.; Noble, R.D.; Gin, D.L.; Izák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 528, APRIL (2017), s. 64-71 ISSN 0376-7388 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-12695S; GA MŠk LH14006; GA TA ČR TE01020080 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : epoxy-amine-based ion gel membranes * biogas processing * humid mixed- gas permeation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering Impact factor: 6.035, year: 2016

  16. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  17. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  18. Investigation of structural, optical, magnetic and electrical properties of tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn nano-ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathania, Abhilash; Bhardwaj, Sanjay; Thakur, Shyam Singh; Mattei, Jean-Luc; Queffelec, Patrick; Panina, Larissa V.; Thakur, Preeti; Thakur, Atul

    2018-02-01

    Tungsten substituted nickel-zinc ferrite nanoparticles with chemical composition of Ni0.5Zn0.5WxFe2-xO4 (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 & 1.0) were successfully synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared ferrites were pre sintered at 850 °C and then annealed at 1000 °C in a muffle furnace for 3 h each. This sintered powder was inspected by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to study the structural, optical, and magnetic properties. XRD measurement revealed the phase purity of all the nanoferrite samples with cubic spinel structure. The estimated crystallite size by X-ray line broadening is found in the range of 49-62 nm. FTIR spectra of all the samples have observed two prominent absorption bands in the range 400-700 cm-1 arising due to tetrahedral and octahedral stretching vibrations. Vibrating sample magnetometer experiments showed that the saturation magnetizations (MS) decreased with an increase in non-magnetic tungsten ion doping. The electrical resistivity of tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn nano ferrites were examined extensively as a function of temperature. With an increase in tungsten composition, resistivity was found to decrease from 2.2 × 105 Ω cm to 1.9 × 105 Ω cm which indicates the semiconducting behavior of the ferrite samples. The activation energy also decreased from 0.0264 to 0.0221 eV at x = 0.0 to x = 1.0. These low coercive field tungsten doped Nisbnd Zn ferrites are suitable for hyperthermia and sensor applications. These observations are explained in detail on the basis of various models and theories.

  19. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polášek, J., E-mail: xpolasekj@seznam.cz [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Mašek, K. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J. [HVM Plasma Ltd., Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, CZ-158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-30

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O{sup −} ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  20. Suppression of deuterium-induced blistering in pre-damaged tungsten exposed to short-duration deuterium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Long; Shi, Li-Qun; De Temmerman, Gregory; Yuan, Yue; Liu, Hui-Ping; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2018-03-01

    Effects of pre-damage by 500 keV argon ion implantation on deuterium-induced blistering in tungsten has been investigated. After low-energy (40 eV) and high-flux (∼1024 D/m2s) deuterium plasma exposure with short exposure duration (100 s), a large increase of deuterium retention is found in the pre-damaged tungsten, while surface blistering is significantly suppressed as compared to the un-damaged one. According to elastic recoil detection analysis, a local deuterium concentration peak is observed at a depth of ∼100 nm for the un-damaged tungsten, which is supposed to be related to the surface blistering with nanometer size. Comparison of deuterium retention in the near surface (within 300 nm) and in the bulk suggests that deuterium inward diffusion is more significant in the pre-damaged tungsten. It is speculated that the creation of deuterium trap-sites and enhancement of deuterium inward diffusion give rise to an increase of critical deuterium concentration for blistering and contribute to the suppressed deuterium-induced blistering on pre-damaged tungsten under the present exposure conditions.

  1. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.

    1993-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper

  2. L-H power threshold studies with tungsten/carbon divertor on the EAST tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, L.; Xu, G. S.; Gao, W.

    2016-01-01

    carbon divertor. For both sets of divertors, the power threshold was found to decrease with gradual accumulation of the lithium wall coating, suggesting the important role played by the low Z impurities and/or the edge neutral density on the L-H power threshold. When operating in the upper single null......The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency heating and molybdenum first wall with lithium coating has been experimentally investigated on the EAST tokamak for two sets of divertor geometries and materials: tungsten/carbon divertor and full...... configuration, with the ion grad-B drift direction away from the primary X-point, a lower normalized power threshold is observed in EAST with the tungsten/carbon divertor, compared to the carbon divertor after intensive lithium wall coating. A newly installed cryopump increasing the pumping efficiency also...

  3. An equilibrium model for tungsten fuzz in an eroding plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.P.; Baldwin, M.J.; Stangeby, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    A model equating the growth rate of tungsten fuzz on a plasma-exposed surface to the erosion rate of the fuzzy surface is developed to predict the likelihood of tungsten fuzz formation in the steady-state environment of toroidal confinement devices. To date this question has not been answered because the operational conditions in existing magnetic confinement machines do not necessarily replicate those expected in future fusion reactors (i.e. high-fluence operation, high temperature plasma-facing materials and edge plasma relatively free of condensable impurities). The model developed is validated by performing plasma exposure experiments at different incident ion energies (thereby varying the erosion rate) and measuring the resultant fuzz layer thickness. The results indicate that if the conditions exist for fuzz development in a steady-state plasma (surface temperature and energetic helium flux), then the erosion rate will determine the equilibrium thickness of the surface fuzz layer.

  4. Effect of mechanical milling on the microstructure of tungsten under He{sup +} irradiation condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiao-Yue [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Li, Ping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); National–Local Joint Engineering Research Centre of Nonferrous Metals and Processing Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Luo, Lai-Ma, E-mail: luolaima@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); National–Local Joint Engineering Research Centre of Nonferrous Metals and Processing Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Chen, Hong-Yu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Zan, Xiang; Zhu, Xiao-Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); National–Local Joint Engineering Research Centre of Nonferrous Metals and Processing Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Luo, Guang-Nan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); National–Local Joint Engineering Research Centre of Nonferrous Metals and Processing Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2015-11-15

    “Pure” W was prepared through a powder metallurgy route by using hard alloy (WC–Co) milling tank and balls to mill WO{sub 3} powder, reducing with high purity H{sub 2}, and sintering with spark plasma sintering technique. XRD, SEM, and TEM were used to characterize the phase and phase structures. Results showed that the cobalt tungsten carbide (Co{sub 3}W{sub 10}C{sub 3.4}) phase was induced from the milling tank and balls. After the “pure” W bulk was exposed to helium ions for 2 h, the cobalt tungsten carbide phase was found to be surrounded by the lattice distortion phase of W, which showed high irradiation resistance.

  5. Affinity of Smectite and Divalent Metal Ions (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+)) with L-leucine: An Experimental and Theoretical Approach Relevant to Astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pramod; Pant, Chandra Kala; Gururani, Kavita; Arora, Priyanka; Pandey, Neetu; Bhatt, Preeti; Sharma, Yogesh; Negi, Jagmohan Singh; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2015-12-01

    Earth is the only known planet bestowed with life. Several attempts have been made to explore the pathways of the origin of life on planet Earth. The search for the chemistry which gave rise to life has given answers related to the formation of biomonomers, and their adsorption on solid surfaces has gained much attention for the catalysis and stabilization processes related to the abiotic chemical evolution of the complex molecules of life. In this communication, surface interactions of L-leucine (Leu) on smectite (SMT) group of clay (viz. bentonite and montmorillonite) and their divalent metal ion (Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cu(2+)) incorporated on SMT has been studied to find the optimal conditions of time, pH, and concentration at ambient temperature (298 K). The progress of adsorption was followed spectrophotometrically and further characterized by FTIR, SEM/EDS and XRD. Leu, a neutral/non polar amino acid, was found to have more affinity in its zwitterionic form towards Cu(2+)- exchanged SMT and minimal affinity for Mg(2+)- exchanged SMT. The vibrational frequency shifts of -NH3 (+) and -COO(-) favor Van der Waal's forces during the course of surface interaction. Quantum calculations using density functional theory (DFT) have been applied to investigate the absolute value of metal ion affinities of Leu (Leu-M(2+) complex, M = Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Cu(2+)) with the help of their physico-chemical parameters. The hydration effect on the relative stability and geometry of the individual species of Leu-M(2+) × (H2O)n, (n =2 and 4) has also been evaluated within the supermolecule approach. Evidence gathered from investigations of surface interactions, divalent metal ions affinities and hydration effects with biomolecules may be important for better understanding of chemical evolution, the stabilization of biomolecules on solid surfaces and biomolecular-metal interactions. These results may have implications for understanding the origin of life and the preservation of

  6. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L.M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Byun, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile. - Highlights: • Fusion reactors need a tough, ductile tungsten plasma-facing material. • The unirradiated tungsten-copper laminate is more ductile than tungsten alone. • After neutron irradiation, the composite has significantly less ductility. • The tungsten behavior appears to dominate the overall composite behavior.

  7. Isotope exchange experiments in tungsten with sequential deuterium and protium plasmas in PISCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Wang, Y.Q.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Doerner, R.P.; Tynan, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange experiments in tungsten samples were conducted in the PISCES linear plasma device to examine this technique as a means of tritium removal. Tungsten samples were first exposed to deuterium plasma in typical divertor conditions to a fluence of 10 26 ions/m 2 while maintaining a sample temperature below 373 K and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma at varying fluences (10 23 –10 26 ions/m 2 ). Bulk retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), and the D( 3 He, p) 4 He reaction was used to obtain concentration profiles of deuterium. The effects of neutron damage were simulated by exposing some samples to 2.5 MeV Cu ions. Ion induced damage increases deuterium inventory in the near surface region and decreases diffusion into the bulk. Although displacement damage allows more deuterium to be retained near the surface where much of the isotope exchange takes place, the efficiency of isotope exchange in the bulk was reduced

  8. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  9. Enhancing the adhesion of diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrate using tungsten particles via MPCVD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Wen Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, 245, Sec. 3, Yen-Chiu-Yuan Road, Nankang, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hou-Cheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-24

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > Larger particles of tungsten led to larger diamond particles with improved crystallinity, covering the specimen with increased speed. > Adhesion was indicated to be a function of the gaps between the tungsten particles. > Diamond films pretreated with tungsten particles of 2.0 {mu}m showed the highest hardness of 27.78 GPa with good crystalline. - Abstract: To increase the adhesion of diamond films and avoid the negative effects of using cobalt, previous treatments have employed tungsten particles to cover the surface of the 6 wt.% cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate. The surface of the tungsten particles is transformed into W{sub 2}C and WC, which attracts and traps carbon. Through the process of nucleation, the carbon forms around the tungsten particles, thereby satisfying the conditions necessary for the formation of diamond film. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that diamond films of good quality with excellent adhesive properties and a hardness level as high as 27.78 GPa could be produced following pretreatment with 2.0 {mu}m tungsten particles. Rockwell indentation tests indicate that addition of tungsten particles promotes the interfacial adhesion of diamond films with WC-Co substrates. We determined that using smaller tungsten particles decreased the number of gaps and cavities on the surface of the substrate, thereby enhancing the adhesion of the diamond film.

  10. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  11. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  12. Bulk ion heating with ICRF waves in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. J., E-mail: mervi.mantsinen@bsc.es [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.; Kappatou, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Odstrčil, T.; Tardini, G.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Maraschek, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Nocente, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Hellsten, T. [Dept. of Fusion Plasma Physics, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Mantica, P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2015-12-10

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER and DEMO operation. This is of particular importance for the bulk ion heating capabilities of ICRF waves. Efficient bulk ion heating with the standard ITER ICRF scheme, i.e. the second harmonic heating of tritium with or without {sup 3}He minority, was demonstrated in experiments carried out in deuterium-tritium plasmas on JET and TFTR and is confirmed by ICRF modelling. This paper focuses on recent experiments with {sup 3}He minority heating for bulk ion heating on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak with ITER-relevant all-tungsten PFCs. An increase of 80% in the central ion temperature T{sub i} from 3 to 5.5 keV was achieved when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central {sup 3}He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the T{sub i} profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LT{sub i} of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG plasmas. The large changes in the T{sub i} profiles were accompanied by significant changes in measured plasma toroidal rotation, plasma impurity profiles and MHD activity, which indicate concomitant changes in plasma properties with the application of ICRF waves. When the {sup 3}He concentration was increased above the optimum range for bulk ion heating, a weaker peaking of the ion temperature profile was observed, in line with theoretical expectations.

  13. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Tungsten at Temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Colgan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that were submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.

  14. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  15. The study of optimal conditions of electrochemical etching of tunnel electron microscopy tungsten tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anguiano, E.; Aguilar, M.; Olivar, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained during the study made in the electrochemical etching of tunneling electron microscopy tungsten tips. The experiments was made using DC and two usual electrolytes: KOH and NaOH. For the tip preparation we used a electrochemical cell with stainless steel cathode and the tungsten wire as anode. the electrodes was introduced in a glass recipient containing the electrolytic solution. We study the effects of applied voltage, polish time, tip length and electrolyte concentration as process relevant parameters. The best condition for tip preparation was obtained with a metallurgical microscope and with a SEM.EDX and Auger analysis was made. The results shown the better tips was made with KOH as electrolyte with a limited concentration range (2-4 normal) and applied voltage (2-6 volts) (Author) 20 refs

  16. Experimental studies of the interactions between a hydrogen plasma and a carbon or tungsten wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaras, K.; Colina Delacqua, L.; Quirós, C.; Lombardi, G.; Redolfi, M.; Vrel, D.; Hassouni, K.; Bonnin, X.

    2015-03-01

    We present work done at LSPM (Laboratory of Sciences of Processes and Material Sciences), using the CASIMIR ECR plasma reactor device, aimed at answering questions about hydrogen isotope fuel retention and dust production in the context of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The plasma is characterized by means of optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and electrostatic probe; furthermore the dust density and size distribution will be measured by a laser diagnostic system. We present some early results obtained from hydrogen plasma exposure of pure tungsten samples, as well as samples of ITER-relevant tungsten-rich powders, produced inhouse by the ball-milling technique, which are likely to be a by-product of material erosion and migration during tokamak operation. In particular, we have performed measurements of the specific surface area of these powders as a proxy to their capacity to absorb hydrogen.

  17. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  18. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  19. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  20. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  1. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  2. 2s 2p 3P10 → 2s21S0 intercombination line in beryllium-like krypton, molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Transition probabilities are evaluated for the 2s 2p 3 P 1 0 → 2s 2 1 S 0 transition in beryllium-like ions for krypton, molybdenum and tungsten, using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The importance of the 2s 3p 1 P 1 0 configuration is considered

  3. Possibilities of chemical isolation of element 106 from aqueous solutions according to the model experiments with short lived tungsten isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szeglowski, Z.; Bruchertseifer, H.; Brudanin, V.B.

    1993-01-01

    A rapid method for continuous separation of short-lived tungsten isotopes from the lanthanides has been developed. It consists in transforming nuclear reaction products from the target by an aerosol jet to an absorber where the KCl particulates are dissolved in 0.2 M HF and percolating the product solution through three successively linked columns filled with ion exchange resins Dowex 50X8 (cationite), Dowex 1X8 (anionite) and again Dowex 50X8. 3 refs

  4. Nature of active centers and mechanism of metathesis of olefines on supported oxidic catalysts of molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadushin, A.A.; Aliev, R.K.; Krylov, O.V.; Andreev, A.A.; Edreva-Kardzhieva, R.M.; Shopov, D.M.; Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Obshta i Organichna Khimiya)

    1982-01-01

    A unified model of active centre in metathesis of olefines for oxide catalysts of molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium, supported on aluminium oxide and silica gel, is suggested. A supposition is made that electron transfer from the nearest electron donor through ion of higher valency transition metal to the olefine adsorbed is the main stage of activation process of surface olefine complex. The model is justified by quantum-chemical calculation

  5. On the origin, properties, and implications of asymmetries in the tungsten impurity density in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odstrcil, Tomas

    2017-07-03

    In this thesis, the transport of tungsten ions is studied in the plasma of ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The plasma facing components of the fusion reactors are expected to be built from high-Z materials such as W, Mo or Fe. These materials provide advantages like a high melting point, small erosion rates, and low tritium retention. However, due to the interaction of the plasma with the wall, ions of this material will be inevitably present also in the main plasma. These ions are not entirely stripped even at fusion plasma temperatures, and therefore emit strong line radiation, which can significantly degrade the performance of the fusion plasma. Thus the understanding and control of impurity transport are of critical importance to the success of fusion. The high mass and charge of the heavy impurities make them susceptible to some of the forces acting upon the plasma, resulting in a poloidal variation of their density. The most prominent are the centrifugal force arising from the plasma rotation and the electric force caused by magnetically trapped non-thermal ions. Furthermore, the poloidal asymmetries should have a significant impact on the radial transport of heavy ions, which was widely ignored up to date. In the present work, the poloidal asymmetries in the heavy impurity density were inferred from the soft X-ray radiation using a newly developed tomographic method. The high accuracy of the tomography and of the model for the centrifugal force allowed to identify for the first time in an experiment the effect of the fast ion distribution produced by neutral beam injection on the poloidal asymmetry of the tungsten density. The measured asymmetry was compared to several fast ion models, and the best match was found with the Monte Carlo code in the TRANSP code suite that includes finite orbits effects of the fast ions. Similarly, fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron heating and localized mainly in the outboard side of the plasma due to a magnetic trapping and produce

  6. Large-scale synthesis and quantitative characterization of size-controllable potassium tungsten bronze nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Peng, Yuehua; Zhou, Fang; Yin, Yanling; Huang, Xingqing; Wang, Lizhou; Wang, Weike; Zhou, Weichang; Tang, Dongsheng

    2018-03-01

    Single-crystalline hexagonal potassium tungsten bronze K0.26WO3 nanowires with diameters of 10–30 nm and lengths to several micrometers have been successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal method. The diameters of K0.26WO3 nanowires can be well modulated by reducing potassium tungsten oxide K2OW7O21 nanowires in hydrogen atmosphere at different temperatures. X-ray quantitative characterization indicates that the lattice constants and crystal lattice microstrains of these K0.26WO3 nanowires exhibit anisotropic behaviors along the radial and axis directions, which can be well explained by the surface effect and K+ ion aggregating or ordering. It also indicates that oxygen vacancies will occur in the WO3 lattice when the reduction temperature is around 650 °C, and the oxygen vacancies will prevent K+ ions from aggregating or ordering. Controllable synthesis and quantitative analysis of size-controllable K x WO3 nanowires will contribute to deepen our understanding on their structures and properties, and explore their potential applications in nanoscale resistive switching devices based on the distribution of K+ ions.

  7. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70 °C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5 × 1025 m-2 to reach the total ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2 in order to investigate the near-surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate the irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near-surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at% D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at% D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near-surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.3 dpa) at 500 °C cases even in the relatively low ion fluence of 1026 m-2.

  8. Carbide formation in tungsten coatings on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasinski, M.; Maier, H.; Ruset, C.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten coatings with molybdenum interlayer deposited on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) substrates were selected as the first wall material for the divertor in the Wall Project at Joint European Torus (similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). For such a layered structure, diffusion of carbon from the CFC substrate towards the Mo and W deposits is expected during the operation of the reactor. As both molybdenum and tungsten form stable carbides, brittle compounds may form at the interface, thus strongly affecting the thermomechanical performance of the coated tiles. For the purpose of prediction of the operation time of such coated tiles, carbon diffusion and carbide formation kinetics need to be determined. In the present study, W/Mo/CFC samples were subjected to heat treatment at 1470 K for various annealing times. The Focused Ion Beam technique was used for sample preparation for electron microscopy examinations. Transmission electron microscopy observations supported with diffraction pattern analyses revealed the both W 2 C and WC carbides in the W coating, as well as that of Mo 2 C carbide in the Mo layer. The results were used to estimate the kinetics of coatings degradation. - Highlights: ► Thin Mo/W layers system on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon divertor tile ► Heat treatment at 1470 K results in two tungsten carbide creation — W 2 C and WC ► The total tungsten carbide creation is limited by carbon diffusion ► WC carbide creation is limited by W 2 C–WC reaction rate

  9. Iso-nuclear tungsten dielectronic recombination rates for use in magnetically-confined fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D.-H.; Lee, W.; Preval, S.; Ballance, C. P.; Behar, E.; Colgan, J.; Fontes, C. J.; Nakano, T.; Li, B.; Ding, X.; Dong, C. Z.; Fu, Y. B.; Badnell, N. R.; O'Mullane, M.; Chung, H.-K.; Braams, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    Under the auspices of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Center and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, our assembled group of authors has reviewed the current state of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for various ion stages of tungsten (W). Subsequent recommendations were based upon available experimental data, first-principle calculations carried out in support of this paper and from available recombination data within existing atomic databases. If a recommendation was possible, data were compiled, evaluated and fitted to a functional form with associated uncertainty information retained, where available. This paper also considers the variation of the W fractional abundance due to the underlying atomic data when employing different data sets.

  10. Nanosized tungsten carbide synthesized by a novel route at low temperature for high performance electrocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Zaoxue; Cai, Mei; Shen, Pei Kang

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) is a widely used engineering material which is usually prepared at high temperature. A new mechanism for synthesizing nanoscaled WC at ultralow temperature has been discovered. This discovery opens a novel route to synthesize valuable WC and other carbides at a cost-efficient way. The novel formation mechanism is based on an ion-exchange resin as carbon source to locally anchor the W and Fe species. As an intermediate, FeWO4 can be formed at lower temperature, which can ...

  11. Tungsten Data for Current and Future Uses in Fusion and Plasma Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Beiersdorfer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We give a brief overview of our recent experimental and theoretical work involving highly charged tungsten ions in high-temperature magnetically confined plasmas. Our work includes X-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, state-of-the-art structure calculations, the generation of dielectronic recombination rate coefficients, collisional-radiative spectral modeling and assessments of the atomic data need for X-ray diagnostics monitoring of the parameters of the core plasma of future tokamaks, such as ITER. We give examples of our recent results in these areas.

  12. Residual stress determination in a 1000 A tungsten thin film by X-rays diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, K.F.; Declemy, A.; Naudon, A.; Goudeau, P.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the complete residual stress tensor by X-rays diffraction, using the sin 2 ψ method, in a 1000 A tungsten thin film deposited on a silicon monocrystal. Stresses are tension wise of big magnitude (1.5 GPa). They are almost isotropic in the film plane. Shear stresses are low but not negligeable. After a bombardment by a 320 keV Xe ++ ion beam, the stresses became compressive (about -1.3 GPa). These results demonstrate the feasability of stress determination by the sin 2 ψ method in films as thin as 1000 A and open interesting areas for future research. (orig.)

  13. Sputtering/redeposition analysis of alkali-based tungsten composites for limiter/divertor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Valentine, M.G.

    1986-07-01

    Composites of porous tungsten infiltrated with alkali metal-bearing alloys have been projected as a means of reducing plasma impurities and sputter erosion in magnetic fusion devices. Self-sustaining alkali metal overlayers have been observed to inhibit erosion of the underlying structural substrate by 2X to 10X. The alkali metal itself, insofar as it sputters as a secondary ion, is trapped at the surface by sheath potential and tangential magnetic fields. Self-regeneration of the alkali metal coating is obtained by thermal and radiation-induced segregation from the bulk

  14. Development and characterization of powder metallurgically produced discontinuous tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Riesch, J.; Sistla, S.; Almanstötter, J.; Jasper, B.; Terra, A.; Höschen, T.; Gietl, H.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Broeckmann, C.

    2017-12-01

    In future fusion reactors, tungsten is the prime candidate material for the plasma facing components. Nevertheless, tungsten is prone to develop cracks due to its intrinsic brittleness—a major concern under the extreme conditions of fusion environment. To overcome this drawback, tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten (Wf/W) composites are being developed. These composite materials rely on an extrinsic toughing principle, similar to those in ceramic matrix composite, using internal energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crack bridging and fiber pull-out, during crack propagation. This can help Wf/W to facilitate a pseudo-ductile behavior and allows an elevated damage resilience compared to pure W. For pseudo-ductility mechanisms to occur, the interface between the fiber and matrix is crucial. Recent developments in the area of powder-metallurgical Wf/W are presented. Two consolidation methods are compared. Field assisted sintering technology and hot isostatic pressing are chosen to manufacture the Wf/W composites. Initial mechanical tests and microstructural analyses are performed on the Wf/W composites with a 30% fiber volume fraction. The samples produced by both processes can give pseudo-ductile behavior at room temperature.

  15. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  16. Developments toward the use of tungsten as armour material in plasma facing components promoted by Euratom-CEA Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitteau, R.; Missiaen, J.M.; Brustolin, P.

    2006-01-01

    developed for tungsten coating. The coatings are manufactured by MEdC-Euratom Association using Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation and Thermo-ionic Vacuum Arc. The coating morphology is characterised by an electron microscope using a focused ion beam. The adhesion between the coating and substrate is studied. The thermal lock-in technique is investigated to develop a non destructive test allowing to check the coating homogeneity, and its adhesion to the substrate. (author)

  17. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cryogenic treatment; tungsten carbide–cobalt; SEM; XRD; microhardness. 1. Introduction. Tungsten carbide tools can machine metals at speeds that cause the cutting edge to become red hot, without losing its hardness or sharpness. It exhibits about 2–3 times the produc- tivity and 10 times the life of high-speed ...

  18. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  19. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  20. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  1. Extraction and separation of tungsten (VI) from aqueous media with Triton X-100-ammonium sulfate-water aqueous two-phase system without any extractant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Zhang; Tichang Sun; Tieqiang Lu; Chunhuan Yan

    2016-11-25

    An aqueous two-phase system composed of Triton X-100-(NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 -H 2 O was proposed for extraction and separation of tungsten(VI) from aqueous solution without using any extractant. The effects of aqueous pH, concentration of ammonium sulfate, Triton X-100 and tungsten, extracting temperature on the extraction of tungsten were investigated. The extraction of tungsten has remarkable relationship with aqueous pH and are to above 90% at pH=1.0-3.0 under studied pH range (pH=1.0-7.0) and increases gradually with increasing Triton X-100 concentration, but decreases slightly with increasing ammonium sulfate concentration. The extraction percentage of tungsten is hardly relevant to temperature but its distribution coefficient linearly increases with increasing temperature within 303.15-343.15K. The distribution coefficient of tungsten increases with the increase of initial tungsten concentration (0.1-3%) and temperature (303.15 K-333.15K). The solubilization capacity of tungsten in Triton X-100 micellar phase is independent of temperature. FT-IR analysis reveals that there is no evident interaction between polytungstate anion and ether oxygen unit in Triton X-100, and DLS analysis indicates that zeta potential of Triton X-100 micellar phase have a little change from positive to negative after extracting tungsten. Based on the above-mentioned results, it can be deduced that polytungstate anions are solubilized in hydrophilic outer shell of Triton X-100 micelles by electrostatic attraction depending on its relatively high hydrophobic nature. The stripping of tungsten is mainly influenced by temperature and can be easily achieved to 95% in single stage stripping. The tungsten (VI) is separated out from solution containing Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Al(III), Cr(III) and Mn(II) under the suitable conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  3. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity......, applicability to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of aligned CNT forests, and electrochemical performance are investigated. Experiments include culturing of NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells on TiW coated silicon scaffolds, CNT growth on TiW substrates with nickel catalyst, and cyclic...

  4. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  5. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  6. Gasochromic property of dehydrogenation-catalyst loaded tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Igarashi, Hidetoshi; Isozumi, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Shunya; Aritani, Hirofumi; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2013-02-01

    The gasochromic property of dehydrogenation-catalyst loaded tungsten trioxide (M/WO3) powders was examined in exposure to gaseous cyclohexane under different kinds and contents of catalysts, catalyst temperatures, and cyclohexane concentrations. The change in the intensity of visible lights reflected from the M/WO3 powders was in situ obtained using a portable visible-light spectrometer associating with the analysis of dehydrogenation products when M/WO3 powders were exposed to cyclohexane gas. The catalyst of Pt was a catalyst initiating dehydrogenation and change of reflected light intensity at lower temperatures in comparison with the catalysts of Pd and Rh. Among 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt% Pt/WO3 powders, 0.5 wt% Pt/WO3 powders demonstrated large change of reflected 640-nm lights, 5.4%, to visually detect their coloration at lower temperatures. The heating of 0.5 wt% Pt/WO3 powders at temperatures higher than 130 °C was required to visually detect cyclohexane at a concentration of 1 vol%, lower than the combustion lower limit (1.3 vol%). The quantitative analysis of hydrogen species such as hydrogen atoms and ions absorbed in 0.1-1 wt% Pt/WO3 powders demonstrated that Pt/WO3 powders would absorb the same amount of hydrogen species independent of loaded-Pt contents.

  7. Photodecomposition of Molybdenum andTungsten Carbonyl Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamer A. Alwani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The photodecomposition of four different colored organometallic molybdenum and tungsten carbonyl complexes, i.e. [Mo(CO52LA] (complex I, [(Mo(CO3(bipy2LB] (complex II, [(W(CO3(tmen2LB] (complex III and [Mo(CO2LC]2 (complex I V where LA 2-phenyl-1,3-indandionebis(2-methyl anilines, LB 2-phenyl-1,3-indandione bis (4-hydroxy anilines and LCbis (2-hydroxo-benzalydine benzidine ion have been performed at 365 nm in chloroform at 25 °C under oxygen atmosphere. The absorbance spectrum of these complexes has been recorded with the time of irradiation in order to examine the kinetics of photodecomposition. The rate of the photodecomposition process was investigated and the relative values of the rate constants of dissociation (Kd for the first-order reaction are tabulated. The apparent rate constant of photodecomposition was found to be (8.33-11.50 × 10-5 s-1.

  8. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  9. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, J. de; Cadoret, K; Martinez, L.; Veillet, D.; Millot, F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La 2 O 3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  10. Observation of the Structure of Tungsten Films Prepared by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Weiliang; Yu, Lei; Li, Yujie; Guo, Shuangquan

    2013-09-01

    The tungsten films with ultra microstructure on CuCrZr alloy and China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel have been prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The films were produced by pyrolysing the tungsten hexacarbonyl at air or argon atmosphere. When formed at or below 400 °C, they were poorly crystalized and the films showed low quality in thickness, density, bonding performance etc. While above this temperature, the properties of tungsten films have been improved, all the films consist of tungsten in the β-W. And β-W can change into α-W after heat treatment. As in other variations of pyrolysis, oxygen and carbon were observed. When filled with argon, the oxygen and carbon content would reduce apparently. Tungsten films prepared by MOCVD have stable chemical composition and microstructure. Besides, the properties of films on CuCrZr alloy are better than that on CLAM steel.

  11. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  12. Tungsten tetraboride, an inexpensive superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Lech, Andrew T.; Xie, Miao; Weaver, Beth E.; Yeung, Michael T.; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten tetraboride (WB4) is an interesting candidate as a less expensive member of the growing group of superhard transition metal borides. WB4 was successfully synthesized by arc melting from the elements. Characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicates that the as-synthesized material is phase pure. The zero-pressure bulk modulus, as measured by high-pressure X-ray diffraction for WB4, is 339 GPa. Mechanical testing using microindentation gives a Vickers hardness of 43.3 ± 2.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N. Various ratios of rhenium were added to WB4 in an attempt to increase hardness. With the addition of 1 at.% Re, the Vickers hardness increased to approximately 50 GPa at 0.49 N. Powders of tungsten tetraboride with and without 1 at.% Re addition are thermally stable up to approximately 400 °C in air as measured by thermal gravimetric analysis. PMID:21690363

  13. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  14. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  15. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  16. A new fully automatic PIM tool to replicate two component tungsten DEMO divertor parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Steffen; Commin, Lorelei; Heneka, Jochen; Piotter, Volker; Plewa, Klaus; Walter, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a fully automatic 2C-PIM tool. • Replicate fusion relevant components in one step without additional brazing. • No cracks or gaps in the seam of the joining zone visible. • For both material combinations a solid bond of the material interface was achieved. • PIM is a powerful process for mass production as well as for joining even complex shaped parts. -- Abstract: At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), divertor design concepts for future nuclear fusion power plants beyond ITER are intensively investigated. One promising KIT divertor design concept for the future DEMO power reactor is based on modular He-cooled finger units. The manufacturing of such parts by mechanical machining such as milling and turning, however, is extremely cost and time intensive because tungsten is very hard and brittle. Powder Injection Molding (PIM) has been adapted to tungsten processing at KIT since a couple of years. This production method is deemed promising in view of large-scale production of tungsten parts with high near-net-shape precision, hence, offering an advantage of cost-saving process compared to conventional machining. The properties of the effectively and successfully manufactured divertor part tile consisting only of pure tungsten are a microstructure without cracks and a high density (>98% T.D.). Based on the achieved results a new fully automatic multicomponent PIM tool was developed and allows the replication and joining without brazing of fusion relevant components of different materials in one step and the creation of composite materials. This contribution describes the process route to design and engineer a new fully automatic 2C-PIM tool, including the filling simulation and the implementing of the tool. The complete technological fabrication process of tungsten 2C-PIM, including material and feedstock (powder and binder) development, injection molding, and heat-treatment of real DEMO divertor parts is outlined

  17. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  18. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  19. Microstructure refinement of tungsten by surface deformation for irradiation damage resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efe, Mert; El-Atwani, Osman; Guo, Yang; Klenosky, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Surface deformation by machining is demonstrated as a way to engineer microstructures of pure tungsten for extreme irradiation environments. Thermomechanical conditions are established for microstructure refinement in the chips and the workpiece subsurface. Ultrafine grains are observed both in the chip and the subsurface, at depths relevant to the typical thickness of the irradiation-induced damage. Guidelines for producing a uniform, ultrafine-grained structure via machining and other surface deformation processes are discussed along with the implications of such microstructures for damage resistance

  20. Microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys due to neutron irradiation in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanaka, Teruya

    2014-12-01

    The microstructural development of pure tungsten (W) and tungsten-rhenium (Re) alloys due to neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA, was investigated in this work. The irradiation conditions were ∼1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 and 800 °C. After the neutron irradiation, microstructural observations were performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Large amounts of precipitates identified as sigma- and chi-phases were observed in not only the W-Re alloys but also in the pure W after the neutron irradiation. The precipitates observed in the pure W were coarse and larger than those in the W-Re alloys. This was considered to be caused by the transmutation products of W and Re, namely, Re and osmium (Os), respectively, under irradiation in the HFIR with a higher contents of thermal neutron flux.

  1. Formation of tungsten carbide nanoparticles on graphitized carbon to facilitate the oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zaoxue; He, Guoqiang; Cai, Mei; Meng, Hui; Shen, Pei Kang

    2013-11-01

    Tungsten carbide nanoparticles with the average size less than 5 nm uniformly dispersed on the graphitized carbon matrix have been successfully synthesized by a one-step ion-exchange method. This route is to locally anchor the interested species based on an ionic level exchange process using ion-exchange resin. The advantage of this method is the size control of targeted nanomaterial as well as the graphitization of resin at low temperatures catalyzed by iron salt. The Pt nanoparticles coupled with tungsten carbide nanoparticles on graphitized carbon nanoarchitecture form a stable electrocatalyst (Pt/WC-GC). The typical Pt/WC-GC electrocatalyst gives a Pt-mass activity of 247.7 mA mgPt-1, which is much higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst (107.1 mA mgPt-1) for oxygen reduction reaction due to the synergistic effect between Pt and WC. The presented method is simple and could be readily scaled up for mass production of the nanomaterials.

  2. Deuterium retention in MeV self-implanted tungsten: Influence of damaging dose rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schwarz-Selinger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recrystallized, polycrystalline tungsten was self-damaged by 20MeV tungsten ions up to a calculated damage dose in the damage peak of 0.23dpa. The time to acquire this dose and hence the average damaging dose rate was varied from 6×10-3 to 4×10-6dpa/s, the latter coming close to the damage dose rate expected from fusion neutrons in future devices such as ITER and DEMO. One series was conducted at 295K and one at 800K to check for possible effects of defect evolution at elevated temperature. The created damage was decorated afterwards with a deuterium plasma at low ion energy of <15eV and low flux of 6×1019D/m2 until saturation to derive a measure for the defect density that can retain hydrogen isotopes. 3He nuclear reaction analysis (NRA was applied to derive the deuterium depth profile and the maximum concentration in the damage peak. Neither for the 295K nor for the 800K series a variation in deuterium retention with damage dose rate was found.

  3. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  4. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  5. Investigation of Tungsten and Beryllium Behaviour under Short Transient Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Kuehnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam facility JUDITH is a rather versatile test facility for the simulation of high heat fluxes. One key issue is the simulation of the material performance under short transient events. The study of melting behaviour and crack formation, which occurs even for heat pulses below the melting threshold of the metals, is of huge importance for the qualification of materials for future nuclear devices. Heat load simulations at RT with a pulse length of 5 ms have been performed on beryllium (S65C), the ITER candidate material for the first wall, at power loads of 0.5 - 2 GW/m 2 . Crack formation, surface roughening and melt layer motion has been studied. Similar conditions during single and multiple shots below and above the melting threshold (∼50 MW·m-2·s 1 /2) have been applied to tungsten. Since its material properties are dependent on grain size and shape, 3 different grades have been tested in an as-delivered state: 1) deformed tungsten aligned in deformation direction, which corresponds to the actual ITER specification for tungsten used in the divertor; 2) deformed tungsten aligned perpendicular to the deformation direction; 3) sintered tungsten. Significant differences in the crack resistance and the crack pattern of the various tungsten grades below the melting threshold have been determined and further material degradation has been found after multiple shots. This is of importance also in regard to expected ELM loads in ITER, in which power densities below the melting threshold are applied at a high repetition rate (∼ 1 Hz). Crack formation for sintered tungsten starts at ∼20 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. The cracks are located across the loaded area and increase in number, length and width with increasing power load. In comparison to that for deformed tungsten cracking was first detected at ∼35 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. Whereas for tungsten aligned in deformation direction a crack pattern comparable to those of sintered tungsten was formed, tungsten

  6. Classification of tungsten powder by fluidization method and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Khan-Guan'.

    1989-01-01

    Search for accessible in practice, the technological method to increase the level of control of the granulometric composition of tungsten powder and to increase quality of products and to prepare new materials is carried out. It is shown that the method of fluidization is effective and accessible in practice for tungsten powder (and other refractory metals and compounds) classification, that increases the level of control of the granulometric composition of the powder and thus - its quality, and that improves control of properties of tungsten and other refractory metal products

  7. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  8. Active gas adsorption-promoted evaporation of tungsten and niobium in strong electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksenofontov, V.A.; Kul'ko, V.B.; Mikhajlovskij, I.M.

    1980-01-01

    Field-ion methods and pulsed mass-spectrometeric analysis are used to study field evaporation of tungsten and niobium affected by nitrogen and hydrogen. Active gas-promoted evaporation is found to take place at field intensities high enough for the field ionization of active gases. The evaporating field intensity is established to increase from 1.45x10 8 to 5.5x10 8 V/cm while passing from continuous to pulsed conditions of evaporation, this testifies to the change of the mechanism of the promoted evaporation. Under the effect of active gases, the evaporation rate essentially depends on the surface state. It is shown that in the microcrystals irradiated with 1-3 kV helium ions, the dependence of the evaporation rate of Nb in hydrogen on the field intensity gets monotonous. The obtained results are in fair agreement with the recombination model of a promoted evaporation [ru

  9. High precision tungsten cutting for optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Clemente, G.; Sanz-Tudanca, C.; Lopez, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained during the INTEGRAL masks development program an implementing the HURA and MURA codes on tungsten plates of different thickness are presented. Hard scientific requirements on pixels size and location tolerances (tenths of microns over large areas -1 m 2 - and thickness from 0.5 mm to 60 mm) required the set up of a dedicated program for testing cutting technologies: laser, photochemical milling, spark machining and electro discharge wire cutting. After a very intensive test campaign the wire cutting process was selected as the optimum technology for code manufacturing . Accuracies achieved an the code cutting fulfill scientific requirements. In fact, they are 5 times better than required. Pixel size and centroids location accuracies of 0.01 mm over a 1 m 2 area have been obtained for the 10,000 pixels on IBIS, 100 pixels on SPI and 24000 pixels on JEM-X masks. Comparative results among different cutting technologies are also discussed. (author)

  10. Modification of tungsten layers by arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, M.; Schneider, W.; Juettner, B.; Lindig, S.; Mayer, M.; Balden, M.; Beilis, I.; Djakov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous traces of arcs have been found on W-covered graphite tiles of ASDEX Upgrade after exposure. The distributions of number density, lengths and orientation are calculated and compared to pure graphite tiles at comparable locations. It was established that arcs perforate a 1 μm tungsten layer down to the carbon substrate. The amount of removal should rise with arc current, but a surface fraction of about 8% is eroded at 10 A already. At tiles of the divertor baffle the layer is continuously removed along the entire track pointing to higher currents. The carbon of the stripped parts is subject to subsequent erosion processes. The distribution of materials in and around arc tracks was investigated by sputter depth profiling (SIMS and AES) and the characteristic geometry was studied using an electron microscope. Observations are interpreted using results from laboratory vacuum arcs on the same material

  11. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-03-25

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a<1 1 1> screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three <1 1 2> direction on {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction.

  12. Electronic structure and Compton profiles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal Ahuja, Babu; Rathor, Ashish; Sharma, Vinit; Sharma, Yamini; Ramniklal Jani, Ashvin; Sharma, Balkrishna

    2008-01-01

    The energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of tungsten have been computed using band structure methods, namely the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SPR-KKR) approach as well as the linear combination of atomic orbitals with Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. The full potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme to calculate these properties and the Fermi surface topology(except the momentum densities) have also been used to analyze the theoretical data on the electron momentum densities. The directional Compton profiles have been measured using a 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer. From the comparison, the measured anisotropies are found to be in good agreement with the SPR-KKR calculations. The band structure calculations are also compared with the available data. (orig.)

  13. Hydrogen generation from steam reaction with tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, G. R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Petti, D. A.; Coates, K.

    1998-10-01

    A LOCA in a fusion reactor involving an ingress of steam presents a safety concern due to hydrogen generated from steam reactions with plasma facing components. Hydrogen concentrations must be maintained below explosive levels. To support safety evaluations we have experimentally determined hydrogen generation rates when a tungsten alloy is exposed to steam from 400°C to 1200°C. We studied effects of steam pressure between 2.8 × 10 4 and 8.5 × 10 4 Pa, i.e., (0.28-0.84 atm) and gas velocity between 0.011 and 0.063 m/s. We present relationships for the reaction rates, oxidation phases, and mechanisms associated with the hydrogen generation.

  14. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  15. Electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on molybdenum substrates and deuterium irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Ziwei; Fang, Xianqin; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Wang, Zhanlei; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on molybdenum substrates. • The current density affected the performance of tungsten coatings. • Deuterium irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Deuterium retention in the tungsten coating was less than that in the bulk tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings were prepared using pulse electrodeposition on the molybdenum substrates. Effects of variations in current density on surface morphology, thickness distribution and crystal orientation of the coatings were investigated. The results indicate that with the current density increasing, the grain size of tungsten coatings first decreases, then increases; while the deposited thickness increases all the time. And all of tungsten coatings exhibit the preferred orientation of (200) plane. Moreover, the polished tungsten coating and bulk tungsten were exposed to low energy (80 eV) and high flux (7.2 × 10 20 D/m 2 /s) deuterium plasma in a linear plasma device (Simulator of Tokamak Edge Plasma, STEP). Deuterium (D) retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It is found that blisters on the tungsten coating are much fewer than that on the bulk tungsten. TDS spectroscopy of the tungsten coating reveals one D 2 release peak at 740 K, while the bulk tungsten has two D 2 release peaks at 500 K and 660 K. The amount of deuterium retention in the tungsten coating is lower.

  16. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARPES) and spectro- microscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based on ...

  17. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  18. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  19. Experimental investigation on the effect of surface electric field in the growth of tungsten nano-tendril morphology due to low energy helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woller, K.B.; Whyte, D.G.; Wright, G.M.; Brunner, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for and controlling the growth of tungsten nano-tendrils (or “fuzz”) under low-energy helium plasma exposure remain unclear. For the first time in nano-tendril experiments, the plasma sheath-produced electric field and the helium (He) ion energy have been decoupled, showing that the sheath electric field has little impact on nano-tendril growth, eliminating a possible cause for tendril growth. The well-established necessary growth conditions for W fuzz were maintained with He ion flux density Γ He  > 10 21  He m −2  s −1 , surface temperature T s  = 1273 K, He ion energy E He  = 64 eV, and He ion fluence Φ He  > 10 24  He m −2 . A grid is situated between the tungsten sample and plasma, with the grid and sample potentials independently controlled in order to control the electric field at the surface of the sample while maintaining the same incident He ion energy to the surface. A calculation of the potential profile in the drift space between the grid and sample was used to account for space charge and calculate the electric field at the surface of the sample. Tungsten fuzz formed at all electric fields tested, even near zero electric field. Also, the depth of the resulting W fuzz layer was unaltered by the electric field when compared to the calculated depth determined from an empirical growth model. The conclusion is that the sheath electric field is not necessary to cause the changes in surface morphology. - Highlights: • Surface electric field is proposed as a possible driver of tungsten fuzz growth. • A method that decouples plasma sheath electric field and ion energy is described. • Tungsten fuzz is shown to grow even without direct exposure to plasma. • Tungsten fuzz grows to the same depth with and without the plasma sheath.

  20. Interaction of plasmas with lithium and tungsten fusion plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, Peter Robert

    One of the largest outstanding issues in magnetic confinement fusion is the interaction of the fusion plasma with the first wall of the device; an interaction which is strongest in the divertor region. Erosion, melting, sputtering, and deformation are all concerns which inform choices of divertor material. Of the many materials proposed for use in the divertor, only a few remain as promising choices. Tungsten has been chosen as the material for the ITER divertor, and liquid lithium stands poised as its replacement in higher heat flux devices. As a refractory metal, tungsten's large melting point and thermal conductivity as well as its low sputtering yield have led to its selection as the material of choice of the ITER divertor. Experiments have reinforced this choice demonstrating tungsten's ability to withstand large heat fluxes when adequately cooled. However, tungsten has shown a propensity to nanostructure under exposure within a certain temperature range to large fluxes of helium ions. These nanostructures if disrupted into the plasma as dust by an off-normal event would cause quenching of the plasma from the generated dust. Liquid lithium, meanwhile, has gathered growing interest within the fusion community in recent years as a divertor, limiter, and alternative first wall material. Liquid lithium is attractive as a low-Z material replacement for refractory metals due to its ability to getter impurities, while also being self-healing in nature. However, concerns exist about the stability of a liquid metal surface at the edge of a fusion device. Liquid metal pools, such as the Li-DiMes probe, have shown evidence of macroscopic lithium displacement as well as droplet formation and ejection into the plasma. These issues must be mitigated in future implementations of liquid lithium divertor concepts. Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like (KH) instabilities have been claimed as the initiators of droplet ejection, yet not enough data exists to

  1. Development of Low Thermal Expansion Tungsten UO 2 Cermet Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M O; Kaznoff, A I

    1970-03-31

    An attempt was made to develop a tungsten-uranium dioxide cermet of high fue 1 loading with thermal expansion approaching that of tungsten and with good dimensional stability on thermal cycling. These goals were sought through the use of tungsten-coated uranium dioxide particles with sufficient locally available void volume to accommodate the difference in thermal expansion between the uranium dioxide and the tungsten matrix and through limitation of plastic deformation in the particles during fabrication to avoid mechanical keying of the particles and the matrix. The particles were vibratorily compacted prior to hot pressing. The thermal expansion of the cermets was determined and they were thermal cycle tested. The thermal expansion of the cermets was considerably closer to that of tungsten than was observed with previously reported specimens of similar composition. However, the thermal cycling of the cermets resulted in intolerable growth. This growth could be accounted for by the agglomeration of gases trapped in the uranium dioxide particles during deposition of the tungsten coating.

  2. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  3. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  4. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  5. Cesium ion bombardment of metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompa, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The steady state cesium coverage due to cesium ion bombardment of molybdenum and tungsten was studied for the incident energy range below 500 eV. When a sample is exposed to a positive ion beam, the work function decreases until steady state is reached with a total dose of less than ≅10 16 ions/cm 2 , for both tungsten and molybdenum. A steady state minimum work function surface is produced at an incident energy of ≅100 eV for molybdenum and at an incident energy of ≅45 eV for tungsten. Increasing the incident energy results in an increase in the work function corresponding to a decrease in the surface coverage of cesium. At incident energies less than that giving the minimum work function, the work function approaches that of cesium metal. At a given bombarding energy the cesium coverage of tungsten is uniformly less than that of molybdenum. Effects of hydrogen gas coadsorption were also examined. Hydrogen coadsorption does not have a large effect on the steady state work functions. The largest shifts in the work function due to the coadsorption of hydrogen occur on the samples when there is no cesium present. A theory describing the steady-state coverage was developed is used to make predictions for other materials. A simple sticking and sputtering relationship, not including implantation, cannot account for the steady state coverage. At low concentrations, cesium coverage of a target is proportional to the ratio of (1 - β)/γ where β is the reflection coefficient and γ is the sputter yield. High coverages are produced on molybdenum due to implantation and low backscattering, because molybdenum is lighter than cesium. For tungsten the high backscattering and low implantation result in low coverages

  6. Toxicity of tungsten carbide and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide nanoparticles in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meissner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-04-01

    Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendrocyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Chemical-physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect.

  7. Toxicity of Tungsten Carbide and Cobalt-Doped Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles in Mammalian Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meißner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. Objective We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobaltdoped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. Methods We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendro cyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Results Chemical–physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect. PMID:19440490

  8. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  9. Synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt via gas-solid reaction in rotary bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tertuliano, R.S.C.; Araujo, C.P.B. de; Frota, A.V.V.M.; Moriyama, A.L.L.; Souza, C.P. de

    2016-01-01

    The search for materials with high added value, high applicability and sustainability, motivates innovations in all areas of engineering. In this context, so-called doped carbides, ceramic and metal compounds are included. This work proposes the synthesis and characterization of tungsten carbide doped cobalt (WC-Co) through the gas-solid reaction in a rotating bed reactor. The production stages of the material are: precursor synthesis by wetting, drying at 80 deg C, characterization of the precursor by MEV, DRX and FRX, gas-solid reaction at 750 deg C in a reducing atmosphere of CH 4 / H 2 in a rotary reactor at 34 rpm and characterization of the reaction product by the techniques already mentioned. The results showed that tungsten carbide powders were produced with cobalt inserted into the structure, with high surface area, nanometric grains and with potential for applications in the areas of catalysis, reactors and fuel cells, showing the relevance of this type of research

  10. Growth and structure analysis of tungsten oxide nanorods using environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakamura, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-01-25

    WO3 nanorods targeted for applications in electric devices were grown from a tungsten wire heated in an oxygen atmosphere inside an environmental transmission electron microscope, which allowed the growth process to be observed to reveal the growth mechanism of the WO3 nanorods. The initial growth of the nanorods did not consist of tungsten oxide but rather crystal tungsten. The formed crystal tungsten nanorods were then oxidized, resulting in the formation of the tungsten oxide nanorods. Furthermore, it is expected that the nanorods grew through cracks in the natural surface oxide layer on the tungsten wire.

  11. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  12. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  13. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  14. Advanced solutions for beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, C.; Jakeman, R.; Ando, T.; Chiocchio, S.; Federici, G.; Heidl, H.; Tivey, R.; Falter, H.; Ciric, D.; Merola, M.; Vieider, G.; Ploechl, L.; Roedig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium and tungsten are candidate plasma-facing armour materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These armours are proposed for areas with low heat flux (≤5 MW m -2 ); however, in the divertor, surface melting during abnormal events may occur. This paper reports the progress made in developing novel approaches to solving the difficulties posed in designing with these armours. A Be monoblock brazed to an OFHC 10 mm ID Cu tube using InCuSil 'ABA' braze alloy has survived 130 cycles of 10-11 MW m -2 for 6 s, with surface temperatures of 1250 C. No visible surface cracking occurred. The same monoblock was then exposed to several cycles of 20-22 MW m -2 for 8 s, creating a 2 mm deep molten layer. High cycle fatigue was then performed. The test results are detailed in this paper. Comparison between experimental and theoretical results are made. W and Cu have a large mismatch in their thermal expansion coefficients and two designs are proposed that minimise the interface stresses. These are: a 'brush'-like structure with rectangular fibres set in a Cu substrate using the 'active metal casting' (AMC) technique; and thin monoblocks (or lamellae) brazed or active metal cast onto a Cu tube. Analyses of the lamellae concept for steady-state heat loads of 5 MW m -2 are presented. Fatigue analyses show that both solutions are theoretically viable (∝10 4 cycles). A 'brush' mock-up has been manufactured and progress on its testing is reported. Results of all tests and their relevance to the ITER design are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Durable and self-hydrating tungsten carbide-based composite polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weiqing; Wang, Liang; Deng, Fei; Giles, Stephen A; Prasad, Ajay K; Advani, Suresh G; Yan, Yushan; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2017-09-04

    Proton conductivity of the polymer electrolyte membranes in fuel cells dictates their performance and requires sufficient water management. Here, we report a simple, scalable method to produce well-dispersed transition metal carbide nanoparticles. We demonstrate that these, when added as an additive to the proton exchange Nafion membrane, provide significant enhancement in power density and durability over 100 hours, surpassing both the baseline Nafion and platinum-containing recast Nafion membranes. Focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography reveals the key membrane degradation mechanism. Density functional theory exposes that OH• and H• radicals adsorb more strongly from solution and reactions producing OH• are significantly more endergonic on tungsten carbide than on platinum. Consequently, tungsten carbide may be a promising catalyst in self-hydrating crossover gases while retarding desorption of and capturing free radicals formed at the cathode, resulting in enhanced membrane durability.The proton conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes in fuel cells dictates their performance, but requires sufficient water management. Here, the authors report a simple method to produce well-dispersed transition metal carbide nanoparticles as additives to enhance the performance of Nafion membranes in fuel cells.

  16. Plasma interaction with tungsten samples in the COMPASS tokamak in ohmic ELMy H-modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrova, M; Weinzettl, V; Matejicek, J; Dejarnac, R; Stöckel, J; Havlicek, J; Panek, R; Popov, Tsv; Marinov, S; Costea, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results on plasma interaction with tungsten samples with or without pre-grown He fuzz. Under the experimental conditions, arcing was observed on the fuzzy tungsten samples, resulting in localized melting of the fuzz structure that did not extend into the bulk. The parallel power flux densities were obtained from the data measured by Langmuir probes embedded in the divertor tiles on the COMPASS tokamak. Measurements of the current-voltage probe characteristics were performed during ohmic ELMy H-modes reached in deuterium plasmas at a toroidal magnetic field B T = 1.15 T, plasma current I p = 300 kA and line-averaged electron density n e = 5×10 19 m -3 . The data obtained between the ELMs were processed by the recently published first-derivative probe technique for precise determination of the plasma potential and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The spatial profile of the EEDF shows that at the high-field side it is Maxwellian with a temperature of 5 -- 10 eV. The electron temperatures and the ion-saturation current density obtained were used to evaluate the radial distribution of the parallel power flux density as being in the order of 0.05 -- 7 MW/m 2 . (paper)

  17. Synthesis and ferroelectric properties of rare earth compounds with tungsten bronze-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouziane, M., E-mail: bouzianemeryem@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue Ibn Batouta, BP 1014, Rabat (Morocco); Taibi, M. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, LAF 502, Ecole Normale Superieure, BP 5118, Rabat (Morocco); Boukhari, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Avenue Ibn Batouta, BP 1014, Rabat (Morocco)

    2011-10-03

    Highlights: {center_dot} Polycrystalline materials with the tungsten bronze-type structure have been synthesized and characterized. {center_dot} Effect of the incorporation of rare earth ions and paramagnetic cations (Fe{sup 3+}) into a matrix ferroelectrically active was studied. {center_dot} Ferroelectric transition is pronounced by a large thermal hysteresis during the heating and cooling cycles. {center_dot} Phase transitions around T{sub c} were confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. - Abstract: Polycrystalline materials with a general formula Pb{sub 2}Na{sub 0.8}R{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 4.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 15} (R = Dy, Eu, Sm, Nd, La) have been synthesized, in air by a high temperature solid state reaction method. X-ray diffraction study, at room temperature, revealed that they crystallize in the tungsten bronze-type structure. Dielectric properties were performed, in the temperature range 25-500 deg. C, at three different frequencies 10, 100 and 1000 kHz. The ferroelectric transition is pronounced by a large thermal hysteresis during the heating and cooling cycles. The determined Curie temperature values T{sub c} were discussed as a function of rare earth size. Phase transitions around T{sub c} for the investigated compounds were confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements.

  18. Deuterium supersaturation in low-energy plasma-loaded tungsten surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L.; Jacob, W.; von Toussaint, U.; Manhard, A.; Balden, M.; Schmid, K.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of hydrogen-metal interactions is challenging due to a lack of knowledge on defect production and/or evolution upon hydrogen ingression, especially for metals undergoing hydrogen irradiation with ion energy below the displacement thresholds reported in literature. Here, applying a novel low-energy argon-sputter depth profiling method with significantly improved depth resolution for tungsten (W) surfaces exposed to deuterium (D) plasma at 300 K, we show the existence of a 10 nm thick D-supersaturated surface layer (DSSL) with an unexpectedly high D concentration of ~10 at.% after irradiation with ion energy of 215 eV. Electron back-scatter diffraction reveals that the W lattice within this DSSL is highly distorted, thus strongly blurring the Kikuchi pattern. We explain this strong damage by the synergistic interaction of energetic D ions and solute D atoms with the W lattice. Solute D atoms prevent the recombination of vacancies with interstitial W atoms, which are produced by collisions of energetic D ions with W lattice atoms (Frenkel pairs). This proposed damaging mechanism could also be active on other hydrogen-irradiated metal surfaces. The present work provides deep insight into hydrogen-induced lattice distortion at plasma-metal interfaces and sheds light on its modelling work.

  19. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  20. Spectroscopic and Collisional Data for Tungsten from 1 eV to 20 keV. Summary Report of the Final Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.-K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Müller, A.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Braams, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The final Research Coordination Meeting of a coordinated research project (CRP) on spectroscopic and collisional data for tungsten ions in fusion plasma was held at IAEA Headquarters with 17 external experts representing 14 research groups and staff from the International Atomic Energy Agency. Participants summarized their research during the CRP and made plans for a final report. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  1. Spectroscopic and Collisional Data for Tungsten from 1 eV to 20 keV. Summary Report of the First Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B.J.; Chung, H.-K.

    2012-06-01

    Experts representing 14 research groups and the International Atomic Energy Agency met at IAEA Headquarters for the first research coordination meeting of a coordinated research project (CRP) on spectroscopic and collisional data for tungsten ions in fusion plasma. Participants presented their research following which a work plan was developed for the remainder of the CRP and outstanding data needs were identified. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  2. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  3. Atomic collisions in fusion plasmas involving multiply charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzborn, E.

    1980-01-01

    A short survey is given on atomic collisions involving multiply charged ions. The basic features of charge transfer processes in ion-ion and ion-atom collisions relevant to fusion plasmas are discussed. (author)

  4. Development and optimisation of tungsten armour geometry for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Safronov, V.; Yablokov, N.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFC) of the future thermonuclear reactor in great extend determine the time of non-stop operation of the reactor. In current ITER project the most of the divertor PFC surfaces are covered by tungsten armour. Therefore selection of tungsten grade and attachment scheme for joining the tungsten armour to heat sink is a matter of great importance. Two attachment schemes for highly loaded components (up to 20 MW/m 2 ) are described in this paper. The small size mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested at heat fluxes up to 30 MW/m 2 in screening test and up to 20 MW/m 2 at thermal fatigue test. One mock-up with four different tungsten grades was tested by consequent thermal shock (15 MJ/m 2 at 50 μs) and thermal cycling loading (15 MW/m 2 ). The damages that could lead to mock-up failure were not found but the behaviour of tungsten grades was quite different. (author)

  5. Experimental study of tungsten transport properties in T-10 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Sarychev, D. V.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.; Leontiev, D. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Grashin, S. A.; Ryjakov, D. V.; Sergeev, D. S.; Mustafin, N. A.; Trukhin, V. M.; Solomatin, R. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    First experimental results of tungsten transport investigation in OH and ECRH plasmas in the T-10 tokamak with W-limiter and movable Li-limiter are presented. It is shown that tungsten tends to accumulate (a joint process of cumulation and peaking) near the plasma axis in ohmic regimes. The cumulation of W is enhanced in discharges with high values of the parameter γ ={{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}\\centerdot {{\\bar{Z}}\\text{eff}}\\centerdot I\\text{pl}-1.5 that coincides with accumulation conditions of light and medium impurities in T-10 plasmas. Experiments with Li-limiter show the immeasurable level of Li3+ (0.3-0.5% of n e) of T-10 CXRS diagnostics because of the low inflow of Li with respect to other light impurities. Nevertheless, the strong influence of lithium on inflow of light and tungsten impurities is observed. In discharges with lithized walls, vanishing of light impurities occurs and values of {{Z}\\text{eff}}≈ 1 are obtained. It is also shown that the tungsten density in the plasma center decreases by 15 to 20 times while the W inflow reduces only by 2 to 4 times. In lithized discharges with high γ, the flattening of the tungsten density profile occurs and its central concentration decreases up to 10 times during the on-axis ECRH. This effect is observed together with the increase of the W inflow by 3 to 4 times at the ECRH stage.

  6. Generation and analysis of plasmas with centrally reduced helicity in full-tungsten ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    -studies where the plasma is heated early in the discharge to delay the relaxation of the initially elevated q-profiles as well as a new approach of manipulating an already equilibrated q-profile have been explored. The former was found to be suitable for non-inductive operation but remained susceptible to 2/1-NTMs. The latter allowed non-inductive operation at high plasma pressure under reactor-relevant conditions to be achieved without confinement degradation or any strong MHD instabilities. The plasma heat transport in steady-state phases with elevated q was modelled using the numerical simulation code TGLF. Without shear flows due to a radial electric field TGLF's predictions for the ion heat transport are beyond the experimental observation, which may be due to TGLF not considering stabilising effects of fast ions. With such shear flows the TGLF temperature predictions exceed the experimental observations significantly, i.e. heat transport is underestimated. The findings of this work show that the attractive non-inductive operation with high confinement can be achieved in ASDEX Upgrade. As such, further AT-studies are possible.

  7. Why relevance theory is relevant for lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothma, Theo; Tarp, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This article starts by providing a brief summary of relevance theory in information science in relation to the function theory of lexicography, explaining the different types of relevance, viz. objective system relevance and the subjective types of relevance, i.e. topical, cognitive, situational...... dictionary project, identifying new tasks and responsibilities of the modern lexicographer. The article furthermore discusses how relevance theory impacts on teaching dictionary culture and reference skills. By integrating insights from lexicography and information science, the article contributes to new...

  8. Carbon and tungsten effect on characteristics of sputtered and re-deposited beryllium target layers under deuteron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danelyan, L.S.; Gureev, V.M.; Elistratov, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    The behavior of the plasma facing Be-elements in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ITER will be affected by the re-deposition of other eroded plasma facing materials. The effect of carbon- and tungsten-additions on the microstructure, chemical composition and hydrogen isotope accumulation in the sputtered and re-deposited layers of beryllium TGP-56 at its interaction with 200 - 300 eV hydrogen isotope ions was studied in the MAGRAS facility equipped with a magnetron sputtering system. (author)

  9. Study of Tungsten effect on CFETR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengyu; Xiang Gao Collaboration; Guoqiang Li Collaboration; Nan Shi Collaboration; Vincent Chan Collaboration; Xiang Jian Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    An integrated modeling workflow using OMFIT/TGYRO is constructed to evaluate W impurity effects on China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) performance. Self-consistent modeling of tungsten(W) core density profile, accounting for turbulence and neoclassical transport, is performed based on the CFETR steady-state scenario developed by D.Zhao (ZhaoDeng, APS, 2016). It's found that the fusion performance degraded in a limited level with increasing W concentration. The main challenge arises in sustainment of H-mode with significant W radiation. Assuming the power threshold of H-L back transition is approximately the same as that of L-H transition, using the scaling law of Takizuka (Takizuka etc, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2004), it is found that the fractional W concentration should not exceed 3e-5 to stay in H-mode for CFETR phase I. A future step is to connect this requirement to W wall erosion modeling. We are grateful to Dr. Emiliano Fable and Dr. Thomas Pütterich and Ms. Emily Belli for very helpful discussions and comments. We also would like to express our thanks to all the members of the CFETR Physics Group, and we appreciate the General Atomic Theory Group for permission to use the OMFIT framework and GA code suite, and for their valuable technical support. Numerical computations were performed on the ShenMa High Performance Computing Cluster in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This work was mainly supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB110001, 2014GB110002, 2014GB110003) and supported in part by the National ITER Plans Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB106001, 2013GB111002, 2015GB110001).

  10. Impacts of friction stir processing on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray coated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Kazumi, E-mail: ozawa.kazumi@jaea.go.jp [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi-Omotedate, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    In order to examine the impacts of friction stir processing (FSP) on irradiation effects in vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) coated tungsten (W), nano indentation hardness was evaluated of three kinds of W materials after self-ion-irradiation to 5.0–5.4 dpa at 500 and 800 °C. The VPS-FSP clearly got grains refined and isotropic compared to bulk-W and the as-VPS-W. Nano indentation hardness remains unchanged for the as-VPS-W and VPS-FSP × 2-W irradiated to 5.4 dpa at 500 °C and it decreased from 1 dpa at 800 °C, while typical irradiation induced hardening was observed for the bulk-W irradiated at 500 °C.

  11. Uniform lateral etching of tungsten in deep trenches utilizing reaction-limited NF3 plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofuji, Naoyuki; Mori, Masahito; Nishida, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    The reaction-limited etching of tungsten (W) with NF3 plasma was performed in an attempt to achieve the uniform lateral etching of W in a deep trench, a capability required by manufacturing processes for three-dimensional NAND flash memory. Reaction-limited etching was found to be possible at high pressures without ion irradiation. An almost constant etching rate that showed no dependence on NF3 pressure was obtained. The effect of varying the wafer temperature was also examined. A higher wafer temperature reduced the threshold pressure for reaction-limited etching and also increased the etching rate in the reaction-limited region. Therefore, the control of the wafer temperature is crucial to controlling the etching amount by this method. We found that the uniform lateral etching of W was possible even in a deep trench where the F radical concentration was low.

  12. Pulsed X-Ray Exposures and Modeling for Tungsten as an IFE First Wall Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Schmitt, R C

    2004-01-01

    Dry-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants must survive repeated exposure to target threats that include x-rays, ions, and neutrons. While this exposure may lead to sputtering, exfoliation, transmutation, and swelling, more basic effects are thermomechanical in nature. In the present work, we use the newly developed RadHeat code to predict time-temperature profiles in a tungsten armor, which has been proposed for use in an IFE power plant. The XAPPER x-ray damage experiment is used to simulate thermal effects by operating at fluences that produce similar peak temperatures, temperature gradients, or thermomechanical stresses. Soft x-ray fluences in excess of 1 J/cm 2 are possible. Using RadHeat, we determine the XAPPER x-ray fluence needed to simulate thermomechanical effects expected in a typical IFE case of interest. Here, we report our findings and detail directions for future experiments and modeling

  13. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hara, Masanori; Otsuka, Teppei; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min-1 up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h.

  14. ELM-induced transient tungsten melting in the JET divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Autricque, A.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Jachmich, S.; Komm, M.; Knaup, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2015-02-01

    The original goals of the JET ITER-like wall included the study of the impact of an all W divertor on plasma operation (Coenen et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 073043) and fuel retention (Brezinsek et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 083023). ITER has recently decided to install a full-tungsten (W) divertor from the start of operations. One of the key inputs required in support of this decision was the study of the possibility of W melting and melt splashing during transients. Damage of this type can lead to modifications of surface topology which could lead to higher disruption frequency or compromise subsequent plasma operation. Although every effort will be made to avoid leading edges, ITER plasma stored energies are sufficient that transients can drive shallow melting on the top surfaces of components. JET is able to produce ELMs large enough to allow access to transient melting in a regime of relevance to ITER. Transient W melt experiments were performed in JET using a dedicated divertor module and a sequence of IP = 3.0 MA/BT = 2.9 T H-mode pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ˜6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ˜ 30 Hz. By moving the outer strike point onto a dedicated leading edge in the W divertor the base temperature was raised within ˜1 s to a level allowing transient, ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Such ELMs (δW ˜ 300 kJ per ELM) are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER (Pitts et al 2011 J. Nucl. Mater. 415 (Suppl.) S957-64). Although significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed, there is indirect evidence that some small droplets (˜80 µm) were released. Almost 1 mm (˜6 mm3) of W was moved by ˜150 ELMs within 7 subsequent discharges. The impact on the main plasma parameters was minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the leading edge towards the high-field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined

  15. Synthesis of bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2009-01-01

    Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method with tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) as precursor and cyclohexanol as solvent. The as-synthesized products were systematically characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transition electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller gas-sorption measurements were also employed. Accompanied by an apparent drop of specific surface area from 151 m 2 g -1 for the longer nanowires synthesized using a lower concentration of WCl 6 to 106 m 2 g -1 for the shorter nanowires synthesized using a higher concentration of WCl 6 , a dramatically morphological evolution was also observed. With increasing concentration of tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) in cyclohexanol, the nanostructured bundles became larger, shorter and straighter, and finally a block-shape product occurred

  16. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  17. Displacement disorder and reconstruction of the (001) face of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorushkin, V.E.; Kul'ment'ev, A.I.; Savushkin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    The reconstruction of the (001) border of tungsten is examined taking into consideration random static displacements of surface atoms in the high-temperature (1 x 1) phase. A microscopic model is proposed, in which the creation of c(2 x 2) phase is described as a transition of the Jahn-Teller type and an ordering of static displacements. It is shown that displacement disorder induces instability of (001) tungsten with respect to reconstruction. The effect of a uniform electric field on a disordered reconstructing surface is examined. A possible reason is given for pronounced differences in the results of investigations of the structural conversion of the (001) face in tungsten when different experimental methods are used

  18. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  19. Hypoeutectic Silumin to Pressure Die Casting with Vanadium and Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczak T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this study is to investigate the effect of vanadium and tungsten on the crystallization process, microstructure and mechanical properties of silumin grade EN-AC 46000. The research involved a derivative thermal analysis DTA of the crystallization process, the metallographic analysis as well as the mechanical properties. The metallographic analysis was carried out on pressure die castings and made in the DTA probe. Vanadium and tungsten were added simultaneously to silumin in amount of approximately 0.1; 0.2; 0.3 and 0.4%. The DTA studies have shown the similar shape of all crystallization curves. It has been shown the additives of vanadium and tungsten in pressure die cast silumin can significantly increase its tensile strength as an well as elongation.

  20. Volatility from copper and tungsten alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Piet, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Accident scenarios for fusion power plants present the potential for release and transport of activated constituents volatilized from first wall and structural materials. The extent of possible mobilization and transport of these activated species, many of which are ''oxidation driven'', is being addressed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report presents experimental measurements of volatilization from a copper alloy in air and steam and from a tungsten alloy in air. The major elements released included zinc from the copper alloy and rhenium and tungsten from the tungsten alloy. Volatilization rates of several constituents of these alloys over temperatures ranging from 400 to 1200 degree C are presented. These values represent release rates recommended for use in accident assessment calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Positron simulations of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Popov, E.; Staikov, P.; Nankov, N.; Yoshiie, T.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of defects containing hydrogen or helium in tungsten is an important issue. Here the properties of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen or helium atoms have been investigated by model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical simulations. The electron and positron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation to the two-component density-functional theory. The calculated values of the positron lifetime correlate with the magnitude of the electron density. The vacancy-clusters without hydrogen or helium are active positron traps. The lattice relaxation of atoms around vacancy reduces the effective vacancy volume and decrease the positron lifetime at a vacancy. The hydrogen and helium atoms are trapped in tungsten by lattice vacancies and nano-voids. It was established that positron lifetime depends on the density of gas atoms inside the nano-void. Hydrogen and helium presence in the larger nano-voids considerably decrease the positron lifetime.

  2. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  3. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  4. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  5. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  6. A high energy density all solid-state tungsten-air battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Xu, Nansheng; Romito, Kevin; Huang, Kevin

    2013-06-14

    An all solid-state tungsten-air battery is reported here, which is based on a new metal-air chemistry, featuring decoupled design of electrodes and energy storage. Benefited from higher specific density and better redox kinetics of tungsten, the new tungsten-air battery exhibits roughly higher energy density (W h L(-1)) than the previously reported iron-air battery.

  7. Thermal outgassing studies on machinable tungsten and TZM molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Nielsen, R.W.; Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Machinable tungsten and molybdenum alloys are extensively used as safety shutters and optical slits at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) front ends. These materials may present a vacuum problem because of their porosity. Also, an environmentally hazard-free cleaning procedure has to be developed for these materials. We have chosen specially heat-treated machinable tungsten with a density of 18 g/cm 3 for safety shutters and TZM (a molybdenum alloy containing 0.5% titanium and ∼0.1% zirconium) for optical slits. Thermal outgassing tests have been performed for a machinable tungsten set with a total surface area of 4500 cm 2 and a 2.8 x 4.6 x 32.6 cm 3 piece of TZM. A cleaning procedure using alkaline detergent ultrasonic washes and vacuum furnace baking was used before outgassing measurements. Outgassing rates 10 hours after initial pump down at room temperature are 1.6 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 6.0 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for TZM. The outgassing rates 24 hours after an in situ bake at 160 degrees C for two days decreased to 2.2 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 2.2 x 10 -11 Torr·l·s -1 · -2 for TZM. Optical studies confirmed that the TZM sample is more porous than the machinable tungsten sample. Further studies of a denser TZM sample show that the outgassing rate decreases as the porosity decreases. The outgassing rate 24 hours after a 48-h bake at 160 degree C reached 7.4 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for the denser TZM sample

  8. Irradiation effects of hydrogen and helium plasma on different grade tungsten materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fine-grain tungsten alloys could be one of the solutions for the plasma facing materials of future DEMO reactors. In order to evaluate the service performances of the newly developed W alloys under edge plasma irradiation and the synergetic effect of fusion plasma together with high heat flux, both low energy He ions and high energy H, H/He mixed neutral beam irradiation on W-ZrC, W-K, W-Y2O3, W-La2O3 and CVD-W coating were performed respectively at a liner plasma facility (Dalian Nationality University, China and the neutral beam facility GLADIS (IPP, Germany. Surface damages were characterized, and the crack formation and extension behaviors under ELM-like transient loading after H and H/He mixed beam irradiation were also investigated in the 60kW EMS-60 facility (Electron beam Materials testing Scenario at SWIP (Southwestern Institute of Physics, China. The experimental results indicated that surface damages induced by low or high energy H/He ion/neutral beam didn't closely correlate with the type of tungsten materials. However, H/He (6at% He concentration neutral beam induced more significant surface damages of the tested W materials than only H neutral beam irradiation under the similar irradiation conditions. Similarly, the mixed H/He pre-exposure remarkably reduced the critical power of crack initiation compared with the un-irradiated samples under 100 repetitive loads of 1ms pulse, while no significant degeneration for the case of only H beam irradiation was observed.

  9. Effect due to plasma electrode adsorbates upon the negative ion current and electron current extracted from a negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2017-08-01

    The intensity of negative hydrogen (H-) ion current and that of electron current extracted from a negative ion source show different characteristics against the change in plasma electrode bias depending upon the material covering the plasma electrode surface. The knowledge of these characteristics is of importance for a proper design of an efficient H- ion source. This paper discusses this subject based upon two kind of experiments i) experiments with plasma electrodes covered with tungsten or tantalum evaporated from filaments made of these metals ii) experiments with caesium covered plasma electrode. The tantalum and caesium covered plasma electrodes lead to an enhancement of the extracted H- ion current by a factor of 2 compared to the tungsten coverage on the plasma electrode. The electron current is also affected by the material covering the plasma electrode. The reasons for observing these characteristics are also elucidated.

  10. Tungsten versus depleted uranium for armour-piercing penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have been widely used in the production of armour-piercing (AP) penetrators for defense purposes for the past 40 years. In recent years, however, depleted uranium (DU) has also been utilised for this application. Both materials exhibit high density and strength, two properties necessary for kinetic-energy projectiles to penetrate armour on tanks and other vehicles. The facts, however, support the view that tungsten can and should be utilised as the primary material for most armour-defeating ordnance applications. (author)

  11. Helium effects on tungsten surface morphology and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Peng, H.Y.; Lee, H.T.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshida, N.; Doerner, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Alimov, V.; Wright, G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on tungsten surface morphology, especially nano-structure (fuzz), induced by helium plasma exposure at temperatures between 1000 K and 2000 K are reviewed. This structure was firstly reported in 2006. In this review, most of experimental results reported so far including characteristics and formation conditions of the nano-structure in both linear plasma devices and magnetic confinement devices, erosion and arcing by steady-state plasma exposure and ELM-like pulsed heat or pulsed plasma exposure by a laser and a plasma gun are summarized. In addition, He effects on D retention under simultaneous D/He irradiation on tungsten are presented

  12. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  13. Tool life of ceramic wedges during precise turning of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legutko Stanislaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties, application and machinability of tungsten and its alloys have been demonstrated. The comparison of the tool life and wear of the wedges made of SiAlON and whisker ceramics during the precise turning at different cutting parameters have been presented. The CNC lathe DMG CTX 310 Ecoline and tungsten of 99.7 % purity were used during the experiments. Only the wedge of whisker ceramics has proved to be sufficiently suitable and only for relatively low cutting speeds.

  14. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.

  15. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    diamond burs or tungsten carbide burs were used. This study shows some statistical differences that could not be clinically perceivable. The clinical relevance could be resumed as follows: the fine tungsten carbide burs provided less roughness compared to a fine diamond bur. There were no differences between the ultrafine tungsten carbide and diamond burs. The less favourable interface to be finished is CD, compared to the CE interface and C surfaces.

  16. Simulation of cracks in tungsten under ITER specific heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschany, S.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of high tritium retention in co-deposited carbon layers on the walls of ITER vacuum chamber motivates investigation of materials for the divertor armour others than carbon fibre composite (CFC). Tungsten is most probable material for CFC replacement as the divertor armour because of high vaporisation temperature and heat conductivity. In the modern ITER design tungsten is a reference material for the divertor cover, except for the separatrix strike point armoured with CFC. As divertor armour, tungsten should withstand severe heat loads at off-normal ITER events like disruptions, ELMs and vertical displacement events. Experiments on tungsten heating with plasma streams and e-beams have shown an intense crack formation at the surface of irradiated sample [ V.I. Tereshin, A.N. Bandura, O.V. Byrka et al. Repetitive plasma loads typical for ITER type-I ELMs: Simulation at QSPA Kh-50.PLASMA 2005. ed. By Sadowski M.J., AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics, 2006, V 812, p. 128-135., J. Linke. Private communications.]. The reason for tungsten cracking under severe heat loads is thermo stress. It appears as due to temperature gradient in solid tungsten as in resolidified layer after cooling down. Both thermo stresses are of the same value, but the gradiental stress is compressive and the stress in the resolidified layer is tensile. The last one is most dangerous for crack formation and it was investigated in this work. The thermo stress in tungsten that develops during cooling from the melting temperature down to room temperature is ∼ 8-16 GPa. Tensile strength of tungsten is much lower, < 1 GPa at room temperature, and at high temperatures it drops at least for one order of magnitude. As a consequence, various cracks of different characteristic scales appear at the heated surface of the resolidified layer. For simulation of the cracks in tungsten the numeric code PEGASUS-3D [Pestchanyi and I. Landman. Improvement of the CFC structure to

  17. Application of ion chromatography in the analysis of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doepke, T.; Braun, N.; Wuensch, G.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for the determination of chloride in molybdenum, tungsten, niobium and tantalum and of phosphorus in molybdenum and tungsten are presented. After oxidative digestion the analytes are separated from the matrix and accumulated in a small volume of liquid. Unsuppressed ion chromatography serves as the final determination method. The trace-matrix-separation and enrichment of chloride is largely independent of the kind of matrix. The procedure is therefore also applicable to concentrated solutions of various salts. A closed system ensures chloride blanks around 0.2 ppm and detection limits in the higher ppb range. A modification allows an enrichment of bromide and the simultaneous determination of chloride and bromide. (orig.) [de

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and optical properties of hexagonal tungsten oxide nanocrystals assisted by ammonium tartrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Hua-Feng; Li, Zhi-Jie [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Xiang, Xia; Zu, Xiao-Tao [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); International Center for Material Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Fu, Yong-Qing [Thin Film Center, Scottish Universities of Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of the West of Scotland, Paisley (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Crystals of hexagonal tungsten oxides (hex-WO{sub 3}) have been synthesized using hydrothermal method at 150 C, assisted by the capping reagent of ammonium tartrate (AT). The XRD and EDX results reveal that the lattice distortion exists in all the samples, possibly due to the defects and the intercalation of the residual sodium ions. Different crystal shapes including plate-like, urchin-like, and particle structures were obtained by varying concentration of AT and pH values in the precursor solution. Beside the absorption action of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Na{sup +} ions, the capping effect can be reinforced by the hydrogen bonding from the tartrate groups in the crystallization process. The bandgap energies were modulated by the size of the nanostructured hex-WO{sub 3} crystals due to quantum confinement effect, which increases from 2.74 to 3.04 eV. Based on the analysis of the photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the enhancement of the blue emission of the nanocrystals is assigned as a result of a complex of the local intercalation of the residual sodium ions and the oxygen vacancies or defects. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Reactive magnetron sputtering of tungsten disulfide (WS2-x) films: Influence of deposition parameters on texture, microstructure, and stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, V.; Seeger, S.; Ellmer, K.; Mientus, R.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS 2-x ) films (0.07≤x≤0.7) were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering from a tungsten target in rare gas/H 2 S atmospheres and at substrate temperatures up to 620 degree sign C. The nucleation and growth of the films were investigated by in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) and by ex situ techniques such as electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, and x-ray reflectivity. From the EDXRD analysis it was found that the films always nucleate with the (001) planes, i.e., the van der Waals planes, parallel to the substrate surface. For high deposition rates and/or low substrate temperatures a texture crossover from the (001) to the (100) crystallite orientation occurs during the growth. High deposition rates, low substrate temperatures, or low sputtering pressures lead to a significant lattice expansion of the crystallites in the c direction (up to 3%). This is most probably caused by a disturbed or turbostratic film growth induced by the energetic bombardment during film deposition. Reflected and neutralized energetic ions (Ar 0 ,S 0 ) from the tungsten target and negative ions (S - ) accelerated in the cathode dark space constitute the main sources of the energetic bombardment leading to crystallographic defects. The energy of these particles can be tailored by (i) thermalization between target and substrate in the sputtering gas or (ii) by a reduction of the discharge or target voltage, respectively, by high frequency excitation of the plasma. Films deposited under favorable conditions with respect to low particle energies and at substrate temperatures higher than 200 degree sign C exhibit a significant sulfur deficiency of up to about 5 at. % compared to the stoichiometric composition of WS 2 . This is ascribed to an energetic particle bombardment-induced sulfur desorption from the growing films

  20. Molecular dynamics study of grain boundary diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Toussaint, U; Gori, S; Manhard, A; Höschen, T; Höschen, C

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of the microstructure of tungsten on hydrogen transport is crucial for the use of tungsten as first-wall material in fusion reactors. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics and transition state studies on the influence of grain boundaries in tungsten on the transport of hydrogen. An exhaustive mapping of possible minimum activation energy migration trajectories for hydrogen as the trace impurity reveals a strongly modified activation energy distribution in the neighborhood of grain boundaries together with an altered connectivity matrix. The results indicate that grain boundaries in polycrystalline tungsten may provide an important transport channel, especially for neutron-damaged tungsten.

  1. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibers have high tensile strength but a poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Using this first characteristic and to prevent oxidation of tungsten coated composite materials in which the primary requirement: reinforcement against destruction or deformation, was studied on tungsten fibers and tungsten wires which were coated by applying the metal and ceramic powders via plasma spraying device in plasma generator WSP®. Deposition took place in an atmosphere of Ar + 7 % H2, sufficient to reduce the oxidized trace amounts of tungsten.

  2. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  3. Hollow microspheres with a tungsten carbide kernel for PEMFC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arbigny, Julien Bernard; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J; Rozière, Jacques

    2011-07-28

    Tungsten carbide microspheres comprising an outer shell and a compact kernel prepared by a simple hydrothermal method exhibit very high surface area promoting a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, and an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) stability compared to the usual Pt/C electrocatalysts used for PEMFC application.

  4. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the ...

  5. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  6. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences.

  7. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences. Component

  8. Tasmanian tin and tungsten granites - their radiometric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric survey of Tasmanian granites has shown, with one exception, that tin and tungsten-bearing granites have high radioactivity, largely owing to increased uranium. Many have a high uranium/thorium ratio as well. Radiometric measurements can also delineate different granite types within composite bodies

  9. Features of simultaneous discharge of tungsten with nickel and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.L.; Krivtsov, A.K.; Pavel'eva, L.A.; Zajtsev, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Specific features of the kinetics of electrolytic codeposition of tungsten alloys with nickel and cobalt were investigated. Experiments were conducted with ammonia-citrate electrolytes having the following composition in g/1: (1)CoSO 4 x7H 2 O-60, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O -70, citric acid-60, NH 4 OH to pH=6-7; (2) NiSO 4 x7H 2 O - from 1 to 20, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O-50, citric acid-66, NH 4 OH, to pH=6-7. Dependences of tungsten content in the alloy on the concentration of citric acid and current densities are investigated. It is shown that intermediate tungsten oxides of lower oxidation degrees can be formed in the electrolyte. Experimental proofs are obtained of tungsten discharge into the alloy with cobalt and nickel from citrate solutions through the film of intermediate compounds, which forms in the near-cathode space

  10. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-20

    May 20, 2015 ... We have carried out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spectromicroscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based ...

  11. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  12. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  13. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cryogenic treatment is a recent advancement in the field of machining to improve the properties of cutting tool materials. Tungsten carbide is the most commonly used cutting tool material in the industry and the technique can also be extended to it. Although the importance of tempering after cryogenic treatment has been ...

  14. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of sodium tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Studies of dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity have been made on three samples of sodium tungsten phosphate glasses over a temperature range of 77–420 K. Complex relative permit- tivity data have been analyzed using dielectric modulus approach. Conductivity relaxation frequency increases with the ...

  15. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Lithium microbattery; tungsten oxysulphide; thin film; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); sputtering. ... At the beginning of the intercalation, W6+ was first partially reduced into W5+, and then into W4+, but the important stage was the reduction of W4+ into W0. In W0, the electron binding energy was very ...

  16. Understanding the surface and structural characteristics of tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Tungsten oxide; tin oxide; etherification; glycerol; tert-butanol; glycerol ethers. 1. Introduction. Biodiesel, an eco-friendly biofuel is being chosen as an alternative to fossil fuels. Biodiesel has been produced in large quantities by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats.1 During the production of biodiesel.

  17. Hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition of Tungsten films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to establish a novel technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the future ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) of microelectronics. We developed a hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), where a heated tungsten (W) filament is utilized instead of a plasma to generate radicals. HWALD is

  18. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. II. Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerbacher, B.; Egede Christensen, N.

    1974-01-01

    Energy-distribution spectra of photoelectrons emitted normal to three single-crystal faces of tungsten have been measured for photon energies between 7.7 and 21.2 eV. The results are interpreted in terms of one-dimensional electronic properties along the symmetry lines in k space that correspond ...

  19. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1⋅2 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed on different compounds in both inter- calated (Li1WO1⋅05S2 ... during the first discharge–charge cycle. The analysis of both the W4f and the S2p peaks has shown that the redox processes involve not only the tungsten atoms but also sulphur atoms.

  20. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding pro- cesses to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively ...

  1. Thermally induced defects in a polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, B.N. [Department of Physics and Engineering, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Forbes, A., E-mail: aforbes1@csir.co.z [CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Ndwandwe, O.M. [Department of Physics and Engineering, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Hearne, G. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private bag X3, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, B.W. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private bag X3, P.O. Wits, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Physics and Biochemical Sciences, University of Malawi-The Polytechnic, Private Bag 303, Chichiri, Blantyre 0003 (Malawi); Katumba, G. [CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2009-12-01

    In this study we make use of laser heating of HTHP industrial diamond, to study temperature induced changes to the diamond structure, both chemically and mechanically, in the absence of mechanical forces. This has relevance to the efficacy of diamond as a hard material in such applications as rock drilling and material processing. We report on the induced defects when the diamond is irradiated with high power CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG lasers respectively, and show that the thermal induced stresses in the diamond are sufficient to radically alter its physical properties, resulting in critical fracture. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the heating does not result in graphitisation of the diamond, but rather diffusion from the non-diamond base results in cobalt and tungsten oxides forming on the diamond surface. This has a deleterious effect on the diamond performance.

  2. Space-charge compensation of highly charged ion beam from laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondrashev, S.A.; Collier, J.; Sherwood, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    The problem of matching an ion beam delivered by a high-intensity ion source with an accelerator is considered. The experimental results of highly charged ion beam transport with space-charge compensation by electrons are presented. A tungsten thermionic cathode is used as a source of electrons for beam compensation. An increase of ion beam current density by a factor of 25 is obtained as a result of space-charge compensation at a distance of 3 m from the extraction system. The process of ion beam space-charge compensation, requirements for a source of electrons, and the influence of recombination losses in a space-charge-compensated ion beam are discussed. (author)

  3. Low temperature processing of tungsten-fibre high-strength composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A tungsten nickel/iron compound with a high tungsten content up to over 90 percent by volume of tungsten and an ideal distribution of the nickel-iron multilayer-matrix avoiding tungsten - tungsten interfaces, has been processed without the use of any sintering process and thus resulted in avoiding temperatures of above 700 o C during the entire manufacturing process. An electrochemical coating of coarse tungsten powder with alternating layers of nickel and iron and a forging process at temperatures not exceeding 650 o C resulted in a high strength compound, which easily could be altered into a tungsten fiber compound with a fiber-length to fiber-diameter ratio of more than 10 3 . From the viewpoint of the metallurgist, easier handling systems are obtained when both a liquid phase and high temperatures with their risks for grain structures and grain boundaries are lacking. (author)

  4. Thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of erbium-doped niobic-tungsten-tellurite glasses for laser and amplifier devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boetti, Nadia G., E-mail: nadia.boetti@polito.it [PhotonLab, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Lousteau, Joris [PhotonLab, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Chiasera, Alessandro; Ferrari, Maurizio [CNR-IFN, Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CSMFO Lab. via alla Cascata 56/C, Povo, 38123 Trento (Italy); Mura, Emanuele; Scarpignato, Gerardo C. [PhotonLab, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Abrate, Silvio [PhotonLab, Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, Via P.C. Boggio, 61, 10138 Torino (Italy); Milanese, Daniel [PhotonLab, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Er{sup 3+} doped niobic-tungsten-tellurite glasses doped with concentration of Er{sup 3+} ion up to 3 wt% were fabricated. The effect of Er{sup 3+} doping concentration on thermal stability and optical properties was investigated in order to obtain the most suitable rare earth content for developing 1.5 {mu}m compact fiber amplifier pumped with a commercial telecom 980 nm laser diode. The maximum doping concentration allowed was found to be around 1.77 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} ions/cm{sup 3}, for which a broad 1.5 {mu}m emission spectra of 65 nm FWHM and a lifetime of 3.4 ms for the {sup 4}I{sub 13/2} level was measured. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal and optical properties of Er{sup 3+} doped niobic-tungsten-tellurite glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectroscopic properties measured when pumped by commercial telecom 980 nm LD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigation of the effect of Er{sup 3+}doping level on glass properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present glass is a good candidate for efficient 1.5 {mu}m compact fiber amplifier or laser.

  5. Spectrometer for cluster ion beam induced luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryuto, H., E-mail: ryuto@kuee.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakata, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Takaoka, G. H. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Musumeci, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Catania University, Catania 95123 (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania 95123 (Italy)

    2015-02-15

    A spectrometer to detect the ultra-weak luminescence originated by the collision of cluster ions on the surfaces of solid materials was constructed. This spectrometer consists of 11 photomultipliers with band-pass interference filters that can detect the luminescence within the wavelength ranging from 300 to 700 nm and of a photomultiplier without filter. The calibration of the detection system was performed using the photons emitted from a strontium aluminate fluorescent tape and from a high temperature tungsten filament. Preliminary measurements show the ability of this spectrometer to detect the cluster ion beam induced luminescence.

  6. The high temperature impact response of tungsten and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure polycrystalline tungsten and chromium at room and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.05 to 3 mm (tungsten) and from 0.1 to 2 mm (chromium). The use of fused silica windows in all but one experiment with chromium and in several high temperature experiments with tungsten led to the need for performing shock and optic characterization of these windows over the 300-1200 K temperature interval. Experiments with tungsten and chromium samples showed that annealing of the metals transforms the initial ramping elastic wave into a jump-like wave, substantially increasing the Hugoniot elastic limits of the metals. With increased annealing time, the spall strength of the two metals slightly increases. Both at room and at high temperatures, the elastic precursor in the two metals decays in two distinct regimes. At propagation distances smaller than ˜1 mm (tungsten) or ˜0.5 mm (chromium), decay is fast, with the dislocation motion and multiplication being controlled by phonon viscous drag. At greater distances, the rate of decay becomes much lower, with control of the plastic deformation being passed to the thermally activated generation and motion of dislocation double-kinks. The stress at which this transition takes place virtually coincides with the Peierls stress τP of the active glide system. Analysis of the annealing effects in both presently and previously studied BCC metals (i.e., Ta, V, Nb, Mo, W, and Cr) and of the dependencies of their normalized Peierls stresses τP(θ) /τP(0 ) on the normalized temperature θ=T /Tm allows one to conclude that the non-planar, split into several glide planes, structure of the dislocation core in these metals is mainly responsible for their plastic deformation features.

  7. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  8. Synthesis of high purity tungsten nanoparticles from tungsten heavy alloy scrap by selective precipitation and reduction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, S.S. Kalyan, E-mail: kalyanchem03@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, P.K.; Vimala, J.; Shanker, B.; Ghosal, P.; Durai, L.

    2016-09-05

    In this paper we report synthesis of tungsten nanoparticles of high purity >99.7 wt% from heavy alloy scrap using a novel chemical route of selective precipitation and reduction. The effect of Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer on controlling the particle size is established through FTIR spectra and corroborated with TEM images, wherein the average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g under different experimental conditions. This process is economical as raw material is a scrap and the efficiency of the reaction is >95%. - Highlights: • Tungsten nanoparticles were synthesized from tungsten heavy alloy scrap. • A novel chemical route of precipitation and reduction with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer as stabilizer is reported. • The average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g. • High pure tungsten nanoparticles of >99.7% purity could be synthesized using this route. • Efficiency of the reaction is >95%.

  9. A study of structural and mechanical properties of nano-crystalline tungsten nitride film synthesis by plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussnain, Ali; Singh Rawat, Rajdeep; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Umar, Z. A.; Ikhlaq, Uzma; Chen, Zhong; Shen, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Nano-crystalline tungsten nitride thin films are synthesized on AISI-304 steel at room temperature using Mather-type plasma focus system. The surface properties of the exposed substrate against different deposition shots are examined for crystal structure, surface morphology and mechanical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope and nano-indenter. The XRD results show the growth of WN and WN2 phases and the development of strain/stress in the deposited films by varying the number of deposition shots. Morphology of deposited films shows the significant change in the surface structure with different ion energy doses (number of deposition shots). Due to the effect of different ion energy doses, the strain/stress developed in the deposited film leads to an improvement of hardness of deposited films.

  10. Charge state of sputtered impurity ions near a limiter or divertor in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boley, C.D.; Brooks, J.N.; Kim, Y.K.

    1983-03-01

    Many impurity atoms sputtered from a limiter or divertor plate are ionized in the scrapeoff zone and return to the sputtering surface bacause of friction with incoming plasma ions. The final charge state attained by such impurities has been calculated for a variety of plasma edge conditions. The surface materials considered are tungsten, beryllium, beryllium oxide, and carbon. Estimates of the successive ionization cross sections for tungsten are developed. In all cases examined, returning impurity ions are found to be multiply ionized. This implies a significant energy gain in the sheath region, with important implications for self-sputtering of redeposited surface material

  11. Study of defects and radiation damage in solids by field-ion and atom-probe microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1979-06-01

    A brief review is presented of: the basic physical principles of the field-ion and atom-probe microscopes; the many applications of these instruments to the study of defects and radiation damage in solids; and the application of the atom-probe field-ion microscope to the study of the behavior of implanted 3 He and 4 He in tungsten

  12. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10 4 Bq cm -3 at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10 6 Bq cm -3 after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to 179 Ta with

  13. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  14. Influences of Temperature on the Conversion of Ammonium Tungstate Pentahydrate to Tungsten Oxide Particles with Controllable Sizes, Crystallinities, and Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Bayu Dani Nandiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate influences of temperature on the conversion of ammonium tungstate pentahydrate (ATP powder to tungsten trioxide (WO3 particles with controllable sizes, crystallinities, and physicochemical properties. In this study, we used a simple thermal decomposition method. In the experimental procedure, we explored the effect of temperature on the physicochemical properties of ATP by testing various heating temperatures (from 100 to 900 °C. The heated ATP samples were then characterized by a physical observation (i.e. color and various analysis methods (i.e. a thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that increases in temperature had an impact to the decreases in particle size, the change in material crystallinity, and the change in physical properties (e.g. change of color from white, orange, to yellowish green. The relationships between the reaction temperatures and the physicochemical properties of the ATP were also investigated in detail along with the theoretical consideration and the proposal of the WO3 particle formation mechanism. In simplification, the phenomena can be described into three zones of temperatures. (1 Below 250 °C (release of water molecules and some ammonium ions.; (2 At 250-400 °C (release of water molecules and ammonium ions, restructurization of tungsten and oxygen elements, and formation of amorphous tungsten trioxide. (3 At higher than 400 °C (crystallization of tungsten trioxide. Since ATP possessed reactivity on temperature, its physicochemical properties changing could be observed easily, and the experimental procedure could be done easily. The present study will benefit not only for “chemistry and material science” but also potentially to be used as a model material for explaining the thermal behavior of material to undergraduate students (suitable

  15. Effect of deposited tungsten on deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharapov, V.M.; Gavrilov, L.E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikauskas, V.S.

    1998-01-01

    Usually ion or plasma beam is used for the experiment with beryllium which simulates the interaction of plasma with first wall in fusion devices. However, the use of thermal or subthermal atoms of hydrogen isotopes seems to be useful for that purpose. Recently, the authors have studied the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium. The experimental setup is shown, and is explained. By means of elastic recoil detection (ERD) technique, it was shown that in the exposure to D atoms at 740 K, deuterium is distributed deeply into the bulk, and is accumulated up to higher concentration than the case of the exposure to molecular deuterium. The depth and concentration of deuterium distribution depend on the exposure time, and those data are shown. During the exposure to atomic deuterium, oxide film grew on the side of a sample facing plasma. In order to understand the mechanism of deuterium trapping, the experiment was performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). The influence that the tungsten deposit from the heated cathode exerted to the deuterium accumulation in beryllium in contact with atomic deuterium was investigated. These results are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Nanogravimetric studies of tungsten oxide thin films obtained by the polymeric precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, V.C.; Santos, M.C.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the intercalation/de-intercalation process of Li + ions in the tungsten oxide matrix was investigated. The reaction mechanism involved was also investigated. The WO 3 films, prepared by the polymeric precursor method, were deposited on a Pt covered quartz crystal using the dip-coating technique. The electrolyte was 0.1 mol L -1 LiClO 4 in acetonitrile. The morphology and structure of the deposit was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In the electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance results, it was observed that the mass transport as well as the kinetic processes involved are facilitated in the films cycled at lower potential sweep-rates. The mass variation data as a function of the charge variations in the anodic and cathodic regions indicate the participation of solvent molecules (acetonitrile) during the Li + ion intercalation/de-intercalation process. This was confirmed by the development of a model of the species flux as a function of the potential

  17. Tungsten covered graphite and copper elements and ITER-like actively cooled tungsten divertor plasma facing units for the WEST project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilhem, D; Bucalossi, J; Burles, S; Corre, Y; Ferlay, F; Firdaouss, M; Languille, P; Lipa, M; Martinez, A; Missirlian, M; Proust, M; Richou, M; Samaille, F; Tsitrone, E

    2016-01-01

    After a brief introduction giving some insight of the WEST project, we present the three types of plasma facing units (PFUs) developed for the WEST project taking into account the envisaged main scenarios: (1) high power short pulse scenario (a few seconds) where the objective is to maximize the power handling of the PFUs, up to 20 MW m −2 , (2) high fluence scenario (a few 100 s) on actively cooled ITER-like tungsten (W) PFUs, up to 10 MW m −2 during 1000 s. For the graphite PFUs, the high heat flux tests have been done at GLADIS (ion beam test facility), and for the CuCrZr PFUs on the JUDITH (electron beam test facility). The tests were successful, as no damage occurred for the different load cases. This confirms that the modelling done during the design phase is appropriate to describe these PFUs. Series productions are expected to be achieved by the end of 2015 for the graphite and CuCrZr PFUs, and few ITER-like W PFUs are expected at the beginning of 2016. The lower divertor will be complemented with ITER-like W PFUs as soon as available from our partners so that different fabrication procedures could be evaluated in a real industrial process and a real tokamak environment. (paper)

  18. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  19. Field electron emission from dense array of microneedles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Aoyagi, M.; Kitai, T.; Ishikawa, K.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristics of field electron emission from the dense array of microneedles of tungsten prepared on a 10-μm tungsten filament were measured at an environmental pressure of approx.1 x 10 -8 Torr (1.33 x 10 -6 Pa). Electron emission was not uniform over the filament surface, but the variation of emission current with applied voltage explicitly obeyed the Fowler-Nordheim relationship. At an emission current of approx.10 -4 A, a vacuum arc was induced that led to a permanent change in current-voltage characteristic. Current fluctuation was dependent on emitter temperature and applied voltage, and the lowest fluctuation of about 4% was routinely obtained at approx.550 K and at applied voltages several percent lower than the arc-inducing voltage. Macroscopic current density amounted to approx.20-80 mA/cm 2 at the best stability

  20. First-principles study on migration of vacancy in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    We calculated di-vacancy binding energies and migration energies of mono-vacancy and di-vacancy in tungsten material using DFT calculation. The mono-vacancy diffuses in [111] direction easily rather than in [001] direction. The migration energies of di-vacancies are almost the same value of the mono-vacancy. The migration of di-vacancy is approximately the same as the migration of mono-vacancy. The di-vacancy binding energies are almost zero or negative. The interactions between two vacancies in tungsten material are repulsive from the second to fifth nearest-neighbor. The vacancies are difficult to aggregate since di-vacancy is less stable than mono-vacancy. (author)

  1. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  2. Characterization of tungsten silicides formed by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.; Santiago, J.J.; VanDerSpiegel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Tungsten silicide samples were formed by sputter depositing 80 nm W metal onto (100) oriented, 5 ohm-cm Si wafers. After deposition, the samples were fast radiatively processed in an RTA system using quartz-halogen tungsten lamps as radiation sources for time intervals ranging from 20 to 60s under high vacuum. Films processed at 22-25 W/cm 2 radiation with the film side of the samples oriented away from the lamps result in films which are metallic or cloudy in color, and have mixed composition as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (W, W 5 Si 3 and WSi 2 ). Films processed with the film side oriented toward the lamps show the occurrence of a phase transformation clearly nucleated at the film edge

  3. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  4. Tungsten-182 heterogeneity in modern ocean island basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundl, Andrea; Touboul, Mathieu; Jackson, Matthew G.; Day, James M. D.; Kurz, Mark D.; Lekic, Vedran; Helz, Rosalind T.; Walker, Richard J.

    2017-04-01

    New tungsten isotope data for modern ocean island basalts (OIB) from Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland reveal variable 182W/184W, ranging from that of the ambient upper mantle to ratios as much as 18 parts per million lower. The tungsten isotopic data negatively correlate with 3He/4He. These data indicate that each OIB system accesses domains within Earth that formed within the first 60 million years of solar system history. Combined isotopic and chemical characteristics projected for these ancient domains indicate that they contain metal and are repositories of noble gases. We suggest that the most likely source candidates are mega-ultralow-velocity zones, which lie beneath Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland but not beneath hot spots whose OIB yield normal 182W and homogeneously low 3He/4He.

  5. High-temperature brazing for reliable tungsten-CFC joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppitz, Th; Pintsuk, G; Reisgen, U; Remmel, J; Hirai, T; Sievering, R; Rojas, Y; Casalegno, V

    2007-01-01

    The joining of tungsten and carbon-based materials is demanding due to the incompatibility of their chemical and thermophysical properties. Direct joining is unfeasible by the reason of brittle tungsten carbide formation. High-temperature brazing has been investigated in order to find a suitable brazing filler metal (BFM) which successfully acts as an intermediary between the incompatible properties of the base materials. So far only low Cr-alloyed Cu-based BFMs provide the preferential combination of good wetting action on both materials, tolerable interface reactions, and a precipitation free braze joint. Attempts to implement a higher melting metal (e.g. Pd, Ti, Zr) as a BFM have failed up to now, because the formation of brittle precipitations and pores in the seam were inevitable. But the wide metallurgical complexity of this issue is regarded to offer further joining potential

  6. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  7. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin, E-mail: shuxlin@buaa.edu.cn; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-15

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  8. R&D of the CEPC scintillator-tungsten ECAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    The circular electron and positron collider (CEPC) was proposed as a future Higgs factory. To meet the physics requirements, a particle flow algorithm-oriented calorimeter system with high energy resolution and precise reconstruction is considered. A sampling calorimeter with scintillator-tungsten sandwich structure is selected as one of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) options due to its good performance and relatively low cost. We present the design, the test and the optimization of the scintillator module read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), including the design and the development of the electronics. To estimate the performance of the scintillator and SiPM module for particles with different energy, the beam test of a mini detector prototype without tungsten shower material was performed at the E3 beams in Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The results are consistent with the expectation. These studies provide a reference and promote the development of particle flow electromagnetic calorimeter for the CEPC.

  9. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  10. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  11. The influence of low-energy helium plasma on bubble formation in micro-engineered tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Edward; Nadvornick, Warren; Doerner, Russ; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2018-04-01

    Four different types of micro-engineered tungsten surfaces were exposed to low energy helium plasma, with a planar surface as control. These samples include two surfaces covered with uniform W-coated rhenium micro-pillars; one with cylindrical pillars 1 μm in diameter and 25 μm in height, and one with dendritic conical pillars 4-10 μm in diameter and 20 μm in height. Additionally, two samples with reticulated open-cell foam geometry, one at 45 pores per inch (PPI), and the other at 80 PPI were fabricated with Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The samples were exposed to helium plasma at 30-100 eV ion energy, 823-1123 K temperature, and 5 × 1025 - 2 × 1026 m-2 ion fluence. It is shown that the formation of nanometer-scale tendrils (fuzz) on micro-engineered W surfaces is greatly reduced as compared to planar surfaces. This is attributed to more significant ion backscattering and the increased effective surface area that intercept incident ions in micro-engineered W. A 20% decrease in the average ion incident angle on pillar type surfaces leads to ∼30% decrease in bubble size, down to 30 nm in diameter. W fuzz was found to be absent from pillar sides due to high ion backscattering rates from pillar sides. In foam samples, 28% higher PPI is observed to have 24.7%-36.7% taller fuzz, and 17.0%-25.0% larger subsurface bubbles. These are found to be an order of magnitude smaller than those found in planar surfaces of similar environment. The helium bubble density was found to increase with ion energy in pillars, roughly from 8.2% to 48.4%, and to increase with increasing PPI, from 36.4% to 116.2%, and with bubble concentrations up to 9.1 × 1021 m-3. Geometric shadowing effects in or near surface ligaments are observed in all foam samples, with near absence of helium bubbles or fuzz in deeper layers of the foam.

  12. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  13. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  14. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel T; Timotius P; Maziar R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ) with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa...

  15. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux component asks for an increase of their operational range towards higher temperature in case of Cu/CuCrZr and lower temperatures for W. A remedy for both issues- brittleness of W and degrading strength of CuCrZr- could be the use of W fibres (Wf in W and Cu based composites. Fibre preforms could be manufactured with industrially viable textile techniques. Flat textiles with a combination of 150/70 µm W wires have been chosen for layered deposition of tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten (Wf/W samples and tubular multi-layered braidings with W wire thickness of 50 µm were produced as a preform for tungsten-fibre reinforced copper (Wf /Cu tubes. Cu melt infiltration was performed together with an industrial partner resulting in sample tubes without any blowholes. Property estimation by mean field homogenisation predicts strongly enhanced strength of the Wf/CuCrZr composite compared to its pure CuCrZr counterpart. Wf /W composites show very high toughness and damage tolerance even at room temperature. Cyclic load tests reveal that the extrinsic toughening mechanisms counteracting the crack growth are active and stable. FEM simulations of the Wf/W composite suggest that the influence of fibre debonding, which is an integral part of the toughening mechanisms, and reduced thermal conductivity of the fibre due to the necessary interlayers do not strongly influence the thermal properties of future components.

  16. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  17. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfaller, H.

    1980-01-01

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  18. USE OF TITANIUM AND TUNGSTEN AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO GOLD IN JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Y.R. Surnam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the use titanium and tungsten as alternatives to the noble metals in the jewellery industry was investigated. The degradation of titanium and tungsten were compared to that of gold, used as reference. Alternate immersion tests were performed in 3.5% sodium chloride and artificial perspiration. The metals’ abrasion resistance with respect to textile fabrics was determined. In general, there is around 30% difference in pit density for titanium and tungsten as compared to that of gold. Pit depth and pit diameter showed a similar trend. From the abrasive test performed, it was observed that titanium and tungsten had insignificant changes in the surface reflectivity with time. Hence, it was deduced that titanium and tungsten products would have longer maintenance intervals than that of gold. New tools and techniques, however, would be required by jewellers to work with titanium and tungsten.  

  19. Flow behaviour of a heat treated tungsten heavy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Jiten; Sarkar, R.; Rao, G. Appa; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.; Pabi, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation is proposed for the investigated alloy. ► Peierl's controlled dislocation motion is observed at low temperature. ► Transition from Peierl's to forest controlled mechanism is observed at 673 K. ► At room temperature predominantly tungsten grain, cleavage fracture is observed. ► At elevated temperature predominantly intergranular fracture is observed. - Abstract: Flow behaviour of a tungsten heavy alloy was studied in the strain rate-temperature range of 10 −5 –1/s and 298–973 K, respectively. It was observed in this study that the dislocation motion in tungsten heavy alloy was controlled by a Peierl's mechanism at low temperatures (up to 573 K). This was confirmed by the magnitude of apparent activation volume and apparent activation enthalpy as well as TEM observations. Apparent activation enthalpy in the Peierls regime, determined by several methods, was found to vary in between 22 and 37 kJ/mol. An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation was also proposed in the Peierls controlled regime for predicting flow stress as a function of temperature and strain rate. Transition temperature of rate controlling mechanism—from Peierl's mechanism to forest mechanism—was determined from the strain rate sensitivity and apparent activation volume estimation at several temperatures. The transition temperature was found to be about 673 K.

  20. Tungsten Oxide Photonic Crystals as Optical Transducer for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Wu, Xia; Wagner, Thorsten

    2018-01-26

    Some metal oxide semiconductors, such as tungsten trioxide or tin dioxide, are well-known as resistive transducers for gas sensing and offer high sensitivities down to the part per billion level. Electrical signal read-out, however, limits the information obtained on the electronic properties of metal oxides to a certain frequency range and its application because of the required electrical contacts. Therefore, a novel approach for building an optical transducer for gas reactions utilizing metal oxide photonic crystals is presented here. By the rational design of the structure and composition it is possible to synthesize a functional material which allows one to obtain insight into its electronic properties in the optical frequency range with simple experimental measures. The concept is demonstrated by tungsten trioxide inverse opal structure as optical transducer material for hydrogen sensing. The sensing behavior is analyzed in a temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C and in a wide hydrogen concentration range (3000 ppm to 10%). The sensing mechanism is mainly the refractive index change resulting from hydrogen intercalation in tungsten trioxide, but the back reaction has also impact on the optical properties of this system. Detailed chemical reaction studies provide suggestions for specific sensing conditions.

  1. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  2. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  3. Brazing molybdenum and tungsten for high temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Turner, W.C.; Hoffman, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop vacuum brazes for molybdenum and tungsten which can be used in seal joint applications up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F). Joints were attempted in molybdenum, tungsten and tungsten--molybdenum. The braze materials included: Ti--10Cr powder, Ti--30V wire, Ti--65V wire, V wire, Ni electroplate, MoB--50MoC powder mixture, V--50Mo powder mixture, Mo--15MoB 2 powder mixture and Mo--49V--15MoB 2 powder mixture. Braze temperature ranged from 1900 K (1627 C, 2961 F) to 2530 K, (2257 C, 4095 F), and leak-tight joints were made with all braze materials except Ti--10Cr. After heat treatments up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F) Kirkendall voiding was found to cause leakage of some of the joints made with only substitutional alloying elements. However, adding base metal powders to the braze or narrowing the root opening eliminated this problem. Kirkendall voiding was not a problem when interstitial elements were a major ingredient in the braze material. Shear testing of Ti--65V, V, MoB--50MoC and V--50Mo brazed molybdenum at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) indicated strengths equal to or better than the base metal. Ti--65V, V--50Mo and MoB--50MoC brazed joints were exposed to basalt at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) for 3 h without developing leaks

  4. The thermal accommodation of helium and argon on hot tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the momentum flux of gas atoms, remitted normal to the surface of a hot clean tungsten ribbon immersed in a low pressure of helium or argon, is measured with a torsion balance and the thermal accommodation coefficient deduced. Data are presented in which the tungsten temperature range was 700 to 1900 K for helium and 1100 to 1700 K for argon. A model is proposed which assumes that atoms impinging on and remitted from the hot tungsten ribbon conserve momentum in directions parallel to the surface. This results in a remitted flux, in the direction of the normal, greater than the cosine emission relation would predict. The resulting accommodation coefficients are then of the same order as those found using the total heat loss method. The accuracy of the reported method increases with the temperature of the hot solid. Measurement of translational thermal accommodation is possible without relying on the temperature coefficient of resistance of the solid and hence is applicable to alloys and to non-metals. For metals, which have a normal temperature coefficient of resistance, the method allows translational accommodation to be measured and internal energy accommodation to be deduced. (U.K.)

  5. Extractive separation and spectrophotometric determination of tungsten as phosphotungsten blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatirajam, V.; Dhamija, S.

    1977-01-01

    Phosphotungsten blue is produced by tin(II) reduction of tungstate solution complexed with phosphate at a w/w ratio of W/P = 5, in 4M hydrochloric acid medium, and extracted with isoamyl alcohol; thus tungsten is separated from Fe(III), Ni, Co, Cr(III), V(V), As(V), Sb(III), Bi, Si, U(VI), Ca and Cu(II). In presence of bismuth (0.5 mg/ml), >= 99.7% W is separated in a single extraction. After alkaline back-extraction, tungsten is determined spectrophotometrically as phosphotungsten blue; it is measured at 930 nm in aqueous solution or at 900 to 960 nm after isoamyl alcohol extraction, the Beer's law ranges being 0.08 to 0.6 and 0.16 to 0.72 mg/ml respectively. The methods are shown to give satisfactory results in the analysis of practical samples containing some milligrams of tungsten. (author)

  6. Hypervelocity impact of tungsten cubes on spaced armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Pradeep S; Sood, Dharmanshu; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Prince; Sewak, Bhupinder; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Athwal, Manoj; Mangla, Vikas; Biswas, Ipsita; Singh, Manjit

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental observations and simulation studies of damage potential of tungsten alloy cubes on relatively thin mild steel spaced armour target plates in the velocity regime 1300 – 4000 ms −1 using Two Stage Light Gas Gun technique. The cubes of size 9.5 mm and 12 mm having mass 15 g and 30 g respectively were made to impact normally on three target plates of size 300 mm × 300 mm of thickness 4, 4 and 10 mm at 100 mm distance apart. Flash radiography has been used to image the projectile-target interaction in the nitrogen environment at 300 mbar vacuum at room temperature. The results reveal clear perforation by 9.5 mm cube in all the three target plates up to impact velocity of about 2000 m/s. While 12 mm cube can perforate the spaced armour upto impact velocity of 4000 m/s. This shows that 9.5mm tungsten alloy cube is not effective beyond 2000 m/s while 12 mm tungsten alloy cube can defeat the spaced armour upto 4000 m/s. The simulation studies have been carried out using Autodyn 3D nonlinear code using Lagrange solver at velocities 1200 – 4000 m/s. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. Sputtering properties of tungsten 'fuzzy' surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, D.; Baldwin, M.J.; Doerner, R.P.; Yu, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Sputtering yields of He-induced W 'fuzzy' surfaces bombarded by Ar have been measured in the linear divertor plasma simulator PISCES-B. It is found that the sputtering yield of a fuzzy surface, Y fuzzy , decreases with increasing fuzzy layer thickness, L, and saturates at ∼10% of that of a smooth surface, Y smooth , at L > 1 μm. The reduction in the sputtering yield is suspected to be due mainly to the porous structure of fuzz, since the ratio, Y fuzzy /Y smooth follows (1 - p fuzz ), where p fuzz is the fuzz porosity. Further, Y fuzzy /Y smooth is observed to increase with incident ion energy, E i . This may be explained by an energy dependent change in the angular distribution of sputtered W atoms, since at lower E i , the angular distribution is observed to become more butterfly-shaped. That is, a larger fraction of sputtered W atoms can line-of-sight deposit/stick onto neighboring fuzz nanostructures for lower E i butterfly distributions, resulting in lower ratio of Y fuzzy /Y smooth .

  8. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-648] Certain Semiconductor Integration... semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization and products containing the same by reason of...

  9. Tissue distribution patterns of solubilized metals from internalized tungsten alloy in the F344 rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernieda B. Vergara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique physical and chemical properties, tungsten has been increasingly utilized in a variety of civilian and military applications. This expanded use also raises the risk of human exposure through internalization by various routes. In most cases the toxicological and carcinogenic properties of these tungsten-based compounds are not known nor are the dissolution biokinetics and ultimate fate of the associated metals. Using a laboratory rodent model system designed to assess the health effects of embedded metals, and a tungsten alloy comprised of tungsten (91.1%, nickel (6.0%, and cobalt (2.9%, we investigated the tissue distribution patterns of the metals over a six month period. Despite its perceived insolubility, tungsten rapidly solubilized from the implanted metal fragments, as did nickel and cobalt. All three metals distributed systemically over time with extremely elevated levels of all three metals found in kidney, liver, and spleen. Unexpectedly, tungsten was found to cross the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers and localize in those tissues. These results, along with recent reports suggesting that tungsten is a tumor promoter, raises serious concerns as to the long-term health effects of exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based compounds.

  10. Programming voltage reduction in phase change memory cells with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Feng; Song Zhitang; Gong Yuefeng; Wu Liangcai; Feng Songlin; Chen, Bomy

    2008-01-01

    A phase change memory cell with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode is investigated. The crystalline tungsten trioxide heating layer promotes the temperature rise in the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 layer which causes the reduction in the reset voltage compared to a conventional phase change memory cell. Theoretical thermal simulation and calculation for the reset process are applied to understand the thermal effect of the tungsten trioxide heating layer/electrode. The improvement in thermal efficiency of the PCM cell mainly originates from the low thermal conductivity of the crystalline tungsten trioxide material.

  11. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  12. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, C.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lee, E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Langdon, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement.

  13. Hydrogen isotope exchange in tungsten: Discussion as removal method for tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Markina, E.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope exchange in re-crystallized polycrystalline tungsten was investigated at 320 and 450 K. In a first step the tungsten samples were loaded with deuterium to a fluence of 1024 D/m2 from a low-temperature plasma at 200 eV/D particle energy. In a second step, H was implanted at the same particle energy and similar target temperature with a mass-separated ion beam at different ion fluences ranging from 2 × 1020 to 7.5 × 1023 H/m2. The analytic methods used were nuclear reaction analysis with D(3He,p)α reaction and elastic recoil detection analysis with 4He. In order to determine the D concentration at depths of up to 7.4 μm the 3He energy was varied from 0.5 to 4.5 MeV. It was found that already at an H fluence of 2 × 1020 H/m2, i.e. at 1/5000 of the initial D fluence, about 30% of the retained D was released. Depth profiling of D without and with subsequent H implantation shows strong replacement close to the surface at 320 K, but extending to all analyzable depths at 450 K especially at high fluences, leading to higher release efficiency. The reverse sequence of hydrogen isotopes allowed the analysis of the replacing isotope and showed that the release of D is balanced by the uptake of H. It also shows that hydrogen does not diffuse through a region of filled traps into a region were unfilled traps can be encounter but transport is rather a dynamic process of trapping and de-trapping even at 320 K. Initial D retention in H loaded W is an order of magnitude higher than in pristine W, indicating that every H-containing trap is a potential trap for D. In consequence, hydrogen isotope exchange is not a viable method to significantly enhance the operation time before the tritium inventory limit is reached but should be considered an option to reduce the tritium inventory in ITER before major interventions at the end of an operation period.

  14. Deep learning relevance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Petersen, Casper

    2016-01-01

    train a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) on existing relevant information to that query. We then use the RNN to "deep learn" a single, synthetic, and we assume, relevant document for that query. We design a crowdsourcing experiment to assess how relevant the "deep learned" document is, compared...

  15. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  16. Electron capture by C2+ and Ti2+ ions in H and H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.L.; McCullough, R.W.; Gilbody, H.B.

    1978-01-01

    Cross sections for electron capture by C 2+ and Ti 2+ ions in H and H 2 have been determined within the energy range 0.5 to 14 keV from measurements made using a tungsten-tube furnace to provide a target of highly dissociated hydrogen. (author)

  17. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Allain, J.P.; Efe, Mert; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 10 23 –2.0 × 10 24  ions m −2  s −1 , the sample bias ranged from a negative (20–65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600–1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma. (paper)

  18. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Spectroscopic and Collisional Data for Tungsten from 1 eV to 20 keV. Summary Report of the Second Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.

    2014-08-01

    The second Research Coordination Meeting of a coordinated research project (CRP) on spectroscopic and collisional data for tungsten ions in fusion plasma was held 29-31 August 2012 at Max-Planck- Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg, Germany. Thirteen projects participate in the CRP and were represented at the meeting together with 8 further experts and 2 IAEA scientific staff. Participants presented their research following which outstanding data needs were identified and a work plan was developed for the remainder of the CRP. The proceedings and conclusions of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  20. A simple alkali-metal and noble gas ion source for SIMS equipments with mass separation of the primary ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duesterhoeft, H.; Pippig, R.

    1986-01-01

    An alkali-metal ion source working without a store of alkali-metals is described. The alkali-metal ions are produced by evaporation of alkali salts and ionization in a low-voltage arc discharge stabilized with a noble gas plasma or in the case of small alkali-metal ion currents on the base of the well known thermic ionization at a hot tungsten wire. The source is very simple in construction and produces a stable ion current of 0.3 μA for more than 100 h. It is possible to change the ion species in a short time. This source is applicable to all SIMS equipments using mass separation for primary ions. (author)