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Sample records for tunable chemokine production

  1. Chemokines

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    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  2. Local Production of Chemokines during Experimental Vaginal Candidiasis

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    Saavedra, Michael; Taylor, Brad; Lukacs, Nicholas; Fidel, Paul L.

    1999-01-01

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused by Candida albicans, is a significant problem in women of childbearing age. Although cell-mediated immunity (CMI) due to T cells and cytokines is the predominant host defense mechanism against C. albicans at mucosal tissue sites, host defense mechanisms against C. albicans at the vaginal mucosa are poorly understood. Based on an estrogen-dependent murine model of vaginal candidiasis, our data suggest that systemic CMI is ineffective against C. albicans vaginal infections. Thus, we have postulated that local immune mechanisms are critical for protection against infection. In the present study, the kinetic production of chemokines normally associated with the chemotaxis of T cells, macrophages (RANTES, MIP-1α, MCP-1), and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (MIP-2) was examined following intravaginal inoculation of C. albicans in estrogen-treated or untreated mice. Results showed significant increases in MCP-1 protein and mRNA in vaginal tissue of infected mice as early as 2 and 4 days postinoculation, respectively, that continued through a 21-day observation period, irrespective of estrogen status. No significant changes were observed with RANTES, MIP-1α, or MIP-2, although relatively high constitutive levels of RANTES mRNA and MIP-2 protein were observed. Furthermore, intravaginal immunoneutralization of MCP-1 with anti-MCP-1 antibodies resulted in a significant increase in vaginal fungal burden early during infection, suggesting that MCP-1 plays some role in reducing the fungal burden during vaginal infection. However, the lack of changes in leukocyte profiles in vaginal lavage fluids collected from infected versus uninfected mice suggests that MCP-1 functions to control vaginal C. albicans titers in a manner independent of cellular chemotactic activity. PMID:10531235

  3. IL-27 Modulates Chemokine Production in TNF-α -Stimulated Human Oral Epithelial Cells.

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    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Hosokawa, Ikuko; Ozaki, Kazumi; Matsuo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a cytokine which belongs to the IL-12 family. However, the role of IL-27 in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease is uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of IL-27 on chemokine production in TNF-α-stimulated human oral epithelial cells (TR146). We measured chemokine production in TR146 by ELISA. We used western blot analysis to detect the phosphorylation levels of signal transduction molecules, including STAT1 and STAT3 in TR146. We used inhibitors to examine the role of STAT1 and STAT3 activation. IL-27 increased CXCR3 ligands production in TNF-α-stimulated TR146. Meanwhile, IL-27 suppressed IL-8 and CCL20 production induced by TNF-α. STAT1 phosphorylation level in IL-27 and TNF-α-stimulated TR146 was enhanced in comparison to TNF-α-stimulated TR146. STAT3 phosphorylation level in IL-27-treated TR146 did not change by TNF-α. Both STAT1 inhibitor and STAT3 inhibitor decreased CXCR3 ligands production. STAT1 inhibitor overrode the inhibitory effect of IL-27 on IL-8 and CCL20 production in TNF-α-stimulated TR146. Meanwhile, STAT3 inhibitor did not modulate IL-8 and CCL20 production. IL-27 might control leukocyte migration in periodontal lesion by modulating chemokine production from epithelial cells. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Alpha-mangostin inhibits both dengue virus production and cytokine/chemokine expression.

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    Tarasuk, Mayuri; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Chimma, Pattamawan; Sratongno, Panudda; Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2017-08-15

    Since severe dengue virus (DENV) infection in humans associates with both high viral load and massive cytokine production - referred to as "cytokine storm", an ideal drug for treatment of DENV infection should efficiently inhibit both virus production and cytokine expression. In searching for such an ideal drug, we discovered that α-mangostin (α-MG), a major bioactive compound purified from the pericarp of the mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana Linn), which has been used in traditional medicine for several conditions including trauma, diarrhea, wound infection, pain, fever, and convulsion, inhibits both DENV production in cultured hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh-7 cells, and cytokine/chemokine expression in HepG2 cells. α-MG could also efficiently inhibit all four serotypes of DENV. Treatment of DENV-infected cells with α-MG (20μM) significantly reduced the infection rates of four DENV serotypes by 47-55%. α-MG completely inhibited production of DENV-1 and DENV-3, and markedly reduced production of DENV-2 and DENV-4 by 100 folds. Furthermore, it could markedly reduce cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (RANTES, MIP-1β, and IP-10) transcription. These actions of α-MG are more potent than those of antiviral agent (ribavirin) and anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone). Thus, α-MG is potential to be further developed as therapeutic agent for DENV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 15-Lipoxygenases regulate the production of chemokines in human lung macrophages.

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    Abrial, C; Grassin-Delyle, S; Salvator, H; Brollo, M; Naline, E; Devillier, P

    2015-09-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) activity is associated with inflammation and immune regulation. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the expression of 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 and evaluate the enzymes' roles in the polarization of human lung macrophages (LMs) in response to LPS and Th2 cytokines (IL-4/-13). LMs were isolated from patients undergoing surgery for carcinoma. The cells were cultured with a 15-LOX inhibitor (PD146176 or ML351), a COX inhibitor (indomethacin), a 5-LOX inhibitor (MK886) or vehicle and then stimulated with LPS (10 ng · mL(-1)), IL-4 (10 ng · mL(-1)) or IL-13 (50 ng · mL(-1)) for 24 h. Levels of ALOX15 (15-LOX-1) and ALOX15B (15-LOX-2) transcripts were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Immunoassays were used to measure levels of LPS-induced cytokines (TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL10) and Th2 cytokine-induced chemokines (CCL13, CCL18 and CCL22) in the culture supernatant. Stimulation of LMs with LPS was associated with increased expression of ALOX15B, whereas stimulation with IL-4/IL-13 induced the expression of ALOX15. PD146176 and ML351 (10 μM) reduced the release of the chemokines induced by LPS and Th2 cytokines. The effects of these 15-LOX inhibitors were maintained in the presence of indomethacin and MK886. Furthermore, indomethacin revealed the inhibitory effect of PD146176 on TNF-α release. Inhibition of the 15-LOX pathways is involved in the down-regulation of the in vitro production of chemokines in LMs. Our results suggest that the 15-LOX pathways have a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung disorders and may thus constitute a potential drug target. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Macrophage Transactivation for Chemokine Production Identified as a Negative Regulator of Granulomatous Inflammation Using Agent-Based Modeling

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    Daniel Moyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular activation in trans by interferons, cytokines, and chemokines is a commonly recognized mechanism to amplify immune effector function and limit pathogen spread. However, an optimal host response also requires that collateral damage associated with inflammation is limited. This may be particularly so in the case of granulomatous inflammation, where an excessive number and/or excessively florid granulomas can have significant pathological consequences. Here, we have combined transcriptomics, agent-based modeling, and in vivo experimental approaches to study constraints on hepatic granuloma formation in a murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. We demonstrate that chemokine production by non-infected Kupffer cells in the Leishmania donovani-infected liver promotes competition with infected KCs for available iNKT cells, ultimately inhibiting the extent of granulomatous inflammation. We propose trans-activation for chemokine production as a novel broadly applicable mechanism that may operate early in infection to limit excessive focal inflammation.

  7. Carnosol and Related Substances Modulate Chemokine and Cytokine Production in Macrophages and Chondrocytes

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    Joseph Schwager

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic diterpenes present in Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis have anti-inflammatory and chemoprotective effects. We investigated the in vitro effects of carnosol (CL, carnosic acid (CA, carnosic acid-12-methylether (CAME, 20-deoxocarnosol and abieta-8,11,13-triene-11,12,20-triol (ABTT in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells and human chondrocytes. The substances concentration-dependently reduced nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages (i.e., acute inflammation. They significantly blunted gene expression levels of iNOS, cytokines/interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6 and chemokines including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. The substances modulated the expression of catabolic and anabolic genes in chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 and in primary human chondrocytes that were stimulated by IL-1β (i.e., chronic inflammation In SW1353, catabolic genes like MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 that contribute to cartilage erosion were down-regulated, while expression of anabolic genes including Col2A1 and aggrecan were shifted towards pre-pathophysiological homeostasis. CL had the strongest overall effect on inflammatory mediators, as well as on macrophage and chondrocyte gene expression. Conversely, CAME mainly affected catabolic gene expression, whereas ABTT had a more selectively altered interleukin and chemokine gene exprssion. CL inhibited the IL-1β induced nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65, suggesting that it primarily regulated via the NF-κB signalling pathway. Collectively, CL had the strongest effects on inflammatory mediators and chondrocyte gene expression. The data show that the phenolic diterpenes altered activity pattern of genes that regulate acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Since the substances affected catabolic and anabolic gene expression in cartilage cells in vitro, they may beneficially act on the aetiology of osteoarthritis.

  8. Low intensity shear stress increases endothelial ELR+ CXC chemokine production via a focal adhesion kinase-p38{beta} MAPK-NF-{kappa}B pathway.

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    Shaik, Sadiq S; Soltau, Thomas D; Chaturvedi, Gaurav; Totapally, Balagangadhar; Hagood, James S; Andrews, William W; Athar, Mohammad; Voitenok, Nikolai N; Killingsworth, Cheryl R; Patel, Rakesh P; Fallon, Michael B; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2009-02-27

    CXC chemokines with a glutamate-leucine-arginine (ELR) tripeptide motif (ELR(+) CXC chemokines) play an important role in leukocyte trafficking into the tissues. For reasons that are not well elucidated, circulating leukocytes are recruited into the tissues mainly in small vessels such as capillaries and venules. Because ELR(+) CXC chemokines are important mediators of endothelial-leukocyte interaction, we compared chemokine expression by microvascular and aortic endothelium to investigate whether differences in chemokine expression by various endothelial types could, at least partially, explain the microvascular localization of endothelial-leukocyte interaction. Both in vitro and in vivo models indicate that ELR(+) CXC chemokine expression is higher in microvascular endothelium than in aortic endothelial cells. These differences can be explained on the basis of the preferential activation of endothelial chemokine production by low intensity shear stress. Low shear activated endothelial ELR(+) CXC chemokine production via cell surface heparan sulfates, beta(3)-integrins, focal adhesion kinase, the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38beta, mitogen- and stress-associated protein kinase-1, and the transcription factor.

  9. Autocrine production of beta-chemokines protects CMV-Specific CD4 T cells from HIV infection.

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    Joseph P Casazza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction of a functional subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells that is resistant to HIV infection could enhance immune protection and decrease the rate of HIV disease progression. CMV-specific CD4+ T cells, which are less frequently infected than HIV-specific CD4+ T cells, are a model for such an effect. To determine the mechanism of this protection, we compared the functional response of HIV gag-specific and CMV pp65-specific CD4+ T cells in individuals co-infected with CMV and HIV. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells rapidly up-regulated production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta mRNA, resulting in a rapid increase in production of MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta after cognate antigen stimulation. Production of beta-chemokines was associated with maturational phenotype and was rarely seen in HIV-specific CD4+ T cells. To test whether production of beta-chemokines by CD4+ T cells lowers their susceptibility to HIV infection, we measured cell-associated Gag DNA to assess the in vivo infection history of CMV-specific CD4+ T cells. We found that CMV-specific CD4+ T cells which produced MIP-1beta contained 10 times less Gag DNA than did those which failed to produce MIP-1beta. These data suggest that CD4+ T cells which produce MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta bind these chemokines in an autocrine fashion which decreases the risk of in vivo HIV infection.

  10. Production of cytokine and chemokines by human mononuclear cells and whole blood cells after infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Karine Rezende-Oliveira

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The innate immune response is the first mechanism of protection against Trypanosoma cruzi, and the interaction of inflammatory cells with parasite molecules may activate this response and modulate the adaptive immune system. This study aimed to analyze the levels of cytokines and chemokines synthesized by the whole blood cells (WBC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of individuals seronegative for Chagas disease after interaction with live T. cruzi trypomastigotes. METHODS: IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α, TGF-β, CCL-5, CCL-2, CCL-3, and CXCL-9 were measured by ELISA. Nitrite was determined by the Griess method. RESULTS: IL-10 was produced at high levels by WBC compared with PBMC, even after incubation with live trypomastigotes. Production of TNF-α by both PBMC and WBC was significantly higher after stimulation with trypomastigotes. Only PBMC produced significantly higher levels of IL-12 after parasite stimulation. Stimulation of cultures with trypomastigotes induced an increase of CXCL-9 levels produced by WBC. Nitrite levels produced by PBMC increased after the addition of parasites to the culture. CONCLUSIONS: Surface molecules of T. cruzi may induce the production of cytokines and chemokines by cells of the innate immune system through the activation of specific receptors not evaluated in this experiment. The ability to induce IL-12 and TNF-α contributes to shift the adaptive response towards a Th1 profile.

  11. Extracellular Histones Induce Chemokine Production in Whole Blood Ex Vivo and Leukocyte Recruitment In Vivo.

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    Westman, Johannes; Papareddy, Praveen; Dahlgren, Madelene W; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Smeds, Emanuel; Linder, Adam; Mörgelin, Matthias; Johansson-Lindbom, Bengt; Egesten, Arne; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    The innate immune system relies to a great deal on the interaction of pattern recognition receptors with pathogen- or damage-associated molecular pattern molecules. Extracellular histones belong to the latter group and their release has been described to contribute to the induction of systemic inflammatory reactions. However, little is known about their functions in the early immune response to an invading pathogen. Here we show that extracellular histones specifically target monocytes in human blood and this evokes the mobilization of the chemotactic chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 from these cells. The chemokine induction involves the toll-like receptor 4/myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex on monocytes, and is under the control of interferon-γ. Consequently, subcutaneous challenge with extracellular histones results in elevated levels of CXCL10 in a murine air pouch model and an influx of leukocytes to the site of injection in a TLR4 dependent manner. When analyzing tissue biopsies from patients with necrotizing fasciitis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, extracellular histone H4 and CXCL10 are immunostained in necrotic, but not healthy tissue. Collectively, these results show for the first time that extracellular histones have an important function as chemoattractants as their local release triggers the recruitment of immune cells to the site of infection.

  12. IL-1β produced by aggressive breast cancer cells is one of the factors that dictate their interactions with mesenchymal stem cells through chemokine production

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    Serret, Julien; Bièche, Ivan; Brigitte, Madly; Caicedo, Andres; Sanchez, Elodie; Vacher, Sophie; Vignais, Marie-Luce; Bourin, Philippe; Geneviève, David; Molina, Franck; Jorgensen, Christian; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to understand whether the nature of breast cancer cells could modify the nature of the dialog of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with cancer cells. By treating MSCs with the conditioned medium of metastatic Estrogen-receptor (ER)-negative MDA-MB-231, or non-metastatic ER-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we observed that a number of chemokines were produced at higher levels by MSCs treated with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium (CM). MDA-MB-231 cells were able to induce NF-κB signaling in MSC cells. This was shown by the use of a NF-kB chemical inhibitor or an IκB dominant negative mutant, nuclear translocation of p65 and induction of NF-κB signature. Our results suggest that MDA-MB-231 cells exert their effects on MSCs through the secretion of IL-1β, that activates MSCs and induces the same chemokines as the MDA-MB-231CM. In addition, inhibition of IL-1β secretion in the MDA-MB-231 cells reduces the induced production of a panel of chemokines by MSCs, as well the motility of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data suggest that aggressive breast cancer cells secrete IL-1β, which increases the production of chemokines by MSCs. PMID:26362269

  13. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Multiple Sclerosis

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    Wenjing Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease with classical traits of demyelination, axonal damage, and neurodegeneration. The migration of autoimmune T cells and macrophages from blood to central nervous system as well as the destruction of blood brain barrier are thought to be the major processes in the development of this disease. Chemokines, which are small peptide mediators, can attract pathogenic cells to the sites of inflammation. Each helper T cell subset expresses different chemokine receptors so as to exert their different functions in the pathogenesis of MS. Recently published results have shown that the levels of some chemokines and chemokine receptors are increased in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients. This review describes the advanced researches on the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in the development of MS and discusses the potential therapy of this disease targeting the chemokine network.

  14. IL-6 amplifies TLR mediated cytokine and chemokine production: implications for the pathogenesis of rheumatic inflammatory diseases.

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    Ivan Caiello

    Full Text Available The role of Interleukin(IL-6 in the pathogenesis of joint and systemic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (s-JIA has been clearly demonstrated. However, the mechanisms by which IL-6 contributes to the pathogenesis are not completely understood. This study investigates whether IL-6 affects, alone or upon toll like receptor (TLR ligand stimulation, the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, synovial fluid mononuclear cells from JIA patients (SFMCs and fibroblast-like synoviocytes from rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA synoviocytes and signalling pathways involved. PBMCs were pre-treated with IL-6 and soluble IL-6 Receptor (sIL-6R. SFMCs and RA synoviocytes were pre-treated with IL-6/sIL-6R or sIL-6R, alone or in combination with Tocilizumab (TCZ. Cells were stimulated with LPS, S100A8-9, poly(I-C, CpG, Pam2CSK4, MDP, IL-1β. Treatment of PBMCs with IL-6 induced production of TNF-α, CXCL8, and CCL2, but not IL-1β. Addition of IL-6 to the same cells after stimulation with poly(I-C, CpG, Pam2CSK4, and MDP induced a significant increase in IL-1β and CXCL8, but not TNF-α production compared with TLR ligands alone. This enhanced production of IL-1β and CXCL8 paralleled increased p65 NF-κB activation. In contrast, addition of IL-6 to PBMCs stimulated with LPS or S100A8-9 (TLR-4 ligands led to reduction of IL-1β, TNF-α and CXCL8 with reduced p65 NF-κB activation. IL-6/IL-1β co-stimulation increased CXCL8, CCL2 and IL-6 production. Addition of IL-6 to SFMCs stimulated with LPS or S100A8 increased CXCL8, CCL2 and IL-1β production. Treatment of RA synoviocytes with sIL-6R increased IL-6, CXCL8 and CCL2 production, with increased STAT3 and p65 NF-κB phosphorylation. Our results suggest that IL-6 amplifies TLR-induced inflammatory response. This effect may be relevant in the presence of high IL-6 and sIL-6R levels, such as in arthritic

  15. PULSION registered HP: Tunable, High Productivity Plasma Doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felch, S. B.; Torregrosa, F.; Etienne, H.; Spiegel, Y.; Roux, L.; Turnbaugh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma doping has been explored for many implant applications for over two decades and is now being used in semiconductor manufacturing for two applications: DRAM polysilicon counter-doping and contact doping. The PULSION HP is a new plasma doping tool developed by Ion Beam Services for high-volume production that enables customer control of the dominant mechanism--deposition, implant, or etch. The key features of this tool are a proprietary, remote RF plasma source that enables a high density plasma with low chamber pressure, resulting in a wide process space, and special chamber and wafer electrode designs that optimize doping uniformity.

  16. High Levels of Chemokine C-C Motif Ligand 20 in Human Milk and Its Production by Oral Keratinocytes.

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    Lourenço, Alan G; Komesu, Marilena C; Duarte, Geraldo; Del Ciampo, Luiz A; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M; Yamamoto, Aparecida Y

    2017-03-01

    Chemokine C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20) is implicated in the formation and function of mucosal lymphoid tissues. Although CCL20 is secreted by many normal human tissues, no studies have evaluated the presence of CCL20 in human milk or its production by oral keratinocytes stimulated by human milk. To evaluate the presence of CCL20 in breast milk and verify CCL20 secretion in vitro by oral keratinocytes stimulated with human and bovine milk, as well as its possible association with breast milk lactoferrin levels. The levels of CCL20 and lactoferrin were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in human milk at three different stages of maturation from 74 healthy breastfeeding mothers. In vitro, oral keratinocytes were stimulated with human and bovine milk, and CCL20 was measured in their supernatant. High concentrations of CCL20 were detected in the human breast milk samples obtained during the first week (1,777.07 pg/mL) and second week postpartum (1,523.44 pg/mL), with a significantly low concentration in samples at 3-6 weeks postpartum (238.42 pg/mL; p stimulated higher CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes compared with bovine milk (p stimulation had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration. CCl20 is present at high levels in human milk, predominantly in the first and second week postpartum, but at significantly lower levels at 3-6 weeks postpartum. Human milk is capable of stimulating CCL20 secretion by oral keratinocytes, and this induction had no association with breast milk lactoferrin concentration.

  17. Tick saliva increases production of three chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a histamine-releasing cytokine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langhansová, Helena; Bopp, T.; Schmitt, E.; Kopecký, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 2 (2015), s. 92-96 ISSN 0141-9838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP302/11/J029 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chemokine * histamine * Ixodes ricinus * mcp-1 * Th2 response * tick saliva Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.917, year: 2015

  18. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells.

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    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...

  20. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yi-Sook, E-mail: yisjung@ajou.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  1. Accelerated Stress Testing of Multi-Source LED Products: Horticulture Lamps and Tunable-White Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn Davis, Kelley Rountree, Karmann Mills

    2018-03-30

    This report discusses the use of accelerated stress testing (AST) to provide insights into the long-term behavior of commercial products utilizing different types of mid-power LEDs (MP-LEDs) integrated into the same LED module. Test results are presented from two commercial lamps intended for use in horticulture applications and one tunable-white LED module intended for use in educational and office lighting applications. Each of these products is designed to provide a custom spectrum for their targeted applications and each achieves this goal in different ways. Consequently, a comparison of the long-term stability of these devices will provide insights regarding approaches that could be used to possibly lengthen the lifetime of SSL products.

  2. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy

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    Nadja de Lima Santana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Leprosy or hansen’s disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host’s immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. METHODS Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551, TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099 and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911. A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. FINDINGS Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2. Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. MAIN CONCLUSIONS All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host’s production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  3. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nadja de Lima; Rêgo, Jamile Leão; Oliveira, Joyce Moura; de Almeida, Lucas Frederico; Braz, Marcos; Machado, Lídia Maria Medeiros; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Castellucci, Léa Cristina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy or hansen’s disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host’s immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR) variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. METHODS Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551), TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099) and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911). A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. FINDINGS Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2). Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. MAIN CONCLUSIONS All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host’s production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:28327786

  4. Polymorphisms in genes TLR1, 2 and 4 are associated with differential cytokine and chemokine serum production in patients with leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nadja de Lima; Rêgo, Jamile Leão; Oliveira, Joyce Moura; Almeida, Lucas Frederico de; Braz, Marcos; Machado, Lídia Maria Medeiros; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Castellucci, Léa Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy or hansen's disease is a spectral disease whose clinical forms mostly depends on host's immune and genetic factors. Different Toll-like receptors (TLR) variants have been described associated with leprosy, but with some lack of replication across different populations. To evaluate the role of polymorphisms in genes TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 and susceptibility to leprosy in a genetic case control study; to verify the association between genotypes of these markers and the immunological profile in the serum of patients with leprosy. Pre-designed TaqMan® assays were used to genotype markers at TLR1 (rs4833095, rs5743551), TLR2 (rs7656411, rs3804099) and TLR4 (rs1927914, rs1927911). A panel of cytokines and chemokines was accessed by enzime-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test in the serum of a subgroup of patients with and without leprosy reactions. Our results show an association between the T allele of rs3804099 at the TLR2 gene and increased risk for leprosy per se [Odds ratio (OR) = 1.296, p = 0,022]. In addition, evaluating the association between different genotypes of the TLR1, 2 and 4 markers and cytokine/chemokine serological levels, IL-17 appears as an immunological marker regulated by the polymorphism of the three TLR genes evaluated, whereas different TLR1 genotypes were associated with differential production of IL-12p40 and MCP-1(CCL2). Furthermore, other relevant serum markers such as CXCL-10 and IL-6 seemed to be regulated by TLR2 variants and IL-1β was related to TLR4 genotypes. All together our data points that the tested TLR markers may have a regulatory role in the immunity against Mycobacterium leprae, by driving the host's production of key cytokines and chemokines involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

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    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  6. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription

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    Santoro Thomas J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS. The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chemokine. Curcumin is a spice principle in, and constitutes approximately 4 percent of, turmeric. Curcumin's immunomodulating and antioxidant activities suggest that it might be a useful adjunct in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses characterized by inflammation. Relatively unexplored, but relevant to its potential therapeutic efficacy in neuroinflammatory syndromes is the effect of curcumin on chemokine production. To examine the possibility that curcumin may influence CNS inflammation by mechanisms distinct from its known anti-oxidant activities, we studied the effect of this spice principle on the synthesis of MIP-2 by astrocytes. Methods Primary astrocytes were prepared from neonatal brains of CBA/CaJ mice. The cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of various amount of curcumin or epigallocatechin gallate. MIP-2 mRNA was analyzed using semi-quantitative PCR and MIP-2 protein production in the culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Astrocytes were transfected with a MIP-2 promoter construct, pGL3-MIP-2, and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of curcumin. Results The induction of MIP-2 gene expression and the production of MIP-2 protein were inhibited by curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of the MIP-2 promoter reporter gene construct in primary astrocytes. However MIP-2 gene induction by lipopolysaccharide was not inhibited by another anti

  7. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Michiyo; Holman, Brita J; Santoro, Christopher P; Santoro, Thomas J

    2005-02-25

    BACKGROUND: In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chemokine.Curcumin is a spice principle in, and constitutes approximately 4 percent of, turmeric. Curcumin's immunomodulating and antioxidant activities suggest that it might be a useful adjunct in the treatment of neurodegenerative illnesses characterized by inflammation. Relatively unexplored, but relevant to its potential therapeutic efficacy in neuroinflammatory syndromes is the effect of curcumin on chemokine production. To examine the possibility that curcumin may influence CNS inflammation by mechanisms distinct from its known anti-oxidant activities, we studied the effect of this spice principle on the synthesis of MIP-2 by astrocytes. METHODS: Primary astrocytes were prepared from neonatal brains of CBA/CaJ mice. The cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of various amount of curcumin or epigallocatechin gallate. MIP-2 mRNA was analyzed using semi-quantitative PCR and MIP-2 protein production in the culture supernatants was quantified by ELISA. Astrocytes were transfected with a MIP-2 promoter construct, pGL3-MIP-2, and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide in the presence or absence of curcumin. RESULTS: The induction of MIP-2 gene expression and the production of MIP-2 protein were inhibited by curcumin. Curcumin also inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of the MIP-2 promoter reporter gene construct in primary astrocytes. However MIP-2 gene induction by lipopolysaccharide was not inhibited by another anti-oxidant, epigallocatechin

  8. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    inflammation, thick- ness of the synovial lining layer, and vascularity (16). These observations support the hypothesis that citrulli- nated chemokines may...Gerszten RE, Garcia-Zepeda EA, Lim YC, Yoshida M, Ding HA, Gimbrone MA, et al. MCP-1 and IL-8 trigger firm adhesion of monocytes to vascular endothelium...arthritis: regulation of its production in synovial cells by interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. Arthritis Rheum 1993;36:762–71. 35. Hatano Y

  9. Effects of nitrous oxide on the production of cytokines and chemokines by the airway epithelium during anesthesia with sevoflurane and propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakura, Seiichiro; Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Sugasawa, Yusuke; Murakami, Taisuke; Kikuchi, Toshihiro; Inada, Eiichi; Nagaoka, Isao

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of nitrous oxide (a gaseous anesthetic) on the in vivo production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by the airway epithelium, when combined with sevoflurane or propofol. Subjects undergoing simple or segmental mastectomy were randomly assigned to the sevoflurane and nitrous oxide, sevoflurane and air, propofol and nitrous oxide, or propofol and air group (all n=13). Epithelial lining fluid (ELF) was obtained using the bronchoscopic microsampling method prior to and following the mastectomy to enable measurement of the pre- and post-operative levels of certain inflammatory cytokines and chemokines using a cytometric bead array system. Notably, the levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in the ELF were significantly increased following the operations which involved the inhalation of sevoflurane and nitrous oxide, although the levels of these molecules were not significantly changed by the inhalation of sevoflurane and air. Furthermore, the IL-12p70 levels were significantly reduced in the ELF following the operations that involved the inhalation of sevoflurane and air, although the IL-12p70 levels were not significantly changed by the inhalation of nitrous oxide and sevoflurane. These observations suggest that the combination of sevoflurane and nitrous oxide induces an inflammatory response (increased production of IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1) and suppresses the anti-inflammatory response (reduced production of IL-12p70) in the local milieu of the airway. Thus, the combination of these compounds should be carefully administered for anesthesia.

  10. Prednisolone phosphate-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibit cytokine and chemokine production in human fibroblast-like synovial cells: a novel approach to rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigai, Takashi; Hagiwara, Hitomi; Ogawa, Yumi; Ishizuka, Takanobu; Kaneda, Shinichi; Kimura, Junji

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of using prednisolone phosphate (PSLP)-containing 3,5-dipentadecyloxybenzamidine hydrochloride (TRX-20) liposomes to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined their ability to bind human fibroblast-like synovial (HFLS) cells and their effects in these cells. To test for binding, Lissamine rhodamine B-1, 2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (rhodamine)-labelled PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes were added to HFLS cells, and the fluorescence intensity of the rhodamine bound to the cells was evaluated. Rhodamine-labelled PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20 were used as a negative control. To evaluate the uptake of liposomes by the HFLS cells, we used TRX-20 liposomes containing 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) and p-xylene-bis-pyridinium bromide (DPX), and observed the cells by fluorescence microscopy. The effects of the PSLP in TRX-20 liposomes on HFLS cells were assessed by the inhibition of the production of two inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and one inflammatory chemokine (interleukin 8). The interaction of the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes with HFLS cells was approximately 40 times greater than that of PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes bound to HFLS cells primarily via chondroitin sulfate. TRX-20 liposomes taken up by the cell were localized to acidic compartments. Furthermore, the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibited the production of the inflammatory cytokines and the chemokine more effectively than did the PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. These results indicate that PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes show promise as a novel drug delivery system that could enhance the clinical use of glucocorticoids for treating RA.

  11. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  12. Different patterns of cytokines and chemokines combined with IFN-γ production reflect Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

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    Yang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IFN-γ is presently the only soluble immunological marker used to help diagnose latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb infection. However, IFN-γ is not available to distinguish latent from active TB infection. Moreover, extrapulmonary tuberculosis, such as tuberculous pleurisy, cannot be properly diagnosed by IFN-γ release assay. As a result, other disease- or infection-related immunological biomarkers that would be more effective need to be screened and identified. METHODOLOGY: A panel of 41 soluble immunological molecules (17 cytokines and 24 chemokines was tested using Luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays. Samples, including plasma and pleural effusions, from healthy donors (HD, n = 12 or patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI, n = 20, pulmonary tuberculosis (TB, n = 12, tuberculous pleurisy (TP, n = 15 or lung cancer (LC, n = 15 were collected and screened for soluble markers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs were also isolated to investigate antigen-specific immune factors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For the 41 examined factors, our results indicated that three patterns were closely associated with infection and disease. (1 Significantly elevated plasma levels of IL-2, IP-10, CXCL11 and CXCL12 were present in both patients with tuberculosis and in a sub-group participant with latent tuberculosis infection who showed a higher level of IFN-γ producing cells by ELISPOT assay compared with other latently infected individuals. (2 IL-6 and IL-9 were only significantly increased in plasma from active TB patients, and the two factors were consistently highly secreted after M.tb antigen stimulation. (3 When patients developed tuberculous pleurisy, CCL1, CCL21 and IL-6 were specifically increased in the pleural effusions. In particular, these three factors were consistently highly secreted by pleural fluid mononuclear cells following M

  13. CC chemokine receptor 4 is required for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating GM-CSF and IL-23 production in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppensieker, Karola; Otte, David-Marian; Schürmann, Britta; Limmer, Andreas; Dresing, Philipp; Drews, Eva; Schumak, Beatrix; Klotz, Luisa; Raasch, Jennifer; Mildner, Alexander; Waisman, Ari; Scheu, Stefanie; Knolle, Percy; Förster, Irmgard; Prinz, Marco; Maier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Alferink, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanisms by which they control disease remain to be determined. This study demonstrates that expression of CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) by DCs is required for EAE induction. CCR4−/− mice presented enhanced resistance to EAE associated with a reduction in IL-23 and GM-CSF expression in the CNS. Restoring CCR4 on myeloid cells in bone marrow chimeras or intracerebral microinjection of CCR4-competent DCs, but not macrophages, restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, indicating that CCR4+ DCs are cellular mediators of EAE development. Mechanistically, CCR4−/− DCs were less efficient in GM-CSF and IL-23 production and also TH-17 maintenance. Intraspinal IL-23 reconstitution restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, whereas intracerebral inoculation using IL-23−/− DCs or GM-CSF−/− DCs failed to induce disease. Thus, CCR4-dependent GM-CSF production in DCs required for IL-23 release in these cells is a major component in the development of EAE. Our study identified a unique role for CCR4 in regulating DC function in EAE, harboring therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity by targeting CCR4 on this specific cell type. PMID:22355103

  14. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

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    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  15. A requirement for CD45 distinguishes Ly49D-mediated cytokine and chemokine production from killing in primary natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Nicholas D.; Xu, Yuekang; Nutt, Stephen L.; Tarlinton, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Engagement of receptors on the surface of natural killer (NK) cells initiates a biochemical cascade ultimately triggering cytokine production and cytotoxicity, although the interrelationship between these two outcomes is currently unclear. In this study we investigate the role of the cell surface phosphatase CD45 in NK cell development and intracellular signaling from activating receptors. Stimulation via the major histocompatibility complex I–binding receptor, Ly49D on CD45 −/− primary NK cells resulted in the activation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase and normal cytotoxicity but failed to elicit a range of cytokines and chemokines. This blockage is associated with impaired phosphorylation of Syk, Vav1, JNK, and p38, which mimics data obtained using inhibitors of the src-family kinases (SFK). These data, supported by analogous findings after CD16 and NKG2D stimulation of CD45 −/− primary NK cells, place CD45 upstream of SFK in NK cells after stimulation via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing receptors. Thus we identify CD45 as a pivotal enzyme in eliciting a precise subset of NK cell responses. PMID:15867094

  16. Nanoporous carbon tunable resistor/transistor and methods of production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Juergen; Baumann, Theodore F; Dasgupta, Subho; Hahn, Horst

    2014-04-22

    In one embodiment, a tunable resistor/transistor includes a porous material that is electrically coupled between a source electrode and a drain electrode, wherein the porous material acts as an active channel, an electrolyte solution saturating the active channel, the electrolyte solution being adapted for altering an electrical resistance of the active channel based on an applied electrochemical potential, wherein the active channel comprises nanoporous carbon arranged in a three-dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method for forming the tunable resistor/transistor includes forming a source electrode, forming a drain electrode, and forming a monolithic nanoporous carbon material that acts as an active channel and selectively couples the source electrode to the drain electrode electrically. In any embodiment, the electrolyte solution saturating the nanoporous carbon active channel is adapted for altering an electrical resistance of the nanoporous carbon active channel based on an applied electrochemical potential.

  17. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

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    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  18. Psidium guajava extract inhibits thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) production in human keratinocytes by inducing heme oxygenase-1 and blocking NF-κB and STAT1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Hee; Hwang, Yong Pil; Choi, Jae Ho; Yang, Ji Hye; Seo, Jong Kwon; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-09-01

    Psidium guajava (P. guajava) is a food and medicinal plant with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-allergic activities that support its traditional uses. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of P. guajava ethyl acetate extract (PGEA) on atopic dermatitis and to investigate the possible mechanisms by which PGEA inhibits cytokine-induced Th2 chemokine expression in HaCaT human keratinocyte cells. We found that PGEA suppressed the IFN-γ/TNF-α-co-induced production of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) protein and mRNA in HaCaT cells. Additionally, PGEA inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-co-induced activation of NF-κB and STAT1 and increased the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein and mRNA. HO-1 inhibitor enhanced the suppressive effects of PGEA on TNF-α/IFN-γ-co-induced TARC production and gene expression. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGEA inhibits chemokine expression in keratinocytes by inducing HO-1 expression and it suggests a possible therapeutic application in atopic dermatitis and other inflammatory skin diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of Human CD4 and chemokine receptors in cotton rat cells confers permissiveness for productive HIV infection

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    Broder Christopher C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current small animal models for studying HIV-1 infection are very limited, and this continues to be a major obstacle for studying HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis, as well as for the urgent development and evaluation of effective anti-HIV-1 therapies and vaccines. Previously, it was shown that HIV-1 can infect cotton rats as indicated by development of antibodies against all major proteins of the virus, the detection of viral cDNA in spleen and brain of challenged animals, the transmission of infectious virus, albeit with low efficiency, from animal to animal by blood, and an additional increase in the mortality in the infected groups. Results Using in vitro experiments, we now show that cotton rat cell lines engineered to express human receptor complexes for HIV-1 (hCD4 along with hCXCR4 or hCCR5 support virus entry, viral cDNA integration, and the production of infectious virus. Conclusion These results further suggest that the development of transgenic cotton rats expressing human HIV-1 receptors may prove to be useful small animal model for HIV infection.

  20. Neutrophil Influx and Chemokine Production during the Early Phases of the Antitumor Response to the Vascular Disrupting Agent DMXAA (ASA404

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    Liang-Chuan S. Wang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA acts through tumor vascular disruption and cytokine production and is the first of its class to enter phase 3 trials. We characterized leukocytes and cytokines in murine Colon 38 tumors before and after DMXAA treatment. Tumor mass declined 50% 24 hours after DMXAA administration, but the leukocyte count per gram of tumor increased threefold owing to a large influx of Ly6G+CD11b+F4/80−. cells with the morphology of neutrophils. However, B and T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and macrophages in the tumor all decreased in numbers. Seven chemokines were substantially induced in the tumor, spleen, and serum 4 hours after DMXAA administration. Using cultured spleen cell subpopulations, CD11b+ cells (largely monocytes and macrophages were shown to be the primary producers of tumor necrosis factor á, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and macrophage inflammatory 1α (MIP-1α. CD49b+ natural killer cells produced IP-10, whereas CD45R+ B lymphocytes produced regulated upon activation normal T cell express sequence. T lymphocytes were not major producers of cytokines in the response to DMXAA. Murine peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs produced a similar panel of cytokines in culture to that detected in mouse serum after DMXAA treatment. Cytokines in human PBL cultures were subsequently measured with the aim of identifying potential serum markers of the human response to DMXAA. IP-10 (P < .001, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (P < .001, and sCD40L (P < .01 were decreased, whereas IL-8 (P < .001 and MIP-1α (P = .03 were increased in DMXAA-treated compared with untreated PBL cultures from a group of 12 donors.

  1. Chemokine CCL2–CCR2 Signaling Induces Neuronal Cell Death via STAT3 Activation and IL-1β Production after Status Epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dai-Shi; Feng, Li-Jie; Liu, Jun-Li

    2017-01-01

    Elevated levels of chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor CCR2 have been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and in experimental seizures. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanism underlying CCL2–CCR2 signaling in epileptic brain remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that the upregulated CCL2 was mainly expressed in hippocampal neurons and activated microglia from mice 1 d after kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. Taking advantage of CX3CR1GFP/+:CCR2RFP/+ double-transgenic mice, we demonstrated that CCL2–CCR2 signaling has a role in resident microglial activation and blood-derived monocyte infiltration. Moreover, seizure-induced degeneration of neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region was attenuated in mice lacking CCL2 or CCR2. We further showed that CCR2 activation induced STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation and IL-1β production, which are critical for promoting neuronal cell death after status epilepticus. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 by WP1066 reduced seizure-induced IL-1β production and subsequent neuronal death. Two weeks after KA-induced seizures, CCR2 deficiency not only reduced neuronal loss, but also attenuated seizure-induced behavioral impairments, including anxiety, memory decline, and recurrent seizure severity. Together, we demonstrated that CCL2–CCR2 signaling contributes to neurodegeneration via STAT3 activation and IL-1β production after status epilepticus, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a global concern and epileptic seizures occur in many neurological conditions. Neuroinflammation associated with microglial activation and monocyte infiltration are characteristic of epileptic brains. However, molecular mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation in neuronal death following epilepsy remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that CCL2–CCR2 signaling is

  2. Chemokines in cancer related inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allavena, Paola; Germano, Giovanni; Marchesi, Federica [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.mantovani@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan (Italy)

    2011-03-10

    Chemokines are key players of the cancer-related inflammation. Chemokine ligands and receptors are downstream of genetic events that cause neoplastic transformation and are abundantly expressed in chronic inflammatory conditions which predispose to cancer. Components of the chemokine system affect multiple pathways of tumor progression including: leukocyte recruitment, neo-angiogenesis, tumor cell proliferation and survival, invasion and metastasis. Evidence in pre-clinical and clinical settings suggests that the chemokine system represents a valuable target for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies.

  3. Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis: examination of chemokine and chemokine receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Carl J; Williams, Jacqueline P; Okunieff, Paul; Finkelstein, Jacob N

    2002-03-01

    Fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic inflammation or injury. Pulmonary fibrosis may be the result of abnormal repair after an acute inflammatory response. The process of repair initiated by a tissue insult is largely a function of the activation of cells to produce important biological mediators such as cytokines, growth factors and chemokines, which orchestrate most aspects of the inflammatory response. Consequently, altered regulation of the production of inflammatory cell cytokines and chemokines after injury and repair likely contributes to the fibrosis. Our hypothesis is that chronic expression of specific chemokine and chemokine receptors during the fibrotic phase induced by thoracic irradiation may perpetuate the recruitment and activation of lymphocytes and macrophages, which may contribute to the development of fibrosis. Fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) and fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and hybridized using microarray analysis and RNase protection assays. At 26 weeks postirradiation, messages encoding the chemokines BLC (now known as Scyb13), C10 (now known as Scya6), IP-10 (now known as Scyb10), MCP-1 (now known as Scya2), MCP-3 (now known as Scya7), MIP-1gamma (now known as Scya9), and RANTES (now known as Scya5) and the chemokine receptors Ccr1, Ccr2, Ccr5 and Ccr6 were elevated in fibrosis-sensitive (C57BL/6) mice. In contrast, only the messages encoding SDF-1alpha (now known as Sdf1) and Ccr1 were elevated 26 weeks postirradiation in fibrosis-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice. Our results point to the CC and CCR family members as the predominant chemokine responders during the development of fibrosis. These studies suggest that monocyte/macrophage and lymphocyte recruitment and activation are key components of radiation-induced fibrosis.

  4. Astrocyte production of the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 is inhibited by the spice principle curcumin at the level of gene transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Michiyo; Holman, Brita J; Santoro, Christopher P; Santoro, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background In neuropathological processes associated with neutrophilic infiltrates, such as experimental allergic encephalitis and traumatic injury of the brain, the CXC chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) is thought to play a pivotal role in the induction and perpetuation of inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). The origin of MIP-2 in inflammatory disorders of the brain has not been fully defined but astrocytes appear to be a dominant source of this chem...

  5. Chemokines as Cancer Vaccine Adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Petrosiute

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We are witnessing a new era of immune-mediated cancer therapies and vaccine development. As the field of cancer vaccines advances into clinical trials, overcoming low immunogenicity is a limiting step in achieving full success of this therapeutic approach. Recent discoveries in the many biological roles of chemokines in tumor immunology allow their exploitation in enhancing recruitment of antigen presenting cells (APCs and effector cells to appropriate anatomical sites. This knowledge, combined with advances in gene therapy and virology, allows researchers to employ chemokines as potential vaccine adjuvants. This review will focus on recent murine and human studies that use chemokines as therapeutic anti-cancer vaccine adjuvants.

  6. Controlled and tunable polymer particles' production using a single microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoyav, Benzion; Benny, Ofra

    2018-04-01

    Microfluidics technology offers a new platform to control liquids under flow in small volumes. The advantage of using small-scale reactions for droplet generation along with the capacity to control the preparation parameters, making microfluidic chips an attractive technology for optimizing encapsulation formulations. However, one of the drawback in this methodology is the ability to obtain a wide range of droplet sizes, from sub-micron to microns using a single chip design. In fact, typically, droplet chips are used for micron-dimension particles, while nanoparticles' synthesis requires complex chips design (i.e., microreactors and staggered herringbone micromixer). Here, we introduce the development of a highly tunable and controlled encapsulation technique, using two polymer compositions, for generating particles ranging from microns to nano-size using the same simple single microfluidic chip design. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA 50:50) or PLGA/polyethylene glycol polymeric particles were prepared with focused-flow chip, yielding monodisperse particle batches. We show that by varying flow rate, solvent, surfactant and polymer composition, we were able to optimize particles' size and decrease polydispersity index, using simple chip designs with no further related adjustments or costs. Utilizing this platform, which offers tight tuning of particle properties, could offer an important tool for formulation development and can potentially pave the way towards a better precision nanomedicine.

  7. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro and in vivo dependency of chemokine generation on C5a and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Sarma, V; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    production in vitro and in vivo. Two rat CXC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)) as well as three rat CC chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) were investigated. Chemokine generation in vitro...

  9. Chemokines in teleost fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Tafalla, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    Chemokines are chemoattractant cytokines defined by the presence of four conserved cysteine residues which in mammals can be divided into four subfamilies depending on the arrangement of the first two conserved cysteines in their sequence: CXC (α), CC (β), C and CX(3)C classes. Evolutionarily, fish can be considered as an intermediate step between species which possess only innate immunity (invertebrates) and species with a fully developed acquired immune network such as mammals. Therefore, the functionality of their different immune cell types and molecules is sometimes also intermediate between innate and acquired responses. The first chemokine gene identified in a teleost was a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) chemokine designated as CK1 in 1998. Since then, many different chemokine genes have been identified in several fish species, but their role in homeostasis and immune response remains largely unknown. Extensive genomic duplication events and the fact that chemokines evolve more quickly than other immune genes, make it very difficult to establish true orthologues between fish and mammalian chemokines that would help us with the ascription of immune roles. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish, focusing mainly on which genes have been identified so far and highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation, due to the great lack of functional information available for them. As the number of chemokine genes begins to close down for some teleost species, there is an important need for functional assays that may elucidate the role of each of these molecules within the fish immune response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemokines: novel targets for breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Simi; Lazennec, Gwendal

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the possible involvement of chemokines and their receptors in breast cancer progression and metastasis. Chemokines and their receptors constitute a superfamily of signalling factors whose prognosis value in breast cancer progression remains unclear. We will examine here the expression pattern of chemokines and their receptors in mammary gland physiology and carcinogenesis. The nature of the cells producing chemokines or harboring chemokine receptors appears to be crucial in certain conditions for example, the infiltration of the primary tumor by leukocytes and angiogenesis. In addition, chemokines, their receptors and the interaction with glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) are key players in the homing of cancer cells to distant metastasis sites. Several lines of evidence, including in vitro and in vivo models, suggest that the mechanism of action of chemokines in cancer development involves the modulation of proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, leukocyte recruitment or angiogenesis. Furthermore, we will discuss the regulation of chemokine network in tumor neovascularity by decoy receptors. The reasons accounting for the deregulation of chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in breast cancer are certainly crucial for the comprehension of chemokine role in breast cancer and are in several cases linked to estrogen receptor status. The targeting of chemokines and chemokine receptors by antibodies, small molecule antagonists, viral chemokine binding proteins and heparins appears as promising tracks to develop therapeutic strategies. Thus there is significant interest in developing strategies to antagonize the chemokine function, and an opportunity to interfere with metastasis, the leading cause of death in most patients. PMID:17717637

  11. Advanced glycation end products induce chemokine/cytokine production via activation of p38 pathway and inhibit proliferation and migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke; Wang, Xiao Qun; He, Yu Song; Lu, Lin; Chen, Qiu Jing; Liu, Jing; Shen, Wei Feng

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Advanced glycation products (AGEs), as endogenous inflammatory mediator, compromise the physiological function of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs have a potential role in cell replacement therapy in acute myocardial infarction and ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, mechanisms of AGEs on MSCs are still not unveiled. Methods Reactive oxygen species (ROS), genes regulation, cell proliferation and migration have been detected by AGE-BSA stimulated MSCs. Results We found tha...

  12. Production of narrowband tunable extreme-ultraviolet radiation by noncollinear resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; Hollenstein, U.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Fourier-transform-limited extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation (bandwidth ≲300 MHz) tunable around 91 nm is produced by use of two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing on the Kr resonance at 94 093 cm

  13. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarka E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eszter Szarka1*, Zsuzsa Neer1*, Péter Balogh2, Monika Ádori1, Adrienn Angyal1, József Prechl3, Endre Kiss1,3, Dorottya Kövesdi1, Gabriella Sármay11Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, 2Department of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, 3Immunology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Science at Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2. These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro

  14. MicroRNA-17-92 cluster promotes the proliferation and the chemokine production of keratinocytes: implication for the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weigang; Yi, Xiuli; An, Yawen; Guo, Sen; Li, Shuli; Song, Pu; Chang, Yuqian; Zhang, Shaolong; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying

    2018-05-11

    Keratinocytes are the main epidermal cell type that constitutes the skin barrier against environmental damages, which emphasizes the balance between the growth and the death of keratinocytes in maintaining skin homeostasis. Aberrant proliferation of keratinocytes and the secretion of inflammatory factors from keratinocytes are related to the formation of chronic inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis. MicroRNA-17-92 (miRNA-17-92 or miR-17-92) is a miRNA cluster that regulates cell growth and immunity, but the role of miR-17-92 cluster in keratinocytes and its relation to skin diseases have not been well investigated. In the present study, we initially found that miR-17-92 cluster promoted the proliferation and the cell-cycle progression of keratinocytes via suppressing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B). Furthermore, miR-17-92 cluster facilitated the secretion of C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9) and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) from keratinocytes by inhibiting suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1), which enhanced the chemotaxis for T lymphocytes formed by keratinocytes. In addition, we detected increased expression of miR-17-92 cluster in psoriatic lesions and the level of lesional miR-17-92 cluster was positively correlated with the disease severity in psoriasis patients. At last, miR-17-92 cluster was increased in keratinocytes by cytokines through the activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that cytokine-induced overexpression of miR-17-92 cluster can promote the proliferation and the immune function of keratinocytes, and thus may contribute to the development of inflammatory skin diseases like psoriasis, which implicates miR-17-92 cluster as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and other skin diseases with similar inflammatory pathogenesis.

  15. Coupled Metal/Oxide Catalysts with Tunable Product Selectivity for Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shengjuan; Weng, Zhe; Wu, Zishan; Zhong, Yiren; Wu, Yueshen; Fang, Jianhui; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-08-30

    One major challenge to the electrochemical conversion of CO 2 to useful fuels and chemical products is the lack of efficient catalysts that can selectively direct the reaction to one desirable product and avoid the other possible side products. Making use of strong metal/oxide interactions has recently been demonstrated to be effective in enhancing electrocatalysis in the liquid phase. Here, we report one of the first systematic studies on composition-dependent influences of metal/oxide interactions on electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction, utilizing Cu/SnO x heterostructured nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a model catalyst system. By adjusting the Cu/Sn ratio in the catalyst material structure, we can tune the products of the CO 2 electrocatalytic reduction reaction from hydrocarbon-favorable to CO-selective to formic acid-dominant. In the Cu-rich regime, SnO x dramatically alters the catalytic behavior of Cu. The Cu/SnO x -CNT catalyst containing 6.2% of SnO x converts CO 2 to CO with a high faradaic efficiency (FE) of 89% and a j CO of 11.3 mA·cm -2 at -0.99 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode, in stark contrast to the Cu-CNT catalyst on which ethylene and methane are the main products for CO 2 reduction. In the Sn-rich regime, Cu modifies the catalytic properties of SnO x . The Cu/SnO x -CNT catalyst containing 30.2% of SnO x reduces CO 2 to formic acid with an FE of 77% and a j HCOOH of 4.0 mA·cm -2 at -0.99 V, outperforming the SnO x -CNT catalyst which only converts CO 2 to formic acid in an FE of 48%.

  16. TARSyn: Tunable Antibiotic Resistance Devices Enabling Bacterial Synthetic Evolution and Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennig, Maja; Martinez, Virginia; Mirzadeh, Kiavash

    2018-01-01

    Evolution can be harnessed to optimize synthetic biology designs. A prominent example is recombinant protein production-a dominating theme in biotechnology for more than three decades. Typically, a protein coding sequence (cds) is recombined with genetic elements, such as promoters, ribosome...... and allows expression levels in large clone libraries to be probed using a simple cell survival assay on the respective antibiotic. The power of the approach is demonstrated by substantially increasing production of two commercially interesting proteins, a Nanobody and an Affibody. The method is a simple......-level expression-an example of synthetic evolution. However, manual screening limits the ability to assay expression levels of all putative sequences in the libraries. Here we have solved this bottleneck by designing a collection of translational coupling devices based on a RNA secondary structure. Exchange...

  17. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Machura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim: We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods : Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results: The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions : An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation.

  18. Chemokine RANTES in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, J; Rogala, B

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate chemokine RANTES in the sera of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to analyze the correlation between RANTES serum level and the immunological and clinical parameters of the disease. Serum levels of RANTES (ELISA; R&D Systems), total IgE and specific IgE (FEIA; Pharmacia CAP System) were estimated in 24 patients with AD, 28 patients with pollinosis (PL) and 22 healthy nonatopic subjects (HC). The division of the AD group into a pure AD (pAD) subgroup, without a coexisting respiratory allergy, and a subgroup of patients with AD and a respiratory allergy (AD+AO) was done according to Wütrich. Levels of RANTES were higher in the AD group than in the HC group and the PL group. RANTES levels did not differ among subgroups with various clinical scores and between the pAD and AD+AO subgroups. There were no correlations between levels of RANTES and total IgE. Significant positive correlations between serum levels of RANTES and Dermatophagoides farinae and cat dander-specific IgE were found in the AD group. We conclude that the serum level of chemokine RANTES differs patients with AD from patients with PL. The increase of RANTES concentration in the serum of patients with AD depends neither on a clinical picture nor an IgE system.

  19. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptors...... of others has been termed signaling bias and can accordingly be grouped into ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue bias. Bias has so far been broadly overlooked in the process of drug development. The low number of currently approved drugs targeting the chemokine system, as well as the broad range...... of failed clinical trials, reflects the need for a better understanding of the chemokine system. Thus, understanding the character, direction, and consequence of biased signaling in the chemokine system may aid the development of new therapeutics. This review describes experiments to assess G protein...

  20. Chemokines and chemokine receptors: new insights into cancer-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Gwendal; Richmond, Ann

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines are involved in cellular interactions and tropism in situations frequently associated with inflammation. Recently, the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation associated with carcinogenesis has been highlighted. Increasing evidence suggests that chemokines are produced by tumor cells as well as by cells of the tumor microenvironment including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), endothelial cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and more recently tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). In addition to affecting tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis, chemokines also seem to modulate senescence and cell survival. Here, we review recent progress on the roles of chemokines and chemokine receptors in cancer-related inflammation, and discuss the mechanisms underlying chemokine action in cancer that might facilitate the development of novel therapies in the future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringman, Jasper J.; Oostendorp, Roos L.; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    The development of specific targeted therapies, such as anti-TNF-alpha treatment, for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, has significantly improved treatment, although not all patients respond. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors as

  2. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    binding. Attempts to unravel the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors have led to the conclusion that activation involves movements of the transmembrane segments VI and VII in particular, as recently gathered in the Global Toggle Switch Model. However, to understand the activation mechanism completely......, more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  3. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2003-01-01

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...

  5. Inhibitory effects of methamphetamine on mast cell activation and cytokine/chemokine production stimulated by lipopolysaccharide in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Li; Geng, Yan; Li, Ming; Jin, Yao-Feng; Ren, Hui-Xun; Li, Xia; Wu, Feng; Wang, Biao; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Chen, Teng; Chen, Yan-Jiong

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that methamphetamine (MA) influences host immunity; however, the effect of MA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses remains unknown. Mast cells (MCs) are considered to serve an important role in the innate and acquired immune response, but it remains unknown whether MA modulates MC activation and LPS-stimulated cytokine production. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of MA on LPS-induced MC activation and the production of MC-derived cytokines in mice. Markers for MC activation, including cluster of differentiation 117 and the type I high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor, were assessed in mouse intestines. Levels of MC-derived cytokines in the lungs and thymus were also examined. The results demonstrated that cytokines were produced in the bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) of mice. The present study demonstrated that MA suppressed the LPS-mediated MC activation in mouse intestines. MA also altered the release of MC cytokines in the lung and thymus following LPS stimulation. In addition, LPS-stimulated cytokines were decreased in the BMMCs of mice following treatment with MA. The present study demonstrated that MA may regulate LPS-stimulated MC activation and cytokine production.

  6. Decrease in Dengue virus-2 infection and reduction of cytokine/chemokine production by Uncaria guianensis in human hepatocyte cell line Huh-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia da Silva Mello

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Dengue fever may present hemorrhages and cavitary effusions as result of exacerbated immune responses. We investigated hydro-alcoholic extracts from leaves (UGL and bark (UGB of the medicinal species Uncaria guinanensis with respect to antiviral effects in Dengue virus (DENV infection and in immunological parameters associated with in vivo physiopathological features. METHODS Chemical profiles from UGB or UGL were compared in thin layer chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance using flavonoid compounds and a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched fraction as references. DENV-2-infected hepatocytes (Huh-7 were treated with extracts. Cell viability, DENV antigens and immunological factors were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or flow cytometry. FINDINGS The UGL mainly differed from UGB by selectively containing the flavonoid kaempferitrin. UGB and UGL improved hepatocyte viability. Both extracts reduced intracellular viral antigen and inhibited the secretion of viral non-structural protein (NS1, which is indicative of viral replication. Reduction in secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was achieved by UGB, of interleukin-6 by UGL, and of interleukin-8 by both UGB and UGL. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The U. guianensis extracts presented, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects for DENV and possibly a hepatocyte-protective activity. Further studies may be performed to consider these products as potential candidates for the development of an herbal product for the future treatment of dengue.

  7. Decrease in Dengue virus-2 infection and reduction of cytokine/chemokine production by Uncaria guianensis in human hepatocyte cell line Huh-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Cíntia da Silva; Valente, Ligia Maria Marino; Wolff, Thiago; Lima-Junior, Raimundo Sousa; Fialho, Luciana Gomes; Marinho, Cintia Ferreira; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; Pereira, Rita de Cássia Alves; Siani, Antonio Carlos; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2017-06-01

    Dengue fever may present hemorrhages and cavitary effusions as result of exacerbated immune responses. We investigated hydro-alcoholic extracts from leaves (UGL) and bark (UGB) of the medicinal species Uncaria guinanensis with respect to antiviral effects in Dengue virus (DENV) infection and in immunological parameters associated with in vivo physiopathological features. Chemical profiles from UGB or UGL were compared in thin layer chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance using flavonoid compounds and a pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched fraction as references. DENV-2-infected hepatocytes (Huh-7) were treated with extracts. Cell viability, DENV antigens and immunological factors were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or flow cytometry. The UGL mainly differed from UGB by selectively containing the flavonoid kaempferitrin. UGB and UGL improved hepatocyte viability. Both extracts reduced intracellular viral antigen and inhibited the secretion of viral non-structural protein (NS1), which is indicative of viral replication. Reduction in secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor was achieved by UGB, of interleukin-6 by UGL, and of interleukin-8 by both UGB and UGL. MAIN. The U. guianensis extracts presented, antiviral and immunomodulatory effects for DENV and possibly a hepatocyte-protective activity. Further studies may be performed to consider these products as potential candidates for the development of an herbal product for the future treatment of dengue.

  8. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the “cytokine storm” is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called “cytokine storm.” In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  9. Novel chemokine-like activities of histones in tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Yangchun; Zhong, Xiao; Fu, Yongmin; Huang, Yan; Zhen, Yixiang; Pan, Pinhua; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L; Billiar, Timothy R; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2016-09-20

    Histones are intracellular nucleosomal components and extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that modulate chromatin remodeling, as well as the immune response. However, their extracellular roles in cell migration and invasion remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that histones are novel regulators of tumor metastasis with chemokine-like activities. Indeed, exogenous histones promote both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell migration and invasion through toll-like receptor (TLR)4, but not TLR2 or the receptor for advanced glycosylation end product. TLR4-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is required for histone-induced chemokine (e.g., C-C motif ligand 9/10) production. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TLR4-ERK-NF-κB signaling impairs histone-induced chemokine production and HCC cell migration. Additionally, TLR4 depletion (by using TLR4-/- mice and TLR4-shRNA) or inhibition of histone release/activity (by administration of heparin and H3 neutralizing antibody) attenuates lung metastasis of HCC cells injected via the tail vein of mice. Thus, histones promote tumor metastasis of HCC cells through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway and represent novel targets for treating patients with HCC.

  10. Production of carbonaceous materials with various lengths in small spheroidal fullerenes and long CNTs by tunable multi-walled carbon nanotube cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hoi; Shin, Ueon Sang [Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Tunable cutting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using high pressure homogenizer and/or HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution was accomplished, resulting in the production of short CNTs with minimum length of 35 nm. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Zeta sizer analysis showed significant reduction of CNT length from this tunable cutting (e.g. from long and entangled pristine CNTs at about 20 μm to ≥1000 nm, ⁓400 nm, ⁓200 nm, and ⁓100 nm via high pressure jet-spraying cutting within 5 h, while chemical cutting process using greatly longer hours (48 h) showed a reduction only to about 1000 nm). When CNT sample of average 1000 nm length previously shortened by HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was subjected to the high pressure jet-spraying cutting process, the reduction progressed faster (≤1 h), producing ≥35 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated restricted formation of hydrophilic functional groups such as carboxylic group and hydroxyl group in the high pressure jet-spraying cutting, whereas an intensive formation of hydrophilic functional groups on the surface of shortened CNT samples was found after chemical cutting. Such short CNT samples would fulfill the requirements for carbonaceous materials with various lengths in small spheroidal fullerenes and long CNTs. The short CNTs produced are promising for scientific and technological applications in many fields such as electronics, diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, biomedical engineering, and environmental or energy industries.

  11. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity......-contributing interactions are attributed to different domains and known to occur in two steps. Here, knowledge on chemokine and receptor domains involved in the first binding-step and the second activation-step is reviewed. A mechanism comprising at least two steps seems consistent; however, several intermediate...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  12. CD8 chemokine receptors in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, L J C; Starkey, C; Gordon, F S

    2008-01-01

    Increased lung CD8 cells and their expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 have been previously reported in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Alterations of CD8-CCR3 and -CCR4 expression and their ligands in COPD patients have not been fully investigated. The objective...... there was low level CCL11 production. CD8CCR3 and CCR5 expression appear to be regulated by cigarette smoke exposure. We show that COPD lung tissue released more CCL5, suggesting a role for CCL5-CCR3 signalling in pulmonary CD8 recruitment in COPD....... of this study was to assess in COPD patients: (i) broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) CD8 CCR3 and CCR4 expression in COPD patients; and (ii) airway levels of the CCR3 ligands, CCL11 and CCL5. Multi-parameter flow cytometric analysis was used to assess BAL CD3 and CD8-chemokine receptor expression in COPD patients...

  13. Viral leads for chemokine-modulatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine system, which controls leukocyte trafficking, provides several potentially very attractive anti-inflammatory drug targets. However, the complexity and redundancy of this system makes it very difficult to exploit through classical drug discovery. Despite this, viruses have millions...

  14. Tunable laser applications

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2008-01-01

    Introduction F. J. Duarte Spectroscopic Applications of Tunable Optical Parametric Oscillators B. J. Orr, R. T. White, and Y. He Solid-State Dye Lasers Costela, I. García-Moreno, and R. Sastre Tunable Lasers Based on Dye-Doped Polymer Gain Media Incorporating Homogeneous Distributions of Functional Nanoparticles F. J. Duarte and R. O. James Broadly Tunable External-Cavity Semiconductor Lasers F. J. Duarte Tunable Fiber Lasers T. M. Shay and F. J. Duarte Fiber Laser Overview and Medical Applications

  15. Synergistic enhancement of chemokine generation and lung injury by C5a or the membrane attack complex of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    demonstrated synergistic production of C-X-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant) and C-C (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and monocyte chemoattractant-1) chemokines. In the absence of the costimulus, C5a or MAC did not induce chemokine generation....... In in vivo studies, C5a and MAC alone caused limited or no intrapulmonary generation of chemokines, but in the presence of a costimulus (IgG immune complexes) C5a and MAC caused synergistic intrapulmonary generation of C-X-C and C-C chemokines but not of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Under these conditions...... increased neutrophil accumulation occurred, as did lung injury. These observations suggest that C5a and MAC function synergistically with a costimulus to enhance chemokine generation and the intensity of the lung inflammatory response....

  16. CALiPER Report 23: Photometric Testing of White Tunable LED Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-01

    This report documents an initial investigation of photometric testing procedures for white-tunable LED luminaires and summarizes the key features of those products. Goals of the study include understanding the amount of testing required to characterize a white-tunable product, and documenting the performance of available color-tunable luminaires that are intended for architectural lighting.

  17. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  18. Targeting herpesvirus reliance of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N

    2006-01-01

    the infection. However, since both virus and host exist, the organisms struggle must reach an ecological equilibrium. Among the best-studied interactions between viruses and the host immune system are those between herpesviruses and their hosts. Herpesviruses are known to devote a significant part...... of their large genomes on immuno-modulatory genes, some encoding chemokines or chemokine receptors. These genes, which may be dispensable for viral replication in vitro, are highly important for viral growth in vivo, for viral dissemination and disease progression. Indeed, all beta and gamma-herpesviruses have...... chemokine receptors seems to be their constitutive activity. The biological function of the constitutive activity is still unclear, but it has become clear that the receptors are involved in important parts of the viral lifecycle in vivo, and that the receptor signaling is involved in gamma-herpesvirus...

  19. Impact of periodontitis on chemokines in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haytural, O; Yaman, D; Ural, E C; Kantarci, A; Demirel, Korkud

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemokine expression profiles in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum in patients with advanced chronic periodontitis and to assess the impact of smoking on local and systemic levels of chemokines. Thirty patients with chronic periodontitis (CP; 20 smokers and 10 non-smokers) and 20 periodontally healthy subjects (10 smokers and 10 non-smokers) were recruited. Clinical parameters included the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and bleeding on probing (BOP). Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1α), macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1β), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted chemokine (RANTES) were measured in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum using a multiplex immunoassay. MIP-1α levels were significantly lower (10.15 ± 1.48; p = 0.039) while MIP-1β levels were significantly higher (42.05 ± 8.21; p = 0.005) in sera from non-smoker patients with CP compared to non-smoker healthy subjects. MCP-1 concentration in sera was significantly higher in smoker periodontitis patients (8.89 ± 1.65) compared to non-smoker patients with periodontitis (8.14 ± 0.97; p = 0.004). MIP-1α and RANTES were significantly higher in GCF of the patients with CP (p = 0.001) while there were no statistically significant correlations between the GCF levels of these analytes and the smoking status. Periodontal inflammation increases the chemokine concentrations in the GCF while smoking suppresses chemokine levels in serum suggesting that different local and systemic mechanisms are involved during the response to periodontitis in smokers. Understanding the local and systemic chemokine responses in smokers will enable the development of biologically-based treatment methods for chronic periodontitis.

  20. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua

    2010-01-01

    and the PI3K, NF-κB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host...... defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity....

  1. IFN-gamma shapes immune invasion of the central nervous system via regulation of chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Prince, E N; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic interplay between cytokines and chemokines directs trafficking of leukocyte subpopulations to tissues in autoimmune inflammation. We have examined the role of IFN-gamma in directing chemokine production and leukocyte infiltration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EA......-gamma in EAE, acting on T cell proliferation and directing chemokine production, with profound implications for the onset and progression of disease.......). BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice are resistant to induction of EAE by immunization with myelin basic protein. However, IFN-gamma-deficient (BALB/c) and IFN-gammaR-deficient (C57BL/6) mice developed rapidly progressing lethal disease. Widespread demyelination and disseminated leukocytic infiltration of spinal...

  2. Tunable micro-optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duppé, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Presenting state-of-the-art research into the dynamic field of tunable micro-optics, this is the first book to provide a comprehensive survey covering a varied range of topics including novel materials, actuation concepts and new imaging systems in optics. Internationally renowned researchers present a diverse range of chapters on cutting-edge materials, devices and subsystems, including soft matter, artificial muscles, tunable lenses and apertures, photonic crystals, and complete tunable imagers. Special contributions also provide in-depth treatment of micro-optical characterisation, scanners, and the use of natural eye models as inspiration for new concepts in advanced optics. With applications extending from medical diagnosis to fibre telecommunications, Tunable Micro-optics equips readers with a solid understanding of the broader technical context through its interdisciplinary approach to the realisation of new types of optical systems. This is an essential resource for engineers in industry and academia,...

  3. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the tota...

  4. Chemokines and their receptors in central nervous system disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; de Jong, EK; van Weering, HRJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    Almost a decade ago, it was discovered that the human deficiency virus (HIV) makes use of chemokine receptors to infect blood cells. This appreciation of the clinical relevance of specific chemokine receptors has initiated a considerable boost in the field of chemokine research. It is clear today

  5. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Susceptibility to HIV-1 Infection and Progression to AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  6. Possible Roles of CC- and CXC-Chemokines in Regulating Bovine Endometrial Function during Early Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Sakumoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the possible roles of chemokines in regulating bovine endometrial function during early pregnancy. The expression of six chemokines, including CCL2, CCL8, CCL11, CCL14, CCL16, and CXCL10, was higher in the endometrium at 15 and 18 days of pregnancy than at the same days in non-pregnant animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CXCR3 were expressed in the epithelial cells and glandular epithelial cells of the bovine endometrium as well as in the fetal trophoblast obtained from a cow on day 18 of pregnancy. The addition of interferon-τ (IFNT to an endometrial tissue culture system increased CCL8 and CXCL10 expression in the tissues, but did not affect CCL2, CCL11, and CCL16 expression. CCL14 expression by these tissues was inhibited by IFNT. CCL16, but not other chemokines, clearly stimulated interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 and myxovirus-resistance gene 1 (MX1 expression in these tissues. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 expression decreased after stimulation with CCL8 and CCL14, and oxytocin receptor (OTR expression was decreased by CCL2, CCL8, CCL14, and CXCL10. Collectively, the expression of chemokine genes is increased in the endometrium during early pregnancy. These genes may contribute to the regulation of endometrial function by inhibiting COX2 and OTR expression, subsequently decreasing prostaglandin production and preventing luteolysis in cows.

  7. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine-like, secreted protein product of the U83 gene from human herpesvirus 6, here named vCCL4, was chemically synthesized to be characterized in a complete library of the 18 known human chemokine receptors expressed individually in stably transfected cell lines. vCCL4 was found to cause...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  8. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme: in vitro and in vivo processing of CXCL10 generates a C-terminally truncated chemokine retaining full activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A; Dijkman, Remco; van der Schors, Roel C; van der Raaij-Helmer, Elizabeth M H; van der Plas, Mariena J A; Leurs, Rob; Deelder, André M; Smit, Martine J; Tensen, Cornelis P

    2004-04-02

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the total spectrum of chemokine variants. We have recently shown that the native chemokine CXCL10 is processed at the C terminus, thereby shedding the last four amino acids. The present study was performed to elucidate the mechanism in vivo and in vitro and to study the biological activity of this novel isoform of CXCL10. Using a combination of protein purification and mass spectrometric techniques, we show that the production of C-terminally truncated CXCL10 by primary keratinocytes is inhibited in vivo by a specific inhibitor of pro-protein convertases (e.g. furin) but not by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases. Moreover, CXCL10 is processed by furin in vitro, which is abrogated by a mutation in the furin recognition site. Using GTPgammaS binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, and chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that the C-terminally truncated CXCL10 variant is a potent ligand for CXCR3. Moreover, the inverse agonist activity on the virally encoded receptor ORF74 and the direct antibacterial activity of CXCL10 are fully retained. Hence, we have identified furin as a novel chemokine-modifying enzyme in vitro and most probably also in vivo, generating a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, which fully retains its (inverse) agonistic properties.

  9. Tunable Microfluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Helbo, Bjarne; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a tunable microfluidic dye laser fabricated in SU-8. The tunability is enabled by integrating a microfluidic diffusion mixer with an existing microfluidic dye laser design by Helbo et al. By controlling the relative flows in the mixer between a dye solution and a solvent......, the concentration of dye in the laser cavity can be adjusted, allowing the wavelength to be tuned. Wavelength tuning controlled by the dye concentration was demonstrated with macroscopic dye lasers already in 1971, but this principle only becomes practically applicable by the use of microfluidic mixing...

  10. Profiling Heparin-Chemokine Interactions Using Synthetic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paz, Jose L.; Moseman, E. Ashley; Noti, Christian; Polito, Laura; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin or heparan sulfate, are required for the in vivo function of chemokines. Chemokines play a crucial role in the recruitment of leukocyte subsets to sites of inflammation and lymphocytes trafficking. GAG-chemokine interactions mediate cell migration and determine which leukocyte subsets enter tissues. Identifying the exact GAC sequences that bind to particular chemokines is key to understand chemokine function at the molecular level and develop strategies to interfere with chemokine-mediated processes. Here, we characterize the heparin binding profiles of eight chemokines (CCL21, IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19, CCL25, CCL28, and CXCL16) by employing heparin microarrays containing a small library of synthetic heparin oligosaccharides. The chemokines differ significantly in their interactions with heparin oligosaccharides: While some chemokines, (e.g., CCL21) strongly bind to a hexasaccharide containing the GlcNSO3(6-OSO3)-IdoA(2-OSO3) repeating unit, CCL19 does not bind and CXCL12 binds only weakly. The carbohydrate microarray binding results were validated by surface plasmon resonance experiments. In vitro chemotaxis assays revealed that dendrimers coated with the fully sulfated heparin hexasaccharide inhibit lymphocyte migration toward CCL21. Migration toward CXCL12 or CCL19 was not affected. These in vitro homing assays indicate that multivalent synthetic heparin dendrimers inhibit the migration of lymphocytes toward certain chemokine gradients by blocking the formation of a chemokine concentration gradient on GAG endothelial chains. These findings are in agreement with preliminary in vivo measurements of circulating lymphocytes. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of GAG-chemokine interactions, a first step toward the design of novel drugs that modulate chemokine activity. PMID:18030990

  11. Desloratadine citrate disodium injection, a potent histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, inhibits chemokine production in ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinitis guinea pig model and histamine-induced human nasal epithelial cells via inhibiting the ERK1/2 and NF-kappa B signal cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meiling; Xu, Shuhong; Zhou, Peipei; He, Guangwei; Jie, Qiong; Wu, Yulin

    2015-11-15

    Chemokines have chemotactic properties on leukocyte subsets whose modulation plays a pivotal role in allergic inflammatory processes. Our present study was designed to investigate the anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties of desloratadine citrate disodium injection (DLC) and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory properties. The anti-allergic effects of DLC were evaluated based on allergic symptoms, serological marker production and histological changes of the nasal mucosa in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis. The anti-inflammatory properties and molecular mechanisms of DLC were explored by studying the regulation of a set of chemokines and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways, after DLC treatment in guinea pigs model of allergic rhinitis in vivo and histamine-activated human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) in vitro. In vivo model in guinea pigs, DLC alleviated the rhinitis symptoms, inhibited inflammatory cells infiltration in nasal lavage fluid (NLF) and histamine, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTEs) and interleukin (IL)-8 release in sera and P-ERK1/2 and NF-κB activation in nasal mucosa. In vitro, DLC markedly inhibited histamine-induced production of MCP-1, RANTEs and IL-8 and suppressed c-Raf, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and ERK1/2 activation in HNECs. These results provide evidence that DLC possesses potent anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties. The mechanism of action underlying DLC in allergic inflammation appears to be inhibition of the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, in addition to blocking of the NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemokine Signaling in Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Toward Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2018-06-22

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a common skin disease that results in significant cost and morbidity. Despite its high prevalence, therapeutic options are limited. Allergic contact dermatitis is regulated primarily by T cells within the adaptive immune system, but also by natural killer and innate lymphoid cells within the innate immune system. The chemokine receptor system, consisting of chemokine peptides and chemokine G protein-coupled receptors, is a critical regulator of inflammatory processes such as ACD. Specific chemokine signaling pathways are selectively up-regulated in ACD, most prominently CXCR3 and its endogenous chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. Recent research demonstrates that these 3 chemokines are not redundant and indeed activate distinct intracellular signaling profiles such as those activated by heterotrimeric G proteins and β-arrestin adapter proteins. Such differential signaling provides an attractive therapeutic target for novel ACD therapies and other inflammatory diseases.

  13. Chemokines: structure, receptors and functions. A new target for inflammation and asthma therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. van Acker

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Five to 10% of the human population have a disorder of the respiratory tract called ‘asthma’. It has been known as a potentially dangerous disease for over 2000 years, as it was already described by Hippocrates and recognized as a disease entity by Egyptian and Hebrew physicians. At the beginning of this decade, there has been a fundamental change in asthma management. The emphasis has shifted from symptom relief with bronchodilator therapies (e.g. β2-agonists to a much earlier introduction of anti-inflammatory treatment (e.g. corticosteroids. Asthma is now recognized to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, involving various inflammatory cells and their mediators. Although asthma has been the subject of many investigations, the exact role of the different inflammatory cells has not been elucidated completely. Many suggestions have been made and several cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, such as the eosinophils, the mast cells, the basophils and the lymphocytes. To date, however, the relative importance of these cells is not completely understood. The cell type predominantly found in the asthmatic lung is the eosinophil and the recruitment of these eosinophils can be seen as a characteristic of asthma. In recent years much attention is given to the role of the newly identified chemokines in asthma pathology. Chemokines are structurally and functionally related 8–10 kDa peptides that are the products of distinct genes clustered on human chromosomes 4 and 17 and can be found at sites of inflammation. They form a superfamily of proinflammatory mediators that promote the recruitment of various kinds of leukocytes and lymphocytes. The chemokine superfamily can be divided into three subgroups based on overall sequence homology. Although the chemokines have highly conserved amino acid sequences, each of the chemokines binds to and induces the chemotaxis of particular classes of white blood cells. Certain

  14. Investigating tunable KRb gases and Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils Byg

    2015-01-01

    We present the production of dual-species Bose-Einstein condensates of 39K and 87Rb with tunable interactions. A dark spontaneous force optical trap was used for 87Rb to reduce the losses in 39K originating from light-assisted collisions in the magneto optical trapping phase. Using sympathetic...... for dual-species condensates with tunable interactions. Employing the dual-species condensates, the miscible to immiscible phase transition was investigated. By applying an empirical model, the transition was used to determine the background scattering length. Two species quantum gases with tunable...

  15. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  16. MEMS Tunable nanostructured photodetector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee

    This thesis was prepared at the department of Photonics Engineering, the Technical University of Denmark in fulfilment of the requirements for acquiring a Philosophiae doctor (Ph.D.) in Photonics Engineering. The thesis deals with the design and fabrication of tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced pho......) structure. Results from the fabricated devices are reported along with an investigation of the design parameters which influence the performance deviation from the design....

  17. Tunable laser optics

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, FJ

    2015-01-01

    This Second Edition of a bestselling book describes the optics and optical principles needed to build lasers. It also highlights the optics instrumentation necessary to characterize laser emissions and focuses on laser-based optical instrumentation. The book emphasizes practical and utilitarian aspects of relevant optics including the essential theory. This revised, expanded, and improved edition contains new material on tunable lasers and discusses relevant topics in quantum optics.

  18. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    approximately halfway into the solution. All animals were tested at 60, 15 and 0 min before drug injection. For each animal , the first reading was discarded...approval (December 31, 2015), hiring new personnel, conducting baseline testing for procedures not involving animals , testing equipment, developing...treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation; Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain

  19. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  20. Neuronal chemokines : Versatile messengers in central nervous system cell interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, A. H.; van Weering, H. R. J.; de Jong, E. K.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Biber, K. P. H.

    2007-01-01

    Whereas chemokines are well known for their ability to induce cell migration, only recently it became evident that chemokines also control a variety of other cell functions and are versatile messengers in the interaction between a diversity of cell types. In the central nervous system (CNS),

  1. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  2. Neonatal chemokine levels and risk of autism spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna; Grove, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    A potential role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) has been previously suggested. In a recent study we examined levels of three inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1a and RANTES) in samples of amniotic fluid of children diagnosed later in life with ASD...

  3. S100 chemokines mediate bookmarking of premetastatic niches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Shahin; Lyden, David

    2010-01-01

    Primary tumours release soluble factors, including VEGF-A, TGFβ and TNFα, which induce expression of the chemokines S100A8 and S100A9 in the myeloid and endothelial cells within the lung before tumour metastasis. These chemokine-activated premetastatic niches support adhesion and invasion of disseminating malignant cells, thereby establishing a fertile habitat for metastatic tumours. PMID:17139281

  4. Human osteoarthritic cartilage shows reduced in vivo expression of IL-4, a chondroprotective cytokine that differentially modulates IL-1β-stimulated production of chemokines and matrix-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Assirelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In osteoarthritis (OA, an inflammatory environment is responsible for the imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic activity of chondrocytes and, thus, for articular cartilage derangement. This study was aimed at providing further insight into the impairment of the anabolic cytokine IL-4 and its receptors in human OA cartilage, as well as the potential ability of IL-4 to antagonize the catabolic phenotype induced by IL-1β. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The in vivo expression of IL-4 and IL-4 receptor subunits (IL-4R, IL-2Rγ, IL-13Rα1 was investigated on full thickness OA or normal knee cartilage. IL-4 expression was found to be significantly lower in OA, both in terms of the percentage of positive cells and the amount of signal per cell. IL-4 receptor type I and II were mostly expressed in mid-deep cartilage layers. No significant difference for each IL-4 receptor subunit was noted. IL-4 anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic activity was assessed in vitro in the presence of IL-1β and/or IL-4 for 24 hours using differentiated high density primary OA chondrocyte also exhibiting the three IL-4 R subunits found in vivo. Chemokines, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes and their inhibitors were evaluated at mRNA (real time PCR and protein (ELISA or western blot levels. IL-4 did not affect IL-1β-induced mRNA expression of GRO-α/CXCL1, IL-8/CXCL8, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-1 or TIMP-3. Conversely, IL-4 significantly inhibited RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. These results were confirmed at protein level for RANTES/CCL5 and MMP-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate for the first time that OA cartilage has a significantly lower expression of IL-4. Furthermore, we found differences in the spectrum of biological effects of IL-4. The findings that IL-4 has the ability to hamper the IL-1β-induced release of both MMP-13 and CCL5/RANTES, both markers of OA chondrocytes, strongly indicates IL-4 as a

  5. Distinct chemokine receptor and cytokine expression profile in secondary progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS).......Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)....

  6. Anti-chemokine small molecule drugs: a promising future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Power, Christine A; Schwarz, Matthias K

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines have principally been associated with inflammation due to their role in the control of leukocyte migration, but just over a decade ago chemokine receptors were also identified as playing a pivotal role in the entry of the HIV virus into cells. Chemokines activate seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, making them extremely attractive therapeutic targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Although there are now a large number of molecules targeting chemokines and chemokine receptors including neutralizing antibodies in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, the results to date have not always been positive, which has been disappointing for the field. These failures have often been attributed to redundancy in the chemokine system. However, other difficulties have been encountered in drug discovery processes targeting the chemokine system, and these will be addressed in this review. In this review, the reader will get an insight into the hurdles that have to be overcome, learn about some of the pitfalls that may explain the lack of success, and get a glimpse of the outlook for the future. In 2007, the FDA approved maraviroc, an inhibitor of CCR5 for the prevention of HIV infection, the first triumph for a small-molecule drug acting on the chemokine system. The time to market, 11 years from discovery of CCR5, was fast by industry standards. A second small-molecule drug, a CXCR4 antagonist for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, was approved by the FDA at the end of 2008. The results of a Phase III trial with a CCR9 inhibitor for Crohn's disease are also promising. This could herald the first success for a chemokine receptor antagonist as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic and confirms the importance of chemokine receptors as a target class for anti-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  7. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets...... for antiviral therapies have been provided by UL33, UL78 and in particular ORF74 and the chances are that many more will follow. In HHV8 vMIP-2 and the chemokine-binding proteins potent anti-inflammatory agents have been provided. These have already had their potential demonstrated in animal models and may...

  8. Non-Enzymatic-Browning-Reaction: A Versatile Route for Production of Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots with Tunable Multicolor Luminescent Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Weili; Xu, Can; Wu, Li; Wang, Jiasi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    The non-enzymatic browning, namely Maillard reaction is commonly invoked to account for abiotic chemical transformations of organic matter. Here we report a new reaction pathway via the Maillard reaction to systematically synthesize a series of nitrogen-doped carbon dots (C-dots) with superhigh quantum yield (QY) and tunable multicolor luminescent displayment. The starting materials are glucose and the serial amino acid analogues which allow systemically controlling luminescent and physicochemical properties of C-dots at will. Unexpectedly, the as-prepared C-dots possess bright photoluminescence with QY up to 69.1% which is almost the highest ever reported, favorable biocompatibility, excellent aqueous and nonaqueous dispersibility, ultrahigh photostability, and readily functionalization. We have demonstrated that they are particularly suitable for multicolor luminescent display and long-term and real-time cellular imaging. Furthermore, the methodology is readily scalable to large yield, and can provide sufficient amount of C-dots for practical demands.

  9. Chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F; Jensen, C V

    2001-01-01

    leukocyte count, the CSF concentration of neopterin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and intrathecal IgG and IgM synthesis. The concentration of CCL2 increased between baseline for 3 weeks in both groups, more distinctly so in patients treated with methylprednisolone. CCL2 correlated negatively with MMP-9...... patients in relapse, whilst levels of CCL2 (MCP-1) were reduced. Here, we report a serial analysis of CSF CXCL10 and CCL2 concentrations in 22 patients with attacks of MS or acute optic neuritis (ON) treated with methylprednisolone, and 26 patients treated with placebo in two randomized controlled trials....... Chemokine concentrations were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in CSF obtained at baseline and after 3 weeks, and were compared with other measures of intrathecal inflammation. At baseline CSF concentrations of CCL2 were significantly lower in the patient group than in controls...

  10. Tunable resistance coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.; Mane, Anil U.

    2015-08-11

    A method and article of manufacture of intermixed tunable resistance composite materials containing at least one of W:Al.sub.2O.sub.3, Mo:Al.sub.2O.sub.3 or M:Al.sub.2O.sub.3 where M is a conducting compound containing either W or Mo. A conducting material and an insulating material are deposited by such methods as ALD or CVD to construct composites with intermixed materials which do not have structure or properties like their bulk counterparts.

  11. Tunable Nitride Josephson Junctions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, Nancy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Henry, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lewis, Rupert M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Stephen W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolfley, Steven L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brunke, Lyle Brent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wolak, Matthaeus [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    We have developed an ambient temperature, SiO2/Si wafer - scale process for Josephson junctions based on Nb electrodes and Ta x N barriers with tunable electronic properties. The films are fabricated by magnetron sputtering. The electronic properties of the TaxN barriers are controlled by adjusting the nitrogen flow during sputtering. This technology offers a scalable alternative to the more traditional junctions based on AlOx barriers for low - power, high - performance computing.

  12. Role of Tumor-Derived Chemokines in Osteolytic Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore J. Coniglio

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the primary cause of mortality and morbidity in cancer patients. The bone marrow is a common destination for many malignant cancers, including breast carcinoma (BC, prostate carcinoma, multiple myeloma, lung carcinoma, uterine cancer, thyroid cancer, bladder cancer, and neuroblastoma. The molecular mechanism by which metastatic cancer are able to recognize, infiltrate, and colonize bone are still unclear. Chemokines are small soluble proteins which under normal physiological conditions mediate chemotactic trafficking of leukocytes to specific tissues in the body. In the context of metastasis, the best characterized role for the chemokine system is in the regulation of primary tumor growth, survival, invasion, and homing to specific secondary sites. However, there is ample evidence that metastatic tumors exploit chemokines to modulate the metastatic niche within bone which ultimately results in osteolytic bone disease. In this review, we examine the role of chemokines in metastatic tumor growth within bone. In particular, the chemokines CCL2, CCL3, IL-8/CXCL8, and CXCL12 are consistently involved in promoting osteoclastogenesis and tumor growth. We will also evaluate the suitability of chemokines as targets for chemotherapy with the use of neutralizing antibodies and chemokine receptor-specific antagonists.

  13. Tissue-specific regulation of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines in keratinocytes: Implications for oral inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Marshall

    Full Text Available The IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 play a key role in many inflammatory conditions, particularly those mediated by T cells. Therefore, the production of these chemokines in peripheral tissues could be instrumental in the pathophysiology of tissue-specific immunological diseases such as oral lichen planus (OLP. In the present study, we assessed the production of keratinocyte-derived CXCL9/10/11 under basal and inflammatory conditions and investigated whether these chemokines were involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. We used semi-quantitative PCR, ELISA, chemotaxis assays, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS to assess the expression and functional role of CXCL9/10/11 in oral keratinocytes (three strains of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK, and the H357 oral cancer cell line in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. CXCL9/10/11 were also assessed in tissues from normal patients and those with oral lichen planus (OLP. The time course study in oral keratinocytes treated with IFN-γ showed that expression of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines was significantly enhanced by IFN-γ in a time-dependent manner. In particular, CXCL10, a prominent chemokine that was overexpressed by IFN-γ-stimulated NHOK, was able to effectively recruit CD4 lymphocytes, mainly CD4+CD45RA- cells. Significantly higher levels of CXCL9/10/11 were found in tissues from patients with OLP compared to normal oral mucosa. Taken together, the results demonstrate that normal oral keratinocytes produce chemotactic molecules that mediate T cell recruitment. This study furthers understanding of chemokine production in oral keratinocytes and their role in the pathophysiology of oral mucosa, with particular relevance to OLP.

  14. Tunable Topological Phononic Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zeguo; Wu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators first observed in electronic systems have inspired many analogues in photonic and phononic crystals in which remarkable one-way propagation edge states are supported by topologically nontrivial band gaps. Such band gaps can be achieved by breaking the time-reversal symmetry to lift the degeneracy associated with Dirac cones at the corners of the Brillouin zone. Here, we report on our construction of a phononic crystal exhibiting a Dirac-like cone in the Brillouin zone center. We demonstrate that simultaneously breaking the time-reversal symmetry and altering the geometric size of the unit cell result in a topological transition that we verify by the Chern number calculation and edge-mode analysis. We develop a complete model based on the tight binding to uncover the physical mechanisms of the topological transition. Both the model and numerical simulations show that the topology of the band gap is tunable by varying both the velocity field and the geometric size; such tunability may dramatically enrich the design and use of acoustic topological insulators.

  15. Tunable Topological Phononic Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zeguo

    2016-05-27

    Topological insulators first observed in electronic systems have inspired many analogues in photonic and phononic crystals in which remarkable one-way propagation edge states are supported by topologically nontrivial band gaps. Such band gaps can be achieved by breaking the time-reversal symmetry to lift the degeneracy associated with Dirac cones at the corners of the Brillouin zone. Here, we report on our construction of a phononic crystal exhibiting a Dirac-like cone in the Brillouin zone center. We demonstrate that simultaneously breaking the time-reversal symmetry and altering the geometric size of the unit cell result in a topological transition that we verify by the Chern number calculation and edge-mode analysis. We develop a complete model based on the tight binding to uncover the physical mechanisms of the topological transition. Both the model and numerical simulations show that the topology of the band gap is tunable by varying both the velocity field and the geometric size; such tunability may dramatically enrich the design and use of acoustic topological insulators.

  16. Electrothermally Tunable Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2017-03-18

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated microelectromechanical arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. An electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the beam generating a current that controls the axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to an increase in its curvature, thereby increasing its resonance frequencies. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase monotonically up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electrothermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators. Analytical results based on the nonlinear Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and the results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2016-0291

  17. Structure of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 with a Potent Chemokine Antagonist Reveals Mechanisms of Chemokine Recognition and Molecular Mimicry by HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Han, Gye Won; Abagyan, Ruben; Wu, Beili; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M. (USC); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2017-06-01

    CCR5 is the primary chemokine receptor utilized by HIV to infect leukocytes, whereas CCR5 ligands inhibit infection by blocking CCR5 engagement with HIV gp120. To guide the design of improved therapeutics, we solved the structure of CCR5 in complex with chemokine antagonist [5P7]CCL5. Several structural features appeared to contribute to the anti-HIV potency of [5P7]CCL5, including the distinct chemokine orientation relative to the receptor, the near-complete occupancy of the receptor binding pocket, the dense network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the similarity of binding determinants with the FDA-approved HIV inhibitor Maraviroc. Molecular modeling indicated that HIV gp120 mimicked the chemokine interaction with CCR5, providing an explanation for the ability of CCR5 to recognize diverse ligands and gp120 variants. Our findings reveal that structural plasticity facilitates receptor-chemokine specificity and enables exploitation by HIV, and provide insight into the design of small molecule and protein inhibitors for HIV and other CCR5-mediated diseases.

  18. Roles of the Chemokine System in Development of Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Longbiao; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Chen, Yitong; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The escalating epidemic of obesity has increased the incidence of obesity-induced complications to historically high levels. Adipose tissue is a dynamic energy depot, which stores energy and mobilizes it during nutrient deficiency. Excess nutrient intake resulting in adipose tissue expansion triggers lipid release and aberrant adipokine, cytokine and chemokine production, and signaling that ultimately lead to adipose tissue inflammation, a hallmark of obesity. This low-grade chronic inflammation is thought to link obesity to insulin resistance and the associated comorbidities of metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increase risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on and discuss members of the chemokine system for which there is clear evidence of participation in the development of obesity and obesity-induced pathologies. PMID:24741577

  19. Roles of the Chemokine System in Development of Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbiao Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating epidemic of obesity has increased the incidence of obesity-induced complications to historically high levels. Adipose tissue is a dynamic energy depot, which stores energy and mobilizes it during nutrient deficiency. Excess nutrient intake resulting in adipose tissue expansion triggers lipid release and aberrant adipokine, cytokine and chemokine production, and signaling that ultimately lead to adipose tissue inflammation, a hallmark of obesity. This low-grade chronic inflammation is thought to link obesity to insulin resistance and the associated comorbidities of metabolic syndrome such as dyslipidemia and hypertension, which increase risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on and discuss members of the chemokine system for which there is clear evidence of participation in the development of obesity and obesity-induced pathologies.

  20. IL-1beta-induced chemokine and Fas expression are inhibited by suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 in insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M L B; Rønn, S G; Bruun, C

    2008-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Chemokines recruit activated immune cells to sites of inflammation and are important mediators of insulitis. Activation of the pro-apoptotic receptor Fas leads to apoptosis-mediated death of the Fas-expressing cell. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IFN-gamma regulate...... the transcription of genes encoding the Fas receptor and several chemokines. We have previously shown that suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS)-3 inhibits IL-1beta- and IFN-gamma-induced nitric oxide production in a beta cell line. The aim of this study was to investigate whether SOCS-3 can influence cytokine......-induced Fas and chemokine expression in beta cells. METHODS: Using a beta cell line with inducible Socs3 expression or primary neonatal rat islet cells transduced with a Socs3-encoding adenovirus, we employed real-time RT-PCR analysis to investigate whether SOCS-3 affects cytokine-induced chemokine and Fas m...

  1. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  2. Chemokine Receptors and Integrin Function in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, James

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary data demonstrated that the addition of specific alpha-chemokines, IL-8 and Gro-alpha, to prostate carcinoma cell cultures, leads to an increase in the motility and invasion of these cells in vitro...

  3. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  4. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar, E-mail: snimmag1@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-05-30

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer.

  5. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer.

  6. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Alcheikh, Nouha; Ramini, Abdallah; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  7. Electrothermally Tunable Bridge Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator compressed by a force due to electrothermal actuation. We demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally, by passing a DC current through it. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and to simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results.

  8. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-03

    We report an analytical and experimental study on the tunability of in-plane doubly-clamped nanomechanical arches under varied DC bias conditions at room temperature. For this purpose, silicon based shallow arches are fabricated using standard e-beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a transduction gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes. The high tunability of shallow arches paves the ways for highly tunable band pass filtering applications in high frequency range.

  9. Tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    A tunable radiation emitting semiconductor device includes at least one elongated structure at least partially fabricated from one or more semiconductor materials exhibiting a bandgap characteristic including one or more energy transitions whose energies correspond to photon energies of light

  10. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  11. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tunable on chip optofluidic laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakal, Avraham; Vannahme, Christoph; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    On chip tunable laser is demonstrated by realizing a microfluidic droplet array. The periodicity is controlled by the pressure applied to two separate inlets, allowing to tune the lasing frequency over a broad spectral range.......On chip tunable laser is demonstrated by realizing a microfluidic droplet array. The periodicity is controlled by the pressure applied to two separate inlets, allowing to tune the lasing frequency over a broad spectral range....

  13. Tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate electrically-tunable femtosecond Cherenkov fiber laser output at the visible range. Using an all-fiber, self-starting femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser as the pump source and nonlinear photonic crystal fiber link as the wave-conversion medium, ultrafast, milliwatt-level, tunable...... and spectral isolated Cherenkov radiation at visible wavelengths are reported. Such a femtosecond Cherenkov laser source is promising for practical biophotonics applications....

  14. Truncation of CXCL12 by CD26 reduces its CXC chemokine receptor 4- and atypical chemokine receptor 3-dependent activity on endothelial cells and lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Rik; Mortier, Anneleen; Boff, Daiane

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 or stromal cell-derived factor 1/SDF-1 attracts hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature leukocytes through the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). In addition, it interacts with atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3 or CXCR7) and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12 ac...

  15. Magnetostatic wave tunable resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castera, J.-P.; Hartemann, P.

    1983-06-01

    Theoretical principles and techniques for the implementation of magnetostatic surface wave and volume wave resonators in high frequency oscillators are discussed. Magnetostatic waves are magnetic waves that propagate in materials exposed to a polarized magnetic field. The propagation speed ranges from 3-300 km/sec for wavelengths between 1 micron and 10 mm, in the presence of lags from 10-1000 nsec/ cm. Tunable resonators in the 1-20 GHz frequency range have been manufactured with YIG using liquid phase epitaxy for deposition on gadolinium and gallium substrates. Distributed-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity resonators are described and performance tests results are reported, including losses of 8 dB, a quality coefficient under voltage of 450, and frequency rejection outside of resonance better than 10 dB. However, saturation occurs at low power levels at frequencies lower than 4.2 GHz, a feature overcome with forward volume magnetostatic wave generators, which have a quality factor of 500, an insertion loss of 22 dB, and rejection around 15 dB.

  16. Chemokine CCL2 and chemokine receptor CCR2 in early active multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Strieter, R M

    2004-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 have been strongly implicated in disease pathogenesis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas data on the CCL2-CCR2 axis are scarce in MS. We studied...... the expression of CCR2 on leukocytes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis and MS, and the concentration of CCL2 in the CSF from these patients. Results were compared with the results in non-inflammatory neurological controls and were correlated with other...... parameters (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF data). Our findings suggest a limited role for CCL2/CCR2 in early active MS....

  17. Thiazolidinediones inhibit airway smooth muscle release of the chemokine CXCL10: in vitro comparison with current asthma therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel Petra; Alkhouri Hatem; Lalor Daniel J; Burgess Janette K; Armour Carol L; Hughes J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Activated mast cells are present within airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles in eosinophilic asthma. ASM production of the chemokine CXCL10 plays a role in their recruitment. Thus the effects of glucocorticoids (fluticasone, budesonide), long-acting β2-agonists (salmeterol, formoterol) and thiazolidinediones (ciglitazone, rosiglitazone) on CXCL10 production by ASM cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma were investigated in vitro. Methods Confluent serum-deprived ce...

  18. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed...... whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays...

  19. Chemokines in the corpus luteum: Implications of leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liptak Amy R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokines are small molecular weight peptides responsible for adhesion, activation, and recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Leukocytes are thought to influence follicular atresia, ovulation, and luteal function. Many studies in recent years have focused attention on the characterization of leukocyte populations within the ovary, the importance of leukocyte-ovarian cell interactions, and more recently, the mechanisms of ovarian leukocyte recruitment. Information about the role of chemokines and leukocyte trafficking (chemotaxis during ovarian function is important to understanding paracrine-autocrine relationships shared between reproductive and immune systems. Recent advances regarding chemokine expression and leukocyte accumulation within the ovulatory follicle and the corpus luteum are the subject of this mini-review.

  20. Tunable Multiband Microwave Photonic Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mable P. Fok

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for multifunctional devices, the use of cognitive wireless technology to solve the frequency resource shortage problem, as well as the capabilities and operational flexibility necessary to meet ever-changing environment result in an urgent need of multiband wireless communications. Spectral filter is an essential part of any communication systems, and in the case of multiband wireless communications, tunable multiband RF filters are required for channel selection, noise/interference removal, and RF signal processing. Unfortunately, it is difficult for RF electronics to achieve both tunable and multiband spectral filtering. Recent advancements of microwave photonics have proven itself to be a promising candidate to solve various challenges in RF electronics including spectral filtering, however, the development of multiband microwave photonic filtering still faces lots of difficulties, due to the limited scalability and tunability of existing microwave photonic schemes. In this review paper, we first discuss the challenges that were facing by multiband microwave photonic filter, then we review recent techniques that have been developed to tackle the challenge and lead to promising developments of tunable microwave photonic multiband filters. The successful design and implementation of tunable microwave photonic multiband filter facilitate the vision of dynamic multiband wireless communications and radio frequency signal processing for commercial, defense, and civilian applications.

  1. Human astrocytes: secretome profiles of cytokines and chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung S Choi

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a key role in maintenance of neuronal functions in the central nervous system by producing various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which act as a molecular coordinator of neuron-glia communication. At the site of neuroinflammation, astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines play both neuroprotective and neurotoxic roles in brain lesions of human neurological diseases. At present, the comprehensive profile of human astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines during inflammation remains to be fully characterized. We investigated the cytokine secretome profile of highly purified human astrocytes by using a protein microarray. Non-stimulated human astrocytes in culture expressed eight cytokines, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, GROα (CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8 (CXCL8, MCP-1 (CCL2, MIF and Serpin E1. Following stimulation with IL-1β and TNF-α, activated astrocytes newly produced IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, IP-10 (CXCL10, MIP-1α (CCL3 and RANTES (CCL5, in addition to the induction of sICAM-1 and complement component 5. Database search indicated that most of cytokines and chemokines produced by non-stimulated and activated astrocytes are direct targets of the transcription factor NF-kB. These results indicated that cultured human astrocytes express a distinct set of NF-kB-target cytokines and chemokines in resting and activated conditions, suggesting that the NF-kB signaling pathway differentially regulates gene expression of cytokines and chemokines in human astrocytes under physiological and inflammatory conditions.

  2. Tunable features of magnetoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuxiang; Zhai, Junyi; Priya, Shashank; Li, Jie-Fang; Viehland, Dwight

    2009-06-01

    We have found that magnetostrictive FeBSiC alloy ribbons laminated with piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3) fiber can act as a tunable transformer when driven under resonant conditions. These composites were also found to exhibit the strongest resonant magnetoelectric voltage coefficient of 750 V/cm-Oe. The tunable features were achieved by applying small dc magnetic biases of -5 transformer features can be attributed to large changes in the piezomagnetic coefficient and permeability of the magnetostrictive phase under H(dc).

  3. Coherent tunable far infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Tunable, CW, FIR radiation has been generated by nonlinear mixing of radiation from two CO2 lasers in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode. The FIR difference-frequency power was radiated from the MIM diode antenna to a calibrated InSb bolometer. FIR power of 200 nW was generated by 250 mW from each of the CO2 lasers. Using the combination of lines from a waveguide CO2 laser, with its larger tuning range, with lines from CO2, N2O, and CO2-isotope lasers promises complete coverage of the entire FIR band with stepwise-tunable CW radiation.

  4. Rac1 mediates collapse of microvilli on chemokine-activated T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhara, Ruchika; van Hennik, Paula B.; Gignac, Michelle L.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Delon, Jerome; Shaw, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Lymphocytes circulate in the blood and upon chemokine activation rapidly bind, where needed, to microvasculature to mediate immune surveillance. Resorption of microvilli is an early morphological alteration induced by chemokines that facilitates lymphocyte emigration. However, the antecedent

  5. Tunable Soft X-Ray Oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, Jonathan; Gandhi, Punut; Gu, X.-W.; Fawley, William M.; Reinsch, Matthia; Penn, Gregory; Kim, K.-J.; Lindberg, Ryan; Zholents, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a tunable soft x-ray free electron laser (FEL) photon source is presented and studied numerically. The concept is based on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), wherein two modulator-chicane sections impose high harmonic structure with much greater efficacy as compared to conventional high harmonic FELs that use only one modulator-chicane section. The idea proposed here is to replace the external laser power sources in the EEHG modulators with FEL oscillators, and to combine the bunching of the beam with the production of radiation. Tunability is accomplished by adjusting the magnetic chicanes while the two oscillators remain at a fixed frequency. This scheme eliminates the need to develop coherent sources with the requisite power, pulse length, and stability requirements by exploiting the MHz bunch repetition rates of FEL continuous wave (CW) sources driven by superconducting (SC) linacs. We present time-dependent GINGER simulation results for an EEHG scheme with an oscillator modulator at 43 nm employing 50percent reflective dielectric mirrors and a second modulator employing an external, 215-nm drive laser. Peak output of order 300 MW is obtained at 2.7 nm, corresponding to the 80th harmonic of 215 nm. An alternative single-cavity echo-oscillator scheme based on a 13.4 nm oscillator is investigated with time-independent simulations that a 180-MW peak power at final wavelength of 1.12 nm. Three alternate configurations that use separate bunches to produce the radiation for EEHG microbunching are also presented. Our results show that oscillator-based soft x-ray FELs driven by CWSC linacs are extremely attractive because of their potential to produce tunable radiation at high average power together with excellent longitudinal coherence and narrow spectral bandwidth.

  6. Tunable Soft X-Ray Oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurtele, Jonathan; Gandhi, Punut; Gu, X-W; Fawley, William M; Reinsch, Matthia; Penn, Gregory; Kim, K-J; Lindberg, Ryan; Zholents, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    A concept for a tunable soft x-ray free electron laser (FEL) photon source is presented and studied numerically. The concept is based on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), wherein two modulator-chicane sections impose high harmonic structure with much greater efficacy as compared to conventional high harmonic FELs that use only one modulator-chicane section. The idea proposed here is to replace the external laser power sources in the EEHG modulators with FEL oscillators, and to combine the bunching of the beam with the production of radiation. Tunability is accomplished by adjusting the magnetic chicanes while the two oscillators remain at a fixed frequency. This scheme eliminates the need to develop coherent sources with the requisite power, pulse length, and stability requirements by exploiting the MHz bunch repetition rates of FEL continuous wave (CW) sources driven by superconducting (SC) linacs. We present time-dependent GINGER simulation results for an EEHG scheme with an oscillator modulator at 43 nm employing 50percent reflective dielectric mirrors and a second modulator employing an external, 215-nm drive laser. Peak output of order 300 MW is obtained at 2.7 nm, corresponding to the 80th harmonic of 215 nm. An alternative single-cavity echo-oscillator scheme based on a 13.4 nm oscillator is investigated with time-independent simulations that a 180-MW peak power at final wavelength of 1.12 nm. Three alternate configurations that use separate bunches to produce the radiation for EEHG microbunching are also presented. Our results show that oscillator-based soft x-ray FELs driven by CWSC linacs are extremely attractive because of their potential to produce tunable radiation at high average power together with excellent longitudinal coherence and narrow spectral bandwidth.

  7. Development of specific cytokine and Chemokine ELISAs for Bottlenose Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlier detection of changes in the health status of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) is expected to further improve their medical care. Cytokines and chemokines are critical mediators of the cellular immune response, and studies have suggested that these molecules may serve as important bio...

  8. [Evaluation of chemokines in tears of patients with infectious keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Shinsuke; Shoji, Jun; Inada, Noriko; Sawa, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the chemokine profile in tears of patients with infectious keratitis. Subjects were 32 eyes of 16 patients with infectious keratitis and 5 eyes of 5 healthy volunteers as a control. The patients with infectious keratitis were classified into two groups of eyes: 10 with bacterial keratitis and 6 with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Tear fluid was obtained from both eyes of the patients with infectious keratitis and from the right eyes of the control subjects using filter paper. Chemokine concentration (unit: Odu/mm2) and its profile in tears was analyzed using an antibody-array. In terms of chemokine profile in the bacterial keratitis group, the expression volume of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in the diseased eyes was significantly higher than in the healthy eyes (p tears of the Acanthamoeba keratitis group. Regarding the chemokine ratio, the IL-8/MEC ratio in the diseased eyes of the Pseudomonas keratitis group and the MCP-1/IL-8 in the diseased eyes of the Acanthamoeba keratitis group showed a significantly high level (p tears of infectious keratitis patients is useful as a clinical tear laboratory test to interpret the pathologic condition of infectious keratitis

  9. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...

  10. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  11. Cytokines and chemokines involved in acute retinal necrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. De Visser (Lenneke); J.H. de Boer (Joke); G.T. Rijkers; Wiertz, K. (Karin); H.J. van den Ham; de Boer, R. (Rob); van Loon, A.M. (Anton M.); A. Rothová (Aniki); J.D.F. de Groot-Mijnes (Jolanda )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. To investigate which cytokines and chemokines are involved in the immunopatho-genesis of acute retinal necrosis (ARN), and whether cytokine profiles are associated with clinical manifestations, such as visual outcome. METHODS. Serum and aqueous humor (AH) samples of 19 patients

  12. Elevated plasma chemokine CCL18/PARC in beta-thalassemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitriou, E.; Verhoek, M.; Altun, S.; Karabatsos, F.; Moraitou, M.; Youssef, J.; Boot, R.; Sarafidou, J.; Karagiorga, M.; Aerts, H.; Michelakakis, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma CCL18/PARC, a member of the CC chemokine family, has been found to be several ten-fold increased in symptomatic Gaucher type I patients. Elevated plasma chitotriosidase levels are a well-known abnormality in Gaucher patients, however, its diagnostic use is limited by the frequent genetic

  13. Cytokines and Chemokines Involved in Acute Retinal Necrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Lenneke; H de Boer, Joke; T Rijkers, Ger; Wiertz, Karin; van den Ham, Henk-Jan; de Boer, Rob; M van Loon, Anton; Rothova, Aniki; de Groot-Mijnes, Jolanda D F

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which cytokines and chemokines are involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute retinal necrosis (ARN), and whether cytokine profiles are associated with clinical manifestations, such as visual outcome. Methods: Serum and aqueous humor (AH) samples of 19 patients with ARN were

  14. Tunable electro-optic filter stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecchio, Adam K.; Shriyan, Sameet K.; Bellingham, Alyssa

    2017-09-05

    A holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) tunable filter exhibits switching times of no more than 20 microseconds. The HPDLC tunable filter can be utilized in a variety of applications. An HPDLC tunable filter stack can be utilized in a hyperspectral imaging system capable of spectrally multiplexing hyperspectral imaging data acquired while the hyperspectral imaging system is airborne. HPDLC tunable filter stacks can be utilized in high speed switchable optical shielding systems, for example as a coating for a visor or an aircraft canopy. These HPDLC tunable filter stacks can be fabricated using a spin coating apparatus and associated fabrication methods.

  15. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 downregulated by von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor pVHL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, Peter; Sulitkova, Jitka; Lisztwan, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    Organ-specific metastasis is governed, in part, by interactions between chemokine receptors on cancer cells and matching chemokines in target organs. For example, malignant breast cancer cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and commonly metastasize to organs that are an abundant source of t...

  16. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, Rory R; von Hundelshausen, Philipp; Nesmelova, Irina V

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...

  17. CXC chemokine receptor 2 contributes to host defense in murine urinary tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olszyna, D. P.; Florquin, S.; Sewnath, M.; Branger, J.; Speelman, P.; van Deventer, S. J.; Strieter, R. M.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    CXC chemokines have been implicated in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection. To determine the role of CXC chemokines in the host response to urinary tract infection (UTI), female mice were treated with an antibody against the major CXC chemokine receptor in the mouse, CXCR2, before

  18. Tunable on chip optofluidic laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakal, Avraham; Vannahme, Christoph; Kristensen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    A chip scale tunable laser in the visible spectral band is realized by generating a periodic droplet array inside a microfluidic channel. Combined with a gain medium within the droplets, the periodic structure provides the optical feedback of the laser. By controlling the pressure applied to two...

  19. Electrostatically Tunable Nanomechanical Shallow Arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    -beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical results with a maximum tunability of 108.14% for 180 nm thick arch with a

  20. Cytokine and chemokine levels in tears from healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño, Ester; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia; Tesón, Marisa; García-Vázquez, Carmen; Stern, Michael E; Whitcup, Scott M; Calonge, Margarita

    2010-11-01

    There is growing evidence for the existence of an 'immune tone' in normal tears. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of a large panel of cytokines and chemokines in tears obtained from healthy subjects. These levels can then serve as baseline values for comparison with patients suffering from ocular surface diseases. Nine healthy subjects participated in this study, and normal ocular surface health was documented by the results of a dry eye questionnaire, Schirmer strip wetting, and vital staining of the cornea. Four microliters of tears were collected from each eye and analysed separately with multiplex bead-based assays for the concentration of 30 cytokines and chemokines. Twenty-five cytokines/chemokines were detected. CCL11/Eotaxin1, GM-CSF, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-12p70, IL-15, CX3CL1/Fractalkine, TNF-α, epidermal growth factor, and CCL4/MIP-1β were present at 5-100 pg/ml. IL-1β, IL-6, IL-7A, CXCL8/IL-8, and CCL2/MCP-1 were present at 100-400 pg/ml. IL-1Ra, CXCL10/IP-10 and vascular endothelial growth factor were present at more than 1000 pg/ml. Multiplex bead-based assays are convenient for cytokine/chemokine detection in tears. Fracktalkine has been detected in human healthy tears for the first time. The knowledge of cytokine/chemokine concentrations in tears from normal subjects is an important reference for further comparison with patients suffering from ocular surface diseases. Variability in their levels can reflect a phenomenon of potential importance for the understanding of the ocular surface cytokine pattern. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  1. Acidic pH stimulates the production of the angiogenic CXC chemokine, CXCL8 (interleukin-8), in human adult mesenchymal stem cells via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and NF-kappaB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, David S; Zhu, Jian-Hua; Makhijani, Nalini S; Yamaguchi, Dean T

    2008-07-01

    Blood vessel injury results in limited oxygen tension and diffusion leading to hypoxia, increased anaerobic metabolism, and elevated production of acidic metabolites that cannot be easily removed due to the reduced blood flow. Therefore, an acidic extracellular pH occurs in the local microenvironment of disrupted bone. The potential role of acidic pH and glu-leu-arg (ELR(+)) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) treated with medium of decreasing pH (7.4, 7.0, 6.7, and 6.4). The cells showed a reciprocal increase in CXCL8 (interleukin-8, IL-8) mRNA levels as extracellular pH decreased. At pH 6.4, CXCL8 mRNA was induced >60x in comparison to levels at pH 7.4. hMSCs treated with osteogenic medium (OGM) also showed an increase in CXCL8 mRNA with decreasing pH; although, at a lower level than that seen in cells grown in non-OGM. CXCL8 protein was secreted into the medium at all pHs with maximal induction at pH 6.7. Inhibition of the G-protein-coupled receptor alpha, G(alphai), suppressed CXCL8 levels in response to acidic pH; whereas phospholipase C inhibition had no effect on CXCL8. The use of specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction inhibitors indicated that the pH-dependent increase in CXCL8 mRNA is due to activation of ERK and p38 pathways. The JNK pathway was not involved. NF-kappaB inhibition resulted in a decrease in CXCL8 levels in hMSCs grown in non-OGM. However, OGM-differentiated hMSCs showed an increase in CXCL8 levels when treated with the NF-kappaB inhibitor PDTC, a pyrrolidine derivative of dithiocarbamate. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Airfoil sampling of a pulsed Laval beam with tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry: application to low-temperature kinetics and product detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Liu, Chen-Lin; Savee, John D; Ferrell, Sarah J; Leone, Stephen R; Wilson, Kevin R

    2011-12-01

    A new pulsed Laval nozzle apparatus with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron photoionization quadrupole mass spectrometry is constructed to study low-temperature radical-neutral chemical reactions of importance for modeling the atmosphere of Titan and the outer planets. A design for the sampling geometry of a pulsed Laval nozzle expansion has been developed that operates successfully for the determination of rate coefficients by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The new concept employs airfoil sampling of the collimated expansion with excellent sampling throughput. Time-resolved profiles of the high Mach number gas flow obtained by photoionization signals show that perturbation of the collimated expansion by the airfoil is negligible. The reaction of C(2)H with C(2)H(2) is studied at 70 K as a proof-of-principle result for both low-temperature rate coefficient measurements and product identification based on the photoionization spectrum of the reaction product versus VUV photon energy. This approach can be used to provide new insights into reaction mechanisms occurring at kinetic rates close to the collision-determined limit.

  3. SMM-chemokines: a class of unnatural synthetic molecules as chemical probes of chemokine receptor biology and leads for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Choi, Won-Tak; Dong, Chang-Zhi; Madani, Navid; Tian, Shaomin; Liu, Dongxiang; Wang, Youli; Pesavento, James; Wang, Jun; Fan, Xuejun; Yuan, Jian; Fritzsche, Wayne R; An, Jing; Sodroski, Joseph G; Richman, Douglas D; Huang, Ziwei

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. To develop natural chemokines into receptor probes and inhibitors of pathological processes, the lack of chemokine-receptor selectivity must be overcome. Here, we apply chemical synthesis and the concept of modular modifications to generate unnatural synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokines that have high receptor selectivity and affinity, and reduced toxicity. A proof of the concept was shown by transforming the nonselective viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II into new analogs with enhanced selectivity and potency for CXCR4 or CCR5, two principal coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 entry. These new analogs provided insights into receptor binding and signaling mechanisms and acted as potent HIV-1 inhibitors. These results support the concept of SMM-chemokines for studying and controlling the function of other chemokine receptors.

  4. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  5. Effects of urban air pollution on the inflammatory reaction: involvement of the chemokine pathways; Impact de la pollution atmospherique urbaine sur la reponse inflammatoire: implication des chimiokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahy, O.

    2000-12-01

    Urban air pollution is both gaseous and particulate, and diesel exhausts are now the main source of particles. Diesel particles consist of a carbon core with multiple adsorbed organic compounds, among witch poly-aromatic hydrocarbons. These diesel particles and associated poly-aromatic hydrocarbons are likely to play a role in the recent increase in allergic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of diesel organic extracts on the initiation and the orientation of the allergen-dependent inflammatory reaction by analyzing the dis-regulation of a family of mediators involved in cellular recruitment: the chemokines. We demonstrated that mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages from normal subjects displayed a dis-regulation in pro-inflammatory chemokine expression and production (IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES) when exposed to diesel organic extracts. In addition we observed a synergy between the effects of diesel and allergen when cells from allergic patients were exposed to both simultaneously, leading to a strong over-production of chemokines, and to the increased capacity of recruiting effector cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils. The MAP kinase pathways seemed largely involved in the transduction of diesel and allergen stimulus, since a specific inhibition almost abolished the dis-regulation of chemokine production. Diesel and allergen also appeared to favour the establishment of a type 2 immune response (pro-allergenic), by preferentially recruiting Th2 lymphocytes via the dis-regulation of chemokine expression (MDC and IP-10). Finally, the humanized SCID mouse model grafted with autologous human skin allowed the in vivo evaluation of a local over-production of chemokine, by analyzing the cellular recruitment in the skin after intra-dermal injection of recombinant chemokines. This model appears useful for the study of the mechanisms of cellular recruitment by chemokines and the potential therapeutic approaches. In conclusion, our study underlines the

  6. Development of Novel Promiscuous Anti-Chemokine Peptibodies for Treating Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Abraham

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines and their receptors play critical roles in the progression of autoimmunity and inflammation. Typically, multiple chemokines are involved in the development of these pathologies. Indeed, targeting single chemokines or chemokine receptors has failed to achieve significant clinical benefits in treating autoimmunity and inflammation. Moreover, the binding of host atypical chemokine receptors to multiple chemokines as well as the binding of chemokine-binding proteins secreted by various pathogens can serve as a strategy for controlling inflammation. In this work, promiscuous chemokine-binding peptides that could bind and inhibit multiple inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL9/10/11, were selected from phage display libraries. These peptides were cloned into human mutated immunoglobulin Fc-protein fusions (peptibodies. The peptibodies BKT120Fc and BKT130Fc inhibited the ability of inflammatory chemokines to induce the adhesion and migration of immune cells. Furthermore, BKT120Fc and BKT130Fc also showed a significant inhibition of disease progression in a variety of animal models for autoimmunity and inflammation. Developing a novel class of antagonists that can control the courses of diseases by selectively blocking multiple chemokines could be a novel way of generating effective therapeutics.

  7. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  8. A closed-tube assay for genotyping of the 32-bp deletion polymorphism in the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Werge, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a closed-tube assay for determination of the chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) 32-bp deletion allele, which protects against infections with HIV and modulates susceptibility to a variety of inflammatory diseases. This assay utilizes dissociation analysis of amplified products...

  9. The CXC chemokines gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-inducible protein 10 and monokine induced by IFN-gamma are released during severe melioidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauw, F. N.; Simpson, A. J.; Prins, J. M.; van Deventer, S. J.; Chaowagul, W.; White, N. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) are related CXC chemokines which bind to the CXCR3 receptor and specifically target activated T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells. The production of IP-10 and Mig by various cell types in vitro

  10. Mutational analysis of the extracellular disulphide bridges of the atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 uncovers multiple binding and activation modes for its chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowska, Martyna; Meyrath, Max; Reynders, Nathan; Counson, Manuel; Hanson, Julien; Steyaert, Jan; Chevigné, Andy

    2018-07-01

    The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes but also in viral infection and cancer. ACKR3 shows strong propensity for activation and, unlike classical chemokine receptors, can respond to chemokines from both the CXC and CC families as well as to the endogenous peptides BAM22 and adrenomedullin. Moreover, despite belonging to the G protein coupled receptor family, its function appears to be mainly dependent on β-arrestin. ACKR3 has also been shown to continuously cycle between the plasma membrane and the endosomal compartments, suggesting a possible role as a scavenging receptor. So far, the molecular basis accounting for these atypical binding and signalling properties remains elusive. Noteworthy, ACKR3 extracellular domains bear three disulphide bridges. Two of them lie on top of the two main binding subpockets and are conserved among chemokine receptors, and one, specific to ACKR3, forms an intra-N terminus four-residue-loop of so far unknown function. Here, by mutational and functional studies, we examined the impact of the different disulphide bridges for ACKR3 folding, ligand binding and activation. We showed that, in contrast to most classical chemokine receptors, none of the extracellular disulphide bridges was essential for ACKR3 function. However, the disruption of the unique ACKR3 N-terminal loop drastically reduced the binding of CC chemokines whereas it only had a mild impact on CXC chemokine binding. Mutagenesis also uncovered that chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine ligands interact and activate ACKR3 according to distinct binding modes characterized by different transmembrane domain subpocket occupancy and N-terminal loop contribution, with BAM22 mimicking the binding mode of CC chemokine N terminus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Micromachined tunable metamaterials: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, A Q; Zhu, W M; Tsai, D P; Zheludev, N I

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews micromachined tunable metamaterials, whereby the tuning capabilities are based on the mechanical reconfiguration of the lattice and/or the metamaterial element geometry. The primary focus of this review is the feasibility of the realization of micromachined tunable metamaterials via structure reconfiguration and the current state of the art in the fabrication technologies of structurally reconfigurable metamaterial elements. The micromachined reconfigurable microstructures not only offer a new tuning method for metamaterials without being limited by the nonlinearity of constituent materials, but also enable a new paradigm of reconfigurable metamaterial-based devices with mechanical actuations. With recent development in nanomachining technology, it is possible to develop structurally reconfigurable metamaterials with faster tuning speed, higher density of integration and more flexible choice of the working frequencies. (review article)

  12. Tropoelastin regulates chemokine expression in fibroblasts in Costello syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatano, Yutaka; Fujinawa, Reiko; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Tsuta, Kohji; Takada, Goro; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Itoh, Kohji

    2008-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly associated with growth and mental retardation, cardiac and skeletal anomalies, and a predisposition to develop neoplasia. Comprehensive expression analysis revealed remarkable up-regulation of several cytokines and chemokines including Gro family proteins, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-8 and MCP-1 but down-regulation of extracellular matrix components including collagens and proteoglycans of skin fibroblasts derived from a Japanese Costello syndrome patient characterized by significantly reduced tropoelastin mRNA, impaired elastogenesis and enhanced cell proliferation. In contrast, decreases in these chemokines and IL-1β expression were observed in Costello fibroblastic cell lines stably expressing the bovine tropoelastin (btEln) gene and in restored elastic fibers. These results strongly suggest that the human TE gene (ELN) transfer could be applicable for the gene therapy of a group of Costello syndrome patients with reduced ELN gene expression

  13. ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubie, Claudia; Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Wagner, Mathias; Schuld, Jochen; Gräber, Stefan; Brittner, Brigitte; Bohle, Rainer M; Schilling, Martin K

    2008-01-01

    CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA) (n = 30) as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 48) and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) (n = 16). Chemokine expression was assessed by microdissection, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR), the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In contrast to CXCL6, we demonstrated CXCL1 and CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression to be significantly up-regulated in CRC and CRLM tissue specimens in relation to their matched tumor neighbor tissues. Moreover, both chemokine ligands were demonstrated to be significantly higher expressed in CRC tissues than in CRA tissues thus indicating a progressive increase in the transition from the premalignant condition to the development of the malignant status. Although a comparative analysis of the CXCL1/CXCL5 protein expression profiles in CRC patients revealed that the absolute expression level of CXCL1 was significantly higher in comparison to CXCL5, mRNA- and protein overexpression of CXCL5 in CRC and CRLM tissues was much more pronounced (80- and 60- fold in CRC tissues, respectively) in comparison to CXCL1 (5- and 3.5- fold in CRC tissues, respectively). Our results demonstrate a significant association between CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression with CRC and CRLM suggesting for both chemokine ligands a potential role in the progression from CRA to CRC and thus, in the initiation of CRC

  14. Peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles in juvenile localized scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torok, Kathryn S.; Kurzinski, Katherine; Kelsey, Christina; Yabes, Jonathan; Magee, Kelsey; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Medsger, Thomas; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate peripheral blood T-helper (TH) cell associated cytokine and chemokine profiles in localized scleroderma (LS), and correlate them with clinical disease features, including disease activity parameters. Methods A 29-plex Luminex platform was used to analyze the humoral profile of plasma samples from 69 pediatric LS patients and 71 healthy pediatric controls. Cytokine/chemokine levels were compared between these two groups and within LS patients, focusing on validated clinical outcome measures of disease activity and damage in LS. Results Plasma levels of IP-10, MCP-1, IL-17a, IL-12p70, GM-CSF, PDGF-bb, IFN-α2, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in LS compared to healthy controls. Analysis within the LS group demonstrated IP-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF correlated with clinical measures of disease activity. Several cytokines/chemokines correlated with anti-histone antibody, while only a few correlated with positive ANA and single-stranded DNA antibody. Conclusion This is the first time that multiple cytokines and chemokines have been examined simultaneously LS. In general, a TH-1 (IFN-γ) and TH-17 (IL-17a) predominance was demonstrated in LS compared to healthy controls. There is also an IFN–γ signature with elevated IP-10, MCP-1 and IFN-γ, which has been previously demonstrated in systemic sclerosis, suggesting a shared pathophysiology. Within the LS patients, those with active disease demonstrated IP-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF, which may potentially serve as biomarkers of disease activity in the clinical setting. PMID:26254121

  15. Elevated CXC chemokines in urine noninvasively discriminate OAB from UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Qu, Xianggui; Chuang, Yao Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Overlapping symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) often complicate the diagnosis and contribute to overprescription of antibiotics. Inflammatory response is a shared characteristic of both UTI and OAB and here we hypothesized that molecular differences in inflammatory response seen in urine can help discriminate OAB from UTI. Subjects in the age range of (20-88 yr) of either sex were recruited for this urine analysis study. Urine specimens were available from 62 UTI patients with positive dipstick test before antibiotic treatment. Six of these patients also provided urine after completion of antibiotic treatment. Subjects in cohorts of OAB (n = 59) and asymptomatic controls (n = 26) were negative for dipstick test. Urinary chemokines were measured by MILLIPLEX MAP Human Cytokine/Chemokine Immunoassay and their association with UTI and OAB was determined by univariate and multivariate statistics. Significant elevation of CXCL-1, CXCL-8 (IL-8), and CXCL-10 together with reduced levels for a receptor antagonist of IL-1A (sIL-1RA) were seen in UTI relative to OAB and asymptomatic controls. Elevated CXCL-1 urine levels predicted UTI with odds ratio of 1.018 and showed a specificity of 80.77% and sensitivity of 59.68%. Postantibiotic treatment, reduction was seen in all CXC chemokines with a significant reduction for CXCL-10. Strong association of CXCL-1 and CXCL-10 for UTI over OAB indicates mechanistic differences in signaling pathways driving inflammation secondary of infection in UTI compared with a lack of infection in OAB. Urinary chemokines highlight molecular differences in the paracrine signaling driving the overlapping symptoms of UTI and OAB. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Highly tunable NEMS shallow arches

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-11-30

    We report highly tunable nanoelectromechanical systems NEMS shallow arches under dc excitation voltages. Silicon based in-plane doubly clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. By designing the structures to have gap to thickness ratio of more than four, the mid-plane stretching of the nano arches is maximized such that an increase in the dc bias voltage will result into continuous increase in the resonance frequency of the resonators to wide ranges. This is confirmed analytically based on a nonlinear beam model. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with that of the results from developed analytical model. A maximum tunability of 108.14% for a 180 nm thick arch with an initially designed gap of 1 μm between the beam and the driving/sensing electrodes is achieved. Furthermore, a tunable narrow bandpass filter is demonstrated, which opens up opportunities for designing such structures as filtering elements in high frequency ranges.

  17. Highly Tunable Electrostatic Nanomechanical Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed Naveed Riaz

    2017-11-24

    There has been significant interest towards highly tunable resonators for on-demand frequency selection in modern communication systems. Here, we report highly tunable electrostatically actuated silicon-based nanomechanical resonators. In-plane doubly-clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches due to residual stresses, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining. The resonators are designed such that the effect of mid-plane stretching dominates the softening effect of the electrostatic force. This is achieved by controlling the gap-to-thickness ratio and by exploiting the initial curvature of the structure from fabrication. We demonstrate considerable increase in the resonance frequency of nanoresonators with the dc bias voltages up to 108% for 180 nm thick structures with a transduction gap of 1 $mu$m separating them from the driving/sensing electrodes. The experimental results are found in good agreement with those of a nonlinear analytical model based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. As a potential application, we demonstrate a tunable narrow band-pass filter using two electrically coupled nanomechanical arch resonators with varied dc bias voltages.

  18. Highly Tunable Electrostatic Nanomechanical Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed Naveed Riaz; Hajjaj, Amal Z.; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2017-01-01

    There has been significant interest towards highly tunable resonators for on-demand frequency selection in modern communication systems. Here, we report highly tunable electrostatically actuated silicon-based nanomechanical resonators. In-plane doubly-clamped bridges, slightly curved as shallow arches due to residual stresses, are fabricated using standard electron beam lithography and surface nanomachining. The resonators are designed such that the effect of mid-plane stretching dominates the softening effect of the electrostatic force. This is achieved by controlling the gap-to-thickness ratio and by exploiting the initial curvature of the structure from fabrication. We demonstrate considerable increase in the resonance frequency of nanoresonators with the dc bias voltages up to 108% for 180 nm thick structures with a transduction gap of 1 $mu$m separating them from the driving/sensing electrodes. The experimental results are found in good agreement with those of a nonlinear analytical model based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. As a potential application, we demonstrate a tunable narrow band-pass filter using two electrically coupled nanomechanical arch resonators with varied dc bias voltages.

  19. Additive manufacturing of tunable lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Katja; Novak, Tobias; Heinrich, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Individual additive manufacturing of optical systems based on 3D Printing offers varied possibilities in design and usage. In addition to the additive manufacturing procedure, the usage of tunable lenses allows further advantages for intelligent optical systems. Our goal is to bring the advantages of additive manufacturing together with the huge potential of tunable lenses. We produced tunable lenses as a bundle without any further processing steps, like polishing. The lenses were designed and directly printed with a 3D Printer as a package. The design contains the membrane as an optical part as well as the mechanical parts of the lens, like the attachments for the sleeves which contain the oil. The dynamic optical lenses were filled with an oil. The focal length of the lenses changes due to a change of the radius of curvature. This change is caused by changing the pressure in the inside of the lens. In addition to that, we designed lenses with special structures to obtain different areas with an individual optical power. We want to discuss the huge potential of this technology for several applications. Further, an appropriate controlling system is needed. Wéll show the possibilities to control and regulate the optical power of the lenses. The lenses could be used for illumination tasks, and in the future, for individual measurement tasks. The main advantage is the individuality and the possibility to create an individual design which completely fulfills the requirements for any specific application.

  20. Impact of Cytokines and Chemokines on Alzheimer's Disease Neuropathological Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Catarina; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Henriques, Ana Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of β-amyloid peptides, which deposit as senile plaques, and of TAU protein, which forms neurofibrillary tangles. It is now widely accepted that neuroinflammation is implicated in AD pathogenesis. Indeed, inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can impact on the Alzheimer´s amyloid precursor protein by affecting its expression levels and amyloidogenic processing and/or β -amyloid aggregation. Additionally, cytokines and chemokines can influence kinases' activities, leading to abnormal TAU phosphorylation. To date there is no cure for AD, but several therapeutic strategies have been directed to prevent neuroinflammation. Anti-inflammatory, but also anti-amyloidogenic compounds, such as flavonoids were shown to favourably modulate some pathological events associated with neurodegeneration. This review focuses on the role of cytokines and chemokines in AD-associated pathologies, and summarizes the potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing or slowing down disease progression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  2. Abnormal peritoneal regulation of chemokine activation-The role of IL-8 in pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Justyna; Smycz-Kubańska, Marta; Mielczarek-Palacz, Aleksandra; Kondera-Anasz, Zdzisława

    2017-04-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an impairment in immune response. Disorders in the peritoneal fluid and ectopic endometrium macrophage populations and their secretory products create a specific microenvironment inducing the development of the disease. The important factors involved in inflammation associated with endometriosis are chemokines, especially interleukin (IL)-8. For this reason, the current study briefly reviews the role of IL-8 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. A systematic review was done on all published studies that compared IL-8 expression and concentration in patients with and without endometriosis to evaluate their potential as biomarkers for the disease. IL-8 induces chemotaxis of neutrophils and other immune cells; also, it is a potent angiogenic agent. Most researchers pointed to the increased peritoneal and serum IL-8 levels and showed correlation with the severity of the disease, size and number of the active lesions. IL-8 takes part in all processes during the development of the disease: adhesion, invasion, and implantation of ectopic tissue. Additionally, the chemokine plays a role in growth and maintenance of ectopic endometrial tissue directly affecting endometrial cell proliferation. IL-8 might also protect ectopic cells against death by apoptosis. It may act as an autocrine growth factor in the endometrium and promotes the vicious circle of endometrial cell attachment and, in consequence, may lead to a transformation from acute to chronic inflammation stage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vMIP-II, but not the poxvirus-encoded chemokine MC148, inhibits the CCR10 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Lewis, I C; Gerstoft, J

    2001-01-01

    The viral chemokine antagonist vMIP-II encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and MC148 encoded by the poxvirus - Molluscum contagiosum - were tested against the newly identified chemokine receptor CCR10. As the CCR10 ligand ESkine / CCL27 had the highest identity to MC148 and because both...

  4. Antenna Miniaturization with MEMS Tunable Capacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Morris, Art; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    In today’s mobile device market, there is a strong need for efficient antenna miniaturization. Tunable antennas are a very promising way to reduce antenna volume while enlarging its operating bandwidth. MEMS tunable capacitors are state-ofthe- art in terms of insertion loss and their characterist......In today’s mobile device market, there is a strong need for efficient antenna miniaturization. Tunable antennas are a very promising way to reduce antenna volume while enlarging its operating bandwidth. MEMS tunable capacitors are state-ofthe- art in terms of insertion loss...

  5. International Union of Pharmacology. LXXXIX. Update on the Extended Family of Chemokine Receptors and Introducing a New Nomenclature for Atypical Chemokine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelerie, Francoise; Ben-Baruch, Adit; Burkhardt, Amanda M.; Combadiere, Christophe; Farber, Joshua M.; Graham, Gerard J.; Horuk, Richard; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander Hovard; Locati, Massimo; Luster, Andrew D.; Mantovani, Alberto; Matsushima, Kouji; Nibbs, Robert; Nomiyama, Hisayuki; Power, Christine A.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Rosenkilde, Mette M.; Rot, Antal; Sozzani, Silvano; Thelen, Marcus; Yoshie, Osamu; Zlotnik, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Sixteen years ago, the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology approved a system for naming human seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, the large family of leukocyte chemoattractant receptors that regulates immune system development and function, in large part by mediating leukocyte trafficking. This was announced in Pharmacological Reviews in a major overview of the first decade of research in this field [Murphy PM, Baggiolini M, Charo IF, Hébert CA, Horuk R, Matsushima K, Miller LH, Oppenheim JJ, and Power CA (2000) Pharmacol Rev 52:145–176]. Since then, several new receptors have been discovered, and major advances have been made for the others in many areas, including structural biology, signal transduction mechanisms, biology, and pharmacology. New and diverse roles have been identified in infection, immunity, inflammation, development, cancer, and other areas. The first two drugs acting at chemokine receptors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), maraviroc targeting CCR5 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS, and plerixafor targeting CXCR4 for stem cell mobilization for transplantation in cancer, and other candidates are now undergoing pivotal clinical trials for diverse disease indications. In addition, a subfamily of atypical chemokine receptors has emerged that may signal through arrestins instead of G proteins to act as chemokine scavengers, and many microbial and invertebrate G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and soluble chemokine-binding proteins have been described. Here, we review this extended family of chemokine receptors and chemokine-binding proteins at the basic, translational, and clinical levels, including an update on drug development. We also introduce a new nomenclature for atypical chemokine receptors with the stem ACKR (atypical chemokine receptor) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology and the Human

  6. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika

    2006-01-01

    /chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis......, the authors found down regulation of the mRNA expression of the inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR1 and CXCR3 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL7. Also the transcripts for CCR9, CCL25, CCL17, and CXCL1 are found down regulated in protected compared with colitic animals. In addition, the authors......' results suggest that CCL20 is used by CCR6 regulatory T cells in the complex process of controlling colitis because transcripts for this chemokine were expressed to a higher level in protected animals. The chemokine pathways identified in the present study may be of importance for the development of new...

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM

  8. 3D profile-based approach to proteome-wide discovery of novel human chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Tomczak

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small secreted proteins with important roles in immune responses. They consist of a conserved three-dimensional (3D structure, so-called IL8-like chemokine fold, which is supported by disulfide bridges characteristic of this protein family. Sequence- and profile-based computational methods have been proficient in discovering novel chemokines by making use of their sequence-conserved cysteine patterns. However, it has been recently shown that some chemokines escaped annotation by these methods due to low sequence similarity to known chemokines and to different arrangement of cysteines in sequence and in 3D. Innovative methods overcoming the limitations of current techniques may allow the discovery of new remote homologs in the still functionally uncharacterized fraction of the human genome. We report a novel computational approach for proteome-wide identification of remote homologs of the chemokine family that uses fold recognition techniques in combination with a scaffold-based automatic mapping of disulfide bonds to define a 3D profile of the chemokine protein family. By applying our methodology to all currently uncharacterized human protein sequences, we have discovered two novel proteins that, without having significant sequence similarity to known chemokines or characteristic cysteine patterns, show strong structural resemblance to known anti-HIV chemokines. Detailed computational analysis and experimental structural investigations based on mass spectrometry and circular dichroism support our structural predictions and highlight several other chemokine-like features. The results obtained support their functional annotation as putative novel chemokines and encourage further experimental characterization. The identification of remote homologs of human chemokines may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms causing pathologies such as cancer or AIDS, and may contribute to the development of novel treatments. Besides

  9. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  10. Targeting Spare CC Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) as a Principle to Inhibit HIV-1 Entry*

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jun; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Ferret, Cécile; Demir, Arzu; Rogée, Sophie; Hartley, Oliver; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Scott, Mark G. H.; Marullo, Stefano; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Brelot, Anne

    2014-01-01

    International audience; : CCR5 binds the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 and is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 entry into target cells. Chemokines are supposed to form a natural barrier against human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, we showed that their antiviral activity is limited by CCR5 adopting low-chemokine affinity conformations at the cell surface. Here, we investigated whether a pool of CCR5 that is not stabilized by chemokines could represent a target for i...

  11. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone modulates Th1-/Th2-chemokine imbalance in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongtang; Wang, Meiying; Zhou, Shufen; Ma, Ji; Shi, Yan; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming; Guo, Chengshan

    2016-10-24

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in autoimmune diseases; however, their role in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is unclear. High-dose dexamethasone (HD-DXM) may become a first-line therapy for adult patients with ITP, but the effect of HD-DXM on chemokines in ITP patients is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the mechanism of pulsed HD-DXM for management of ITP, specifically regarding the chemokine pathways. Th1-/Th2-associated chemokine and chemokine receptor profiles in ITP patients before and after pulsed HD-DXM was studied. Plasma levels of CCL5 and CXCL11 (Th1-associated) and of CCL11 (Th2-associated) were determined by ELISA. Gene expression of these three chemokines and their corresponding receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CCR3, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Thirty-three of the thirty-eight ITP patients responded effectively to HD-DXM (oral, 40 mg/day, 4 days). In ITP patients, plasma CXCL11 levels increased, while CCL11 and CCL5 decreased compared to controls (P Th1-/Th2-associated chemokines and chemokine receptors may play important roles in the pathogenesis of ITP. Importantly, regulating Th1 polarization by pulsed HD-DXM may represent a novel approach for immunoregulation in ITP.

  12. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  13. Transcriptional Regulation of Chemokine Genes: A Link to Pancreatic Islet Inflammation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Burke

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced expression of chemotactic cytokines (aka chemokines within pancreatic islets likely contributes to islet inflammation by regulating the recruitment and activation of various leukocyte populations, including macrophages, neutrophils, and T-lymphocytes. Because of the powerful actions of these chemokines, precise transcriptional control is required. In this review, we highlight what is known about the signals and mechanisms that govern the transcription of genes encoding specific chemokine proteins in pancreatic islet β-cells, which include contributions from the NF-κB and STAT1 pathways. We further discuss increased chemokine expression in pancreatic islets during autoimmune-mediated and obesity-related development of diabetes.

  14. Amniotic fluid chemokines and autism spectrum disorders: An exploratory study utilizing a Danish Historic Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna Brink; Grove, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of chemokines have been reported in plasma and brain tissue of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to examine chemokine levels in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of individuals diagnosed with ASD and their controls.......Elevated levels of chemokines have been reported in plasma and brain tissue of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to examine chemokine levels in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of individuals diagnosed with ASD and their controls....

  15. Circulating Chemokine Levels in Febrile Infants With Serious Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of serious bacterial infections (SBI in febrile young infants based on clinical symptoms and signs is difficult. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic values of circulating chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP levels in febrile young infants < 3 months of age with suspected SBI. We enrolled 43 febrile young infants < 3 months of age with clinically suspected SBI who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit or complete nursing unit of the pediatric department of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between December 2006 and July 2007. Blood was drawn from the patients at admission, and complete blood counts, plasma levels of CRP, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, including interleukin-8 (IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, monokine induced by interferon-γ, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were measured. Patients’ symptoms and signs, length of hospital stay, main diagnosis, and results of routine blood tests and microbiological culture results were recorded. Twenty-six infants (60.5% were diagnosed with SBI, while 17 (39.5% had no evidence of SBI based on the results of bacterial cultures. CRP, IL-8 and G-CSF levels were significantly higher in the infants with SBI than in those without SBI. Plasma levels of other chemokines were not significantly different between the groups. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve for differentiating between the presence and absence of SBI was 0.79 for CRP level. Diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combining CRP and IL-8, when the area under the ROC curve increased to 0.91. CRP levels were superior to IL-8 and G-CSF levels for predicting SBI in febrile infants at initial survey. IL-8 levels could be used as an additional diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of febrile young infants, allowing clinicians to treat these patients more appropriately.

  16. Backbone dynamics of the human CC-chemokine eotaxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Jiqing; Mayer, Kristen L.; Stone, Martin J. [Indiana University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    1999-10-15

    Eotaxin is a CC chemokine with potent chemoattractant activity towards eosinophils. {sup 15}N NMR relaxation data have been used to characterize the backbone dynamics of recombinant human eotaxin. {sup 15}N longitudinal (R{sub 1}) and transverse (R{sub 2}) auto relaxation rates, heteronuclear {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N steady-state NOEs, and transverse cross-relaxation rates ({eta}{sub xy}) were obtained at 30 deg. C for all resolved backbone secondary amide groups using {sup 1} H-detected two-dimensional NMR experiments. Ratios of transverse auto and cross relaxation rates were used to identify NH groups influenced by slow conformational rearrangement. Relaxation data were fit to the extended model free dynamics formalism, yielding parameters describing axially symmetric molecular rotational diffusion and the internal dynamics of each NH group. The molecular rotational correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) is 5.09{+-}0.02 ns, indicating that eotaxin exists predominantly as a monomer under the conditions of the NMR study. The ratio of diffusion rates about unique and perpendicular axes (D{sub parallel}/D{sub perpendicular}) is 0.81{+-}0.02. Residues with large amplitudes of subnanosecond motion are clustered in the N-terminal region (residues 1-19), the C-terminus (residues 68-73) and the loop connecting the first two {beta}-strands (residues 30-37). N-terminal flexibility appears to be conserved throughout the chemokine family and may have implications for the mechanism of chemokine receptor activation. Residues exhibiting significant dynamics on the microsecond-millisecond time scale are located close to the two conserved disulfide bonds, suggesting that these motions may be coupled to disulfide bond isomerization.

  17. CXC-type chemokines promote myofibroblast phenoconversion and prostatic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Gharaee-Kermani

    Full Text Available Recent studies from our group suggest that extracellular matrix (ECM deposition and fibrosis characterize the peri-urethral prostate tissues of some men suffering from Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS and that fibrosis may be a contributing factor to the etiology of LUTS. Fibrosis can generally be regarded as an errant wound-healing process in response to chronic inflammation, and several studies have shown that the aging prostate tissue microenvironment is rich with inflammatory cells and proteins. However, it is unclear whether these same inflammatory proteins, particularly CXC-type chemokines, can mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and the ECM deposition necessary for the development of prostatic tissue fibrosis. To examine this, immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, CXCL5, CXCL8, or CXCL12 were evaluated morphologically by microscopy, by immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR for αSMA, collagen 1, vimentin, calponin, and tenascin protein and transcript expression, and by gel contraction assays for functional myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies showed that that immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts are induced to express collagen 1 and 3 and αSMA gene transcripts and proteins and to undergo complete and functional myofibroblast phenoconversion in response to CXC-type chemokines, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-β1. Moreover, CXCL12-mediated myofibroblast phenoconversion can be completely abrogated by inhibition of the CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. These findings suggest that CXC-type chemokines, which comprise inflammatory proteins known to be highly expressed in the aging prostate, can efficiently and completely mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and may thereby promote fibrotic changes in prostate tissue architecture associated with the development and progression of male lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  18. Generating substrate bound functional chemokine gradients in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    Microcontact printing (mCP) is employed to generate discontinuous microscale gradients of active fractalkine, a chemokine expressed by endothelial cells near sites of inflammation where it is believed to form concentration gradients descending away from the inflamed area. In vivo, fractalkine...... active part of the molecules. Here, indirect mCP of a capture antibody recognizing a molecular tag on the target protein is successfully used to pattern tagged fractalkine in microscale gradient patterns. Fractalkine functions as an adhesion molecule for leukocytes. Cells expressing the fractalkine...

  19. Effector stage CC chemokine receptor-1 selective antagonism reduces multiple sclerosis-like rat disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb, Sana; Sunnemark, Dan; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nordvall, Gunnar; Malmberg, Asa; Lassmann, Hans; Wallström, Erik; Olsson, Tomas; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, Anders

    2003-09-01

    We have studied the role of the chemokine receptor CCR1 during the effector stage of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in DA rats. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed local production of the CCR1 ligands CCL3 (MIP-1 alpha) and CCL5 (RANTES), as well as large numbers of CCR1 and CCR5 expressing cells within inflammatory brain lesions. A low-molecular weight CCR1 selective antagonist potently abrogated both clinical and histopathological disease signs during a 5-day treatment period, without signs of peripheral immune compromise. Thus, we demonstrate therapeutic targeting of CCR1-dependent leukocyte recruitment to the central nervous system in a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like rat model.

  20. Structure and function of A41, a vaccinia virus chemokine binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W Bahar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV A41L gene encodes a secreted 30 kDa glycoprotein that is nonessential for virus replication but affects the host response to infection. The A41 protein shares sequence similarity with another VACV protein that binds CC chemokines (called vCKBP, or viral CC chemokine inhibitor, vCCI, and strains of VACV lacking the A41L gene induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses than control viruses expressing A41. Using surface plasmon resonance, we screened 39 human and murine chemokines and identified CCL21, CCL25, CCL26 and CCL28 as A41 ligands, with Kds of between 8 nM and 118 nM. Nonetheless, A41 was ineffective at inhibiting chemotaxis induced by these chemokines, indicating it did not block the interaction of these chemokines with their receptors. However the interaction of A41 and chemokines was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by heparin, suggesting that A41 and heparin bind to overlapping sites on these chemokines. To better understand the mechanism of action of A41 its crystal structure was solved to 1.9 A resolution. The protein has a globular beta sandwich structure similar to that of the poxvirus vCCI family of proteins, but there are notable structural differences, particularly in surface loops and electrostatic charge distribution. Structural modelling suggests that the binding paradigm as defined for the vCCI-chemokine interaction is likely to be conserved between A41 and its chemokine partners. Additionally, sequence analysis of chemokines binding to A41 identified a signature for A41 binding. The biological and structural data suggest that A41 functions by forming moderately strong (nM interactions with certain chemokines, sufficient to interfere with chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions at the cell surface (microM-nM and thereby to destroy the chemokine concentration gradient, but not strong enough to disrupt the (pM chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions.

  1. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  2. Maternal Plasma and Amniotic Fluid Chemokines Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Laudanski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Chemokines exert different inflammatory responses which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of selected chemokines in plasma and amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Method. Out of 171 amniocentesis, we had 7 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation. For the purpose of our control, we chose 14 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the concentration of chemokines in the blood plasma and amniotic fluid, we used a protein macroarray, which allows the simultaneous determination of 40 chemokines per sample. Results. We showed significant decrease in the concentration of 4 chemokines, HCC-4, IL-28A, IL-31, and MCP-2, and increase in the concentration of CXCL7 (NAP-2 in plasma of women with fetal Down syndrome. Furthermore, we showed decrease in concentration of 3 chemokines, ITAC, MCP-3, MIF, and increase in concentration of 4 chemokines, IP-10, MPIF-1, CXCL7, and 6Ckine, in amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Conclusion. On the basis of our findings, our hypothesis is that the chemokines may play role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  3. Targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL10 in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2004-01-01

    focuses on the present data regarding CXCL10 (previously known as IP-10) and CXRC3 in multiple sclerosis, since consistent data has suggested that this chemokine/chemokine receptor pair has a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) in multiple sclerosis....

  4. Quantitative analysis of the secretion of the MCP family of chemokines by muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Jeanette; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2011-01-01

    by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) method for quantitative analysis resulted in the identification and generation of quantitative profiles of 59 growth factors and cytokines, including 9 classical chemokines. The members of the CC chemokine family of proteins such as monocyte chemotactic proteins 1, 2...

  5. Orphan chemokine receptors in neuroimmunology : functional and pharmacological analysis of L-CCR and HCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, Michael Wilhelmer

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we have investigated the expression and biological activity of the orphan chemokine receptors L-CCR/HCR in astrocytes and microglia. Several lines of evidence indicate that the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CCL7 and CCL8 are agonists for these receptors. Although a variety of biological

  6. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused by e...

  7. Electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Valeriu

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents two types of active configurations for realizing electronically tunable RC sinusoidal oscillators. The type-1 network employs two grounded scaled resistances KR 1 and KR 2 , where K is scaling factor. The frequency of oscillation W 0 is controlled conveniently by adjusting K, since W 0 appears in the form W 0 =1/K √ R 1 C 1 R 2 C 2 . For realizing the scaled resistances, an active configuration is proposed, which realizes KR 1 =R 1 /(1+f(V B )), where f(V B ) denotes a function of a controlling voltage V B . Thus the frequency tuning can be effected by controlling a voltage V B . The type-2 oscillator uses two periodically switched conductances. It is shown that the tuning of oscillation frequency can be done by varying the pulse width-to-period ratio (t/T) of the periodically switched conductances. (author)

  8. Tunable conductivity in mesoporous germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Meghan N.; Bioud, Youcef A.; Hobson, David G.; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Drouin, Dominique; Arès, Richard; Hinzer, Karin

    2018-05-01

    Germanium-based nanostructures have attracted increasing attention due to favourable electrical and optical properties, which are tunable on the nanoscale. High densities of germanium nanocrystals are synthesized via electrochemical etching, making porous germanium an appealing nanostructured material for a variety of applications. In this work, we have demonstrated highly tunable electrical conductivity in mesoporous germanium layers by conducting a systematic study varying crystallite size using thermal annealing, with experimental conductivities ranging from 0.6 to 33 (×10‑3) Ω‑1 cm‑1. The conductivity of as-prepared mesoporous germanium with 70% porosity and crystallite size between 4 and 10 nm is shown to be ∼0.9 × 10‑3 Ω‑1 cm‑1, 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of bulk p-type germanium. Thermal annealing for 10 min at 400 °C further reduced the conductivity; however, annealing at 450 °C caused a morphological transformation from columnar crystallites to interconnecting granular crystallites and an increase in conductivity by two orders of magnitude relative to as-prepared mesoporous germanium caused by reduced influence of surface states. We developed an electrostatic model relating the carrier concentration and mobility of p-type mesoporous germanium to the nanoscale morphology. Correlation within an order of magnitude was found between modelled and experimental conductivities, limited by variation in sample uniformity and uncertainty in void size and fraction after annealing. Furthermore, theoretical results suggest that mesoporous germanium conductivity could be tuned over four orders of magnitude, leading to optimized hybrid devices.

  9. Lymphoid follicle cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overexpress the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Georgy, Mary; Hershman, Richard; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiuxia; Hurford, Matthew; Solomides, Charalambos; Chatila, Wissam; Kim, Victor

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying formation of lung lymphoid follicles (LF) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unknown. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 regulates immune responses in secondary lymphoid structures elsewhere in the body and is highly expressed by Th1 lymphocytes in the airway in COPD. Because chemokine receptors control inflammatory cell homing to inflamed tissue, we reasoned that CXCR3 may contribute to LF formation in COPD. We assessed the expression of CXCR3 and its ligands (IP-10/CXCL10, Mig/CXCL9, and ITAC/CXCL11) by LF cells in never-smokers, smokers without COPD, and subjects with COPD. CXCR3, IP-10, Mig, and ITAC expression were assessed in lung sections from 46 subjects (never-smokers, smokers without COPD [S], and subjects with COPD in GOLD stages 1-4) by immunohistochemistry. CXCR3-expressing T cells (CD8+ or CD4+) and B cells (CD20+) were topographically distributed at the follicle periphery and center, respectively. The percentage of immunohistochemically identified CXCR3+ cells increased progressively while proceeding from S through GOLD 3-4 (P < 0.01 for GOLD 3-4 vs. S). Moreover, the number of CXCR3+ follicular cells correlated inversely with FEV(1) (r = 0.60). The CXCR3 ligands IP-10 and Mig were expressed by several cell types in and around the follicle, including CD68+ dendritic cells/ macrophages, airway epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and T and B cells. These results suggest that LF form in the COPD lung by recruitment and/or retention of CXCR3-expressing T and B lymphocytes, which are attracted to the region through production of CXCR3 ligands IP-10 and Mig by lung structural and follicular cells.

  10. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  11. Experimental demonstration of water based tunable metasurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odit, Mikhail; Kapitanova, Polina; Andryieuski, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    A simple dynamically tunable metasurface (two-dimensional metamaterial) operating at microwave frequencies is developed and experimentally investigated. Conceptually, the simplicity of the approach is granted by reconfigurable properties of unit cells partially filled with distilled water...

  12. The anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose radiation therapy involves a diminished CCL20 chemokine expression and granulocyte/endothelial cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, F. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hofmann, D.; Auer, J.; Roellinghoff, M.; Beuscher, H.U. [Inst. of Microbiology and Immunology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Keilholz, L. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Clinical Center Bayreuth (Germany); Sauer, R. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) is known to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The manipulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function and/or recruitment may be one mechanism. Chemokines contribute to this process by creating a chemotactic gradient and by activating integrins. This study aimed to characterize the effect of LD-RT on CCL20 chemokine production and PMN/endothelial cell (EC) adhesion. Material and methods: the EC line EA.hy.926 was irradiated with doses ranging from 0 to 3 Gy and was co-cultured with PMNs from healthy donors either by direct cell contact or separated by transwell membrane chambers. CXCL8, CCL18, CCL20 chemokine and tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha} cytokine levels in supernatants were determined by ELISA and adhesion assays were performed. The functional impact of the cytokines transforming growth factor-(TGF-){beta}{sub 1} and TNF-{alpha} and of the intercellular adhesion molecule-(ICAM-)1 on CCL20 expression was analyzed by using neutralizing antibodies. Results: as compared to CXCL8 and CCL18, CCL20 chemokine secretion was found to be exclusively induced by a direct cell-cell contact between PMNs and EA.hy.926 ECs in a TNF-{alpha}-dependent, but ICAM-1-independent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with doses between 0.5 and 1 Gy resulted in a significant reduction of CCL20 release which was dependent on TGF-{beta}{sub 1} (p < 0.01). The decrease of CCL20 paralleled with a significant reduction in PMN/EA.hy.926 EC adhesion (p < 0.001). Conclusion: the modulation of CCL20 chemokine expression and PMN/EC adhesion adds a further facet to the plethora of mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory efficacy of LD-RT. (orig.)

  13. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 influences the development of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleens of myelofibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cho, Sool Yeon; Hu, Cing Siang; Chen, Daniel; Roboz, John; Hoffman, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by the constitutive mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal HSC/HPC trafficking pattern remain poorly understood. We demonstrated that both splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34(+) cells equally share a defective ability to home to the marrow, but not to the spleens, of NOD/LtSz-Prkdc(scid) mice. This trafficking pattern could not be attributed to discordant expression of integrins or chemokine receptors other than the downregulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 by both PB and splenic MF CD34(+) cells. The number of both splenic MF CD34(+) cells and HPCs that migrated toward splenic MF plasma was, however, significantly greater than the number that migrated toward PB MF plasma. The concentration of the intact HSC/HPC chemoattractant C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) was greater in splenic MF plasma than PB MF plasma, as quantified using mass spectrometry. Functionally inactive truncated products of CXCL12, which are the product of proteolytic degradation by serine proteases, were detected at similar levels in both splenic and PB MF plasma. Treatment with an anti-CXCL12 neutralizing antibody resulted in a reduction in the degree of migration of splenic MF CD34(+) cells toward both PB and splenic MF plasma, validating the role of CXCL12 as a functional chemoattractant. Our data indicate that the MF splenic microenvironment is characterized by increased levels of intact, functional CXCL12, which contributes to the localization of MF CD34(+) cells to the spleen and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2015 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrically Tunable Plasmonic Resonances with Graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emani, Naresh K.; Chung, Ting-Fung; Ni, Xingjie

    2012-01-01

    Real time switching of a plasmonic resonance may find numerous applications in subwavelength optoelectronics, spectroscopy and sensing. We take advantage of electrically tunable interband transitions in graphene to control the strength of the plasmonic resonance.......Real time switching of a plasmonic resonance may find numerous applications in subwavelength optoelectronics, spectroscopy and sensing. We take advantage of electrically tunable interband transitions in graphene to control the strength of the plasmonic resonance....

  15. Tunable Beam Diffraction in Infiltrated Microstructured Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites.......We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites....

  16. The chemokine receptor CCR5 in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Silvia; Myburgh, Renier; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2011-02-01

    The expression and the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 have been mainly studied in the context of HIV infection. However, this protein is also expressed in the brain, where it can be crucial in determining the outcome in response to different insults. CCR5 expression can be deleterious or protective in controlling the progression of certain infections in the CNS, but it is also emerging that it could play a role in non-infectious diseases. In particular, it appears that, in addition to modulating immune responses, CCR5 can influence neuronal survival. Here, we summarize the present knowledge about the expression of CCR5 in the brain and highlight recent findings suggesting its possible involvement in neuroprotective mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis – clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp evon Hundelshausen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden.Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities e.g. altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation

  18. Brain microvascular pericytes are immunoactive in culture: cytokine, chemokine, nitric oxide, and LRP-1 expression in response to lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain microvascular pericytes are important constituents of the neurovascular unit. These cells are physically the closest cells to the microvascular endothelial cells in brain capillaries. They significantly contribute to the induction and maintenance of the barrier functions of the blood-brain barrier. However, very little is known about their immune activities or their roles in neuroinflammation. Here, we focused on the immunological profile of brain pericytes in culture in the quiescent and immune-challenged state by studying their production of immune mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. We also examined the effects of immune challenge on pericyte expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, a protein involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the brain-to-blood efflux of amyloid-β peptide. Methods Supernatants were collected from primary cultures of mouse brain pericytes. Release of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess reaction and the level of S-nitrosylation of pericyte proteins measured with a modified "biotin-switch" method. Specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors were used to determine involvement of these pathways on NO production. Cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by multianalyte technology. The expression of both subunits of LRP-1 was analyzed by western blot. Results Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced release of NO by pericytes in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated through MAPK pathways. Nitrative stress resulted in S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Eighteen of twenty-three cytokines measured were released constitutively by pericytes or with stimulation by LPS, including interleukin (IL-12, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, eotaxin, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-3, and CCL-4. Pericyte expressions of both subunits of

  19. Chemokines in the balance: maintenance of homeostasis and protection at CNS barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Williams

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the adult central nervous system (CNS, chemokines and their receptors are involved in developmental, physiological and pathological processes. Although most lines of investigation focus on their ability to induce the migration of cells, recent studies indicate that chemokines also promote cellular interactions and activate signaling pathways that maintain CNS homeostatic functions. Many homeostatic chemokines are expressed on the vasculature of the blood brain barrier including CXCL12, CCL19, CCL20, and CCL21. While endothelial cell expression of these chemokines is known to regulate the entry of leukocytes into the CNS during immunosurveillance, new data indicate that CXCL12 is also involved in diverse cellular activities including adult neurogenesis and neuronal survival, having an opposing role to the homeostatic chemokine, CXCL14, which appears to regulate synaptic inputs to neural precursors. Neuronal expression of CX3CL1, yet another homeostatic chemokine that promotes neuronal survival and communication with microglia, is partly regulated by CXCL12. Regulation of CXCL12 is unique in that it may regulate its own expression levels via binding to its scavenger receptor CXCR7/ACKR3. In this review, we explore the diverse roles of these and other homeostatic chemokines expressed within the CNS, including the possible implications of their dysfunction as a cause of neurologic disease.

  20. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  1. Impact of genetic variations in C-C chemokine receptors and ligands on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Tabish; Khan, M Y

    2016-10-01

    Chemokine receptors and ligands are crucial for extensive immune response against infectious diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, HIV and tuberculosis and a wide variety of other diseases. Role of chemokines are evidenced in the activation and regulation of immune cell migration which is important for immune response against diseases. Outcome of disease is determined by complex interaction among pathogen, host genetic variability and surrounding milieu. Variation in expression or function of chemokines caused by genetic polymorphisms could be associated with attenuated immune responses. Exploration of chemokine genetic polymorphisms in therapeutic response, gene regulation and disease outcome is important. Infectious agents in human host alter the expression of chemokines via epigenetic alterations and thus contribute to disease pathogenesis. Although some fragmentary data are available on chemokine genetic variations and their contribution in diseases, no unequivocal conclusion has been arrived as yet. We therefore, aim to investigate the association of CCR5-CCL5 and CCR2-CCL2 genetic polymorphisms with different infectious diseases, transcriptional regulation of gene, disease severity and response to therapy. Furthermore, the role of epigenetics in genes related to chemokines and infectious disease are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immune response CC chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Hashemi, Nastran; Weigt, Stephen S; Xue, Ying Ying; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Keane, Michael P; Strieter, Robert M; Fishbein, Michael C; Deng, Jane C; Lynch, Joseph P; Elashoff, Robert; Belperio, John A

    2011-04-04

    Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  3. Preparation and Analysis of N-Terminal Chemokine Receptor Sulfopeptides Using Tyrosylprotein Sulfotransferase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Christoph; Sanfiz, Anthony; Sakmar, Thomas P; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    In most chemokine receptors, one or multiple tyrosine residues have been identified within the receptor N-terminal domain that are, at least partially, modified by posttranslational tyrosine sulfation. For example, tyrosine sulfation has been demonstrated for Tyr-3, -10, -14, and -15 of CCR5, for Tyr-3, -14, and -15 of CCR8, and for Tyr-7, -12, and -21 of CXCR4. While there is evidence for several chemokine receptors that tyrosine sulfation is required for optimal interaction with the chemokine ligands, the precise role of tyrosine sulfation for chemokine receptor function remains unclear. Furthermore, the function of the chemokine receptor N-terminal domain in chemokine binding and receptor activation is also not well understood. Sulfotyrosine peptides corresponding to the chemokine receptor N-termini are valuable tools to address these important questions both in structural and functional studies. However, due to the lability of the sulfotyrosine modification, these peptides are difficult to obtain using standard peptide chemistry methods. In this chapter, we provide methods to prepare sulfotyrosine peptides by enzymatic in vitro sulfation of peptides using purified recombinant tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) enzymes. In addition, we also discuss alternative approaches for the generation of sulfotyrosine peptides and methods for sulfopeptide analysis. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The chemokine MCP-1 (CCL2) in the host interaction with cancer: a foe or ally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Teizo

    2018-01-29

    Macrophages are one of the most abundant leukocyte populations infiltrating tumor tissues and can exhibit both tumoricidal and tumor-promoting activities. In 1989, we reported the purification of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from culture supernatants of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumor cells. MCP-1 is a potent monocyte-attracting chemokine, identical to the previously described lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor or tumor-derived chemotactic factor, and greatly contributes to the recruitment of blood monocytes into sites of inflammatory responses and tumors. Because in vitro-cultured tumor cells often produce significant amounts of MCP-1, tumor cells are considered to be the main source of MCP-1. However, various non-tumor cells in the tumor stroma also produce MCP-1 in response to stimuli. Studies performed in vitro and in vivo have provided evidence that MCP-1 production in tumors is a consequence of complex interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor cells and that both tumor cells and non-tumor cells contribute to the production of MCP-1. Although MCP-1 production was once considered to be a part of host defense against tumors, it is now believed to regulate the vicious cycle between tumor cells and macrophages that promotes the progression of tumors.Cellular and Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 29 January 2018; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.135.

  5. Tunable intraparticle frameworks for creating complex heterostructured nanoparticle libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Julie L.; Steimle, Benjamin C.; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2018-05-01

    Complex heterostructured nanoparticles with precisely defined materials and interfaces are important for many applications. However, rationally incorporating such features into nanoparticles with rigorous morphology control remains a synthetic bottleneck. We define a modular divergent synthesis strategy that progressively transforms simple nanoparticle synthons into increasingly sophisticated products. We introduce a series of tunable interfaces into zero-, one-, and two-dimensional copper sulfide nanoparticles using cation exchange reactions. Subsequent manipulation of these intraparticle frameworks yielded a library of 47 distinct heterostructured metal sulfide derivatives, including particles that contain asymmetric, patchy, porous, and sculpted nanoarchitectures. This generalizable mix-and-match strategy provides predictable retrosynthetic pathways to complex nanoparticle features that are otherwise inaccessible.

  6. Tunable plasmonic toroidal terahertz metamodulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerislioglu, Burak; Ahmadivand, Arash; Pala, Nezih

    2018-04-01

    Optical modulators are essential and strategic parts of micro- and nanophotonic circuits to encode electro-optical signals in the optical domain. Here, by using arrays of multipixel toroidal plasmonic terahertz (THz) metamolecules, we developed a functional plasmonic metamodulator with high efficiency and tunability. Technically, the dynamic toroidal dipole induces nonradiating charge-current arrangements leading to have an exquisite role in defining the inherent spectral features of various materials. By categorizing in a different family of multipoles far from the traditional electromagnetic multipoles, the toroidal dipole corresponds to poloidal currents flowing on the surface of a closed-loop torus. Utilizing the sensitivity of the optically driven toroidal momentum to the incident THz beam power and by employing both numerical tools and experimental analysis, we systematically studied the spectral response of the proposed THz plasmonic metadevice. In this Rapid Communication, we uncover a correlation between the existence and the excitation of the toroidal response and the incident beam power. This mechanism is employed to develop THz toroidal metamodulators with a strong potential to be employed for practical advanced and next-generation communication, filtering, and routing applications.

  7. Inhibition of cytokine gene expression and induction of chemokine genes in non-lymphatic cells infected with SARS coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Friedemann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiologic agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV mainly infects tissues of non-lymphatic origin, and the cytokine profile of those cells can determine the course of disease. Here, we investigated the cytokine response of two human non-lymphatic cell lines, Caco-2 and HEK 293, which are fully permissive for SARS-CoV. Results A comparison with established cytokine-inducing viruses revealed that SARS-CoV only weakly triggered a cytokine response. In particular, SARS-CoV did not activate significant transcription of the interferons IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, as well as of the interferon-induced antiviral genes ISG56 and MxA, the chemokine RANTES and the interleukine IL-6. Interestingly, however, SARS-CoV strongly induced the chemokines IP-10 and IL-8 in the colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, but not in the embryonic kidney cell line 293. Conclusion Our data indicate that SARS-CoV suppresses the antiviral cytokine system of non-immune cells to a large extent, thus buying time for dissemination in the host. However, synthesis of IP-10 and IL-8, which are established markers for acute-stage SARS, escapes the virus-induced silencing at least in some cell types. Therefore, the progressive infiltration of immune cells into the infected lungs observed in SARS patients could be due to the production of these chemokines by the infected tissue cells.

  8. Reduced Fc∊RI-Mediated Release of Asthma-Promoting Cytokines and Chemokines from Human Basophils during Omalizumab Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Janet M.; Tarleton, Christy A.; Gilmartin, Laura; Archibeque, Tereassa; Qualls, Clifford R.; Diehl, Lorena; Wilson, Bridget S.; Schuyler, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Treating asthmatics with the humanized IgE-scavenging antibody, omalizumab (rhuMAb-E25, Xolair®), reduces airways inflammation and asthma symptoms. Previously, omalizumab was shown to cause a dramatic and reversible loss of cell surface high-affinity IgE receptors, Fc∊RI, from the peripheral blood basophils of asthmatics. The consequences of receptor loss for the Fc∊RI-mediated synthesis and release of cytokines implicated in allergic asthma have not been examined. Methods Fifteen asthmatic volunteers each received omalizumab for 12 weeks. Peripheral blood basophils were isolated before, during, 2 weeks after and 6 months after omalizumab. Basophils were assayed for the basal and anti-IgE-stimulated release of cytokines, chemokines and histamine. Pooled data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA and by paired t tests. Results Anti-IgE-stimulated human basophils synthesize and release Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13) and chemokines (IL-8, RANTES). The anti-IgE-stimulated release of IL-4, IL-13 and IL-8 was reduced during omalizumab treatment and returned to pretreatment levels after omalizumab withdrawal. Omalizumab did not alter basophil histamine levels or basal and anti-IgE-stimulated histamine release. Conclusions Omalizumab may reduce asthma symptoms in part by suppressing the Fc∊RI-mediated production by basophils of Th2 cytokines and selected chemokines. Anti-IgE-stimulated basophil cytokine synthesis appears more sensitive than histamine release to the loss of Fc∊RI caused by omalizumab treatment. PMID:19844128

  9. The CXC chemokine cCAF stimulates precocious deposition of ECM molecules by wound fibroblasts, accelerating development of granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qi-Jing

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During wound repair, fibroblasts orchestrate replacement of the provisional matrix formed during clotting with tenascin, cellular fibronectin and collagen III. These, in turn, are critical for migration of endothelial cells, keratinocytes and additional fibroblasts into the wound site. Fibroblasts are also important in the deposition of collagen I during scar formation. The CXC chemokine chicken Chemotactic and Angiogenic Factor (cCAF, is highly expressed by fibroblasts after wounding and during development of the granulation tissue, especially in areas where extracellular matrix (ECM is abundant. We hypothesized that cCAF stimulates fibroblasts to produce these matrix molecules. Results Here we show that this chemokine can stimulate precocious deposition of tenascin, fibronectin and collagen I, but not collagen III. Studies in culture and in vivo show that tenascin stimulation can also be achieved by the N-terminal 15 aas of the protein and occurs at the level of gene expression. In contrast, stimulation of fibronectin and collagen I both require the entire molecule and do not involve changes in gene expression. Fibronectin accumulation appears to be linked to tenascin production, and collagen I to decreased MMP-1 levels. In addition, cCAF is chemotactic for fibroblasts and accelerates their migration. Conclusions These previously unknown functions for chemokines suggest that cCAF, the chicken orthologue of human IL-8, enhances healing by rapidly chemoattracting fibroblasts into the wound site and stimulating them to produce ECM molecules, leading to precocious development of granulation tissue. This acceleration of the repair process may have important application to healing of impaired wounds.

  10. Undulator tunability and synchrotron ring-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viccaro, P.J.; Sheony, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    An undulator has two properties which make it an extremely attractive source of electromagnetic radiation. The first is that the radiation is concentrated in a number of narrow energy bands known as harmonics of the device. The second characteristic is that under favorable operating conditions, the energy of these harmonics can be shifted or open-quote tunedclose quotes over an energy interval which can be as large as two or three times the value of the lowest energy harmonic. Both the photon energy of an undulator as well as its tunability are determined by the period, λ, of the device, the magnetic gap, G (which is larger than the minimum aperture required for injection and operation of the storage ring) and the storage ring energy E R . Given the photon energy, E p , the above parameters ultimately define the limits of operation or tunability of the undulator. In general, the larger the tunability range, the more useful the device. Therefore, for a given required maximum photon energy, it is desirable to find the operating conditions and device parameters which result in the largest tunability interval possible. With this in mind, we have investigated the question of undulator tunability with emphasis on the role of the ring energy in order to find the smallest E R consistent with the desired tunability interval and photon energy. As a guideline, we have included a preliminary criteria, concerning the tunability requirements for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to be built at Argonne. The analysis is aimed at X-ray undulator sources on the APS but is applicable to any storage ring

  11. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 chemokine-binding protein M3 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Holst, Peter J; Høgh-Petersen, Mette

    2010-01-01

    M3 (AdM3) directly to the CNS to evaluate the capacity of this protein to inhibit neuroinflammation using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Treatment with the AdM3 vector significantly reduced the clinical severity of EAE, attenuated CNS histopathology, and reduced numbers......Chemokines are critical mediators of immune cell entry into the central nervous system (CNS), as occurs in neuroinflammatory disease such as multiple sclerosis. Chemokines are also implicated in the immune response to viral infections. Many viruses encode proteins that mimic or block chemokine...... of immune cells infiltrating the CNS. These results suggest that M3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to neuroinflammatory disease....

  12. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have...... receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies...

  13. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D

    2001-01-01

    sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does...... not respond to agonist stimulation have a much lower incidence of angiogenic lesions and tumors. These results indicate that induction of the KS-like disease in transgenic mice by ORF74 requires not only high constitutive signaling activity but also modulation of this activity by endogenous chemokines....

  14. Infrared frequency-tunable coherent thermal sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we numerically demonstrate an infrared (IR) frequency-tunable selective thermal emitter made of graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) gratings. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis shows temporally-coherent emission peaks associated with magnetic polariton (MP), whose resonance frequency can be dynamically tuned within the phonon absorption band of SiC by varying graphene chemical potential. An analytical inductor–capacitor circuit model is introduced to quantitatively predict the resonance frequency and further elucidate the mechanism for the tunable emission peak. The effects of grating geometric parameters, such as grating height, groove width and grating period, on the selective emission peak are explored. The direction-independent behavior of MP and associated coherent emission are also demonstrated. Moreover, by depositing four layers of graphene sheets onto the SiC gratings, a large tunability of 8.5% in peak frequency can be obtained to yield the coherent emission covering a broad frequency range from 820 to 890 cm −1 . The novel tunable metamaterial could pave the way to a new class of tunable thermal sources in the IR region. (paper)

  15. Positive versus negative modulation of different endogenous chemokines for CC-chemokine receptor 1 by small molecule agonists through allosteric versus orthosteric binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Ulven, Trond

    2008-01-01

    7 transmembrane-spanning (7TM) chemokine receptors having multiple endogenous ligands offer special opportunities to understand the molecular basis for allosteric mechanisms. Thus, CC-chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) binds CC-chemokine 3 and 5 (CCL3 and CCL5) with K(d) values of 7.3 and 0.16 nm......5 and not CCL3 activation is affected by substitutions in the main ligand binding pocket including the conserved GluVII:06 anchor point. A series of metal ion chelator complexes were found to act as full agonists on CCR1 and to be critically affected by the same substitutions in the main ligand...... binding pocket as CCL5 but not by mutations in the extracellular domain. In agreement with the overlapping binding sites, the small non-peptide agonists displaced radiolabeled CCL5 with high affinity. Interestingly, the same compounds acted as allosteric enhancers of the binding of CCL3, with which...

  16. Narrowband tunable laser for uranium-233 cleanup process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sunita; Sridhar, G.; Rawat, V.S.; Kawde, Nitin; Sinha, A.K.; Bhatt, S.; Gantayet, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    Design, development and technology demonstration of proto type Single Longitudinal Mode pulsed tunable laser is reported in this work. The tunable laser has a narrow bandwidth less than 400 MHz required for isotopic clean up of 233 U. (author)

  17. Differential effects of Radix Paeoniae Rubra (Chishao on cytokine and chemokine expression inducible by mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li James

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon initial infection with mycobacteria, macrophages secrete multiple cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, to mediate host immune responses against the pathogen. Mycobacteria also induce the production of IL-10 via PKR activation in primary human monocytes and macrophages. As an anti-inflammatory cytokine, over-expression of IL-10 may contribute to mycobacterial evasion of the host immunity. Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR, Chishao, a Chinese medicinal herb with potentials of anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects, is used to treat tuberculosis. This study investigates the immunoregulatory effects of RPR on primary human blood macrophages (PBMac during mycobacterial infection. Methods The interaction of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG with PBMac was used as an experimental model. A series of procedures involving solvent extraction and fractionation were used to isolate bioactive constituents in RPR. RPR-EA-S1, a fraction with potent immunoregulatory effects was obtained with a bioactivity guided fractionation scheme. PBMac were treated with crude RPR extracts or RPR-EA-S1 before BCG stimulation. The expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α were measured by qPCR and ELISA. Western blotting was used to determine the effects of RPR-EA-S1 on signaling kinases and transcriptional factors in the BCG-activated PBMac. Results In BCG-stimulated macrophages, crude RPR extracts and fraction RPR-EA-S1 specifically inhibited IL-10 production while enhanced IL-8 expression at both mRNA and protein levels without affecting the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α. Inhibition of BCG-induced IL-10 expression by RPR-EA-S1 occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RPR-EA-S1 did not affect the phosphorylation of cellular protein kinases including MAPK, Akt and GSK3β. Instead, it suppressed the degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm and inhibited the

  18. A study of chemokines, chemokine receptors and interleukin-6 in patients with panic disorder, personality disorders and their co-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna M; Just, Marek J; Szromek, Adam R; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Stress may induce inflammatory changes in the immune system and activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors by activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. 460 hospitalized patients with panic disorders (PD) and/or personality disorders (P) were studied. The study group comprised subjects with PD, avoidant personality disorder (APD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), and concomitant (PD+APD; PD+BPD; PD+OCPD). Each study group consisted of 60 subjects (30 females and 30 males). The control group included 20 females and 20 males without any history of mental disorder. ELISA was used to assess the levels of chemokines: CCL-5/RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), CXCL-12/SDF-1 (stromal derived factor), their receptors CXCR-5 (C-C chemokine receptor type-5), CXCR-4 (chemokine C-X-C motif receptor-4), and IL-6. Statistically significant differences in the levels of CCL-5 and CCR-5 were revealed between all study groups. The greatest differences were found between the groups with PD+OCPD and PD+APD. Moreover, concomitance of PD with P significantly increased the level of chemokines and their receptors in all study groups versus the subjects with P alone. The results of the study show differences between the groups. To be specific, inflammatory markers were more elevated in the study groups than the controls. Therefore, chemokines and chemokine receptors may be used as inflammatory markers in patients with PD co-existent with P to indicate disease severity. PD was found to be a factor in maintaining inflammatory activity in the immune system in patients with P. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of chemokines (CCL-5 and SDF-1), chemokine receptors (CCR-5 and CXCR-4) and IL-6 levels in patients with different severities of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna; Just, Marek J; Moś, Danuta; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2014-10-01

    Depression can be perceived as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder in which cytokines affecting the body's neurochemical and neuroendocrine functions play an important role. Among cytokines, chemokines participating in activation of the inflammatory response are considered to be crucial. 160 men and women were enrolled in the study. 120 of them were diagnosed with various types of depression. The mean age was 45.2 ± 4.5 years (range: 19-47 years). The control group consisted of 40 healthy individuals. The average age in this group was 42.4 ± 4.1 years. Plasma levels of chemokines and their receptors (CCL-5 - RANTES and CXCR-5, SDF-1 and CXCR-4), as well as of IL-6, were assessed by ELISA. There was an increase in SDF-1 and CCL-5 levels in women and men with different severities of depression, versus the control group. Also, an increase in the IL-6 levels, CXCR4 and CCR-5 receptors was observed in both women and men with all types of depression. Levels of SDF-1 and CCL-5 chemokines, as well as of CCR-5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, were higher in women than in men. The results of this study indicate the need for assessment of CCL-5 and SDF-1 chemokines levels, as they are likely markers of developing depression. Early measurement of these chemokines levels may be helpful in choosing the best pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. submitter Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Altara, R; Brandao, R D; Zeidan, A; Booz, G W; Zouein, F A

    2016-01-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the deve...

  1. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  2. Extracellular Disulfide Bridges Serve Different Purposes in Two Homologous Chemokine Receptors, CCR1 and CCR5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rummel, Pia Cwarzko; Thiele, Stefanie; Hansen, Laerke Smidt

    2013-01-01

    interact with residues in the main binding crevice, we show that the 7TM-conserved bridge is essential for all types of ligand-mediated activation, whereas the chemokine-conserved bridge is dispensable for small-molecule activation in CCR1. However, in striking contrast to previous studies in other...... chemokine receptors, high affinity CCL3 chemokine binding was maintained in the absence of either bridge. In CCR5, the closest homolog to CCR1, a completely different dependency was observed as neither chemokine activation nor binding was retained in the absence of either bridge. In contrast, both bridges...... where dispensable for small-molecule activation. This indicates that CCR5 activity is independent of extracellular regions, whereas in CCR1, preserved folding of ECL2 is necessary for activation. These results indicate that conserved structural features in a receptor subgroup, does not necessarily...

  3. Cytokine and chemokine inter-regulation in the inflamed or injured CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Babcock, Alicia A; Millward, Jason M

    2005-01-01

    the expression of chemokines in the CNS, in the absence of any other inflammatory event, but the profiles differ from those induced by axotomy. Chemokines that bind the CCR2 receptor are implicated in traffic of macrophages and T cells to the denervated hippocampus. Innate responses in the immune system...... are directed by Toll-like receptors (TLR). Our recent studies focus on specific TLR signals as upstream on-switches for glial cytokine and chemokine responses. The biological activity of chemokines is regulated by matrix metalloproteinase enzymes (MMPs) and specific members of this family are expressed...... in response to axonal lesioning. These findings strengthen the case for the sharing of signals between the immune and nervous system....

  4. Adaptive Tunable Laser Spectrometer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Gregory; Keymeulen, Didier

    2010-01-01

    An architecture and process for the rapid prototyping and subsequent development of an adaptive tunable laser absorption spectrometer (TLS) are described. Our digital hardware/firmware/software platform is both reconfigurable at design time as well as autonomously adaptive in real-time for both post-integration and post-launch situations. The design expands the range of viable target environments and enhances tunable laser spectrometer performance in extreme and even unpredictable environments. Through rapid prototyping with a commercial RTOS/FPGA platform, we have implemented a fully operational tunable laser spectrometer (using a highly sensitive second harmonic technique). With this prototype, we have demonstrated autonomous real-time adaptivity in the lab with simulated extreme environments.

  5. Bandwidth tunable amplifier for recording biopotential signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sungkil; Aninakwa, Kofi; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise, low power, bandwidth tunable amplifier for bio-potential signal recording applications. By employing depletion-mode pMOS transistor in diode configuration as a tunable sub pA current source to adjust the resistivity of MOS-Bipolar pseudo-resistor, the bandwidth is adjusted without any need for a separate band-pass filter stage. For high CMRR, PSRR and dynamic range, a fully differential structure is used in the design of the amplifier. The amplifier achieves a midband gain of 39.8dB with a tunable high-pass cutoff frequency ranging from 0.1Hz to 300Hz. The amplifier is fabricated in 0.18εm CMOS process and occupies 0.14mm(2) of chip area. A three electrode ECG measurement is performed using the proposed amplifier to show its feasibility for low power, compact wearable ECG monitoring application.

  6. Highly Tunable Narrow Bandpass MEMS Filter

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2017-07-07

    We demonstrate a proof-of-concept highly tunable narrow bandpass filter based on electrothermally and electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) resonators. The device consists of two mechanically uncoupled clamped-clamped arch resonators, designed such that their resonance frequencies are independently tuned to obtain the desired narrow passband. Through the electrothermal and electrostatic actuation, the stiffness of the structures is highly tunable. We experimentally demonstrate significant percentage tuning (~125%) of the filter center frequency by varying the applied electrothermal voltages to the resonating structures, while maintaining a narrow passband of 550 ± 50 Hz, a stopband rejection of >17 dB, and a passband ripple ≤ 2.5 dB. An analytical model based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is used to confirm the behavior of the filter, and the origin of the high tunability using electrothermal actuation is discussed.

  7. Perovskite Superlattices as Tunable Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, H. M.; Harshavardhan, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have shown that superlattices that comprise alternating epitaxial layers of dissimilar paraelectric perovskites can exhibit large changes in permittivity with the application of electric fields. The superlattices are potentially useful as electrically tunable dielectric components of such microwave devices as filters and phase shifters. The present superlattice approach differs fundamentally from the prior use of homogeneous, isotropic mixtures of base materials and dopants. A superlattice can comprise layers of two or more perovskites in any suitable sequence (e.g., ABAB..., ABCDABCD..., ABACABACA...). Even though a single layer of one of the perovskites by itself is not tunable, the compositions and sequence of the layers can be chosen so that (1) the superlattice exhibits low microwave loss and (2) the interfacial interaction between at least two of the perovskites in the superlattice renders either the entire superlattice or else at least one of the perovskites tunable.

  8. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttorp, Christiaan M.; Cremers, Niels A.; van Rheden, René; Regan, Raymond F.; Helmich, Pia; van Kempen, Sven; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Wagener, Frank A.D.T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES) is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO) mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling. PMID:29164113

  9. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  10. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan M. Suttorp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling.

  11. A complex pattern of chemokine receptor expression is seen in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luettichau, Irene von; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J; Segerer, Stephan; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nathrath, Michaela; Kremer, Markus; Henger, Anna; Djafarzadeh, Roghieh; Burdach, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor in childhood and adolescence. Patients with primary metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. It is therefore important to better characterize the biology of this tumor to define new prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for tailored therapy. Chemokines and their receptors have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of malignant tumors. They are thought to be active participants in the biology of osteosarcoma. The function of specific chemokines and their receptors is strongly associated with the biological context and microenvironment of their expression. In this report we characterized the expression of a series of chemokine receptors in the complex environment that defines osteosarcoma. The overall level of chemokine receptor mRNA expression was determined using TaqMan RT-PCR of microdissected archival patient biopsy samples. Expression was then verified at the protein level by immunohistochemistry using a series of receptor specific antibody reagents to elucidate the cellular association of expression. Expression at the RNA level was found for most of the tested receptors. CCR1 expression was found on infiltrating mononuclear and polynuclear giant cells in the tumor. Cells associated with the lining of intratumoral vessels were shown to express CCR4. Infiltrating mononuclear cells and tumor cells both showed expression of the receptor CCR5, while CCR7 was predominantly expressed by the mononuclear infiltrate. CCR10 was only very rarely detected in few scattered infiltrating cells. Our data elucidate for the first time the cellular context of chemokine receptor expression in osteosarcoma. This is an important issue for better understanding potential chemokine/chemokine receptor function in the complex biologic processes that underlie the development and progression of osteosarcoma. Our data support the suggested involvement of chemokines and their receptors in diverse aspects of the biology

  12. The CC chemokine receptor 5 regulates olfactory and social recognition in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkonde, Y V; Shelton, R; Villarreal, M; Sigala, J; Mishra, P K; Ahuja, S S; Barea-Rodriguez, E; Moretti, P; Ahuja, S K

    2011-12-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate cell migration and are thought to play an important role in a broad range of inflammatory diseases. The availability of chemokine receptor blockers makes them an important therapeutic target. In vitro, chemokines are shown to modulate neurotransmission. However, it is not very clear if chemokines play a role in behavior and cognition. Here we evaluated the role of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) in various behavioral tasks in mice using Wt (Ccr5⁺/⁺) and Ccr5-null (Ccr5⁻/⁻)mice. Ccr5⁻/⁻ mice showed enhanced social recognition. Administration of CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), one of the CCR5-ligands, impaired social recognition. Since the social recognition task is dependent on the sense of olfaction, we tested olfactory recognition for social and non-social scents in these mice. Ccr5⁻/⁻ mice had enhanced olfactory recognition for both these scents indicating that enhanced performance in social recognition task could be due to enhanced olfactory recognition in these mice. Spatial memory and aversive memory were comparable in Wt and Ccr5⁻/⁻ mice. Collectively, these results suggest that chemokines/chemokine receptors might play an important role in olfactory recognition tasks in mice and to our knowledge represents the first direct demonstration of an in vivo role of CCR5 in modulating social behavior in mice. These studies are important as CCR5 blockers are undergoing clinical trials and can potentially modulate behavior. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modified Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling Dan Suppresses Adjuvant Arthritis by Inhibiting Chemokines and Matrix-Degrading Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraju M. Nanjundaiah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints that can lead to deformities and disability. The prolonged use of conventionally used drugs is associated with severe adverse reactions. Therefore, safer and less expensive therapeutic products are continually being sought. Huo-Luo-Xiao-Ling dan (HLXL, a traditional Chinese herbal mixture, and its modified versions possess anti-arthritic activity. In this paper, we examined the influence of modified HLXL on two of the key mediators of arthritic inflammation and tissue damage, namely, chemokines and matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA model of RA. We treated arthritic Lewis rats with HLXL (2.3 g/kg by daily gavage beginning at the onset of AA. The control rats received the vehicle. At the peak phase of AA, rats were sacrificed and their draining lymph node cells (LNC and spleen adherent cells (SAC were tested. The HLXL-treated rats showed a significant reduction in the levels of chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and GRO/KC, MMPs (MMP 2 and 9, as well as cytokines (IL-6 and IL-17 that induce them, compared to the control vehicle-treated rats. Thus, HLXL controls arthritis in part by suppressing the mediators of immune pathology, and it might offer a promising alternative/adjunct treatment for RA.

  14. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-04-11

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis.

  15. Chemokines in neuron-glial cell interaction and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from damage or dysfunction of the nervous system is a highly debilitating chronic pain state and is often resistant to currently available treatments. It has become clear that neuroinflammation, mainly mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines were originally identified as regulators of peripheral immune cell trafficking and were also expressed in neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system. In recent years, accumulating studies have revealed the expression, distribution and function of chemokines in the spinal cord under chronic pain conditions. In this review, we provide evidence showing that several chemokines are upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain via different forms of neuron-glia interaction in the spinal cord. First, chemokine CX3CL1 is expressed in primary afferents and spinal neurons and induces microglial activation via its microglial receptor CX3CR1 (neuron-to-microglia signaling). Second, CCL2 and CXCL1 are expressed in spinal astrocytes and act on CCR2 and CXCR2 in spinal neurons to increase excitatory synaptic transmission (astrocyte-to-neuron signaling). Third, we recently identified that CXCL13 is highly upregulated in spinal neurons after spinal nerve ligation and induces spinal astrocyte activation via receptor CXCR5 (neuron-to-astrocyte signaling). Strategies that target chemokine-mediated neuron-glia interactions may lead to novel therapies for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  16. A chemokine-binding domain in the tumor necrosis factor receptor from variola (smallpox) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M. Begoña; Ho, Yin; Smith, Vincent P.; Saraiva, Margarida; Alcami, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Variola virus (VaV) is the causative agent of smallpox, one of the most devastating diseases encountered by man, that was eradicated in 1980. The deliberate release of VaV would have catastrophic consequences on global public health. However, the mechanisms that contribute to smallpox pathogenesis are poorly understood at the molecular level. The ability of viruses to evade the host defense mechanisms is an important determinant of viral pathogenesis. Here we show that the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologue CrmB encoded by VaV functions not only as a soluble decoy TNFR but also as a highly specific binding protein for several chemokines that mediate recruitment of immune cells to mucosal surfaces and the skin, sites of virus entry and viral replication at late stages of smallpox. CrmB binds chemokines through its C-terminal domain, which is unrelated to TNFRs, was named smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and uncovers a family of poxvirus chemokine inhibitors. An active SECRET domain was found in another viral TNFR (CrmD) and three secreted proteins encoded by orthopoxviruses. These findings identify a previously undescribed chemokine-binding and inhibitory domain unrelated to host chemokine receptors and a mechanism of immune modulation in VaV that may influence smallpox pathogenesis. PMID:16581912

  17. Tunable high-gradient permanent magnet quadrupoles

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, B J A; Marks, N; Collomb, N A; Stokes, D G; Modena, M; Struik, M; Bartalesi, A

    2014-01-01

    A novel type of highly tunable permanent magnet (PM) based quadrupole has been designed by the ZEPTO collaboration. A prototype of the design (ZEPTO-Q1), intended to match the specification for the CLIC Drive Beam Decelerator, was built and magnetically measured at Daresbury Laboratory and CERN. The prototype utilises two pairs of PMs which move in opposite directions along a single vertical axis to produce a quadrupole gradient variable between 15 and 60 T/m. The prototype meets CLIC's challenging specification in terms of the strength and tunability of the magnet.

  18. Thermally tunable magnetic metamaterials at THz frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, Son Tung; Nguyen, Van Dung; Bui, Xuan Khuyen; Vu, Dinh Lam; Nguyen, Thanh Tung; Lievens, Peter; Lee, YoungPak

    2013-01-01

    We investigate theoretically and numerically the tunability of the magnetic property of metamaterial in the THz region via thermal control. One component of the meta-atom is InSb, playing an important role as an alterable metal. When the temperature of the InSb stack increases from 300 to 350 K, the resonance peak of the transmission spectra shows a shift from 0.6 to 0.85 THz accompanied by a stronger magnetic behavior. The S-parameter retrieval method realizes the tunability of the negative permeability achieved in the above heating range. (paper)

  19. Enhanced Performance & Functionality of Tunable Delay Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Based Tunable Optical Delays”, Optics Letters, Vol. 33, Issue 13, pp. 1518-1520 (2008). 2. Louis Christen, Irfan Fazal , Omer F. Yilmaz, Xiaoxia Wu...2008. 3. Omer F. Yilmaz, Louis Christen, Xiaoxia Wu, Scott R. Nuccio, Irfan Fazal , and Alan E. Willner, “Time-Slot-Interchange of 40 Gb/s Variable...F. Yilmaz, S. Khaleghi, L. Christen, I. Fazal , and A. E. Willner, “503 ns, Tunable Optical Delay of 40 Gb/s RZ-OOK using Additional λ-Conversion

  20. Investigating the association of chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 polymorphism with cervical cancer in human papillomavirus (HPV positive patients - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.944 Investigating association of chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 polymorphism with cervical cancer in human papillomavirus (HPV suggestive patients - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.944

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Donizete Borelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available HPV is one of the most frequent causes for the development of cervical cancer. It is known that chemokines are important determinants of early inflammatory responses. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 gene is involved in the chemotaxis of leukocytes toward inflammation sites. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 225 bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 193 bp product from the 32 bp deletion allele. The wild type genotype was prevalent in both group, but it was not statistically significant, with χ2 = 1.519 (2 degrees of freedom; p > 0.05. As there are a small number of 32 allele carriers, further studies are needed to clarify the role of CCR5 in the cervical cancer.HPV is the most responsible of cervical cancer. It is known that chemokines are important determinants of the early inflammatory response. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 gene is involved in the chemotaxis of leukocytes toward inflammation sites. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 225bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 193bp product from the 32bp deletion allele. The wild type genotype was prevalent in both group, but it wasn’t statistically significant with χ² =1,519 (2 degrees of freedom; p>0.05. Once there is a small number of 32 allele carriers, further studies are needed to clarify the role of CCR5 in the cervical cancer.

  1. Roles for C-X-C chemokines and C5a in lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bless, N M; Warner, R L; Padgaonkar, V A

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the roles of the C-X-C chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) as well as the complement activation product C5a in development of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. During reperfusion, CD11b...... and CD18, but not CD11a, were upregulated on neutrophils [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood] and lung macrophages. BAL levels of CINC and MIP-2 were increased during the ischemic and reperfusion periods. Treatment with either anti-CINC or anti-MIP-2 IgG significantly reduced lung vascular......, 58, and 23%, respectively (P MIP-2 as well as the complement activation product C5a are required for lung neutrophil recruitment and full induction of lung injury after hindlimb ischemia-reperfusion in rats....

  2. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  3. Shear Stress Enhances Chemokine Secretion from Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J; Dallo, Shatha F; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that is considered a highly likely risk factor for atherosclerosis. C. pneumoniae is disseminated from the lung into systemic circulation via infected monocytes and lodges at the atherosclerotic sites. During transit, C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes in circulation are subjected to shear stress due to blood flow. The effect of mechanical stimuli on infected monocytes is largely understudied in the context of C. pneumoniae infection and inflammation. We hypothesized that fluid shear stress alters the inflammatory response of C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes and contributes to immune cell recruitment to the site of tissue damage. Using an in vitro model of blood flow, we determined that a physiological shear stress of 7.5 dyn/cm 2 for 1 h on C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes enhances the production of several chemokines, which in turn is correlated with the recruitment of significantly large number of monocytes. Taken together, these results suggest synergistic interaction between mechanical and chemical factors in C. pneumoniae infection and associated inflammation.

  4. The role of CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)12-CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4 signalling in the migration of neural stem cells towards a brain tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, A. A. E.; Biber, K.; Lukovac, S.; Balasubramaniyan, V.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.; Mooij, J. J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: It has been shown that neural stem cells (NSCs) migrate towards areas of brain injury or brain tumours and that NSCs have the capacity to track infiltrating tumour cells. The possible mechanism behind the migratory behaviour of NSCs is not yet completely understood. As chemokines are involved

  5. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutrophil chemokines levels in different stages of nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwag S Alsharidah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotic syndrome (NS is a disease of glomerular filtration barrier failure presenting with variable degrees of proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of NS. The aim of this study was to monitor the serum levels of three cytokines [i.e., granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2, growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α, and interleukin-8 (IL-8] in different stages of NS and to find out whether changes in the levels of these cytokines could be related to the severity of NS. This study included 125 patients who were divided into 40 patients with nephrotic range proteinuria (NRP, 45 patients with NS, and 40 patients who were in remission. This study also included 80 healthy participants as a control group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for the determination of the plasma levels of GRO-α, GCP-2, and IL-8. GCP-2 plasma levels were significantly higher in the NS and NRP groups when compared to the control group, whereas the GRO-α and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in all patient groups in comparison with the control group. All these chemokine levels were significantly decreased in remission as compared with the participants in the NS group (P <0.0001. There was a significant correlation between the cytokine levels and proteinuria and serum albumin in the NS group (P <0.0001. However, in the follow-up group, GCP-2 levels were significantly lower during remission as compared to those with active NS (P <0.0001. Our findings suggest that the pro-inflammatory cytokines GCP-2, GRO-α, and IL-8 could play a role in the pathogenesis of NS, particularly glomerular permeability.

  7. Chemokine receptors and cortical interneuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, David W; Chitrapu, Anjani; Edelson, Jessica R; Lewis, David A

    2015-09-01

    Alterations in inhibitory (GABA) neurons, including deficiencies in the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia are pronounced in the subpopulations of neurons that contain the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin or the neuropeptide somatostatin. The presence of similar illness-related deficits in the transcription factor Lhx6, which regulates prenatal development of parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons, suggests that cortical GABA neuron dysfunction may be related to disturbances in utero. Since the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 guide the migration of cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons from their birthplace in the medial ganglionic eminence to their final destination in the neocortex, we sought to determine whether altered CXCR4 and/or CXCR7 mRNA levels were associated with disturbances in GABA-related markers in schizophrenia. Quantitative PCR was used to quantify CXCR4 and CXCR7 mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex of 62 schizophrenia and 62 healthy comparison subjects that were previously characterized for markers of parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons and in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. We found elevated mRNA levels for CXCR7 (+29%; pschizophrenia subjects but not in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. CXCR7 mRNA levels were inversely correlated with mRNA levels for GAD67, parvalbumin, somatostatin, and Lhx6 in schizophrenia but not in healthy subjects. These findings suggest that higher mRNA levels for CXCR7, and possibly CXCR4, may represent a compensatory mechanism to sustain the migration and correct positioning of cortical parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons in the face of other insults that disrupt the prenatal development of cortical GABA neurons in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency tunable surface magneto elastic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janusonis, J.; Chang, C. L.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Tobey, R. I.

    2015-01-01

    We use the transient grating technique to generate narrow-band, widely tunable, in-plane surface magnetoelastic waves in a nickel film. We monitor both the structural deformation of the acoustic wave and the accompanying magnetic precession and witness their intimate coupling in the time domain.

  9. Tunable metamaterials fabricated by fiber drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Simon; Stefani, Alessio; Tang, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a practical scalable approach to the fabrication of tunable metamaterials. Designed for terahertz (THz) wavelengths, the metamaterial is comprised of polyurethane filled with an array of indium wires using the well-established fiber drawing technique. Modification of the dimensions...

  10. Tunable structures and modulators for THz light

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kužel, Petr; Kadlec, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2008), 197-214 ISSN 1631-0705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100100512; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : terahertz radiation * tunable devices * photonic crystals * strontium titanate * gallium arsenide Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.164, year: 2008

  11. Absolute Distance Measurements with Tunable Semiconductor Laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikel, Břetislav; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    T118, - (2005), s. 41-44 ISSN 0031-8949 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAB2065001 Keywords : tunable laser * absolute interferometer Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.661, year: 2004

  12. Tunable Water-based Microwave Metasurface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapitanova, Polina; Odit, Mikhail; Dobrykh, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    A water-based dynamically tunable microwave metasurface is developed and experimentally investigated. A simple approach to tune the metasurface properties by changing the shape of water-based unit cells by gravitation force is proposed. The transmission spectra of the metasurface for linear...... angle. The proposed approach can be used to design cheap metasurfaces for electromagnetic wave control in the microwave frequency range....

  13. Hybrid Micro-Electro-Mechanical Tunable Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    and polymer hybrid actuator and applications as a tunable filter in telecom and in IR chemical detector,” in Micromachining and Microfabrication...consistently achieved. At this temperature, SU8 - SU-8 bonding withstood subsequent processing steps, resulting in a 57% bond yield and an overall 30

  14. Cathepsin D Specifically Cleaves the Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α, Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1β, and SLC That Are Expressed in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marlene; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Buri, Caroline; Langen, Hanno; Lis, Maddalena; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2003-01-01

    Cathepsin D (Cath-D) expression in human primary breast cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis. In search of a better understanding of the Cath-D substrates possibly involved in cancer invasiveness and metastasis, we investigated the potential interactions between this protease and chemokines. Here we report that purified Cath-D, as well as culture supernatants from the human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, selectively degrade macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (CCL3), MIP-1β (CCL4), and SLC (CCL21). Proteolysis was totally blocked by the protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and specificity of Cath-D cleavage was demonstrated using a large chemokine panel. Whereas MIP-1α and MIP-1β degradation was rapid and complete, cleavage of SLC was slow and not complete. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Cath-D cleaves the Leu58 to Trp59 bond of SLC producing two functionally inactive fragments. Analysis of Cath-D proteolysis of a series of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3/MIP-1β hybrids indicated that processing of MIP-1β might start by cleaving off amino acids located in the C-terminal domain. In situ hybridization studies revealed MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and Cath-D gene expression mainly in the stromal compartment of breast cancers whereas SLC transcripts were found in endothelial cells of capillaries and venules within the neoplastic tissues. Cath-D production in the breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of culture supernatants and cell lysates, was not affected by stimulation with chemokines such as interleukin-8 (CXCL8), SDF-1 (CXCL12), and SLC. These data suggest that inactivation of chemokines by Cath-D possibly influences regulatory mechanisms in the tumoral extracellular microenvironment that in turn may affect the generation of the antitumoral immune response, the migration of cancer cells, or both processes. PMID:12651610

  15. Processing of natural and recombinant CXCR3-targeting chemokines and implications for biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensbergen, P J; van der Raaij-Helmer, E M; Dijkman, R; van der Schors, R C; Werner-Felmayer, G; Boorsma, D M; Scheper, R J; Willemze, R; Tensen, C P

    2001-09-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of peptides with chemotactic activity towards leukocytes. The potency of different chemokines for the same receptor often varies as a result of differences in primary structure. In addition, post-translational modifications have been shown to affect the effectiveness of chemokines. Although in several studies, natural CXCR3-targeting chemokines have been isolated, detailed information about the proteins and their possible modifications is lacking. Using a combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry we studied the protein profile of CXCR3-targeting chemokines expressed by interferon-gamma-stimulated human keratinocytes. The biological implications of one of the identified modifications was studied in more detail using calcium mobilization and chemotaxis assays. We found that the primary structure of human CXCL10 is different from the generally accepted sequence. In addition we identified a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, lacking the last four amino acids. Native CXCL11 was primarily found in its intact mature form but we also found a mass corresponding to an N-terminally truncated human CXCL11, lacking the first two amino acids FP, indicating that this chemokine is a substrate for dipeptidylpeptidase IV. Interestingly, this same truncation was found when we expressed human CXCL11 in Drosophila S2 cells. The biological activity of this truncated form of CXCL11 was greatly reduced, both in calcium mobilization (using CXCR3 expressing CHO cells) as well as its chemotactic activity for CXCR3-expressing T-cells. It is concluded that detailed information on chemokines at the protein level is important to characterize the exact profile of these chemotactic peptides as modifications can severely alter their biological activity.

  16. Chemokine Ligand 5 (CCL5 and chemokine receptor (CCR5 genetic variants and prostate cancer risk among men of African Descent: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidd LaCreis R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokine and chemokine receptors play an essential role in tumorigenesis. Although chemokine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with various cancers, their impact on prostate cancer (PCA among men of African descent is unknown. Consequently, this study evaluated 43 chemokine-associated SNPs in relation to PCA risk. We hypothesized inheritance of variant chemokine-associated alleles may lead to alterations in PCA susceptibility, presumably due to variations in antitumor immune responses. Methods Sequence variants were evaluated in germ-line DNA samples from 814 African-American and Jamaican men (279 PCA cases and 535 controls using Illumina’s Goldengate genotyping system. Results Inheritance of CCL5 rs2107538 (AA, GA+AA and rs3817655 (AA, AG, AG+AA genotypes were linked with a 34-48% reduction in PCA risk. Additionally, the recessive and dominant models for CCR5 rs1799988 and CCR7 rs3136685 were associated with a 1.52-1.73 fold increase in PCA risk. Upon stratification, only CCL5 rs3817655 and CCR7 rs3136685 remained significant for the Jamaican and U.S. subgroups, respectively. Conclusions In summary, CCL5 (rs2107538, rs3817655 and CCR5 (rs1799988 sequence variants significantly modified PCA susceptibility among men of African descent, even after adjusting for age and multiple comparisons. Our findings are only suggestive and require further evaluation and validation in relation to prostate cancer risk and ultimately disease progression, biochemical/disease recurrence and mortality in larger high-risk subgroups. Such efforts will help to identify genetic markers capable of explaining disproportionately high prostate cancer incidence, mortality, and morbidity rates among men of African descent.

  17. Tunable Microwave Filter Design Using Thin-Film Ferroelectric Varactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridasan, Vrinda

    Military, space, and consumer-based communication markets alike are moving towards multi-functional, multi-mode, and portable transceiver units. Ferroelectric-based tunable filter designs in RF front-ends are a relatively new area of research that provides a potential solution to support wideband and compact transceiver units. This work presents design methodologies developed to optimize a tunable filter design for system-level integration, and to improve the performance of a ferroelectric-based tunable bandpass filter. An investigative approach to find the origins of high insertion loss exhibited by these filters is also undertaken. A system-aware design guideline and figure of merit for ferroelectric-based tunable band- pass filters is developed. The guideline does not constrain the filter bandwidth as long as it falls within the range of the analog bandwidth of a system's analog to digital converter. A figure of merit (FOM) that optimizes filter design for a specific application is presented. It considers the worst-case filter performance parameters and a tuning sensitivity term that captures the relation between frequency tunability and the underlying material tunability. A non-tunable parasitic fringe capacitance associated with ferroelectric-based planar capacitors is confirmed by simulated and measured results. The fringe capacitance is an appreciable proportion of the tunable capacitance at frequencies of X-band and higher. As ferroelectric-based tunable capac- itors form tunable resonators in the filter design, a proportionally higher fringe capacitance reduces the capacitance tunability which in turn reduces the frequency tunability of the filter. Methods to reduce the fringe capacitance can thus increase frequency tunability or indirectly reduce the filter insertion-loss by trading off the increased tunability achieved to lower loss. A new two-pole tunable filter topology with high frequency tunability (> 30%), steep filter skirts, wide stopband

  18. Identification of chemokines associated with the recruitment of decidual leukocytes in human labour: potential novel targets for preterm labour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Current therapies for preterm labour (PTL focus on arresting myometrial contractions but are largely ineffective, thus alternative therapeutic targets need to be identified. Leukocytes infiltrate the uterus around the time of labour, and are in particularly abundant in decidua (maternal-fetal interface. Moreover, decidual inflammation precedes labour in rat pregnancies and thus may contribute to initiation of labour. We hypothesized that chemokines mediate decidual leukocyte trafficking during preterm labour (PTL and term labour (TL, thus representing potential targets for preventing PTL. Women were recruited into 4 groups: TL, term not in labour (TNL, idiopathic PTL and PTL with infection (PTLI. Choriodecidual RNA was subjected to a pathway-specific PCR array for chemokines. Differential expression of 12 candidate chemokines was validated by real time RT-PCR and Bioplex assay, with immunohistochemistry to confirm cellular origin. 25 chemokines were upregulated in choriodecidua from TL compared to TNL. A similar pattern was detected in PTL, however a distinct profile was observed in PTLI consistent with differences in leukocyte infiltration. Upregulation of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was confirmed in TL, with CCL8 upregulated in PTL. Significant correlations were detected between these chemokines and decidual leukocyte abundance previously assessed by immunohistochemical and image analysis. Chemokines were primarily expressed by decidual stromal cells. In addition, CXCL8 and CCL5 were significantly elevated in maternal plasma during labour, suggesting chemokines contribute to peripheral inflammatory events during labour. Differences in chemokine expression patterns between TL and idiopathic PTL may be attributable to suppression of chemokine expression by betamethasone administered to women in PTL; this was supported by in vitro evidence of chemokine downregulation by clinically relevant concentrations of the steroid

  19. Overexpression of the duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) by NSCLC tumor cells results in increased tumor necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, Christina L; Belperio, John A; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) is known to be a promiscuous chemokine receptor that binds a variety of CXC and CC chemokines in the absence of any detectable signal transduction events. Within the CXC group of chemokines, DARC binds the angiogenic CXC chemokines including IL-8 (CXCL8), GROα (CXCL1) and ENA-78 (CXCL5), all of which have previously been shown to be important in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumor growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of DARC by a NSCLC tumor cell line would result in the binding of the angiogenic ELR+ CXC chemokines by the tumor cells themselves, and thus interfere with the stimulation of endothelial cells and induction of angiogenesis by the tumor cell-derived angiogenic chemokines. NSCLC tumor cells that constitutively expressed DARC were generated and their growth characteristics were compared to control transfected cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID animals. We found that tumors derived from DARC-expressing cells were significantly larger in size than tumors derived from control-transfected cells. However, upon histological examination we found that DARC-expressing tumors had significantly more necrosis and decreased tumor cellularity, as compared to control tumors. Expression of DARC by NSCLC cells was also associated with a decrease in tumor-associated vasculature and a reduction in metastatic potential. The expression of DARC in the context of NSCLC tumors may act as a chemokine decoy receptor and interferes with normal tumor growth and chemokine-induced tumor neovascularization

  20. Comparative study of CXC chemokines modulation in brown trout (Salmo trutta) following infection with a bacterial or viral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Zahran, Eman; Taylor, Nick G H; Feist, Stephen W; Zou, Jun; Secombes, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    Chemokine modulation in response to pathogens still needs to be fully characterised in fish, in view of the recently described novel chemokines present. This paper reports the first comparative study of CXC chemokine genes transcription in salmonids (brown trout), with a particular focus on the fish specific CXC chemokines (CXCL_F). Adopting new primer sets, optimised to specifically target mRNA, a RT-qPCR gene screening was carried out. Constitutive gene expression was assessed first in six tissues from SPF brown trout. Transcription modulation was next investigated in kidney and spleen during septicaemic infection induced by a RNA virus (Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia virus, genotype Ia) or by a Gram negative bacterium (Yersinia ruckeri, ser. O1/biot. 2). From each target organ specific pathogen burden, measured detecting VHSV-glycoprotein or Y. ruckeri 16S rRNA, and IFN-γ gene expression were analysed for their correlation to chemokine transcription. Both pathogens modulated CXC chemokine gene transcript levels, with marked up-regulation seen in some cases, and with both temporal and tissue specific effects apparent. For example, Y. ruckeri strongly induced chemokine transcription in spleen within 24h, whilst VHS generally induced the largest increases at 3d.p.i. in both tissues. This study gives clues to the role of the novel CXC chemokines, in comparison to the other known CXC chemokines in salmonids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuronal apoptotic signaling pathways probed and intervened by synthetically and modularly modified (SMM) chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Tak; Kaul, Marcus; Kumar, Santosh; Wang, Jun; Kumar, I M Krishna; Dong, Chang-Zhi; An, Jing; Lipton, Stuart A; Huang, Ziwei

    2007-03-09

    As the main coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, CXCR4 and CCR5 play important roles in HIV-associated dementia (HAD). HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 contributes to HAD by causing neuronal damage and death, either directly by triggering apoptotic pathways or indirectly by stimulating glial cells to release neurotoxins. Here, to understand the mechanism of CXCR4 or CCR5 signaling in neuronal apoptosis associated with HAD, we have applied synthetically and modularly modified (SMM)-chemokine analogs derived from natural stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II as chemical probes of the mechanism(s) whereby these SMM-chemokines prevent or promote neuronal apoptosis. We show that inherently neurotoxic natural ligands of CXCR4, such as stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha or viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II, can be modified to protect neurons from apoptosis induced by CXCR4-preferring gp120(IIIB), and that the inhibition of CCR5 by antagonist SMM-chemokines, unlike neuroprotective CCR5 natural ligands, leads to neurotoxicity by activating a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, we discover distinct signaling pathways activated by different chemokine ligands that are either natural agonists or synthetic antagonists, thus demonstrating a chemical biology strategy of using chemically engineered inhibitors of chemokine receptors to study the signaling mechanism of neuronal apoptosis and survival.

  2. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  3. Different Cytokine and Chemokine Expression Patterns in Malignant Compared to Those in Nonmalignant Renal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gelbrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cytokines and chemokines are widely involved in cancer cell progression and thus represent promising candidate factors for new biomarkers. Methods. Four renal cell cancer (RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, RCC4, and A498 and a nonmalignant renal cell line (RC-124 were examined with respect to their proliferation. The cytokine and chemokine expression pattern was examined by a DNA array (Human Cytokines & Chemokines RT2 Profiler PCR Array; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany, and expression profiles were compared. Results. Caki-1 and 786-O cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation rates, whereas RCC4 and A498 cells demonstrated attenuated proliferation, compared to nonmalignant RC-124 cells. Expression analysis revealed 52 cytokines and chemokines primarily involved in proliferation and inflammation and differentially expressed not only in malignant and nonmalignant renal cells but also in the four RCC cell lines. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the expression of 84 cytokines and chemokines in four RCC cell lines compared to that in a nonmalignant renal cell line. VEGFA, NODAL, and BMP6 correlated with RCC cell line proliferation and, thus, may represent putative clinical biomarkers for RCC progression as well as for RCC diagnosis and prognosis.

  4. Disrupting functional interactions between platelet chemokines inhibits atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koenen, RR; Hundelshausen, P; Nesmelova, IV

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by chronic inflammation of the arterial wall due to chemokine-driven mononuclear cell recruitment. Activated platelets can synergize with chemokines to exacerbate atherogenesis; for example, by deposition of the chemokines platelet factor-4 (PF4, also known as CXC...... monocyte recruitment and reducing atherosclerosis without the aforementioned side effects. These results establish the in vivo relevance of chemokine heteromers and show the potential of targeting heteromer formation to achieve therapeutic effects......) and RANTES (CCL5), triggering monocyte arrest on inflamed endothelium. Homo-oligomerization is required for the recruitment functions of CCL5, and chemokine heteromerization has more recently emerged as an additional regulatory mechanism, as evidenced by a mutual modulation of CXCL8 and CXCL4 activities...... compromise systemic immune responses, delay macrophage-mediated viral clearance and impair normal T cell functions. Here we determined structural features of CCL5-CXCL4 heteromers and designed stable peptide inhibitors that specifically disrupt proinflammatory CCL5-CXCL4 interactions, thereby attenuating...

  5. Single cells from human primary colorectal tumors exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Tahirova, Narmin; Tallapragada, Naren; Yao, Xiaosai; Campion, Liam; Angelini, Alessandro; Douce, Thomas B; Huang, Cindy; Bowman, Brittany; Williamson, Christina A; Kwon, Douglas S; Wittrup, K Dane; Love, J Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is an inflammatory disease of tissue that is largely influenced by the interactions between multiple cell types, secreted factors, and signal transduction pathways. While single-cell sequencing continues to refine our understanding of the clonotypic heterogeneity within tumors, the complex interplay between genetic variations and non-genetic factors ultimately affects therapeutic outcome. Much has been learned through bulk studies of secreted factors in the tumor microenvironment, but the secretory behavior of single cells has been largely uncharacterized. Here we directly profiled the secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines from thousands of single colorectal tumor and stromal cells, using an array of subnanoliter wells and a technique called microengraving to characterize both the rates of secretion of several factors at once and the numbers of cells secreting each chemokine. The ELR+ CXC chemokines are highly redundant, pro-angiogenic cytokines that signal via the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors, influencing tumor growth and progression. We find that human primary colorectal tumor and stromal cells exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in the combinations and magnitudes of secretions for these chemokines. In cell lines, we observe similar variance: phenotypes observed in bulk can be largely absent among the majority of single cells, and discordances exist between secretory states measured and gene expression for these chemokines among single cells. Together, these measures suggest secretory states among tumor cells are complex and can evolve dynamically. Most importantly, this study reveals new insight into the intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity of human primary tumors.

  6. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  7. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Clark, David J; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-07-30

    Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4. U83A diverts human chemokines from signalling, but not

  8. MEMS for Tunable Photonic Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Thomas

    Photonic metamaterials are materials whose optical properties are derived from artificially-structured sub-wavelength unit cells, rather than from the bulk properties of the constituent materials. Examples of metamaterials include plasmonic materials, negative index materials, and electromagnetic cloaks. While advances in simulation tools and nanofabrication methods have allowed this field to grow over the past several decades, many challenges still exist. This thesis addresses two of these challenges: fabrication of photonic metamaterials with tunable responses and high-throughput nanofabrication methods for these materials. The design, fabrication, and optical characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) tunable plasmonic spectrometer are presented. An array of holes in a gold film, with plasmon resonance in the mid-infrared, is suspended above a gold reflector, forming a Fabry-Perot interferometer of tunable length. The spectra exhibit the convolution of extraordinary optical transmission through the holes and Fabry-Perot resonances. Using MEMS, the interferometer length is modulated from 1.7 mum to 21.67 mum , thereby tuning the free spectral range from about 2900 wavenumbers to 230.7 wavenumbers and shifting the reflection minima and maxima across the infrared. Due to its broad spectral tunability in the fingerprint region of the mid-infrared, this device shows promise as a tunable biological sensing device. To address the issue of high-throughput, high-resolution fabrication of optical metamaterials, atomic calligraphy, a MEMS-based dynamic stencil lithography technique for resist-free fabrication of photonic metamaterials on unconventional substrates, has been developed. The MEMS consists of a moveable stencil, which can be actuated with nanometer precision using electrostatic comb drive actuators. A fabrication method and flip chip method have been developed, enabling evaporation of metals through the device handle for fabrication on an

  9. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20, a potential biomarker for Graves' disease, is regulated by osteopontin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Li

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD is a common autoimmune disease involving the thyroid gland. The altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GD. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20 is important for interleukin-17 (IL-17 signal activation and a potent chemoattractant for Th17 cells. Meanwhile, Osteopontin (OPN, a broadly expressed pleiotropic cytokine, has been implicated in GD through inducing Th1-involved response to enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but little is known about the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 and IL-17 signaling. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to explore the possibility of CCL20 level as a biomarker for GD, as well as investigate the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 production. METHODS: Fifty untreated GD patients, fifteen euthyroid GD patients, twelve TRAb-negative GD patients and thirty-five healthy control donors were recruited. OPN, CCL20 and other clinical GD diagnosis parameters were measured. CD4+T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using antibody-coated magnetic beads. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to determine CCL20 expression level. RESULTS: We found that the plasma CCL20 level was enhanced in GD patients and decreased in euthyroid and TRAb-negative GD patients. In addition, CCL20 level correlated with GD clinical diagnostic parameters and plasma OPN level. Moreover, we demonstrated that recombinant OPN and plasma from untreated GD patients increased the expression of CCL20 in CD4+T cells, which could be blocked by OPN antibody. Furthermore, we found that the effect of OPN on CCL20 expression was mediated by β3 integrin receptor, IL-17, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrated that CCL20 might serve as a biomarker for GD and suggested the possible role of OPN in induction of CCL20 expression.

  10. Discretely tunable micromachined injection-locked lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, H; Yu, M B; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L; Zhang, X M; Liu, A Q; Liu, B

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a micromachined injection-locked laser (ILL) to provide tunable discrete wavelengths. It utilizes a non-continuously tunable laser as the master to lock a Fabry–Pérot semiconductor laser chip. Both lasers are integrated into a deep-etched silicon chip with dimensions of 3 mm × 3 mm × 0.8 mm. Based on the experimental results, significant improvements in the optical power and spectral purity have been achieved in the fully locked state, and optical hysteresis and bistability have also been observed in response to the changes of the output wavelength and optical power of the master laser. As a whole system, the micromachined ILL is able to provide single mode, discrete wavelength tuning, high power and direct modulation with small size and single-chip solution, making it promising for advanced optical communications such as wavelength division multiplexing optical access networks.

  11. Tunable driver for the LLNL FEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guss, W.C.; Basten, M.A.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    This report describes main activities undertaken during the period 1 June 1990 to 1 June 1991 by MIT to support the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory tunable FEL driver project. The goal of this research was to further characterize a tunable microwave source (already identified as a BWO-gyrotron) of moderate output power (10--20 kW). In the 1989 fiscal year, the source was assembled at MIT and initial tests were conducted. Proposed for the fiscal year 1990 were analysis of the previous experimental results, and the performance of new experiments designed to increase the voltage tuning range, the output efficiency, and magnetic field tuning. During the report period the previous experimental results were analyzed and compared to computational results and new components were designed, to make the BWO ready for further experiments. In addition, the BWO-gyrotron was mounted in a new superconducting magnet and initial magnetic field profile measurements were made

  12. Tunable Sparse Network Coding for Multicast Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feizi, Soheil; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Sørensen, Chres Wiant

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential and key enabling mechanisms for tunable sparse network coding, a scheme in which the density of network coded packets varies during a transmission session. At the beginning of a transmission session, sparsely coded packets are transmitted, which benefits decoding...... complexity. At the end of a transmission, when receivers have accumulated degrees of freedom, coding density is increased. We propose a family of tunable sparse network codes (TSNCs) for multicast erasure networks with a controllable trade-off between completion time performance to decoding complexity...... a mechanism to perform efficient Gaussian elimination over sparse matrices going beyond belief propagation but maintaining low decoding complexity. Supporting simulation results are provided showing the trade-off between decoding complexity and completion time....

  13. Tunability of optofluidic distributed feedback dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the tunability of optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) dye lasers. The lasers rely on light-confinement in a nano-structured polymer film where an array of nanofluidic channels constitutes a third order Bragg grating DFB laser resonator with a central phase-shift. The lasers...... are operated by filling the DFB laser resonator with a dye solution by capillary action and optical pumping with a frequency doubled Nd: YAG laser. The low reflection order of the DFB laser resonator yields low out-of-plane scattering losses as well as a large free spectral range (FSR), and low threshold...... fluences down to similar to 7 mu J/mm2 are observed. The large FSR facilitates wavelength tuning over the full gain spectrum of the chosen laser dye and we demonstrate 45 nm tunability using a single laser dye by changing the grating period and dye solution refractive index. The lasers are straight...

  14. Computer control of pulsed tunable dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thattey, S.S.; Dongare, A.S.; Suri, B.M.; Nair, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    Pulsed tunable dye lasers are being used extensively for spectroscopic and photo-chemical experiments, and a system for acquisition and spectral analysis of a volume of data generated will be quite useful. The development of a system for wavelength tuning and control of tunable dye lasers and an acquisition system for spectral data generated in experiments with these lasers are described. With this system, it is possible to control the tuning of three lasers, and acquire data in four channels, simultaneously. It is possible to arrive at the desired dye laser wavelength with a reproducibility of ± 0.012 cm -1 , which is within the absorption width (atomic interaction) caused by pulsed dye lasers of linewidth 0.08 cm -1 . The spectroscopic data generated can be analyzed for spectral identification within absolute accuracy ± 0.012 cm -1 . (author). 6 refs., 11 figs

  15. Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 in experimental oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna Moreira; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Fernandes de Oliveira, Ana Laura; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Russo, Remo Castro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2018-03-14

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are critical in oral tumourigenesis. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a scavenger of CC chemokines controlling the availability of these molecules at tumour sites, but the role of ACKR2 in the context of oral carcinogenesis is unexplored. In this study, wild-type (WT) and ACKR2 deficient mice (ACKR2 -/- ) were treated with chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) for induction of oral carcinogenesis. Tongues were collected for macro and microscopic analysis and to evaluate the expression of ACKRs, CC chemokines and its receptors, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. An increased expression of ACKR2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions of 4NQO-treated WT mice was observed. No significant differences were seen in the ACKR1, ACKR3 and ACKR4 mRNA expression comparing SCC lesions from WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. Significantly higher expression of CCL2, IL-6 and IL-17 was detected in ACKR2 -/- treated mice. In contrast, the expression of other CC-chemokines, and receptors, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components were similarly increased in SCC lesions of both groups. Clinical and histopathological analysis revealed no differences in inflammatory cell recruitment and in the SCC incidence comparing WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. The results suggest that ACKR2 expression regulates inflammation in tumour-microenvironment but the absence of ACKR2 does not impact chemically-induced oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Peptide fragments of chemokine domain of fractalkine: effect on human monocyte migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhtina, N B; Aref'eva, T I; Ruleva, N Iu; Sidorova, M V; Az'muko, A A; Bespalova, Zh D; Krasnikova, T L

    2012-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis to the area of tissue damage is mediated by chemokines. According to the primary structure, chemokines are divided into four families, fractalkine (CX3CL1) is the only one member of CX3C family and the only membrane-bound chemokine. Fractalkine molecule includes the extracellular N-terminal chemokine domain, mucin-like rod, the transmembrane and the intracellular domains. In membrane-bound state fractalkine has the properties of an adhesion molecule. Chemokine domain of fractalkine (CDF) is released from cell membrane by proteolysis, and this soluble form acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes expressing fractalkine receptor CX3CR1. Fractalkine is involved in development of a number of pathological processes caused by inflammation, and therefore a search for fractalkine inhibitors is very important. For this purpose we identified several antigenic determinants--the fragments of CDF, and the following peptides were synthesized--P41-52 H-Leu-Glu-Thr-Arg-Gln-His-Arg-Leu-Phe-Cys-Ala-Asp-NH2, P53-60 H-Pro-Lys-Glu-Gln-Trp-Val-Lys-Asp-NH2 and P60-71 H-Asp-Ala-Met-Gln-His-Leu-Asp-Arg-Gln-Ala-Ala-Ala-NH2. The peptide effects on adhesion and migration of human peripheral blood monocytes expressing fractalkine receptors were investigated. In the presence of CDF and P41-52 we observed the increased adhesion and migration of monocytes compared with spontaneous values. Peptides P53-60 and P60-71 significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion and migration stimulated by CDF. Since the chemotactic activity of chemokines was shown to be dependent on their binding to glycosaminoglycans of the cell surface and extracellular matrix, the effect ofpeptides on the interaction of CDF with heparin was analyzed by ELISA. Peptide P41-52 competed with CDF for heparin binding, while peptides P53-60 and P60-71 had no significant activity.

  17. Scleroderma dermal microvascular endothelial cells exhibit defective response to pro-angiogenic chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabquer, Bradley J.; Ohara, Ray A.; Stinson, William A.; Campbell, Phillip L.; Amin, M. Asif; Balogh, Beatrix; Zakhem, George; Renauer, Paul A.; Lozier, Ann; Arasu, Eshwar; Haines, G. Kenneth; Kahaleh, Bashar; Schiopu, Elena; Khanna, Dinesh; Koch, Alisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Angiogenesis plays a critical role in SSc (scleroderma). The aim of this study was to examine the expression of growth-regulated protein-γ (Gro-γ/CXCL3), granulocyte chemotactic protein 2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) and their receptor CXCR2 in endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from SSc skin and determine whether these cells mount an angiogenic response towards pro-angiogenic chemokines. The downstream signalling pathways as well as the pro-angiogenic transcription factor inhibitor of DNA-binding protein 1 (Id-1) were also examined. Methods. Skin biopsies were obtained from patients with dcSSc. ECs were isolated via magnetic positive selection. Angiogenesis was measured by EC chemotaxis assay. Results. Gro-γ/CXCL3 and GCP-2/CXCL6 were minimally expressed in both skin types but elevated in SSc serum. Pro-angiogenic chemokine mRNA was greater in SSc ECs than in normal ECs. SSc ECs did not migrate to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Gro-γ/CXCL3, GCP-2/CXCL6 or CXCL16. The signalling pathways stimulated by these chemokines were also dysregulated. Id-1 mRNA in SSc ECs was lower compared with normal ECs, and overexpression of Id-1 in SSc ECs increased their ability to migrate towards VEGF and CXCL16. Conclusion. Our results show that SSc ECs are unable to respond to pro-angiogenic chemokines despite their increased expression in serum and ECs. This might be due to the differences in the signalling pathways activated by these chemokines in normal vs SSc ECs. In addition, the lower expression of Id-1 also decreases the angiogenic response. The inability of pro-angiogenic chemokines to promote EC migration provides an additional mechanism for the impaired angiogenesis that characterizes SSc. PMID:26705326

  18. Repeated measurement of nasal lavage fluid chemokines in school-age children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Terry L; Tudor, Gail E; Ivins, Sally S; Murphy, Paula C; Peden, David B; Henderson, Frederick W

    2006-02-01

    Inflammatory processes at the mucosal surface may play a role in maintenance of asthma pathophysiology. Cross-sectional studies in asthmatic patients suggest that chemokines such as interleukin 8 (IL-8) are overproduced by respiratory epithelium. To test the hypothesis that chemokine levels are persistently elevated in the respiratory secretions of asthmatic children at a stable baseline. We measured nasal lavage fluid (NLF) levels of chemokines and other mediators at 3- to 4-month intervals in a longitudinal study of asthmatic children, with nonasthmatic siblings as controls. In a linear mixed-model analysis, both family and day of visit had significant effects on nasal mediators. Thus, data for 12 asthmatic-nonasthmatic sibling pairs who had 3 or more same-day visits were analyzed separately. For sibling pairs, median eosinophil cationic protein levels derived from serial measurements in NLF were elevated in asthmatic patients compared with nonasthmatic patients, with a near-significant tendency for elevation of total protein and eotaxin levels as well. However, no significant differences were found for IL-8 or several other chemokines. Ratios of IL-13 or IL-5 to interferon-gamma released by house dust mite antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, tested on a single occasion, were significantly increased for asthmatic patients. Substantial temporal and family-related variability exists in nasal inflammation in asthmatic children. Although higher levels of eosinophil cationic protein are usually present in NLF of patients with stable asthma compared with patients without asthma, chemokines other than eotaxin are not consistently increased. Eosinophil activation at the mucosal surface is a more consistent predictor of asthmatic symptoms than nonspecific elevation of epithelium-derived inflammatory chemokine levels.

  19. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  20. Consequences of ChemR23 heteromerization with the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric de Poorter

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that heteromerization of the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR4 is associated to negative binding cooperativity. In the present study, we build on these previous results, and investigate the consequences of chemokine receptor heteromerization with ChemR23, the receptor of chemerin, a leukocyte chemoattractant protein structurally unrelated to chemokines. We show, using BRET and HTRF assays, that ChemR23 forms homomers, and provide data suggesting that ChemR23 also forms heteromers with the chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4. As previously described for other chemokine receptor heteromers, negative binding cooperativity was detected between ChemR23 and chemokine receptors, i.e. the ligands of one receptor competed for the binding of a specific tracer of the other. We also showed, using mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells prepared from wild-type and ChemR23 knockout mice, that ChemR23-specific ligands cross-inhibited CXCL12 binding on CXCR4 in a ChemR23-dependent manner, supporting the relevance of the ChemR23/CXCR4 interaction in native leukocytes. Finally, and in contrast to the situation encountered for other previously characterized CXCR4 heteromers, we showed that the CXCR4-specific antagonist AMD3100 did not cross-inhibit chemerin binding in cells co-expressing ChemR23 and CXCR4, demonstrating that cross-regulation by AMD3100 depends on the nature of receptor partners with which CXCR4 is co-expressed.

  1. Consequences of ChemR23 heteromerization with the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Poorter, Cédric; Baertsoen, Kevin; Lannoy, Vincent; Parmentier, Marc; Springael, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that heteromerization of the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR4 is associated to negative binding cooperativity. In the present study, we build on these previous results, and investigate the consequences of chemokine receptor heteromerization with ChemR23, the receptor of chemerin, a leukocyte chemoattractant protein structurally unrelated to chemokines. We show, using BRET and HTRF assays, that ChemR23 forms homomers, and provide data suggesting that ChemR23 also forms heteromers with the chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4. As previously described for other chemokine receptor heteromers, negative binding cooperativity was detected between ChemR23 and chemokine receptors, i.e. the ligands of one receptor competed for the binding of a specific tracer of the other. We also showed, using mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells prepared from wild-type and ChemR23 knockout mice, that ChemR23-specific ligands cross-inhibited CXCL12 binding on CXCR4 in a ChemR23-dependent manner, supporting the relevance of the ChemR23/CXCR4 interaction in native leukocytes. Finally, and in contrast to the situation encountered for other previously characterized CXCR4 heteromers, we showed that the CXCR4-specific antagonist AMD3100 did not cross-inhibit chemerin binding in cells co-expressing ChemR23 and CXCR4, demonstrating that cross-regulation by AMD3100 depends on the nature of receptor partners with which CXCR4 is co-expressed.

  2. Construction of tunable peptide nucleic acid junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Tanghui; He, Liu; Tokura, Yu; Liu, Xin; Wu, Yuzhou; Shi, Zhengshuang

    2018-03-15

    We report here the construction of 3-way and 4-way peptide nucleic acid (PNA) junctions as basic structural units for PNA nanostructuring. The incorporation of amino acid residues into PNA chains makes PNA nanostructures with more structural complexity and architectural flexibility possible, as exemplified by building 3-way PNA junctions with tunable nanopores. Given that PNA nanostructures have good thermal and enzymatic stabilities, they are expected to have broad potential applications in biosensing, drug delivery and bioengineering.

  3. Quantitative nanometer-scale mapping of dielectric tunability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tselev, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klein, Andreas [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Gassmann, Juergen [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany); Jesse, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, Qian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wisinger, Nina Balke [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-21

    Two scanning probe microscopy techniques—near-field scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM)—are used to characterize and image tunability in a thin (Ba,Sr)TiO3 film with nanometer scale spatial resolution. While sMIM allows direct probing of tunability by measurement of the change in the dielectric constant, in PFM, tunability can be extracted via electrostrictive response. The near-field microwave imaging and PFM provide similar information about dielectric tunability with PFM capable to deliver quantitative information on tunability with a higher spatial resolution close to 15 nm. This is the first time that information about the dielectric tunability is available on such length scales.

  4. The essential role of chemokines in the selective regulation of lymphocyte homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, María Rosa; Elgueta, Raúl; Sauma, Daniela; Pino, Karina; Osorio, Fabiola; Michea, Paula; Fierro, Alberto; Rosemblatt, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of lymphocyte migration has become a major issue in our understanding of acquired immunity. The selective migration of naïve, effector, memory and regulatory T-cells is a multiple step process regulated by a specific arrangement of cytokines, chemokines and adhesion receptors that guide these cells to specific locations. Recent research has outlined two major pathways of lymphocyte trafficking under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions, one concerning tropism to cutaneous tissue and a second one related to mucosal-associated sites. In this article we will outline our present understanding of the role of cytokines and chemokines as regulators of lymphocyte migration through tissues.

  5. The chemokine receptor CCR5 Δ32 allele in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Søndergaard, Helle B; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The chemokine receptor CCR5 may be important for the recruitment of pathogenic T cells to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that this chemokine receptor might still be important for T-cell migration during treatment with anti-very late antigen (VLA)-4 antibody. We...... impact on the frequency of relapses 1 year prior to natalizumab treatment or during the first 48 weeks of treatment. The multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) was significantly lower at baseline in patients carrying CCR5 Δ32 (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: CCR5 Δ32 is not associated with lower disease...

  6. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  7. Tunable cytotoxicity of rhodamine 6G via anion variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magut, Paul K S; Das, Susmita; Fernand, Vivian E; Losso, Jack; McDonough, Karen; Naylor, Brittni M; Aggarwal, Sita; Warner, Isiah M

    2013-10-23

    Chemotherapeutic agents with low toxicity to normal tissues are a major goal in cancer research. In this regard, the therapeutic activities of cationic dyes, such as rhodamine 6G, toward cancer cells have been studied for decades with observed toxicities toward normal and cancer cells. Herein, we report rhodamine 6G-based organic salts with varying counteranions that are stable under physiological conditions, display excellent fluorescence photostability, and more importantly have tunable chemotherapeutic properties. Our in vitro studies indicate that the hydrophobic compounds of this series allow production of nanoparticles which are nontoxic to normal cells and toxic to cancer cells. Furthermore, the anions, in combination with cations such as sodium, were observed to be nontoxic to both normal and cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that both the cation and anion play an extremely important and cooperative role in the antitumor properties of these compounds.

  8. Nanoparticles with tunable shape and composition fabricated by nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alayo, Nerea; Bausells, Joan; Pérez-Murano, Francesc; Conde-Rubio, Ana; Labarta, Amilcar; Batlle, Xavier; Borrisé, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Cone-like and empty cup-shaped nanoparticles of noble metals have been demonstrated to provide extraordinary optical properties for use as optical nanoanntenas or nanoresonators. However, their large-scale production is difficult via standard nanofabrication methods. We present a fabrication approach to achieve arrays of nanoparticles with tunable shape and composition by a combination of nanoimprint lithography, hard-mask definition and various forms of metal deposition. In particular, we have obtained arrays of empty cup-shaped Au nanoparticles showing an optical response with distinguishable features associated with the excitations of localized surface plasmons. Finally, this route avoids the most common drawbacks found in the fabrication of nanoparticles by conventional top-down methods, such as aspect ratio limitation, blurring, and low throughput, and it can be used to fabricate nanoparticles with heterogeneous composition. (paper)

  9. Nanoparticles with tunable shape and composition fabricated by nanoimprint lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayo, Nerea; Conde-Rubio, Ana; Bausells, Joan; Borrisé, Xavier; Labarta, Amilcar; Batlle, Xavier; Pérez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-11-06

    Cone-like and empty cup-shaped nanoparticles of noble metals have been demonstrated to provide extraordinary optical properties for use as optical nanoanntenas or nanoresonators. However, their large-scale production is difficult via standard nanofabrication methods. We present a fabrication approach to achieve arrays of nanoparticles with tunable shape and composition by a combination of nanoimprint lithography, hard-mask definition and various forms of metal deposition. In particular, we have obtained arrays of empty cup-shaped Au nanoparticles showing an optical response with distinguishable features associated with the excitations of localized surface plasmons. Finally, this route avoids the most common drawbacks found in the fabrication of nanoparticles by conventional top-down methods, such as aspect ratio limitation, blurring, and low throughput, and it can be used to fabricate nanoparticles with heterogeneous composition.

  10. Liquid lens with double tunable surfaces for large power tunability and improved optical performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose a liquid lens with two tunable interfaces formed by two kinds of immiscible liquids. The proposed liquid lens uses liquid pressure to change the shape of the interfaces. It can provide a large tunable range of optical power and improved optical performance. By applying suitable liquids the gravity effect can also be negligible. To prove the principles, a liquid lens with 7 mm aperture was fabricated. The optical performance indicates that the proposed liquid lens can provide a large tunable range of both positive and negative powers even using liquids with small differences in refractive indices. The resolution is better than 50 lp mm −1 under white light environment. The spherical aberration and coma are also largely reduced. The proposed liquid lens can also provide the optical designer with the freedom to choose the combination of liquids to reduce or even correct aberrations

  11. A Continuously Tunable Erbium-Doped Fibre Laser Using Tunable Fibre Bragg Gratings and Optical Circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Liu; Feng-Ping, Yan; Jian, Li; Lin, Wang; Ti-Gang, Ning; Tao-Rong, Gong; Shui-Sheng, Jian

    2008-01-01

    A continuously tunable erbium-doped fibre laser (TEDFL) based on tunable fibre Bragger grating (TFBG) and a three-port optical circulator (OC) is proposed and demonstrated. The OC acts as a 100%-reflective mirror. A strain-induced uniform fibre Bragger grating (FBG) which functions as a partial-reflecting mirror is implemented in the linear cavity. By applying axial strain onto the TFBG, a continuously tunable lasing output can be realized. The wavelength tuning range covers approximately 7.00nm in C band (from 1543.6161 to 1550.3307nm). The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) is better than 50 dB, and the 3 dB bandwidth of the laser is less than 0.01 nm. Moreover, an array waveguide grating (AWG) is inserted into the cavity for wavelength preselecting, and a 50 km transmission experiment was performed using our TEDFL at a 10Gb/s modulation rate

  12. A Tuning Process in a Tunable Archtecture Computer System

    OpenAIRE

    深沢, 良彰; 岸野, 覚; 門倉, 敏夫

    1986-01-01

    A tuning process in a tunable archtecture computer is described. We have designed a computer system with tunable archtecture. Main components of this computer are four AM2903 bit-slice chips. The control schema of micro instructions is horizontal-type, and the length of each instruction is 104 bits. Our tunable algorithm utilizes an execution history of machine level instructions, because the execution history can be regarded as a property of the user program. In execution histories of simila...

  13. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Larsen, Carsten Schade

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...

  14. Evidence favoring the involvement of CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 in T-lymphocyte accumulation in optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Jensen, J

    2003-01-01

    To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON).......To define the relationships between levels of chemokine receptor (CCR)5+ T-cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of optic neuritis (ON) and control patients (CON)....

  15. The virus-encoded chemokine vMIP-II inhibits virus-induced Tc1-driven inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Nansen, Anneline; Bartholdy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The human herpesvirus 8-encoded protein vMIP-II is a potent in vitro antagonist of many chemokine receptors believed to be associated with attraction of T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile. For the present report we have studied the in vivo potential of this viral chemokine antagonist to inhib...

  16. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) encoded by human herpesvirus 8 is a highly constitutively active seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor stimulated by angiogenic chemokines, e.g. growth-related oncogene-alpha, and inhibited by angiostatic chemokines e.g. interferon-gamma-inducible protein. Transgenic mice...

  17. The chemokines CCL11, CCL20, CCL21, and CCL24 are preferentially expressed in polarized human secondary lymphoid follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Caroline; Gutersohn, Andreas; Hauser, Chantal; Kappeler, Andreas; Mueller, Christoph

    2004-10-01

    Chemokines regulate cellular trafficking to and from lymphoid follicles. Here, the distribution pattern of four CCL chemokines is defined by in situ hybridization in human lymphoid follicles from tonsils and lymph nodes (LNs) of newborns and adults. Cells expressing CCL11 (eotaxin) and CCL20 (Exodus) were preferentially located within follicles, while cells expressing CCL21 (secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine) and CCL24 (eotaxin-2) mRNA were almost exclusively found in the perifollicular areas. Hence, the two CCR3-binding chemokines, CCL11 and CCL24, showed a mutually exclusive expression pattern in the intra- and extra-follicular areas, respectively. Chemokine gene expression paralleled follicular maturation: in tonsils, where approximately 80% of follicles are polarized, CCL11 and CCL20 mRNA-positive cells were detected more frequently than in lymph nodes from adults, where about half of follicles are non-polarized. No intrafollicular chemokine expression was detectable in the primary follicles from newborns. Extrafollicular cells expressing CCL21 and CCL24 were again more frequent in tonsils than in LNs from adults. The observed preferential presence of cells expressing CC chemokines in polarized human lymphoid follicles indicates that chemokines are not only instrumental in the induction of follicle formation, but may also be involved in their further differentiation.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded G protein-coupled-receptor US28 is believed to participate in virus dissemination through modulation of cell migration and immune evasion. US28 binds different CC chemokines and the CX3C chemokine CX3CL1. Membrane-anchored CX3CL1 is expressed by immune-activat...

  19. Protection mediated by chemokine CXCL10 in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania infantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Webertty Mayk Eufrásio; Viana, Sayonara de Melo; Alves, Dorotheia Teixeira; Guerra, Priscila Valera; Coêlho, Zirlane Castelo Branco; Barbosa, Helene Santos; Teixeira, Maria Jania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum is characterised by the loss of the ability of the host to generate an effective immune response. Chemokines have a direct involvement in the pathogenesis of leishmaniasis, causing a rapid change in the expression of these molecules during infection by Leishmania. OBJECTIVES Herein, it was investigated the role of CXCL10 in controlling infection by L. infantum. METHODS RAW 264.7 macrophages were infected with L. infantum in vitro and treated or not with CXCL10 (25, 50 and 100 ng/mL). Parasite load, as well as nitric oxide (NO), IL-4 and IL-10 production were assessed at 24 and 48 h after infection. In vivo, BALB/c mice were infected and treated or not with CXCL10 (5 μg/kg) at one, three and seven days of infection. Parasite load, IFN-g, IL-4, TGF-β and IL-10 were evaluated one, seven and 23 days post treatment. FINDINGS In vitro, CXCL10 reduced parasitic load, not dependent on NO, and inhibited IL-10 and IL-4 secretion. In vivo, CXCL10 was able to reduce the parasite load in both liver and spleen, four weeks after infection, representing a higher decrease in the number of parasites in these organs, also induced IFN-γ at day 23 after treatment, correlating with the decrease in parasite load, and reduced IL-10 and TGF-β. MAIN CONCLUSIONS This study suggests a partial protective role of CXCL10 against L. infantum, mediated by IFN-g, not dependent on NO, and with suppression of IL-10 and TGF-β. These data may provide information for the development of new approaches for future therapeutic interventions for VL. PMID:28767981

  20. C-X-C Chemokine Receptor Type 4 Plays a Crucial Role in Mediating Oxidative Stress-Induced Podocyte Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Hongyan; Wu, Qinyu; Miao, Jinhua; Luo, Congwei; Hong, Xue; Wang, Yongping; Tang, Lan; Hou, Fan Fan; Liu, Youhua; Zhou, Lili

    2017-08-20

    Oxidative stress plays a role in mediating podocyte injury and proteinuria. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the potential role of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), the receptor for stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury. In mouse model of adriamycin nephropathy (ADR), CXCR4 expression was significantly induced in podocytes as early as 3 days. This was accompanied by an increased upregulation of oxidative stress in podocyte, as demonstrated by malondialdehyde assay, nitrotyrosine staining and secretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine, and induction of NOX2 and NOX4, major subunits of NADPH oxidase. CXCR4 was also induced in human kidney biopsies with proteinuric kidney diseases and colocalized with advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), an established oxidative stress trigger. Using cultured podocytes and mouse model, we found that AOPPs induced significant loss of podocyte marker Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), nephrin, and podocalyxin, accompanied by upregulation of desmin both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AOPPs worsened proteinuria and aggravated glomerulosclerosis in ADR. These effects were associated with marked activation of SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis in podocytes. Administration of AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, reduced proteinuria and ameliorated podocyte dysfunction and renal fibrosis triggered by AOPPs in mice. In glomerular miniorgan culture, AOPPs also induced CXCR4 expression and downregulated nephrin and WT1. Innovation and Conclusion: These results suggest that chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a crucial role in mediating oxidative stress-induced podocyte injury, proteinuria, and renal fibrosis. CXCR4 could be a new target for mitigating podocyte injury, proteinuria, and glomerular sclerosis in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 345-362.

  1. The Modulatory Properties of Chronic Antidepressant Drugs Treatment on the Brain ChemokineChemokine Receptor Network: A Molecular Study in an Animal Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Trojan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies indicate that the chemokine system may be the third major communication system of the brain. Therefore, the role of the chemokine system in the development of brain disorders, including depression, has been recently proposed. However, little is known about the impact of the administration of various antidepressant drugs on the brain chemokinechemokine receptor axis. In the present study, we used an animal model of depression based on the prenatal stress procedure. We determined whether chronic treatment with tianeptine, venlafaxine, or fluoxetine influenced the evoked by prenatal stress procedure changes in the mRNA and protein levels of the homeostatic chemokines, CXCL12 (SDF-1α, CX3CL1 (fractalkine and their receptors, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, the impact of mentioned antidepressants on the TGF-β, a molecular pathway related to fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1, was explored. We found that prenatal stress caused anxiety and depressive-like disturbances in adult offspring rats, which were normalized by chronic antidepressant treatment. Furthermore, we showed the stress-evoked CXCL12 upregulation while CXCR4 downregulation in hippocampus and frontal cortex. CXCR7 expression was enhanced in frontal cortex but not hippocampus. Furthermore, the levels of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 were diminished by prenatal stress in the both examined brain areas. The mentioned changes were normalized with various potency by chronic administration of tested antidepressants. All drugs in hippocampus, while tianeptine and venlafaxine in frontal cortex normalized the CXCL12 level in prenatally stressed offspring. Moreover, in hippocampus only fluoxetine enhanced CXCR4 level, while fluoxetine and tianeptine diminished CXCR7 level in frontal cortex. Additionally, the diminished by prenatal stress levels of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the both examined brain areas were normalized by chronic tianeptine and partially fluoxetine

  2. Th2-like chemokine levels are increased in allergic children and influenced by maternal immunity during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelius, Martina S; Lempinen, Esma; Lindblad, Karin; Ernerudh, Jan; Berg, Göran; Matthiesen, Leif; Nilsson, Lennart J; Jenmalm, Maria C

    2014-06-01

    The influence of the intra-uterine environment on the immunity and allergy development in the offspring is unclear. We aimed to investigate (i) whether the pregnancy magnifies the Th2 immunity in allergic and non-allergic women, (ii) whether the maternal chemokine levels during pregnancy influenced the offspring's chemokine levels during childhood and (iii) the relationship between circulating Th1/Th2-associated chemokines and allergy in mothers and children. The Th1-associated chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and the Th2-associated chemokines CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 were quantified by Luminex and ELISA in 20 women with and 36 women without allergic symptoms at gestational week (gw) 10-12, 15-16, 25, 35, 39 and 2 and 12 months post-partum and in their children at birth, 6, 12, 24 months and 6 years of age. Total IgE levels were measured using ImmunoCAP Technology. The levels of the Th2-like chemokines were not magnified by pregnancy. Instead decreased levels were shown during pregnancy (irrespectively of maternal allergy status) as compared to post-partum. In the whole group, the Th1-like chemokine levels were higher at gw 39 than during the first and second trimester and post-partum. Maternal CXCL11, CCL18 and CCL22 levels during and after pregnancy correlated with the corresponding chemokines in the offspring during childhood. Increased CCL22 and decreased CXCL10 levels in the children were associated with sensitisation and increased CCL17 levels with allergic symptoms during childhood. Maternal chemokine levels were not associated with maternal allergic disease. Allergic symptoms and sensitisation were associated with decreased Th1- and increased Th2-associated chemokine levels during childhood, indicating a Th2 shift in the allergic children, possibly influenced by the maternal immunity during pregnancy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Inflammatory role and prognostic value of platelet chemokines in acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchet, X.; Cesarek, K.; Brandt, J.; Herwald, H.; Teupser, D.; Küchenhoff, H.; Karshovska, E.; Mause, S. F.; Siess, W.; Wasmuth, H.; Soehnlein, O.; Koenen, R. R.; Weber, C.; von Hundelshausen, P.

    2014-01-01

    Activated platelets and neutrophils exacerbate atherosclerosis. Platelets release the chemokines CXCL4, CXCL4L1 and CCL5, whereas myeloperoxidase (MPO) and azurocidin are neutrophil-derived. We investigated whether plasma levels of these platelet and neutrophil mediators are affected by the acute

  4. Chemokines beyond chemo-attraction: CXCL10 and its significant role in cancer and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Nathan; Razon, Hila

    2018-09-01

    Chemokines are mostly known for their chemotactic properties, and less for their ability to direct the biological function of target cells, including T cells. The current review focuses on a key chemokine named CXCL10 and its role in directing the migratory propertied and biological function of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the context of cancer and inflammatory autoimmunity. CXCR3 is a chemokine receptor that is abundant on CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells. It has three known ligands: CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL11. Different studies, including those coming form our laboratory, indicated that aside of attracting CD8+ and CD4+ effector T cells to tumor sites and sites of inflammation CXCL10 directs the polarization and potentiates the biological function of these cells. This makes CXCL10 a "key driver chemokine" and a valid target for therapy of autoimmune diseases such as Inflammatory Bowl's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid arthritis and others. As for cancer this motivated different groups, including our group to develop CXCL10 based therapies for cancer due to its ability to enhance T-dependent anti cancer immunity. The current review summarizes these findings and their potential translational implication. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when

  6. Partial functional complementation between human and mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins US28 and UL33 are homologous to chemokine receptors (CKRs). Knockout of the mouse CMV M33 protein (UL33 homologue) results in substantial attenuation of salivary gland infection/replication and reduced efficiency of reactivation from tissue explants. M33-m...

  7. The cytomegalovirus-encoded chemokine receptor US28 promotes intestinal neoplasia in transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Gerold; Maussang, David; Muniz, Luciana R; Noriega, Vanessa M; Fraile-Ramos, Alberto; Barker, Nick; Marchesi, Federica; Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Vischer, Henry F; Qin, Lihui; Mayer, Lloyd; Harpaz, Noam; Leurs, Rob; Furtado, Glaucia C; Clevers, Hans; Tortorella, Domenico; Smit, Martine J; Lira, Sergio A

    2010-01-01

    US28 is a constitutively active chemokine receptor encoded by CMV (also referred to as human herpesvirus 5), a highly prevalent human virus that infects a broad spectrum of cells, including intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). To study the role of US28 in vivo, we created transgenic mice (VS28 mice)

  8. A study of serum levels of B cell-attracting chemokine-13 (CXCL 13 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of serum levels of B cell-attracting chemokine-13 (CXCL 13) and rheumatologic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in a cohort of Egyptian ... manifestations have been associated with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection including; arthralgia, myalgia, fatigue, fibromyalgia, vasculitis, and sicca syndrome.

  9. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Molecular requirements for inhibition of the chemokine receptor CCR8--probe-dependent allosteric interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rummel, Pia Cwarzko; Arfelt, K N; Baumann, L

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a novel series of CCR8 antagonists based on a naphthalene-sulfonamide structure. This structure differs from the predominant pharmacophore for most small-molecule CC-chemokine receptor antagonists, which in fact activate CCR8, suggesting that CCR8 inhibition requires alternative...

  11. Secretion of antiretroviral chemokines by human cells cultured with acyclic nucleoside phosphonates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídek, Zdeněk; Kmoníčková, Eva; Holý, Antonín

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 574, - (2007), s. 77-84 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Acyclic nucleoside phosphonate * Chemokine * Cytokine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.376, year: 2007

  12. Identification of a cobia (Rachycentron canadum) CC chemokine gene and its involvement in the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Jiang, Jingzhe; Wang, Jiangyong; Feng, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The chemokines regulate immune cell migration under inflammatory and physiological conditions. We investigated a CC chemokine gene (RcCC1) from cobia (Rachycentron canadum). The full-length RcCC1 cDNA is comprised 673 nucleotides and encodes a four-cysteine arrangement 99-amino-acid protein typical of known CC chemokines. The genomic DNA of RcCC1 consists of three exons and two introns. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RcCC1 was closest to the MIP group of CC chemokines. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed RcCC1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues examined, with relative strong expression in gill, blood, kidney, spleen, and head kidney. The RcCC1 transcripts in the head kidney, spleen, and liver were quickly up-regulated after stimulation with formalin-inactivated Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C). These results indicate RcCC1 not only plays a role in homeostasis, but also may be involved in inflammatory responses to bacterial and viral infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Renal Protection by Genetic Deletion of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor ACKR2 in Diabetic OVE Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In diabetic nephropathy (DN proinflammatory chemokines and leukocyte infiltration correlate with tubulointerstitial injury and declining renal function. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a chemokine scavenger receptor which binds and sequesters many inflammatory CC chemokines but does not transduce typical G-protein mediated signaling events. ACKR2 is known to regulate diverse inflammatory diseases but its role in DN has not been tested. In this study, we utilized ACKR2−/− mice to test whether ACKR2 elimination alters progression of diabetic kidney disease. Elimination of ACKR2 greatly reduced DN in OVE26 mice, an established DN model. Albuminuria was significantly lower at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. ACKR2 deletion did not affect diabetic blood glucose levels but significantly decreased parameters of renal inflammation including leukocyte infiltration and fibrosis. Activation of pathways that increase inflammatory gene expression was attenuated. Human biopsies stained with ACKR2 antibody revealed increased staining in diabetic kidney, especially in some tubule and interstitial cells. The results demonstrate a significant interaction between diabetes and ACKR2 protein in the kidney. Unexpectedly, ACKR2 deletion reduced renal inflammation in diabetes and the ultimate response was a high degree of protection from diabetic nephropathy.

  14. Dynamic T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression induced by interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Sorensen, P S; Khademi, M

    2006-01-01

    chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 was unaltered. Conversely, at 9-12 h after the most recent IFN-beta injection, CCR4, CCR5 and CCR7 expressions were unaltered, while CXCR3 expression was reduced. CD4(+) T-cell surface expression of CCR4 was significantly lower in untreated MS patients compared with healthy...

  15. Chemokines cooperate with TNF to provide protective anti-viral immunity and to enhance inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Alí; Ruiz-Argüello, M Begoña; Pontejo, Sergio M; Fernández de Marco, María Del Mar; Saraiva, Margarida; Hernáez, Bruno; Alcamí, Antonio

    2018-05-03

    The role of cytokines and chemokines in anti-viral defense has been demonstrated, but their relative contribution to protective anti-viral responses in vivo is not fully understood. Cytokine response modifier D (CrmD) is a secreted receptor for TNF and lymphotoxin containing the smallpox virus-encoded chemokine receptor (SECRET) domain and is expressed by ectromelia virus, the causative agent of the smallpox-like disease mousepox. Here we show that CrmD is an essential virulence factor that controls natural killer cell activation and allows progression of fatal mousepox, and demonstrate that both SECRET and TNF binding domains are required for full CrmD activity. Vaccination with recombinant CrmD protects animals from lethal mousepox. These results indicate that a specific set of chemokines enhance the inflammatory and protective anti-viral responses mediated by TNF and lymphotoxin, and illustrate how viruses optimize anti-TNF strategies with the addition of a chemokine binding domain as soluble decoy receptors.

  16. Design, synthesis, and functionalization of dimeric peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmer, O.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Schumacher, U.; Marinelli, L.; Cosconati, S.; Gourni, E.; Wester, H.J.; Kessler, H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a critical regulator of inflammation and immune surveillance, and it is specifically implicated in cancer metastasis and HIV-1 infection. On the basis of the observation that several of the known antagonists remarkably share a C(2) symmetry element, we constructed

  17. CXC and CC chemokines induced in human renal epithelial cells by inflammatory cytokines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thornburn, E.; Kolesar, L.; Brabcová, E.; Petříčková, Kateřina; Petříček, Miroslav; Jarešová, M.; Slavcev, A.; Stříž, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 7 (2009), s. 477-487 ISSN 0903-4641 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Epithelial cells * chemokines * transplantation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.745, year: 2009

  18. Targeting cytokine/chemokine receptors: a challenge for molecular nuclear medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, A.; Chianelli, M.; Bei, R.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Modesti, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and chemokines are a group of radiopharmaceuticals that, by highlighting in vivo the binding to specific high-affinity receptors expressed on selected cell populations, allow the molecular and functional characterisation of immune-mediated processes Recently, several authors

  19. Migration and chemokine receptor pattern of colitis-preventing DX5+NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Matthias; Werner, Jens M; Farkas, Stefan; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K

    2011-11-01

    DX5(+)NKT cells are a subpopulation of NKT cells expressing both T cell receptor and NK cell markers that show an immune-regulating function. Transferred DX5(+)NKT cells from immune competent Balb/c mice can prevent or reduce induced colitis in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Here, we investigated the in vivo migration of DX5(+)NKT cells and their corresponding chemokine receptor patterns. DX5(+)NKT cells were isolated from spleens of Balb/c mice and transferred into Balb/c SCID mice. After 2 and 8 days, in vivo migration was examined using in vivo microscopy. In addition, the chemokine receptor pattern was analyzed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and the migration assay was performed. Our results show that labeled DX5(+)NKT cells were primarily detectable in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen after transfer. After 8 days, DX5(+)NKT cells were observed in the colonic tissues, especially the appendix. FACS analysis of chemokine receptors in DX5(+)NKT cells revealed expression of CCR3, CCR6, CCR9, CXCR3, CXCR4, and CXCR6, but no CCR5, CXCR5, or the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7. Stimulation upregulated especially CCR7 expression, and chemokine receptor patterns were different between splenic and liver DX5(+)NKT cells. These data indicate that colitis-preventing DX5(+)NKT cells need to traffic through lymphoid organs to execute their immunological function at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, DX5(+)NKT cells express a specific chemokine receptor pattern with an upregulation of the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7 after activation.

  20. The urinary cytokine/chemokine signature of renal hyperfiltration in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron L H Har

    Full Text Available Urinary cytokine/chemokine levels are elevated in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D exhibiting renal hyperfiltration. Whether this observation extends to adolescents with T1D remains unknown. Our first objective was to determine the relationship between hyperfiltration and urinary cytokines/chemokines in normotensive, normoalbuminuric adolescents with T1D using GFR(cystatin. Our second aim was to determine the relationship between urine and plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers, to clarify the origin of these factors.Urine and serum cytokines/chemokines (Luminex platform and GFR(cystatin were measured in normofiltering (n = 111, T1D-N, GFR<135 ml/min/1.73 m(2 and hyperfiltering (n = 31, T1D-H, GFR ≥ 135 ml/min/1.73 m(2 adolescents with T1D (ages 10-16, and in age and sex matched healthy control subjects (HC, n = 59.We noted significant step-wise increases in urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion according to filtration status with highest levels in T1D-H, with parallel trends in serum analyte concentrations. After adjusting for serum glucose at the time of sampling, differences in urinary cytokine excretion were not statistically significant. Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076.Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration. The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia. The relationship between hyperfiltration, glycemia, and variations in serum and urine cytokine expression and their impact on future renal and systemic vascular complications requires further study.

  1. LEVELS OF ANGIOGENESIS-REGULATORY CHEMOKINES IN THE SYNOVIAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zhebrun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of chemokines in the immunopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has been actively investigated in recent years. Angiogenic and angiostatic chemokines are important mediators of angiogenesis in the development and extent of pannus. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid (SF is a major biomaterial in clinical and immunological studies. At the same time, it is the SF test that may yield the most informative results since that gives an idea of the processes that occur locally within a joint. Objective: to perform a comparative analysis of the levels of a number of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in the SF of patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA, and joint injuries. Subjects and methods. The multiplex analysis using xMAP technology (Luminex, USA was used to analyze levels of CXC, CC, and CX3C chemokines in SF and serum of patients with RA (n = 20, OA (n = 9 and controls (n = 9. Results and discussion. The SF levels of CCL24/eotaxin-2, as well as those of the angiostatic chemokines CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP10, CXCL11/ITAC, and CXCL13/BCA-1 were higher in the RA group than in the control and OA groups. There was a direct correlation between SF levels of CCL5/RANTES and DAS28, as well as patient global disease activity assessment on visual analogue scale, and that between the level of CCL2/MCP-1 in the SF and that of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies in the serum. The SF concentrations of CXCL5/ENA78 and CXCL7/NAP-2 were shown to depend on the presence of serum anti-CCP. Serum CXCL13/BCA-1 levels were higher in RA than those in OA, as that of CXCL7/NAP-2 than in the control group.

  2. Urine chemokines indicate pathogenic association of obesity with BPH/LUTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Motley, Saundra S; Kashyap, Mahendra; Pore, Subrata; Gingrich, Jeffrey; Wang, Zhou; Yoshimura, Naoki; Fowke, Jay H

    2015-07-01

    High prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) consistent with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation. Here, we investigated whether chemokines associated with obesity and prostatic inflammation can be measured in normally voided urine of BPH/LUTS patients to demonstrate the mechanistic association between obesity and BPH/LUTS. Frozen urine specimens of BPH/LUTS patients enrolled in the Nashville Men's Health Study were sent for blinded analysis to University of Pittsburgh. Thirty patients were blocked by their AUA-SI (>7 or ≤7) and prostatic enlargement (60 cc). Clinical parameters including age, prostate size, and medications were derived from chart review. CXC chemokines (CXCL-1, CXCL-8, and CXCL-10), CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL3), and sIL-1ra were measured in thawed urine using Luminex™ xMAP(®) technology and ELISA for NGF. Urinary CCL2 levels were several fold higher compared with the other six proteins, of which CCL3 was detectable in less than one-fourth of patients. Urine levels of sIL-1ra and CXCL-8 were significantly associated with increasing BMI and waist circumference in BPH patients. CXCL-8 showed a marginal association with overall AUA-SI scores, as well as obstructive (p = 0.08) symptom subscores. Prostate volume was inversely and marginally associated with urinary CXCL-10 (p = 0.09). Urine levels of CXCL-8, CXCL-10, and sIL-1ra were associated with varying degrees with LUTS severity, prostate size, and obesity, respectively. These findings in urine are consistent with past studies of chemokine levels from expressed prostatic secretions and demonstrate the potential of noninvasively measured chemokine in urine to objectively classify BPH/LUTS patients.

  3. Systematic review of the neurobiological relevance of chemokines to psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eStuart

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent and disabling conditions of increasing public health relevance. Much recent research has focused on the role of cytokines in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders; however the related family of immune proteins designated chemokines has been relatively neglected. Chemokines were originally identified as having chemotactic function on immune cells, however recent evidence has begun to elucidate novel, brain-specific functions of these proteins of relevance to the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. A systematic review of both human and animal literature in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases was undertaken. After application of all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 157 references were remained for the review. Some early mechanistic evidence does associate select chemokines with the neurobiological processes, including neurogenesis, modulation of the neuroinflammatory response, regulation of the HPA axis, and modulation of neurotransmitter systems. This early evidence however does not clearly demonstrate any specificity for a certain psychiatric disorder, but is primarily relevant to mechanisms which are shared across disorders. Notable exceptions include CCL11 which has recently been shown to impair hippocampal function in aging - of distinct relevance to Alzheimer’s disease and depression in the elderly, and prenatal exposure to CXCL8 that may disrupt early neurodevelopmental periods predisposing to schizophrenia. Pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL7, CCL8, CCL12, CCL13, have been shown to drive chemotaxis of pro-inflammatory cells to the inflamed or injured CNS. Likewise, CX3CL has been implicated in promoting glial cells activation, proinflammatory cytokines secretion, expression of ICAM-1 and recruitment of CD4+ T-cells into the CNS during neuroinflammatory processes. With further translational research, chemokines may present novel diagnostic and/or therapeutic targets in

  4. Systematic Review of the Neurobiological Relevance of Chemokines to Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Michael J; Singhal, Gaurav; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent and disabling conditions of increasing public health relevance. Much recent research has focused on the role of cytokines in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders; however, the related family of immune proteins designated chemokines has been relatively neglected. Chemokines were originally identified as having chemotactic function on immune cells; however, recent evidence has begun to elucidate novel, brain-specific functions of these proteins of relevance to the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. A systematic review of both human and animal literature in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases was undertaken. After application of all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 157 references were remained for the review. Some early mechanistic evidence does associate select chemokines with the neurobiological processes, including neurogenesis, modulation of the neuroinflammatory response, regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, and modulation of neurotransmitter systems. This early evidence however does not clearly demonstrate any specificity for a certain psychiatric disorder, but is primarily relevant to mechanisms which are shared across disorders. Notable exceptions include CCL11 that has recently been shown to impair hippocampal function in aging - of distinct relevance to Alzheimer's disease and depression in the elderly, and pre-natal exposure to CXCL8 that may disrupt early neurodevelopmental periods predisposing to schizophrenia. Pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL7, CCL8, CCL12, and CCL13, have been shown to drive chemotaxis of pro-inflammatory cells to the inflamed or injured CNS. Likewise, CX3CL has been implicated in promoting glial cells activation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion, expression of ICAM-1, and recruitment of CD4+ T-cells into the CNS during neuroinflammatory processes. With further translational research, chemokines may present novel diagnostic and

  5. Development of frequency tunable gyrotrons for plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idehara, T.; Mitsudo, S.; Sabchevski, S.; Glyavin, M.; Ogawa, I.; Sato, M.; Kawahata, K.; Brand, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Development of two types of frequency tunable gyrotrons are described. One is frequency step-tunable gyrotrons (Gyrotron FU Series) which cover wide range from millimeter to submillimeter wavelength region. The other is a quasi-optical gyrotron operating in 90 and 180 GHz bands. Both are applicable for plasma diagnostics as power sources. (author)

  6. A low-loss, continuously tunable microwave notch filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acar, Öncel; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    The development in high-end microwave transceiver systems toward the software defined radio has brought about the need for tunable frontend filters. Although the problem is being tackled by the microwave community, there still appears to be an unmet demand for practical tunable filter technologies...

  7. Water: Promising Opportunities For Tunable All-dielectric Electromagnetic Metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Kuznetsova, Svetlana M.; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We reveal an outstanding potential of water as an inexpensive, abundant and bio-friendly high-refractive-index material for creating tunable all-dielectric photonic structures and metamaterials. Specifically, we demonstrate thermal, mechanical and gravitational tunability of magnetic and electric...

  8. Tunable dye laser research at U. N. E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haydon, S C

    1976-10-01

    Attempts to extend present tunable radiation sources into the wavelength region from 140 to 330 nm are presented in the following areas: frequency doubling and parametric upconversion methods, frequency mixing techniques in metal vapors, the pulsed N/sub 2/ laser, tunable dye lasers for the near uv to ir spectral range, heat pipe ovens, and preliminary experiments. (MHR)

  9. Tunable superconducting qudit mediated by microwave photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un Cho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the time-domain characteristics of the Autler-Townes doublet in a superconducting circuit. The transition probabilities between the ground state and the Autler-Townes doublet states are shown to be controlled in a phase-coherent manner using a well-known microwave pulse pattern technique. The experimental results are well explained by a numerical simulation based on the Markovian master equation. Our result indicates that the Autler-Townes doublet states might be useful as a tunable qudit for implementation of quantum information processing, in particular as a multivalued quantum logic element.

  10. Tunable Diode Laser Heterodyne Spectrophotometry of Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogal, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Tunable diode laser heterodyne spectrophotometry (TDLHS) has been used to make extremely high resolution (less than 0.0005/ cm) solar spectra in the 9.6 micron ozone band. Observations have shown that a signal-to-noise ratio of 95 : 1 (35% of theoretical) for an integration time of 1/8 second can be achieved at a resolution of 0.0005 wavenumbers. The spectral data have been inverted to yield a total column amount of ozone, in good agreement with that. measured at the nearby National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ozone monitoring facility in Boulder, Colorado.

  11. Tunable Design for LTE Mobile-Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Bahramzy, Pevand; Svendsen, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Antenna volume has become a critical parameter in mobile phone antenna design, as broader bandwidths are required for high connectivity between users. Shrinking the antenna size affects its efficiency, if one does not sacrifice bandwidth. This paper proposes an architecture to address the need...... for small and wide-band antennas. The study focuses on the low-frequencies (700 MHz - 960 MHz) in order to address a tough scenario for small platforms. A tunable design of the front-end and the antennas of the mobile phone is proposed and investigated. Operation is achieved on all low...

  12. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  13. Magnetocapacitance of an electrically tunable silicene device

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2012-09-26

    Despite their structural similarity, the electronic properties of silicene are fundamentally different from those of well-known graphene due to the strong intrinsic spin orbit interaction and buckled structure of silicene. We address the magnetocapacitance of spin and valley polarized silicene in an external perpendicular magnetic field to clarify the interplay of the spin orbit interaction and the perpendicular electric field. We find that the band gap is electrically tunable and show that the magnetocapacitance exhibits beating at low and splitting of the Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at high magnetic field.

  14. Tunable optical absorption in silicene molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-07-13

    Two-dimensional materials with a tunable band gap that covers a wide range of the solar spectrum hold great promise for sunlight harvesting. For this reason, we investigate the structural, electronic, and optical properties of silicene molecules using time dependent density functional theory. We address the influence of the molecular size, buckling, and charge state as well as that of a dielectric environment. Unlike planar graphene molecules, silicene molecules prefer to form low-buckled structures with strong visible to ultraviolet optical response. We also identify molecular plasmons.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for tunable microwave metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Noginova, Natalia; Williams, Quincy Leon; Dallas, Panagiotis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2012-01-01

    Commonly, metamaterials are electrically engineered systems with optimized spatial arrangement of subwavelength sized metal and dielectric components. We explore alternative methods based on use of magnetic inclusions, such as magnetic nanoparticles, which can allow permeability of a composite to be tuned from negative to positive at the range of magnetic resonance. To better understand effects of particle size and magnetization dynamics, we performed electron magnetic resonance study on several varieties of magnetic nanoparticles and determined potential of nanoparticle use as building blocks for tunable microwave metamaterials. © (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  16. Gyroid Nanoporous Membranes with Tunable Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Li; Schulte, Lars; Clausen, Lydia D.

    2011-01-01

    -linked 1,2-polybutadiene (1,2-PB) membranes with uniform pores that, if needed, can be rendered hydrophilic. The gyroid porosity has the advantage of isotropic percolation with no need for structure prealignment. Closed (skin) or opened (nonskin) outer surface can be simply realized by altering...... the effective diffusion coefficients of a series of antibiotics, proteins, and other biomolecules; solute permeation is discussed in terms of hindered diffusion. The combination of uniform bulk morphology, isotropically percolating porosity, controlled surface chemistry, and tunable permeability is distinctive...

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles for tunable microwave metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Noginova, Natalia

    2012-09-24

    Commonly, metamaterials are electrically engineered systems with optimized spatial arrangement of subwavelength sized metal and dielectric components. We explore alternative methods based on use of magnetic inclusions, such as magnetic nanoparticles, which can allow permeability of a composite to be tuned from negative to positive at the range of magnetic resonance. To better understand effects of particle size and magnetization dynamics, we performed electron magnetic resonance study on several varieties of magnetic nanoparticles and determined potential of nanoparticle use as building blocks for tunable microwave metamaterials. © (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  18. Magnetocapacitance of an electrically tunable silicene device

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Despite their structural similarity, the electronic properties of silicene are fundamentally different from those of well-known graphene due to the strong intrinsic spin orbit interaction and buckled structure of silicene. We address the magnetocapacitance of spin and valley polarized silicene in an external perpendicular magnetic field to clarify the interplay of the spin orbit interaction and the perpendicular electric field. We find that the band gap is electrically tunable and show that the magnetocapacitance exhibits beating at low and splitting of the Shubnikov de Haas oscillations at high magnetic field.

  19. On-line monitoring of methanol and methyl formate in the exhaust gas of an industrial formaldehyde production plant by a mid-IR gas sensor based on tunable Fabry-Pérot filter technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genner, Andreas; Gasser, Christoph; Moser, Harald; Ofner, Johannes; Schreiber, Josef; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    On-line monitoring of key chemicals in an industrial production plant ensures economic operation, guarantees the desired product quality, and provides additional in-depth information on the involved chemical processes. For that purpose, rapid, rugged, and flexible measurement systems at reasonable cost are required. Here, we present the application of a flexible mid-IR filtometer for industrial gas sensing. The developed prototype consists of a modulated thermal infrared source, a temperature-controlled gas cell for absorption measurement and an integrated device consisting of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer and a pyroelectric mid-IR detector. The prototype was calibrated in the research laboratory at TU Wien for measuring methanol and methyl formate in the concentration ranges from 660 to 4390 and 747 to 4610 ppmV. Subsequently, the prototype was transferred and installed at the project partner Metadynea Austria GmbH and linked to their Process Control System via a dedicated micro-controller and used for on-line monitoring of the process off-gas. Up to five process streams were sequentially monitored in a fully automated manner. The obtained readings for methanol and methyl formate concentrations provided useful information on the efficiency and correct functioning of the process plant. Of special interest for industry is the now added capability to monitor the start-up phase and process irregularities with high time resolution (5 s).

  20. Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Autoimmune Addison's Disease Poorly Respond to Interferons In Vitro, Despite Elevated Serum Levels of Interferon-Inducible Chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Kine; Bjånesøy, Trine; Hellesen, Alexander; Breivik, Lars; Bakke, Marit; Husebye, Eystein S; Bratland, Eirik

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a disorder caused by an immunological attack on the adrenal cortex. The interferon (IFN)-inducible chemokine CXCL10 is elevated in serum of AAD patients, suggesting a peripheral IFN signature. However, CXCL10 can also be induced in adrenocortical cells stimulated with IFNs, cytokines, or microbial components. We therefore investigated whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AAD patients display an enhanced propensity to produce CXCL10 and the related chemokine CXCL9, after stimulation with type I or II IFNs or the IFN inducer poly (I:C). Although serum levels of CXCL10 and CXCL9 were significantly elevated in patients compared with controls, IFN stimulated patient PBMC produced significantly less CXCL10/CXCL9 than control PBMC. Low CXCL10 production was not significantly associated with medication, disease duration, or comorbidities, but the low production of poly (I:C)-induced CXCL10 among patients was associated with an AAD risk allele in the phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene. PBMC levels of total STAT1 and -2, and IFN-induced phosphorylated STAT1 and -2, were not significantly different between patients and controls. We conclude that PBMC from patients with AAD are deficient in their response to IFNs, and that the adrenal cortex itself may be responsible for the increased serum levels of CXCL10.

  1. Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Autoimmune Addison's Disease Poorly Respond to Interferons In Vitro, Despite Elevated Serum Levels of Interferon-Inducible Chemokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjånesøy, Trine; Hellesen, Alexander; Breivik, Lars; Bakke, Marit; Husebye, Eystein S.; Bratland, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a disorder caused by an immunological attack on the adrenal cortex. The interferon (IFN)-inducible chemokine CXCL10 is elevated in serum of AAD patients, suggesting a peripheral IFN signature. However, CXCL10 can also be induced in adrenocortical cells stimulated with IFNs, cytokines, or microbial components. We therefore investigated whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AAD patients display an enhanced propensity to produce CXCL10 and the related chemokine CXCL9, after stimulation with type I or II IFNs or the IFN inducer poly (I:C). Although serum levels of CXCL10 and CXCL9 were significantly elevated in patients compared with controls, IFN stimulated patient PBMC produced significantly less CXCL10/CXCL9 than control PBMC. Low CXCL10 production was not significantly associated with medication, disease duration, or comorbidities, but the low production of poly (I:C)-induced CXCL10 among patients was associated with an AAD risk allele in the phosphatase nonreceptor type 22 (PTPN22) gene. PBMC levels of total STAT1 and -2, and IFN-induced phosphorylated STAT1 and -2, were not significantly different between patients and controls. We conclude that PBMC from patients with AAD are deficient in their response to IFNs, and that the adrenal cortex itself may be responsible for the increased serum levels of CXCL10. PMID:25978633

  2. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Wei [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yu, Zhengyue [School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Xiaole [School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lai, Yun [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Yellen, Benjamin B., E-mail: yellen@duke.edu [University of Michigan–Shanghai Jiao Tong University Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, P.O. Box 90300, Hudson Hall, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-02-07

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ∼30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  3. Highly Tunable Electrothermally Actuated Arch Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-12-05

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically a wide-range tunability of electrothermally actuated MEMS arch beams. The beams are made of silicon and are intentionally fabricated with some curvature as in-plane shallow arches. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared to the experimental data and results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. The electrothermal voltage is applied between the anchors of the clamped-clamped MEMS arch beam, generating a current that passes through the MEMS arch beam and controls its axial stress caused by thermal expansion. When the electrothermal voltage increases, the compressive stress increases inside the arch beam. This leads to increase in its curvature, thereby increases the resonance frequencies of the structure. We show here that the first resonance frequency can increase up to twice its initial value. We show also that after some electro-thermal voltage load, the third resonance frequency starts to become more sensitive to the axial thermal stress, while the first resonance frequency becomes less sensitive. These results can be used as guidelines to utilize arches as wide-range tunable resonators.

  4. Highly Tunable Electrothermally and Electrostatically Actuated Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjaj, Amal Z.

    2016-03-30

    This paper demonstrates experimentally, theoretically, and numerically for the first time, a wide-range tunability of an in-plane clamped-clamped microbeam, bridge, and resonator actuated electrothermally and electrostatically. Using both actuation methods, we demonstrate that a single resonator can be operated at a wide range of frequencies. The microbeam is actuated electrothermally by passing a dc current through it, and electrostatically by applying a dc polarization voltage between the microbeam and the stationary electrode. We show that when increasing the electrothermal voltage, the compressive stress inside the microbeam increases, which leads eventually to its buckling. Before buckling, the fundamental frequency decreases until it drops to very low values, almost to zero. After buckling, the fundamental frequency increases, which is shown to be as high as twice the original resonance frequency. Adding a dc bias changes the qualitative nature of the tunability both before and after buckling, which adds another independent way of tuning. This reduces the dip before buckling, and can eliminate it if desired, and further increases the fundamental frequency after buckling. Analytical results based on the Galerkin discretization of the Euler Bernoulli beam theory are generated and compared with the experimental data and simulation results of a multi-physics finite-element model. A good agreement is found among all the results. [2015-0341

  5. Tunable Mechanical Metamaterials through Hybrid Kirigami Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Doh-Gyu; Bartlett, Michael D

    2018-02-21

    Inspired by the art of paper cutting, kirigami provides intriguing tools to create materials with unconventional mechanical and morphological responses. This behavior is appealing in multiple applications such as stretchable electronics and soft robotics and presents a tractable platform to study structure-property relationships in material systems. However, mechanical response is typically controlled through a single or fractal cut type patterned across an entire kirigami sheet, limiting deformation modes and tunability. Here we show how hybrid patterns of major and minor cuts creates new opportunities to introduce boundary conditions and non-prismatic beams to enable highly tunable mechanical responses. This hybrid approach reduces stiffness by a factor of ~30 while increasing ultimate strain by a factor of 2 (up to 750% strain) relative to single incision patterns. We present analytical models and generate general design criteria that is in excellent agreement with experimental data from nanoscopic to macroscopic systems. These hybrid kirigami materials create new opportunities for multifunctional materials and structures, which we demonstrate with stretchable kirigami conductors with nearly constant electrical resistance up to >400% strain and magnetoactive actuators with extremely rapid response (>10,000% strain s -1 ) and high, repeatable elongation (>300% strain).

  6. Elastic metamaterial beam with remotely tunable stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wei; Yu, Zhengyue; Wang, Xiaole; Lai, Yun; Yellen, Benjamin B.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a dynamically tunable elastic metamaterial, which employs remote magnetic force to adjust its vibration absorption properties. The 1D metamaterial is constructed from a flat aluminum beam milled with a linear array of cylindrical holes. The beam is backed by a thin elastic membrane, on which thin disk-shaped permanent magnets are mounted. When excited by a shaker, the beam motion is tracked by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer, which conducts point by point scanning of the vibrating element. Elastic waves are unable to propagate through the beam when the driving frequency excites the first elastic bending mode in the unit cell. At these frequencies, the effective mass density of the unit cell becomes negative, which induces an exponentially decaying evanescent wave. Due to the non-linear elastic properties of the membrane, the effective stiffness of the unit cell can be tuned with an external magnetic force from nearby solenoids. Measurements of the linear and cubic static stiffness terms of the membrane are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements of the bandgap shift as a function of the applied force. In this implementation, bandgap shifts by as much as 40% can be achieved with ˜30 mN of applied magnetic force. This structure has potential for extension in 2D and 3D, providing a general approach for building dynamically tunable elastic metamaterials for applications in lensing and guiding elastic waves.

  7. Permanent magnetic ferrite based power-tunable metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guanqiao; Lan, Chuwen [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao, Rui [High Temperature Thermochemistry Laboratory, Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0C5 (Canada); Zhou, Ji, E-mail: zhouji@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated. • It is observed that resonant frequency of the array shifts upon altering the output power. • This kind of power-tunable behavior is due to the temperature rise as a result of FMR-induced heat buildup. • This work offers a practical idea to tune ferrite metamaterials besides magneto-tunability and thermal-tunability. - Abstract: Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated in this research. Scattering parameter measurements confirm a shift in resonant frequency in correlation to changes in incident electromagnetic power within microwave frequency band. The tunable phenomenon represented by a blue-shift in transmission spectra in the metamaterials array can be attributed to a decrease in saturation magnetization resulting from FMR-induced temperature elevation upon resonant conditions. This power-dependent behavior offers a simple and practical route towards dynamically fine-tunable ferrite metamaterials.

  8. Molecular interaction of a potent nonpeptide agonist with the chemokine receptor CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Nygaard, Rie; Thiele, Stefanie

    2007-01-01

    Most nonpeptide antagonists for CC-chemokine receptors share a common pharmacophore with a centrally located, positively charged amine that interacts with the highly conserved glutamic acid (Glu) located in position 6 of transmembrane helix VII (VII:06). We present a novel CCR8 nonpeptide agonist......, 8-[3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl]-1-phenethyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5]decan-4-one (LMD-009), that also contains a centrally located, positively charged amine. LMD-009 selectively stimulated CCR8 among the 20 identified human chemokine receptors. It mediated chemotaxis, inositol phosphate accumulation......-binding pockets of CCR8 uncovered that the binding of LMD-009 and of four analogs [2-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)-4-hydroxypiperidin-4-yl)benzoic acid (LMD-584), N-ethyl-2-4-methoxybenzenesulfonamide (LMD-902), N-(1-(3-(2-methoxyphenoxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)-2-phenyl-4-(pyrrolidin-1yl)butanamide (LMD-268...

  9. Analysis of the antimicrobial activities of a chemokine-derived peptide (CDAP-4) on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Becerra, Francisco; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Dominguez-Ramirez, Lenin; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Soldevila, Gloria; Garcia-Zepeda, Eduardo A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are key molecules involved in the control of leukocyte trafficking. Recently, a novel function as antimicrobial proteins has been described. CCL13 is the only member of the MCP chemokine subfamily displaying antimicrobial activity. To determine Key residues involved in its antimicrobial activity, CCL13 derived peptides were synthesized and tested against several bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One of these peptides, corresponding to the C-terminal region of CCL13 (CDAP-4) displayed good antimicrobial activity. Electron microscopy studies revealed remarkable morphological changes after CDAP-4 treatment. By computer modeling, CDAP-4 in α helical configuration generated a positive electrostatic potential that extended beyond the surface of the molecule. This feature is similar to other antimicrobial peptides. Altogether, these findings indicate that the antimicrobial activity was displayed by CCL13 resides to some extent at the C-terminal region. Furthermore, CDAP-4 could be considered a good antimicrobial candidate with a potential use against pathogens including P. aeruginosa

  10. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of the chemokine CXCL13 in active MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Börnsen, L; Khademi, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence supports a major role of B cells in multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. How B cells are recruited to the CNS is incompletely understood. Our objective was to study B-cell chemokine concentrations in MS, their relationship with disease activity, and how treatment...... the chemokine receptor CXCR5 to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS), and may be a useful biomarker for treatment effects in MS. Furthermore, CXCL13 or its receptor CXCR5 should be considered as therapeutic targets in MS....... with methylprednisolone and natalizumab affected the concentration in CSF. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, CSF and blood samples were obtained from cohorts of patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS), relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), primary progressive MS (PPMS), or secondary progressive MS (SPMS...

  11. Staphylococcal superantigens stimulate immortalized human adipocytes to produce chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao G Vu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human adipocytes may have significant functions in wound healing and the development of diabetes through production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after stimulation by gram-negative bacterial endotoxin. Diabetic foot ulcers are most often associated with staphylococcal infections. Adipocyte responses in the area of the wound may play a role in persistence and pathology. We studied the effect of staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs on immortalized human adipocytes, alone and in the presence of bacterial endotoxin or staphylococcal α-toxin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Primary non-diabetic and diabetic human preadipocytes were immortalized by the reverse transcriptase component of telomerase (TERT and the E6/E7 genes of human papillomavirus. The immortal cells were demonstrated to have properties of non-immortalized pre-adipocytes and could be differentiated into mature and functional adipocytes. Differentiated adipocytes exposed to staphylococcal SAgs produced robust levels of cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, but there were no significant differences in levels between the non-diabetic and diabetic cells. Cytokine production was increased by co-incubation of adipocytes with SAgs and endotoxin together. In contrast, α-toxin alone was cytotoxic at high concentrations, but, at sub-cytotoxic doses, did not stimulate production of IL-6 and IL-8. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endotoxin has been proposed to contribute to diabetes through enhanced insulin resistance after chronic exposure and stimulation of adipocytes to produce cytokines. Our data indicate staphylococcal SAgs TSST-1 and SEB alone and in combination with bacterial endotoxin also stimulate adipocytes to produce cytokines and thus may contribute to the inflammatory response found in chronic diabetic ulcers and in the systemic inflammation that is associated with the development and persistence of diabetes. The immortal human pre-adipocytes reported here will be useful for studies to

  12. Oligonucleotide fishing for STAT6: cross-talk between IL-4 and chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K W; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K

    2001-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) is essential for the biological activities of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and the development of allergic responses in mice. Here we report on a sensitive and specific assay for STAT6 activation in response to IL-4. We took advantage of double-s...... activation, whereas other chemokines and cytokines do not. In conclusion, our data show that oligonucleotide fishing is a supplementary tool for studying cytokine cross-talk at a genomic level....

  13. CONTENTS OF CHEMOKINES AND CYTOKINES IN PERITONEAL FLUID FROM THE PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIOSIS OF VARIOUS SEVERITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Sokolov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Endometriosis is a disease accompanied by development of heterotopic endometrial foci at the peritoneum, proliferation of endothelial cells, and inflammatory reaction. Aiming to specify the dynamics of inflammatory process in endometriosis of different severity, as well as significance of chemokines and cytokines in angiogenesis and inflammation, we determined concentrations of RANTES, IL-8, IP-10, MIG, MCP-1 chemokines, as well as IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines in peritoneal fluid from patients by endometriosis. Forty women at reproductive age with an endometriosis have been observed. Among them, endometriosis grade I-II was registered in 20 cases, whereas grade III-IV has been confirmed in 20 women. Twenty-two women without evidence of endometriosis referred to diagnostic laparoscopy for pregnancy planning, comprised a control group. Diagnosis of endometriosis was based upon endoscopic findings and results of histological research. Severity grade of endometriosis was estimated according to R-AFS classification. Sampling of peritoneal fluid was carried out when performing surgical laparoscopies. Concentrations of chemokines and cytokines were determined by flow cytometry techniques, using BD Cytometric Bead Array test kits and FACStrack flow cytometer. The amounts of RANTES in peritoneal fluid were higher in grade I-II endometriosis, in comparison with grade III-IV endometriosis and control samples. Concentrations of IP-10, IL-8, МСР-1, MIG, IL-6, and IL-4 were higher than in control group and correlated with severity of the disease. IL-10 was not detectable in peritoneal fluid of the patients with endometriosis. These results suggest a significant role of the mentioned cytokines and chemokines that may promote invasion of endometrial cells, growth of heterotopic endometrioid locuses, development of vascular bed and induction of inflammatory processes, in development and progression of endometriosis.

  14. Modulation in selectivity and allosteric properties of small-molecule ligands for CC-chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel; Engel-Andreasen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Among 18 human chemokine receptors, CCR1, CCR4, CCR5, and CCR8 were activated by metal ion Zn(II) or Cu(II) in complex with 2,2'-bipyridine or 1,10-phenanthroline with similar potencies (EC(50) from 3.9 to 172 μM). Besides being agonists, they acted as selective allosteric enhancers of CCL3. Thes...

  15. Melatonin reduces the expression of chemokines in rat with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun H.; Zhou, W.; Liu, K.; Li, Hong X.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effect of melatonin on the colon inflammatory injury of rats with colitis and determine whether this effect is associated with inhibition of chemoattractant molecules interleukins (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1.The study was designed and implemented in JingMen No.1 People's Hospital, HuBei Province, from May 2006 to April 2007. It involved 72 animals divided into 6 groups of 12 each: normal group, model group, 5-aminosalisalicylic acid group, and melatonin group (dose of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0mg/kg). Rat colitis model was established by 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. Interleukin-8 and MCP-1 proteins in colon tissue were examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. The messenger-RNA expressions of chemokines were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enema resulted in pronounced pathological changes of colonic mucosa in model rats, which were in accordance with the significantly elevated Myeloperoxidase activity. Expressions of chemokines were up-regulated in colitis. Melatonin treatment reduced colonic lesions and improved colitis symptom, and decreased the protein and mRNA expressions of IL-8 and MCP-1 significantly in colon tissues of rats with colitis. Chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 are elevated in mucosal tissues in colitis and play an important role in the perpetuation of tissue destructive inflammatory process; melatonin reduces colonic inflammatory injury of rats colitis through down-regulating the expressions of chemokines. Melatonin can be considered as a novel therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. (author)

  16. Association of cord blood chemokines and other biomarkers with neonatal complications following intrauterine inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Otsubo

    Full Text Available Intrauterine inflammation has been associated with preterm birth and neonatal complications. Few reports have comprehensively investigated multiple cytokine profiles in cord blood and precisely identified surrogate markers for intrauterine inflammation.To identify the cytokines and surrogate markers associated with intrauterine inflammation and subsequent neonatal complications.We analyzed cord blood samples from 135 patients admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Sasebo City General Hospital. We retrospectively determined the associations between the presence of neonatal complications and cord blood cytokines, prenatal factors, and laboratory data at birth. A total of 27 cytokines in the cord blood were measured using a bead-based array sandwich immunoassay.Both Th1 and Th2 cytokine levels were low, whereas the levels of growth factors and chemokines were high. In particular, chemokines IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1α were significantly higher in very premature neonates when compared with more mature neonates. In addition, some have been shown to be associated with multiple neonatal complications, including patent ductus arteriosus (PDA, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, and chronic lung disease (CLD. Similarly, the levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, nucleated RBC, and urinary β2-microglobulin were associated with these complications and chemokine levels.Our results suggest the association of inflammatory chemokines IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-1α with intrauterine inflammation, premature birth, and neonatal complications in these perinatal subjects. Furthermore, the association of the aforementioned biomarkers with PDA, RDS, and CLD may help establish early diagnostic measures to predict such neonatal complications following intrauterine inflammation.

  17. Permanent magnetic ferrite based power-tunable metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanqiao; Lan, Chuwen; Gao, Rui; Zhou, Ji

    2017-08-01

    Power-tunable metamaterials based on barium permanent magnetic ferrite have been proposed and fabricated in this research. Scattering parameter measurements confirm a shift in resonant frequency in correlation to changes in incident electromagnetic power within microwave frequency band. The tunable phenomenon represented by a blue-shift in transmission spectra in the metamaterials array can be attributed to a decrease in saturation magnetization resulting from FMR-induced temperature elevation upon resonant conditions. This power-dependent behavior offers a simple and practical route towards dynamically fine-tunable ferrite metamaterials.

  18. A Microwave Tunable Bandpass Filter for Liquid Crystal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weiping; Jiang, Di; Liu, Yupeng; Yang, Yuanwang; Gan, Baichuan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, a novel microwave continuously tunable band-pass filter, based on nematic liquid crystals (LCs), is proposed. It uses liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic material to mainly realize frequency shift at microwave band by changing the dielectric anisotropy, when applying the bias voltage. According to simulation results, it achieves 840 MHz offset. Comparing to the existing tunable filter, it has many advantages, such as continuously tunable, miniaturization, low processing costs, low tuning voltage, etc. Thus, it has shown great potentials in frequency domain and practical applications in modern communication.

  19. Tunable Microwave Component Technologies for SatCom-Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maune, Holger; Jost, Matthias; Wiens, Alex; Weickhmann, Christian; Reese, Roland; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Schuster, Christian; Franke, Tobias; Hu, Wenjuan; Nickel, Matthias; Kienemund, Daniel; Prasetiadi, Ananto Eka; Jakoby, Rolf

    2017-03-01

    Modern communication platforms require a huge amount of switched RF component banks especially made of different filters and antennas to cover all operating frequencies and bandwidth for the targeted services and application scenarios. In contrast, reconfigurable devices made of tunable components lead to a considerable reduction in complexity, size, weight, power consumption, and cost. This paper gives an overview of suitable technologies for tunable microwave components especially for SatCom applications. Special attention is given to tunable components based on functional materials such as barium strontium titanate (BST) and liquid crystal (LC).

  20. B Cell, Th17, and Neutrophil Related Cerebrospinal Fluid Cytokine/Chemokines Are Elevated in MOG Antibody Associated Demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Kothur

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody (MOG Ab associated demyelination represents a subgroup of autoimmune demyelination that is separate from multiple sclerosis and aquaporin 4 IgG-positive NMO, and can have a relapsing course. Unlike NMO and MS, there is a paucity of literature on immunopathology and CSF cytokine/chemokines in MOG Ab associated demyelination.To study the differences in immunopathogenesis based on cytokine/chemokine profile in MOG Ab-positive (POS and -negative (NEG groups.We measured 34 cytokines/chemokines using multiplex immunoassay in CSF collected from paediatric patients with serum MOG Ab POS [acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM = 8, transverse myelitis (TM = 2 n = 10] and serum MOG Ab NEG (ADEM = 5, TM = 4, n = 9 demyelination. We generated normative data using CSF from 20 non-inflammatory neurological controls.The CSF cytokine and chemokine levels were higher in both MOG Ab POS and MOG Ab NEG demyelination groups compared to controls. The CSF in MOG Ab POS patients showed predominant elevation of B cell related cytokines/chemokines (CXCL13, APRIL, BAFF and CCL19 as well as some of Th17 related cytokines (IL-6 AND G-CSF compared to MOG Ab NEG group (all p<0.01. In addition, patients with elevated CSF MOG antibodies had higher CSF CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, IL-17A and G-CSF than patients without CSF MOG antibodies.Our findings suggest that MOG Ab POS patients have a more pronounced CNS inflammatory response with elevation of predominant humoral associated cytokines/chemokines, as well as some Th 17 and neutrophil related cytokines/chemokines suggesting a differential inflammatory pathogenesis associated with MOG antibody seropositivity. This cytokine/chemokine profiling provides new insight into disease pathogenesis, and improves our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment. In addition, some of these molecules may represent potential immunomodulatory targets.

  1. CXCL11 production in cerebrospinal fluid distinguishes herpes simplex meningitis from herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Liza; Studahl, Marie; Persson Berg, Linn; Eriksson, Kristina

    2017-07-10

    The closely related herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 can cause inflammations of the central nervous system (CNS), where type 1 most often manifest as encephalitis (HSE), and type 2 as meningitis (HSM). HSE is associated with severe neurological complications, while HSM is benign in adults. We proposed that studying the chemokine and cytokine production in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum could indicate why two closely related viruses exhibit different severity of their accompanied CNS inflammation. Secretion patterns of 30 chemokines and 10 cytokines in CSF of adult patients with acute HSE (n = 14) and HSM (n = 20) in the initial stage of disease were analyzed and compared to control subjects without viral central nervous system infections and to levels in serum. Most measured chemokines and cytokines increased in CSF of HSE and HSM patients. Overall, the CSF chemokine levels were higher in CSF of HSM patients compared to HSE patients. However, only five chemokines reached levels in the CSF that exceeded those in serum facilitating a positive CSF-serum chemokine gradient. Of these, CXCL8, CXCL9, and CXCL10 were present at high levels both in HSE and HSM whereas CXCL11 and CCL8 were present in HSM alone. Several chemokines were also elevated in serum of HSE patients but only one in HSM patients. No chemokine in- or efflux between CSF and serum was indicated as the levels of chemokines in CSF and serum did not correlate. We show that HSM is associated with a stronger and more diverse inflammatory response in the CNS compared to HSE in the initial stage of disease. The chemokine patterns were distinguished by the exclusive local CNS production of CXCL11 and CCL8 in HSM. Inflammation in HSM appears to be restricted to the CNS whereas HSE also was associated with systemic inflammation.

  2. Optogenetic control of chemokine receptor signal and T-cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuexin; Hyun, Young-Min; Lim, Kihong; Lee, Hyunwook; Cummings, Ryan J.; Gerber, Scott A.; Bae, Seyeon; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Lord, Edith M.; Kim, Minsoo

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of ex vivo-generated immune-promoting or tolerogenic T cells to either enhance immunity or promote tolerance in patients has been used with some success. However, effective trafficking of the transferred cells to the target tissue sites is the main barrier to achieving successful clinical outcomes. Here we developed a strategy for optically controlling T-cell trafficking using a photoactivatable (PA) chemokine receptor. Photoactivatable-chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4 (PA-CXCR4) transmitted intracellular CXCR4 signals in response to 505-nm light. Localized activation of PA-CXCR4 induced T-cell polarization and directional migration (phototaxis) both in vitro and in vivo. Directing light onto the melanoma was sufficient to recruit PA-CXCR4–expressing tumor-targeting cytotoxic T cells and improved the efficacy of adoptive T-cell transfer immunotherapy, with a significant reduction in tumor growth in mice. These findings suggest that the use of photoactivatable chemokine receptors allows remotely controlled leukocyte trafficking with outstanding spatial resolution in tissues and may be feasible in other cell transfer therapies. PMID:24733886

  3. Solution structure of CXCL5--a novel chemokine and adipokine implicated in inflammation and obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Mohan Sepuru

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL5 is selectively expressed in highly specialized cells such as epithelial type II cells in the lung and white adipose tissue macrophages in muscle, where it mediates diverse functions from combating microbial infections by regulating neutrophil trafficking to promoting obesity by inhibiting insulin signaling. Currently very little is known regarding the structural basis of how CXCL5 mediates its novel functions. Towards this missing knowledge, we have solved the solution structure of the CXCL5 dimer by NMR spectroscopy. CXCL5 is a member of a subset of seven CXCR2-activating chemokines (CAC that are characterized by the highly conserved ELR motif in the N-terminal tail. The structure shows that CXCL5 adopts the typical chemokine fold, but also reveals several distinct differences in the 30 s loop and N-terminal residues; not surprisingly, crosstalk between N-terminal and 30 s loop residues have been implicated as a major determinant of receptor activity. CAC function also involves binding to highly sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAG, and the CXCL5 structure reveals a distinct distribution of positively charged residues, suggesting that differences in GAG interactions also influence function. The availability of the structure should now facilitate the design of experiments to better understand the molecular basis of various CXCL5 functions, and also serve as a template for the design of inhibitors for use in a clinical setting.

  4. Analysis of Chemokines and Receptors Expression Profile in the Myelin Mutant Taiep Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Soto-Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiep rat has a failure in myelination and remyelination processes leading to a state of hypomyelination throughout its life. Chemokines, which are known to play a role in inflammation, are also involved in the remyelination process. We aimed to demonstrate that remyelination-stimulating factors are altered in the brainstem of 1- and 6-month-old taiep rats. We used a Rat RT2 Profiler PCR Array to assess mRNA expression of 84 genes coding for cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors. We also evaluated protein levels of CCL2, CCR1, CCR2, CCL5, CCR5, CCR8, CXCL1, CXCR2, CXCR4, FGF2, and VEGFA by ELISA. Sprague-Dawley rats were used as a control. PCR Array procedure showed that proinflammatory cytokines were not upregulated in the taiep rat. In contrast, some mRNA levels of beta and alpha chemokines were upregulated in 1-month-old rats, but CXCR4 was downregulated at their 6 months of age. ELISA results showed that CXCL1, CCL2, CCR2, CCR5, CCR8, and CXCR4 protein levels were decreased in brainstem at the age of 6 months. These results suggest the presence of a chronic neuroinflammation process with deficiency of remyelination-stimulating factors (CXCL1, CXCR2, and CXCR4, which might account for the demyelination in the taiep rat.

  5. Preparation of C-terminally modified chemokines by expressed protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Lars; Steinhagen, Max; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-01-01

    In order to link structural features on a molecular level to the function of chemokines, site-specific modification strategies are strongly required. These can be used to incorporate fluorescent dyes and/or physical probes to allow investigations in a wide range of biological and physical techniques, e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Only a limited number of functional groups within the 20 canonical amino acids allow ligation strategies that can be helpful to introduce novel functionalities, which in turn expand the scope of chemoselective and orthogonal reactivity of (semi)synthetic chemokines. In the present chapter we mainly focus on the fabulous history of native chemical ligation (NCL) and provide a general protocol for the preparation of C-terminally modified SDF-1α including tips and tricks for practical work. We believe that this protocol can be easily adapted to other chemokines and many proteins in general.

  6. Thermodynamic and mechanical effects of disulfide bonds in CXCLl7 chemokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Christopher

    Chemokines are a family of signaling proteins mainly responsible for the chemotaxis of leukocytes, where their biological activity is modulated by their oligomerization state. Here, the dynamics and thermodynamic stability are characterized in monomer and homodimer structures of CXCL7, one of the most abundant platelet chemokines. The effects of dimerization and disulfide bond formation are investigated using computational methods that include molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Distance Constraint Model (DCM). A consistent picture emerges for the effect of dimerization and role of the Cys5-Cys31 and Cys7- Cys47 disulfide bonds. Surprisingly, neither disulfide bond is critical for maintaining structural stability in the monomer or dimer, although the monomer is destabilized more than the dimer upon removal of disulfide bonds. Instead, it is found that disulfide bonds influence the native state dynamics as well as modulates the relative stability between monomer and dimer. The combined analysis elucidates how CXCL7 is mechanically stable as a monomer, and how upon dimerization flexibly correlated motions are induced between the 30s and 50s loop within each monomer and across the dimer interface. Interestingly, the greatest gain in flexibility upon dimerization occurs when both disulfide bonds are present in each domain, and the homodimer is least stable relative to its two monomers. These results suggest the highly conserved disulfide bonds in chemokines facilitate a structural mechanism for distinguishing functional characteristics between monomer and dimer.

  7. Understanding the Role of Chemokines and Cytokines in Experimental Models of Herpes Simplex Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayaba N. Azher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex keratitis is a disease of the cornea caused by HSV-1. It is a leading cause of corneal blindness in the world. Underlying molecular mechanism is still unknown, but experimental models have helped give a better understanding of the underlying molecular pathology. Cytokines and chemokines are small proteins released by cells that play an important proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory role in modulating the disease process. Cytokines such as IL-17, IL-6, IL-1α, and IFN-γ and chemokines such as MIP-2, MCP-1, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β have proinflammatory role in the destruction caused by HSV including neutrophil infiltration and corneal inflammation, and other chemokines and cytokines such as IL-10 and CCL3 can have a protective role. Most of the damage results from neutrophil infiltration and neovascularization. While many more studies are needed to better understand the role of these molecules in both experimental models and human corneas, current studies indicate that these molecules hold potential to be targets of future therapy.

  8. Impact of blood processing variations on Natural Killer cell frequency, activation, chemokine receptor expression and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Bartman, Pat; Ndlovu, Dudu; Ramkalawon, Pamela; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Altfeld, Marcus; Carr, William H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the role of natural killer (NK) cells in human disease pathogenesis is crucial and necessitates study of patient samples directly ex vivo. Manipulation of whole blood by density gradient centrifugation or delays in sample processing due to shipping, however, may lead to artifactual changes in immune response measures. Here, we assessed the impact of density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of both whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at multiple timepoints (2–24 hrs) on flow cytometric measures of NK cell frequency, activation status, chemokine receptor expression, and effector functions. We found that density gradient centrifugation activated NK cells and modified chemokine receptor expression. Delays in processing beyond 8 hours activated NK cells in PBMC but not in whole blood. Likewise, processing delays decreased chemokine receptor (CCR4 and CCR7) expression in both PBMC and whole blood. Finally, delays in processing PBMC were associated with a decreased ability of NK cells to degranulate (as measured by CD107a expression) or secrete cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α). In summary, our findings suggest that density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of PBMC can alter measures of clinically relevant NK cell characteristics including effector functions; and therefore should be taken into account in designing clinical research studies. PMID:21255578

  9. The Chemokine MIP-1α/CCL3 impairs mouse hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, Elodie; Faivre, Emilie; Dutar, Patrick; Alves Pires, Claire; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Laloux, Charlotte; Buée, Luc; Blum, David; Humez, Sandrine

    2015-10-29

    Chemokines are signaling molecules playing an important role in immune regulations. They are also thought to regulate brain development, neurogenesis and neuroendocrine functions. While chemokine upsurge has been associated with conditions characterized with cognitive impairments, their ability to modulate synaptic plasticity remains ill-defined. In the present study, we specifically evaluated the effects of MIP1-α/CCL3 towards hippocampal synaptic transmission, plasticity and spatial memory. We found that CCL3 (50 ng/ml) significantly reduced basal synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse without affecting NMDAR-mediated field potentials. This effect was ascribed to post-synaptic regulations, as CCL3 did not impact paired-pulse facilitation. While CCL3 did not modulate long-term depression (LTD), it significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), an effect abolished by Maraviroc, a CCR5 specific antagonist. In addition, sub-chronic intracerebroventricular (icv) injections of CCL3 also impair LTP. In accordance with these electrophysiological findings, we demonstrated that the icv injection of CCL3 in mouse significantly impaired spatial memory abilities and long-term memory measured using the two-step Y-maze and passive avoidance tasks. These effects of CCL3 on memory were inhibited by Maraviroc. Altogether, these data suggest that the chemokine CCL3 is an hippocampal neuromodulator able to regulate synaptic plasticity mechanisms involved in learning and memory functions.

  10. Changes in cytokine and chemokine expression distinguish dysthymic disorder from major depression and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pei-Shen; Yen, Che-Hung; Chen, Chun-Yen; Huang, San-Yuan; Liang, Chih-Sung

    2017-02-01

    An important area of uncertainty is the inflammatory degree to which depression occurring as part of dysthymic disorder may differ from major depression. Using a 27-plex cytokine assay, we analyzed the serum of 12 patients with dysthymic disorder, 12 with major depression, and an age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched control group of 20 healthy volunteers. We observed that patients with dysthymic disorder exhibited aberrant cytokine and chemokine expression compared with healthy controls and patients with major depression. The levels of interferon-γ-induced protein 10 highly predicted dysthymic disorder. Network analyses revealed that in patients with dysthymic disorder, the vertices were more sparsely connected and adopted a more hub-like architecture, and the connections from neighboring vertices of interleukin 2 and eotaxin-1 increased. After treatment with the same antidepressant, there was no difference between dysthymic disorder and major depression regarding any of the cytokines or chemokines analyzed. For dysthymic disorder, changes in the levels of interferon-γ-induced protein 10 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α correlated with depression improvement. The findings suggest that the cytokine milieu in dysthymic disorder differs either at the level of individual expression or in network patterns. Moreover, chemokines play an important role in driving the pathophysiology of dysthymic disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Involvement of CCR-2 chemokine receptor activation in ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning of brain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Thakur Gurjeet

    2012-10-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the potential role of CCR-2 chemokine receptor in ischemic preconditioning as well as postconditioning induced reversal of ischemia-reperfusion injury in mouse brain. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion of 17 min followed by reperfusion for 24h was employed in present study to produce ischemia and reperfusion induced cerebral injury in mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was evaluated using elevated plus-maze test and Morris water maze test. Rota rod test was employed to assess motor incoordination. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produced cerebral infarction and impaired memory and motor co-ordination. Three preceding episodes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 1 min and reperfusion of 1 min were employed to elicit ischemic preconditioning of brain, while three episodes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 10s and reperfusion of 10s immediately after the completion of were employed to elicit ischemic postconditioning of brain. Both prior ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic postconditioning immediately after global cerebral ischemia prevented markedly ischemia-reperfusion-induced cerebral injury as measured in terms of infarct size, loss of memory and motor coordination. RS 102895, a selective CCR-2 chemokine receptor antagonist, attenuated the neuroprotective effect of both the ischemic preconditioning as well as postconditioning. It is concluded that the neuroprotective effect of both ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic postconditioning may involve the activation of CCR-2 chemokine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP) consisted of a variant (F49A) of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin...... A (PE). Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1) altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E), (2) shortened and elongated linker region, and (3) modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher...... selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate...

  13. The Role of Cytokines, Chemokines, and Growth Factors in the Pathogenesis of Pityriasis Rosea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Drago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis rosea (PR is an exanthematous disease related to human herpesvirus- (HHV- 6/7 reactivation. The network of mediators involved in recruiting the infiltrating inflammatory cells has never been studied. Object. To investigate the levels of serum cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines in PR and healthy controls in order to elucidate the PR pathogenesis. Materials and Methods. Interleukin- (IL- 1, IL-6, IL-17, interferon- (IFN- γ, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF- α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, CXCL8 (IL-8 and CXCL10 (IP-10, were measured simultaneously by a multiplex assay in early acute PR patients’ sera and healthy controls. Subsequently, sera from PR patients were analysed at 3 different times (0, 15, and 30 days. Results and discussion. Serum levels of IL-17, IFN-γ, VEGF, and IP-10 resulted to be upregulated in PR patients compared to controls. IL-17 has a key role in host defense against pathogens stimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. IFN-γ has a direct antiviral activity promoting NK cells and virus specific T cells cytotoxicity. VEGF stimulates vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. IP-10 can induce chemotaxis, apoptosis, cell growth, and angiogenesis. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that these inflammatory mediators may modulate PR pathogenesis in synergistic manner.

  14. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  15. Age-dependent alterations of monocyte subsets and monocyte-related chemokine pathways in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trautwein Christian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental approaches have unraveled essential migratory and functional differences of monocyte subpopulations in mice. In order to possibly translate these findings into human physiology and pathophysiology, human monocyte subsets need to be carefully revisited in health and disease. In analogy to murine studies, we hypothesized that human monocyte subsets dynamically change during ageing, potentially influencing their functionality and contributing to immunosenescence. Results Circulating monocyte subsets, surface marker and chemokine receptor expression were analyzed in 181 healthy volunteers (median age 42, range 18-88. Unlike the unaffected total leukocyte or total monocyte counts, non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocytes significantly increased with age, but displayed reduced HLA-DR and CX3CR1 surface expression in the elderly. Classical CD14++CD16- monocyte counts did not vary dependent on age. Serum MCP-1 (CCL2, but not MIP1α (CCL3, MIP1β (CCL4 or fractalkine (CX3CL1 concentrations increased with age. Monocyte-derived macrophages from old or young individuals did not differ with respect to cytokine release in vitro at steady state or upon LPS stimulation. Conclusions Our study demonstrates dynamic changes of circulating monocytes during ageing in humans. The expansion of the non-classical CD14+CD16+ subtype, alterations of surface protein and chemokine receptor expression as well as circulating monocyte-related chemokines possibly contribute to the preserved functionality of the monocyte pool throughout adulthood.

  16. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Expression on Leukocytes of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldeck

    Full Text Available Although primarily a neurological complaint, systemic inflammation is present in Alzheimer's Disease, with higher than normal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the periphery as well as the brain. A gradient of these factors may enhance recruitment of activated immune cells into the brain via chemotaxis. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of circulating immune cells in AD patients with multi-colour flow cytometry to determine whether their expression of chemokine receptors is consistent with this hypothesis. In this study, we confirmed our previously reported data on the shift of early- to late-differentiated CD4+ T-cells in AD patients. The percentage of cells expressing CD25, a marker of acute T-cell activation, was higher in patients than in age-matched controls, and percentages of CCR6+ cells were elevated. This chemokine receptor is primarily expressed on pro-inflammatory memory cells and Th17 cells. The proportion of cells expressing CCR4 (expressed on Th2 cells and CCR5 (Th1 cells and dendritic cells was also greater in patients, and was more pronounced on CD4+ than CD8+ T-cells. These findings allow a more detailed insight into the systemic immune status of patients with Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible novel targets for immune therapy.

  17. Polarization independent polymer waveguide tunable receivers incorporating a micro-optic circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Park, Tae-Hyun; Park, Su-Hyun; Seo, Jun-Kyu; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2018-06-01

    In order to simplify the receiver configuration in a wavelength division multiplexed optical fiber network, compact wavelength tunable filters have long been expected to be used as channel selectors. Bragg reflector inherently has the most suitable reflection spectrum for filtering a single wavelength from the densely multiplexed wavelength signal. Polymer has high thermo-optic coefficient and good thermal insulation property compared to the other optical waveguide materials such as silicon and silica materials. This can be used to broadly tune the reflection spectrum of Bragg reflector using a simple micro-heater. In this work, a micro-optic circulator component and a polymeric Bragg reflector device are assembled to produce a small form factor tunable receiver. Compared to the integrated-optical versions, the micro-optics are based on well-developed manufacturing processes and can achieve competitive production yields. The device exhibits high reflectivity with a flat top passband, and a polarization dependence of 0.06 nm achieved by virtue of the low birefringence of LFR polymer, which make a significant contribution to the implementation of polarization independent tunable receiver. The wavelength tuning range of 40 nm is demonstrated by using a bottom located heater with a groove for heat isolation.

  18. Tunable Q-Factor RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, Mario D. [Fermilab; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Kazakevitch, Gregory [Fermilab

    2018-01-01

    Intense neutrino beam is a unique probe for researching beyond the standard model. Fermilab is the main institution to produce the most powerful and widespectrum neutrino beam. From that respective, a radiation robust beam diagnostic system is a critical element in order to maintain the quality of the neutrino beam. Within this context, a novel radiation-resistive beam profile monitor based on a gasfilled RF cavity is proposed. The goal of this measurement is to study a tunable Qfactor RF cavity to determine the accuracy of the RF signal as a function of the quality factor. Specifically, measurement error of the Q-factor in the RF calibration is investigated. Then, the RF system will be improved to minimize signal error.

  19. Origami structures for tunable thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatti, Elisa; Bertoldi, Katia

    Materials with engineered thermal expansion, capable of achieving targeted and extreme area/volume changes in response to variations in temperature, are important for a number of aerospace, optical, energy, and microelectronic applications. While most of the proposed structures with tunable coefficient of thermal expansion consist of bi-material 2D or 3D lattices, here we propose a periodic metastructure based on a bilayer Miura-Ori origami fold. We combine experiments and simulations to demonstrate that by tuning the geometrical and mechanical parameters an extremely broad range of thermal expansion coefficients can be obtained, spanning both negative and positive values. Additionally, the thermal properties along different directions can be adjusted independently. Differently from all previously reported systems, the proposed structure is non-porous.

  20. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders` perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology`s field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States.

  1. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  2. Electro-optical tunable birefringent filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinton, Fred M [Princeton, NJ

    2012-01-31

    An electrically tunable Lyot type filter is a Lyot that include one or more filter elements. Each filter element may have a planar, solid crystal comprised of a material that exhibits birefringence and is electro-optically active. Transparent electrodes may be coated on each face of the crystal. An input linear light polarizer may be located on one side of the crystal and oriented at 45 degrees to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal. An output linear light polarizer may be located on the other side of the crystal and oriented at -45 degrees with respect to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal. When an electric voltage is applied between the electrodes, the retardation of the crystal changes and so does the spectral transmission of the optical filter.

  3. Compact microstrip bandpass filter with tunable notch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Silas; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2014-01-01

    Two different designs combining a bandpass and a notch filter are developed to operate in the receiving band from 350–470 MHz. The bandpass filter is designed from a simple structure, by use of only four short circuited stubs and a half wavelength transmission line connecting the stubs. The tunable...... notch filter ensures an attenuation level of 19.3 dB to 27.3 dB in the frequency range from 360–480 MHz. The measured passband ripple of the combined filter is less than 0.5 dB, while the insertion loss for the simplest design is less than 1.7 dB only 10 MHz from the notch frequency. Even though...... the wavelength on the selected substrate (εr = 3.55) is approximately 45 cm, the outer dimensions of the final filter only measure 10×10 cm2....

  4. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  5. Broad band tunable dye laser development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Jung Bog; Kim, Sung Ho; Go, Do Kyung; Lim, Chang Hwan; Rho, Si Pyo; Song, Kyu Seok; Lee, Byung Cheol; Rhi, Jong Hoon; Han, Jae Min; Cha, Hyung Ki; Cha, Byung Hun; Jeong, Do Yung; Han, Jae Min; Jung, Yeu Chang; Im, Ho; Yoo, Choon Sun; Jung, Byung Ik; Seok, Gum Sook

    1992-12-01

    The technical goal and objectives are the development of a tunable laser which can be tuned from UV to near IR and commercialization for uses in various fields. Two kinds of resonators are developed. User can select one resonator and change into the other without changing other parts. GIM type has a linewidth of 5GHz which is able to be used usually, and SLM type is very narrow linewidth of less than 1GHz. Each system can have one or two amplifiers depending on output power or cost. High stability and safety, cost-down, and modules into about 30 components have been tried. We hope that this laser can help developments in researches of university, industry, and institute. (Author)

  6. Quantum information storage using tunable flux qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Matthias; Brito, Frederico; DiVincenzo, David; Farinelli, Matthew; Keefe, George; Ketchen, Mark; Kumar, Shwetank; Milliken, Frank; Rothwell, Mary Beth; Rozen, Jim; Koch, Roger H, E-mail: msteffe@us.ibm.co [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2010-02-10

    We present details and results for a superconducting quantum bit (qubit) design in which a tunable flux qubit is coupled strongly to a transmission line. Quantum information storage in the transmission line is demonstrated with a dephasing time of T{sub 2}approx2.5 mus. However, energy lifetimes of the qubit are found to be short (approx10 ns) and not consistent with predictions. Several design and material changes do not affect qubit coherence times. In order to determine the cause of these short coherence times, we fabricated standard flux qubits based on a design which was previously successfully used by others. Initial results show significantly improved coherence times, possibly implicating losses associated with the large size of our qubit. (topical review)

  7. Tunable plasmonic lattices of silver nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Andrea; Sinsermsuksakul, Prasert; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    Silver nanocrystals are ideal building blocks for plasmonicmaterials that exhibit a wide range of unique and potentially usefuloptical phenomena. Individual nanocrystals display distinct opticalscattering spectra and can be assembled into hierarchical structures thatcouple strongly to external electromagnetic fields. This coupling, whichis mediated by surface plasmons, depends on their shape and arrangement.Here we demonstrate the bottom-up assembly of polyhedral silvernanocrystals into macroscopic two-dimensional superlattices using theLangmuir-Blodgett technique. Our ability to control interparticlespacing, density, and packing symmetry allows for tunability of theoptical response over the entire visible range. This assembly strategyoffers a new, practical approach to making novel plasmonic materials forapplication in spectroscopic sensors, sub-wavelength optics, andintegrated devices that utilize field enhancement effects.

  8. Tunable 'optical activity' in electrorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Zhao, X.P.

    2005-01-01

    The 'optical activity' of adjustable periodic structure material (SiO 2 and pentaerythrital electrorheological (ER) fluids) is firstly investigated using two kinds of setup. It is found that the rotation angles can be tuned by the external electric field and weight concentrations, and the sign of the rotation angle is negative, so, the used ER fluids are defined as the left-handed optically active substances under the application of electric field. The laser diffraction patterns are also observed in the ER fluids, which indicates the formation of alignment. It is thought that the symmetry breaking of structure induced by applied electric field is the origin of the 'optical activity' in the ER fluids. The electrically tunable 'optical activity' will find innovative applications in displays, optical devices and other fields

  9. Resonant Elements for Tunable Reflectarray Antenna Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an accurate analysis of different configurations of reflectarray resonant elements that can be used for the design of passive and tunable reflectarrays. Reflection loss and bandwidth performances of these reflectarray elements have been analyzed in the X-band frequency range with the Finite Integral Method technique, and the results have been verified by the waveguide scattering parameter measurements. The results demonstrate a reduction in the phase errors offering an increased static linear phase range of 225° which allows to improve the bandwidth performance of single layer reflectarray antenna. Moreover a maximum dynamic phase range of 320° and a volume reduction of 22.15% have been demonstrated for a 10 GHz reflectarray element based on the use of rectangular patch with an embedded circular slot.

  10. Switchable and Tunable Aerodynamic Drag on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttag, Mark; Lopéz Jiménez, Francisco; Upadhyaya, Priyank; Kumar, Shanmugam; Reis, Pedro

    We report results on the performance of Smart Morphable Surfaces (Smporhs) that can be mounted onto cylindrical structures to actively reduce their aerodynamic drag. Our system comprises of an elastomeric thin shell with a series of carefully designed subsurface cavities that, once depressurized, lead to a dramatic deformation of the surface topography, on demand. Our design is inspired by the morphology of the giant cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) which possesses an array of axial grooves, thought to help reduce aerodynamic drag, thereby enhancing the structural robustness of the plant under wind loading. We perform systematic wind tunnel tests on cylinders covered with our Smorphs and characterize their aerodynamic performance. The switchable and tunable nature of our system offers substantial advantages for aerodynamic performance when compared to static topographies, due to their operation over a wider range of flow conditions.

  11. Nanostructured electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hemma; Varela, Ana Sofia; Kühl, Stefanie; Strasser, Peter; Cuenya, Beatriz Roldan

    2016-04-01

    The field of electrocatalysis has undergone tremendous advancement in the past few decades, in part owing to improvements in catalyst design at the nanoscale. These developments have been crucial for the realization of and improvement in alternative energy technologies based on electrochemical reactions such as fuel cells. Through the development of novel synthesis methods, characterization techniques and theoretical methods, rationally designed nanoscale electrocatalysts with tunable activity and selectivity have been achieved. This Review explores how nanostructures can be used to control electrochemical reactivity, focusing on three model reactions: O2 electroreduction, CO2 electroreduction and ethanol electrooxidation. The mechanisms behind nanoscale control of reactivity are discussed, such as the presence of low-coordinated sites or facets, strain, ligand effects and bifunctional effects in multimetallic materials. In particular, studies of how particle size, shape and composition in nanostructures can be used to tune reactivity are highlighted.

  12. Stakeholder acceptance analysis: Tunable hybrid plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.

    1995-12-01

    This report resents evaluations, recommendations, and requirements concerning Tunable Hybrid Plasma (THP) derived from a three-year program of stake holder involvement. THP destroys volatile organic compounds by directing a moderate energy electron beam into a flow of air containing organic contaminants. This report is for technology developers and for those responsible for making decisions about the use of technology to remediate contamination by volatile organic compounds. Stakeholders' perspectives help those responsible for technology deployment make good decisions concerning the acceptability and applicability of THP to the remediation problems the face. In addition, this report presents data requirements for the technology's field demonstration defined by stakeholders associated with the Hanford site in Washington State, as well as detailed comments on THP from stakeholders from four other sites throughout the western United States

  13. Tunable protease-activatable virus nanonodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Justin; Ho, Michelle L; Tiwari, Abhinav; Gomez, Eric J; Dempsey, Christopher; Van Vliet, Kim; Igoshin, Oleg A; Silberg, Jonathan J; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Suh, Junghae

    2014-05-27

    We explored the unique signal integration properties of the self-assembling 60-mer protein capsid of adeno-associated virus (AAV), a clinically proven human gene therapy vector, by engineering proteolytic regulation of virus-receptor interactions such that processing of the capsid by proteases is required for infection. We find the transfer function of our engineered protease-activatable viruses (PAVs), relating the degree of proteolysis (input) to PAV activity (output), is highly nonlinear, likely due to increased polyvalency. By exploiting this dynamic polyvalency, in combination with the self-assembly properties of the virus capsid, we show that mosaic PAVs can be constructed that operate under a digital AND gate regime, where two different protease inputs are required for virus activation. These results show viruses can be engineered as signal-integrating nanoscale nodes whose functional properties are regulated by multiple proteolytic signals with easily tunable and predictable response surfaces, a promising development toward advanced control of gene delivery.

  14. Strain-tunable quantum dot devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastelli, A.; Trotta, R.; Zallo, E.; Atkinson, P.; Magerl, E.; Ding, F.; Plumhof, J.D.; Kumar, S.; Doerr, K.; Schmidt, O.G.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new class of quantum dot-based devices, in which the semiconductor structures are integrated on top of piezoelectric actuators. This combination allows on one hand to study in detail the effects produced by variable strains (up to about 0.2%) on the excitonic emission of single quantum dots and on the other to manipulate their electronic- and optical properties to achieve specific requirements. In fact, by combining strain with electric fields we are able to obtain (i) independent control of emission energy and charge-state of a QD, (II) wavelength-tunable single-QD light-emitting diodes and (III) frequency-stabilized sources of single photons at predefined wavelengths. Possible future extensions and applications of this technology will be discussed.

  15. MEMS tunable grating micro-spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormen, Maurizio; Lockhart, R.; Niedermann, P.; Overstolz, T.; Hoogerwerf, A.; Mayor, J.-M.; Pierer, J.; Bosshard, C.; Ischer, R.; Voirin, G.; Stanley, R. P.

    2017-11-01

    The interest in MEMS based Micro-Spectrometers is increasing due to their potential in terms of flexibility as well as cost, low mass, small volume and power savings. This interest, especially in the Near-Infrared and Mid- Infrared, ranges from planetary exploration missions to astronomy, e.g. the search for extra solar planets, as well as to many other terrestrial fields of application such as, industrial quality and surface control, chemical analysis of soil and water, detection of chemical pollutants, exhausted gas analysis, food quality control, process control in pharmaceuticals, to name a few. A compact MEMS-based Spectrometer for Near- Infrared and Mid-InfraRed operation have been conceived, designed and demonstrated. The design based on tunable MEMS blazed grating, developed in the past at CSEM [1], achieves state of the art results in terms of spectral resolution, operational wavelength range, light throughput, overall dimensions, and power consumption.

  16. Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INFγ ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.

  17. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment - A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Koli

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung.

  18. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment - A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung.

  19. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment – A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung. PMID:27428020

  20. Tunable lasers for waste management photochemistry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, F.T.

    1978-09-01

    A review of lasers with potential photochemical applications in waste management indicates that dye lasers, as a class, can provide tunable laser output through the visible and near-uv regions of the spectrum of most interest to photochemistry. Many variables can affect the performance of a specific dye laser, and the interactions of these variables, at the current state of the art, are complex. The recent literature on dye-laser characteristics has been reviewed and summarized, with emphasis on those parameters that most likely will affect the scaling of dye lasers in photochemical applications. Current costs are reviewed and correlated with output power. A new class of efficient uv lasers that appear to be scalable in both energy output and pulse rate, based on rare-gas halide excimers and similar molecules, is certain to find major applications in photochemistry. Because the most important developments are too recent to be adequately described in the literature or are the likely outcome of current experiments, the basic physics underlying the class of excimer lasers is described. Specific cost data are unavailable, but these new gas lasers should reflect costs similar to those of existing gas lasers, in particular, the pulsed CO 2 lasers. To complete the survey of tunable-laser characteristics, the technical characteristics of the various classes of lasers in the ir are summarized. Important developments in ir laser technology are being accelerated by isotope-separation research, but, initially at least, this portion of the spectrum is least likely to receive emphasis in waste-management-oriented photochemistry

  1. Negative stiffness honeycombs as tunable elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsberry, Benjamin M.; Haberman, Michael R.

    2018-03-01

    Acoustic and elastic metamaterials are media with a subwavelength structure that behave as effective materials displaying atypical effective dynamic properties. These material systems are of interest because the design of their sub-wavelength structure allows for direct control of macroscopic wave dispersion. One major design limitation of most metamaterial structures is that the dynamic response cannot be altered once the microstructure is manufactured. However, the ability to modify wave propagation in the metamaterial with an external stimulus is highly desirable for numerous applications and therefore remains a significant challenge in elastic metamaterials research. In this work, a honeycomb structure composed of a doubly periodic array of curved beams, known as a negative stiffness honeycomb (NSH), is analyzed as a tunable elastic metamaterial. The nonlinear static elastic response that results from large deformations of the NSH unit cell leads to a large variation in linear elastic wave dispersion associated with infinitesimal motion superposed on the externally imposed pre-strain. A finite element model is utilized to model the static deformation and subsequent linear wave motion at the pre-strained state. Analysis of the slowness surface and group velocity demonstrates that the NSH exhibits significant tunability and a high degree of anisotropy which can be used to guide wave energy depending on static pre-strain levels. In addition, it is shown that partial band gaps exist where only longitudinal waves propagate. The NSH therefore behaves as a meta-fluid, or pentamode metamaterial, which may be of use for applications of transformation elastodynamics such as cloaking and gradient index lens devices.

  2. A novel optogenetically tunable frequency modulating oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Mahajan

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology has enabled the creation of biological reconfigurable circuits, which perform multiple functions monopolizing a single biological machine; Such a system can switch between different behaviours in response to environmental cues. Previous work has demonstrated switchable dynamical behaviour employing reconfigurable logic gate genetic networks. Here we describe a computational framework for reconfigurable circuits in E.coli using combinations of logic gates, and also propose the biological implementation. The proposed system is an oscillator that can exhibit tunability of frequency and amplitude of oscillations. Further, the frequency of operation can be changed optogenetically. Insilico analysis revealed that two-component light systems, in response to light within a frequency range, can be used for modulating the frequency of the oscillator or stopping the oscillations altogether. Computational modelling reveals that mixing two colonies of E.coli oscillating at different frequencies generates spatial beat patterns. Further, we show that these oscillations more robustly respond to input perturbations compared to the base oscillator, to which the proposed oscillator is a modification. Compared to the base oscillator, the proposed system shows faster synchronization in a colony of cells for a larger region of the parameter space. Additionally, the proposed oscillator also exhibits lesser synchronization error in the transient period after input perturbations. This provides a strong basis for the construction of synthetic reconfigurable circuits in bacteria and other organisms, which can be scaled up to perform functions in the field of time dependent drug delivery with tunable dosages, and sets the stage for further development of circuits with synchronized population level behaviour.

  3. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2017-04-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  4. The β-chemokines CCL2 and CCL7 are two novel differentiation factors for midbrain dopaminergic precursors and neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edman, Linda C.; Mira, Helena; Arenas, Ernest

    2008-01-01

    β-chemokines are secreted factors that regulate diverse functions in the adult brain, such as neuro-immune responses and neurotransmission, but their function in the developing brain is largely unknown. We recently found that the orphan nuclear receptor, Nurr1, up regulates CCL2 and CCL7 in neural stem cells, suggesting a possible function of β-chemokines in midbrain development. Here we report that two β-chemokines, CCL2 and CCL7, and two of their receptors, CCR1 and CCR2, are expressed and developmentally regulated in the ventral midbrain (VM). Moreover, we found that the expression of CCL7 was down regulated in the Nurr1 knockout mice, linking CCL7 to dopamine (DA) neuron development. When the function of CCL2 and CCL7 was examined, we found that they selectively enhanced the differentiation of Nurr1+ precursors into DA neurons, but not their survival or progenitor proliferation in primary precursor cultures. Moreover, both CCL2 and CCL7 promoted neuritogenesis in midbrain DA neuron cultures. Thus, our results show for the first time a function of β-chemokines in the developing brain and identify β-chemokines as novel class of pro-differentiation factors for midbrain DA neurons. These data also suggest that β-chemokines may become useful tools to enhance the differentiation of DA cell preparations for cell replacement therapy and drug discovery in Parkinson's disease (PD)

  5. Tumor-Promoting Circuits That Regulate a Cancer-Related Chemokine Cluster: Dominance of Inflammatory Mediators Over Oncogenic Alterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibovich-Rivkin, Tal; Buganim, Yosef; Solomon, Hilla; Meshel, Tsipi; Rotter, Varda; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2012-01-01

    Here, we investigated the relative contribution of genetic/signaling components versus microenvironmental factors to the malignancy phenotype. In this system, we took advantage of non-transformed fibroblasts that carried defined oncogenic modifications in Ras and/or p53. These cells were exposed to microenvironmental pressures, and the expression of a cancer-related chemokine cluster was used as readout for the malignancy potential (CCL2, CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL10). In cells kept in-culture, synergism between Ras hyper-activation and p53 dysfunction was required to up-regulate the expression of the chemokine cluster. The in vivo passage of Ras High /p53 Low -modified cells has led to tumor formation, accompanied by potentiation of chemokine release, implicating a powerful role for the tumor microenvironment in up-regulating the chemokine cluster. Indeed, we found that inflammatory mediators which are prevalent in tumor sites, such as TNFα and IL-1β, had a predominant impact on the release of the chemokines, which was substantially higher than that obtained by the oncogenic modifications alone, possibly acting through the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB. Together, our results propose that in the unbiased model system that we were using, inflammatory mediators of the tumor milieu have dominating roles over oncogenic modifications in dictating the expression of a pro-malignancy chemokine readout

  6. Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Charles H.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical

  7. Designed synthesis of tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Page 1. Electronic Supplementary Material. Graphical abstract. Designed synthesis of tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) by a novel route and their oxidation resistance properties by Longlong. Xu et al (pp 1397–1402).

  8. New Temperature-Insensitive Electronically-Tunable Grounded Capacitor Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Abuelma'atti, Muhammad Taher; Khan, Muhammad Haroon

    1996-01-01

    A new circuit for simulating a grounded capacitor is presented. The circuit uses one operationalamplifier (OA), three operational-transconductance amplifiers (OTAs), and one capacitor. The realized capacitor is temperature-insensitive and electronically tunable. Experimental results are included.

  9. Novel Tunable Dye Laser for Lidar Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A tunable dye laser for Lidar detection will be fabricated based on the innovative dye-doped Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (HPDLC) technology. The...

  10. Tunable eye-safe Er:YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Němec, M; Šulc, J; Indra, L; Fibrich, M; Jelínková, H

    2015-01-01

    Er:YAG crystal was investigated as the gain medium in a diode (1452 nm) pumped tunable laser. The tunability was reached in an eye-safe region by an intracavity birefringent filter. The four tuning bands were obtained peaking at wavelengths 1616, 1632, 1645, and 1656 nm. The broadest continuous tunability was 6 nm wide peaking at 1616 nm. The laser was operating in a pulsed regime (10 ms pulse length, 10 Hz repetition rate). The maximum mean output power was 26.5 mW at 1645 nm. The constructed system demonstrated the tunability of a resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG laser which could be useful in the development of compact diode-pumped lasers for spectroscopic applications. (paper)

  11. Oxidative damage and chemokine production dominate days before immune cell infiltration and EAE disease debut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis is widely accepted as an inflammatory disease. However, studies indicate that degenerative processes in the CNS occur prior to inflammation. In the widely used animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we investigated the significance of degenera...

  12. Optimal design of tunable phononic bandgap plates under equibiaxial stretch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayatrasa, Saeid; Abhary, Kazem; Uddin, M S; Guest, James K

    2016-01-01

    Design and application of phononic crystal (PhCr) acoustic metamaterials has been a topic with tremendous growth of interest in the last decade due to their promising capabilities to manipulate acoustic and elastodynamic waves. Phononic controllability of waves through a particular PhCr is limited only to the spectrums located within its fixed bandgap frequency. Hence the ability to tune a PhCr is desired to add functionality over its variable bandgap frequency or for switchability. Deformation induced bandgap tunability of elastomeric PhCr solids and plates with prescribed topology have been studied by other researchers. Principally the internal stress state and distorted geometry of a deformed phononic crystal plate (PhP) changes its effective stiffness and leads to deformation induced tunability of resultant modal band structure. Thus the microstructural topology of a PhP can be altered so that specific tunability features are met through prescribed deformation. In the present study novel tunable PhPs of this kind with optimized bandgap efficiency-tunability of guided waves are computationally explored and evaluated. Low loss transmission of guided waves throughout thin walled structures makes them ideal for fabrication of low loss ultrasound devices and structural health monitoring purposes. Various tunability targets are defined to enhance or degrade complete bandgaps of plate waves through macroscopic tensile deformation. Elastomeric hyperelastic material is considered which enables recoverable micromechanical deformation under tuning finite stretch. Phononic tunability through stable deformation of phononic lattice is specifically required and so any topology showing buckling instability under assumed deformation is disregarded. Nondominated sorting genetic algorithm (GA) NSGA-II is adopted for evolutionary multiobjective topology optimization of hypothesized tunable PhP with square symmetric unit-cell and relevant topologies are analyzed through finite

  13. Tunable pulse-shaping with gated graphene nanoribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokopeva, Ludmila; Emani, Naresh K.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    We propose a pulse-shaper made of gated graphene nanoribbons. Simulations demonstrate tunable control over the shapes of transmitted and reflected pulses using the gating bias. Initial fabrication and characterization of graphene elements is also discussed.......We propose a pulse-shaper made of gated graphene nanoribbons. Simulations demonstrate tunable control over the shapes of transmitted and reflected pulses using the gating bias. Initial fabrication and characterization of graphene elements is also discussed....

  14. Freely tunable broadband polarization rotator for terahertz waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ren-Hao; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xiao-Ping; Peng, Ru-Wen; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Xu, Di-Hu; Xiong, Xiang; Huang, Xian-Rong; Wang, Mu

    2015-02-18

    A freely tunable polarization rotator for broadband terahertz waves is demonstrated using a three-rotating-layer metallic grating structure, which can conveniently rotate the polarization of a linearly polarized terahertz wave to any desired direction with nearly perfect conversion efficiency. This low-cost, high-efficiency, and freely tunable device has potential applications as material analysis, wireless communication, and THz imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Optically controlled tunable dispersion compensators based on pumped fiber gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xuewen; Sugden, Kate; Bennion, Ian

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate optically tunable dispersion compensators based on pumping fiber Bragg gratings made in Er/Yb codoped fiber. The tunable dispersion for a chirped grating and also a uniform-period grating was successfully demonstrated in the experiment. The dispersion of the chirped grating was tuned from 900 to 1990 ps/nm and also from -600 to -950 ps/nm in the experiment. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. Equivalent Circuit of a High Q Tunable PIFA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Pelosi, Mauro; Franek, Ondrej

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM) for a high Quality factor (Q) tunable Planar Inverted F Antenna (PIFA). A PIFA is described and simulated with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. The resonance behavior of the proposed ECM is compared to the FDTD results and shows...... a match. The ECM is also valid when the PIFA is made tunable with an additional capacitor....

  17. Capacity of wild-type and chemokine-armed parvovirus H-1PV for inhibiting neo-angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavie, Muriel [Tumor Virology Division, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Struyf, Sofie [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Rommelaere, Jean [Tumor Virology Division, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Van Damme, Jo [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Dinsart, Christiane, E-mail: c.dinsart@dkfz.de [Tumor Virology Division, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has been recognized as a powerful potential strategy for impeding the growth of various tumors. However no major therapeutic effects have been observed to date, mainly because of the emergence of several resistance mechanisms. Among novel strategies to target tumor vasculature, some oncolytic viruses open up new prospects. In this context, we addressed the question whether the rodent parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. We show that cultures of human normal (HUVEC) and immortalized (KS-IMM) endothelial cells sustain an abortive viral cycle upon infection with H-1PV and are sensitive to H-1PV cytotoxicity. H-1PV significantly inhibits infected KS-IMM tumor growth. This effect may be traced back by the virus ability to both kill proliferating endothelial cells and inhibit VEGF production Recombinant H-1PV vectors can also transduce tumor cells with chemokines endowed with anti-angiogenesis properties, and warrant further validation for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. - Highlights: • The oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. • Abortive viral cycle upon infection of endothelial cells with H-1PV. • Inhibition of VEGF expression and KS-IMM tumor growth by H-1PV.

  18. Capacity of wild-type and chemokine-armed parvovirus H-1PV for inhibiting neo-angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Muriel; Struyf, Sofie; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Dinsart, Christiane

    2013-12-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has been recognized as a powerful potential strategy for impeding the growth of various tumors. However no major therapeutic effects have been observed to date, mainly because of the emergence of several resistance mechanisms. Among novel strategies to target tumor vasculature, some oncolytic viruses open up new prospects. In this context, we addressed the question whether the rodent parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. We show that cultures of human normal (HUVEC) and immortalized (KS-IMM) endothelial cells sustain an abortive viral cycle upon infection with H-1PV and are sensitive to H-1PV cytotoxicity. H-1PV significantly inhibits infected KS-IMM tumor growth. This effect may be traced back by the virus ability to both kill proliferating endothelial cells and inhibit VEGF production Recombinant H-1PV vectors can also transduce tumor cells with chemokines endowed with anti-angiogenesis properties, and warrant further validation for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Capacity of wild-type and chemokine-armed parvovirus H-1PV for inhibiting neo-angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, Muriel; Struyf, Sofie; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Dinsart, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapy has been recognized as a powerful potential strategy for impeding the growth of various tumors. However no major therapeutic effects have been observed to date, mainly because of the emergence of several resistance mechanisms. Among novel strategies to target tumor vasculature, some oncolytic viruses open up new prospects. In this context, we addressed the question whether the rodent parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. We show that cultures of human normal (HUVEC) and immortalized (KS-IMM) endothelial cells sustain an abortive viral cycle upon infection with H-1PV and are sensitive to H-1PV cytotoxicity. H-1PV significantly inhibits infected KS-IMM tumor growth. This effect may be traced back by the virus ability to both kill proliferating endothelial cells and inhibit VEGF production Recombinant H-1PV vectors can also transduce tumor cells with chemokines endowed with anti-angiogenesis properties, and warrant further validation for the treatment of highly vascularized tumors. - Highlights: • The oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV can target endothelial cells. • Abortive viral cycle upon infection of endothelial cells with H-1PV. • Inhibition of VEGF expression and KS-IMM tumor growth by H-1PV

  20. The role of the eosinophil-selective chemokine, eotaxin, in allergic and non-allergic airways inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conroy Dolores M

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood eosinophilia and tissue infiltration by eosinophils are frequently observed in allergic inflammation and parasitic infections. This selective accumulation of eosinophils suggested the existence of endogenous eosinophil-selective chemoattractants. We have recently discovered a novel eosinophil-selective chemoattractant which we called eotaxin in an animal model of allergic airways disease. Eotaxin is generated in both allergic and non-allergic bronchopulmonary inflammation. The early increase in eotaxin paralled eosinophil infiltration in the lung tissue in both models. An antibody to IL-5 suppressed lung eosinophilia, correlating with an inhibition of eosinophil release from bone marrow, without affecting eotaxin generation. This suggests that endogenous IL-5 is important for eosinophil migration but does not appear to be a stimulus for eotaxin production. Constitutive levels of eotaxin observed in guinea-pig lung may be responsible for the basal lung eosinophilia observed in this species. Allergen-induced eotaxin was present mainly in the epithelium and alveolar macrophages, as detected by immunostaining. In contrast there was no upregulation of eotaxin by the epithelial cells following the injection of Sephadex beads and the alveolar macrophage and mononuclear cells surrounding the granuloma were the predominant positive staining cells. Eotaxin and related chemokines acting through the CCR3 receptor may play a major role in eosinophil recruitment in allergic inflammation and parasitic diseases and thus offer an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell motility in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: defective Rap1 and alphaLbeta2 activation by chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Kathleen J; Harris, Robert J; Linford, Andrea; Spiller, David G; Zuzel, Mirko; Cawley, John C

    2008-10-15

    Chemokine-induced activation of alpha4beta1 and alphaLbeta2 integrins (by conformational change and clustering) is required for lymphocyte transendothelial migration (TEM) and entry into lymph nodes. We have previously reported that chemokine-induced TEM is defective in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and that this defect is a result of failure of the chemokine to induce polar clustering of alphaLbeta2; engagement of alpha4beta1 and autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) restore clustering and TEM. The aim of the present study was to characterize the nature of this defect in alphaLbeta2 activation and determine how it is corrected. We show here that the alphaLbeta2 of CLL cells is already in variably activated conformations, which are not further altered by chemokine treatment. Importantly, such treatment usually does not cause an increase in the GTP-loading of Rap1, a GTPase central to chemokine-induced activation of integrins. Furthermore, we show that this defect in Rap1 GTP-loading is at the level of the GTPase and is corrected in CLL cells cultured in the absence of exogenous stimuli, suggesting that the defect is the result of in vivo stimulation. Finally, we show that, because Rap1-induced activation of both alpha4beta1 and alphaLbeta2 is defective, autocrine VEGF and chemokine are necessary to activate alpha4beta1 for ligand binding. Subsequently, this binding and both VEGF and chemokine stimulation are all needed for alphaLbeta2 activation for motility and TEM. The present study not only clarifies the nature of the alphaLbeta2 defect of CLL cells but is the first to implicate activation of Rap1 in the pathophysiology of CLL.

  3. Thiazolidinediones inhibit airway smooth muscle release of the chemokine CXCL10: in vitro comparison with current asthma therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel Petra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated mast cells are present within airway smooth muscle (ASM bundles in eosinophilic asthma. ASM production of the chemokine CXCL10 plays a role in their recruitment. Thus the effects of glucocorticoids (fluticasone, budesonide, long-acting β2-agonists (salmeterol, formoterol and thiazolidinediones (ciglitazone, rosiglitazone on CXCL10 production by ASM cells (ASMC from people with and without asthma were investigated in vitro. Methods Confluent serum-deprived cells were treated with the agents before and during cytokine stimulation for 0-24 h. CXCL10 protein/mRNA, IκB-α levels and p65 activity were measured using ELISA, RT PCR, immunoblotting and p65 activity assays respectively. Data were analysed using ANOVA followed by Fisher’s post-hoc test. Results Fluticasone and/or salmeterol at 1 and 100 nM inhibited CXCL10 release induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IFNγ or all three cytokines (cytomix. The latter was also not affected by budesonide and formoterol. In asthmatic ASMC low salmeterol, but not formoterol, concentrations increased cytomix-induced CXCL10 release and at 0.01 nM enhanced NF-κB activity. Salmeterol 0.1nM together with fluticasone 0.1 and 10 nM still increased CXCL10 release. The thiazolidinediones ciglitazone and rosiglitazone (at 25 and 100 μM inhibited cytomix-induced CXCL10 release but these inhibitory effects were not prevented by the PPAR-g antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone did not affect early NF-κB activity and CXCL10 mRNA production. Conclusions Thus the thiazolidinediones inhibited asthmatic ASMC CXCL10 release under conditions when common asthma therapies were ineffective or enhanced it. They may provide an alternative strategy to reduce mast cell-ASM interactions and restore normal airway physiology in asthma.

  4. Thiazolidinediones inhibit airway smooth muscle release of the chemokine CXCL10: in vitro comparison with current asthma therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Petra; Alkhouri, Hatem; Lalor, Daniel J; Burgess, Janette K; Armour, Carol L; Hughes, J Margaret

    2012-10-04

    Activated mast cells are present within airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles in eosinophilic asthma. ASM production of the chemokine CXCL10 plays a role in their recruitment. Thus the effects of glucocorticoids (fluticasone, budesonide), long-acting β2-agonists (salmeterol, formoterol) and thiazolidinediones (ciglitazone, rosiglitazone) on CXCL10 production by ASM cells (ASMC) from people with and without asthma were investigated in vitro. Confluent serum-deprived cells were treated with the agents before and during cytokine stimulation for 0-24 h. CXCL10 protein/mRNA, IκB-α levels and p65 activity were measured using ELISA, RT PCR, immunoblotting and p65 activity assays respectively. Data were analysed using ANOVA followed by Fisher's post-hoc test. Fluticasone and/or salmeterol at 1 and 100 nM inhibited CXCL10 release induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but not IFNγ or all three cytokines (cytomix). The latter was also not affected by budesonide and formoterol. In asthmatic ASMC low salmeterol, but not formoterol, concentrations increased cytomix-induced CXCL10 release and at 0.01 nM enhanced NF-κB activity. Salmeterol 0.1 nM together with fluticasone 0.1 and 10 nM still increased CXCL10 release. The thiazolidinediones ciglitazone and rosiglitazone (at 25 and 100 μM) inhibited cytomix-induced CXCL10 release but these inhibitory effects were not prevented by the PPAR-g antagonist GW9662. Ciglitazone did not affect early NF-κB activity and CXCL10 mRNA production. Thus the thiazolidinediones inhibited asthmatic ASMC CXCL10 release under conditions when common asthma therapies were ineffective or enhanced it. They may provide an alternative strategy to reduce mast cell-ASM interactions and restore normal airway physiology in asthma.

  5. Tunable bandgaps in a deployable metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Aditya; Karami, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    In this manuscript, we investigate deployable structures (such as solar arrays) and origami-inspired foldable structures as metamaterials capable of tunable wave manipulation. Specifically, we present a metamaterial whose bandgaps can be modulated by changing the fold angle of adjacent panels. The repeating unit cell of the structure consists of a beam (representing a panel) and a torsional spring (representing the folding mechanism). Two important cases are considered. Firstly, the fold angle (angle between adjacent beams), Ψ, is zero and only flexural waves propagate. In the second case, the fold angle is greater than zero (Ψ > 0). This causes longitudinal and transverse vibration to be coupled. FEM models are used to validate both these analyses. Increasing the fold angle was found to inflict notable changes to the wave transmission characteristics of the structure. In general, increasing the fold angles caused the bandwidth of bandgaps to increase. For the lowest four bandgaps we found bandwidth increases of 252 %, 177 %, 230 % and 163 % respectively at Ψ = 90 deg (relative to the bandwidths at Ψ = 0). In addition, non-trivial increases in bandwidth of the odd-numbered bandgaps occurs even at small fold angles-the bandwidth for the first and third bandgaps effectively double in size (increase by 100 %) at Ψ = 20 deg relative to those at Ψ = 0. This could have ramifications in the context of tunable wave manipulation and adaptive filtering. In addition, by expanding out the characteristic equation of transfer matrix for the straight structure, we prove that the upper band edge of the nth bandgap will always equal the nth simply supported natural frequency of the constituent beam. Further, we found that the ratio (EI/kt) is a pertinent parameter affecting the bandwidth of bandgaps. For low values of the ratio, effectively, no bandgap exists. For higher values of the ratio (EI/kt), we obtain a relatively large bandgap over which no waves propagate. This can

  6. Dimensional and Compositional Change of 1D Chalcogen Nanostructures Leading to Tunable Localized Surface Plasmon Resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yuho; Seo, Ho Jun; Choi, Jong-Jin; Hahn, Byung-Dong; Moon, Geon Dae

    2018-05-31

    As the oxygen family, chalcogen (Se, Te) nanostructures have been considered important elements for various practical fields and further exploited to constitute metal chalcogenides for each targeted application. Here we report a controlled synthesis of well-defined one-dimensional chalcogen nanostructures such as nanowries, nanorods, and nanotubes by controlling reduction reaction rate to fine-tune the dimension and composition of the products. Tunable optical properties (localized surface plasmon resonances) of these chalcogen nanostructures are observed depending on their morphological, dimensional, and compositional variation. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Composites with mechanically tunable plasmon frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuil, Crystal J; Amirkhizi, Alireza V; Bayatpur, Farhad; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes our efforts to create a composite material with a mechanically tunable plasmon frequency at the microwave band. The permittivity of the composite changes sign at the plasmon frequency. Such composites, therefore, can be used as electromagnetic filters. Theoretically, an array of non-magnetic, metallic wire coils has been shown to have a plasmon behavior that is dependent on the wire thickness, coil inner diameter, pitch and coil spacing. Here, a material is made out of an array of coils placed within a non-metallic frame, and the material plasmon frequency is tuned through altering the pitch. The coils are arranged with alternating handedness to create an effective, non-chiral medium. A transmit/receive setup is used to characterize the electromagnetic behavior of the composite. The setup consists of a vector network analyzer and two horn antennas, which are used to measure the scattering parameters of the material. These parameters are then used to calculate the permittivity. The results show an increase in the plasmon frequency with increase in the pitch. Increasing the pitch 30%, from 3 to 3.9 mm, results in a corresponding increase from 6.3 to 7.5 GHz in the frequency

  8. Continuously tunable nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lucia R; Wang, Juexiao Sherry; Fang, John Z; Evans, Emily R; Pinto, Alessandro; Pekker, Irena; Boykin, Richard; Ngouenet, Celine; Webster, Philippa J; Beechem, Joseph; Zhang, David Yu

    2015-12-01

    In silico-designed nucleic acid probes and primers often do not achieve favorable specificity and sensitivity tradeoffs on the first try, and iterative empirical sequence-based optimization is needed, particularly in multiplexed assays. We present a novel, on-the-fly method of tuning probe affinity and selectivity by adjusting the stoichiometry of auxiliary species, which allows for independent and decoupled adjustment of the hybridization yield for different probes in multiplexed assays. Using this method, we achieved near-continuous tuning of probe effective free energy. To demonstrate our approach, we enforced uniform capture efficiency of 31 DNA molecules (GC content, 0-100%), maximized the signal difference for 11 pairs of single-nucleotide variants and performed tunable hybrid capture of mRNA from total RNA. Using the Nanostring nCounter platform, we applied stoichiometric tuning to simultaneously adjust yields for a 24-plex assay, and we show multiplexed quantitation of RNA sequences and variants from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples.

  9. Stretchable Random Lasers with Tunable Coherent Loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tzu-Min; Wang, Cih-Su; Liao, Chi-Shiun; Lin, Shih-Yao; Perumal, Packiyaraj; Chiang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-12-22

    Stretchability represents a key feature for the emerging world of realistic applications in areas, including wearable gadgets, health monitors, and robotic skins. Many optical and electronic technologies that can respond to large strain deformations have been developed. Laser plays a very important role in our daily life since it was discovered, which is highly desirable for the development of stretchable devices. Herein, stretchable random lasers with tunable coherent loops are designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. To illustrate our working principle, the stretchable random laser is made possible by transferring unique ZnO nanobrushes on top of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer substrate. Apart from the traditional gain material of ZnO nanorods, ZnO nanobrushes were used as optical gain materials so they can serve as scattering centers and provide the Fabry-Perot cavity to enhance laser action. The stretchable PDMS substrate gives the degree of freedom to mechanically tune the coherent loops of the random laser action by changing the density of ZnO nanobrushes. It is found that the number of laser modes increases with increasing external strain applied on the PDMS substrate due to the enhanced possibility for the formation of coherent loops. The device can be stretched by up to 30% strain and subjected to more than 100 cycles without loss in laser action. The result shows a major advance for the further development of man-made smart stretchable devices.

  10. Hybrid nanostructured materials with tunable magnetic characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Martínez, Nubia E.; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; García-Gutiérrez, Domingo; González-González, Virgilio A.; Torres-Castro, Alejandro; Ortiz-Méndez, U. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the development of hybrid nanostructured materials (HNM) based on spinel-metal-oxide nanoparticles (SMON) stabilized in carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC)/cetyltrimethyl-ammonium-bromide (CTAB) templates, with tunable magnetic characteristics. These HNM were synthesized using a one-pot chemical approach to obtain CMC/CTAB templates with controllable size and morphology, where the SMON could be densely arranged. The synthesized HNM were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and its related techniques, such as bright field (BF) and Z-contrast (HAADF-STEM) imaging, and selected area electron diffraction, as well as static magnetic measuring. Experimental evidence suggests that the morphology and size of the CMC/CTAB templates are highly dependent on the weight ratio of CTAB:SMON, as well as the hydration days of the CMC that is used for the synthesis of the HNM. Controlling these parameters allows modifying the density of the SMON arrangement in the CMC/CTAB templates. Moreover, magnetic features such as remanence, coercivity, and blocking/de-blocking processes of the particles’ magnetic moments are highly dependent on the interactions among the SMON assembled in the templates. Hence, the magnetic characteristics of HNM can be modulated or tuned by controlling the manner the SMON are arranged within the CMC/CTAB templates.

  11. Controlling superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, S; Park, E; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Kim, J N; Shim, J-H; Thompson, J D; Park, Tuson

    2015-03-04

    The heavy fermion compound CeRhIn5 is a rare example where a quantum critical point, hidden by a dome of superconductivity, has been explicitly revealed and found to have a local nature. The lack of additional examples of local types of quantum critical points associated with superconductivity, however, has made it difficult to unravel the role of quantum fluctuations in forming Cooper pairs. Here, we show the precise control of superconductivity by tunable quantum critical points in CeRhIn5. Slight tin-substitution for indium in CeRhIn5 shifts its antiferromagnetic quantum critical point from 2.3 GPa to 1.3 GPa and induces a residual impurity scattering 300 times larger than that of pure CeRhIn5, which should be sufficient to preclude superconductivity. Nevertheless, superconductivity occurs at the quantum critical point of the tin-doped metal. These results underline that fluctuations from the antiferromagnetic quantum criticality promote unconventional superconductivity in CeRhIn5.

  12. Tunable white light source for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczak, Urszula J.; Gryko, Lukasz; Zajac, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Development of light-emitting diodes has brought new possibilities in many applications, especially in terms of flexible adjustment of light spectra. This feature is very useful in construction of many devices, for example for medical diagnosis and treatment. It was proved, that in some cases LEDs can easily replace lasers during therapy of cancer without reduction of efficiency of this process. On the other hand during diagnosis process LED-based constructions can provide unique ability to adjust the color temperature of the output light while maintaining high color rendering. It allows for optimum surface contrast and enhanced tissue differentiation at the operator site. In the paper we describe the construction of the tunable LED-based source designed for application in endoscopy. It was optimized from the point of view of the color rendition for 5 different correlated color temperatures (illuminant A, D55, D65, 3500K and 4500K) with the restriction of very high (>90) values of general and specific color rendering indexes (according to Ra method). The source is composed of 13 light-emitting diodes from visible region mounted on the common radiator and controlled by dedicated system. Spectra of the components are mixed and the spectra of output light is analyzed. On the basis of obtained spectra colorimetric parameters are calculated and compared with the results of theoretical analysis.

  13. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@physics.auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bellas, D. V.; Lidorikis, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Abadias, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-27

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as Ti{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N, and Zr{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400–700 nm) and UVA (315–400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  14. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middel, Peter; Brauneck, Sven; Meyer, Werner; Radzun, Heinz-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response

  15. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. Methods We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. Results The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Conclusion Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response.

  16. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Stat3 inhibition attenuates mechanical allodynia through transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in spinal astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is known to induce cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating gene transcription. Recent studies showed that Stat3 modulates nociceptive transmission by reducing spinal astrocyte proliferation. However, it is unclear whether Stat3 also contributes to the modulation of nociceptive transmission by regulating inflammatory response in spinal astrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of Stat3 on neuroinflammation during development of pain in rats after intrathecal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS: Stat3 specific siRNA oligo and synthetic selective inhibitor (Stattic were applied to block the activity of Stat3 in primary astrocytes or rat spinal cord, respectively. LPS was used to induce the expression of proinflammatory genes in all studies. Immunofluorescence staining of cells and slices of spinal cord was performed to monitor Stat3 activation. The impact of Stat3 inhibition on proinflammatory genes expression was determined by cytokine antibody array, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mechanical allodynia, as determined by the threshold pressure that could induce hind paw withdrawal after application of standardized von Frey filaments, was used to detect the effects of Stat3 inhibition after pain development with intrathecal LPS injection. RESULTS: Intrathecal injection of LPS activated Stat3 in reactive spinal astrocytes. Blockade of Stat3 activity attenuated mechanical allodynia significantly and was correlated with a lower number of reactive astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. In vitro study demonstrated that Stat3 modulated inflammatory response in primary astrocytes by transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression including Cx3cl1, Cxcl5, Cxcl10 and Ccl20. Similarly, inhibition of Stat3 reversed the expression of these chemokines in the spinal dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: Stat3 acted as a

  18. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 on lymphocytes of leprosy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Mendonça

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which induces chronic granulomatous infection of the skin and peripheral nerves. The disease ranges from the tuberculoid to the lepromatous forms, depending on the cellular immune response of the host. Chemokines are thought to be involved in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy, but few studies have investigated the expression of chemokine receptors on leukocytes of leprosy patients. In the present study, we evaluated 21 leprosy patients (M/F: 16/5 with a new diagnosis from the Dermatology Outpatient Clinic of the University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais. The control group was composed of 20 healthy members (M/F: 15/5 of the community recruited by means of announcements. The expression of CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4 was investigated by flow cytometry on the surface of peripheral blood lymphocytes. There was a decrease in percentage of CD3+CXCR4+ and CD4+CXCR4+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of leprosy patients (median [range], 17.6 [2.7-41.9] and 65.3 [3.9-91.9], respectively compared to the control group (median [range], 43.0 [3.7-61.3] and 77.2 [43.6-93.5], respectively. The percentage of CD4+CXCR4+ was significantly lower in patients with the tuberculoid form (median [range], 45.7 [0.0-83.1] of the disease, but not in lepromatous patients (median [range], 81.5 [44.9-91.9]. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor may play a role in leprosy immunopathogenesis, probably directing cell migration to tissue lesions in tuberculoid leprosy patients.

  19. Identification and expression analysis of a CC chemokine from cobia (Rachycentron canadum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Juan; Su, Youlu; Guo, Zhixun; Xu, Liwen; Sun, Xiuxiu; Wang, Yunxin

    2013-06-01

    Chemokines are small, secreted cytokine peptides known principally for their ability to induce migration and activation of leukocyte populations and regulate the immune response mechanisms. The cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a marine finfish species, has a great potential for net cage aquaculture in the South China Sea. We isolated and characterized a CC chemokine cDNA from cobia-designated RcCC2. Its cDNA is 783 bp in length and encodes a putative protein of 110 amino acids. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the RcCC2 gene, which contains four conserved cysteine residues, shares a high degree of similarity with other known CC chemokine sequences and is closest to the CCL19/21 clade. The mRNA of RcCC2 is expressed constitutively in all tested tissues, including gill, liver, muscle, spleen, kidney, head kidney, skin, brain, stomach, intestine and heart, but not blood, with the highest level of expression in gill and liver. The reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to examine the expression of the RcCC2 gene in immune-related tissues, including head kidney, spleen and liver, following intraperitoneal injection of the viral mimic polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, formalin-killed Vibrio carchariae (bacterial vaccine) and phosphate-buffered saline as a control. RcCC2 gene expression was up-regulated differentially in head kidney, spleen and liver during 12 h after challenge. These results indicate that the RcCC2 gene is inducible and is involved in immune responses, suggesting RcCC2 has an important role in the early stage of viral and bacterial infections.

  20. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its splice variant are expressed in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Safadi, Fayez; Rogers, Thomas J

    2004-09-01

    Activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 by its cognate ligands induces several differentiated cellular responses important to the growth and migration of a variety of hematopoietic and structural cells. In the human respiratory tract, human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) release the CXCR3 ligands Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. Simultaneous expression of CXCR3 by HAEC would have important implications for the processes of airway inflammation and repair. Accordingly, in the present study we sought to determine whether HAEC also express the classic CXCR3 chemokine receptor CXCR3-A and its splice variant CXCR3-B and hence may respond in autocrine fashion to its ligands. We found that cultured HAEC (16-HBE and tracheocytes) constitutively expressed CXCR3 mRNA and protein. CXCR3 mRNA levels assessed by expression array were approximately 35% of beta-actin expression. In contrast, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR8, and CX3CR1 were <5% beta-actin. Both CXCR3-A and -B were expressed. Furthermore, tracheocytes freshly harvested by bronchoscopy stained positively for CXCR3 by immunofluorescence microscopy, and 68% of cytokeratin-positive tracheocytes (i.e., the epithelial cell population) were positive for CXCR3 by flow cytometry. In 16-HBE cells, CXCR3 receptor density was approximately 78,000 receptors/cell when assessed by competitive displacement of 125I-labeled IP-10/CXCL10. Finally, CXCR3 ligands induced chemotactic responses and actin reorganization in 16-HBE cells. These findings indicate constitutive expression by HAEC of a functional CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Our data suggest the possibility that autocrine activation of CXCR3 expressed by HAEC may contribute to airway inflammation and remodeling in obstructive lung disease by regulating HAEC migration.

  1. Efficient T-cell surveillance of the CNS requires expression of the CXC chemokine receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline; Moos, Torben

    2004-01-01

    T-cells play an important role in controlling viral infections inside the CNS. To study the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the migration and positioning of virus-specific effector T-cells within the brain, CXCR3-deficient mice were infected intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis......-cell-mediated immunopathology. Quantitative analysis of the cellular infiltrate in CSF of infected mice revealed modest, if any, decrease in the number of mononuclear cells recruited to the meninges in the absence of CXCR3. However, immunohistological analysis disclosed a striking impairment of CD8+ T-cells from CXCR3...

  2. Allosteric and orthosteric sites in CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), a chimeric receptor approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Steen, Anne; Jensen, Pia C

    2011-01-01

    -allosteric molecules. A chimera was successfully constructed between CCR5 and the closely related CCR2 by transferring all extracellular regions of CCR2 to CCR5, i.e. a Trojan horse that resembles CCR2 extracellularly but signals through a CCR5 transmembrane unit. The chimera bound CCR2 (CCL2 and CCL7), but not CCR5...... preserved, the allosteric enhancement of chemokine binding was disrupted. In summary, the Trojan horse chimera revealed that orthosteric and allosteric sites could be structurally separated and still act together with transmission of agonism and antagonism across the different receptor units....

  3. Role of Chemokine Network in the Development and Progression of Ovarian Cancer: A Potential Novel Pharmacological Target

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    Federica Barbieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common type of gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in surgery and chemotherapy, the survival rate is still low since most ovarian cancers relapse and become drug-resistant. Chemokines are small chemoattractant peptides mainly involved in the immune responses. More recently, chemokines were also demonstrated to regulate extra-immunological functions. It was shown that the chemokine network plays crucial functions in the tumorigenesis in several tissues. In particular the imbalanced or aberrant expression of CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 strongly affects cancer cell proliferation, recruitment of immunosuppressive cells, neovascularization, and metastasization. In the last years, several molecules able to target CXCR4 or CXCL12 have been developed to interfere with tumor growth, including pharmacological inhibitors, antagonists, and specific antibodies. This chemokine ligand/receptor pair was also proposed to represent an innovative therapeutic target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Thus, a thorough understanding of ovarian cancer biology, and how chemokines may control these different biological activities might lead to the development of more effective therapies. This paper will focus on the current biology of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the context of understanding their potential role in ovarian cancer development.

  4. Genetic characterization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 gene in lagomorphs: comparison between the families Ochotonidae and Leporidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, J; Esteves, P J; Carmo, C R; Müller, A; Thompson, G; van der Loo, W

    2008-04-01

    Chemokines receptors are transmembrane proteins that bind chemokines. Chemokines and their receptors are known to play a crucial role in the immune system and in pathogen entry. There is evidence that myxoma virus, the causative agent of myxomatosis, can use the chemokine receptor CXCR4 to infect cells. This virus causes a benign disease in its natural host, Sylvilagus, but in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) it causes a highly fatal and infectious disease known as myxomatosis. We have characterized the chemokine receptor CXCR4 gene in five genera of the order Lagomorpha, Ochotona (Ochotonidae), and Oryctolagus, Lepus, Bunolagus and Sylvilagus (Leporidae). In lagomorphs, the CXCR4 is highly conserved, with most of the protein diversity found at surface regions. Five amino acid replacements were observed, two in the intracellular loops, one in the transmembrane domain and two in the extracellular loops. Oryctolagus features unique amino acid changes at the intracellular domains, putting this genus apart of all other lagomorphs. Furthermore, in the 37 European rabbits analysed, which included healthy rabbits and rabbits with clinical symptoms of myxomatosis, 14 nucleotide substitutions were obtained but no amino acid differences were observed.

  5. Diesel effects in allergic diseases: modulation of chemokines synthesis and development of an in vivo allergic model; Effets du diesel dans les maladies allergiques: modulation de la synthese de chimiokines et developpement d'un modele allergique in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senechal, St.

    2003-09-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by an immunoglobulin E (IgE)-dependent inflammatory reaction, presenting a type 2 cytokines profile (IL-4 and IL-5), and by the presence of eosinophils. The particulate pollution in urban areas comes mainly from diesel engines. Diesel particulates and their associated hydrocarbons, are probably involved in the recent increase of allergic pathologies thanks to their capability to induce a type-2 immune response. In this work, the effect of organic extracts of diesel particulates on the development of a Th2-type inflammatory response are analyzed, in particular by the evaluation of the synthesis modulation of chemokines, molecules known for their attraction capacities with respect to inflammatory cells, and of Th1 or Th2-type lymphocytes. It is shown that the exposure of mono-nucleated cells and alveolar macrophages from people allergic to diesel particulates induces a diminution of IP-10 production (pro-Th1), and in conjunction with the allergen, an increase of MDC (pro-Th2), mediated by the CD28 route. The functional consequence is an increased capability to attract human Th2 clones, non-completely inhibited by an anti-MDC neutralizing Ac, suggesting the participation of some other chemokines. Other analyses have shown that the diesel alone induces an I-309 production (pro-Th2) and that the diesel/allergen combination leads to a production of PARC (pro-Th2) but also of MIG (pro-Th1), the functional result being an attraction of Th2 cells again. In parallel and surprisingly, an increase of the expression of chemokine receptors expressed on Th1 cells has been evidenced, in particular the CXCR3, combined to a loss of its chemo-attractive power. These properties have been linked to a clearance function of the receptors with respect to their ligands. These results suggest that diesel can amplify a type-2 noxious response to allergic patients, firstly by inducing pro-Th2 chemokines, and secondly by facilitating the clearance of pro-Th1

  6. Ultrahigh frequency tunability of aperture-coupled microstrip antenna via electric-field tunable BST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hong-Lei; Xue, Qian; Gao, Xiao-Yang; Yao, Feng-Rui; Lu, Shi-Yang; Wang, Ye-Long; Liu, Chun-Heng; Zhang, Yong-Cheng; Lü, Yue-Guang; Li, Shan-Dong

    2015-12-01

    A composite ceramic with nominal composition of 45.0 wt%(Ba0.5Sr0.5)TiO3-55.0 wt%MgO (acronym is BST-MgO) is sintered for fabricating a frequency reconfigurable aperture-coupled microstrip antenna. The calcined BST-MgO composite ceramic exhibits good microwave dielectric properties at X-band with appropriate dielectric constant ɛr around 85, lower dielectric loss tan δ about 0.01, and higher permittivity tunability 14.8% at 8.33 kV/cm. An ultrahigh E-field tunability of working frequency up to 11.0% (i.e., from 9.1 GHz to 10.1 GHz with a large frequency shift of 1000 MHz) at a DC bias field from 0 to 8.33 kV/cm and a considerably large center gain over 7.5 dB are obtained in the designed frequency reconfigurable microstrip antenna. These results demonstrate that BST materials are promising for the frequency reconfigurable antenna. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11074040) and the Key Project of Shandong Provincial Department of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. ZR2012FZ006).

  7. Serum concentrations of chemokines (CCL-5 and CXCL-12), chemokine receptors (CCR-5 and CXCR-4), and IL-6 in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and avoidant personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna M; Moś, Danuta M; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander; Szromek, Adam R

    2015-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be perceived as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder in which cytokines affecting the neurochemical and neuroendocrine functions of the body play an important role. Among cytokines, chemokines participating in activation of the inflammatory response are considered to be crucial. 220 men and women were enrolled in the study. 180 of them constituted the study group. The studied groups consisted of: 60 patients with a diagnosed avoidant personality disorders (APD), 60 patients with a diagnosed APD and with PTSD and of 60 patients with PTSD but without a APD. There were 30 women and 30 men in each group of 60 subjects. The control group consisted of 40 healthy individuals. The plasma levels of chemokines and their receptors (CCL-5, CXCR-5, CXCL-12 and CXCR-4), as well as IL-6, were assessed by ELISA. There was an increase in the CXCL-12 and CCL-5 levels in women and men with the PTSD versus the control group. Also, increased levels of IL-6 and the receptors CXCR-4, CCR-5 were observed in women and men with PTSD. The levels of CXCL-12 and CCL-5 chemokines, as well as CCR-5 and CXCR4 receptors were higher in women than in men. The results of this study indicate a need for assessment of the CCL-5 and CXCL-12 chemokine levels, as they are likely markers of PTSD. Measurement of the concentrations of chemokines, chemokine receptors and IL-6 in women and men with PTSD along with concomittant APD may be useful for early detection of mental disorders. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging role of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 related mechanisms in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-08-24

    Chemokines are critical components in pathology. The roles of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 (CCL4) and its receptor are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases. However, due to the complexity of these diseases, the specific effects of CCL4 remain unclear, although recent reports have suggested that multiple pathways are related to CCL4. In this review, we provide an overview of the role and potential mechanisms of CCL4 and one of its major receptors, fifth CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), in DM and cardiovascular diseases. CCL4-related mechanisms, including CCL4 and CCR5, might provide potential therapeutic targets in DM and/or atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases.

  9. The CXCR4/SDF-1 chemokine receptor axis: a new target therapeutic for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Shannon; Bebb, Gwyn

    2008-12-01

    Chemokines are proinflammatory chemoattractant cytokines that regulate cell trafficking and adhesion. The CXCR4 chemokine receptor and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor (SDF-1), constitute a chemokine/receptor axis that has attracted great interest because of an increasing understanding of its role in cancer, including lung cancer. The CXCR4/SDF-1 complex activates several pathways that mediate chemotaxis, migration and secretion of angiopoietic factors. Neutralization of SDF-1 by anti-SDF-1 or anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody in preclinical in vivo studies results in a significant decrease of non-small cell lung cancer metastases. Since anti-SDF-1/CXCR4 strategies have already been developed for use in combating human immunodeficiency virus infections, it is likely that these approaches will be used in clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer in the very near future.

  10. Effects of Resistance Exercise Intensity on Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression in Atopic Dermatitis Mouse Model

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    Eun-Ju Choi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Although the evidence is unclear, literature indicates that resistance exercise reduces inflammation in colorectal disease. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of colon tissue on cytokine and chemokine gene expression with changes in resistance exercise intensity. Material and Methods: We divided male BABL/c mice into 6 groups (each group n=10, total=60 (control group: CON, low resistance exercise group: EX_L, high resistance exercise group: EX_H, atopic dermatitis group: AD, atopic dermatitis+low resistance exercise group: AD+EX_L, atopic dermatitis+high resistance exercise group: AD+EX_H and subjected them to ladder climbing resistance exercise for 4 weeks. After 24 h of each exercise schedule, a real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20. Results: The AD group showed significantly higher mRNA expression of IL-6 and CCL20 compared with the CON, EX_L, EX_H, AD+EX_L, and AD+EX_H groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: In conclusion, both high and low resistance exercise effectively decreases the concentration of IL-6 and CCL20 in mice with and without AD.

  11. CXCL12 chemokine and GABA neurotransmitter systems crosstalk and their putative roles

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    Guyon eAlice

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since CXCL12 and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been found in the brain, the role of this chemokine has been expanded from chemoattractant in the immune system to neuromodulatory in the brain. Several pieces of evidence suggest that this chemokine system could crosstalk with the GABAergic system, known to be the main inhibitory neurotransmitter system in the brain. Indeed, GABA and CXCL12 as well as their receptors are colocalized in many cell types including neurons and there are several examples in which these two systems interact. Several mechanisms can be proposed to explain how these systems interact, including receptor-receptor interactions, crosstalk at the level of second messenger cascades, or direct pharmacological interactions, as GABA and GABAB receptor agonists/antagonists have been shown to be allosteric modulators of CXCR4.The interplay between CXCL12/CXCR4-CXCR7 and GABA/GABAA-GABAB receptors systems could have many physiological implications in neurotransmission, cancer and inflammation. In addition, the GABAB agonist baclofen is currently used in medicine to treat spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and other disorders. More recently it has also been used in the treatment of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. The allosteric effects of this agent on CXCR4 could contribute to these beneficial effects or at the opposite, to its side effects.

  12. Statins affect the presentation of endothelial chemokines by targeting to multivesicular bodies.

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    Johanna Hol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to lowering cholesterol, statins are thought to beneficially modulate inflammation. Several chemokines including CXCL1/growth-related oncogene (GRO-α, CXCL8/interleukin (IL-8 and CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 are important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and can be influenced by statin-treatment. Recently, we observed that atorvastatin-treatment alters the intracellular content and subcellular distribution of GRO-α in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. METHODOLOGY/ PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of atorvastatin on secretion levels and subcellular distribution of GRO-α, IL-8 and MCP-1 in HUVECs activated by interleukin (IL-1β were evaluated by ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. Atorvastatin increased the intracellular contents of GRO-α, IL-8, and MCP-1 and induced colocalization with E-selectin in multivesicular bodies. This effect was prevented by adding the isoprenylation substrate GGPP, but not the cholesterol precursor squalene, indicating that atorvastatin exerts these effects by inhibiting isoprenylation rather than depleting the cells of cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Atorvastatin targets inflammatory chemokines to the endocytic pathway and multivesicular bodies and may contribute to explain the anti-inflammatory effect of statins at the level of endothelial cell function.

  13. A role for chemokine signaling in neural crest cell migration and craniofacial development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Eugenia C. Olesnicky; Birkholz, Denise A.; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2009-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a unique population of multipotent cells that migrate along defined pathways throughout the embryo and give rise to many diverse cell types including pigment cells, craniofacial cartilage and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Aberrant migration of NCCs results in a wide variety of congenital birth defects including craniofacial abnormalities. The chemokine Sdf1 and its receptors, Cxcr4 and Cxcr7, have been identified as key components in the regulation of cell migration in a variety of tissues. Here we describe a novel role for the zebrafish chemokine receptor Cxcr4a in the development and migration of cranial NCCs (CNCCs). We find that loss of Cxcr4a, but not Cxcr7b results in aberrant CNCC migration, defects in the neurocranium, as well as cranial ganglia dismorphogenesis. Moreover, overexpression of either Sdf1b or Cxcr4a causes aberrant CNCC migration and results in ectopic craniofacial cartilages. We propose a model in which Sdf1b signaling from the pharyngeal arch endoderm and optic stalk to Cxcr4a expressing CNCCs is important for both the proper condensation of the CNCCs into pharyngeal arches and the subsequent patterning and morphogenesis of the neural crest derived tissues. PMID:19576198

  14. Onbaekwon Suppresses Colon Cancer Cell Invasion by Inhibiting Expression of the CXC Chemokine Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Buyun; Yoon, Jaewoo; Yoon, Seong Woo; Park, Byoungduck

    2017-06-01

    Cysteine X cysteine (CXC) chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) were originally identified as chemoattractants between immune cells and sites of inflammation. Since studies have validated an increased level of CXCL12 and its receptor in patients with colorectal cancers, CXCL12/CXCR4 axis has been considered as a valuable marker of cancer metastasis. Therefore, identification of CXCR4 inhibitors has great potential to abrogate tumor metastasis. Onbaekwon (OBW) is a complex herbal formula that is derived from the literature of traditional Korean medicine Dongeuibogam. In this study, we demonstrated that OBW suppressed CXCR4 expression in various cancer cell types in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors had no effect to prevent the OBW-induced suppression of CXCR4, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of OBW was not due to proteolytic degradation but occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay further confirmed that OBW could block endogenous activation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of CXCR4 in colon cancer cells. Consistent with the aforementioned molecular basis, OBW abolished cell invasion induced by CXCL12 in colon cancer cells. Together, our results suggest that OBW, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, could be a promising therapeutic agent contributing to cancer treatment.

  15. Genetic diversification of chemokine CXCL16 and its receptor CXCR6 in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; He, Dan; Liu, Jiabin; Ni, Qingyong; Lyu, Yongqing; Xiong, Shiqiu; Li, Yan

    2018-08-01

    Chemokine CXCL16 and its receptor CXCR6 are associated with a series of physiological and pathological processes in cooperative and stand-alone fashions. To shed insight into their versatile nature, we studied genetic variations of CXCL16 and CXCR6 in primates. Evolutionary analyses revealed that these genes underwent a similar evolutionary fate. Both genes experienced adaptive diversification with the phylogenetic division of cercopithecoids (Old World monkeys) and hominoids (humans, great apes, and gibbons) from their common ancestor. In contrast, they were conserved in the periods preceding and following the dividing process. In terms of the adaptive diversification between cercopithecoids and hominoids, the adaptive genetic changes have occurred in the mucin-like and chemokine domains of CXCL16 and the N-terminus and transmembrane helixes of CXCR6. In combination with currently available structural and functional information for CXCL16 and CXCR6, the parallels between the evolutionary footprints and the co-occurrence of adaptive diversification at some evolutionary stage suggest that interplay could exist between the diversification-related amino acid sites, or between the domains on which the identified sites are located, in physiological processes such as chemotaxis and/or cell adhesion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Defective chemokine signal integration in leukocytes lacking activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branham-O'Connor, Melissa; Robichaux, William G; Zhang, Xian-Kui; Cho, Hyeseon; Kehrl, John H; Lanier, Stephen M; Blumer, Joe B

    2014-04-11

    Activator of G-protein signaling 3 (AGS3, gene name G-protein signaling modulator-1, Gpsm1), an accessory protein for G-protein signaling, has functional roles in the kidney and CNS. Here we show that AGS3 is expressed in spleen, thymus, and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, and is up-regulated upon leukocyte activation. We explored the role of AGS3 in immune cell function by characterizing chemokine receptor signaling in leukocytes from mice lacking AGS3. No obvious differences in lymphocyte subsets were observed. Interestingly, however, AGS3-null B and T lymphocytes and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells exhibited significant chemotactic defects as well as reductions in chemokine-stimulated calcium mobilization and altered ERK and Akt activation. These studies indicate a role for AGS3 in the regulation of G-protein signaling in the immune system, providing unexpected venues for the potential development of therapeutic agents that modulate immune function by targeting these regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Lactocepin secreted by Lactobacillus exerts anti-inflammatory effects by selectively degrading proinflammatory chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schillde, Marie-Anne; Hörmannsperger, Gabriele; Weiher, Monika; Alpert, Carl-Alfred; Hahne, Hannes; Bäuerl, Christine; van Huynegem, Karolien; Steidler, Lothar; Hrncir, Tomas; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Kuster, Bernhard; Haller, Dirk

    2012-04-19

    The intestinal microbiota has been linked to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and oral treatment with specific bacteria can ameliorate IBD. One bacterial mixture, VSL#3, containing Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Streptococcus, was clinically shown to reduce inflammation in IBD patients and normalize intestinal levels of IP-10, a lymphocyte-recruiting chemokine, in a murine colitis model. We identified Lactobacillus paracasei prtP-encoded lactocepin as a protease that selectively degrades secreted, cell-associated, and tissue-distributed IP-10, resulting in significantly reduced lymphocyte recruitment after intraperitoneal injection in an ileitis model. A human Lactobacillus casei isolate was also found to encode lactocepin and degrade IP-10. L. casei feeding studies in a murine colitis model (T cell transferred Rag2(-/-) mice) revealed that a prtP-disruption mutant was significantly less potent in reducing IP-10 levels, T cell infiltration and inflammation in cecal tissue compared to the isogenic wild-type strain. Thus, lactocepin-based therapies may be effective treatments for chemokine-mediated diseases like IBD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. UNBS5162, a Novel Naphthalimide That Decreases CXCL Chemokine Expression in Experimental Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Several naphthalimides have been evaluated clinically as potential anticancer agents. UNBS3157, a naphthalimide that belongs to the same class as amonafide, was designed to avoid the specific activating metabolism that induces amonafide’s hematotoxicity. The current study shows that UNBS3157 rapidly and irreversibly hydrolyzes to UNBS5162 without generating amonafide. In vivo UNBS5162 after repeat administration significantly increased survival in orthotopic human prostate cancer models. Results obtained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI using UNBS3157 and UNBS5162 against the NCI 60 cell line panel did not show a correlation with any other compound present in the NCI database, including amonafide, thereby suggesting a unique mechanism of action for these two novel naphthalimides. Affymetrix genome-wide microarray analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that in vitro exposure of PC-3 cells to UNBS5162 (1 μM for 5 successive days dramatically decreased the expression of the proangiogenic CXCL chemokines. Histopathology additionally revealed antiangiogenic properties in vivo for UNBS5162 in the orthotopic PC-3 model. In conclusion, the present study reveals UNBS5162 to be a pan-antagonist of CXCL chemokine expression, with the compound displaying antitumor effects in experimental models of human refractory prostate cancer when administered alone and found to enhance the activity of taxol when coadministered with the taxoid.

  19. Elevated levels of CXC chemokine connective tissue activating peptide (CTAP)-III in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gina; Gardner, Brian K; Elashoff, David A; Purcell, Colleen M; Sandha, Harpavan S; Mao, Jenny T; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Lee, Jay M; Dubinett, Steven M

    2011-05-15

    Despite advances in treatments, lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States for the past several decades. Recent findings from the National Lung Screening Trial reveal that low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scan screening of high-risk individuals reduces lung cancer mortality. This suggests that early detection is of key importance to improving patient outcome. However, of those screened with CT scans, 25% had positive scans that require further follow-up studies which often involve more radiation exposure and invasive tests to reduce false positive results. The purpose of this study was to identify candidate plasma biomarkers to aid in diagnosis of lung cancer in at-risk individuals. We found increased expression of the CXC chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III from plasma specimens of lung cancer patients compared to at-risk control subjects. Identification of the peptide was confirmed by the addition of an anti-NAP-2 antibody that recognizes CTAP-III and NAP-2. We also quantified and verified the increased levels of plasma CTAP-III with ELISA in patients with lung cancer (mean ± SD, 1859 ± 1219 ng/mL) compared to controls (698 ± 434 ng/mL; Pcancer patients. Further studies are required to determine if this chemokine could be utilized in a blood-based biomarker panel for the diagnosis of lung cancer.

  20. Long-term changes of serum chemokine levels in vaccinated military personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brichacek Beda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the United States Armed Forces receive a series of vaccinations during their course of service. To investigate the influence of multiple vaccinations on innate immunity, we measured concentrations of a panel of immunomodulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum samples from a group of such individuals. Results Significantly increased levels of macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α, MIP-1β and interleukin 8 (IL-8 were detected. Since these cytokines are known to have anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV activity, we tested the effect of serum from these individuals on HIV-1 infectivity and susceptibility of their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Sera from vaccinated military personnel inhibited, and their PBMCs were partially resistant to, infection by HIV-1 strains tropic to CCR5 (R5, but not to CXCR4 (X4, chemokine receptor. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that increased anti-HIV chemokines can be detected in vaccine recipients up to 68 weeks following immunization.

  1. A novel fusion protein of IP10-scFv retains antibody specificity and chemokine function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqing, Guo; Liu, Chen; Hongwu, Ai; Jiannian, Jing; Jiyong, Zhou; Chuyu, Zhang; Shangyou, You

    2004-07-23

    We combined the specificity of tumor-specific antibody with the chemokine function of interferon-{gamma} inducible protein 10 (IP-10) to recruit immune effector cells in the vicinity of tumor cells. A novel fusion protein of IP10-scFv was constructed by fusing mouse IP-10 to V{sub H} region of single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) against acidic isoferritin (AIF), and expressed in NS0 murine myeloma cells. The IP10-scFv fusion protein was shown to maintain the specificity of the antiAIF scFv with similar affinity constant, and bind to the human hepatocarcinoma SMMC 7721 cells secreting AIF as well as the activated mouse T lymphocytes expressing CXCR3 receptor. Furthermore, the IP10-scFv protein either in solution or bound on the surface of SMMC 7721 cells induced significant chemotaxis of mouse T cells in vitro. The results indicate that the IP10-scFv fusion protein possesses both bioactivities of the tumor-specific antibody and IP-10 chemokine, suggesting its possibility to induce an enhanced immune response against the residual tumor cells in vivo.

  2. A novel fusion protein of IP10-scFv retains antibody specificity and chemokine function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Junqing; Chen Liu; Ai Hongwu; Jing Jiannian; Zhou Jiyong; Zhang Chuyu; You Shangyou

    2004-01-01

    We combined the specificity of tumor-specific antibody with the chemokine function of interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) to recruit immune effector cells in the vicinity of tumor cells. A novel fusion protein of IP10-scFv was constructed by fusing mouse IP-10 to V H region of single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) against acidic isoferritin (AIF), and expressed in NS0 murine myeloma cells. The IP10-scFv fusion protein was shown to maintain the specificity of the antiAIF scFv with similar affinity constant, and bind to the human hepatocarcinoma SMMC 7721 cells secreting AIF as well as the activated mouse T lymphocytes expressing CXCR3 receptor. Furthermore, the IP10-scFv protein either in solution or bound on the surface of SMMC 7721 cells induced significant chemotaxis of mouse T cells in vitro. The results indicate that the IP10-scFv fusion protein possesses both bioactivities of the tumor-specific antibody and IP-10 chemokine, suggesting its possibility to induce an enhanced immune response against the residual tumor cells in vivo

  3. Magnetic-Field-Tunable Superconducting Rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Superconducting electronic components have been developed that provide current rectification that is tunable by design and with an externally applied magnetic field to the circuit component. The superconducting material used in the device is relatively free of pinning sites with its critical current determined by a geometric energy barrier to vortex entry. The ability of the vortices to move freely inside the device means this innovation does not suffer from magnetic hysteresis effects changing the state of the superconductor. The invention requires a superconductor geometry with opposite edges along the direction of current flow. In order for the critical current asymmetry effect to occur, the device must have different vortex nucleation conditions at opposite edges. Alternative embodiments producing the necessary conditions include edges being held at different temperatures, at different local magnetic fields, with different current-injection geometries, and structural differences between opposite edges causing changes in the size of the geometric energy barrier. An edge fabricated with indentations of the order of the coherence length will significantly lower the geometric energy barrier to vortex entry, meaning vortex passage across the device at lower currents causing resistive dissipation. The existing prototype is a two-terminal device consisting of a thin-film su - perconducting strip operating at a temperature below its superconducting transition temperature (Tc). Opposite ends of the strip are connected to electrical leads made of a higher Tc superconductor. The thin-film lithographic process provides an easy means to alter edge-structures, current-injection geo - metries, and magnetic-field conditions at the edges. The edge-field conditions can be altered by using local field(s) generated from dedicated higher Tc leads or even using the device s own higher Tc superconducting leads.

  4. Pseudogenization of the MCP-2/CCL8 chemokine gene in European rabbit (genus Oryctolagus, but not in species of Cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus and Hare (Lepus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Loo Wessel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies in human have highlighted the importance of the monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCP in leukocyte trafficking and their effects in inflammatory processes, tumor progression, and HIV-1 infection. In European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus one of the prime MCP targets, the chemokine receptor CCR5 underwent a unique structural alteration. Until now, no homologue of MCP-2/CCL8a, MCP-3/CCL7 or MCP-4/CCL13 genes have been reported for this species. This is interesting, because at least the first two genes are expressed in most, if not all, mammals studied, and appear to be implicated in a variety of important chemokine ligand-receptor interactions. By assessing the Rabbit Whole Genome Sequence (WGS data we have searched for orthologs of the mammalian genes of the MCP-Eotaxin cluster. Results We have localized the orthologs of these chemokine genes in the genome of European rabbit and compared them to those of leporid genera which do (i.e. Oryctolagus and Bunolagus or do not share the CCR5 alteration with European rabbit (i.e. Lepus and Sylvilagus. Of the Rabbit orthologs of the CCL8, CCL7, and CCL13 genes only the last two were potentially functional, although showing some structural anomalies at the protein level. The ortholog of MCP-2/CCL8 appeared to be pseudogenized by deleterious nucleotide substitutions affecting exon1 and exon2. By analyzing both genomic and cDNA products, these studies were extended to wild specimens of four genera of the Leporidae family: Oryctolagus, Bunolagus, Lepus, and Sylvilagus. It appeared that the anomalies of the MCP-3/CCL7 and MCP-4/CCL13 proteins are shared among the different species of leporids. In contrast, whereas MCP-2/CCL8 was pseudogenized in every studied specimen of the Oryctolagus - Bunolagus lineage, this gene was intact in species of the Lepus - Sylvilagus lineage, and was, at least in Lepus, correctly transcribed. Conclusion The biological function of a gene was often

  5. CXC-chemokine regulation and neutrophil trafficking in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in P-selectin/ICAM-1 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crockett Elahé T

    2007-05-01

    -selectin does not appear to be critical for neutrophil infiltration and I/R injury in the liver, they may regulate CXC-chemokine production. Blockage of these adhesion molecules may improve survival and remote organ injury that often accompanies liver I/R injury, through chemokine regulation.

  6. Tunable bandpass filter based on photonic crystal fiber filled with multiple liquid crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scolari, Lara; Tartarini, G.; Borelli, E.

    2007-01-01

    A tunable bandpass filter based on a photonic crystal fiber filled with two different liquid crystals is demonstrated. 130 nm bandwidth tunability is achieved by tuning the temperature from 30degC to 90degC.......A tunable bandpass filter based on a photonic crystal fiber filled with two different liquid crystals is demonstrated. 130 nm bandwidth tunability is achieved by tuning the temperature from 30degC to 90degC....

  7. Critical electric field for maximum tunability in nonlinear dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.

    2006-09-01

    The authors develop a self-consistent thermodynamic theory to compute the critical electric field at which maximum tunability is attained in a nonlinear dielectric. They then demonstrate that the stored electrostatic free energy functional has to be expanded at least up to the sixth order in electric field so as to define the critical field, and show that it depends solely on the fourth and sixth order permittivities. They discuss the deficiency of the engineering tunability metric in describing nonlinear dielectric phenomena, introduce a critical field renormalized tunability parameter, and substantiate the proposed formalism by computing the critical electric field for prototypical 0.9Pb(Mg1/3,Nb2/3)-0.1PbTiO3 and Ba(Ti0.85,Sn0.15)O3 paraelectrics.

  8. Frequency-tunable SRF cavities for microwave opto-mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Alessandro; Martinez, Luis; Pate, Jacob; Thompson, Johnathon; Chiao, Raymond; Sharping, Jay

    Three dimensional SRF (Superconducting Radio Frequency) cavities are known for achieving high quality factors (Q =109 or higher) but suffer from limited frequency tunability once fabricated and cooled to superconducting temperatures. Our end-wall design allows for numerous applications of cavity tuning at temperatures as low as 40 millikelvin. Using a bimorphic piezoelectric transducer, we demonstrate approximately 15 MHz of resonance tunability for the TE011 mode at cryogenic temperatures in a cylindrical reactor grade niobium (Nb) cavity (10% of the range at room temperature). This range doubles when using tunable end-walls on both cavity ends. We report on techniques for improving the Q of multi-component cavities including the use of concave end-walls to reduce fields near the cylinder ends and indium O-rings to reduce resistive losses at the gaps. Three-dimensional SRF cavities of this type have potential applications to quantum information science, precision displacement metrology, and quantum electro-dynamics.

  9. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry using tunable diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor diode lasers will find many important applications in atomic spectroscopy. They exhibit the desirable attributes of lasers: narrow bandwidth, tunability, and spatial coherence. At the same time, they possess few of the disadvantages of other tunable lasers. They require no alignment, are simple to operate, and are inexpensive. Practical laser spectroscopic instruments can be envisioned. The authors have applied diode lasers to resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) of some of the lanthanide elements. Sub-Doppler resolution spectra have been recorded and have been used for atomic hyperfine structure analysis. Isotopically-selective ionization has been accomplished, even in cases where photons from a broadband dye laser are part of the overall ionization process and where the isotopic spectral shift is very small. A convenient RIMS instrument for isotope ratio measurements that employs only diode lasers, along with electric field ionization, should be possible

  10. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1......-mediated chemokine responses are not dependent on TLR2 and TLR9 in human macrophages. Here, we investigated the role of the recently identified innate IFN-inducible DNA receptor IFI16 during HSV-1 infection in human macrophages. METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were purified from buffy coats...

  11. Interferon-regulated chemokine score associated with improvement in disease activity in refractory myositis patients treated with rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López De Padilla, Consuelo M; Crowson, Cynthia S; Hein, Molly S; Strausbauch, Michael A; Aggarwal, Rohit; Levesque, Marc C; Ascherman, Dana P; Oddis, Chester V; Reed, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether serum interferon (IFN)-regulated chemokine and distinct cytokine response profiles are associated with clinical improvement in patients with refractory inflammatory myopathy treated with rituximab. In a randomised, placebo-phase trial Rituximab in Myositis Trial (RIM), 200 refractory adult and paediatric myositis subjects received rituximab. Following rituximab, clinical response and disease activity were assessed. Serum samples and clinical data were collected at baseline and several time-points after rituximab treatment. Multiplexed sandwich immunoassays quantified serum levels of IFN-regulated chemokines and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Composite IFN-regulated chemokine and Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory cytokine scores were computed. Baseline IFN-regulated chemokine, Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory cytokine scores correlated with baseline physician global VAS, whereas the baseline Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokine scores correlated with baseline muscle VAS. We also found baseline IFN-regulated chemokine scores correlated with specific non-muscular targets such as baseline cutaneous (r=0.29; p=0.002) and pulmonary (r=0.18; p=0.02) VAS scores. Among all cytokine/chemokines examined, the baseline score of IFN-regulated chemokines demonstrated the best correlation with changes in muscle VAS at 8 (r=-0.19; p=0.01) and 16 weeks (r=-0.17; p=0.03) following rituximab and physician global VAS at 16 weeks (r=-0.16; p=0.04). In vitro experiments showed increased levels of IL-8 (p=0.04), MCP-1 (p=0.04), IL-6 (p=0.03), IL-1β (p=0.04), IL-13 (p=0.04), IL-10 (p=0.02), IL-2 (p=0.04) and IFN-γ (p=0.02) in supernatants of TLR-3 stimulated PBMCs from non-responder compared to patients responders to rituximab. IFN-regulated chemokines before treatment is associated with improvement in disease activity measures in refractory myositis patients treated with rituximab.

  12. In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Tresoldi, E; Björndal, A; Fredriksson, R; Colognesi, C; Deng, H K; Malnati, M S; Plebani, A; Siccardi, A G; Littman, D R; Fenyö, E M; Lusso, P

    1997-11-01

    Following the identification of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta as major human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-suppressive factors produced by CD8+ T cells, several chemokine receptors were found to serve as membrane co-receptors for primate immunodeficiency lentiretroviruses. The two most widely used co-receptors thus far recognized, CCR5 and CXCR4, are expressed by both activated T lymphocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. CCR5, a specific RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1 receptor, is used preferentially by non-MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains and by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), whereas CXCR4, a receptor for the C-X-C chemokine SDF-1, is used by MT2-tropic HIV-1 and HIV-2, but not by SIV. Other receptors with a more restricted cellular distribution, such as CCR2b, CCR3 and STRL33, can also function as co-receptors for selected viral isolates. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 has been fingered as a critical determinant of the co-receptor choice. Here, we document a consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection. Viral isolates obtained during the asymptomatic stages generally used only CCR5 as a co-receptor and were inhibited by RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta, but not by SDF-1. By contrast, the majority of the isolates derived after the progression of the disease were resistant to C-C chemokines, having acquired the ability to use CXCR4 and, in some cases, CCR3, while gradually losing CCR5 usage. Surprisingly, most of these isolates were also insensitive to SDF-1, even when used in combination with RANTES. An early acquisition of CXCR4 usage predicted a poor prognosis. In children who progressed to AIDS without a shift to CXCR4 usage, all the sequential isolates were CCR5-dependent but showed a reduced sensitivity to C-C chemokines. Discrete changes in the V3 domain

  13. Tunable thin-film optical filters for hyperspectral microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging was originally developed for use in remote sensing applications. More recently, it has been applied to biological imaging systems, such as fluorescence microscopes. The ability to distinguish molecules based on spectral differences has been especially advantageous for identifying fluorophores in highly autofluorescent tissues. A key component of hyperspectral imaging systems is wavelength filtering. Each filtering technology used for hyperspectral imaging has corresponding advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a new optical filtering technology has been developed that uses multi-layered thin-film optical filters that can be rotated, with respect to incident light, to control the center wavelength of the pass-band. Compared to the majority of tunable filter technologies, these filters have superior optical performance including greater than 90% transmission, steep spectral edges and high out-of-band blocking. Hence, tunable thin-film optical filters present optical characteristics that may make them well-suited for many biological spectral imaging applications. An array of tunable thin-film filters was implemented on an inverted fluorescence microscope (TE 2000, Nikon Instruments) to cover the full visible wavelength range. Images of a previously published model, GFP-expressing endothelial cells in the lung, were acquired using a charge-coupled device camera (Rolera EM-C2, Q-Imaging). This model sample presents fluorescently-labeled cells in a highly autofluorescent environment. Linear unmixing of hyperspectral images indicates that thin-film tunable filters provide equivalent spectral discrimination to our previous acousto-optic tunable filter-based approach, with increased signal-to-noise characteristics. Hence, tunable multi-layered thin film optical filters may provide greatly improved spectral filtering characteristics and therefore enable wider acceptance of hyperspectral widefield microscopy.

  14. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques...... positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells...

  15. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated lo...

  16. LPS-induced expression of a novel chemokine receptor (L-CCR) in mouse glial cells in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, MW; Heeroma, J; Brouwer, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    There is increasing evidence that chemokines, specialized regulators of the peripheral immune system, are also involved in the physiology and pathology of the CNS. It is known that glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) express various chemokine receptors like CCR1, -3, -5, and CXCR4. We have

  17. CXC-chemokines KC and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) synergistically induce leukocyte recruitment to the central nervous system in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenburg, Petra J. G.; Polfliet, Machteld M. J.; Florquin, Sandrine; van den Berg, Timo K.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; van Deventer, Sander J. H.; Roord, John J.; van der Poll, Tom; van Furth, A. Marceline

    2003-01-01

    Intracisternal injection of the CXC-chemokines KC or macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 induced a pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of rats in a dose dependent way. MIP-2 was much more potent than KC. The concurrent injection of both chemokines revealed a profound synergistic effect

  18. Tunable graphene antennas for selective enhancement of THz-emission

    KAUST Repository

    Filter, Robert; Farhat, Mohamed; Steglich, Mathias; Alaee, Rasoul; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we will introduce THz graphene antennas that strongly enhance the emission rate of quantum systems at specific frequencies. The tunability of these antennas can be used to selectively enhance individual spectral features. We will show as an example that any weak transition in the spectrum of coronene can become the dominant contribution. This selective and tunable enhancement establishes a new class of graphene-based THz devices, which will find applications in sensors, novel light sources, spectroscopy, and quantum communication devices. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  19. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays as tunable acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lani, Shane W., E-mail: shane.w.lani@gmail.com, E-mail: karim.sabra@me.gatech.edu, E-mail: levent.degertekin@me.gatech.edu; Sabra, Karim G. [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801Ferst Drive, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Wasequr Rashid, M.; Hasler, Jennifer [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Van Leer Electrical Engineering Building, 777 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Levent Degertekin, F. [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801Ferst Drive, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Van Leer Electrical Engineering Building, 777 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States)

    2014-02-03

    Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) operating in immersion support dispersive evanescent waves due to the subwavelength periodic structure of electrostatically actuated membranes in the array. Evanescent wave characteristics also depend on the membrane resonance which is modified by the externally applied bias voltage, offering a mechanism to tune the CMUT array as an acoustic metamaterial. The dispersion and tunability characteristics are examined using a computationally efficient, mutual radiation impedance based approach to model a finite-size array and realistic parameters of variation. The simulations are verified, and tunability is demonstrated by experiments on a linear CMUT array operating in 2-12 MHz range.

  20. Computer Processing Of Tunable-Diode-Laser Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Randy D.

    1991-01-01

    Tunable-diode-laser spectrometer measuring transmission spectrum of gas operates under control of computer, which also processes measurement data. Measurements in three channels processed into spectra. Computer controls current supplied to tunable diode laser, stepping it through small increments of wavelength while processing spectral measurements at each step. Program includes library of routines for general manipulation and plotting of spectra, least-squares fitting of direct-transmission and harmonic-absorption spectra, and deconvolution for determination of laser linewidth and for removal of instrumental broadening of spectral lines.