WorldWideScience

Sample records for tumour targeting optimization

  1. Targeting radiation to tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.; Greater Glasgow Health Board, Glasgow

    1994-01-01

    Biologically targeted radiotherapy entails the preferential delivery of radiation to solid tumours or individual tumour cells by means of tumour-seeking delivery vehicles to which radionuclides can be conjugated. Monoclonal antibodies have attracted attention for some years as potentially selective targeting agents, but advances in tumour and molecular biology are now providing a much wider choice of molecular species. General radiobiological principles may be derived which are applicable to most forms of targeted radiotherapy. These principles provide guidelines for the appropriate choice of radionuclide in specific treatment situations and its optimal combination with other treatment modalities. In future, the availability of gene targeting agents will focus attention on the use of Auger electron emitters whose high potency and short range selectivity makes them attractive choices for specific killing of cancer cells whose genetic peculiarities are known. (author)

  2. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  3. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunodetection of tumours and for targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, R.W.; Embleton, M.J.; Pimm, M.V.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody 791T/36 prepared against human osteogenic sarcoma has been used to detect primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas by external imaging of patients following injection of 131 I-labelled antibody. In 10 of 11 patients radiolabelled 791T/36 antibody localized in tumours, the tumour/non tumour ratio of radioactivity ranging from 1.5:1 to 8.1. 791T/36 antibody was also evaluated for its potential for targeting anti-tumour agents including cytotoxic drugs (Vindesine) and immunomodulating agents (interferon). Vindesine-791T/36 conjugates were preferentially cytotoxic in vitro for target cells expressing the 791T/36 anti-body defined antigen. Also interferon conjugated to 791T/36 antibody, like free interferon activated peripheral blood natural killer cell activity. These in vitro tests together with related studies on antibody localization in vivo indicate the potential of monoclonal antibody targeting of anti-tumour agents

  5. Targeting Tumour Vasculature as a Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Honstvet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling blood flow and capillary growth in tumours has been the focus of several research groups with the aim of generating theoretical models that can be used to predict biological behaviour within these systems. Since dysfunctional angiogenesis is seen in a wide range of pathological conditions ranging from cardiovascular, to arthritis, to diabetes, it is easy to see how these models may have a far-reaching influence on future therapeutic strategies.

  6. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severin, E S

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  7. Optimal exploration target zones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available -of-evidence (WofE) method logistic regression canonical favorability analysis neural networks evidential belief functions Optimal Exploration Target Zones Debba, Carranza, Stein, van der Meer Introduction to Remote Sensing Background and Objective of the study... for the following equation: n∑ i=r ( n i ) pi(1− p)n−i = 0.95 . (1) Optimal Exploration Target Zones Debba, Carranza, Stein, van der Meer Introduction to Remote Sensing Background and Objective of the study Methodology Results METHODS (cont. . . ): FITNESS FUNCTION...

  8. Optimal exploration target zones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available prospective map are the weights-of-evidence (WofE) method logistic regression canonical favorability analysis neural networks evidential belief functions Optimal Exploration Target Zones Debba, Carranza, Stein, van der Meer Introduction to Remote.... . . ): FITNESS FUNCTION φWMSD+V(Sn) = λ N(A) ∑ −→x ∈A P(−→x ) ∣ ∣ ∣ ∣−→x −QSn( −→x ) ∣ ∣ ∣ ∣ +(1− λ)s2(OSn) , (2) where QSn( −→x ) is the location vector of an optimal exploration focal point in Sn nearest to −→x , and s2(OSn) is the variance...

  9. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  10. Targeted radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumours: principles and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Maralyn R; Lewington, Val; Grossman, Ashley B

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours comprise a group of neoplasms with variable clinical behaviour. Their growth and spread is often very slow and initially asymptomatic, and thus they are often metastatic at the time of diagnosis and incurable by surgery. An exciting therapeutic strategy for cytoreduction, both for stabilisation of tumour growth and inhibition of hormone production, is the use of targeted radionuclide therapy. Evidence from large-scale, randomised, placebo-controlled trials is very difficult to obtain in these rare diseases, but current data appear promising. It is timely to review the principles underlying the use of these therapies, together with the clinical outcomes to date and potential directions for future research. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Investigation of the effect of physical parameters on the design of tumour targeting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Joanne Lois

    Tumour targeting using radiolabelled antibodies for radioimmunodetection (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been studied for many years. The main factors that have limited clinical success are low tumour uptake, immunogenicity and poor therapeutic ratios. This thesis has applied current technology to make advances in this area of research. The effect of physical parameters (antibody size, valency, affinity and charge) on the design of tumour targeting agents was studied by constructing divalent (DFM) and trivalent (TFM) forms of the murine anti-CEA antibody A5B7 Fab' by chemical cross-linking. This involves partial reduction of the hinge disulphides to expose thiol (-SH) groups and subsequent reaction with a maleimide cross-linker to form a thioether bond at the hinge region. Previous studies have suggested that the stability of thioether bonds is superior to naturally occurring disulphide bonds present at the hinge region of IgG and F(ab')2. The aim was to compare the functional affinities and in vivo tumour targeting in nude mice bearing human tumour xenografts of DFM and TFM to similar sized parent IgG and F(ab')2. Radiolabelling with 131I and 90Y was also compared with a view to determine which combination would be optimal for RIT. Results clearly demonstrated a significantly faster on-rate of DFM compared to all other antibody forms and estimated dosimetry analysis suggested that DFM would be the most suitable antibody form radiolabelled with 131I for RIT. Both F(ab')2 and DFM showed high kidney uptake levels on labelling with which is unacceptable for RIT. Despite the improved tumour: blood ratios for TFM, the increased estimated dose to normal tissues and lower therapeutic effect in RIT studies suggests that the most promising combination with the radionuclide appears to be IgG. A humanised version of A5B7 hFab' has been constructed previously in order to reduce its immunogenicity in man. The in vivo stability of hDFM proved to be superior to hF(ab')2

  12. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice

    2003-01-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst 1 -sst 5 , the VIP receptors VPAC 1 and VPAC 2 , the CCK 1 and CCK 2 receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB 1 (NMB receptor), BB 2 (GRP receptor) and BB 3 , and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC 1 and sst 2 was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst 2 and VPAC 1 receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK 1 , CCK 2 , sst 1 or sst 5 in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK 2 and VPAC 1 receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a particularly high density; they expressed sst 2 in two-thirds and sst 1 in approximately half of

  13. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 31, PO Box 62, 3010, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst{sub 1}-sst{sub 5}, the VIP receptors VPAC{sub 1} and VPAC{sub 2}, the CCK{sub 1} and CCK{sub 2} receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB{sub 1} (NMB receptor), BB{sub 2} (GRP receptor) and BB{sub 3}, and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC{sub 1} and sst{sub 2} was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK{sub 1}, CCK{sub 2}, sst{sub 1} or sst{sub 5} in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a

  14. Targeting Chromosomal Instability and Tumour Heterogeneity in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrell, Rebecca A.; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Johnston, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a common cause of tumour heterogeneity and poor prognosis in solid tumours and describes cell-cell variation in chromosome structure or number across a tumour population. In this article we consider evidence suggesting that CIN may be targeted and may influence...... response to distinct chemotherapy regimens, using HER2-positive breast cancer as an example. Pre-clinical models have indicated a role for HER2 signalling in initiating CIN and defective cell-cycle control, and evidence suggests that HER2-targeting may attenuate this process. Anthracyclines and platinum...... agents may target tumours with distinct patterns of karyotypic complexity, whereas taxanes may have preferential activity in tumours with relative chromosomal stability. A greater understanding of karyotypic complexity and identification of methods to directly examine and target CIN may support novel...

  15. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M.; Rodriguez C, J.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu- 177 -DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  16. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, B.; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 86-93 ISSN 1567-7249 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Tumour-initiating cells * ALPHA-TOCOPHERYL SUCCINATE * Therapeutic resistance * Mitochondria Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.704, year: 2016

  17. Targeted BCL2 inhibition effectively inhibits neuroblastoma tumour growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, Fieke; Schild, Linda; den Hartog, Ilona J. M.; Ebus, Marli E.; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Ora, Ingrid; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic aberrations of key regulators of the apoptotic pathway have hardly been identified in neuroblastoma. We detected high BCL2 mRNA and protein levels in the majority of neuroblastoma tumours by Affymetrix expression profiling and Tissue Micro Array analysis. This BCL2 mRNA expression is

  18. Tetracycline is back. Three-step tetracycline-biotin tumour targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, N.; Lichtenstein, M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In the 1960s, investigators attempted to use radiolabelled tetracycline for the detection of tumours. This was limited by bone and gastrointestinal uptake. The monoclonal antibody Avidin Biotin technology has been used for 10 years to target tumours. We have improved a novel mechanism using three step targeting, to demonstrate tumour cells in (C57B1/6X balb-c) F1 mice with subcutaneously implanted E-3 thymoma. The three steps were (1) i.p. injection of Biotin Tetracycline conjugate (t:1) ratio, (2) 96 h later Avidin was injected, and (3) 24 h after (2) 99m Tc-CDTPA-Biotin was injected. Avidin has four high affinity (Km 10-15) Biotin binding sites, hence step (2) couples the Avidin to Tetracycline-Biotin in the tumour. The Avidin then provides a high affinity target for the otherwise rapidly urinary excreted 99m Tc-CDTPA-Biotin. Mice were sacrificed 16-24h after (3) by cervical dislocation. Biodistribution of radioactivity tumour to blood, liver, bone and stomach were: T:BL= 7.2, T:LI= 3.35, TBO= 9.65, T:ST= 0.93. The percentage of injected dose/g was T = 4.49%, BL = 0.62%. E-3 Thymoma is a rapid growing tumour. At day 1 (step 1) the tumour size was 0.45 cm, six days later (step 3) each dimension was doubled. Hence, percentage of injected dose per gram is artefactually reduced eight-fold. With a slowly growing tumour using the same method the results may be better. The conclusions reached are that Tetracycline-Biotin 3-stage method of tumour targeting is worthy of further development

  19. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-30

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells.

  20. EpCAM as multi-tumour target for near-infrared fluorescence guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driel, P. B. A. A. van; Boonstra, M. C.; Prevoo, H. A. J. M.; Giessen, M. van de; Snoeks, T. J. A.; Tummers, Q. R. J. G.; Keereweer, S.; Cordfunke, R. A.; Fish, A.; Eendenburg, J. D. H. van; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Dijkstra, J.; Velde, C. J. H. van de; Kuppen, P. J. K.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Löwik, C. W. G. M.; Sier, C. F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of resection margins during cancer surgery can be challenging, often resulting in incomplete tumour removal. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) aims to aid the surgeon to visualize tumours and resection margins during surgery. FGS relies on a clinically applicable imaging system in combination with a specific tumour-targeting contrast agent. In this study EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) is evaluated as target for FGS in combination with the novel Artemis imaging system. The NIR fluorophore IRDye800CW was conjugated to the well-established EpCAM specific monoclonal antibody 323/A3 and an isotype IgG1 as control. The anti-EpCAM/800CW conjugate was stable in serum and showed preserved binding capacity as evaluated on EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, using flow cytometry and cell-based plate assays. Four clinically relevant orthotopic tumour models, i.e. colorectal cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and peritonitis carcinomatosa, were used to evaluate the performance of the anti-EpCAM agent with the clinically validated Artemis imaging system. The Pearl Impulse small animal imaging system was used as reference. The specificity of the NIRF signal was confirmed using bioluminescence imaging and green-fluorescent protein. All tumour types could clearly be delineated and resected 72 h after injection of the imaging agent. Using NIRF imaging millimetre sized tumour nodules were detected that were invisible for the naked eye. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the distribution and tumour specificity of the anti-EpCAM agent. This study shows the potential of an EpCAM specific NIR-fluorescent agent in combination with a clinically validated intraoperative imaging system to visualize various tumours during surgery

  1. Mechanisms and biomaterials in pH-responsive tumour targeted drug delivery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamala, Manju; Wilson, William R; Yang, Mimi; Palmer, Brian D; Wu, Zimei

    2016-04-01

    As the mainstay in the treatment of various cancers, chemotherapy plays a vital role, but still faces many challenges, such as poor tumour selectivity and multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology has provided a new strategy for addressing the limitations of the conventional chemotherapy. In the last decade, the volume of research published in this area has increased tremendously, especially with functional nano drug delivery systems (nanocarriers). Coupling a specific stimuli-triggered drug release mechanism with these delivery systems is one of the most prevalent approaches for improving therapeutic outcomes. Among the various stimuli, pH triggered delivery is regarded as the most general strategy, targeting the acidic extracellular microenvironment and intracellular organelles of solid tumours. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of pH-sensitive nanocarriers for tumour-targeted drug delivery. The review focuses on the chemical design of pH-sensitive biomaterials, which are used to fabricate nanocarriers for extracellular and/or intracellular tumour site-specific drug release. The pH-responsive biomaterials bring forth conformational changes in these nanocarriers through various mechanisms such as protonation, charge reversal or cleavage of a chemical bond, facilitating tumour specific cell uptake or drug release. A greater understanding of these mechanisms will help to design more efficient drug delivery systems to address the challenges encountered in conventional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clipping of tumour resection margins allows accurate target volume delineation in head and neck cancer adjuvant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittermann, Gido; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Bunea, Andrei; Schwarz, Steffen J.; Grosu, Anca-L.; Schmelzeisen, Rainer; Metzger, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate tumour bed localisation is a key requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy. A new procedure is described for head and neck cancer treatment that improves tumour bed localisation using titanium clips. Materials and methods: Following complete local excision of the primary tumour, the tumour bed was marked with titanium clips. Preoperative gross target volume (GTV) and postoperative tumour bed were examined and the distances between the centres of gravity were evaluated. Results: 49 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent tumour resection, neck lymph node dissection and defect reconstruction in one stage. During surgery, 7–49 clips were placed in the resection cavity. Surgical clip insertion was successful in 88% (n = 43). Clip identification and tumour bed delineation was successful in all 43 patients. The overall distance between the centres of gravity of the preoperative tumour extension to the tumour bed was 0.9 cm. A significant relationship between the preoperative tumour extension and the postoperative tumour bed volume could be demonstrated. Conclusion: We demonstrate a precise delineation of the former tumour cavity. Improvements in tumour bed delineation allow an increase of accuracy for adjuvant treatment

  3. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habrand, J.L.; Abdulkarim, B.; Beaudre, A.; El Khouri, M.; Kalifa, C.

    2001-01-01

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  4. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander A. A. Kooijmans

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods: EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF. EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results: V analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression, but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions: We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules.

  5. A novel concept for tumour targeting with radiation: Inverse dose-painting or targeting the "Low Drug Uptake Volume".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaromina, Ala; Granzier, Marlies; Biemans, Rianne; Lieuwes, Natasja; van Elmpt, Wouter; Shakirin, Georgy; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    We tested a novel treatment approach combining (1) targeting radioresistant hypoxic tumour cells with the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 and (2) inverse radiation dose-painting to boost selectively non-hypoxic tumour sub-volumes having no/low drug uptake. 18 F-HX4 hypoxia tracer uptake measured with a clinical PET/CT scanner was used as a surrogate of TH-302 activity in rhabdomyosarcomas growing in immunocompetent rats. Low or high drug uptake volume (LDUV/HDUV) was defined as 40% of the GTV with the lowest or highest 18 F-HX4 uptake, respectively. Two hours post TH-302/saline administration, animals received either single dose radiotherapy (RT) uniformly (15 or 18.5Gy) or a dose-painted non-uniform radiation (15Gy) with 50% higher dose to LDUV or HDUV (18.5Gy). Treatment plans were created using Eclipse treatment planning system and radiation was delivered using VMAT. Tumour response was quantified as time to reach 3 times starting tumour volume. Non-uniform RT boosting tumour sub-volume with low TH-302 uptake (LDUV) was superior to the same dose escalation to HDUV (pvolume with no/low activity of hypoxia-activated prodrugs. This strategy applies on average a lower radiation dose and is as effective as uniform dose escalation to the entire tumour. It could be applied to other type of drugs provided that their distribution can be imaged. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiple model predictive control for optimal drug administration of mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, N; Ozgoli, S; Ramezani, A

    2017-06-01

    Mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours is one of the most efficient ways to improve cancer treatment strategies. However, it is important to 'design' an effective treatment programme which can optimize the ways of combining immunotherapy and chemotherapy to diminish their imminent side effects. Control engineering techniques could be used for this. The method of multiple model predictive controller (MMPC) is applied to the modified Stepanova model to induce the best combination of drugs scheduling under a better health criteria profile. The proposed MMPC is a feedback scheme that can perform global optimization for both tumour volume and immune competent cell density by performing multiple constraints. Although current studies usually assume that immunotherapy has no side effect, this paper presents a new method of mixed drug administration by employing MMPC, which implements several constraints for chemotherapy and immunotherapy by considering both drug toxicity and autoimmune. With designed controller we need maximum 57% and 28% of full dosage of drugs for chemotherapy and immunotherapy in some instances, respectively. Therefore, through the proposed controller less dosage of drugs are needed, which contribute to suitable results with a perceptible reduction in medicine side effects. It is observed that in the presence of MMPC, the amount of required drugs is minimized, while the tumour volume is reduced. The efficiency of the presented method has been illustrated through simulations, as the system from an initial condition in the malignant region of the state space (macroscopic tumour volume) transfers into the benign region (microscopic tumour volume) in which the immune system can control tumour growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Manipulation of P450 gene expression in tumours; a novel approach for targeted activation of bioreductive prodrugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, T.; Yakkundi, A.; McCarthy, H.; McErlane, V.; Hughes, C.M.; Hirst, D.G.; McKeown, S.R.; Patterson, L.H.

    2003-01-01

    We are developing a gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategy to enhance the metabolism of a novel bioreductive drug, AQ4N. Bioreductive drugs are metabolically activated in the hypoxic cell environment allowing effective targeting of hypoxic radioresistant tumour regions. We aim to achieve additional layers of selectivity by using an X-ray inducible promoter linked to our therapeutic gene (cytochrome P450s). This strategy would enhance metabolism of the drug only within the radiation field. Furthermore, normal tissue would be unaffected as the bioreductive drug is only activated in hypoxic conditions. We have identified several human cytochrome P450s which are important for AQ4N prodrug activation, these include CYP3A4, 1A1 and 2B6. RIF1 murine tumour cells transfected with cDNA from any one of these CYPs displayed increased DNA damage and clonogenic cell kill following treatment with AQ4N under hypoxia compared to controls. We are presently testing the ability of these transfectants to enhance anti-tumour effectiveness of AQ4N in combination with radiation in vivo. We have shown that a single CYP3A4 injection using a simple non-optimized approach can increase metabolism of AQ4N and when used in combination with radiation 3 out of 4 tumours are locally controlled for > 60 days (McCarthy et al., 2002). This result is remarkable considering the large enhancement of the radiation effect achieved by adding AQ4N alone. This implies that the bioreduction of AQ4N by CYPs in this tumour system is sub-optimal and this strategy could therefore be very promising for clinical use where CYP levels are known to be variable. We are now exploring the CYP/AQ4N GDEPT strategy in combination with cyclophosphamide, which is also metabolised by CYPs and aim to link these CYPs to the radiation and hypoxia inducible WAF1 promoter for selective activation in vivo

  8. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. A de; Pedraza L, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez C, J. [Faculty of Medicine, UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses and to evaluate {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells, which over-express somatostatin receptors, were injected in athymic mice and 20 days later the mean tumour size was 3.08 square cm (n=3). A mean of 86.3 MBq {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE, was injected in a tail vein and 19 days after therapy the size of the tumours was 0.81 square cm. There was a partial relapse and after 16 days, when sacrificed, the mean tumour size was 8.28 cubic cm. An epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidney of one treated mouse was found. The tumour of the control mouse was 8.61 cubic cm when sacrificed 14 days after tumour induction. Radiotherapy estimates to the tumours was 35.9-39.7 Gy and the tumours might have been completely reduced with a second therapy dose. These preliminary studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that Lu-{sup 177}-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man, considering kidney radiation. (Author)

  9. Targeted radiotherapy with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Ferro F, G.; Murphy S, E.

    2006-01-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 ± 7.2 Gy, 17.5 ± 2.5 Gy and 12.6 ± 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  10. Influence of tumour size on the efficacy of targeted alpha therapy with (213)Bi-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]-octreotate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho Sze; Konijnenberg, Mark W; de Blois, Erik; Koelewijn, Stuart; Baum, Richard P; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Breeman, Wouter A; de Jong, Marion

    2016-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy has been postulated to have great potential for the treatment of small clusters of tumour cells as well as small metastases. (213)Bismuth, an α-emitter with a half-life of 46 min, has shown to be effective in preclinical as well as in clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated whether (213)Bi-[DOTA(0), Tyr(3)]-octreotate ((213)Bi-DOTATATE), a (213)Bi-labelled somatostatin analogue with high affinity for somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2), is suitable for the treatment of larger neuroendocrine tumours overexpressing SSTR2 in comparison to its effectiveness for smaller tumours. We performed a preclinical targeted radionuclide therapy study with (213)Bi-DOTATATE in animals bearing tumours of different sizes (50 and 200 mm(3)) using two tumour models: H69 (human small cell lung carcinoma) and CA20948 (rat pancreatic tumour). Pharmacokinetics was determined for calculation of dosimetry in organs and tumours. H69- or CA20948-xenografted mice with tumour volumes of approximately 120 mm(3) were euthanized at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min post injection of a single dose of (213)Bi-DOTATATE (1.5-4.8 MBq). To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of (213)Bi-DOTATATE, xenografted H69 and CA20948 tumour-bearing mice with tumour sizes of 50 and 200 mm(3) were administered daily with a therapeutic dose of (213)Bi-DOTATATE (0.3 nmol, 2-4 MBq) for three consecutive days. The animals were followed for 90 days after treatment. At day 90, mice were injected with 25 MBq (99m)Tc-DMSA and imaged by SPECT/CT to investigate possible renal dysfunction due to (213)Bi-DOTATATE treatment. Higher tumour uptakes were found in CA20948 tumour-bearing animals compared to those in H69 tumour-bearing mice with the highest tumour uptake of 19.6 ± 6.6 %IA/g in CA20948 tumour-bearing animals, while for H69 tumour-bearing mice, the highest tumour uptake was found to be 9.8 ± 2.4 %IA/g. Nevertheless, as the anti-tumour effect was more pronounced in H69

  11. Sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT: dynamic enhancement patterns and timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-dan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Hao; Li, Ping; Jin, Zheng-yu [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Wu, Wen-ming; Zhao, Yu-pei [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    To assess enhancement patterns of sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT (VPCT), and to identify timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast. Consecutive patients who underwent VPCT for clinically suspected insulinomas were retrospectively identified. Patients with insulinomas confirmed by surgery were included, and patients with familial syndromes were excluded. Two radiologists evaluated VPCT images in consensus. Tumour-parenchyma contrast at each time point was measured, and timing of optimal contrast was determined. Time duration of hyperenhancement (tumour-parenchyma contrast >20 Hounsfield units, HU) was recorded. Perfusion parameters were evaluated. Three dynamic enhancement patterns were observed in 63 tumours: persistent hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement time window ≥10 s) in 39 (61.9%), transient hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement <10 s) in 19 (30.2%) and non-hyperenhancement in 5 (7.9%). Timing of optimal contrast was 9 s after abdominal aorta threshold (AAT) of 200 HU, with tumour-parenchyma contrast of 77.6 ± 57.2 HU. At 9 s after AAT, 14 (22.2%) tumours were non-hyperenhancing, nine of which had missed transient hyperenhancement. Insulinomas with transient and persistent hyperenhancement patterns had significantly increased perfusion. Insulinomas have variable enhancement patterns. Tumour-parenchyma contrast is time-dependent. Optimal timing of enhancement is 9 s after AAT. VPCT enables tumour detection even if the hyperenhancement is transient. (orig.)

  12. Beyond typing and grading: target analysis in individualized therapy as a new challenge for tumour pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, Hans H; von Wasielewski, Reinhard

    2007-01-01

    In order to bring about its beneficial effects in oncology, targeted therapy depends on accurate target analysis. Whether cells of a tumour will be sensitive to a specific treatment is predicted by the detection of appropriate targets in cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry or molecular methods. In most instances this is performed by histopathologists. Reliability and reproducibility of tissue-based target analysis in histopathology require novel measures of quality assurance by internal and external controls. As a model for external quality assurance in targeted therapy an annual inter-laboratory trial has been set up in Germany applying tissue arrays with up to 60 mammary cancer samples which are tested by participants for expression of HER2/neu and steroid hormone receptors.

  13. Targeting of liver tumour in rats by selective delivery of holmium-166 loaded microspheres: a biodistribution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nijsen, F.; Rook, D.; Zonnenberg, B.; Klerk, J. de; Rijk, P. van; Schip, F. van het [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brandt, C. [Animal Inst., Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands); Meijer, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dullens, H. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hennink, W. [Dept. of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    2001-06-01

    Intra-arterial administration of beta-emitting particles that become trapped in the vascular bed of a tumour and remain there while delivering high doses, represents a unique approach in the treatment of both primary and metastatic liver tumours. Studies on selective internal radiation therapy of colorectal liver metastases using yttrium-90 glass microspheres have shown encouraging results. This study describes the biodistribution of 40-{mu}m poly lactic acid microspheres loaded with radioactive holmium-166, after intra-arterial administration into the hepatic artery of rats with implanted liver tumours. Radioactivity measurements showed >95% retention of injected activity in the liver and its resident tumour. The average activity detected in other tissues was {<=}0.1%ID/g, with incidental exceptions in the lungs and stomach. Very little {sup 166}Ho activity was detected in kidneys (<0.1%ID/g), thereby indicating the stability of the microspheres in vivo. Tumour targeting was very effective, with a mean tumour to liver ratio of 6.1{+-}2.9 for rats with tumour (n=15) versus 0.7{+-}0.5 for control rats (n=6; P<0.001). These ratios were not significantly affected by the use of adrenaline. Histological analysis showed that five times as many large (>10) and medium-sized (4-9) clusters of microspheres were present within tumour and peritumoural tissue, compared with normal liver. Single microspheres were equally dispersed throughout the tumour, as well as normal liver parenchyma. (orig.)

  14. [{sup 177}Lu]pertuzumab: experimental studies on targeting of HER-2 positive tumour cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mikael; Gedda, Lars [Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Experimental Urology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir; Andersson, Karl; Carlsson, Joergen [Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Sandstroem, Mattias [Uppsala University, Medical Radiation Physics, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    The new antibody pertuzumab (Omnitarg) targets the dimerisation subdomain of HER-2. The purpose of this study was to analyse whether pertuzumab retains HER-2 targeting capacity after labelling with the therapeutically interesting beta emitter {sup 177}Lu and to make initial characterisations in vitro and in vivo. Pertuzumab was conjugated with isothiocyanate-benzyl-CHX-A{sup ''}-DTPA and chelated to {sup 177}Lu. Immunoreactivity, affinity, cellular retention and internalisation were analysed using SKOV-3 cells. The affinity of non-radioactive pertuzumab was measured using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor. In vivo targeting and specific binding were assessed in Balb/c (nu/nu) mice carrying SKOV-3 xenografts. The biodistribution of {sup 177}Lu was determined 1, 3 and 7 days after [{sup 177}Lu]pertuzumab administration. Gamma camera images were taken after 3 days. The immunoreactivity of [{sup 177}Lu]pertuzumab was 85.8{+-}1.3%. The affinity of non-radioactive pertuzumab was 1.8{+-}1.1 nM, and that of [{sup 177}Lu]pertuzumab, 4.1{+-}0.7 nM. The cellular retention after 5 h pre-incubation was 90{+-}2% at 20 h. The targeting was HER-2 specific both in vitro and in vivo, since excess amounts of non-labelled antibody inhibited the uptake of labelled antibody (p<0.0001 and p<0.01, respectively). The biodistribution and gamma camera images of {sup 177}Lu showed extensive tumour uptake. Normal tissues had a surprisingly low uptake. Pertuzumab was efficiently labelled with {sup 177}Lu and showed good intracellular retention and HER-2 specific binding both in vitro and in vivo. The gamma camera images and the biodistribution study gave excellent tumour targeting results. Thus, [{sup 177}Lu]pertuzumab is of interest for further studies aimed at radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic catechin-dextran conjugate as targeted therapeutic for pancreatic tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorio, Orazio; Voliani, Valerio; Faraci, Paolo; Karmakar, Biswajit; Iemma, Francesca; Hampel, Silke; Kavallaris, Maria; Cirillo, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Catechin-dextran conjugates have recently attracted a lot of attention due to their anticancer activity against a range of cancer cells. Magnetic nanoparticles have the ability to concentrate therapeutically important drugs due to their magnetic-spatial control and provide opportunities for targeted drug delivery. Enhancement of the anticancer efficiency of catechin-dextran conjugate by functionalisation with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Modification of the coating shell of commercial magnetic nanoparticles (Endorem) composed of dextran with the catechin-dextran conjugate. Catechin-dextran conjugated with Endorem (Endo-Cat) increased the intracellular concentration of the drug and it induced apoptosis in 98% of pancreatic tumour cells placed under magnetic field. The conjugation of catechin-dextran with Endorem enhances the anticancer activity of this drug and provides a new strategy for targeted drug delivery on tumour cells driven by magnetic field. The ability to spatially control the delivery of the catechin-dextran by magnetic field makes it a promising agent for further application in cancer therapy.

  16. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) for radiation therapy of benign skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.P.; Liguoro, D.; San Galli, F.

    2001-01-01

    Skull base tumours represent a out 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate: it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimensional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. (authors)

  17. In vivo imaging of chromogranin A-positive endocrine tumours by three-step monoclonal antibody targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siccardi, A.G.; Paganelli, G.; Pontiroli, A.E.; Pelagi, M.; Magnani, P.; Viale, G.; Faglia, G.; Fazio, F.

    1996-01-01

    The detection of chromogranins (Cg) by immunohistochemistry and serology represents a new in vitro diagnostic tool for endocrine tumours. We have recently reported on the feasibility of targeting chromogranin A (CgA) for in vivo detection of pituitary adenomas by immunoscintigraphy (ISG). The scintigraphic procedure, based on an anti-CgA monoclonal antibody and on the avidin-biotin three-step method (Cg-3S-ISG), was evaluated on a group of 29 consecutive patients with known or suspected endocrine tumours other than pituitary adenomas, i.e. medullary thyroid carcinoma, carcinoid, insulinoma and parathormone- or ACTH-producing tumours. Primary tumours (10) and recurrences (16) were visualised in 26 patients, whereas conventional imaging techniques (planar radiography, computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography) failed to detect the tumour sites in ten of the same (Cg-3S-ISG-positive) patients. Therefore, these preliminary results indicate that Cg-3S-ISG, the first immunological method able to detect endocrine tumours in vivo, has a higher diagnostic accuracy than conventional imaging techniques (93.1% compared with 65.5%). (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Target and collection optimization for muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    1996-01-01

    To achieve adequate luminosity in a muon collider it is necessary to produce and collect large numbers of muons. The basic method used in this paper follows closely a proposed scheme which starts with a proton beam impinging on a thick target (∼ one interaction length) followed by a long solenoid which collects muons resulting mainly from pion decay. Production and collection of pions and their decay muons must be optimized while keeping in mind limitations of target integrity and of the technology of magnets and cavities. Results of extensive simulations for 8 GeV protons on various targets and with various collection schemes are reported. Besides muon yields results include-energy deposition in target and solenoid to address cooling requirements for these systems. Target composition, diameter, and length are varied in this study as well as the configuration and field strengths of the solenoid channel. A curved solenoid field is introduced to separate positive and negative pions within a few meters of the target. This permits each to be placed in separate RF buckets for acceleration which effectively doubles the number of muons per bunch available for collisions and increases the luminosity fourfold

  19. Selective targeting of tumour neovasculature by a radiohalogenated human antibody fragment specific for the ED-B domain of fibronectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demartis, S.; Tarli, L.; Neri, D.; Borsi, L.; Zardi, L.

    2001-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumours and other disorders. Antibodies capable of binding to new blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective targeting agents for immunoscintigraphic and radioimmunotherapeutic applications. Here we show that scFv(L19), a recombinant human antibody fragment with sub-nanomolar affinity for the ED-B domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, can be stably labelled with iodine-125 and astatine-211 with full retention of immunoreactivity, using a trimethyl-stannyl benzoate bifunctional derivative. Biodistribution studies in mice bearing two different types of tumour grafted subcutaneously, followed by ex vivo micro-autoradiographic analysis, revealed that scFv(L19) rapidly localises around tumour blood vessels, but not around normal vessels. Four hours after intravenous injection of the stably radioiodinated scFv(L19), tumour to blood ratios were 6:1 in mice bearing the F9 murine teratocarcinoma and 9:1 in mice bearing an FE8 rat sarcoma. As expected, all other organs (including kidney) contained significantly less radioactivity than the tumour. Since the ED-B domain of fibronectin has an identical sequence in mouse and man, scFv(L19) is a pan-species antibody and the results presented here suggest clinical utility of radiolabelled scFv(L19) for the scintigraphic detection of angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, it should now be possible to investigate scFv(L19) for the selective delivery of 211 At to the tumour neovasculature, causing the selective death of tumour endothelial cells and tumour collapse. (orig.)

  20. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate efficiently kills breast tumour-initiating cells in a complex II-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Bing; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Stapelberg, Michael; Stursa, Jan; Prokopova, Katerina; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that breast cancer involves tumour-initiating cells (TICs), which play a role in initiation, metastasis, therapeutic resistance and relapse of the disease. Emerging drugs that target TICs are becoming a focus of contemporary research. Mitocans, a group of compounds that induce apoptosis of cancer cells by destabilising their mitochondria, are showing their potential in killing TICs. In this project, we investigated mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate (MitoVES), a recently developed mitocan, for its in vitro and in vivo efficacy against TICs. The mammosphere model of breast TICs was established by culturing murine NeuTL and human MCF7 cells as spheres. This model was verified by stem cell marker expression, tumour initiation capacity and chemotherapeutic resistance. Cell susceptibility to MitoVES was assessed and the cell death pathway investigated. In vivo efficacy was studied by grafting NeuTL TICs to form syngeneic tumours. Mammospheres derived from NeuTL and MCF7 breast cancer cells were enriched in the level of stemness, and the sphere cells featured altered mitochondrial function. Sphere cultures were resistant to several established anti-cancer agents while they were susceptible to MitoVES. Killing of mammospheres was suppressed when the mitochondrial complex II, the molecular target of MitoVES, was knocked down. Importantly, MitoVES inhibited progression of syngeneic HER2 high tumours derived from breast TICs by inducing apoptosis in tumour cells. These results demonstrate that using mammospheres, a plausible model for studying TICs, drugs that target mitochondria efficiently kill breast tumour-initiating cells. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1394-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  1. Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate efficiently kills breast tumour-initiating cells in a complex II-dependent manner

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, B.; Stantic, M.; Zobalová, Renata; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Stapelberg, M.; Stursa, J.; Prokopová, Kateřina; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 401 (2015) ISSN 1471-2407 R&D Projects: GA MZd NT14078; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Tumour-initiating cells * Mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate * Complex II Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.265, year: 2015

  2. Discovery of a selective catalytic p300/CBP inhibitor that targets lineage-specific tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasko, Loren M.; Jakob, Clarissa G.; Edalji, Rohinton P.; Qiu, Wei; Montgomery, Debra; Digiammarino, Enrico L.; Hansen, T. Matt; Risi, Roberto M.; Frey, Robin; Manaves, Vlasios; Shaw, Bailin; Algire, Mikkel; Hessler, Paul; Lam, Lloyd T.; Uziel, Tamar; Faivre, Emily; Ferguson, Debra; Buchanan, Fritz G.; Martin, Ruth L.; Torrent, Maricel; Chiang, Gary G.; Karukurichi, Kannan; Langston, J. William; Weinert, Brian T.; Choudhary, Chunaram; de Vries, Peter; Van Drie, John H.; McElligott, David; Kesicki, Ed; Marmorstein, Ronen; Sun, Chaohong; Cole, Philip A.; Rosenberg, Saul H.; Michaelides, Michael R.; Lai, Albert; Bromberg, Kenneth D. (AbbVie); (UCopenhagen); (Petra Pharma); (UPENN); (JHU); (Van Drie); (Faraday)

    2017-09-27

    The dynamic and reversible acetylation of proteins, catalysed by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), is a major epigenetic regulatory mechanism of gene transcription1 and is associated with multiple diseases. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently approved to treat certain cancers, but progress on the development of drug-like histone actyltransferase inhibitors has lagged behind2. The histone acetyltransferase paralogues p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) are key transcriptional co-activators that are essential for a multitude of cellular processes, and have also been implicated in human pathological conditions (including cancer3). Current inhibitors of the p300 and CBP histone acetyltransferase domains, including natural products4, bi-substrate analogues5 and the widely used small molecule C6466,7, lack potency or selectivity. Here, we describe A-485, a potent, selective and drug-like catalytic inhibitor of p300 and CBP. We present a high resolution (1.95 Å) co-crystal structure of a small molecule bound to the catalytic active site of p300 and demonstrate that A-485 competes with acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). A-485 selectively inhibited proliferation in lineage-specific tumour types, including several haematological malignancies and androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer. A-485 inhibited the androgen receptor transcriptional program in both androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and inhibited tumour growth in a castration-resistant xenograft model. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using small molecule inhibitors to selectively target the catalytic activity of histone acetyltransferases, which may provide effective treatments for transcriptional activator-driven malignancies and diseases.

  3. Low-energy electron emitters for targeted radiotherapy of small tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, Peter; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva; Jacobsson, Lars; Skarnemark, Gunnar

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of using electron emitters to cure a cancer with metastatic spread depends on the energy of the emitted electrons. Electrons with high energy will give a high, absorbed dose to large tumours, but the absorbed dose to small tumours or single tumour cells will be low, because the range of the electrons is too long. The fraction of energy absorbed within the tumour decreases with increasing electron energy and decreasing tumour size. For tumours smaller than 1 g, the tumour-to-normal-tissue mean absorbed dose-rate ratio, TND, will be low, e.g. for 131 I and 90 Y, because of the high energy of the emitted electrons. For radiotherapy of small tumours, radionuclides emitting charged particles with short ranges (a few m u m ) are required. A mathematical model was constructed to evaluate the relation between TND and electron energy, photon-to-electron energy ratio, p/e, and tumour size. Criteria for the selection of suitable radionuclides for the treatment of small tumours were defined based on the results of the TND model. In addition, the possibility of producing such radionuclides and their physical and chemical properties were evaluated. Based on the mathematical model, the energy of the emitted electrons should be = 40 keV for small tumours ( 58m Co, 103m Rh, 119 Sb, 161 Ho, and 189m Os. All of these nuclides by internal transition or electron capture, which yields conversion and Auger electrons, and it should be possible to produce most of them in therapeutic amounts. The five low-energy electron-emitting radionuclides identified may be relevant in the radiation treatment of small tumours, especially if bound to internalizing radiopharmaceuticals

  4. Targeted radiotherapy with Sm-153-EDTMP in nine cases of canine primary bone tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Milner

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Nine dogs with primary bone tumours were treated with Samarium-153-EDTMP (Sm-153- EDTMP. Conventional treatment protocols were precluded by the size of the dogs and the owners' refusal of limb amputation. All the tumours were of the appendicular skeleton; 4 were confirmed osteosarcomas. The other 5 tumours were radiologically suspect for osteosarcoma. Bone scans were performed on all dogs using Technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m-MDP before administration of Sm-153-EDTMP. Regions of interest were identified over the contralateral limb at the same site as the tumour and counts per pixel were recorded for the tumour and contralateral limb and expressed as a ratio. The dogs were given 1 injection of 37 MBq/kg (1 mCi/kg of Sm-153-EDTMP intravenously. Thoracic and primary tumour site radiographs were taken at monthly or 2-monthly intervals to monitor progression of the primary tumour and search for evidence of metastasis. Two dogs showed no response to treatment, with an increase in bone pain, and were euthanased within 1 month. In 1 dog, a tumour of the scapula underwent complete involution and the dog is considered free of disease at 20 months post Sm-153-EDTMP treatment. The overall tumourcidal effect of a single dose of Sm-153-EDTMP on primary bone tumours was difficult to evaluate in this group of dogs, as, with one exception, all the primary tumours progressed over time and the dogs were euthanased. Pain control, for which Sm-155-EDTMP is used in man, was not evident, except in the dog that responded completely to treatment.

  5. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, Hans-Christian; Akpolat-Basci, Leyla; Stephanou, Miltiades [Marienhospital Bottrop gGmbH, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Bottrop (Germany); Loevey, Gyoergy [BORAD, Bottrop (Germany); Fasching, Peter A. [University of Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Untch, Michael [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany); Liedtke, Cornelia [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein/Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Bulsara, Max [University of Notre Dame, Fremantle (Australia); University College, London (United Kingdom); Vaidya, Jayant S. [University College, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    The use of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT) as a tumour bed boost during breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for breast cancer has been reported since 1998. We present its use in patients undergoing breast conservation following neoadjuvant therapy (NACT). In this retrospective study involving 116 patients after NACT we compared outcomes of 61 patients who received a tumour bed boost with IORT during lumpectomy versus 55 patients treated in the previous 13 months with external (EBRT) boost. All patients received whole breast radiotherapy. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS), disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), breast cancer mortality (BCM), non-breast cancer mortality (NBCM) and overall mortality (OS) were compared. Median follow up was 49 months. The differences in LRFS, DFS and BCM were not statistically significant. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of OS was significantly better by 15% with IORT: IORT 2 events (96.7%, 95%CI 87.5-99.2), EBRT 9 events (81.7%, 95%CI 67.6-90.1), hazard ratio (HR) 0.19 (0.04-0.87), log rank p = 0.016, mainly due to a reduction of 10.1% in NBCM: IORT 100%, EBRT 89.9% (77.3-95.7), HR (not calculable), log rank p = 0.015. The DDFS was as follows: IORT 3 events (95.1%, 85.5-98.4), EBRT 12 events (69.0%, 49.1-82.4), HR 0.23 (0.06-0.80), log rank p = 0.012. IORT during lumpectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy as a tumour bed boost appears to give results that are not worse than external beam radiotherapy boost. These data give further support to the inclusion of such patients in the TARGIT-B (boost) randomised trial that is testing whether IORT boost is superior to EBRT boost. (orig.) [German] Die intraoperative Radiotherapie (TARGIT-IORT) als vorgezogener Boost im Rahmen der brusterhaltenden Therapie (BET) ist seit 1998 Gegenstand der wissenschaftlichen Diskussion. Wir praesentieren Daten zum Einsatz der IORT bei der BET nach neoadjuvanter Therapie (NACT). In diese retrospektive Analyse

  6. A stable neurotensin-based radiopharmaceutical for targeted imaging and therapy of neurotensin receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Garayoa, Elisa; Blaeuenstein, Peter; Blanc, Alain; Maes, Veronique; Tourwe, Dirk; Schubiger, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) and its high affinity receptor (NTR1) are involved in several neoplastic processes. Thus, NT-based radiopharmaceuticals are potential tracers for targeted diagnosis and therapy of NTR-positive tumours. A new analogue based on NT(8-13), NT-XIX, with the three enzymatic cleavage sites stabilised, was synthesised and tested. The synthesis was performed by Boc strategy. Labelling with 99m Tc/ 188 Re was performed using the tricarbonyl technique. Metabolic stability was tested in vitro and in vivo. NT-XIX was further characterised in vitro in HT-29 cells and in vivo in nude mice with HT-29 xenografts. NT-XIX showed much longer half-lives than non-stabilised analogues. Binding to NTR1 was highly specific, although the affinity was lower than that of natural NT. Bound activity rapidly internalised into HT-29 cells and 50% remained trapped after 24 h. In the time-course biodistribution, the highest uptake was found in the tumour at all p.i. times. In vivo uptake was specific, and accumulation of activity in the kidneys was low. Radioactivity clearance from healthy organs was faster than that from the tumour, resulting in improved tumour-to-tissue ratios and good SPECT/CT imaging. Treatment with 188 Re-NT-XIX (30 MBq, in three or four fractions) decreased tumour growth by 50% after 3 weeks. The high in vivo stability and the favourable in vivo behaviour makes NT-XIX an excellent candidate for the imaging and therapy of NTR1-positive tumours. (orig.)

  7. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California - Los Angeles School of Medicine, 200 Medical Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    }{sup sparse} improves tradeoff between planning goals by 'sacrificing' voxels that have already been violated to improve PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity, and/or OAR-sparing. In doing so, overall plan quality is increased since these large violations only arise if a net reduction in E{sub tot}{sup sparse} occurs as a result. For example, large violations to dose prescription in the PTV in E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans will naturally localize to voxels in and around PTV-OAR overlaps where OAR-sparing may be increased without compromising target coverage. The authors compared the results of our method and the corresponding clinical plans using analyses of DVH plots, dose maps, and two quantitative metrics that quantify PTV homogeneity and overdose. These metrics do not penalize underdose since E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans were planned such that their target coverage was similar or better than that of the clinical plans. Finally, plan deliverability was assessed with the 2D modulation index.Results: The proposed method was implemented using IBM's CPLEX optimization package (ILOG CPLEX, Sunnyvale, CA) and required 1-4 min to solve with a 12-core Intel i7 processor. In the testing procedure, the authors optimized for several points on the Pareto surface of four 7-field 6MV prostate cases that were optimized for different levels of PTV homogeneity and OAR-sparing. The generated results were compared against each other and the clinical plan by analyzing their DVH plots and dose maps. After developing intuition by planning the four prostate cases, which had relatively few tradeoffs, the authors applied our method to a 7-field 6 MV pancreas case and a 9-field 6MV head-and-neck case to test the potential impact of our method on more challenging cases. The authors found that our formulation: (1) provided excellent flexibility for balancing OAR-sparing with PTV homogeneity; and (2) permitted the dose planner more control over the evolution of the PTV

  8. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan

    2013-01-01

    tradeoff between planning goals by “sacrificing” voxels that have already been violated to improve PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity, and/or OAR-sparing. In doing so, overall plan quality is increased since these large violations only arise if a net reduction in E tot sparse occurs as a result. For example, large violations to dose prescription in the PTV in E tot sparse -optimized plans will naturally localize to voxels in and around PTV-OAR overlaps where OAR-sparing may be increased without compromising target coverage. The authors compared the results of our method and the corresponding clinical plans using analyses of DVH plots, dose maps, and two quantitative metrics that quantify PTV homogeneity and overdose. These metrics do not penalize underdose since E tot sparse -optimized plans were planned such that their target coverage was similar or better than that of the clinical plans. Finally, plan deliverability was assessed with the 2D modulation index.Results: The proposed method was implemented using IBM's CPLEX optimization package (ILOG CPLEX, Sunnyvale, CA) and required 1–4 min to solve with a 12-core Intel i7 processor. In the testing procedure, the authors optimized for several points on the Pareto surface of four 7-field 6MV prostate cases that were optimized for different levels of PTV homogeneity and OAR-sparing. The generated results were compared against each other and the clinical plan by analyzing their DVH plots and dose maps. After developing intuition by planning the four prostate cases, which had relatively few tradeoffs, the authors applied our method to a 7-field 6 MV pancreas case and a 9-field 6MV head-and-neck case to test the potential impact of our method on more challenging cases. The authors found that our formulation: (1) provided excellent flexibility for balancing OAR-sparing with PTV homogeneity; and (2) permitted the dose planner more control over the evolution of the PTV's spatial dose distribution than conventional objective

  9. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, George A; Ruan, Dan

    2013-07-01

    planning goals by "sacrificing" voxels that have already been violated to improve PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity, and/or OAR-sparing. In doing so, overall plan quality is increased since these large violations only arise if a net reduction in E tot (sparse) occurs as a result. For example, large violations to dose prescription in the PTV in E tot (sparse)-optimized plans will naturally localize to voxels in and around PTV-OAR overlaps where OAR-sparing may be increased without compromising target coverage. The authors compared the results of our method and the corresponding clinical plans using analyses of DVH plots, dose maps, and two quantitative metrics that quantify PTV homogeneity and overdose. These metrics do not penalize underdose since Etot (sparse)-optimized plans were planned such that their target coverage was similar or better than that of the clinical plans. Finally, plan deliverability was assessed with the 2D modulation index. The proposed method was implemented using IBM's CPLEX optimization package (ILOG CPLEX, Sunnyvale, CA) and required 1-4 min to solve with a 12-core Intel i7 processor. In the testing procedure, the authors optimized for several points on the Pareto surface of four 7-field 6MV prostate cases that were optimized for different levels of PTV homogeneity and OAR-sparing. The generated results were compared against each other and the clinical plan by analyzing their DVH plots and dose maps. After developing intuition by planning the four prostate cases, which had relatively few tradeoffs, the authors applied our method to a 7-field 6 MV pancreas case and a 9-field 6MV head-and-neck case to test the potential impact of our method on more challenging cases. The authors found that our formulation: (1) provided excellent flexibility for balancing OAR-sparing with PTV homogeneity; and (2) permitted the dose planner more control over the evolution of the PTV's spatial dose distribution than conventional objective functions. In particular, Etot

  10. The BLAIRR Irradiation Facility Hybrid Spallation Target Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos N.; Hanson A.; Brown, D.; Elbakhshawn, M.

    2016-04-11

    BLAIRR STUDY STATUS OVERVIEW Beamline Complex Evaluation/Assessment and Adaptation to the Goals Facility Radiological Constraints ? Large scale analyses of conventional facility and integrated shield (concrete, soil)Target Optimization and Design: Beam-target interaction optimization Hadronic interaction and energy deposition limitations Single phase and Hybrid target concepts Irradiation Damage Thermo-mechanical considerations Spallation neutron fluence optimization for (a) fast neutron irradiation damage (b) moderator/reflector studies, (c) NTOF potential and optimization (d) mono-energetic neutron beam

  11. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  12. Magnetic resonance-imaging of the effect of targeted antiangiogenic gene delivery in a melanoma tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Walter [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany); Steinbach, Silke [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Dirk; Guccione, Samira [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Kiessling, Andreas; Figiel, Jens [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy to melanoma tumours (M21) by MR-imaging. M21 and M21-L tumours were grown to a size of 850 mm{sup 3}. M21 and M21-L tumours were intravenously treated with an αvβ3-integrin-ligand-coupled nanoparticle (RGDNP)/RAF(-) complex five times every 72 hours. MRI was performed at set time intervals 24h and 72h after the i.v. injection of the complex. The MRI protocol was T1-wt-SE±CM, T2-wt-FSE, DCE-MRI, Diffusion-wt-STEAM-sequence, T2-time obtained on a 1.5-T-GE-MRI device. The size of the treated M21 tumours kept nearly constant during the treatment phase (847.8±31.4 mm{sup 3} versus 904.8±44.4 mm{sup 3}). The SNR value (T2-weighted images) of the tumours was 36.7±0.6 and dropped down to 30.6±1.9 (p=0.004). At the beginning the SNR value (T1-weighted images) of the tumours after contrast medium application was 42.3±1.9 and dropped down to 28.5±3.0 (p<0.001). In the treatment group the diffusion coefficient increased significantly under therapy (0.54±0.01x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s versus 0.67±0.04x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). The DCE-MRI showed a reduction of the slope and of the Akep of 67.8±4.3 % respectively 64.8±3.3 % compared to baseline. Targeted gene delivery therapy induces significant changes in MR-imaging. MRI showed a significant reduction of contrast medium uptake parameters and increase of the diffusion coefficient of the tumours. (orig.)

  13. Targeted radiotherapy with {sup 177} Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez C, J.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santelena, 06000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    Malignant pancreas tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to estimate pancreatic tumour absorbed radiation doses after administration of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE in mice as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical that could be used in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (n=18) to obtain the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE biokinetics and dosimetry. To estimate its therapeutic efficacy 87 MBq were injected in a tail vein of 3 mice and 19 days p.i. there were a partial relapse. There was an epithelial and sarcoma mixed tumour in the kidneys of mouse III. The absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 50.5 {+-} 7.2 Gy, 17.5 {+-} 2.5 Gy and 12.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy respectively. These studies justify further therapeutic and dosimetry estimations to ensure that {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in man considering its kidney radiotoxicity. (Author)

  14. The optimization of acoustic fields for ablative therapies of tumours in the upper abdomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P.; ter Haar, G.; Saffari, N.

    2012-12-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) enables highly localized, non-invasive tissue ablation and its efficacy has been demonstrated in the treatment of a range of cancers, including those of the kidney, prostate and breast. HIFU offers the ability to treat deep-seated tumours locally, and potentially bears fewer side effects than more invasive treatment modalities such as resection, chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. There remains however a number of significant challenges which currently hinder its widespread clinical application. One of these challenges is the need to transmit sufficient energy through the ribcage to ablate tissue at the required foci whilst minimizing the formation of side lobes and sparing healthy tissue. Ribs both absorb and reflect ultrasound strongly. This sometimes results in overheating of bone and overlying tissue during treatment, leading to skin burns. Successful treatment of a patient with tumours in the upper abdomen therefore requires a thorough understanding of the way acoustic and thermal energy is deposited. Previously, a boundary element approach based on a Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) implementation of the Burton-Miller formulation was developed to predict the field of a multi-element HIFU array scattered by human ribs, the topology of which was obtained from CT scan data (Gélat et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 5553-81). The present paper describes the reformulation of the boundary element equations as a least-squares minimization problem with nonlinear constraints. The methodology has subsequently been tested at an excitation frequency of 1 MHz on a spherical multi-element array in the presence of ribs. A single array-rib geometry was investigated on which a 50% reduction in the maximum acoustic pressure magnitude on the surface of the ribs was achieved with only a 4% reduction in the peak focal pressure compared to the spherical focusing case. This method was then compared with a binarized apodization approach

  15. Targeting multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways with a resorcinol derivative leads to inhibition of advanced stages of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Ryuichi; Kawamura, Rumi; Singer, Eric; Pakdel, Arash; Sarma, Pranamee; Judkins, Jonathon; Elwakeel, Eiman; Dayal, Sonali; Martinez-Martinez, Esther; Amere, Mukkanti; Gujjar, Ramesh; Mahadevan, Anu; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D

    2014-10-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) can both reduce cancer progression, each through distinct anti-tumour pathways. Our goal was to discover a compound that could efficiently target both cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways. To measure breast cancer cell proliferation/viability and invasion, MTT and Boyden chamber assays were used. Modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using dichlorodihydrofluorescein and annexin/propidium iodide, respectively, in combination with cell flow cytometry. Changes in protein levels were evaluated using Western analysis. Orthotopic and i.v. mouse models of breast cancer metastasis were used to test the activity of cannabinoids in vivo. CBD reduced breast cancer metastasis in advanced stages of the disease as the direct result of down-regulating the transcriptional regulator Id1. However, this was associated with moderate increases in survival. We therefore screened for analogues that could co-target cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways (CBD- and THC-associated) and discovered the compound O-1663. This analogue inhibited Id1, produced a marked stimulation of ROS, up-regulated autophagy and induced apoptosis. Of all the compounds tested, it was the most potent at inhibiting breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in culture and metastasis in vivo. O-1663 prolonged survival in advanced stages of breast cancer metastasis. Developing compounds that can simultaneously target multiple cannabinoid anti-tumour pathways efficiently may provide a novel approach for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. An Overview of Radar Waveform Optimization for Target Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lulu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An optimal waveform design method that fully employs the knowledge of the target and the environment can further improve target detection performance, thus is of vital importance to research. In this paper, methods of radar waveform optimization for target detection are reviewed and summarized and provide the basis for the research.

  17. Targeting mesothelin receptors with drug-loaded bacterial nanocells suppresses human mesothelioma tumour growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Alfaleh

    Full Text Available Human malignant mesothelioma is a chemoresistant tumour that develops from mesothelial cells, commonly associated with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma incidence rates in European countries are still rising and Australia has one of the highest burdens of malignant mesothelioma on a population basis in the world. Therapy using systemic delivery of free cytotoxic agents is associated with many undesirable side effects due to non-selectivity, and is thus dose-limited which limits its therapeutic potential. Therefore, increasing the selectivity of anti-cancer agents has the potential to dramatically enhance drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. EnGeneIC Dream Vectors (EDV are antibody-targeted nanocells which can be loaded with cytotoxic drugs and delivered to specific cancer cells via bispecific antibodies (BsAbs which target the EDV and a cancer cell-specific receptor, simultaneously. BsAbs were designed to target doxorubicin-loaded EDVs to cancer cells via cell surface mesothelin (MSLN. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell binding and induction of apoptosis, and confocal microscopy to visualize internalization. Mouse xenograft models were used to assess anti-tumour effects in vivo, followed by immunohistochemistry for ex vivo evaluation of proliferation and necrosis. BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs were able to bind to and internalize within mesothelioma cells in vitro via MSLN receptors and induce apoptosis. In mice xenografts, the BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs suppressed the tumour growth and also decreased cell proliferation. Thus, the use of MSLN-specific antibodies to deliver encapsulated doxorubicin can provide a novel and alternative modality for treatment of mesothelioma.

  18. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [90Y-DOTA-dPhe1,Tyr3]octreotide (90Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, B.; Weckbecker, G.; Smith-Jones, P.M.; Albert, R.; Raulf, F.; Bruns, C.

    1998-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe 1 , Tyr 3 ]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2 ) (human sst 2 IC 50 =0.9 nM, rat sst 2 IC 50 =0.5 nM). In vivo, 90 Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst 2 expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg 90 Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 μg/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of 90 Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of endometrial cancer. Optimizing the imaging delay for tumour-myometrium contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the optimal imaging delay time of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women with endometrial cancer. This prospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the participants. Thirty-five women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 29-66 years) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with a temporal resolution of 25-40 seconds. The signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were analyzed to investigate the optimal imaging delay time using single change-point analysis. The optimal imaging delay time for appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast ranged from 31.7 to 268.1 seconds. The median optimal imaging delay time was 91.3 seconds, with an interquartile range of 46.2 to 119.5 seconds. The median signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were 0.03, with an interquartile range of -0.01 to 0.06, on the pre-contrast MR imaging and 0.20, with an interquartile range of 0.15 to 0.25, on the post-contrast MR imaging. An imaging delay of approximately 90 seconds after initiating contrast material injection may be optimal for obtaining appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast in women with endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  20. High resolution in vivo bioluminescent imaging for the study of bacterial tumour targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Cronin

    Full Text Available The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (μCT for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v. administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and μCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.

  1. Dose optimization of gadolinium DTPA. An inter-individual study of patients with intracranial tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubeus, P.; Schoerner, W.; Haustein, J.; Hosten, N.; Niendorf, H.P.; Felix, R.; Schering AG, Berlin

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic value of various doses of Gd-DTPA was compared intraindividually. Thirty-three patients with cerebral tumours were randomly allocated to three groups. Group 1 was given a dose of 0.025, group 2 a dose of 0.05 and group 3 a dose of 0.1 mmol GD-DTPA/kg body weight. Following administration of Gd-DTPA the average tumor/brain contrast in group 1 was -4.5%, in group 2 +8.4% and in group 3 +43.0%. Diagnostically useful tumour delineation was obtained in two out of 11 in group 1, in seven out of 11 in group 2 and in 10 out of 11 in group 3. A further increase in the dose to 0.2 mmol/kg body weight in group 3 resulted in a further increase in tumour/brain contrast of +62.5% and improved tumour deliniation in one case. As a result of these findings a dose of 0.1 mmol Gd-DTPA/kg body weight is reommended for the routine investigation of intracranial tumours. (orig.) [de

  2. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R.; Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude; Behe, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available β-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using 111 In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using 111 In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the nat In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using 125 I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the 111 In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC 50 values of the nat In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC 50 between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All 111 In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All 111 In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to 111 In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in lower metabolic stability. The properties of the macrocyclic

  3. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); Behe, Martin P. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available {beta}-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using {sup 111}In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using {sup 111}In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the {sup nat}In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using {sup 125}I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC{sub 50} values of the {sup nat}In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC{sub 50} between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All {sup 111}In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All {sup 111}In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in

  4. Development and evaluation of camptothecin loaded polymer stabilized nanoemulsion: Targeting potential in 4T1-breast tumour xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumaran, Abimanyu; Ponnusamy, Chandrasekar; Kandasamy, Palanivel; Krishnaswami, Venkateshwaran; Palanichamy, Rajaguru; Kandasamy, Ruckmani; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Natesan, Subramanian

    2018-04-30

    Targeted delivery of anticancer agents is poised to improve cancer therapy, for which polymers can serve as targeting ligands or nanocarriers for chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we have developed and evaluated the efficacy of a camptothecin (CPT)-loaded polymer stabilized nanoemulsion (PSNE) for the passive targeted delivery to breast cancer. Based on the pseudo-ternary phase diagrams, PSNEs were developed using capmul MCM:poloxamer 407 (4:1), solutol HS 15:simulsol P23 (1:2) and water. CPT polymer mixture was developed by solvent evaporation technique. The PSNEs were characterized for droplet size distribution, plasma protein adsorption, drug release, in-vivo targeting potential, hemolytic potential, cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, in-vivo biodistribution and CPT lactone ring stability. The developed PSNEs showed uniform droplet distribution, extended drug release (76.59±6.12% at 24h), acceptable hemolytic potential, significant cytotoxicity (IC 50 =176±4.3ng/mL) and genotoxicity against MCF-7 cancer cells but low DNA damage potential in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The efficiency of PSNEs for the targeted delivery of CPT into the tumour regions was documented in 4T1-breast tumour xenografted BALB/c mice. In-vivo biodistribution study shows that 7105.84±568.46ng/g of CPT was passively targeted from PSNE to breast cancer tissue. About 80% of the lactone form was stable for 24h. Taken together, our study provides a promising strategy for developing PSNE-targeted drug delivery system for the breast cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo detection of small tumour lesions by multi-pinhole SPECT applying a (99m)Tc-labelled nanobody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüwel, Thomas; Nevoltris, Damien; Bode, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Alves, Frauke

    2016-02-25

    The detection of tumours in an early phase of tumour development in combination with the knowledge of expression of tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important prerequisite for clinical decisions. In this study we applied the anti-EGFR nanobody (99m)Tc-D10 for visualizing small tumour lesions with volumes below 100 mm(3) by targeting EGFR in orthotopic human mammary MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and subcutaneous human epidermoid A431 carcinoma mouse models. Use of nanobody (99m)Tc-D10 of a size as small as 15.5 kDa enables detection of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging already 45 min post intravenous administration with high tumour uptake (>3% ID/g) in small MDA-MB-468 and A431 tumours, with tumour volumes of 52.5 mm(3) ± 21.2 and 26.6 mm(3) ± 16.7, respectively. Fast blood clearance with a serum half-life of 4.9 min resulted in high in vivo contrast and ex vivo tumour to blood and tissue ratios. In contrast, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-D10 in MDA-MB-231 tumours characterized by a very low expression of EGFR was observed. Here we present specific and high contrast in vivo visualization of small human tumours overexpressing EGFR by preclinical multi-pinhole SPECT shortly after administration of anti-EGFR nanobody (99m)Tc-D10.

  6. In vivo detection of small tumour lesions by multi-pinhole SPECT applying a 99mTc-labelled nanobody targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüwel, Thomas; Nevoltris, Damien; Bode, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Baty, Daniel; Chames, Patrick; Alves, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    The detection of tumours in an early phase of tumour development in combination with the knowledge of expression of tumour markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important prerequisite for clinical decisions. In this study we applied the anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10 for visualizing small tumour lesions with volumes below 100 mm3 by targeting EGFR in orthotopic human mammary MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 and subcutaneous human epidermoid A431 carcinoma mouse models. Use of nanobody 99mTc-D10 of a size as small as 15.5 kDa enables detection of tumours by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging already 45 min post intravenous administration with high tumour uptake (>3% ID/g) in small MDA-MB-468 and A431 tumours, with tumour volumes of 52.5 mm3 ± 21.2 and 26.6 mm3 ± 16.7, respectively. Fast blood clearance with a serum half-life of 4.9 min resulted in high in vivo contrast and ex vivo tumour to blood and tissue ratios. In contrast, no accumulation of 99mTc-D10 in MDA-MB-231 tumours characterized by a very low expression of EGFR was observed. Here we present specific and high contrast in vivo visualization of small human tumours overexpressing EGFR by preclinical multi-pinhole SPECT shortly after administration of anti-EGFR nanobody 99mTc-D10. PMID:26912069

  7. Discovery of a selective catalytic p300/CBP inhibitor that targets lineage-specific tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasko, Loren M; Jakob, Clarissa G; Edalji, Rohinton P

    2017-01-01

    -specific tumour types, including several haematological malignancies and androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer. A-485 inhibited the androgen receptor transcriptional program in both androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and inhibited tumour growth in a castration-resistant xenograft...... to treat certain cancers, but progress on the development of drug-like histone actyltransferase inhibitors has lagged behind. The histone acetyltransferase paralogues p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) are key transcriptional co-activators that are essential for a multitude of cellular processes, and have...... also been implicated in human pathological conditions (including cancer). Current inhibitors of the p300 and CBP histone acetyltransferase domains, including natural products, bi-substrate analogues and the widely used small molecule C646, lack potency or selectivity. Here, we describe A-485, a potent...

  8. Development of a potent DOTA-conjugated bombesin antagonist for targeting GRPr-positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansi, Rosalba; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Wang, Xuejuan [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Forrer, Flavio [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Erasmus Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Waser, Beatrice; Cescato, Renzo; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland); Graham, Keith; Borkowski, Sandra [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin-based antagonists show a higher uptake in tumour-bearing mouse models than agonists of similar or even distinctly higher receptor affinity. Very similar results were obtained with another family of G protein-coupled receptor ligands, the bombesin family. We describe a new conjugate, RM2, with the chelator DOTA coupled to D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH{sub 2} via the cationic spacer 4-amino-1-carboxymethyl-piperidine for labelling with radiometals such as {sup 111}In and {sup 68}Ga. RM2 was synthesized on a solid support and evaluated in vitro in PC-3 cells. IC{sub 50} and K{sub d} values were determined. The antagonist potency was evaluated by immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca{sup 2+} mobilization assays. Biodistribution studies were performed in PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing mice with {sup 111}In-RM2 and {sup 68}Ga-RM2, respectively. PET/CT studies were performed on PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing nude mice with {sup 68}Ga-RM2. RM2 and {sup 111}In-RM2 are high-affinity and selective ligands for the GRP receptor (7.7{+-}3.3 nmol/l for RM2; 9.3{+-}3.3 nmol/l for {sup nat}In-RM2). The potent antagonistic properties were confirmed by an immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca{sup 2+} mobilization assays. {sup 68}Ga- and {sup 111}In-RM2 showed high and specific uptake in both the tumour and the pancreas. Uptake in the tumour remained high (15.2{+-}4.8%IA/g at 1 h; 11.7{+-}2.4%IA/g at 4 h), whereas a relatively fast washout from the pancreas and the other abdominal organs was observed. Uptake in the pancreas decreased rapidly from 22.6{+-}4.7%IA/g at 1 h to 1.5{+-}0.5%IA/g at 4 h. RM2 was shown to be a potent GRPr antagonist. Pharmacokinetics and imaging studies indicate that {sup 111}In-RM2 and {sup 68}Ga-RM2 are ideal candidates for clinical SPECT and PET studies. (orig.)

  9. Development of a potent DOTA-conjugated bombesin antagonist for targeting GRPr-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansi, Rosalba; Maecke, Helmut R.; Wang, Xuejuan; Forrer, Flavio; Waser, Beatrice; Cescato, Renzo; Reubi, Jean Claude; Graham, Keith; Borkowski, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Radiolabelled somatostatin-based antagonists show a higher uptake in tumour-bearing mouse models than agonists of similar or even distinctly higher receptor affinity. Very similar results were obtained with another family of G protein-coupled receptor ligands, the bombesin family. We describe a new conjugate, RM2, with the chelator DOTA coupled to D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH 2 via the cationic spacer 4-amino-1-carboxymethyl-piperidine for labelling with radiometals such as 111 In and 68 Ga. RM2 was synthesized on a solid support and evaluated in vitro in PC-3 cells. IC 50 and K d values were determined. The antagonist potency was evaluated by immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca 2+ mobilization assays. Biodistribution studies were performed in PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing mice with 111 In-RM2 and 68 Ga-RM2, respectively. PET/CT studies were performed on PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing nude mice with 68 Ga-RM2. RM2 and 111 In-RM2 are high-affinity and selective ligands for the GRP receptor (7.7±3.3 nmol/l for RM2; 9.3±3.3 nmol/l for nat In-RM2). The potent antagonistic properties were confirmed by an immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca 2+ mobilization assays. 68 Ga- and 111 In-RM2 showed high and specific uptake in both the tumour and the pancreas. Uptake in the tumour remained high (15.2±4.8%IA/g at 1 h; 11.7±2.4%IA/g at 4 h), whereas a relatively fast washout from the pancreas and the other abdominal organs was observed. Uptake in the pancreas decreased rapidly from 22.6±4.7%IA/g at 1 h to 1.5±0.5%IA/g at 4 h. RM2 was shown to be a potent GRPr antagonist. Pharmacokinetics and imaging studies indicate that 111 In-RM2 and 68 Ga-RM2 are ideal candidates for clinical SPECT and PET studies. (orig.)

  10. Multiple roles of glyoxalase 1-mediated suppression of methylglyoxal glycation in cancer biology-Involvement in tumour suppression, tumour growth, multidrug resistance and target for chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Naila; Xue, Mingzhan; Weickert, Martin O; Thornalley, Paul J

    2018-04-01

    Glyoxalase 1 (Glo1) is part of the glyoxalase system in the cytoplasm of all human cells. It catalyses the glutathione-dependent removal of the endogenous reactive dicarbonyl metabolite, methylglyoxal (MG). MG is formed mainly as a side product of anaerobic glycolysis. It modifies protein and DNA to form mainly hydroimidazolone MG-H1 and imidazopurinone MGdG adducts, respectively. Abnormal accumulation of MG, dicarbonyl stress, increases adduct levels which may induce apoptosis and replication catastrophe. In the non-malignant state, Glo1 is a tumour suppressor protein and small molecule inducers of Glo1 expression may find use in cancer prevention. Increased Glo1 expression is permissive for growth of tumours with high glycolytic activity and is thereby a biomarker of tumour growth. High Glo1 expression is a cause of multi-drug resistance. It is produced by over-activation of the Nrf2 pathway and GLO1 amplification. Glo1 inhibitors are antitumour agents, inducing apoptosis and necrosis, and anoikis. Tumour stem cells and tumours with high flux of MG formation and Glo1 expression are sensitive to Glo1 inhibitor therapy. It is likely that MG-induced cell death contributes to the mechanism of action of current antitumour agents. Common refractory tumours have high prevalence of Glo1 overexpression for which Glo1 inhibitors may improve therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumour targeting with monovalent fragments of anti-neuroblastoma antibody chCE7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrel, F.; Novak-Hofer, I.; Ruch, C.; Zimmermann, K.; Amstutz, H.

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo behaviour of the monovalent single chain (scFv) and Fab-fragments derived from anti-neuroblastoma antibody chCE7 is reported. When comparing tumour uptake and -retention of radioactivity of 67 Cu-labelled monovalent chCE7 with divalent chCE7 F(ab') 2 the advantage of the radiocopper label over the radioiodine label was more pronounced with the divalent (internalising) F(ab') 2 fragments. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref

  12. Radioiodinated methylene blue for melanoma targeting: Chemical characterisation and tumour selectivity of labelled components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blower, Philip J.; Clark, Katherine; Link, Eva M.

    1997-01-01

    Radioiodinated methylene blue contains a mixture of components showing selective uptake in human pigmented melanoma, and it has potential for imaging and therapy. Nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopic studies show that the majority of the radioactivity (85%) is in the form of monoiodinated methylene blue, 4-iodo-3-methylamino-7-dimethylaminophenaza thionium chloride. The amino group ortho-to iodine has become demethylated to a mono-methylamino group. The remainder (15%) of the mixture is the doubly labelled 4,5-diiodo-3,7-bis(methylamino) phenazathionium chloride. The separated components show similar tumour selectivity in athymic mice bearing human pigmented melanomas

  13. Use of diagnostic dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for targeting of soft tissue tumour biopsies at 3T: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie; Amann, Gabriele; Krssak, Martin; Panotopoulos, Joannis; Funovics, Philipp; Windhager, Reinhard; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Nemec, Stefan; Breitenseher, Martin; Grabner, Guenther; Bogner, Wolfgang; Dominkus, Martin; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    To test the feasibility and accuracy of MR-guided soft tissue tumour biopsy at 3T, using the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) information from staging MRI for intralesional targeting. After obtaining written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved study, 53 patients with suspected soft tissue tumours prospectively underwent preoperative staging MRI at 3T, including DCE, and subsequent MR-guided core needle biopsy. In 44/53 cases, DCE was heterogeneous and was used for intralesional biopsy targeting. Surgical, whole-specimen histology was used as the gold standard in 43/44 patients and revealed 42 soft tissue tumours (24 men; 18 women; mean age, 52 years; range, 19 - 84). Final surgical histology revealed eight benign lesions, six tumours of intermediate dignity, and 28 malignancies. All malignancies had shown heterogeneous DCE. The diagnostic yield of the biopsies was 100 % (42/42). Histological accuracy rates of biopsy were 100 % in predicting the dignity (42/42; 95 % CI [0.916 - 1.000]), 95.2 % for the tissue-specific entity (40/42; 95 % CI [0.847 - 0.987]), and 90.5 % for the tumour grade (38/42; 95 % CI [0.779 - 0.962]). Our preliminary study indicates that biopsy of soft tissue tumours can be performed accurately and safely with DCE targeted MR-guidance at 3T, using a combined staging/biopsy MRI protocol. (orig.)

  14. Use of diagnostic dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI for targeting of soft tissue tumour biopsies at 3T: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris-Melanie [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna/Vienna General Hospital, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Amann, Gabriele [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Institute for Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Krssak, Martin [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine III, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vienna (Austria); Panotopoulos, Joannis; Funovics, Philipp; Windhager, Reinhard [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Orthopaedics, Vienna (Austria); Szomolanyi, Pavol [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Nemec, Stefan [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Breitenseher, Martin [Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Grabner, Guenther; Bogner, Wolfgang [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Dominkus, Martin [Orthopaedics Hospital Speising, Vienna (Austria); Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, High Field MR Center, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Austrian Cluster for Tissue Regeneration, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    To test the feasibility and accuracy of MR-guided soft tissue tumour biopsy at 3T, using the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) information from staging MRI for intralesional targeting. After obtaining written informed consent for this institutional review board-approved study, 53 patients with suspected soft tissue tumours prospectively underwent preoperative staging MRI at 3T, including DCE, and subsequent MR-guided core needle biopsy. In 44/53 cases, DCE was heterogeneous and was used for intralesional biopsy targeting. Surgical, whole-specimen histology was used as the gold standard in 43/44 patients and revealed 42 soft tissue tumours (24 men; 18 women; mean age, 52 years; range, 19 - 84). Final surgical histology revealed eight benign lesions, six tumours of intermediate dignity, and 28 malignancies. All malignancies had shown heterogeneous DCE. The diagnostic yield of the biopsies was 100 % (42/42). Histological accuracy rates of biopsy were 100 % in predicting the dignity (42/42; 95 % CI [0.916 - 1.000]), 95.2 % for the tissue-specific entity (40/42; 95 % CI [0.847 - 0.987]), and 90.5 % for the tumour grade (38/42; 95 % CI [0.779 - 0.962]). Our preliminary study indicates that biopsy of soft tissue tumours can be performed accurately and safely with DCE targeted MR-guidance at 3T, using a combined staging/biopsy MRI protocol. (orig.)

  15. Improving scanner wafer alignment performance by target optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Jehoul, Christiane; Socha, Robert; Menchtchikov, Boris; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Kent, Eric; Schoonewelle, Hielke; Tinnemans, Patrick; Tuffy, Paul; Belen, Jun; Wise, Rich

    2016-03-01

    In the process nodes of 10nm and below, the patterning complexity along with the processing and materials required has resulted in a need to optimize alignment targets in order to achieve the required precision, accuracy and throughput performance. Recent industry publications on the metrology target optimization process have shown a move from the expensive and time consuming empirical methodologies, towards a faster computational approach. ASML's Design for Control (D4C) application, which is currently used to optimize YieldStar diffraction based overlay (DBO) metrology targets, has been extended to support the optimization of scanner wafer alignment targets. This allows the necessary process information and design methodology, used for DBO target designs, to be leveraged for the optimization of alignment targets. In this paper, we show how we applied this computational approach to wafer alignment target design. We verify the correlation between predictions and measurements for the key alignment performance metrics and finally show the potential alignment and overlay performance improvements that an optimized alignment target could achieve.

  16. Targeted Optimization of Quasi-Symmetric Stellarators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegna, Chris C.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed research focuses on targeted areas of plasma physics dedicated to improving the stellarator concept. Research was pursued in the technical areas of edge/divertor physics in 3D configurations, magnetic island physics in stellarators, the role of 3D shaping on microinstabilities and turbulent transport and energetic ion confinement in stellarators.

  17. Targeted Optimization of Quasi-Symmetric Stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, Chris C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Anderson, D. T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Talmadge, J. N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-10-06

    The proposed research focuses on targeted areas of plasma physics dedicated to improving the stellarator concept. Research was pursued in the technical areas of edge/divertor physics in 3D configurations, magnetic island physics in stellarators, the role of 3D shaping on microinstabilities and turbulent transport and energetic ion confinement in stellarators.

  18. Targeting population heterogeneity for optimal cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Carlqvist, Magnus; Helmark, S.

    the heterogeneity level of the population. To further investigate these phenomena and gain a deeper understanding of population heterogeneity, Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth reporter strains based on the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) were constructed which enabled us to perform single cell level...... analysis, and thereby created the possibility to map population heterogeneity. A factorial design with pH, glucose concentration and oxygen level was performed in batch cultivations using the growth reporter strains to evaluate the effect of those environmental factors on heterogeneity level and amount......To achieve an efficient production process, it is essential to optimize both the strain and the cultivation conditions. Traditionally, a microbial population has been considered homogeneous in optimization studies of fermentation processes. However, research has shown that a typical microbial...

  19. Immunity to tumour antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Mian, Shahid; Ahmad, Murrium; Miles, Amanda; Rees, Robert C

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade, a large number of human tumour antigens have been identified. These antigens are classified as tumour-specific shared antigens, tissue-specific differentiation antigens, overexpressed antigens, tumour antigens resulting from mutations, viral antigens and fusion proteins. Antigens recognised by effectors of immune system are potential targets for antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy. However, most tumour antigens are self-proteins and are generally of low immunogenicity and the immune response elicited towards these tumour antigens is not always effective. Strategies to induce and enhance the tumour antigen-specific response are needed. This review will summarise the approaches to discovery of tumour antigens, the current status of tumour antigens, and their potential application to cancer treatment.

  20. Mid-ventilation position planning: Optimal model for dose distribution in lung tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benchalal, M.; Leseur, J.; Chajon, E.; Cazoulat, G.; Haigron, P.; Simon, A.; Bellec, J.; Lena, H.; Crevoisier, R. de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The dose distribution for lung tumour is estimated using a 3D-CT scan, and since a person breathes while the images are captured, the dose distribution doesn't reflect the reality. A 4D-CT scan integrates the motion of the tumour during breathing and, therefore, provides us with important information regarding tumour's motion in all directions, the motion volume (ITV) and the time-weighted average position (MVP). Patient and methods. - Based on these two concepts, we have estimated, for a lung carcinoma case a 3D dose distribution from a 3D-CT scan, and a 4D dose distribution from a 4-D CT scan. To this, we have applied a non-rigid registration to estimate the cumulative dose. Results. - Our study shows that the 4D dose estimation of the GTV is almost the same when made using MVP and ITV concepts, but sparring of the healthy lung is better done using the MPV model (MVP), as compared to the ITV model. This improvement of the therapeutic index allows, from a projection on the theoretical maximal dose to PTV (strictly restricted to doses for the lungs and the spinal cord), for an increase of about 11% on the total dose (maximal dose of 86 Gy for the ITV and 96 Gy for the MVP). Conclusion. - Further studies with more patients are needed to confirm our data. (authors)

  1. A parameter study to determine the optimal source neutron energy in boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nievaart, V A [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Moss, R L [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J L [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Hagen, T H J J van der [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Dam, H van [Reactor Physics Department, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2004-09-21

    The values of the parameters used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to calculate a given dose to human tissue vary with patients due to different physical, biological and/or medical circumstances. Parameters include the tissue dimensions, the {sup 10}B concentration and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors for the different dose components associated with BNCT. Because there is still no worldwide agreement on RBE values, more often than not, average values for these parameters are used. It turns out that the RBE-problem can be circumvented by taking into account all imaginable parameter values. Approaching this quest from another angle: the outcome will also provide the parameters (and values) which influence the optimal source neutron energy. For brain tumours it turns out that the {sup 10}B concentration, the RBE factors for {sup 10}B as well as fast neutrons, together with the dose limit set for healthy tissue, affect the optimal BNCT source neutron energy. By using source neutrons of a few keV together with neutrons of a few eV, it ensures that, under all imaginable circumstances, a maximum of alpha (and lithium) particles can be delivered in the tumour.

  2. Single photon emission computed tomographic studies (SPECT) of hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy (HAPS) in patients with colorectal liver metastases: improved tumour targetting by microspheres with angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J A; Bradnam, M S; Kerr, D J; McKillop, J H; Bessent, R G; McArdle, C S; Willmott, N; George, W D

    1987-12-01

    As intra-arterial chemotherapy for liver metastases of colorectal origin becomes accepted, methods of further improving drug delivery to the tumour have been devised. Degradable microspheres have been shown to reduce regional blood flow by transient arteriolar capillary block, thereby improving uptake of a co-administered drug, when injected into the hepatic artery. In our study of five patients, we combined hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy (HAPS) and SPECT to assess the localization of approximately 1 X 10(5) labelled microspheres of human serum albumin (99Tcm MSA) in tumour. In addition, in three patients, we assessed the effect of an intra-arterial infusion of the vasoactive agent angiotension II during HAPS. Results were interpreted by comparing transaxial slices with corresponding slices of a tin colloid liver-spleen scan. Two of five patients showed good localization of 99Tcm MSA in tumour without an angiotensin II infusion. Of the three patients receiving angiotensin II, all showed good tumour targetting with the vasoconstrictor compared with only one of these three before its use. Thus, hepatic arterial infusion of angiotensin II greatly improves microsphere localization in tumour in some patients with colorectal liver metastases. This technique may be useful in the assessment of tumour targetting before and during locoregional therapy.

  3. Optimal Target Stars in the Search for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2018-04-01

    The selection of optimal targets in the search for life represents a highly important strategic issue. In this Letter, we evaluate the benefits of searching for life around a potentially habitable planet orbiting a star of arbitrary mass relative to a similar planet around a Sun-like star. If recent physical arguments implying that the habitability of planets orbiting low-mass stars is selectively suppressed are correct, we find that planets around solar-type stars may represent the optimal targets.

  4. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  5. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C; Kallivokas, L F; Huh, C; Lake, L W

    2010-01-01

    that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential- equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized

  6. Targeted radionuclide therapy with RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with {sup 90}Y or {sup 177}Lu in a mouse model of αvβ3-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon-Petitprin, A.; Bacot, S.; Ahmadi, M.; Marti-Batlle, D.; Perret, P.; Broisat, A.; Riou, L.M. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); Gauchez, A.S.; Bourre, J.C.; Fagret, D.; Vuillez, J.P. [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); CHRU Grenoble, Hopital Michallon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Grenoble (France); Claron, M.; Boturyn, D. [CNRS, UMR 5250, Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, Grenoble (France); Ghezzi, Catherine [INSERM, U1039, Grenoble (France); Universite de Grenoble, UMR-S1039, Grenoble (France); INSERM U1039, Radiopharmaceutiques biocliniques, Batiment Jean Roget, Domaine de la Merci, Faculte de Medecine, La Tronche (France)

    2014-08-28

    The αvβ3 integrin plays an important role in tumour-induced angiogenesis, tumour proliferation, survival and metastasis. The tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK]){sub 4} (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets the αvβ3 integrin in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with β{sup -} emitters in a nude mouse model of αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumours. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed after injection of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD in nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG cells. Experimental targeted radionuclide therapy with {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD and {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD (nonspecific controls) was evaluated by intravenous injection of the radionuclides into mice bearing αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG tumours of different sizes (small or large) or bearing TS/A-pc tumours that do not express αvβ3. Tumour volume doubling time was used to evaluate the efficacy of each treatment. Injection of 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD into mice with large αvβ3-positive tumours or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD into mice with small αvβ3-positive tumours caused significant growth delays compared to mice treated with 37 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RAD or 37 MBq of {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In contrast, injection of 30 MBq of {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD had no effect on the growth of αvβ3-negative tumours. {sup 90}Y-RAFT-RGD and {sup 177}Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent agents targeting αvβ3-expressing tumours for internal targeted radiotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Targeted radionuclide therapy with RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with (90)Y or (177)Lu in a mouse model of αvβ3-expressing tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozon-Petitprin, A; Bacot, S; Gauchez, A S; Ahmadi, M; Bourre, J C; Marti-Batlle, D; Perret, P; Broisat, A; Riou, L M; Claron, M; Boturyn, D; Fagret, D; Ghezzi, Catherine; Vuillez, J P

    2015-02-01

    The αvβ3 integrin plays an important role in tumour-induced angiogenesis, tumour proliferation, survival and metastasis. The tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets the αvβ3 integrin in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of RAFT-RGD radiolabelled with β(-) emitters in a nude mouse model of αvβ3 integrin-expressing tumours. Biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed after injection of (90)Y-RAFT-RGD or (177)Lu-RAFT-RGD in nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG cells. Experimental targeted radionuclide therapy with (90)Y-RAFT-RGD or (177)Lu-RAFT-RGD and (90)Y-RAFT-RAD or (177)Lu-RAFT-RAD (nonspecific controls) was evaluated by intravenous injection of the radionuclides into mice bearing αvβ3 integrin-expressing U-87 MG tumours of different sizes (small or large) or bearing TS/A-pc tumours that do not express αvβ3. Tumour volume doubling time was used to evaluate the efficacy of each treatment. Injection of 37 MBq of (90)Y-RAFT-RGD into mice with large αvβ3-positive tumours or 37 MBq of (177)Lu-RAFT-RGD into mice with small αvβ3-positive tumours caused significant growth delays compared to mice treated with 37 MBq of (90)Y-RAFT-RAD or 37 MBq of (177)Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In contrast, injection of 30 MBq of (90)Y-RAFT-RGD had no effect on the growth of αvβ3-negative tumours. (90)Y-RAFT-RGD and (177)Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent agents targeting αvβ3-expressing tumours for internal targeted radiotherapy.

  8. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: What is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna NM.; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Phil M.; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Methods: Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT 6M ); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT 5M ); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CT CW ); (4) all markers removed (CT 0M ). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB 0M , TB CW , and TB 5M in order to encompass TB 6M was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT 0M , CT CW , CT 5M , CT 6M . Results: The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB 6M were 8 mm (range 0–28 mm) for TB 0M , 5 mm (range 1–13 mm) for TB CW , and 2 mm (range 0–7 mm) for TB 5M . CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT 6M (0.31) CT 5M (0.32) than for CT CW (0.19) and CT 0M (0.15). Conclusions: In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or

  9. Polymer-coated albumin microspheres as carriers for intravascular tumour targeting of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrijk, R; Smolders, I J; McVie, J G; Begg, A C

    1991-01-01

    We used a poly-lactide-co-glycolide polymer (PLAGA 50:50) to formulate cisplatin (cDDP) into microspheres designed for intravascular administration. Two systems were developed. PLAGA-coated albumin microspheres and microspheres consisting of PLAGA only. PLAGA-coated microspheres displayed a mean diameter of 31.8 +/- 0.9 microns and a payload of 7.5% cDDP (w/w). Solid PLAGA microspheres exhibited a mean diameter of 19.4 +/- 0.6 microns and a payload of 20% cDDP. Release characteristics and in vitro effects on L1210 leukemia and B16 melanoma cell lines were investigated. Both types of microsphere overcame the initial rapid release of cDDP (burst effect), and PLAGA-coated albumin microspheres also showed a lag phase of approximately 30 min before cDDP release began. PLAGA-coated albumin microspheres released most of their payload through diffusion, and the coating eventually cracked after 7 days' incubation in saline supplemented with 0.1% Tween at 37 degrees C, enabling the release of any cDDP remaining. Effects of platinum, pre-released from PLAGA-coated albumin microspheres on the in vitro growth of L1210 cells were comparable with those of standard formulations (dissolved) of cDDP. Material released from non-drug-loaded PLAGA microspheres had no effect on L1210 cell growth, suggesting the absence of cytotoxic compounds in the matrix. The colony-forming ability of B16 cells was also equally inhibited by standard cDDP and pre-released drug. These studies show that formulation of cDDP in PLAGA-based microspheres prevents the rapid burst effect of cDDP seen in previous preparations and offers an improved system of administration for hepatic artery infusion or adjuvant therapy, enabling better clinical handling and the promise of a higher ratio of tumour tissue to normal tissue.

  10. Optimal fractionation for the radiotherapy of tumour cells possessing wide-shouldered survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    A recent publication (Zeitz, L., and McDonald, J.M., 1978, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 51, 637) has considered the use of in vitro survival curves in the evaluation of different treatment schedules. Several studies of oxygenated melanoma cell have demonstrated a wider than average shoulder width for the survival curves. It is possible that hypoxia reduces the width of this shoulder. Theoretical cell survival probabilities were calculated for each of the four treatment schedules considered by Zeitz and McDonald. The calculations were based on hypothetical survival curves for anoxic melanoma cells with the shoulder either fully retained or completely abolished. No allowance was made for either re-population or re-oxygenation. The advantage of small doses per fraction was demonstrated for both types of survival curve. Re-oxygenation during therapy could therefore mean that a non-uniform treatment schedule is the appropriate choice for this type of tumour. (U.K.)

  11. Target distribution in cooperative combat based on Bayesian optimization algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Zhifu; Zhang An; Wang Anli

    2006-01-01

    Target distribution in cooperative combat is a difficult and emphases. We build up the optimization model according to the rule of fire distribution. We have researched on the optimization model with BOA. The BOA can estimate the joint probability distribution of the variables with Bayesian network, and the new candidate solutions also can be generated by the joint distribution. The simulation example verified that the method could be used to solve the complex question, the operation was quickly and the solution was best.

  12. Intra-tumour 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity decreases the reliability on target volume definition with positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinzhe; Wu, Peipei; Sun, Xiaorong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore whether the intra-tumour (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake heterogeneity affects the reliability of target volume definition with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell oesophageal cancer (SCEC). Patients with NSCLC (n = 50) or SCEC (n = 50) who received (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments were included in this retrospective study. Intra-tumour FDG uptake heterogeneity was assessed by visual scoring, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardised uptake value (SUV) and the image texture feature (entropy). Tumour volumes (gross tumour volume (GTV)) were delineated on the CT images (GTV(CT)), the fused PET/CT images (GTV(PET-CT)) and the PET images, using a threshold at 40% SUV(max) (GTV(PET40%)) or the SUV cut-off value of 2.5 (GTV(PET2.5)). The correlation between the FDG uptake heterogeneity parameters and the differences in tumour volumes among GTV(CT), GTV(PET-CT), GTV(PET40%) and GTV(PET2.5) was analysed. For both NSCLC and SCEC, obvious correlations were found between uptake heterogeneity, SUV or tumour volumes. Three types of heterogeneity parameters were consistent and closely related to each other. Substantial differences between the four methods of GTV definition were found. The differences between the GTV correlated significantly with PET heterogeneity defined with the visual score, the COV or the textural feature-entropy for NSCLC and SCEC. In tumours with a high FDG uptake heterogeneity, a larger GTV delineation difference was found. Advance image segmentation algorithms dealing with tracer uptake heterogeneity should be incorporated into the treatment planning system. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Intra-tumour 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity decreases the reliability on target volume definition with positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Xinzhe; Wu, Peipei; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang; Sun, Xiaorong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore whether the intra-tumour 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake heterogeneity affects the reliability of target volume definition with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell oesophageal cancer (SCEC). Patients with NSCLC (n = 50) or SCEC (n = 50) who received 18 F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments were included in this retrospective study. Intra-tumour FDG uptake heterogeneity was assessed by visual scoring, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardised uptake value (SUV) and the image texture feature (entropy). Tumour volumes (gross tumour volume (GTV) ) were delineated on the CT images (GTV CT ), the fused PET/CT images (GTV PET-CT ) and the PET images, using a threshold at 40% SUV max (GTV PET40% ) or the SUV cut-off value of 2.5 (GTV PET2.5 ). The correlation between the FDG uptake heterogeneity parameters and the differences in tumour volumes among GTV CT , GTV PET-CT , GTV PET40% and GTV PET2.5 was analysed. For both NSCLC and SCEC, obvious correlations were found between uptake heterogeneity, SUV or tumour volumes. Three types of heterogeneity parameters were consistent and closely related to each other. Substantial differences between the four methods of GTV definition were found. The differences between the GTV correlated significantly with PET heterogeneity defined with the visual score, the COV or the textural feature-entropy for NSCLC and SCEC. In tumours with a high FDG uptake heterogeneity, a larger GTV delineation difference was found. Advance image segmentation algorithms dealing with tracer uptake heterogeneity should be incorporated into the treatment planning system.

  14. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer 177Lu-AMBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C.; Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, 177 Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand 177 Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as 125 I-Tyr 4 -bombesin and 125 I-[D-Tyr 6 ,β-Ala 11 ,Phe 13 ,Nle 14 ]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. 177 Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. 177 Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with 177 Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with 177 Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that 177 Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  15. Selective in vitro targeting of GRP and NMB receptors in human tumours with the new bombesin tracer {sup 177}Lu-AMBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Eltschinger, Veronique; Reubi, Jean C. [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland); Linder, Karen; Nunn, Adrian [Bracco Research USA Inc, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    To investigate the in vitro binding properties of a novel radiolabelled bombesin analogue, {sup 177}Lu-AMBA, in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues selected for their expression of the bombesin receptor subtypes GRP-R, NMB-R and BRS-3. In vitro receptor autoradiography was performed in cancers expressing the various bombesin receptor subtypes. The novel radioligand {sup 177}Lu-AMBA was used and compared with established bombesin radioligands such as {sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4}-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[D-Tyr{sup 6},{beta}-Ala{sup 11},Phe{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}]-bombesin(6-14). In vitro incidence of detection of each of the three bombesin receptor subtypes was evaluated in each tumour. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA identified all GRP-R-expressing tumours, such as prostatic, mammary and renal cell carcinomas as well as gastrointestinal stromal tumours. {sup 177}Lu-AMBA also identified all NMB-expressing tumours, but did not detect BRS-3-expressing tumours or BRS-3-expressing pancreatic islets. GRP-R-expressing peritumoural vessels were heavily labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA. In contrast to the strongly GRP-R-positive mouse pancreas, the human pancreas was not labelled with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA unless chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed. In general, the sensitivity was slightly better with {sup 177}Lu-AMBA than with the conventional bombesin radioligands. The present in vitro study suggests that {sup 177}Lu-AMBA may be a very useful in vivo targeting agent for GRP-R-expressing tumours, NMB-R-expressing tumours and GRP-R-expressing neoangiogenic vessels. (orig.)

  16. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  17. Optimal interconnection and renewable targets for north-west Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Muireann Á.; Tol, Richard S.J.; O'Malley, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a mixed-integer, linear programming model for determining optimal interconnection for a given level of renewable generation using a cost minimisation approach. Optimal interconnection and capacity investment decisions are determined under various targets for renewable penetration. The model is applied to a test system for eight regions in Northern Europe. It is found that considerations on the supply side dominate demand side considerations when determining optimal interconnection investment: interconnection is found to decrease generation capacity investment and total costs only when there is a target for renewable generation. Higher wind integration costs see a concentration of wind in high-wind regions with interconnection to other regions. - Highlights: ► We use mixed-integer linear programming to determine optimal interconnection locations for given renewable targets. ► The model is applied to a test system for eight regions in Northern Europe. ► Interconnection reduces costs only when there is a renewable target. ► Wind integration costs affect the interconnection portfolio.

  18. DOTA-PESIN, a DOTA-conjugated bombesin derivative designed for the imaging and targeted radionuclide treatment of bombesin receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanwen; Maecke, Helmut R.; Schuhmacher, Jochen; Eisenhut, Michael; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Wild, Damian

    2007-01-01

    We aimed at designing and developing a novel bombesin analogue, DOTA-PEG 4 -BN(7-14) (DOTA-PESIN), with the goal of labelling it with 67/68 Ga and 177 Lu for diagnosis and radionuclide therapy of prostate and other human cancers overexpressing bombesin receptors. The 8-amino acid peptide bombesin (7-14) was coupled to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA via the spacer 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid (PEG 4 ). The conjugate was complexed with Ga(III) and Lu(III) salts. The GRP receptor affinity and the bombesin receptor subtype profile were determined in human tumour specimens expressing the three bombesin receptor subtypes. Internalisation and efflux studies were performed with the human GRP receptor cell line PC-3. Xenografted nude mice were used for biodistribution. [Ga III /Lu III ]-DOTA-PESIN showed good affinity to GRP and neuromedin B receptors but no affinity to BB3. [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN internalised rapidly into PC-3 cells whereas the efflux from PC-3 cells was relatively slow. In vivo experiments showed a high and specific tumour uptake and good retention of [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN. [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN highly accumulated in GRP receptor-expressing mouse pancreas. The uptake specificity was demonstrated by blocking tumour uptake and pancreas uptake. Fast clearance was found from blood and all non-target organs except the kidneys. High tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were achieved, which increased with time. PET imaging with [ 68 Ga]-DOTA-PESIN was successful in visualising the tumour at 1 h post injection. Planar scintigraphic imaging showed that the 177 Lu-labelled peptide remained in the tumour even 3 days post injection. The newly designed ligands have high potential with regard to PET and SPECT imaging with 68/67 Ga and targeted radionuclide therapy with 177 Lu. (orig.)

  19. Optimization of in-target yields for RIB production: Part 1: direct targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabod, S.; Thiolliere, N.; David, J.Ch.; Dore, D.; Ene, D.; Rapp, B.; Ridikas, D.; Chabod, S.; Blideanu, V.

    2008-03-01

    In the framework of the EURISOL-DS project and within Task-11, we have performed in-target yield calculations for different configurations of thick direct targets. The target materials tested are Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Pb(molten), Ta and UC 3 . The target was irradiated with protons of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 GeV. The production rates have been computed using the MCNPX transport/generation code, coupled with the CINDER-90 evolution program. The yield distributions as a function of charge number Z and mass number A have been evaluated. Their production rates have been optimized for 11 selected elements (Li, Be, Ne, Mg, Ar, Ni, Ga, Kr, Hg, Sn and Fr) and 23 of their isotopes of interest. Finally, the isotopic distributions for each of these 11 elements have been optimized in terms of the target material, its geometry, and incident proton energy

  20. Identification of Achaete-scute complex-like 1 (ASCL1) target genes and evaluation of DKK1 and TPH1 expression in pancreatic endocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Térèse A; Westin, Gunnar; Skogseid, Britt

    2009-01-01

    ASCL1 role in pancreatic endocrine tumourigenesis has not been established. Recently it was suggested that ASCL1 negatively controls expression of the Wnt signalling antagonist DKK1. Notch signalling regulates expression of TPH1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosyntesis of serotonin. Understanding the development and proliferation of pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) is essential for the development of new therapies. ASCL1 target genes in the pancreatic endocrine tumour cell line BON1 were identified by RNA interference and microarray expression analysis. Protein expressions of selected target genes in PETs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. 158 annotated ASCL1 target genes were identified in BON1 cells, among them DKK1 and TPH1 that were negatively regulated by ASCL1. An inverse relation of ASCL1 to DKK1 protein expression was observed for 15 out of 22 tumours (68%). Nine tumours displayed low ASCL1/high DKK1 and six tumours high ASCL1/low DKK1 expression. Remaining PETs showed high ASCL1/high DKK1 (n = 4) or low ASCL1/low DKK1 (n = 3) expression. Nine of twelve analysed PETs (75%) showed TPH1 expression with no relation to ASCL1. A number of genes with potential importance for PET tumourigenesis have been identified. ASCL1 negatively regulated the Wnt signalling antagonist DKK1, and TPH1 expression in BON1 cells. In concordance with these findings DKK1 showed an inverse relation to ASCL1 expression in a subset of PETs, which may affect growth control by the Wnt signalling pathway

  1. Optimization of OT-MACH Filter Generation for Target Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Oliver C.; Edens, Weston; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    An automatic Optimum Trade-off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter generator for use in a gray-scale optical correlator (GOC) has been developed for improved target detection at JPL. While the OT-MACH filter has been shown to be an optimal filter for target detection, actually solving for the optimum is too computationally intensive for multiple targets. Instead, an adaptive step gradient descent method was tested to iteratively optimize the three OT-MACH parameters, alpha, beta, and gamma. The feedback for the gradient descent method was a composite of the performance measures, correlation peak height and peak to side lobe ratio. The automated method generated and tested multiple filters in order to approach the optimal filter quicker and more reliably than the current manual method. Initial usage and testing has shown preliminary success at finding an approximation of the optimal filter, in terms of alpha, beta, gamma values. This corresponded to a substantial improvement in detection performance where the true positive rate increased for the same average false positives per image.

  2. 99mTc-labelled HYNIC-minigastrin with reduced kidney uptake for targeting of CCK-2 receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Gabriel, M.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.; Dietrich, H.; Skvortsova, I.

    2007-01-01

    Different attempts have been made to develop a suitable radioligand for targeting CCK-2 receptors in vivo, for staging of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and other receptor-expressing tumours. After initial successful clinical studies with [DTPA 0 ,DGlu 1 ]minigastrin (DTPA-MG0) radiolabelled with 111 In and 90 Y, our group developed a 99m Tc-labelled radioligand, based on HYNIC-MG0. A major drawback observed with these derivatives is their high uptake by the kidneys. In this study we describe the preclinical evaluation of the optimised shortened peptide analogue, [HYNIC 0 ,DGlu 1 ,desGlu 2-6 ]minigastrin (HYNIC-MG11). 99m Tc labelling of HYNIC-MG11 was performed using tricine and EDDA as coligands. Stability experiments were carried out by reversed phase HPLC analysis in PBS, PBS/cysteine and plasma as well as rat liver and kidney homogenates. Receptor binding and cell uptake experiments were performed using AR4-2J rat pancreatic tumour cells. Animal biodistribution was studied in AR4-2J tumour-bearing nude mice. Radiolabelling was performed at high specific activities and radiochemical purity was >90%. 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG11 showed high affinity for the CCK-2 receptor and cell internalisation comparable to that of 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG0. Despite high stability in solution, a low metabolic stability in rat tissue homogenates was found. In a nude mouse tumour model, very low unspecific retention in most organs, rapid renal excretion with reduced renal retention and high tumour uptake were observed. 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG11 shows advantages over 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG0 in terms of lower kidney retention with unchanged uptake in tumours and CCK-2 receptor-positive tissue. However, the lower metabolic stability and impurities formed in the labelling process still leave room for further improvement. (orig.)

  3. Approaches in the design of 99mTc based peptide radiolabelling for tumour targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, A.; Horiuchi, K.; Arano, Y.

    2001-01-01

    . Neogalactoalbumin (NGA), a specific protein that was incorporated by hepatic parenchymal cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis immediately after administration, was selected as a biological tool. The fate of the radiolabelled NGA after lysosomal proteolysis in hepatocytes was studied in liver homogenates. Subcellular distribution and identification of radiometabolites were performed using multiple analytical methods such as electrophoresis, TLC, and size exclusion and reverse phase HPLC. The data indicated that the chemical bonding between 99m Tc and HYNIC remains stable in the lysosomes but the persistent liver localization was due to a radiometabolite identified as 99m Tc-HYNIC-lysine (tricine)2, demonstrated by the similar HPLC data obtained with the synthesized and radiolabelled metabolite. Better co-ligands or new ligands or new design of the peptides are required in order to reduce the residence time of radioactivity in non-target tissue for future peptide use in radiodiagnosis or radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Multi-Target Tracking via Mixed Integer Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-13

    an easily interpretable global objective function. Furthermore, we propose a greedy heuristic which quickly finds good solutions. We extend both the... heuristic and the MIO model to scenarios with missed detections and false alarms. Index Terms—optimization; multi-target tracking; data asso- ciation...energy in [14] and then again as a minimization of discrete-continuous energy in [15]. These algorithms aim to more accurately represent the nature of the

  5. The HLJ1-targeting drug screening identified Chinese herb andrographolide that can suppress tumour growth and invasion in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Hua; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Wang, Chi-Chung; Chen, Huei-Wen; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2013-05-01

    HLJ1 is a novel tumour suppressor and is a potential druggable target for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this report, using a promoter-containing enhancer region as the HLJ1-targeting drug-screening platform, we identified several herbal compounds from a Chinese herbal bank with the capacity to enhance HLJ1 promoter activity and suppress tumour growth and invasion of NSCLC. Among the herbal drugs identified, the andrographolide (from Andrographis paniculata [Burm. f.] Nees.) most significantly induced HLJ1 expression and suppressed tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. The andrographolide upregulates HLJ1 via JunB activation, which modulates AP-2α binding at the MMP-2 promoter and represses the expression of MMP-2. In addition, silencing of HLJ1 partially reverses the inhibition of cancer-cell invasion by andrographolide. Microarray transcriptomic analysis was performed to comprehensively depict the andrographolide-regulated signalling pathways. We showed that andrographolide can affect 939 genes (analysis of variance, false discovery rate andrographolide on anticancer invasion and proliferation. In conclusion, the HLJ1-targeting drug-screening platform is useful for screening of novel anticancer compounds. Using this platform, we identified andrographolide is a promising new anticancer agent that could suppress tumour growth and invasion in NSCLC.

  6. Targeting tissue factor on tumour cells and angiogenic vascular endothelial cells by factor VII-targeted verteporfin photodynamic therapy for breast cancer in vitro and in vivo in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Rao, Benqiang; Chen, Shimin; Duanmu, Jinzhong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a ligand-targeted photodynamic therapy (tPDT) by conjugating factor VII (fVII) protein with photosensitiser verteporfin in order to overcome the poor selectivity and enhance the effect of non-targeted PDT (ntPDT) for cancer. fVII is a natural ligand for receptor tissue factor (TF) with high affinity and specificity. The reason for targeting receptor TF for the development of tPDT is that TF is a common but specific target on angiogenic tumour vascular endothelial cells (VEC) and many types of tumour cells, including solid tumours and leukaemia. Murine factor VII protein (mfVII) containing a mutation (Lys341Ala) was covalently conjugated via a cross linker EDC with Veterporfin (VP) that was extracted from liposomal Visudyne, and then free VP was separated by Sephadex G50 spin columns. fVII-tPDT using mfVII-VP conjugate, compared to ntPDT, was tested in vitro for the killing of breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated VEC and in vivo for inhibiting the tumour growth of breast tumours in a mouse xenograft model. We showed that: (i) fVII protein could be conjugated with VP without affecting its binding activity; (ii) fVII-tPDT could selectively kill TF-expressing breast cancer cells and VEGF-stimulated angiogenic HUVECs but had no side effects on non-TF expressing unstimulated HUVEC, CHO-K1 and 293 cells; (iii) fVII targeting enhanced the effect of VP PDT by three to four fold; (iii) fVII-tPDT induced significantly stronger levels of apoptosis and necrosis than ntPDT; and (iv) fVII-tPDT had a significantly stronger effect on inhibiting breast tumour growth in mice than ntPDT. We conclude that the fVII-targeted VP PDT that we report here is a novel and effective therapeutic with improved selectivity for the treatment of breast cancer. Since TF is expressed on many types of cancer cells including leukaemic cells and selectively on angiogenic tumour VECs, fVII-tPDT could have broad therapeutic applications for other solid cancers

  7. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, C

    2010-06-08

    We discuss a numerical approach for identifying the surface excitation that is necessary to maximize the response of a targeted subsurface formation. The motivation stems from observations in the aftermath of earthquakes, and from limited field experiments, whereby increased oil production rates were recorded and were solely attributable to the induced reservoir shaking. The observations suggest that focusing wave energy to the reservoir could serve as an effective low-cost enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper, we report on a general method that allows the determination of the source excitation, when provided with a desired maximization outcome at the targeted formation. We discuss, for example, how to construct the excitation that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential- equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized source signal. We seek to satisfy stationarity of an augmented functional, which formally leads to a triplet of state, adjoint and control problems. We use finite elements to resolve the state and adjoint problems, and an iterative scheme to satisfy the control problem to converge to the sought source signal. We report on one-dimensional numerical experiments in the time domain involving a layered medium of semi-infinite extent. The numerical results show that the targeted formation\\'s kinetic energy resulting from an optimized wave source could be several times greater than the one resulting from a blind source choice, and could overcome the mobility threshold of entrapped reservoir oil. © 2010 Nanjing Geophysical Research Institute.

  8. Optimization of sources for focusing wave energy in targeted formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, C; Kallivokas, L F; Huh, C; Lake, L W

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a numerical approach for identifying the surface excitation that is necessary to maximize the response of a targeted subsurface formation. The motivation stems from observations in the aftermath of earthquakes, and from limited field experiments, whereby increased oil production rates were recorded and were solely attributable to the induced reservoir shaking. The observations suggest that focusing wave energy to the reservoir could serve as an effective low-cost enhanced oil recovery method. In this paper, we report on a general method that allows the determination of the source excitation, when provided with a desired maximization outcome at the targeted formation. We discuss, for example, how to construct the excitation that will maximize the kinetic energy in the target zone, while keeping silent the neighbouring zones. To this end, we cast the problem as an inverse-source problem, and use a partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization approach to arrive at an optimized source signal. We seek to satisfy stationarity of an augmented functional, which formally leads to a triplet of state, adjoint and control problems. We use finite elements to resolve the state and adjoint problems, and an iterative scheme to satisfy the control problem to converge to the sought source signal. We report on one-dimensional numerical experiments in the time domain involving a layered medium of semi-infinite extent. The numerical results show that the targeted formation's kinetic energy resulting from an optimized wave source could be several times greater than the one resulting from a blind source choice, and could overcome the mobility threshold of entrapped reservoir oil

  9. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response.Methods: We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups...

  10. PET imaging for the quantification of biologically heterogeneous tumours: measuring the effect of relative position on image-based quantification of dose-painting targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, Keisha C; Barbee, David L; Kissick, Michael W; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    measurement of contrast recovery values which were larger than 30%. However, the magnitudes of the errors were found to depend on the size of the sphere and method of image reconstruction. The error values from standard OSEM images of the 5 mm diameter sphere were 20-35%, and for the 10 mm diameter sphere were 5-10%. The position-dependent variation of contrast recovery can result in changes in spatial distribution within images of heterogeneous tumours. In experiments simulating random set-up errors during imaging of two HN patients, the expectation value of the correlation was ∼1.0 for these tumours; however, Pearson correlation coefficient values as low as 0.8 were observed. Moreover, variations within the images can drastically change the delineation of biological target volumes. The errors in target delineation were more prominent in very heterogeneous tumours. As an example, in a pair of images with a correlation of 0.8, there was a 36% change in the volume of the dose-painting target delineated at 50%-of-max-SUV (ROI 50% ). The results of these studies indicate that the contrast recovery and spatial distributions of tracer within PET images are susceptible to changes in the position of the patient/tumour at the time of imaging. As such, random set-up errors in HN patients can result in reduced correlation between subsequent image-studies of the same tumour.

  11. TUMOUR VACCINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Ernst; Kircheis, Ralf; Crommelin, D.; Van Slooten, Maaike; Storm, Gert

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to a tumour vaccine with a tumour antigen base. In addition to a source of tumour antigens, the vaccine contains a release system for the delayed release of the active agent IFN- gamma , the active dose of IFN- gamma being 50 ng to 5 mu g. The IFN- gamma is released over a

  12. DOTA-PESIN, a DOTA-conjugated bombesin derivative designed for the imaging and targeted radionuclide treatment of bombesin receptor-positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanwen; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Schuhmacher, Jochen; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Centre, Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Berne (Switzerland); Wild, Damian [University Hospital, Clinic and Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    We aimed at designing and developing a novel bombesin analogue, DOTA-PEG{sub 4}-BN(7-14) (DOTA-PESIN), with the goal of labelling it with {sup 67/68}Ga and {sup 177}Lu for diagnosis and radionuclide therapy of prostate and other human cancers overexpressing bombesin receptors. The 8-amino acid peptide bombesin (7-14) was coupled to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA via the spacer 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid (PEG{sub 4}). The conjugate was complexed with Ga(III) and Lu(III) salts. The GRP receptor affinity and the bombesin receptor subtype profile were determined in human tumour specimens expressing the three bombesin receptor subtypes. Internalisation and efflux studies were performed with the human GRP receptor cell line PC-3. Xenografted nude mice were used for biodistribution. [Ga{sup III}/Lu{sup III}]-DOTA-PESIN showed good affinity to GRP and neuromedin B receptors but no affinity to BB3. [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN internalised rapidly into PC-3 cells whereas the efflux from PC-3 cells was relatively slow. In vivo experiments showed a high and specific tumour uptake and good retention of [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN. [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN highly accumulated in GRP receptor-expressing mouse pancreas. The uptake specificity was demonstrated by blocking tumour uptake and pancreas uptake. Fast clearance was found from blood and all non-target organs except the kidneys. High tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were achieved, which increased with time. PET imaging with [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-PESIN was successful in visualising the tumour at 1 h post injection. Planar scintigraphic imaging showed that the {sup 177}Lu-labelled peptide remained in the tumour even 3 days post injection. The newly designed ligands have high potential with regard to PET and SPECT imaging with {sup 68/67}Ga and targeted radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu. (orig.)

  13. Optimizing Nanoscale Quantitative Optical Imaging of Subfield Scattering Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Mark-Alexander; Barnes, Bryan M.; Zhou, Hui; Sohn, Martin; Silver, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The full 3-D scattered field above finite sets of features has been shown to contain a continuum of spatial frequency information, and with novel optical microscopy techniques and electromagnetic modeling, deep-subwavelength geometrical parameters can be determined. Similarly, by using simulations, scattering geometries and experimental conditions can be established to tailor scattered fields that yield lower parametric uncertainties while decreasing the number of measurements and the area of such finite sets of features. Such optimized conditions are reported through quantitative optical imaging in 193 nm scatterfield microscopy using feature sets up to four times smaller in area than state-of-the-art critical dimension targets. PMID:27805660

  14. Kernel method for clustering based on optimal target vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Leonardo; Marinazzo, Daniele; Pellicoro, Mario; Stramaglia, Sebastiano

    2006-01-01

    We introduce Ising models, suitable for dichotomic clustering, with couplings that are (i) both ferro- and anti-ferromagnetic (ii) depending on the whole data-set and not only on pairs of samples. Couplings are determined exploiting the notion of optimal target vector, here introduced, a link between kernel supervised and unsupervised learning. The effectiveness of the method is shown in the case of the well-known iris data-set and in benchmarks of gene expression levels, where it works better than existing methods for dichotomic clustering

  15. [Targeting high-risk drugs to optimize clinical pharmacists' intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouterde, Anne-Laure; Bourdelin, Magali; Maison, Ophélie; Coursier, Sandra; Bontemps, Hervé

    2016-12-01

    By the Order of 6 April 2011, the pharmacist must validate all the prescriptions containing "high-risk drugs" or those of "patients at risk". To optimize this clinical pharmacy activity, we identified high-risk drugs. A list of high-risk drugs has been established using literature, pharmacists' interventions (PI) performed in our hospital and a survey sent to hospital pharmacists. In a prospective study (analysis of 100 prescriptions for each high-risk drug selected), we have identified the most relevant to target. We obtained a statistically significant PI rate (P<0.05) for digoxin, oral anticoagulants direct, oral methotrexate and colchicine. This method of targeted pharmaceutical validation based on high-risk drugs is relevant to detect patients with high risk of medicine-related illness. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Abundant Fas expression by gastrointestinal stromal tumours may serve as a therapeutic target for MegaFasL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; van der Graaf, W. T. A.; Meijer, C.; Le, P. T. K.; Meersma, G. J.; de Jong, S.; Fletcher, J. A.; Suurmeijer, A. J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has been shown to be an active agent in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours ( GIST), complete remissions are almost never seen and most patients finally experience disease progression during their course of treatment. An alternative

  17. Abundant Fas expression by gastrointestinal stromal tumours may serve as a therapeutic target for MegaFasL.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikhof, B.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Meijer, C.; Le, P.T.; Meersma, G.J.; Jong, S. de; Fletcher, J.A.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib has been shown to be an active agent in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST), complete remissions are almost never seen and most patients finally experience disease progression during their course of treatment. An alternative

  18. TARGETED SEQUENTIAL DESIGN FOR TARGETED LEARNING INFERENCE OF THE OPTIMAL TREATMENT RULE AND ITS MEAN REWARD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambaz, Antoine; Zheng, Wenjing; van der Laan, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    This article studies the targeted sequential inference of an optimal treatment rule (TR) and its mean reward in the non-exceptional case, i.e. , assuming that there is no stratum of the baseline covariates where treatment is neither beneficial nor harmful, and under a companion margin assumption. Our pivotal estimator, whose definition hinges on the targeted minimum loss estimation (TMLE) principle, actually infers the mean reward under the current estimate of the optimal TR. This data-adaptive statistical parameter is worthy of interest on its own. Our main result is a central limit theorem which enables the construction of confidence intervals on both mean rewards under the current estimate of the optimal TR and under the optimal TR itself. The asymptotic variance of the estimator takes the form of the variance of an efficient influence curve at a limiting distribution, allowing to discuss the efficiency of inference. As a by product, we also derive confidence intervals on two cumulated pseudo-regrets, a key notion in the study of bandits problems. A simulation study illustrates the procedure. One of the corner-stones of the theoretical study is a new maximal inequality for martingales with respect to the uniform entropy integral.

  19. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV 0 ) and the set of CBCTs ({CTV 1 –CTV 25 }). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV 0 with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV 1 –CTV 25 was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1–16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm 3 ) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm 3 ) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm 3 ) (p 0 , 5–10 mm along the interfaces of CTV 0 with the bladder and rectum, and 10–14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV 0 at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and clinical trials.

  20. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Direct in vitro and in vivo comparison of {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu using a tumour-targeting folate conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Cristina; Reber, Josefine; Haller, Stephanie [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); Dorrer, Holger; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); University of Bern, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhardt, Peter [The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Medical Bioengeneering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zhernosekov, Konstantin [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    The radiolanthanide {sup 161}Tb (T{sub 1/2} = 6.90 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 154 keV) was recently proposed as a potential alternative to {sup 177}Lu (T{sub 1/2} = 6.71 days, Eβ{sup -}{sub av} = 134 keV) due to similar physical decay characteristics but additional conversion and Auger electrons that may enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The goal of this study was to compare {sup 161}Tb and {sup 177}Lu in vitro and in vivo using a tumour-targeted DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09). {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 were tested in vitro on folate receptor (FR)-positive KB and IGROV-1 cancer cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) viability assay. In vivo {sup 161}Tb-cm09 and {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (10 MBq, 0.5 nmol) were investigated in two different tumour mouse models with regard to the biodistribution, the possibility for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and the antitumour efficacy. Potentially undesired side effects were monitored over 6 months by determination of plasma parameters and examination of kidney function with quantitative SPECT using {sup 99m}Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). To obtain half-maximal inhibition of tumour cell viability a 4.5-fold (KB) and 1.7-fold (IGROV-1) lower radioactivity concentration was required for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.014 MBq/ml and ∝2.53 MBq/ml) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (IC{sub 50} ∝0.063 MBq/ml and ∝4.52 MBq/ml). SPECT imaging visualized tumours of mice with both radioconjugates. However, in therapy studies {sup 161}Tb-cm09 reduced tumour growth more efficiently than {sup 177}Lu-cm09. These findings were in line with the higher absorbed tumour dose for {sup 161}Tb-cm09 (3.3 Gy/MBq) compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 (2.4 Gy/MBq). None of the monitored parameters indicated signs of impaired kidney function over the whole time period of investigation after injection of the radiofolates. Compared to {sup 177}Lu-cm09 we demonstrated equal imaging

  2. Inhomogeneous target-dose distributions: a dimension more for optimization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersem, Werner R.T. de; Derycke, Sylvie; Colle, Christophe O.; Wagter, Carlos de; Neve, Wilfried J. de

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if the use of inhomogeneous target-dose distributions, obtained by 3D conformal radiotherapy plans with or without beam intensity modulation, offers the possibility to decrease indices of toxicity to normal tissues and/or increase indices of tumor control stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Ten patients with stage III NSCLC were planned using a conventional 3D technique and a technique involving noncoplanar beam intensity modulation (BIM). Two planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined: PTV1 included macroscopic tumor volume and PTV2 included macroscopic and microscopic tumor volume. Virtual simulation defined the beam shapes and incidences as well as the wedge orientations (3D) and segment outlines (BIM). Weights of wedged beams, unwedged beams, and segments were determined by optimization using an objective function with a biological and a physical component. The biological component included tumor control probability (TCP) for PTV1 (TCP1), PTV2 (TCP2), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung, spinal cord, and heart. The physical component included the maximum and minimum dose as well as the standard deviation of the dose at PTV1. The most inhomogeneous target-dose distributions were obtained by using only the biological component of the objective function (biological optimization). By enabling the physical component in addition to the biological component, PTV1 inhomogeneity was reduced (biophysical optimization). As indices for toxicity to normal tissues, NTCP-values as well as maximum doses or dose levels to relevant fractions of the organ's volume were used. As indices for tumor control, TCP-values as well as minimum doses to the PTVs were used. Results: When optimization was performed with the biophysical as compared to the biological objective function, the PTV1 inhomogeneity decreased from 13 (8-23)% to 4 (2-9)% for the 3D-(p = 0.00009) and from 44 (33-56)% to 20 (9-34)% for the BIM

  3. Geographic miss of lung tumours due to respiratory motion: a comparison of 3D vs 4D PET/CT defined target volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Siva, Shankar; Simoens, Nathalie; Edgar, Amanda; Everitt, Sarah; Schneider, Michal E; Hicks, Rodney J

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT scans acquired in the radiotherapy treatment position are typically performed without compensating for respiratory motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate geographic miss of lung tumours due to respiratory motion for target volumes defined on a standard 3D-PET/CT. 29 patients staged for pulmonary malignancy who completed both a 3D-PET/CT and 4D-PET/CT were included. A 3D-Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) was defined on the standard whole body PET/CT scan. Subsequently a 4D-GTV was defined on a 4D-PET/CT MIP. A 5 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm symmetrical and 15×10 mm asymmetrical Planning Target Volume (PTV) was created by expanding the 3D-GTV and 4D-GTV’s. A 3D conformal plan was generated and calculated to cover the 3D-PTV. The 3D plan was transferred to the 4D-PTV and analysed for geographic miss. Three types of miss were measured. Type 1: any part of the 4D-GTV outside the 3D-PTV. Type 2: any part of the 4D-PTV outside the 3D-PTV. Type 3: any part of the 4D-PTV receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose. The lesion motion was measured to look at the association between lesion motion and geographic miss. When a standard 15 mm or asymmetrical PTV margin was used there were 1/29 (3%) Type 1 misses. This increased 7/29 (24%) for the 10 mm margin and 23/29 (79%) for a 5 mm margin. All patients for all margins had a Type 2 geographic miss. There was a Type 3 miss in 25 out of 29 cases in the 5, 10, and 15 mm PTV margin groups. The asymmetrical margin had one additional Type 3 miss. Pearson analysis showed a correlation (p < 0.01) between lesion motion and the severity of the different types of geographic miss. Without any form of motion suppression, the current standard of a 3D- PET/CT and 15 mm PTV margin employed for lung lesions has an increasing risk of significant geographic miss when tumour motion increases. Use of smaller asymmetric margins in the cranio-caudal direction does not comprise tumour coverage. Reducing PTV margins for volumes defined on 3D

  4. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in target volume delineation of base of tongue tumours - A study using flexible surface coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Merina [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Maria [Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Sohaib, Aslam [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Kong, Christine; Burke, Kevin [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne [Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom); Brennan, Sinead [Department of Radiotherapy, St. James' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Riddell, Angela [Department of Radiology, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Mark; Newbold, Kate [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior diagnostic accuracy over computed tomography (CT) in oropharyngeal tumours. Precise delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is mandatory in radiotherapy planning when a GTV boost is required. CT volume definition in this regard is poor. We studied the feasibility of using flexible surface (flex-L) coils to obtain MR images for MR-CT fusion to assess the benefit of MRI over CT alone in planning base of tongue tumours. Methods: Eight patients underwent CT and MRI radiotherapy planning scans with an immobilisation device. Distortion-corrected T1-weighted post-contrast MR scans were fused to contrast-enhanced planning CT scans. GTV, clinical target and planning target volumes (CTV, PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated on CT, then on MRI with blinding to the CT images. The volumetric and spatial differences between MRI and CT volumes for GTV, CTV, PTV and OAR were compared. MR image distortions due to field inhomogeneity and non-linear gradients were corrected and the need for such correction was evaluated. Results: The mean primary GTV was larger on MRI (22.2 vs. 9.5 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.05) than CT. The mean primary and nodal GTV (i.e. BOT and macroscopic nodes) was significantly larger on MRI (27.2 vs. 14.4 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.05). The volume overlap index (VOI) between MRI and CT for the primary was 0.34 suggesting that MRI depicts parts of the primary tumour not detected by CT. There was no significant difference in volume delineation between MR and CT for CTV, PTV, nodal CTV and nodal PTV. MRI volumes for brainstem and spinal cord were significantly smaller due to improved organ definition (p = 0.002). Susceptibility and gradient-related distortions were not found to be clinically significant. Conclusion: MRI improves the definition of tongue base tumours and neurological structures. The use of MRI is recommended for GTV dose-escalation techniques to provide precise depiction of GTV and

  5. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in target volume delineation of base of tongue tumours - A study using flexible surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Merina; Schmidt, Maria; Sohaib, Aslam; Kong, Christine; Burke, Kevin; Richardson, Cheryl; Usher, Marianne; Brennan, Sinead; Riddell, Angela; Davies, Mark; Newbold, Kate; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior diagnostic accuracy over computed tomography (CT) in oropharyngeal tumours. Precise delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) is mandatory in radiotherapy planning when a GTV boost is required. CT volume definition in this regard is poor. We studied the feasibility of using flexible surface (flex-L) coils to obtain MR images for MR-CT fusion to assess the benefit of MRI over CT alone in planning base of tongue tumours. Methods: Eight patients underwent CT and MRI radiotherapy planning scans with an immobilisation device. Distortion-corrected T1-weighted post-contrast MR scans were fused to contrast-enhanced planning CT scans. GTV, clinical target and planning target volumes (CTV, PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) were delineated on CT, then on MRI with blinding to the CT images. The volumetric and spatial differences between MRI and CT volumes for GTV, CTV, PTV and OAR were compared. MR image distortions due to field inhomogeneity and non-linear gradients were corrected and the need for such correction was evaluated. Results: The mean primary GTV was larger on MRI (22.2 vs. 9.5 cm 3 , p = 0.05) than CT. The mean primary and nodal GTV (i.e. BOT and macroscopic nodes) was significantly larger on MRI (27.2 vs. 14.4 cm 3 , p = 0.05). The volume overlap index (VOI) between MRI and CT for the primary was 0.34 suggesting that MRI depicts parts of the primary tumour not detected by CT. There was no significant difference in volume delineation between MR and CT for CTV, PTV, nodal CTV and nodal PTV. MRI volumes for brainstem and spinal cord were significantly smaller due to improved organ definition (p = 0.002). Susceptibility and gradient-related distortions were not found to be clinically significant. Conclusion: MRI improves the definition of tongue base tumours and neurological structures. The use of MRI is recommended for GTV dose-escalation techniques to provide precise depiction of GTV and improved

  6. The high-risk HPV E6 target scribble (hScrib is required for HPV E6 expression in cervical tumour-derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kranjec

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins to target cellular proteins which harbor PDZ domains is believed to play an important role in the virus life cycle and to influence the ability of these viruses to bring about malignant transformation. Whilst many of these PDZ proteins are potential tumour suppressors, involved in the control of cell polarity and cell-contact, recent studies suggest that mislocalisation or overexpression might result in the emergence of oncogenic functions. This has been shown most clearly for two E6 targets, hDlg and hScrib. In this study we show that hScrib plays such a role in HeLa cells, where its expression is required for maintaining high levels of HPV-18 E6 protein. Loss of hScrib has no effect on E6 stability but results in lower levels of E6 transcription and a reduced rate of E6 translation. We further show that, in the context of cervical tumour-derived cell lines, both hScrib and E6 cooperate in the activation of the S6 kinase signaling pathway, and thereby contribute towards maintaining high rates of protein translation. These results indicate that the residual hScrib that is present within HPV transformed cells is pro-oncogenic, and highlights the dual functions of E6 cell polarity targets. Keywords: HPV E6, hScrib, S6 kinase, Protein translation

  7. An optimized hydrogen target for muon catalyzed fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.i [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with the optimization of the processes involved in muon catalyzed fusion. Muon catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) is studied in all layers of the solid hydrogen structure H/0.1%T+D{sub 2}+HD. The layer H/T acts as an emitter source of energetic t{mu} atoms, due to the so-called Ramsauer-Townsend effect. These t{mu} atoms are slowed down in the second layer (degrader) and are forced to take place nuclear fusion in HD. The degrader affects time evolution of t{mu} atomic beam. This effect has not been considered until now in {mu}CF-multilayered targets. Due to muon cycling and this effect, considerable reactions occur in the degrader. In our calculations, it is shown that the fusion yield equals 180{+-}1.5. It is possible to separate events that overlap in time.

  8. Improving tumour response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, S.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation oncology is in the middle of the most exciting developments in its 100-year history. Progress in treatment planning and delivery, in medical imaging and in basic cancer and normal tissue biology is likely to change the indication for radiotherapy as well as the way it is prescribed and delivered. Technological and conceptual advances, in particular the development of the multi-leaf collimator and the concept of inverse treatment planning, have led to the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with its capability to plan and deliver non-uniform dose distributions in the clinic. This has forced us to re-think radiation oncology: refining the indication for radiotherapy, optimizing the prescription of dose distributions and considering how, based on clinical evidence, radiation can best be combined with other treatment modalities, surgery, cytotoxic chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies. The attraction of radiation therapy as an element of multi-modality cancer therapy is that it induces DNA damage that can be modulated in space and time. Progress in basic cancer biology, genomics and proteomics, as well as biological imaging provides novel avenues for individualization of cancer therapy and for biological optimization of radiotherapy. In improving cancer care, it is the therapeutic ratio, rather than tumour control per se, that must be optimised. Interestingly, the two main avenues for improving the effectiveness of radiotherapy currently being actively pursued in the clinic generally aim at different sides of the therapeutic ratio: 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT predominantly aim to reduce normal-tissue side effects - and by doing this, open the way for dose escalation that may lead to increased tumour control rates - whereas combined radio-chemotherapy aims to improve tumour response - while keeping the fingers crossed that this will not increase normal-tissue complications to the same extent. In parallel with these

  9. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  10. Folate-targeted amphiphilic cyclodextrin nanoparticles incorporating a fusogenic peptide deliver therapeutic siRNA and inhibit the invasive capacity of 3D prostate cancer tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, James C; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Sweeney, Katrina; Darcy, Raphael; Nelson, Colleen C; Hollier, Brett G; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2017-10-30

    The main barrier to the development of an effective RNA interference (RNAi) therapy is the lack of a suitable delivery vector. Modified cyclodextrins have emerged in recent years for the delivery of siRNA. In the present study, a folate-targeted amphiphilic cyclodextrin was formulated using DSPE-PEG 5000 -folate to target prostate cancer cells. The fusogenic peptide GALA was included in the formulation to aid in the endosomal release of siRNA. Targeted nanoparticles were less than 200nm in size with a neutral surface charge. The complexes were able to bind siRNA and protect it from serum nucleases. Incubation with excess free folate resulted in a significant decrease in the uptake of targeted nanoparticles in LNCaP and PC3 cells, both of which have been reported to have differing pathways of folate uptake. There was a significant reduction in the therapeutic targets, ZEB1 and NRP1 at mRNA and protein level following treatment with targeted complexes. In preliminary functional assays using 3D spheroids, treatment of PC3 tumours with targeted complexes with ZEB1 and NRP1 siRNA resulted in more compact colonies relative to the untargeted controls and inhibited infiltration into the Matrigel™ layer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal Design of Gradient Materials and Bi-Level Optimization of Topology Using Targets (BOTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Anthony

    The objective of this research is to understand the fundamental relationships necessary to develop a method to optimize both the topology and the internal gradient material distribution of a single object while meeting constraints and conflicting objectives. Functionally gradient material (FGM) objects possess continuous varying material properties throughout the object, and they allow an engineer to tailor individual regions of an object to have specific mechanical properties by locally modifying the internal material composition. A variety of techniques exists for topology optimization, and several methods exist for FGM optimization, but combining the two together is difficult. Understanding the relationship between topology and material gradient optimization enables the selection of an appropriate model and the development of algorithms, which allow engineers to design high-performance parts that better meet design objectives than optimized homogeneous material objects. For this research effort, topology optimization means finding the optimal connected structure with an optimal shape. FGM optimization means finding the optimal macroscopic material properties within an object. Tailoring the material constitutive matrix as a function of position results in gradient properties. Once, the target macroscopic properties are known, a mesostructure or a particular material nanostructure can be found which gives the target material properties at each macroscopic point. This research demonstrates that topology and gradient materials can both be optimized together for a single part. The algorithms use a discretized model of the domain and gradient based optimization algorithms. In addition, when considering two conflicting objectives the algorithms in this research generate clear 'features' within a single part. This tailoring of material properties within different areas of a single part (automated design of 'features') using computational design tools is a novel benefit

  12. [99mTc]Demotensin 5 and 6 in the NTS1-R-targeted imaging of tumours: synthesis and preclinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maina, Theodosia; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Stathopoulou, Eleni; Nock, Berthold A.; Galanis, Athanassios S.; Cordopatis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 5 and 6 ([ 99m Tc- N 0 4 ,(β)Ala 7 ,Dab 9 ,X 12 AA ]NT(7-13); X AA =Ile/5,Tle/6,NT=neurotensin) in the targeted diagnostic imaging of neurotensin subtype 1 receptor (NTS1-R)-expressing tumours. Labelling of Demotensin 5 and 6 with 99m Tc was conducted by brief incubation with 99m TcO 4 - , SnCl 2 and citrate anions in alkaline medium at ambient temperature. Affinities of conjugates for the NTS1-R were determined by competition binding experiments in WiDr cell membranes using [ 125 I-Tyr 3 ]NT as the radioligand. Saturation binding assays were conducted for [ 99m Tc/ 99g Tc]Demotensin 6 in WiDr cell membranes. Internalisation of [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 5 and 6 was studied at 37 C in WiDr cells. Biodistribution of [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 5 and 6 was performed in female Swiss nu/nu mice bearing human WiDr xenografts. Unlabelled conjugates showed a high affinity for the human NTS1-R (Demotensin 5 IC 50 =0.03±0.01 nM; Demotensin 6 IC 50 =0.08±0.02 nM), while high affinity was also exhibited by (radio)metallated [ 99m Tc/ 99g Tc]Demotensin 6 (K d =0.13±0.01 nM). [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 5 and 6 internalised rapidly and specifically in WiDr cells. After injection in WiDr tumour-bearing mice, radiopeptides, and especially the doubly stabilised [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 6, showed NTS1-R-mediated uptake in the intestines and in the implanted tumour (4.30±0.45%ID/g at 1 h post injection) and rapid renal excretion from non-target tissues into the urine. [ 99m Tc]Demotensin 6 shows a favourable preclinical profile and further testing in patients is warranted to monitor its eventual applicability as a radiotracer in the diagnostic imaging of NTS1-R-positive tumours. (orig.)

  13. Risk factors for radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung tumours: clinical usefulness of the planning target volume to total lung volume ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Tomoko; Arimura, Takeshi; Takumi, Koji; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Higashi, Ryutaro; Ito, Soichiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    To identify risk factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for lung tumours. We retrospectively evaluated 68 lung tumours in 63 patients treated with SRT between 2011 and 2015. RP was graded according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. SRT was delivered at 7.0-12.0 Gy per each fraction, once daily, to a total of 48-64 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to assess patient- and treatment-related factors, including age, sex, smoking index (SI), pulmonary function, tumour location, serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 value (KL-6), dose-volume metrics (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 and VS5), homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose, mean lung dose (MLD), contralateral MLD and V2, PTV volume, lung volume and the PTV/lung volume ratio (PTV/Lung). Performance of PTV/Lung in predicting symptomatic RP was also analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The median follow-up period was 21 months. 10 of 63 patients (15.9%) developed symptomatic RP after SRT. On univariate analysis, V10, V20, PTV volume and PTV/Lung were significantly associated with occurrence of RP  ≥Grade 2. ROC curves indicated that symptomatic RP could be predicted using PTV/Lung [area under curve (AUC): 0.88, confidence interval (CI: 0.78-0.95), cut-off value: 1.09, sensitivity: 90.0% and specificity: 72.4%]. PTV/Lung is a good predictor of symptomatic RP after SRT. Advances in knowledge: The cases with high PTV/Lung should be carefully monitored with caution for the occurrence of RP after SRT.

  14. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  15. {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Boll, R.; Murphy, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with {sup 90}Y/{sup 177}Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of {sup 213}Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  16. 213Bi-DOTATOC receptor-targeted alpha-radionuclide therapy induces remission in neuroendocrine tumours refractory to beta radiation: a first-in-human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratochwil, C.; Giesel, F.L.; Mier, W.; Haberkorn, U.; Bruchertseifer, F.; Apostolidis, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Boll, R.; Murphy, K.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopeptide therapy using a somatostatin analogue labelled with a beta emitter such as 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC is a new therapeutic option in neuroendocrine cancer. Alternative treatments for patients with refractory disease are rare. Here we report the first-in-human experience with 213 Bi-DOTATOC targeted alpha therapy (TAT) in patients pretreated with beta emitters. Seven patients with progressive advanced neuroendocrine liver metastases refractory to treatment with 90 Y/ 177 Lu-DOTATOC were treated with an intraarterial infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC, and one patient with bone marrow carcinosis was treated with a systemic infusion of 213 Bi-DOTATOC. Haematological, kidney and endocrine toxicities were assessed according to CTCAE criteria. Radiological response was assessed with contrast-enhanced MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. More than 2 years of follow-up were available in seven patients. The biodistribution of 213 Bi-DOTATOC was evaluable with 440 keV gamma emission scans, and demonstrated specific tumour binding. Enduring responses were observed in all treated patients. Chronic kidney toxicity was moderate. Acute haematotoxicity was even less pronounced than with the preceding beta therapies. TAT can induce remission of tumours refractory to beta radiation with favourable acute and mid-term toxicity at therapeutic effective doses. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of lanreotide in combination with targeted therapies in patients with neuroendocrine tumours in clinical practice: a retrospective cross-sectional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, Jaume; Sevilla, Isabel; Alonso, Vicente; Antón Aparicio, Luís; Jiménez Fonseca, Paula; Grande, Enrique; Reina, Juan José; Manzano, José Luís; Alonso Lájara, Juan Domingo; Barriuso, Jorge; Castellano, Daniel; Medina, Javier; López, Carlos; Segura, Ángel; Carrera, Sergio; Crespo, Guillermo; Fuster, José; Munarriz, Javier; García Alfonso, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Based on the mechanism of action, combining somatostatin analogues (SSAs) with mTOR inhibitors or antiangiogenic agents may provide synergistic effects for the treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Herein, we investigate the use of these treatment combinations in clinical practice. This retrospective cross-sectional analysis of patients with NETs treated with the SSA lanreotide and targeted therapies at 35 Spanish hospitals evaluated the efficacy and safety of lanreotide treatment combinations in clinical practice. The data of 159 treatment combinations with lanreotide in 133 patients was retrospectively collected. Of the 133 patients, with a median age of 59.4 (16–83) years, 70 (52.6 %) patients were male, 64 (48.1 %) had pancreatic NET, 23 (17.3 %) had ECOG PS ≥2, 41 (30.8 %) had functioning tumours, 63 (47.7 %) underwent surgery of the primary tumour, 45 (33.8 %) had received prior chemotherapy, and 115 (86.5 %) had received prior SSAs. 115 patients received 1 lanreotide treatment combination and 18 patients received between 2 and 5 combinations. Lanreotide was mainly administered in combination with everolimus (73 combinations) or sunitinib (61 combinations). The probability of being progression-free was 78.5 % (6 months), 68.6 % (12 months) and 57.0 % (18 months) for patients who only received everolimus plus lanreotide (n = 57) and 89.3 % (6 months), 73.0 % (12 months), and 67.4 % (18 months) for patients who only received sunitinib and lanreotide (n = 50). In patients who only received everolimus plus lanreotide the median time-to-progression from the initiation of lanreotide combination treatment was 25.8 months (95 % CI, 11.3, 40.3) and it had not yet been reached among the subgroup of patients only receiving sunitinib plus lanreotide. The safety profile of the combination treatment was comparable to that of the targeted agent alone. The combination of lanreotide and targeted therapies, mainly everolimus and sunitinib, is widely

  18. Putting tumours in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, M J; Radisky, D

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumour growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets.

  19. The somatostatin receptor-targeted radiotherapeutic [{sup 90}Y-DOTA-dPhe{sup 1},Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide ({sup 90}Y-SMT 487) eradicates experimental rat pancreatic CA 20948 tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, B.; Weckbecker, G.; Smith-Jones, P.M.; Albert, R.; Raulf, F.; Bruns, C. [Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours are potential targets for therapy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. We have synthesized a number of such analogues in the past and identified [DOTA-dPhe{sup 1}, Tyr{sup 3}]octreotide (SMT 487) as the most promising candidate molecule because of its advantageous properties in cellular and in vivo tumour models. In the current paper we describe the radiotherapeutic effect of yttrium-90 labelled SMT 487 in Lewis rats bearing the somatostatin receptor-positive rat pancreatic tumour CA 20948. SMT 487 binds with nanomolar affinity to both the human and the rat somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst{sub 2}) (human sst{sub 2} IC{sub 50}=0.9 nM, rat sst{sub 2} IC{sub 50}=0.5 nM). In vivo, {sup 90}Y-SMT 487 distributed rapidly to the sst{sub 2} expressing CA 20948 rat pancreatic tumour, with a tumour-to-blood ratio of 49.15 at 24 h post injection. A single intravenous administration of 10 mCi/kg {sup 90}Y-SMT 487 resulted in a complete remission of the tumours in five out of seven CA 20948 tumour-bearing Lewis rats. No regrowth of the tumours occurred 8 months post injection. Control animals that were treated with 30 {mu}g/kg of unlabelled SMT 487 had to be sacrificed 10 days post injection due to excessive growth or necrotic areas on the tumour surface. Upon re-inoculation of tumour cells into those rats that had shown complete remission, the tumours disappeared after 3-4 weeks of moderate growth without any further treatment. The present study shows for the first time the curative potential of {sup 90}Y-SMT 487-based radiotherapy for somatostatin receptor-expressing tumours. Clinical phase I studies with yttrium-labelled SMT 487 have started in September 1997. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 29 refs.

  20. Optimal random search for a single hidden target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A single target is hidden at a location chosen from a predetermined probability distribution. Then, a searcher must find a second probability distribution from which random search points are sampled such that the target is found in the minimum number of trials. Here it will be shown that if the searcher must get very close to the target to find it, then the best search distribution is proportional to the square root of the target distribution regardless of dimension. For a Gaussian target distribution, the optimum search distribution is approximately a Gaussian with a standard deviation that varies inversely with how close the searcher must be to the target to find it. For a network where the searcher randomly samples nodes and looks for the fixed target along edges, the optimum is either to sample a node with probability proportional to the square root of the out-degree plus 1 or not to do so at all.

  1. Deriving optimal exploration target zones on mineral prospectivity maps

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available into an objective function in simulated annealing in order to derive a set of optimal exploration focal points. Each optimal exploration focal point represents a pixel or location within a circular neighborhood of pixels with high posterior probability of mineral...

  2. Optimal Semi-Adaptive Search With False Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Kress, K. Y. Lin, and R. Szechtman, “Optimal discrete search with imperfect specificity,” Math Meth Oper Res, vol. 68, pp. 539–549, 2008. [16] L. D...constraints on employment of physical search assets will involve discrete approximations to the continuous solutions given by these techniques. These...model assumes. We optimize in the continuous case, to be able then to make the best possible discrete approximations if needed, given the constraints of a

  3. Proteasomal targeting and minigene repetition improve cell-surface presentation of a transfected, modified melanoma tumour antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, A B; Zocca, M-B; Bonefeld, C M

    2004-01-01

    Melanoma antigen recognized by T cell 1 (MART-1) is regarded as a candidate peptide for vaccination against malignant melanoma, and it is of importance to develop strategies to improve the vaccine-elicited T-cell activation towards MART-1. T-cell activation is, among other determinants, dependent...... on the density of specific major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. In this study, we explored the cell-surface presentation of a substituted MART-1 peptide encoded by transfected minigenes. We investigated the potential of proteasomal targeting compared...... to non-proteasomal targeting of the epitope to increase its cell-surface presentation. Furthermore, we explored the potential of incorporating multiple minigenes instead of one to increase cell-surface presentation. We show that both proteasomal targeting and repetition of the minigene increase cell...

  4. Production and dosimetric aspects of the potent Auger emitter Co-58m for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing; Jensen, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Based on theoretical calculations, the Auger emitter 58mCo has been identified as a potent nuclide for targeted radionuclide therapy of small tumors. During the production of this isotope, the coproduction of the long-lived ground state 58gCo is unfortunately unavoidable, as is ingrowth of the gr...

  5. Optimization of gas target production for Z-pinch implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semushin, S.; Etlicher, B.; Rouille, C.

    1996-01-01

    Optimization of shell parameters for further imploding in a Z-pinch has been done. The nozzle shape was selected with the help of two-dimensional gas dynamics computer simulation. The influence of the electrode configuration was taken into account during the optimization. Two types of nozzle are presented. The advanced design with three gaseous shells may use different gases. The other design is based on aluminium vapor jet. The designs were tested by interferometry. The resulting mass distributions are analyzed by a real experiment and by means of 2D MHD computer simulations. The new nozzles provide smaller zippering, higher radiation power and better reproducible results. (author). 4 figs., 4 refs

  6. Utilizing random Forest QSAR models with optimized parameters for target identification and its application to target-fishing server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoungyeul; Lee, Minho; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    The identification of target molecules is important for understanding the mechanism of "target deconvolution" in phenotypic screening and "polypharmacology" of drugs. Because conventional methods of identifying targets require time and cost, in-silico target identification has been considered an alternative solution. One of the well-known in-silico methods of identifying targets involves structure activity relationships (SARs). SARs have advantages such as low computational cost and high feasibility; however, the data dependency in the SAR approach causes imbalance of active data and ambiguity of inactive data throughout targets. We developed a ligand-based virtual screening model comprising 1121 target SAR models built using a random forest algorithm. The performance of each target model was tested by employing the ROC curve and the mean score using an internal five-fold cross validation. Moreover, recall rates for top-k targets were calculated to assess the performance of target ranking. A benchmark model using an optimized sampling method and parameters was examined via external validation set. The result shows recall rates of 67.6% and 73.9% for top-11 (1% of the total targets) and top-33, respectively. We provide a website for users to search the top-k targets for query ligands available publicly at http://rfqsar.kaist.ac.kr . The target models that we built can be used for both predicting the activity of ligands toward each target and ranking candidate targets for a query ligand using a unified scoring scheme. The scores are additionally fitted to the probability so that users can estimate how likely a ligand-target interaction is active. The user interface of our web site is user friendly and intuitive, offering useful information and cross references.

  7. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules based on 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy: the effect of tumour size on the optimal method of image assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plachcinska, Anna; Kusmierek, Jacek; Mikolajczak, Renata; Kozak, Jozef; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine an optimal method for the evaluation of scintigrams obtained with 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC for the purpose of differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and to assess the diagnostic value of the method. Eighty-five patients (48 males and 37 females, mean age 57 years, range 34-78 years) were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy for the purpose of differential diagnosis of SPNs (size between 1 and 4 cm). Images of all patients were evaluated visually in a prospective manner. Positive scintigraphic results were found in 37 out of 40 (93%) patients with malignant SPNs including 34 out of 35 (97%) patients with primary lung carcinoma. Two remaining false negative cases turned out to be metastatic lesions of malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma. Among 45 benign tumours, negative results were obtained in 31 cases (69%) and positive results in 14. The accuracy of the method was 80%. Analysis of the results of the visual assessment of scintigrams revealed a significantly higher frequency of false positive results among larger nodules (diameter at least 1.4 cm). Uptake of the tracer in those nodules was therefore assessed semi-quantitatively (using the tumour-to-background ratio), in expectation of an improvement in the low specificity of the visual method. The semi-quantitative assessment reduced the total number of false positive results in a subgroup of larger nodules from 13 to six, while preserving the high sensitivity of the method. The combination of visual analysis (for lesions smaller than 1.4 cm in diameter) and semi-quantitative assessment (for larger lesions) provided a high sensitivity of the method and significantly improved its specificity (84%) and accuracy (88%) in comparison with visual analysis (p<0.05). (orig.)

  8. Differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules based on 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy: the effect of tumour size on the optimal method of image assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płachcińska, Anna; Mikołajczak, Renata; Kozak, Józef; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kuśmierek, Jacek

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine an optimal method for the evaluation of scintigrams obtained with (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC for the purpose of differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) and to assess the diagnostic value of the method. Eighty-five patients (48 males and 37 females, mean age 57 years, range 34-78 years) were enrolled in the study. Patients underwent (99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy for the purpose of differential diagnosis of SPNs (size between 1 and 4 cm). Images of all patients were evaluated visually in a prospective manner. Positive scintigraphic results were found in 37 out of 40 (93%) patients with malignant SPNs including 34 out of 35 (97%) patients with primary lung carcinoma. Two remaining false negative cases turned out to be metastatic lesions of malignant melanoma and leiomyosarcoma. Among 45 benign tumours, negative results were obtained in 31 cases (69%) and positive results in 14. The accuracy of the method was 80%. Analysis of the results of the visual assessment of scintigrams revealed a significantly higher frequency of false positive results among larger nodules (diameter at least 1.4 cm). Uptake of the tracer in those nodules was therefore assessed semi-quantitatively (using the tumour-to-background ratio), in expectation of an improvement in the low specificity of the visual method. The semi-quantitative assessment reduced the total number of false positive results in a subgroup of larger nodules from 13 to six, while preserving the high sensitivity of the method. The combination of visual analysis (for lesions smaller than 1.4 cm in diameter) and semi-quantitative assessment (for larger lesions) provided a high sensitivity of the method and significantly improved its specificity (84%) and accuracy (88%) in comparison with visual analysis (p<0.05).

  9. Targeting tumour re-wiring by triple blockade of mTORC1, epidermal growth factor, and oestrogen receptor signalling pathways in endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Ricardo; Pancholi, Sunil; Rani, Aradhana; Schuster, Eugene; Guest, Stephanie K; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Thornhill, Allan; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2018-06-08

    Endocrine therapies are the mainstay of treatment for oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive (ER + ) breast cancer (BC). However, resistance remains problematic largely due to enhanced cross-talk between ER and growth factor pathways, circumventing the need for steroid hormones. Previously, we reported the anti-proliferative effect of everolimus (RAD001-mTORC1 inhibitor) with endocrine therapy in resistance models; however, potential routes of escape from treatment via ERBB2/3 signalling were observed. We hypothesised that combined targeting of three cellular nodes (ER, ERBB, and mTORC1) may provide enhanced long-term clinical utility. A panel of ER + BC cell lines adapted to long-term oestrogen deprivation (LTED) and expressing ESR1 wt or ESR1 Y537S , modelling acquired resistance to an aromatase-inhibitor (AI), were treated in vitro with a combination of RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) in the presence or absence of oestradiol (E2), tamoxifen (4-OHT), or fulvestrant (ICI182780). End points included proliferation, cell signalling, cell cycle, and effect on ER-mediated transactivation. An in-vivo model of AI resistance was treated with monotherapies and combinations to assess the efficacy in delaying tumour progression. RNA-seq analysis was performed to identify changes in global gene expression as a result of the indicated therapies. Here, we show RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation, irrespective of the ESR1 mutation status. The combination of either agent with endocrine therapy further reduced proliferation but the maximum effect was observed with a triple combination of RAD001, neratinib, and endocrine therapy. In the absence of oestrogen, RAD001 caused a reduction in ER-mediated transcription in the majority of the cell lines, which associated with a decrease in recruitment of ER to an oestrogen-response element on the TFF1 promoter. Contrastingly, neratinib increased both ER

  10. Differential Evolution Optimization for Targeting Spacecraft Maneuver Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Previous analysis identified specific orbital parameters as being safer for conjunction avoidance for the TDRS fleet. With TDRS-9 being considered an at-risk spacecraft, a potential conjunction concern was raised should TDRS-9 fail while at a longitude of 12W. This document summarizes the analysis performed to identify if these specific orbital parameters could be targeted using the remaining drift-termination maneuvers for the relocation of TDRS-9 from 41W longitude to 12W longitude.

  11. Molecular profiling of tumour budding implicates TGFβ-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a therapeutic target in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D H; Dabelsteen, E; Specht, L; Fiehn, A M K; Therkildsen, M H; Jønson, L; Vikesaa, J; Nielsen, F C; von Buchwald, C

    2015-08-01

    Although tumour budding is an adverse prognostic factor for many cancer types, the molecular mechanisms governing this phenomenon are incompletely understood. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of tumour budding may provide new therapeutic and diagnostic options. We employ digital image analysis to demonstrate that the number of tumour buds in cytokeratin-stained sections correlates with patients having lymph node metastases at diagnosis. The tumour bud count was also a predictor of overall survival, independent of TNM stage. Tumour buds and paired central tumour areas were subsequently collected from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) specimens, using laser capture microdissection, and examined with RNA sequencing and miRNA-qPCR arrays. Compared with cells from the central parts of the tumours, budding cells exhibited a particular gene expression signature, comprising factors involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and activated TGFβ signalling. Transcription factors ZEB1 and PRRX1 were up-regulated concomitantly with the decreased expression of mesenchymal-epithelial (MET) transcription factors (eg OVOL1) in addition to Krüppel-like factors and Grainyhead-like factors. Moreover, miR-200 family members were down-regulated in budding tumour cells. We used immunohistochemistry to validate five markers of the EMT/MET process in 199 OSCC tumours, as well as in situ hybridization in 20 OSCC samples. Given the strong relationship between tumour budding and the development of lymph node metastases and an adverse prognosis, therapeutics based on inhibiting the activation of TGFβ signalling may prove useful in the treatment of OSCC. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Low tumour cell content in a lung tumour bank: implications for molecular characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Felicia; Duhig, Edwina E; Clarke, Belinda E; McCaul, Elizabeth; Passmore, Linda; Courtney, Deborah; Windsor, Morgan; Naidoo, Rishendren; Franz, Louise; Parsonson, Kylie; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer encompasses multiple malignant epithelial tumour types, each with specific targetable, potentially actionable mutations, such that precision management mandates accurate tumour typing. Molecular characterisation studies require high tumour cell content and low necrosis content, yet lung cancers are frequently a heterogeneous mixture of tumour and stromal cells. We hypothesised that there may be systematic differences in tumour cell content according to histological subtype, and that this may have implications for tumour banks as a resource for comprehensive molecular characterisation studies in lung cancer. To investigate this, we estimated tumour cell and necrosis content of 4267 samples resected from 752 primary lung tumour specimens contributed to a lung tissue bank. We found that banked lung cancer samples had low tumour cell content (33%) generally, although it was higher in carcinoids (77.5%) than other lung cancer subtypes. Tumour cells comprise a variable and often small component of banked resected tumour samples, and are accompanied by stromal reaction, inflammation, fibrosis, and normal structures. This has implications for the adequacy of unselected tumour bank samples for diagnostic and molecular investigations, and further research is needed to determine whether tumour cell content has a significant impact on analytical results in studies using tissue from tumour bank resources. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeted Structural Optimization with Additive Manufacturing of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Adam; Hull, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in additive manufacturing (AM) of metals have now improved the state-of-the-art such that traditionally non-producible parts can be readily produced in a cost-effective way. Because of these advances in manufacturing technology, structural optimization techniques are well positioned to supplement and advance this new technology. The goal of this project is to develop a structural design, analysis, and optimization framework combined with AM to significantly light-weight the interior of metallic structures while maintaining the selected structural properties of the original solid. This is a new state-of-the-art capability to significantly reduce mass, while maintaining the structural integrity of the original design, something that can only be done with AM. In addition, this framework will couple the design, analysis, and fabrication process, meaning that what has been designed directly represents the produced part, thus closing the loop on the design cycle and removing human iteration between design and fabrication. This fundamental concept has applications from light-weighting launch vehicle components to in situ resource fabrication.

  14. MR vs CT imaging: low rectal cancer tumour delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, B D P

    2009-06-01

    Modern three-dimentional radiotherapy is based upon CT. For rectal cancer, this relies upon target definition on CT, which is not the optimal imaging modality. The major limitation of CT is its low inherent contrast resolution. Targets defined by MRI could facilitate smaller, more accurate, tumour volumes than CT. Our study reviewed imaging and planning data for 10 patients with locally advanced low rectal cancer (defined as < 6 cm from the anal verge on digital examination). Tumour volume and location were compared for sagittal pre-treatment MRI and planning CT. CT consistently overestimated all tumour radiological parameters. Estimates of tumour volume, tumour length and height of proximal tumour from the anal verge were larger on planning CT than on MRI (p < 0.05). Tumour volumes defined on MRI are smaller, shorter and more distal from the anal sphincter than CT-based volumes. For radiotherapy planning, this may result in smaller treatment volumes, which could lead to a reduction in dose to organs at risk and facilitate dose escalation.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF THE METHOD OF DETERMINING THE TARGET FUNCTION OF OPTIMIZATION OF POWER PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Maksymovа

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed the application of an optimization criterion based on properties of target functions, taken from the elements of technical, economic and thermodynamic analyses. Marginal costs indicators of energy for different energy products have also been identified. Target function of the power plant optimization was proposed, that considers energy expenditure in the presented plant and in plants closing the energy sources generation and consumption balance.

  16. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  17. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Soevik, Aste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Oeyvind S; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2006-01-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO 2 -related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO 2 -related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO 2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO 2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure

  18. Flood risk and economically optimal safety targets for coastal flood defense systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupuits, E.J.C.; Schweckendiek, T.

    2015-01-01

    A front defense can improve the reliability of a rear defense in a coastal flood defense system. The influence of this interdependency on the accompanying economically optimal safety targets of both front and rear defense is investigated. The results preliminary suggest that the optimal safety level

  19. Tailoring peritoneal dialysis fluid for optimal acid-base targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Mild derangements of acid-base status are common features in peritoneal dialysis patients, metabolic acidosis being the most frequent alteration. One of the main tasks of dialysis is to correct these derangements and the target is the normalization of the acid-base parameters since they affect several organs and functions. Since factors affecting acid-base homeostasis are intrinsic characteristics of the individual patient (metabolic acid production, distribution space for bicarbonate, dialytic prescription, etc.), it is not surprising that only relatively few patients achieve the normal range. Only a certain modulation of buffer infusion by using different buffer concentrations in the dialysis fluid may ensure a good correction in a large percentage of patients.

  20. Optimizing megakaryocyte polyploidization by targeting multiple pathways of cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Mauro P; Chen, Amanda; He, Wu; Mitchell, W Beau

    2012-11-01

    Large-scale in vitro production of platelets (PLTs) from cord blood stem cells is one goal of stem cell research. One step toward this goal will be to produce polyploid megakaryocytes capable of releasing high numbers of PLTs. Megakaryocyte polyploidization requires distinct cytoskeletal and cellular mechanisms, including actin polymerization, myosin activation, microtubule formation, and increased DNA production. In this study we variably combined inhibition of these principal mechanisms of cytokinesis with the goal of driving polyploidization in megakaryocytes. Megakaryocytes were derived from umbilical cord blood and cultured with reagents that inhibit distinct mechanisms of cytokinesis: Rho-Rock inhibitor (RRI), Src inhibitor (SI), nicotinamide (NIC), aurora B inhibitor (ABI), and myosin light chain kinase inhibitor (MLCKI). Combinations of reagents were used to determine their interactions and to maximize megakaryocyte ploidy. Treatment with RRI, NIC, SI, and ABI, but not with MLCKI, increased the final ploidy and RRI was the most effective single reagent. RRI and MLCKI, both inhibitors of MLC activation, resulted in opposite ploidy outcomes. Combinations of reagents also increased ploidy and the use of NIC, SI, and ABI was as effective as RRI alone. Addition of MLCKI to NIC, SI, and ABI reached the highest level of polyploidization. Megakaryocyte polyploidization results from modulation of a combination of distinct cytokinesis pathways. Reagents targeting distinct cytoskeletal pathways produced additive effects in final megakaryocyte ploidy. The RRI, however, showed no additive effect but produced a high final ploidy due to overlapping inhibition of multiple cytokinesis pathways. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Windowed multipole sensitivity to target accuracy of the optimization procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josey, Colin; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of the windowed multipole direct Doppler broadening method to that of the ENDF-B/VII.1 libraries that come with MCNP6. Various windowed multipole libraries were generated with different maximum allowed relative errors. Then, the libraries were compared to the MCNP6 data via resonance integral and through single assembly Monte Carlo analysis. Since the windowed multipole uses resonance parameters, resonance integrals are only affected by the number of resonances included in the library and not by the order of the background fitting function. The relative performance of each library with varying maximum allowed error was evaluated. It was found that setting a maximum target relative error of 0.1% in the library provided highly accurate data that closely matches the MCNP6 data for all temperatures of interest, while still having suitable computational performance. Additionally, a library with a maximum relative error of 1% also provided reasonable accuracy on eigenvalue and reaction rates with a noticeable improvement on performance, but with a few statistically significant differences with the MCNP6 data. (author)

  2. Gastric Calcifying Fibrous Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Attila

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours; however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases.

  3. Target-moderator-reflector optimization for JAERI 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Noboru; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kai, Tetsuya

    1999-01-01

    Optimization studies on the target-moderator-reflector neutronics for the projected intense pulsed-spallation-neutron-source in JAERI are reported. In order to obtain the highest possible performance of the source a new target-moderator-reflector system has been proposed and effects of various parameters, such as material and the shape/dimensions of the target, the profile/distribution of the proton beam, material and dimensions of the reflector, the coupling scheme of the target-moderator, moderator parameters, etc., on slow neutron performance and energy deposition in cryogenic moderators have extensively been studied by neutronic calculations. A cold neutron moderator for high-resolution together with high-intensity experiments has newly been proposed. It was found that, by adopting a flat target with a flat beam profile, the slow neutron intensities from the moderators could be rather insensitive to the target/beam dimensions, providing more flexibility to the engineering design of the target and the moderators. The moderator position relative to the target is another important issue to be optimized. It was confirmed that the proposed target-moderator-reflector layout made it possible to put all the moderators almost at the best position (It has not been possible so far), resulting in a higher performance. The predicted performance obtained with nearly optimized parameters was compared with those of similar projects in the world to justify the present concept. (author)

  4. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milic S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sandra Milic,1 Ivana Mikolasevic,1,2 Irena Krznaric-Zrnic,1 Marija Stanic,3 Goran Poropat,1 Davor Stimac,1 Vera Vlahovic-Palcevski,4 Lidija Orlic2 1Department of Gastroenterology, UHC Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia; 2Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation, UHC Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia; 3Department of Hematology, UHC Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia; 4Department for Clinical Pharmacology, University of Rijeka Medical School, UHC Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia Abstract: Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only

  5. CG200745, an HDAC inhibitor, induces anti-tumour effects in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines via miRNAs targeting the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dawoon E; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Kahee; Kim, Chanyang; Song, Si Young

    2017-09-07

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a devastating malignancy with fatal complications that exhibits low response and resistance to chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CG200745, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy drugs in cholangiocarcinoma cells. CG200745 dose-dependently reduced the viability of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro and decreased tumour volume and weight in a xenograft model. Administering CG200745 along with other chemotherapeutic agents including gemcitabine, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, oxaliplatin, or gemcitabine plus cisplatin further decreased cholangiocarcinoma cell viability, with a combination index CG200745 also enhanced the sensitivity of gemcitabine-resistant cells to gemcitabine and 5-FU, thereby decreasing cell viability and inducing apoptosis. This was accompanied by downregulation of YAP, TEAD4, TGF-β2, SMAD3, NOTCH3, HES5, Axl, and Gas6 and upregulation of the miRNAs miR-22-3p, miR-22-5p, miR-194-5p, miR-194-3p, miR-194-5p, miR-210-3p, and miR-509-3p. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that CG200745 mainly targets the Hippo signalling pathway by inducing miR-509-3p expression. Thus, CG200745 inhibits cholangiocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo, and acts synergistically when administered in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents, enabling dose reduction. CG200745 is therefore expected to improve the outcome of cholangiocarcinoma patients who exhibit resistance to conventional therapies.

  6. The Dosimetric Consequences of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervix Cancer: The Impact of Organ Motion, Deformation and Tumour Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Karen Siah Huey

    Hypothesis: In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for cervix cancer, the dose received by the tumour target and surrounding normal tissues is significantly different to that indicated by a single static plan. Rationale: The optimal use of IMRT in cervix cancer requires a greater attention to clinical target volume (CTV) definition and tumour & normal organ motion to assure maximum tumour control with the fewest side effects. Research Aims: 1) Generate consensus CTV contouring guidelines for cervix cancer; 2) Evaluate intra-pelvic tumour and organ dynamics during radiotherapy; 3) Analyze the dose consequences of intra-pelvic organ dynamics on different radiotherapy strategies. Results: Consensus CTV definitions were generated using experts-in-the-field. Substantial changes in tumour volume and organ motion, resulted in significant reductions in accumulated dose to tumour targets and variability in accumulated dose to surrounding normal tissues. Significance: Formalized CTV definitions for cervix cancer is important in ensuring consistent standards of practice. Complex and unpredictable tumour and organ dynamics mandates daily soft-tissue image guidance if IMRT is used. To maximize the benefits of IMRT for cervix cancer, a strategy of adaptation is necessary.

  7. Multi-Robot, Multi-Target Particle Swarm Optimization Search in Noisy Wireless Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Multiple small robots (swarms) can work together using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) to perform tasks that are difficult or impossible for a single robot to accomplish. The problem considered in this paper is exploration of an unknown environment with the goal of finding a target(s) at an unknown location(s) using multiple small mobile robots. This work demonstrates the use of a distributed PSO algorithm with a novel adaptive RSS weighting factor to guide robots for locating target(s) in high risk environments. The approach was developed and analyzed on multiple robot single and multiple target search. The approach was further enhanced by the multi-robot-multi-target search in noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrated how the availability of radio frequency signal can significantly affect robot search time to reach a target.

  8. Perfusion imaging of parotid gland tumours: usefulness of arterial spin labeling for differentiating Warthin's tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Haruo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Kajita, Kimihiro [Gifu University Hospital, High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke; Aoki, Mitsuhiro [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu (Japan); Okuaki, Tomoyuki [Philips Healthcare, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    To assess prospectively the efficacy of arterial spin labelling (ASL) against conventional and diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for differentiating parotid gland tumours. We included 10 pleomorphic adenomas, 12 Warthin's tumours, and nine malignant tumours of the parotid glands. Only tumours larger than 10 mm were included in this study. All parotid gland tumours underwent T1-weighted, T2-weighted, DW, and ASL imaging. Tumour-to-parotid gland signal intensity ratios (SIRs) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of solid components were correlated with these pathologies. SIRs on T2-weighted images and ADCs were higher in pleomorphic adenomas than in Warthin's tumours (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.01). SIRs on ASL were higher in Warthin's tumours than in pleomorphic adenomas (p <.01) and malignant tumours (p <.05). Az value of SIRs on ASL for differentiating Warthin's tumours from the other pathologies was 0.982. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of SIRs on ASL for the diagnosis of Warthin's tumours at an optimal SIR threshold of over 8.70 were 91.7 %, 94.7 %, and 93.5 %, respectively. ASL with SIR measurements could non-invasively evaluate tumour blood flow of parotid gland tumours and differentiate Warthin's tumours from pleomorphic adenomas and malignant tumours. (orig.)

  9. Precise modelling of the eye for proton therapy of intra-ocular tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobler, B.; Bendl, R. [Medizinische Physik, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mails: b.dobler@dkfz-heidelberg.de; barbara.dobler@gmx.de; r.bendl@dkfz-heidelberg.de

    2002-02-21

    A new method is described that allows precise modelling of organs at risk and target volume for radiation therapy of intra-ocular tumours. The aim is to optimize the dose distribution and thus to reduce normal tissue complication probability. A geometrical 3D model based on elliptic shapes was developed that can be used for multimodal model-based segmentation of 3D patient data. The tumour volume cannot be clearly identified in CT and MR data, whereas the tumour outline can be discriminated very precisely in fundus photographs. Therefore, a multimodal 2D fundus diagram was developed, which allows us to correlate and display simultaneously information extracted from the eye model, 3D data and the fundus photograph. Thus, the connection of fundus diagram and 3D data is well-defined and the 3D volume can be calculated directly from the tumour outline drawn onto the fundus photograph and the tumour height measured by ultrasound. The method allows the calculation of a precise 3D eye model of the patient, including the different structures of the eye as well as the tumour volume. The method was developed as part of the new 3D treatment planning system OCTOPUS for proton therapy of ocular tumours within a national research project together with the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin. (author)

  10. A novel algorithm for finding optimal driver nodes to target control complex networks and its applications for drug targets identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shi, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Cheng-Ming; Zeng, Tao; Chen, Luonan

    2018-01-19

    The advances in target control of complex networks not only can offer new insights into the general control dynamics of complex systems, but also be useful for the practical application in systems biology, such as discovering new therapeutic targets for disease intervention. In many cases, e.g. drug target identification in biological networks, we usually require a target control on a subset of nodes (i.e., disease-associated genes) with minimum cost, and we further expect that more driver nodes consistent with a certain well-selected network nodes (i.e., prior-known drug-target genes). Therefore, motivated by this fact, we pose and address a new and practical problem called as target control problem with objectives-guided optimization (TCO): how could we control the interested variables (or targets) of a system with the optional driver nodes by minimizing the total quantity of drivers and meantime maximizing the quantity of constrained nodes among those drivers. Here, we design an efficient algorithm (TCOA) to find the optional driver nodes for controlling targets in complex networks. We apply our TCOA to several real-world networks, and the results support that our TCOA can identify more precise driver nodes than the existing control-fucus approaches. Furthermore, we have applied TCOA to two bimolecular expert-curate networks. Source code for our TCOA is freely available from http://sysbio.sibcb.ac.cn/cb/chenlab/software.htm or https://github.com/WilfongGuo/guoweifeng . In the previous theoretical research for the full control, there exists an observation and conclusion that the driver nodes tend to be low-degree nodes. However, for target control the biological networks, we find interestingly that the driver nodes tend to be high-degree nodes, which is more consistent with the biological experimental observations. Furthermore, our results supply the novel insights into how we can efficiently target control a complex system, and especially many evidences on the

  11. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. Methods We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0–6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6–12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Results Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0–6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6–12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Conclusion Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. Trail registration EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701 PMID:28968858

  12. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis-a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-11-01

    RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6-12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0-6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6-12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  13. Human leucocyte antigen class I-redirected anti-tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M P; Dolton, G M; Gerry, A B; Brewer, J E; Bennett, A D; Pumphrey, N J; Jakobsen, B K; Sewell, A K

    2017-01-01

    CD4 + T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour-specific CD4 + T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low-affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4 + T cells with tumour-specific HLA class I-restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co-receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4 + cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing wild-type and a range of affinity-enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201-restricted NY-ESO-1- and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4 + T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4 + T cells than CD8 + T cells. These results indicate that the CD4 + T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8 + T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Immunology.

  14. Reversible Masking Using Low-Molecular-Weight Neutral Lipids to Achieve Optimal-Targeted Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Smyth Templeton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous injection of therapeutics is required to effectively treat or cure metastatic cancer, certain cardiovascular diseases, and other acquired or inherited diseases. Using this route of delivery allows potential uptake in all disease targets that are accessed by the bloodstream. However, normal tissues and organs also have the potential for uptake of therapeutic agents. Therefore, investigators have used targeted delivery to attempt delivery solely to the target cells; however, use of ligands on the surface of delivery vehicles to target specific cell surface receptors is not sufficient to avoid nonspecific uptake. PEGylation has been used for decades to try to avoid nonspecific uptake but suffers from many problems known as “The PEGylation Dilemma.” We have solved this dilemma by replacing PEGylation with reversible masking using low-molecular-weight neutral lipids in order to achieve optimal-targeted delivery solely to target cells. Our paper will focus on this topic.

  15. Two-phase framework for optimal multi-target Lambert rendezvous

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Jun; Ahn, Jaemyung

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-phase framework to solve an optimal multi-target Lambert rendezvous problem. The first phase solves a series of single-target rendezvous problems for all departure-arrival object pairs to generate the elementary solutions, which provides candidate rendezvous trajectories (elementary solutions). The second phase formulates a variant of traveling salesman problem (TSP) using the elementary solutions prepared in the first phase and determines the best rendezvous sequenc...

  16. Molecular profiling of tumour budding implicates TGFβ-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition as a therapeutic target in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, David Hebbelstrup; Dabelsteen, Erik; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    collected from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) specimens using laser capture microdissection and examined with RNA sequencing and miRNA-qPCR arrays. Compared with cells from the central parts of the tumours, budding cells exhibited a particular gene expression signature comprising factors involved...

  17. Tumour sleuths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.; Springolo, E.; Conradie, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common disease in South Africa and its identification difficult. Methods for the diagnosis of this disease includes the production of hybridoma cell lines by inoculating laboratory mice with a purified human tumour-associated antigen or the antigen-containing surface membranes or the intact cells. In the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, high concentrations of serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) can be measured by means of radioimmunoassay techniques. The need for specific methods of diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma led to the investigation by the Isotope Production Centre at Pelindaba into the possibility of using radiolabelled monoclonal anti-AFP for diagnosis, and later, therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. The monoclonal antibodies can also be labelled with 131 I. Recently the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the University of the Witwatersrand is conducting diagnostic trials on patients who have given their informed consent, to assess the specificity of 131 I radiolabelled anti-AFP monoclonal antibodies to hepatocellular carcinoma cells in humans. Although the investigation is still in its infancy, monoclonal antibodies may prove to be successful non-invasive agents for detecting tumors in early stages

  18. LPI Optimization Framework for Target Tracking in Radar Network Architectures Using Information-Theoretic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Widely distributed radar network architectures can provide significant performance improvement for target detection and localization. For a fixed radar network, the achievable target detection performance may go beyond a predetermined threshold with full transmitted power allocation, which is extremely vulnerable in modern electronic warfare. In this paper, we study the problem of low probability of intercept (LPI design for radar network and propose two novel LPI optimization schemes based on information-theoretic criteria. For a predefined threshold of target detection, Schleher intercept factor is minimized by optimizing transmission power allocation among netted radars in the network. Due to the lack of analytical closed-form expression for receiver operation characteristics (ROC, we employ two information-theoretic criteria, namely, Bhattacharyya distance and J-divergence as the metrics for target detection performance. The resulting nonconvex and nonlinear LPI optimization problems associated with different information-theoretic criteria are cast under a unified framework, and the nonlinear programming based genetic algorithm (NPGA is used to tackle the optimization problems in the framework. Numerical simulations demonstrate that our proposed LPI strategies are effective in enhancing the LPI performance for radar network.

  19. Optimal Monetary Policy Cooperation through State-Independent Contracts with Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Simple state-independent monetary institutions are shown to secure optimal cooperative policies in a stochastic, linear-quadratic two-country world with international policy spill-overs and national credibility problems. Institutions characterize delegation to independent central bankers facing...... quadratic performance related contracts punishing or rewarding deviations from primary and intermediate policy targets...

  20. Population and patient-specific target margins for 4D adaptive radiotherapy to account for intra- and inter-fraction variation in lung tumour position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D; Di Yan; Jian Liang

    2007-01-01

    In this work, five 4D image-guidance strategies (two population, an offline adaptive and two online strategies) were evaluated that compensated for both inter- and intra-fraction variability such as changes to the baseline tumour position and respiratory pattern. None of the strategies required active motion compensation such as gating or tracking; all strategies simulated a free-breathing-based treatment technique. Online kilovoltage fluoroscopy was acquired for eight patients with lung tumours, and used to construct inter- and intra-fraction tumour position variability models. Planning was performed on a mid-ventilation image acquired from a respiration-correlated CT scan. The blurring effect of tumour position variability was included in the dose calculation by convolution. CTV to PTV margins were calculated for variability in the cranio-caudal direction. A population margin of 9.0 ± 0.7 mm was required to account for setup error and respiration in the study population without the use of image-guidance. The greatest mean margin reduction was introduced by the offline adaptive strategy. A daily online correction strategy produced a small reduction (1.6 mm) in the mean margin from the offline strategy. Adaptively correcting for an inter-fraction change in the respiratory pattern had little effect on margin size due to most patients having only small daily changes in the respiratory pattern. A daily online correction strategy would be useful for patients who exhibit large variations in the daily mean tumour position, while an offline adaptive strategy is more applicable to patients with less variation

  1. Adnexal Tumours Of Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parate Sanjay N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A total 120 cases of epidermal appendage tumours of skin were analysed and classified according to the classification provided by WHO’. Epidermal appendage tumours accounted for 12.87% of all skin tumours, of which 29.17% were benign and 70.83% were malignant. Most of the tumours (75.83% were in the head and face region. The most common tumour was basal cell epithelioma (55%.

  2. Optimal use of EEG recordings to target active brain areas with transcranial electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Koessler, Laurent; Norcia, Anthony M; Bikson, Marom; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-08-15

    To demonstrate causal relationships between brain and behavior, investigators would like to guide brain stimulation using measurements of neural activity. Particularly promising in this context are electroencephalography (EEG) and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), as they are linked by a reciprocity principle which, despite being known for decades, has not led to a formalism for relating EEG recordings to optimal stimulation parameters. Here we derive a closed-form expression for the TES configuration that optimally stimulates (i.e., targets) the sources of recorded EEG, without making assumptions about source location or distribution. We also derive a duality between TES targeting and EEG source localization, and demonstrate that in cases where source localization fails, so does the proposed targeting. Numerical simulations with multiple head models confirm these theoretical predictions and quantify the achieved stimulation in terms of focality and intensity. We show that constraining the stimulation currents automatically selects optimal montages that involve only a few (4-7) electrodes, with only incremental loss in performance when targeting focal activations. The proposed technique allows brain scientists and clinicians to rationally target the sources of observed EEG and thus overcomes a major obstacle to the realization of individualized or closed-loop brain stimulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimizing prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions responsible for cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongying; Yuan, Huating; Hu, Jing; Xu, Chaohan; Liao, Gaoming; Yin, Wenkang; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xinxin; Shi, Aiai; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun

    2017-12-12

    Increasing evidence suggests that the abnormality of microRNAs (miRNAs) and their downstream targets is frequently implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancers, however, the clinical benefit of causal miRNA-target interactions has been seldom studied. Here, we proposed a computational method to optimize prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions by combining transcriptome and clinical data from thousands of TCGA tumors across 16 cancer types. We obtained a total of 1,956 prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions between 112 miRNAs and 1,443 their targets. Interestingly, these key target genes are specifically involved in tumor progression-related functions, such as 'cell adhesion' and 'cell migration'. Furthermore, they are most significantly correlated with 'tissue invasion and metastasis', a hallmark of metastasis, in ten distinct types of cancer through the hallmark analysis. These results implicated that the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions were highly associated with cancer metastasis. Finally, we observed that the combination of these key miRNA-target interactions allowed to distinguish patients with good prognosis from those with poor prognosis both in most TCGA cancer types and independent validation sets, highlighting their roles in cancer metastasis. We provided a user-friendly database named miRNATarget (freely available at http://biocc.hrbmu.edu.cn/miRNATar/), which provides an overview of the prognosis-related key miRNA-target interactions across 16 cancer types.

  4. Parameterization of Fuel-Optimal Synchronous Approach Trajectories to Tumbling Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Charles Sternberg

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Docking with potentially tumbling Targets is a common element of many mission architectures, including on-orbit servicing and active debris removal. This paper studies synchronized docking trajectories as a way to ensure the Chaser satellite remains on the docking axis of the tumbling Target, thereby reducing collision risks and enabling persistent onboard sensing of the docking location. Chaser satellites have limited computational power available to them and the time allowed for the determination of a fuel optimal trajectory may be limited. Consequently, parameterized trajectories that approximate the fuel optimal trajectory while following synchronous approaches may be used to provide a computationally efficient means of determining near optimal trajectories to a tumbling Target. This paper presents a method of balancing the computation cost with the added fuel expenditure required for parameterization, including the selection of a parameterization scheme, the number of parameters in the parameterization, and a means of incorporating the dynamics of a tumbling satellite into the parameterization process. Comparisons of the parameterized trajectories are made with the fuel optimal trajectory, which is computed through the numerical propagation of Euler’s equations. Additionally, various tumble types are considered to demonstrate the efficacy of the presented computation scheme. With this parameterized trajectory determination method, Chaser satellites may perform terminal approach and docking maneuvers with both fuel and computational efficiency.

  5. Simulation-optimization model of reservoir operation based on target storage curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-bin Fang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new storage allocation rule based on target storage curves. Joint operating rules are also proposed to solve the operation problems of a multi-reservoir system with joint demands and water transfer-supply projects. The joint operating rules include a water diversion rule to determine the amount of diverted water in a period, a hedging rule based on an aggregated reservoir to determine the total release from the system, and a storage allocation rule to specify the release from each reservoir. A simulation-optimization model was established to optimize the key points of the water diversion curves, the hedging rule curves, and the target storage curves using the improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO algorithm. The multi-reservoir water supply system located in Liaoning Province, China, including a water transfer-supply project, was employed as a case study to verify the effectiveness of the proposed join operating rules and target storage curves. The results indicate that the proposed operating rules are suitable for the complex system. The storage allocation rule based on target storage curves shows an improved performance with regard to system storage distribution.

  6. Optimization study on structural analyses for the J-PARC mercury target vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wenhai; Wakai, Eiichi; Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2018-06-01

    The spallation neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) mercury target vessel is used for various materials science studies, work is underway to achieve stable operation at 1 MW. This is very important for enhancing the structural integrity and durability of the target vessel, which is being developed for 1 MW operation. In the present study, to reduce thermal stress and relax stress concentrations more effectively in the existing target vessel in J-PARC, an optimization approach called the Taguchi method (TM) is applied to thermo-mechanical analysis. The ribs and their relative parameters, as well as the thickness of the mercury vessel and shrouds, were selected as important design parameters for this investigation. According to the analytical results of 18 model types designed using the TM, the optimal design was determined. It is characterized by discrete ribs and a thicker vessel wall than the current design. The maximum thermal stresses in the mercury vessel and the outer shroud were reduced by 14% and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, it was indicated that variations in rib width, left/right rib intervals, and shroud thickness could influence the maximum thermal stress performance. It is therefore concluded that the TM was useful for optimizing the structure of the target vessel and to reduce the thermal stress in a small number of calculation cases.

  7. Molecular characterization of c-Abl/c-Src kinase inhibitors targeted against murine tumour progenitor cells that express stem cell markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kruewel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The non-receptor tyrosine kinases c-Abl and c-Src are overexpressed in various solid human tumours. Inhibition of their hyperactivity represents a molecular rationale in the combat of cancerous diseases. Here we examined the effects of a new family of pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidines on a panel of 11 different murine lung tumour progenitor cell lines, that express stem cell markers, as well as on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549, the human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and the human colon cancer cell line CaCo2 to obtain insight into the mode of action of these experimental drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Treatment with the dual kinase inhibitors blocked c-Abl and c-Src kinase activity efficiently in the nanomolar range, induced apoptosis, reduced cell viability and caused cell cycle arrest predominantly at G0/G1 phase while western blot analysis confirmed repressed protein expression of c-Abl and c-Src as well as the interacting partners p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, heterogenous ribonucleoprotein K, cyclin dependent kinase 1 and further proteins that are crucial for tumour progression. Importantly, a significant repression of the epidermal growth factor receptor was observed while whole genome gene expression analysis evidenced regulation of many cell cycle regulated genes as well integrin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK signalling to impact cytoskeleton dynamics, migration, invasion and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our experiments and recently published in vivo engraftment studies with various tumour cell lines revealed the dual kinase inhibitors to be efficient in their antitumour activity.

  8. CG200745, an HDAC inhibitor, induces anti-tumour effects in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines via miRNAs targeting the Hippo pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Dawoon E.; Park, Soo Been; Kim, Kahee; Kim, Chanyang; Song, Si Young

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a devastating malignancy with fatal complications that exhibits low response and resistance to chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CG200745, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy drugs in cholangiocarcinoma cells. CG200745 dose-dependently reduced the viability of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro and decreased tumour volume and weight in a xenograft model. Administering CG200745 along with...

  9. Design and Optimization for the Windowless Target of the China Nuclear Waste Transmutation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desheng Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A windowless spallation target can provide a neutron source and maintain neutron chain reaction for a subcritical reactor, and is a key component of China's nuclear waste transmutation of coupling accelerator and subcritical reactor. The main issue of the windowless target design is to form a stable and controllable free surface that can ensure that energy spectrum distribution is acquired for the neutron physical design when the high energy proton beam beats the lead–bismuth eutectic in the spallation target area. In this study, morphology and flow characteristics of the free surface of the windowless target were analyzed through the volume of fluid model using computational fluid dynamics simulation, and the results show that the outlet cross section size of the target is the key to form a stable and controllable free surface, as well as the outlet with an arc transition. The optimization parameter of the target design, in which the radius of outlet cross section is 60 ± 1 mm, is verified to form a stable and controllable free surface and to reduce the formation of air bubbles. This work can function as a reference for carrying out engineering design of windowless target and for verification experiments.

  10. Target Channel Visiting Order Design Using Particle Swarm Optimization for Spectrum Handoff in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilian Zheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a dynamic spectrum access network, when a primary user (licensed user reappears on the current channel, cognitive radios (CRs need to vacate the channel and reestablish a communications link on some other channel to avoid interference to primary users, resulting in spectrum handoff. This paper studies the problem of designing target channel visiting order for spectrum handoff to minimize expected spectrum handoff delay. A particle swarm optimization (PSO based algorithm is proposed to solve the problem. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm performs far better than random target channel visiting scheme. The solutions obtained by PSO are very close to the optimal solution which further validates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Visualization of network target crosstalk optimizes drug synergism in myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Wan

    Full Text Available Numerous drugs and compounds have been validated as protecting against myocardial ischemia (MI, a leading cause of heart failure; however, synergistic possibilities among them have not been systematically explored. Thus, there appears to be significant room for optimization in the field of drug combination therapy for MI. Here, we propose an easy approach for the identification and optimization of MI-related synergistic drug combinations via visualization of the crosstalk between networks of drug targets corresponding to different drugs (each drug has a unique network of targets. As an example, in the present study, 28 target crosstalk networks (TCNs of random pairwise combinations of 8 MI-related drugs (curcumin, capsaicin, celecoxib, raloxifene, silibinin, sulforaphane, tacrolimus, and tamoxifen were established to illustrate the proposed method. The TCNs revealed a high likelihood of synergy between curcumin and the other drugs, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Further drug combination optimization showed a synergistic protective effect of curcumin, celecoxib, and sililinin in combination against H₂O₂-induced ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes at a relatively low concentration of 500 nM. This result is in agreement with the earlier finding of a denser and modular functional crosstalk between their networks of targets in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Our study offers a simple approach to rapidly search for and optimize potent synergistic drug combinations, which can be used for identifying better MI therapeutic strategies. Some new light was also shed on the characteristic features of drug synergy, suggesting that it is possible to apply this method to other complex human diseases.

  12. Visualization of network target crosstalk optimizes drug synergism in myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaojing; Meng, Jia; Dai, Yingnan; Zhang, Yina; Yan, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous drugs and compounds have been validated as protecting against myocardial ischemia (MI), a leading cause of heart failure; however, synergistic possibilities among them have not been systematically explored. Thus, there appears to be significant room for optimization in the field of drug combination therapy for MI. Here, we propose an easy approach for the identification and optimization of MI-related synergistic drug combinations via visualization of the crosstalk between networks of drug targets corresponding to different drugs (each drug has a unique network of targets). As an example, in the present study, 28 target crosstalk networks (TCNs) of random pairwise combinations of 8 MI-related drugs (curcumin, capsaicin, celecoxib, raloxifene, silibinin, sulforaphane, tacrolimus, and tamoxifen) were established to illustrate the proposed method. The TCNs revealed a high likelihood of synergy between curcumin and the other drugs, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Further drug combination optimization showed a synergistic protective effect of curcumin, celecoxib, and sililinin in combination against H₂O₂-induced ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes at a relatively low concentration of 500 nM. This result is in agreement with the earlier finding of a denser and modular functional crosstalk between their networks of targets in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Our study offers a simple approach to rapidly search for and optimize potent synergistic drug combinations, which can be used for identifying better MI therapeutic strategies. Some new light was also shed on the characteristic features of drug synergy, suggesting that it is possible to apply this method to other complex human diseases.

  13. PORTOFOLIO MARKOWITZ: UJI OPTIMAL HOLDING PERIOD DAN KINERJA PORTOFOLIO BERDASARKAN KRITERIA RISIKO DAN TARGET RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Ivand Markemo Boangmanalu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of mean-variance optimization, developed by Markowitz, is the cornerstone of modern finance theory. The objective of this portfolio construction is to minimize investment risk by forming optimal portfolios. Dynamic movement in capital markets requires not only changes in portfolio composition. Optimal portfolio is not only determined by the covariance between securities in the portfolio, but also by holding period. The aims of this study is to answer two research questions. The first research question is how long the optimal holding period that was resulted from trade-off between risk and return. This study using target return that are determined hypothetically as well as the risk criteria are divided into 3 namely the mean variance, semivarians and expected loss. Target returns are simulated in this study were divided into 3 criteria namely aggressive, moderate and conservative. The second research question is whether there are differences among the various portfolio performance based on criteria of risk and target return. Portfolio performance is measured by using excess return and the Sharpe index. In this study, stocks covered in LQ-45 index are used to construct efficient portoflio. Monthly price series for company and LQ-45 index for February 2004 to September 2008 are collected. The analysis found that optimal holing period is ranges between 1-5 months. Holding period of a portfolio that more than 5 months will provide risk and return trade-off less favorable. In addition this study found that there was no significant differences in portfolio performance based on overall scenarios

  14. Application of analytical target cascading method in multidisciplinary design optimization of ship conceptual design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Ship conceptual design requires the coordination of many different disciplines for comprehensive optimization, which presents a complicated system design problem affecting several fields of technology. However, the development of overall ship design is relatively slow compared with other subjects. [Methods] The decomposition and coordination strategy of ship design is presented, and the analytical target cascading (ATC method is applied to the multidisciplinary design optimization of the conceptual design phase of ships on this basis. A tank ship example covering the 5 disciplines of buoyancy and stability, rapidity, maneuverability, capacity and economy is established to illustrate the analysis process in the present study. [Results] The results demonstrate the stability, convergence and validity of the ATC method in dealing with the complex coupling effect occurring in ship conceptual design.[Conclusions] The proposed method provides an effective basis for optimization of ship conceptual design.

  15. Inverse Problems and Data Fusion for crop production applications targeting optimal growth - Fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Bipjeet; Owusu, Robert K. A.

    2015-01-01

    of the crop growth process based on information on soil quality, field seeding, spraying/fertilization and environmental information in general. Finally, references to software tools, which could form the basis for an open source platform for a planning and monitoring system for optimal crop growth......, such that the crop yield is optimized with respect to several parameters (e.g. high end user value and minimum environmental impact), thus obtaining a sustainable production. The growth process optimization is based on information, including sensor based measurements with sensor quality monitoring, from previous......This work in progress is a contribution to crop growth systems for planning and monitoring of farm activities and practices by farmers. The work outlines the initial findings related to modelling, simulation and visualization techniques for crop growth, specifically targeting the barley crop...

  16. Clinical trials in hospitalized heart failure patients: targeting interventions to optimal phenotypic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Butler, Javed; Roessig, Lothar; Fonarow, Gregg C; Greene, Stephen J; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gadi; Kupfer, Stuart; Zalewski, Andrew; Sato, Naoki; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2015-07-01

    With one possible exception, the last decade of clinical trials in hospitalized heart failure (HHF) patients has failed to demonstrate improvement in long-term clinical outcomes. This trend necessitates a need to evaluate optimal drug development strategies and standards of trial conduct. It has become increasingly important to recognize the heterogeneity among HHF patients and the differential characterization of novel drug candidates. Targeting these agents to specific subpopulations may afford optimal net response related to the particular mode of action of the drug. Analyses of previous trials demonstrate profound differences in the baseline characteristics of patients enrolled across global regions and participating sites. Such differences may influence risks for events and interpretation of results. Therefore, the actual execution of trials and the epidemiology of HHF populations at the investigative sites must be taken into consideration. Collaboration among participating sites including the provision of registry data tailored to the planned development program will optimize trial conduct. Observational data prior to study initiation may enable sites to feedback and engage in protocol development to allow for feasible and valid clinical trial conduct. This site-centered, epidemiology-based network environment may facilitate studies in specific patient populations and promote optimal data collection and clear interpretation of drug safety and efficacy. This review summarizes the roundtable discussion held by a multidisciplinary team of representatives from academia, National Institutes of Health, industry, regulatory agencies, payers, and contract and academic research organizations to answer the question: Who should be targeted for novel therapies in HHF?

  17. of brain tumours

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    outline of the important clinical issues related to brain tumours and psychiatry. ... Left-sided, frontal tumours also seem to be associated with higher rates of depression, while those in the frontal lobe of the right .... Oxford: Blackwell Science,.

  18. Tumour compartment transcriptomics demonstrates the activation of inflammatory and odontogenic programmes in human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma and identifies the MAPK/ERK pathway as a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, John R; Carreno, Gabriela; Gonzalez-Meljem, Jose Mario; Haston, Scott; Guiho, Romain; Cooper, Julie E; Manshaei, Saba; Jani, Nital; Hölsken, Annett; Pettorini, Benedetta; Beynon, Robert J; Simpson, Deborah M; Fraser, Helen C; Hong, Ying; Hallang, Shirleen; Stone, Thomas J; Virasami, Alex; Donson, Andrew M; Jones, David; Aquilina, Kristian; Spoudeas, Helen; Joshi, Abhijit R; Grundy, Richard; Storer, Lisa C D; Korbonits, Márta; Hilton, David A; Tossell, Kyoko; Thavaraj, Selvam; Ungless, Mark A; Gil, Jesus; Buslei, Rolf; Hankinson, Todd; Hargrave, Darren; Goding, Colin; Andoniadou, Cynthia L; Brogan, Paul; Jacques, Thomas S; Williams, Hywel J; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2018-05-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACPs) are clinically challenging tumours, the majority of which have activating mutations in CTNNB1. They are histologically complex, showing cystic and solid components, the latter comprised of different morphological cell types (e.g. β-catenin-accumulating cluster cells and palisading epithelium), surrounded by a florid glial reaction with immune cells. Here, we have carried out RNA sequencing on 18 ACP samples and integrated these data with an existing ACP transcriptomic dataset. No studies so far have examined the patterns of gene expression within the different cellular compartments of the tumour. To achieve this goal, we have combined laser capture microdissection with computational analyses to reveal groups of genes that are associated with either epithelial tumour cells (clusters and palisading epithelium), glial tissue or immune infiltrate. We use these human ACP molecular signatures and RNA-Seq data from two ACP mouse models to reveal that cell clusters are molecularly analogous to the enamel knot, a critical signalling centre controlling normal tooth morphogenesis. Supporting this finding, we show that human cluster cells express high levels of several members of the FGF, TGFB and BMP families of secreted factors, which signal to neighbouring cells as evidenced by immunostaining against the phosphorylated proteins pERK1/2, pSMAD3 and pSMAD1/5/9 in both human and mouse ACP. We reveal that inhibiting the MAPK/ERK pathway with trametinib, a clinically approved MEK inhibitor, results in reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis in explant cultures of human and mouse ACP. Finally, we analyse a prominent molecular signature in the glial reactive tissue to characterise the inflammatory microenvironment and uncover the activation of inflammasomes in human ACP. We validate these results by immunostaining against immune cell markers, cytokine ELISA and proteome analysis in both solid tumour and cystic fluid from ACP

  19. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  20. TRUSTWORTHY OPTIMIZED CLUSTERING BASED TARGET DETECTION AND TRACKING FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jehan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an efficient approach is proposed to address the problem of target tracking in wireless sensor network (WSN. The problem being tackled here uses adaptive dynamic clustering scheme for tracking the target. It is a specific problem in object tracking. The proposed adaptive dynamic clustering target tracking scheme uses three steps for target tracking. The first step deals with the identification of clusters and cluster heads using OGSAFCM. Here, kernel fuzzy c-means (KFCM and gravitational search algorithm (GSA are combined to create clusters. At first, oppositional gravitational search algorithm (OGSA is used to optimize the initial clustering center and then the KFCM algorithm is availed to guide the classification and the cluster formation process. In the OGSA, the concept of the opposition based population initialization in the basic GSA to improve the convergence profile. The identified clusters are changed dynamically. The second step deals with the data transmission to the cluster heads. The third step deals with the transmission of aggregated data to the base station as well as the detection of target. From the experimental results, the proposed scheme efficiently and efficiently identifies the target. As a result the tracking error is minimized.

  1. Recent advances and opportunities in proteomic analyses of tumour heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Conrads, Thomas P

    2018-04-01

    Solid tumour malignancies comprise a highly variable admixture of tumour and non-tumour cellular populations, forming a complex cellular ecosystem and tumour microenvironment. This tumour heterogeneity is not incidental, and is known to correlate with poor patient prognosis for many cancer types. Indeed, non-malignant cell populations, such as vascular endothelial and immune cells, are known to play key roles supporting and, in some cases, driving aggressive tumour biology, and represent targets of emerging therapeutics, such as antiangiogenesis and immune checkpoint inhibitors. The biochemical interplay between these cellular populations and how they contribute to molecular tumour heterogeneity remains enigmatic, particularly from the perspective of the tumour proteome. This review focuses on recent advances in proteomic methods, namely imaging mass spectrometry, single-cell proteomic techniques, and preanalytical sample processing, that are uniquely positioned to enable detailed analysis of discrete cellular populations within tumours to improve our understanding of tumour proteomic heterogeneity. This review further emphasizes the opportunity afforded by the application of these techniques to the analysis of tumour heterogeneity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tumour tissues, as these represent an invaluable resource for retrospective analyses that is now routinely accessible, owing to recent technological and methodological advances in tumour tissue proteomics. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Interleukin 21 controls tumour growth and tumour immunosurveillance in colitis-associated tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Dominik; Martin, Maria; Schiechl, Gabriela; Kesselring, Rebecca; Schlitt, Hans Jürgen; Geissler, Edward K; Fichtner-Feigl, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Colitis-associated tumorigenesis is a balance between proliferation of tumour cells and tumour immunosurveillance. The role of T-helper-cell-derived cytokines in tumour growth is not fully understood. In this study the authors investigated the influence of interleukin (IL) 21 on intestinal tumorigenesis. Chronic colitis was induced in IL-21(-/-) and littermate control wild-type mice with three cycles of 1.5% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) over 7 days followed by 7 days of drinking water. Mice received an azoxymethane injection on day 0 of DSS-colitis to induce tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemistry was performed on inflamed and tumour-bearing areas of colons. Cytokine expression of isolated colonic CD4 T cells was determined by ELISA. Cytotoxic capacity of isolated colonic CD8 T cells targeting tumour cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and quantitative cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis of tumour cells was determined by TUNEL assay of colonic sections. Increasing expression of IL-21 was observed in chronic colitis, which showed functional importance, since IL-21 deficiency prevented chronic DSS-colitis development. Further, in the absence of IL-21, significantly fewer tumour nodules were detected, despite a similar extent of intestinal inflammation. In wild-type mice, 8.6±1.9 tumour nodules were found compared with 1.0±1.2 in IL-21-deficient mice. In tumour-bearing IL-21-deficient mice, intestinal inflammation was restored and partly dependent on interferon (IFN)-γ, whereas the inflammation in wild-type mice showed high IL-17A concentrations. In these rare tumours in IL-21-deficient mice, tumour cell proliferation (Ki-67) was decreased, while cell apoptosis was increased, compared with wild-type mice. Increased IFNγ expression in tumour-bearing IL-21-deficient mice led to increased tumour immunosurveillance mediated by cytotoxic CD8CD103 T cells targeting E-cadherin(+) colonic tumour cells and therefore limited tumour growth. These results indicate that IL-21

  3. Predicting targeted drug combinations based on Pareto optimal patterns of coexpression network connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penrod, Nadia M; Greene, Casey S; Moore, Jason H

    2014-01-01

    Molecularly targeted drugs promise a safer and more effective treatment modality than conventional chemotherapy for cancer patients. However, tumors are dynamic systems that readily adapt to these agents activating alternative survival pathways as they evolve resistant phenotypes. Combination therapies can overcome resistance but finding the optimal combinations efficiently presents a formidable challenge. Here we introduce a new paradigm for the design of combination therapy treatment strategies that exploits the tumor adaptive process to identify context-dependent essential genes as druggable targets. We have developed a framework to mine high-throughput transcriptomic data, based on differential coexpression and Pareto optimization, to investigate drug-induced tumor adaptation. We use this approach to identify tumor-essential genes as druggable candidates. We apply our method to a set of ER(+) breast tumor samples, collected before (n = 58) and after (n = 60) neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, to prioritize genes as targets for combination therapy with letrozole treatment. We validate letrozole-induced tumor adaptation through coexpression and pathway analyses in an independent data set (n = 18). We find pervasive differential coexpression between the untreated and letrozole-treated tumor samples as evidence of letrozole-induced tumor adaptation. Based on patterns of coexpression, we identify ten genes as potential candidates for combination therapy with letrozole including EPCAM, a letrozole-induced essential gene and a target to which drugs have already been developed as cancer therapeutics. Through replication, we validate six letrozole-induced coexpression relationships and confirm the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as a process that is upregulated in the residual tumor samples following letrozole treatment. To derive the greatest benefit from molecularly targeted drugs it is critical to design combination

  4. Nuclear medicine procedures to diagnose endocrine pancreatic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bares, R.; Besenfelder, H.; Eschmann, S.M.; Pfannenberg, C.

    2003-01-01

    The typical clinical features of endocrine pancreatic tumours are either symptoms caused by excessive hormone production or progressive tumour growth. In several prospective studies it has been shown that somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is the most accurate imaging technique currently available to detect endocrine pancreatic tumours. Therefore it should be used whenever curative surgical treatment appears to be feasible. Furthermore it should be applied if a radionuclide treatment of inoperable tumours is considered. In this situation scintigraphy with 123 I-mIBG might be useful, too. Future developments include the use of PET with labelled somatostatin analogues or DOPA derivatives as well as image fusion techniques to optimize preoperative tumour localization. (orig.) [de

  5. Saponins extracted from by-product of Asparagus officinalis L. suppress tumour cell migration and invasion through targeting Rho GTPase signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Liu, Yali; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Wen; Pang, Xiufeng

    2013-04-01

    The inedible bottom part (~30-40%) of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) spears is usually discarded as waste. However, since this by-product has been reported to be rich in many bioactive phytochemicals, it might be utilisable as a supplement in foods or natural drugs for its therapeutic effects. In this study it was identifed that saponins from old stems of asparagus (SSA) exerted potential inhibitory activity on tumour growth and metastasis. SSA suppressed cell viability of breast, colon and pancreatic cancers in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 809.42 to 1829.96 µg mL(-1). However, SSA was more functional in blocking cell migration and invasion as compared with its cytotoxic effect, with an effective inhibitory concentration of 400 µg mL(-1). A mechanistic study showed that SSA markedly increased the activities of Cdc42 and Rac1 and decreased the activity of RhoA in cancer cells. SSA inhibits tumour cell motility through modulating the Rho GTPase signalling pathway, suggesting a promising use of SSA as a supplement in healthcare foods and natural drugs for cancer prevention and treatment. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Optimization of LDL targeted nanostructured lipid carriers of 5-FU by a full factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sare Andalib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC are a mixture of solid and liquid lipids or oils as colloidal carrier systems that lead to an imperfect matrix structure with high ability for loading water soluble drugs. The aim of this study was to find the best proportion of liquid and solid lipids of different types for optimization of the production of LDL targeted NLCs used in carrying 5-Fu by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method. Materials and Methods: The influence of the lipid type, cholesterol or cholesteryl stearate for targeting LDL receptors, oil type (oleic acid or octanol, lipid and oil% on particle size, surface charge, drug loading efficiency, and drug released percent from the NLCs were studied by a full factorial design. Results: The NLCs prepared by 54.5% cholesterol and 25% of oleic acid, showed optimum results with particle size of 105.8 nm, relatively high zeta potential of −25 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38% and release efficiency of about 40%. Scanning electron microscopy of nanoparticles confirmed the results of dynamic light scattering method used in measuring the particle size of NLCs. Conclusions: The optimization method by a full factorial statistical design is a useful optimization method for production of nanostructured lipid carriers.

  7. Optimization of LDL targeted nanostructured lipid carriers of 5-FU by a full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Sare; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Sadeghi, Hojjat

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) are a mixture of solid and liquid lipids or oils as colloidal carrier systems that lead to an imperfect matrix structure with high ability for loading water soluble drugs. The aim of this study was to find the best proportion of liquid and solid lipids of different types for optimization of the production of LDL targeted NLCs used in carrying 5-Fu by the emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The influence of the lipid type, cholesterol or cholesteryl stearate for targeting LDL receptors, oil type (oleic acid or octanol), lipid and oil% on particle size, surface charge, drug loading efficiency, and drug released percent from the NLCs were studied by a full factorial design. The NLCs prepared by 54.5% cholesterol and 25% of oleic acid, showed optimum results with particle size of 105.8 nm, relatively high zeta potential of -25 mV, drug loading efficiency of 38% and release efficiency of about 40%. Scanning electron microscopy of nanoparticles confirmed the results of dynamic light scattering method used in measuring the particle size of NLCs. The optimization method by a full factorial statistical design is a useful optimization method for production of nanostructured lipid carriers.

  8. Distributed Bees Algorithm Parameters Optimization for a Cost Efficient Target Allocation in Swarms of Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Gutiérrez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Swarms of robots can use their sensing abilities to explore unknown environments and deploy on sites of interest. In this task, a large number of robots is more effective than a single unit because of their ability to quickly cover the area. However, the coordination of large teams of robots is not an easy problem, especially when the resources for the deployment are limited. In this paper, the Distributed Bees Algorithm (DBA, previously proposed by the authors, is optimized and applied to distributed target allocation in swarms of robots. Improved target allocation in terms of deployment cost efficiency is achieved through optimization of the DBA’s control parameters by means of a Genetic Algorithm. Experimental results show that with the optimized set of parameters, the deployment cost measured as the average distance traveled by the robots is reduced. The cost-efficient deployment is in some cases achieved at the expense of increased robots’ distribution error. Nevertheless, the proposed approach allows the swarm to adapt to the operating conditions when available resources are scarce.

  9. Topology of classical molecular optimal control landscapes for multi-target objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe-Wong, Carlee [Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1000 (United States); Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel, E-mail: hrabitz@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States); Wu, Rebing [Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-04-21

    This paper considers laser-driven optimal control of an ensemble of non-interacting molecules whose dynamics lie in classical phase space. The molecules evolve independently under control to distinct final states. We consider a control landscape defined in terms of multi-target (MT) molecular states and analyze the landscape as a functional of the control field. The topology of the MT control landscape is assessed through its gradient and Hessian with respect to the control. Under particular assumptions, the MT control landscape is found to be free of traps that could hinder reaching the objective. The Hessian associated with an optimal control field is shown to have finite rank, indicating an inherent degree of robustness to control noise. Both the absence of traps and rank of the Hessian are shown to be analogous to the situation of specifying multiple targets for an ensemble of quantum states. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the classical landscape principles and further characterize the system behavior as the control field is optimized.

  10. Multiple cyber attacks against a target with observation errors and dependent outcomes: Characterization and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Maochao; Xu, Shouhuai; Zhao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a cybersecurity model: An attacker can launch multiple attacks against a target with a termination strategy that says that the attacker will stop after observing a number of successful attacks or when the attacker is out of attack resources. However, the attacker's observation of the attack outcomes (i.e., random variables indicating whether the target is compromised or not) has an observation error that is specified by both a false-negative and a false-positive probability. The novelty of the model we study is the accommodation of the dependence between the attack outcomes, because the dependence was assumed away in the literature. In this model, we characterize the monotonicity and bounds of the compromise probability (i.e., the probability that the target is compromised). In addition to extensively showing the impact of dependence on quantities such as compromise probability and attack cost, we give methods for finding the optimal strategy that leads to maximum compromise probability or minimum attack cost. This study highlights that the dependence between random variables cannot be assumed away, because the results will be misleading. - Highlights: • A novel cybersecurity model is proposed to accommodate the dependence among attack outcomes. • The monotonicity and bounds of the compromise probability are studied. • The dependence effect on the compromise probability and attack cost is discussed via simulation. • The optimal strategy that leads to maximum compromise probability or minimum attack cost is presented.

  11. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  12. Progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haojun; Wu Hua

    2012-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical in the growth, invasion and metastasis of malignant tumors. The integrins, which express on many types of tumor cells and activated vascular endothelial cells, play an important role in regulation of the tumor angiogenesis. RGD peptide, which contains Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, binds specifically to integrin α v β 3 . Therefore, the radiolabeled RGD peptides may have broad application prospects in radionuclide imaging and therapy. Major research interests include the selection of radionuclides, modification and improvement of RGD structures. In this article, we give a review on research progresses in optimization strategy for radiolabeled molecular probes targeting integrin α v β 3 . (authors)

  13. Optimization of accelerator target and detector for portal imaging using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flampouri, S.; Evans, P.M.; Partridge, M.; Nahum, A.E.; Verhaegen, A.E.; Spezi, E.

    2002-01-01

    Megavoltage portal images suffer from poor quality compared to those produced with kilovoltage x-rays. Several authors have shown that the image quality can be improved by modifying the linear accelerator to generate more low-energy photons. This work addresses the problem of using Monte Carlo simulation and experiment to optimize the beam and detector combination to maximize image quality for a given patient thickness. A simple model of the whole imaging chain was developed for investigation of the effect of the target parameters on the quality of the image. The optimum targets (6 mm thick aluminium and 1.6 mm copper) were installed in an Elekta SL25 accelerator. The first beam will be referred to as Al6 and the second as Cu1.6. A tissue-equivalent contrast phantom was imaged with the 6 MV standard photon beam and the experimental beams with standard radiotherapy and mammography film/screen systems. The arrangement with a thin Al target/mammography system improved the contrast from 1.4 cm bone in 5 cm water to 19% compared with 2% for the standard arrangement of a thick, high-Z target/radiotherapy verification system. The linac/phantom/detector system was simulated with the BEAM/EGS4 Monte Carlo code. Contrast calculated from the predicted images was in good agreement with the experiment (to within 2.5%). The use of MC techniques to predict images accurately, taking into account the whole imaging system, is a powerful new method for portal imaging system design optimization. (author)

  14. Optimizing targeted vaccination across cyber-physical networks: an empirically based mathematical simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mones, Enys; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Pentland, Alex 'Sandy'; Hupert, Nathaniel; Lehmann, Sune

    2018-01-01

    Targeted vaccination, whether to minimize the forward transmission of infectious diseases or their clinical impact, is one of the 'holy grails' of modern infectious disease outbreak response, yet it is difficult to achieve in practice due to the challenge of identifying optimal targets in real time. If interruption of disease transmission is the goal, targeting requires knowledge of underlying person-to-person contact networks. Digital communication networks may reflect not only virtual but also physical interactions that could result in disease transmission, but the precise overlap between these cyber and physical networks has never been empirically explored in real-life settings. Here, we study the digital communication activity of more than 500 individuals along with their person-to-person contacts at a 5-min temporal resolution. We then simulate different disease transmission scenarios on the person-to-person physical contact network to determine whether cyber communication networks can be harnessed to advance the goal of targeted vaccination for a disease spreading on the network of physical proximity. We show that individuals selected on the basis of their closeness centrality within cyber networks (what we call 'cyber-directed vaccination') can enhance vaccination campaigns against diseases with short-range (but not full-range) modes of transmission. © 2018 The Author(s).

  15. NEWTONIAN IMPERIALIST COMPETITVE APPROACH TO OPTIMIZING OBSERVATION OF MULTIPLE TARGET POINTS IN MULTISENSOR SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Afghan-Toloee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of specifying the minimum number of sensors to deploy in a certain area to face multiple targets has been generally studied in the literatures. In this paper, we are arguing the multi-sensors deployment problem (MDP. The Multi-sensor placement problem can be clarified as minimizing the cost required to cover the multi target points in the area. We propose a more feasible method for the multi-sensor placement problem. Our method makes provision the high coverage of grid based placements while minimizing the cost as discovered in perimeter placement techniques. The NICA algorithm as improved ICA (Imperialist Competitive Algorithm is used to decrease the performance time to explore an enough solution compared to other meta-heuristic schemes such as GA, PSO and ICA. A three dimensional area is used for clarify the multiple target and placement points, making provision x, y, and z computations in the observation algorithm. A structure of model for the multi-sensor placement problem is proposed: The problem is constructed as an optimization problem with the objective to minimize the cost while covering all multiple target points upon a given probability of observation tolerance.

  16. Study and analysis of how to optimize marketing & sales of a b-to-b company for the target group

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppila, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    Study and analysis of how to optimize the marketing & sales strategy of a b-to-b company for the target group. Case study for Green Fortune Plantwall Oy. This thesis is a case study of Green Fortune Plantwall Oy. The objective of this thesis is to study and analyze how to optimize the current marketing and sales strategy of a small b-to-b company for its target group (i.e. architects and interior designers).

  17. Imaging of sacral tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S.; Leclere, J.; Vanel, D.; Missenard, G.; Pinieux, G. de

    2008-01-01

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  18. Imaging of sacral tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S.; Ollivier, L.; Brisse, H.; Neuenschwander, S. [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Leclere, J. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif (France); Vanel, D. [The Rizzoli Institute, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Missenard, G. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Comite de pathologie tumorale de l' appareil locomoteur, Villejuif (France); Pinieux, G. de [CHRU de Tours, Department of Pathology, Hopital Trousseau, Tours (France)

    2008-04-15

    All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed. (orig.)

  19. Estimation of Partial Safety Factors and Target Failure Probability Based on Cost Optimization of Rubble Mound Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung-Woo; Suh, Kyung-Duck; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2010-01-01

    The breakwaters are designed by considering the cost optimization because a human risk is seldom considered. Most breakwaters, however, were constructed without considering the cost optimization. In this study, the optimum return period, target failure probability and the partial safety factors...

  20. Evaluation of target coverage and margins adequacy during CyberKnife Lung Optimized Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Seregni, Matteo; Ciardo, Delia; Vigorito, Sabrina; Rondi, Elena; Piperno, Gaia; Ferrari, Annamaria; Zerella, Maria Alessia; Arculeo, Simona; Francia, Claudia Maria; Sibio, Daniela; Cattani, Federica; De Marinis, Filippo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Orecchia, Roberto; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2018-04-01

    Evaluation of target coverage and verification of safety margins, in motion management strategies implemented by Lung Optimized Treatment (LOT) module in CyberKnife system. Three fiducial-less motion management strategies provided by LOT can be selected according to tumor visibility in the X ray images acquired during treatment. In 2-view modality the tumor is visible in both X ray images and full motion tracking is performed. In 1-view modality the tumor is visible in a single X ray image, therefore, motion tracking is combined with an internal target volume (ITV)-based margin expansion. In 0-view modality the lesion is not visible, consequently the treatment relies entirely on an ITV-based approach. Data from 30 patients treated in 2-view modality were selected providing information on the three-dimensional tumor motion in correspondence to each X ray image. Treatments in 1-view and 0-view modalities were simulated by processing log files and planning volumes. Planning target volume (PTV) margins were defined according to the tracking modality: end-exhale clinical target volume (CTV) + 3 mm in 2-view and ITV + 5 mm in 0-view. In the 1-view scenario, the ITV encompasses only tumor motion along the non-visible direction. Then, non-uniform ITV to PTV margins were applied: 3 mm and 5 mm in the visible and non-visible direction, respectively. We defined the coverage of each voxel of the CTV as the percentage of X ray images where such voxel was included in the PTV. In 2-view modality coverage was calculated as the intersection between the CTV centred on the imaged target position and the PTV centred on the predicted target position, as recorded in log files. In 1-view modality, coverage was calculated as the intersection between the CTV centred on the imaged target position and the PTV centred on the projected predictor data. In 0-view modality coverage was calculated as the intersection between the CTV centred on the imaged target position and the non

  1. Oxidative stress specifically downregulates survivin to promote breast tumour formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, S; Tran, L; Urman, R; Braga, M; Parveen, M; Li, S A; Chaudhuri, G; Singh, R

    2013-03-05

    Breast cancer, a heterogeneous disease has been broadly classified into oestrogen receptor positive (ER+) or oestrogen receptor negative (ER-) tumour types. Each of these tumours is dependent on specific signalling pathways for their progression. While high levels of survivin, an anti-apoptotic protein, increases aggressive behaviour in ER- breast tumours, oxidative stress (OS) promotes the progression of ER+ breast tumours. Mechanisms and molecular targets by which OS promotes tumourigenesis remain poorly understood. DETA-NONOate, a nitric oxide (NO)-donor induces OS in breast cancer cell lines by early re-localisation and downregulation of cellular survivin. Using in vivo models of HMLE(HRAS) xenografts and E2-induced breast tumours in ACI rats, we demonstrate that high OS downregulates survivin during initiation of tumourigenesis. Overexpression of survivin in HMLE(HRAS) cells led to a significant delay in tumour initiation and tumour volume in nude mice. This inverse relationship between survivin and OS was also observed in ER+ human breast tumours. We also demonstrate an upregulation of NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1) and its activating protein p67, which are novel markers of OS in E2-induced tumours in ACI rats and as well as in ER+ human breast tumours. Our data, therefore, suggest that downregulation of survivin could be an important early event by which OS initiates breast tumour formation.

  2. Optimization and in Vivo Validation of Peptide Vectors Targeting the LDL Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Guillaume; Lécorché, Pascaline; Malcor, Jean-Daniel; Laurencin, Mathieu; Smirnova, Maria; Varini, Karine; Malicet, Cédric; Gassiot, Fanny; Abouzid, Karima; Faucon, Aude; David, Marion; Gaudin, Nicolas; Masse, Maxime; Ferracci, Géraldine; Dive, Vincent; Cisternino, Salvatore; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2016-12-05

    Active targeting and delivery to pathophysiological organs of interest is of paramount importance to increase specific accumulation of therapeutic drugs or imaging agents while avoiding systemic side effects. We recently developed a family of new peptide ligands of the human and rodent LDL receptor (LDLR), an attractive cell-surface receptor with high uptake activity and local enrichment in several normal or pathological tissues (Malcor et al., J. Med. Chem. 2012, 55 (5), 2227). Initial chemical optimization of the 15-mer, all natural amino acid compound 1/VH411 (DSGL[CMPRLRGC] c DPR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) investigation led to the cyclic 8 amino acid analogue compound 22/VH445 ([cMPRLRGC] c ) which specifically binds hLDLR with a K D of 76 nM and has an in vitro blood half-life of ∼3 h. Further introduction of non-natural amino acids led to the identification of compound 60/VH4106 ([(d)-"Pen"M"Thz"RLRGC] c ), which showed the highest K D value of 9 nM. However, this latter analogue displayed the lowest in vitro blood half-life (∼1.9 h). In the present study, we designed a new set of peptide analogues, namely, VH4127 to VH4131, with further improved biological properties. Detailed analysis of the hLDLR-binding kinetics of previous and new analogues showed that the latter all displayed very high on-rates, in the 10 6 s -1. M -1 range, and off-rates varying from the low 10 -2 s -1 to the 10 -1 s -1 range. Furthermore, all these new analogues showed increased blood half-lives in vitro, reaching ∼7 and 10 h for VH4129 and VH4131, respectively. Interestingly, we demonstrate in cell-based assays using both VH445 and the most balanced optimized analogue VH4127 ([cM"Thz"RLRG"Pen"] c ), showing a K D of 18 nM and a blood half-life of ∼4.3 h, that its higher on-rate correlated with a significant increase in both the extent of cell-surface binding to hLDLR and the endocytosis potential. Finally, intravenous injection of tritium-radiolabeled 3 H

  3. Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilms' tumour or nephroblastoma is a cancer of the kidney that ... It may be noticed by parents or it may be an incidental finding ... patients. It may lead to iron deficiency anaemia. Rarely Wilms' tumour may present with acquired von Willebrand's ... the best treatment approach. ... with multimodality therapy in paediatric.

  4. Laser fusion target illumination optimization with consideration of the beam divergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzanna, J.; Schoennagel, H.

    1982-09-01

    Using a focusing system with a great focal length it is demonstrated that the radiation divergence considerably influences the illumination optimization. If the channel beam is composed of several single beams, there are two optimum illumination variants: the channel beam tangent and the single beam tangent illumination. Further, it is shown that the illumination channel distribution function can vary in the central region without any effect on the illumination uniformity. The deviation at the periphery is more critical. The most homogeneous illumination and favourable energy transfer would be obtained by low radiation divergence and optimum lateral and axial defocusing of the single beam imaging a suitable near-field intensity pattern on the target surface. It is emphasized that the estimation was made without considering the plasma parameters and the dynamic variation in time. (author)

  5. Target Registration Error minimization involving deformable organs using elastic body splines and Particle Swarm Optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinczyk, Dominik; Fabian, Sylwester

    2017-12-01

    In minimally invasive surgery one of the main challenges is the precise location of the target during the intervention. The aim of the study is to present usability of elastic body splines (EBS) to minimize TRE error. The method to find the desired EBS parameters values is presented with usage of Particle Swarm optimization approach. This ability of TRE minimization has been achieved for the respiratory phases corresponding to minimum FRE for abdominal (especially liver) surgery. The proposed methodology was verified during experiments conducted on 21 patients diagnosed with liver tumors. This method has been developed to perform operations in real-time on a standard workstation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeted pre-treatment of hemp bast fibres for optimal performance in biocomposite materials: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ming; Thygesen, Anders; Summerscales, John

    2017-01-01

    . In order to achieve strong NFCs, well separated and cellulose-rich fibres are required. Hemp is taking a center stage in this regard as a source of suitable natural plant cellulose fibres because natural hemp bast fibres are long and inherently possess high strength. Classical field and water retting...... methods have been used for centuries for removal of non-cellulosic components from fibrous plant stems including from hemp, but carries a risk of reducing the mechanical properties of the fibres via damaging the cellulose. For NFCs new targeted fibre pre-treatment methods are needed to selectively...... and effectively remove non-cellulosic components from the plant fibres to produce cellulose rich fibres without introducing any damage to the fibres. A key feature for successful use of natural fibres such as hemp fibres in composite materials is optimal interfacial contact between the fibres and the hydrophobic...

  7. Targeted 2D/3D registration using ray normalization and a hybrid optimizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Joyoni; Napel, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    X-ray images are often used to guide minimally invasive procedures in interventional radiology. The use of a preoperatively obtained 3D volume can enhance the visualization needed for guiding catheters and other surgical devices. However, for intraoperative usefulness, the 3D dataset needs to be registered to the 2D x-ray images of the patient. We investigated the effect of targeting subvolumes of interest in the 3D datasets and registering the projections with C-arm x-ray images. We developed an intensity-based 2D/3D rigid-body registration using a Monte Carlo-based hybrid algorithm as the optimizer, using a single view for registration. Pattern intensity (PI) and mutual information (MI) were two metrics tested. We used normalization of the rays to address the problems due to truncation in 3D necessary for targeting. We tested the algorithm on a C-arm x-ray image of a pig's head and a 3D dataset reconstructed from multiple views of the C-arm. PI and MI were comparable in performance. For two subvolumes starting with a set of initial poses from +/-15 mm in x, from +/-3 mm (random), in y and z and +/-4 deg in the three angles, the robustness was 94% for PI and 91% for MI, with accuracy of 2.4 mm (PI) and 2.6 mm (MI), using the hybrid algorithm. The hybrid optimizer, when compared with a standard Powell's direction set method, increased the robustness from 59% (Powell) to 94% (hybrid). Another set of 50 random initial conditions from [+/-20] mm in x,y,z and [+/-10] deg in the three angles, yielded robustness of 84% (hybrid) versus 38% (Powell) using PI as metric, with accuracies 2.1 mm (hybrid) versus 2.0 mm (Powell)

  8. A system dynamics optimization framework to achieve population desired of average weight target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zulkepli, Jafri Haji; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is becoming a serious problem in Malaysia as it has been rated as the highest among Asian countries. The aim of the paper is to propose a system dynamics (SD) optimization framework to achieve population desired weight target based on the changes in physical activity behavior and its association to weight and obesity. The system dynamics approach of stocks and flows diagram was used to quantitatively model the impact of both behavior on the population's weight and obesity trends. This work seems to bring this idea together and highlighting the interdependence of the various aspects of eating and physical activity behavior on the complex of human weight regulation system. The model was used as an experimentation vehicle to investigate the impacts of changes in physical activity on weight and prevalence of obesity implications. This framework paper provides evidence on the usefulness of SD optimization as a strategic decision making approach to assist in decision making related to obesity prevention. SD applied in this research is relatively new in Malaysia and has a high potential to apply to any feedback models that address the behavior cause to obesity.

  9. Optimization of radiotherapy to target volumes with concave outlines: target-dose homogenization and selective sparing of critical structures by constrained matrix inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colle, C; Van den Berge, D; De Wagter, C; Fortan, L; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    The design of 3D-conformal dose distributions for targets with concave outlines is a technical challenge in conformal radiotherapy. For these targets, it is impossible to find beam incidences for which the target volume can be isolated from the tissues at risk. Commonly occurring examples are most thyroid cancers and the targets located at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels related to some head and neck. A solution to this problem was developed, using beam intensity modulation executed with a multileaf collimator by applying a static beam-segmentation technique. The method includes the definition of beam incidences and beam segments of specific shape as well as the calculation of segment weights. Tests on Sherouse`s GRATISTM planning system allowed to escalate the dose to these targets to 65-70 Gy without exceeding spinal cord tolerance. Further optimization by constrained matrix inversion was investigated to explore the possibility of further dose escalation.

  10. Optimization of Time Controlled 6-mercaptopurine Delivery for Site- Specific Targeting to Colon Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hude, Rahul U; Jagdale, Swati C

    2016-01-01

    6-MP has short elimination time (Mercaptopurine (6-MP) for treatment of colon diseases. Compression coating technique was used. 32 full factorial design was designed for optimization of the outer coat for the core tablet. For outer coat amount of Eudragit RS 100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC K100) were employed as independent variables each at three levels while responses evaluated were swelling index and bursting time. Direct compression method was used for tablets formulation. 80% w/w of microcrystalline cellulose and 20% w/w of croscarmellose sodium were found to be optimum concentration for the core tablet. The outer coat of optimized batch (ED) contains 21.05% w/w Eudragit RS 100 and 78.95% w/w HPMC K100 of total polymer weight. In-vitro dissolution study indicated that combination of polymer retards the drug release in gastric region and releases ≥95% of drug in colonic region after ≥7 h. Whereas in case of in-vivo placebo x-ray imaging study had shown that the tablet reaches colonic part after 5±0.5 h providing the proof of arrival in the colon. Stability study indicated that the optimized formulation were physically and chemically stable. Present research work concluded that compression coating by Eudragit RS 100 and HPMC K100 to 6-MP core provides potential colon targeted system with advantages of reduced gastric exposure and enhanced bioavailability. Formulation can be considered as potential and promising candidate for the treatment of colon diseases.

  11. An optimized target-field method for MRI transverse biplanar gradient coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Rui; Xu, Jing; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Fu, Youyi; Li, Yangjing

    2011-01-01

    Gradient coils are essential components of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. In this paper, we present an optimized target-field method for designing a transverse biplanar gradient coil with high linearity, low inductance and small resistance, which can well satisfy the requirements of permanent-magnet MRI systems. In this new method, the current density is expressed by trigonometric basis functions with unknown coefficients in polar coordinates. Following the standard procedures, we construct an objective function with respect to the total square errors of the magnetic field at all target-field points with the penalty items associated with the stored magnetic energy and the dissipated power. By adjusting the two penalty factors and minimizing the objective function, the appropriate coefficients of the current density are determined. Applying the stream function method to the current density, the specific winding patterns on the planes can be obtained. A novel biplanar gradient coil has been designed using this method to operate in a permanent-magnet MRI system. In order to verify the validity of the proposed approach, the gradient magnetic field generated by the resulted current density has been calculated via the Biot–Savart law. The results have demonstrated the effectiveness and advantage of this proposed method

  12. Weighted Optimization-Based Distributed Kalman Filter for Nonlinear Target Tracking in Collaborative Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Li, Jiahong; Yang, Shuanghua; Deng, Fang

    2017-11-01

    The identification of the nonlinearity and coupling is crucial in nonlinear target tracking problem in collaborative sensor networks. According to the adaptive Kalman filtering (KF) method, the nonlinearity and coupling can be regarded as the model noise covariance, and estimated by minimizing the innovation or residual errors of the states. However, the method requires large time window of data to achieve reliable covariance measurement, making it impractical for nonlinear systems which are rapidly changing. To deal with the problem, a weighted optimization-based distributed KF algorithm (WODKF) is proposed in this paper. The algorithm enlarges the data size of each sensor by the received measurements and state estimates from its connected sensors instead of the time window. A new cost function is set as the weighted sum of the bias and oscillation of the state to estimate the "best" estimate of the model noise covariance. The bias and oscillation of the state of each sensor are estimated by polynomial fitting a time window of state estimates and measurements of the sensor and its neighbors weighted by the measurement noise covariance. The best estimate of the model noise covariance is computed by minimizing the weighted cost function using the exhaustive method. The sensor selection method is in addition to the algorithm to decrease the computation load of the filter and increase the scalability of the sensor network. The existence, suboptimality and stability analysis of the algorithm are given. The local probability data association method is used in the proposed algorithm for the multitarget tracking case. The algorithm is demonstrated in simulations on tracking examples for a random signal, one nonlinear target, and four nonlinear targets. Results show the feasibility and superiority of WODKF against other filtering algorithms for a large class of systems.

  13. Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Malaria in Pregnancy: Optimization of Target Concentrations of Dihydroartemisinin-Piperaquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Rada M; Jagannathan, Prasanna; Kajubi, Richard; Huang, Liusheng; Zhang, Nan; Were, Moses; Kakuru, Abel; Muhindo, Mary K; Mwebaza, Norah; Wallender, Erika; Clark, Tamara D; Opira, Bishop; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane V; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Aweeka, Francesca T

    2018-03-14

    Dihydroartemsinin-piperaquine is highly efficacious as intermittent preventive therapy for malaria during pregnancy (IPTp). Determining associations between piperaquine exposure, malaria risk, and adverse birth outcomes informs optimal dosing strategies. HIV-uninfected pregnant women were enrolled in a placebo-controlled trial of IPTp at 12-20 weeks gestation and randomized to: sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine every 8 weeks (n=106), dihydroartemsinin-piperaquine every 8 weeks (n=94), or dihydroartemsinin-piperaquine every 4 weeks (n=100) during pregnancy. Pharmacokinetic sampling for piperaquine was performed every 4 weeks, and an intensive pharmacokinetic sub-study was performed in 30 women at 28 weeks gestation. Concentration-effect relationships were assessed between exposure to piperaquine; the prevalence of P. falciparum infection during pregnancy; outcomes at delivery including placental malaria, low birthweight, and preterm birth; and risks for toxicity. Simulations of new dosing scenarios were performed. Model-defined piperaquine target venous plasma concentrations of 13.9 ng/ml provided 99% protection from P. falciparum infection during pregnancy. Each 10 day increase in time>target piperaquine concentrations was associated with reduced odds of placental parasitemia (0∙67, P<0.0001), preterm birth (0.74, P<0.01), and low birthweight (0.74, P<0.05), though increases in piperaquine concentrations were associated with QTc prolongation (5 msec increase per 100 ng/ml). Modeling suggests that daily or weekly administration of lower dosages of piperaquine, compared to standard dosing, will maintain piperaquine trough levels above target concentrations with reduced piperaquine peak levels, potentially limiting toxicity. The protective efficacy of IPTp with dihydroartemsinin-piperaquine was strongly associated with higher drug exposure. Studies of the efficacy and safety of alternative dihydroartemsinin-piperaquine IPTp dosing strategies are warranted. NCT02163447.

  14. Optimized computational imaging methods for small-target sensing in lens-free holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhen; Engle, Isaiah; Garan, Jacob; Melzer, Jeffrey E.; McLeod, Euan

    2018-02-01

    Lens-free holographic microscopy is a promising diagnostic approach because it is cost-effective, compact, and suitable for point-of-care applications, while providing high resolution together with an ultra-large field-of-view. It has been applied to biomedical sensing, where larger targets like eukaryotic cells, bacteria, or viruses can be directly imaged without labels, and smaller targets like proteins or DNA strands can be detected via scattering labels like micro- or nano-spheres. Automated image processing routines can count objects and infer target concentrations. In these sensing applications, sensitivity and specificity are critically affected by image resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Pixel super-resolution approaches have been shown to boost resolution and SNR by synthesizing a high-resolution image from multiple, partially redundant, low-resolution images. However, there are several computational methods that can be used to synthesize the high-resolution image, and previously, it has been unclear which methods work best for the particular case of small-particle sensing. Here, we quantify the SNR achieved in small-particle sensing using regularized gradient-descent optimization method, where the regularization is based on cardinal-neighbor differences, Bayer-pattern noise reduction, or sparsity in the image. In particular, we find that gradient-descent with sparsity-based regularization works best for small-particle sensing. These computational approaches were evaluated on images acquired using a lens-free microscope that we assembled from an off-the-shelf LED array and color image sensor. Compared to other lens-free imaging systems, our hardware integration, calibration, and sample preparation are particularly simple. We believe our results will help to enable the best performance in lens-free holographic sensing.

  15. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Shanechi

    Full Text Available Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  16. The Clinical Value of Non-Coplanar Photon Beams in Biologically Optimized Intensity Modulated Dose Delivery on Deep-Seated Tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Brigida C.; Svensson, Roger; Loef, Johan; Brahme, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the merits of different radiobiologically optimized treatment techniques using few-field planar and non-coplanar dose delivery on an advanced cancer of the cervix, with rectum and bladder as principal organs at risk. Classically, the rational for using non-coplanar beams is to minimize the overlap of beam entrance and exit regions and to find new beam directions avoiding organs at risk, in order to reduce damage to sensitive normal tissues. Two four-beam configurations have been extensively studied. The first consists of three evenly spaced coplanar beams and a fourth non-coplanar beam. A second tetrahedral-like configuration, with two symmetric non-coplanar beams at the same gantry angle and two coplanar beams, with optimized beam directions, was also tested. The present study shows that when radiobiologically optimized intensity modulated beams are applied to such a geometry, only a marginal increase in the treatment outcome can be achieved by non-coplanar beams compared to the optimal coplanar treatment. The main reason for this result is that the high dose in the beam-overlap regions is already optimally reduced by biologically optimized intensity modulation in the plane. The large number of degrees of freedom already incorporated in the treatment by the use of intensity modulation and radiobiological optimization, leads to the saturation of the benefit acquired by a further increase in the degrees of freedom with non-coplanar beams. In conclusion, the use coplanar of radiobiologically optimized intensity modulation simplifies the dose delivery, reducing the need for non-coplanar beam portals

  17. Bi-objective optimization of a multiple-target active debris removal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérend, Nicolas; Olive, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    The increasing number of space debris in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) raises the question of future Active Debris Removal (ADR) operations. Typical ADR scenarios rely on an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) using one of the two following disposal strategies: the first one consists in attaching a deorbiting kit, such as a solid rocket booster, to the debris after rendezvous; with the second one, the OTV captures the debris and moves it to a low-perigee disposal orbit. For multiple-target ADR scenarios, the design of such a mission is very complex, as it involves two optimization levels: one for the space debris sequence, and a second one for the "elementary" orbit transfer strategy from a released debris to the next one in the sequence. This problem can be seen as a Time-Dependant Traveling Salesman Problem (TDTSP) with two objective functions to minimize: the total mission duration and the total propellant consumption. In order to efficiently solve this problem, ONERA has designed, under CNES contract, TOPAS (Tool for Optimal Planning of ADR Sequence), a tool that implements a Branch & Bound method developed in previous work together with a dedicated algorithm for optimizing the "elementary" orbit transfer. A single run of this tool yields an estimation of the Pareto front of the problem, which exhibits the trade-off between mission duration and propellant consumption. We first detail our solution to cope with the combinatorial explosion of complex ADR scenarios with 10 debris. The key point of this approach is to define the orbit transfer strategy through a small set of parameters, allowing an acceptable compromise between the quality of the optimum solution and the calculation cost. Then we present optimization results obtained for various 10 debris removal scenarios involving a 15-ton OTV, using either the deorbiting kit or the disposal orbit strategy. We show that the advantage of one strategy upon the other depends on the propellant margin, the maximum duration allowed

  18. Electrochemotherapy of tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Rudolf, Z.; Miklavcic, D.

    2006-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy consists of chemotherapy followed by local application of electric pulses to the tumour to increase drug delivery into cells. Drug uptake can be increased by electroporation for only those drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, only bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical trials. In vitro studies demonstrated several fold increase of their cytotoxicity after electroporation of cells. In vivo, electroporation of tumours after local or systemic administration of either of the drugs, i.e. electrochemotherapy, proved to be an effective antitumour treatment. In preclinical studies on several tumour models, electrochemotherapy either with bleomycin or cisplatin was elaborated and parameters for effective local tumour control were determined. In veterinary medicine, electrochemotherapy also proved to be effective in the treatment of primary tumours in cats, dogs and horses. In human clinical studies, electrochemotherapy was performed on the patients with progressive disease and accessible tumour nodules of different malignancies. All clinical studies demonstrated that electrochemotherapy is an effective treatment for local tumour control in cancer patients. (author)

  19. Malignant thyroid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, W.; Reiners, C.

    1987-01-01

    The subjects dealt with at the symposium cover all topical aspects of pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy, and aftercare of the malignant thyroid tumours. A survey of the histological classification of the thyroid tumours and a review of the latest findings concerning the radiocarcinogenesis are followed by a detailed discussion of the most significant tumours. There are also papers dealing with controversial aspects of the histological classification, the value of diagnostic methods, radicality of the therapy, or after care. For five conference papers, separate records are available in the database. (orig./ECB) With 59 figs.; 57 tabs [de

  20. Acetyltransferases and tumour suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, A C; Vousden, Karen H

    2000-01-01

    The acetyltransferase p300 was first identified associated with the adenoviral transforming protein E1A, suggesting a potential role for p300 in the regulation of cell proliferation. Direct evidence demonstrating a role for p300 in human tumours was lacking until the recentl publication by Gayther et al, which strongly supports a role for p300 as a tumour suppressor. The authors identify truncating mutations associated with the loss or mutation of the second allele in both tumour samples and cell lines, suggesting that loss of p300 may play a role in the development of a subset of human cancers

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of the Maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man was diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla. He was treated with total maxillectomy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a close resection margin. The tumour was of high grade with an MIB-1 labelling index of almost 60%. At six weeks following the surgery, he developed local tumour relapse. The patient succumbed to the disease at five months from the time of diagnosis. The present report underlines the locally aggressive nature of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla which necessitates an early therapeutic intervention. A complete resection with clear margins is the most important prognostic factor for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the head and neck region. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered to improve the local control. Future research may demarcate the role of targeted therapy for patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  2. Analyzing the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using optimal assignment algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Kwan S.; Driessen, Brian J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Tovey, Craig A.

    1997-09-01

    This work considers the problem of maximum utilization of a set of mobile robots with limited sensor-range capabilities and limited travel distances. The robots are initially in random positions. A set of robots properly guards or covers a region if every point within the region is within the effective sensor range of at least one vehicle. We wish to move the vehicles into surveillance positions so as to guard or cover a region, while minimizing the maximum distance traveled by any vehicle. This problem can be formulated as an assignment problem, in which we must optimally decide which robot to assign to which slot of a desired matrix of grid points. The cost function is the maximum distance traveled by any robot. Assignment problems can be solved very efficiently. Solution times for one hundred robots took only seconds on a silicon graphics crimson workstation. The initial positions of all the robots can be sampled by a central base station and their newly assigned positions communicated back to the robots. Alternatively, the robots can establish their own coordinate system with the origin fixed at one of the robots and orientation determined by the compass bearing of another robot relative to this robot. This paper presents example solutions to the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using a matching algorithm. Two separate cases with one hundred agents in each were analyzed using this method. We have found these mobile robot problems to be a very interesting application of network optimization methods, and we expect this to be a fruitful area for future research.

  3. Analyzing the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using optimal assignment algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Phillips, C.A.; Tovey, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    This work considers the problem of maximum utilization of a set of mobile robots with limited sensor-range capabilities and limited travel distances. The robots are initially in random positions. A set of robots properly guards or covers a region if every point within the region is within the effective sensor range of at least one vehicle. The authors wish to move the vehicles into surveillance positions so as to guard or cover a region, while minimizing the maximum distance traveled by any vehicle. This problem can be formulated as an assignment problem, in which they must optimally decide which robot to assign to which slot of a desired matrix of grid points. The cost function is the maximum distance traveled by any robot. Assignment problems can be solved very efficiently. Solutions times for one hundred robots took only seconds on a Silicon Graphics Crimson workstation. The initial positions of all the robots can be sampled by a central base station and their newly assigned positions communicated back to the robots. Alternatively, the robots can establish their own coordinate system with the origin fixed at one of the robots and orientation determined by the compass bearing of another robot relative to this robot. This paper presents example solutions to the multiple-target-multiple-agent scenario using a matching algorithm. Two separate cases with one hundred agents in each were analyzed using this method. They have found these mobile robot problems to be a very interesting application of network optimization methods, and they expect this to be a fruitful area for future research

  4. Comparing the Selection and Placement of Best Management Practices in Improving Water Quality Using a Multiobjective Optimization and Targeting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chi Chiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Suites of Best Management Practices (BMPs are usually selected to be economically and environmentally efficient in reducing nonpoint source (NPS pollutants from agricultural areas in a watershed. The objective of this research was to compare the selection and placement of BMPs in a pasture-dominated watershed using multiobjective optimization and targeting methods. Two objective functions were used in the optimization process, which minimize pollutant losses and the BMP placement areas. The optimization tool was an integration of a multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA and a watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool—SWAT. For the targeting method, an optimum BMP option was implemented in critical areas in the watershed that contribute the greatest pollutant losses. A total of 171 BMP combinations, which consist of grazing management, vegetated filter strips (VFS, and poultry litter applications were considered. The results showed that the optimization is less effective when vegetated filter strips (VFS are not considered, and it requires much longer computation times than the targeting method to search for optimum BMPs. Although the targeting method is effective in selecting and placing an optimum BMP, larger areas are needed for BMP implementation to achieve the same pollutant reductions as the optimization method.

  5. Establishment of a biophysical model to optimize endoscopic targeting of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeth, Anjali A; Slabu, Ioana; Baumann, Martin; Alizai, Patrick H; Schmeding, Maximilian; Guentherodt, Gernot; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Neumann, Ulf P

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) may be used for local tumor treatment by coupling them to a drug and accumulating them locally with magnetic field traps, that is, a combination of permanent magnets and coils. Thereafter, an alternating magnetic field generates heat which may be used to release the thermosensitively bound drug and for hyperthermia. Until today, only superficial tumors can be treated with this method. Our aim was to transfer this method into an endoscopic setting to also reach the majority of tumors located inside the body. To find the ideal endoscopic magnetic field trap, which accumulates the most SPION, we first developed a biophysical model considering anatomical as well as physical conditions. Entities of choice were esophageal and prostate cancer. The magnetic susceptibilities of different porcine and rat tissues were measured with a superconducting quantum interference device. All tissues showed diamagnetic behavior. The evaluation of clinical data (computed tomography scan, endosonography, surgical reports, pathological evaluation) of patients gave insight into the topographical relationship between the tumor and its surroundings. Both were used to establish the biophysical model of the tumors and their surroundings, closely mirroring the clinical situation, in which we could virtually design, place and evaluate different electromagnetic coil configurations to find optimized magnetic field traps for each tumor entity. By simulation, we could show that the efficiency of the magnetic field traps can be enhanced by 38-fold for prostate and 8-fold for esophageal cancer. Therefore, our approach of endoscopic targeting is an improvement of the magnetic drug-targeting setups for SPION tumor therapy as it holds the possibility of reaching tumors inside the body in a minimal-invasive way. Future animal experiments must prove these findings in vivo.

  6. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  7. Establishment of a biophysical model to optimize endoscopic targeting of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roeth AA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anjali A Roeth,1,* Ioana Slabu,2,* Martin Baumann,2 Patrick H Alizai,1 Maximilian Schmeding,1 Gernot Guentherodt,3 Thomas Schmitz-Rode,2 Ulf P Neumann1 1Department of General, Visceral and Transplant Surgery, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, 2Institute of Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Aachen, 3Institute of Physics A, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION may be used for local tumor treatment by coupling them to a drug and accumulating them locally with magnetic field traps, that is, a combination of permanent magnets and coils. Thereafter, an alternating magnetic field generates heat which may be used to release the thermosensitively bound drug and for hyperthermia. Until today, only superficial tumors can be treated with this method. Our aim was to transfer this method into an endoscopic setting to also reach the majority of tumors located inside the body. To find the ideal endoscopic magnetic field trap, which accumulates the most SPION, we first developed a biophysical model considering anatomical as well as physical conditions. Entities of choice were esophageal and prostate cancer. The magnetic susceptibilities of different porcine and rat tissues were measured with a superconducting quantum interference device. All tissues showed diamagnetic behavior. The evaluation of clinical data (computed tomography scan, endosonography, surgical reports, pathological evaluation of patients gave insight into the topographical relationship between the tumor and its surroundings. Both were used to establish the biophysical model of the tumors and their surroundings, closely mirroring the clinical situation, in which we could virtually design, place and evaluate different electromagnetic coil configurations to find optimized magnetic field traps for each tumor entity. By simulation, we could show that the

  8. Tumour therapy with radionuclides: assessment of progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Joergen; Forssell Aronsson, Eva; Hietala, Sven-Ola; Stigbrand, Torgny; Tennvall, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a promising modality for treatment of tumours of haematopoietic origin while the success for treatment of solid tumours so far has been limited. The authors consider radionuclide therapy mainly as a method to eradicate disseminated tumour cells and small metastases while bulky tumours and large metastases have to be treated surgically or by external radiation therapy. The promising therapeutic results for haematological tumours give hope that radionuclide therapy will have a breakthrough also for treatment of disseminated cells from solid tumours. New knowledge related to this is continuously emerging since new molecular target structures are being characterised and the knowledge on pharmacokinetics and cellular processing of different types of targeting agents increases. There is also improved understanding of the factors of importance for the choice of appropriate radionuclides with respect to their decay properties and the therapeutic applications. Furthermore, new methods to modify the uptake of radionuclides in tumour cells and normal tissues are emerging. However, we still need improvements regarding dosimetry and treatment planning as well as an increased knowledge about the tolerance doses for normal tissues and the radiobiological effects on tumour cells. This is especially important in targeted radionuclide therapy where the dose rates often are lower than 1 Gy/h

  9. Free-time and fixed end-point multi-target optimal control theory: Application to quantum computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The two-state Deutsch-Jozsa algortihm used to demonstrate the utility of free-time and fixed-end point multi-target optimal control theory. Research highlights: → Free-time and fixed-end point multi-target optimal control theory (FRFP-MTOCT) was constructed. → The features of our theory include optimization of the external time-dependent perturbations with high transition probabilities, that of the temporal duration, the monotonic convergence, and the ability to optimize multiple-laser pulses simultaneously. → The advantage of the theory and a comparison with conventional fixed-time and fixed end-point multi-target optimal control theory (FIFP-MTOCT) are presented by comparing data calculated using the present theory with those published previously [K. Mishima, K. Yamashita, Chem. Phys. 361 (2009) 106]. → The qubit system of our interest consists of two polar NaCl molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. → The calculation examples show that our theory is useful for minor adjustment of the external fields. - Abstract: An extension of free-time and fixed end-point optimal control theory (FRFP-OCT) to monotonically convergent free-time and fixed end-point multi-target optimal control theory (FRFP-MTOCT) is presented. The features of our theory include optimization of the external time-dependent perturbations with high transition probabilities, that of the temporal duration, the monotonic convergence, and the ability to optimize multiple-laser pulses simultaneously. The advantage of the theory and a comparison with conventional fixed-time and fixed end-point multi-target optimal control theory (FIFP-MTOCT) are presented by comparing data calculated using the present theory with those published previously [K. Mishima, K. Yamashita, Chem. Phys. 361, (2009), 106]. The qubit system of our interest consists of two polar NaCl molecules coupled by dipole-dipole interaction. The calculation examples show that our theory is useful for minor

  10. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-dependent pathways control tumour growth and tumour response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Soraya I de; Andrade, Luciana NS; Onuchic, Ana C; Nonogaki, Sueli; Fernandes, Patrícia D; Pinheiro, Mônica C; Rohde, Ciro BS; Chammas, Roger; Jancar, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages induces a suppressor phenotype. Previous data from our group suggested that this occurs via Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R)-mediated pathways. In the present study, we investigated the impact of apoptotic cell inoculation or induction by a chemotherapeutic agent (dacarbazine, DTIC) on tumour growth, microenvironmental parameters and survival, and the effect of treatment with a PAF-R antagonist (WEB2170). These studies were performed in murine tumours: Ehrlich Ascitis Tumour (EAT) and B16F10 melanoma. Tumour growth was assessed by direct counting of EAT cells in the ascitis or by measuring the volume of the solid tumour. Parameters of the tumour microenvironment, such as the frequency of cells expressing cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), caspase-3 and galectin-3, and microvascular density, were determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were determined by ELISA, and levels of nitric oxide (NO) by Griess reaction. PAF-R expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Inoculation of apoptotic cells before EAT implantation stimulated tumour growth. This effect was reversed by in vivo pre-treatment with WEB2170. This treatment also reduced tumour growth and modified the microenvironment by reducing PGE2, VEGF and NO production. In B16F10 melanoma, WEB2170 alone or in association with DTIC significantly reduced tumour volume. Survival of the tumour-bearing mice was not affected by WEB2170 treatment but was significantly improved by the combination of DTIC with WEB2170. Tumour microenvironment elements were among the targets of the combination therapy since the relative frequency of COX-2 and galectin-3 positive cells and the microvascular density within the tumour mass were significantly reduced by treatment with WEB2170 or DTIC alone or in combination. Antibodies to PAF-R stained the cells from inside the tumour, but not the

  11. Optimal management of radial artery grafts in CABG: Patient and target vessel selection and anti-spasm therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwann, Thomas A; Gaudino, Mario; Baldawi, Mustafa; Tranbaugh, Robert; Schwann, Alexandra N; Habib, Robert H

    2018-05-01

    The current literature on radial artery grafting is reviewed focusing on the optimal deployment of radial artery grafts in coronary artery bypass surgery with specific attention to the selection of patients and target vessels for radial artery grafting. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nuclear medicine in childhood tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In recent years the contribution of nuclear medicine has been of increasing interest to paediatric oncology, in particular in imaging for diagnosis, staging and follow-up, in quantitative function analysis of organs at risk during oncological therapy, as well as in radionuclide therapy. For tumour imaging a great number of tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are available, exploiting various metabolic and biological properties of individual tumours; several of these agents can also be applied for radionuclide therapy. More recent tracers allow the characterization of tumours, highlighting features like hormone receptors, hypoxia, MDR and apoptosis. New techniques in paediatric oncology include PET and probe-guided surgery. As a functional modality, nuclear medicine is well suited to monitor the function of organs at risk during treatment in paediatric oncology, in particular cardiac, pulmonary, renal and salivary gland function. A summary of applications and major Indications will be presented. Osteosarcoma: In differentiated osteosarcoma bone scintigraphy/SPECT using 99m Tc-diphosphonate may, as a result of Its targeting the tumour-produced osteoid, visualize not only the primary bone tumour and skeletal metastases, but also the extraosseous metastases. For preoperative therapy nd palliation of metastases beta-emitting bone-seeking agents, such as 89 Sr-chloride, 186 Re-HEDP and 153 Sm-EDTMP, are available. Lymphoma: 67 Ga-citrate has been used for decades in the detection, staging and follow up of lymphoma, as well as for early recognition of response to therapy. 201 TI-chloride scintigraphy/SPECT and PET using 18 F-deoxyglucose can also be used for this purpose. 99m Tc- sestamibi and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin are associated with p-glycoprotein, playing a role in multidrug resistance. In adults with recurrent non Hodgkin lymphoma treatment with 131 l- or 90 Y labelled anti-CD20 antibodies is highly effective. Thyroid carcinoma. 201 TI-chloride scintigraphy

  13. Optimal proteinuria target for renoprotection in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Heon Nam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteinuria is a target for renoprotection in kidney diseases. However, optimal level of proteinuria reduction in IgA nephropathy (IgAN is unknown. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational study in 500 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN. Time-averaged proteinuria (TA-P was calculated as the mean of every 6 month period of measurements of spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio. The study endpoints were a 50% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD, and slope of eGFR. RESULTS: During a median follow-up duration of 65 (12-154 months, a 50% decline in eGFR occurred in 1 (0.8% patient with TA-P of <0.3 g/g compared to 6 (2.7% patients with TA-P of 0.3-0.99 g/g (hazard ratio, 2.82; P = 0.35. Risk of reaching a 50% decline in eGFR markedly increased in patients with TA-P of 1.0-2.99 g/g (P = 0.002 and those with TA-P≥3.0 g/g (P<0.001. ESRD did not occur in patients with TA-P<1.0 g/g compared to 26 (20.0% and 8 (57.1% patients with TA-P of 1.0-2.99 and ≥3.0 g/g, respectively. Kidney function of these two groups deteriorated faster than those with TA-P<1.0 g/g (P<0.001. However, patients with TA-P of 0.3-0.99 g/g had a greater decline of eGFR than patients with TA-P<0.3 g/g (-0.41±1.68 vs. -0.73±2.82 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, P = 0.03. CONCLUSION: In this study, patients with TA-P<1.0 g/g show favorable outcomes. However, given the faster eGFR decline in patients with TA-P of 0.3-0.99 g/g than in patients with TA-P<0.3 g/g, the ultimate optimal goal of proteinuria reduction can be lowered in the management of IgAN.

  14. Finite Element Based Design Optimization of WENDELSTEIN 7-X Divertor Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plankensteiner, A.; Leuprecht, A.; Schedler, B.; Scheiber, K.; Greuner, H.

    2006-01-01

    In the fusion experiment WENDELSTEIN 7-X divertor plasma facing components have to withstand severe loading conditions. In general thermally induced mechanical stressing turns out to be most critical with respect to life time predictions of the component. In the specific case flat tiles of CFC grade NB31 are joined to the precipitation hardened CuCrZr heat sink by employing an active metal cast (AMC)-Cu as an interlayer between CFC and CuCrZr. Residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process act as initial stresses in the subsequent operational heat flux loading. For the latter loading regime these stresses intrinsically are generated due to the large contrast in the CTE for CFC and Cu. Different design variants of those CFC flat tile armoured target elements have been analysed via the finite element package ABAQUS aiming at derivation of an optimized component design. The numerical study comprises variants with different degrees of tessellation of the CFC flat tile section, orientation of the CFC, lamellar design of the AMC-interlayer, and different designs of the cooling channels. The thermo-mechanical material characteristics are accounted for the finite element models with elastic-plastic properties being assigned to the metallic sections CuCrZr and AMC-Cu, respectively, and orthotropic nonlinear-elastic properties being used to the CFC section. The latter has been realized in form of a user-defined material subroutine that is used at the integration point level of the finite element model. In particular, twelve scalar-type damage parameters obeying their own evolution equations with respect to the loading history account for specific stress-strain relationships in the three principal material directions and planes with six damage parameters being used for normal loading under tensile and compressive stress states, respectively, and six parameters being used for shear loading. For the aim of model verification calculated surface temperatures, global

  15. DOA Estimation of Low Altitude Target Based on Adaptive Step Glowworm Swarm Optimization-multiple Signal Classification Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Hao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC algorithm requires significant computational effort and can not be employed for the Direction Of Arrival (DOA estimation of targets in a low-altitude multipath environment. As such, a novel MUSIC approach is proposed on the basis of the algorithm of Adaptive Step Glowworm Swarm Optimization (ASGSO. The virtual spatial smoothing of the matrix formed by each snapshot is used to realize the decorrelation of the multipath signal and the establishment of a fullorder correlation matrix. ASGSO optimizes the function and estimates the elevation of the target. The simulation results suggest that the proposed method can overcome the low altitude multipath effect and estimate the DOA of target readily and precisely without radar effective aperture loss.

  16. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  17. Imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.; Tam, K.F.; Kam, C.K.; Lui, C.Y.; Siu, C.W.; Lam, H.S.; Mak, K.L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) represents the most common kind of mesenchymal tumour that arises from the alimentary tract. GIST is currently defined as a gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal tumour containing spindle cells (or less commonly epithelioid cells or rarely both) and showing CD117 (c-kit protein) positivity. Targeted molecular therapy of non-resectable GIST using imatinib, a specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, represents a real milestone in the management of solid malignancy. Imaging studies, both anatomical and functional, are playing an increasingly important role in management of patients with GIST. This review illustrates the radiological appearance of GISTs and the site-specific roles of each imaging tool. Clinical features and radiological differential diagnosis of GIST are also discussed

  18. Experimental tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    This report of 1984 is the seventh in a series and presents that year's results of continuous studies in the domain of experimental tumour radiotherapy. In the year under review, more personnel has been available for the studies, and the scientific programmes for the assessment of acute and chronic side effects of radiotherapies have been extended. New models have been developed, among them a first system based on animal experiments, for quantifying the mucositis of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa, a limiting condition in the radiotherapy of head and throat tumours. Another significant advancement is a model for quantification of chronical damage to the ureter, which still is a serious problem in the radiotherapy of gynaecological tumours. The 1984 experimental tumour studies have been mainly devoted to the repopulation and split-dose recovery in various tumours, concentrating on dose fractionation as one of the major problems studies. Particular interest has been attached to the processes involved in treatments over several weeks with a daily effective dose of 2 Gy. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 125I-erythropoietin as a potential radiopharmaceutical agent for tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemente, Goncalo dos Santos; Duarte, Vera Lucia Serra

    2011-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein hormone responsible for regulating erythropoiesis. Expression of EPO and EPO receptors (EPOr) has recently been demonstrated in some neoplastic cell lines and tumours, suggesting a potential new target for therapy. In this work, EPO was labeled with iodine-125 using the lactoperoxidase method, known to prevent damage to protein during radioiodination, and labeling conditions were optimized. In vitro stability studies have shown that 125 I-EPO is radiochemically stable for 20 days after radiolabeling. In vitro cell binding studies have demonstrated very low binding ( 125 I-EPO. In mice with induced melanoma, only a residual fixation in the tumour was evident. Further studies are warranted on other tumoral cell lines to better understand the binding process and internalization into cells. Studies on EPO labeled with carbon-11 could be valuable, since there is a greater chance of preserving the biological activity of the protein using this method. (author)

  20. Optimizing labelling conditions of 213Bi-DOTATATE for preclinical applications of peptide receptor targeted alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ho Sze; de Blois, Erik; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Norenberg, Jeffrey P; Verzijlbergen, Fred J; de Jong, Marion; Breeman, Wouter A P

    2017-01-01

    213 Bismuth ( 213 Bi, T 1/2 = 45.6 min) is one of the most frequently used α-emitters in cancer research. High specific activity radioligands are required for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The use of generators containing less than 222 MBq 225 Ac (actinium), due to limited availability and the high cost to produce large-scale 225 Ac/ 213 Bi generators, might complicate in vitro and in vivo applications though.Here we present optimized labelling conditions of a DOTA-peptide with an 225 Ac/ 213 Bi generator (< 222 MBq) for preclinical applications using DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate (DOTATATE), a somatostatin analogue. The following labelling conditions of DOTATATE with 213 Bi were investigated; peptide mass was varied from 1.7 to 7.0 nmol, concentration of TRIS buffer from 0.15 mol.L -1 to 0.34 mol.L -1 , and ascorbic acid from 0 to 71 mmol.L -1 in 800 μL. All reactions were performed at 95 °C for 5 min. After incubation, DTPA (50 nmol) was added to stop the labelling reaction. Besides optimizing the labelling conditions, incorporation yield was determined by ITLC-SG and radiochemical purity (RCP) was monitored by RP-HPLC up to 120 min after labelling. Dosimetry studies in the reaction vial were performed using Monte Carlo and in vitro clonogenic assay was performed with a rat pancreatic tumour cell line, CA20948. At least 3.5 nmol DOTATATE was required to obtain incorporation ≥ 99 % with 100 MBq 213 Bi (at optimized pH conditions, pH 8.3 with 0.15 mol.L -1 TRIS) in a reaction volume of 800 μL. The cumulative absorbed dose in the reaction vial was 230 Gy/100 MBq in 30 min. A minimal final concentration of 0.9 mmol.L -1 ascorbic acid was required for ~100 MBq (t = 0) to minimize radiation damage of DOTATATE. The osmolarity was decreased to 0.45 Osmol/L.Under optimized labelling conditions, 213 Bi-DOTATATE remained stable up to 2 h after labelling, RCP was ≥ 85 %. In vitro showed a negative correlation between ascorbic acid

  1. Colon specific CODES based Piroxicam tablet for colon targeting: statistical optimization, in vivo roentgenography and stability assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Pathak, Kamla

    2015-03-01

    This study was aimed to statistically optimize CODES™ based Piroxicam (PXM) tablet for colon targeting. A 3(2) full factorial design was used for preparation of core tablet that was subsequently coated to get CODES™ based tablet. The experimental design of core tablets comprised of two independent variables: amount of lactulose and PEG 6000, each at three different levels and the dependent variable was %CDR at 12 h. The core tablets were evaluated for pharmacopoeial and non-pharmacopoeial test and coated with optimized levels of Eudragit E100 followed by HPMC K15 and finally with Eudragit S100. The in vitro drug release study of F1-F9 was carried out by change over media method (0.1 N HCl buffer, pH 1.2, phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and phosphate buffer, pH 6.8 with enzyme β-galactosidase 120 IU) to select optimized formulation F9 that was subjected to in vivo roentgenography. Roentgenography study corroborated the in vitro performance, thus providing the proof of concept. The experimental design was validated by extra check point formulation and Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy revealed absence of any interaction between drug and formulation excipients. The shelf life of F9 was deduced as 12 months. Conclusively, colon targeted CODES™ technology based PXM tablets were successfully optimized and its potential of colon targeting was validated by roentgenography.

  2. Approaches to the management of antenatally diagnosed congenital tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahony, Rhona; McParland, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Congenital fetal tumours are rare, but current imaging modalities including US and MRI facilitate antenatal diagnosis and investigation, allowing a presumptive diagnosis and management strategy. Although the prevalence of fetal tumours is difficult to ascertain, an incidence of 7.2 per 100,000 live births has previously been reported, with the incidence of neonatal malignancy estimated at 36.5 per million births. Teratomas and neuroblastomas are the most common solid tumours described. Tumours may be very large or associated with severe hydrops leading to significant dystocia with the potential for difficult vaginal or caesarean delivery. Once the diagnosis of a fetal tumour is made, optimal management incorporates a multidisciplinary approach including obstetrician, neonatologist, paediatric surgeon and paediatric oncologist so that counselling is appropriate and a clear management plan is in place for parents. (orig.)

  3. Approaches to the management of antenatally diagnosed congenital tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, Rhona; McParland, Peter [National Maternity Hospital, Department of Fetal and Maternal Medicine, Dublin (Ireland)

    2009-11-15

    Congenital fetal tumours are rare, but current imaging modalities including US and MRI facilitate antenatal diagnosis and investigation, allowing a presumptive diagnosis and management strategy. Although the prevalence of fetal tumours is difficult to ascertain, an incidence of 7.2 per 100,000 live births has previously been reported, with the incidence of neonatal malignancy estimated at 36.5 per million births. Teratomas and neuroblastomas are the most common solid tumours described. Tumours may be very large or associated with severe hydrops leading to significant dystocia with the potential for difficult vaginal or caesarean delivery. Once the diagnosis of a fetal tumour is made, optimal management incorporates a multidisciplinary approach including obstetrician, neonatologist, paediatric surgeon and paediatric oncologist so that counselling is appropriate and a clear management plan is in place for parents. (orig.)

  4. Geometric optimization of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebello Junior, Andre Luiz P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Golcalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: junior.rebello@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and nd saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs. (author)

  5. Geometric optimization of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebello Junior, Andre Luiz P.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Golcalves, Alessandro C.

    2013-01-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and nd saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs. (author)

  6. Optimization of a liquid hydrogen/deuterium target with extremely thin foil windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nake, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    For external experiments at COSY a target of liquid hydrogen or deuterium has been developed, which is very small in order to take advantage of the excellent beam quality of COSY. Targets with thicknesses down to only mm's have been built and operate without bubbles. In order to make the effects of reactions in the windows much smaller than the target reactions, windows with a thickness of about 1.5 μm have been achieved. A novel system which stabilizes the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the target cell to a small constant value under all target conditions is used. (orig.)

  7. Trajectory Optimization for a Cruising Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Attacking a Target at Back Slope While Subjected to a Wind Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieying Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The trajectory of a tubular launched cruising unmanned aerial vehicle is optimized using the modified direct collocation method for attacking a target at back slope under a wind gradient. A mathematical model of the cruising unmanned aerial vehicle is established based on its operational and motion features under a wind gradient to optimize the trajectory. The motion characteristics of  “altitude adjustment” and “suicide attack” are taken into full account under the combat circumstance of back slope time key targets. By introducing a discrete time function, the trajectory optimization is converted into a nonlinear programming problem and the SNPOT software is applied to solve for the optimal trajectory of the missile under different wind loads. The simulation results show that, for optimized trajectories, the average attack time decreased by up to 29.1% and the energy consumption is reduced by up to 25.9% under specified wind gradient conditions. A, ωdire, and Wmax have an influence on the flight trajectories of cruising unmanned aerial vehicle. This verifies that the application of modified direct collocation method is reasonable and feasible in an effort to achieve more efficient missile trajectories.

  8. Gene transfer preferentially selects MHC class I positive tumour cells and enhances tumour immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich T; Schildhauer, Ines; Barroso, Margarita Céspedes; Kofler, David M; Gerner, Franz M; Mysliwietz, Josef; Buening, Hildegard; Hallek, Michael; King, Susan B S

    2006-05-01

    The modulated expression of MHC class I on tumour tissue is well documented. Although the effect of MHC class I expression on the tumorigenicity and immunogenicity of MHC class I negative tumour cell lines has been rigorously studied, less is known about the validity of gene transfer and selection in cell lines with a mixed MHC class I phenotype. To address this issue we identified a C26 cell subline that consists of distinct populations of MHC class I (H-2D/K) positive and negative cells. Transient transfection experiments using liposome-based transfer showed a lower transgene expression in MHC class I negative cells. In addition, MHC class I negative cells were more sensitive to antibiotic selection. This led to the generation of fully MHC class I positive cell lines. In contrast to C26 cells, all transfectants were rejected in vivo and induced protection against the parental tumour cells in rechallenge experiments. Tumour cell specificity of the immune response was demonstrated in in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. Transfectants expressing CD40 ligand and hygromycin phosphotransferase were not more immunogenic than cells expressing hygromycin resistance alone. We suggest that the MHC class I positive phenotype of the C26 transfectants had a bearing on their immunogenicity, because selected MHC class I positive cells were more immunogenic than parental C26 cells and could induce specific anti-tumour immune responses. These data demonstrate that the generation of tumour cell transfectants can lead to the selection of subpopulations that show an altered phenotype compared to the parental cell line and display altered immunogenicity independent of selection marker genes or other immune modulatory genes. Our results show the importance of monitoring gene transfer in the whole tumour cell population, especially for the evaluation of in vivo therapies targeted to heterogeneous tumour cell populations.

  9. Radiolabelled aptamers for tumour imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Missailidis, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The growth in biotechnology has led to new techniques for the design, selection and production of ligands capable of molecular recognition. One promising approach is the production of specific receptor binding molecules based on specific nucleic acid sequences that are capable of recognising a wide array of target molecules. These oligonuclide ligands are known as aptamers. The technology that allows production of aptamer molecules is known as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). We have used combinatorial chemistry techniques coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to rapidly select aptamers from degenerate libraries that bind with high affinity and specificity to the protein core of the MUC1 antigen, a tumour marker previously extensively used in tumour imaging and therapy. MUC1 is widely expressed by normal glandular epithelial cells, however this expression is dramatically increased when the cells become malignant. This has been well documented for breast and ovarian cancer, as well as some lung, pancreatic and prostate cancers. Recently it has also been shown that MUC1 is a valuable marker for bladder and has been used for the imaging and targeted therapy of bladder cancer. The aptamer selection process was performed on affinity chromatography matrices. After ten rounds of selection and amplification, aptamers were cloned and sequenced. Post SELEX amino modifications have been used to confer nuclease resistance and coupling potential. The aptamers bound to MUC1 antigen with a Kd of 5nm and high specificity, demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy on MUC1-expressing tumour cells. Using peptide coupling reactions, we have successfully attached chelators for Tc-99m radiolabelling. Two of the constructs tested were based on mono-aptamer chelator complexes, one with commercially available MAG3 and one with a novel designed cyclen-based chelator. The other two constructs were based on the use of multi-aptamer complexes

  10. Sensor Networks for Optimal Target Localization with Bearings-Only Measurements in Constrained Three-Dimensional Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Aranda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of an acoustic sensor network that will maximize the angle-related information available for underwater target positioning. In the set-up adopted, a set of autonomous vehicles carries a network of acoustic units that measure the elevation and azimuth angles between a target and each of the receivers on board the vehicles. It is assumed that the angle measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, the variance of which is distance-dependent. Using tools from estimation theory, the problem is converted into that of minimizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, the trace of the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix (also called the Cramer-Rao Bound matrix to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. It is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the intensity of the measurement noise, the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target depth and the probabilistic distribution that defines the prior uncertainty in the target position. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived.

  11. Sensor networks for optimal target localization with bearings-only measurements in constrained three-dimensional scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Salinas, David; Pascoal, Antonio; Aranda, Joaquin

    2013-08-12

    In this paper, we address the problem of determining the optimal geometric configuration of an acoustic sensor network that will maximize the angle-related information available for underwater target positioning. In the set-up adopted, a set of autonomous vehicles carries a network of acoustic units that measure the elevation and azimuth angles between a target and each of the receivers on board the vehicles. It is assumed that the angle measurements are corrupted by white Gaussian noise, the variance of which is distance-dependent. Using tools from estimation theory, the problem is converted into that of minimizing, by proper choice of the sensor positions, the trace of the inverse of the Fisher Information Matrix (also called the Cramer-Rao Bound matrix) to determine the sensor configuration that yields the minimum possible covariance of any unbiased target estimator. It is shown that the optimal configuration of the sensors depends explicitly on the intensity of the measurement noise, the constraints imposed on the sensor configuration, the target depth and the probabilistic distribution that defines the prior uncertainty in the target position. Simulation examples illustrate the key results derived.

  12. [Optimization study on extraction technology of the seed of Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa by orthogonal design with multi-targets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-liang; Zhang, Yu-jie; Chen, Ming-xia; Wang, Ze-feng

    2005-05-01

    To optimize extraction technology of the seed of Ziziphus jujuba var. spinosa with the targets of the total saponin, total jujuboside A and B and total flavonoids. In the method of one-way and orthogonal tests, ethanol concentration, amount of ethanol, extraction time and extraction times were the factors in orthogonal test, and each factor with three levels. Ethanol concentration and extraction times had significant effect on all the targets, other factors should be selected in accordance with production practice. The best extraction technology is to extract for three times with 8 fold ethanol solution (60%), and 1.5 h each time.

  13. Genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, Suppl. 1 (2005), S7 ISSN 1214-021X. [Cells VI - Biological Days /18./. 24.10.2005-26.10.2005, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumour vaccines * HPV16 Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  14. Preferences of the Central Reserve Bank of Peru and optimal monetary rules in the inflation targeting regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Mercedes Cabrera Pasca

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the preferences of the monetary authority in the Peruvian regime of inflation targeting through the derivation of optimal monetary rules. To achieve that, we used a calibration strategy based on the choice of values of the parameters of preferences that minimize the square deviation between the true interest rate and interest rate optimal simulation. The results showed that the monetary authority has applied a system of flexible inflation targeting, prioritizing the stabilization of inflation, but without disregarding gradualism in interest rates. On the other hand, concern over output stabilization has been minimal, revealing that the output gap has been important because it contains information about future inflation and not because it is considered a variable goal in itself. Finally, when the smoothing of the nominal exchange rate is considered in the loss function of the monetary authority, the rank order of preferences has been maintained and the smoothing of the exchange rate proved insignificant.

  15. DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capper, David; Jones, David T.W.; Sill, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging - with substantial inter-observer variabil......Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging - with substantial inter......-observer variability in the histopathological diagnosis of many tumour types. Here we present a comprehensive approach for the DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours across all entities and age groups, and demonstrate its application in a routine diagnostic setting. We show...

  16. Single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing by radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J D

    2003-02-01

    To review the relative importance of the single-hit mechanism of radiation killing for tumour response to 1.8-2.0 Gy day(-1) fractions and to low dose-rate brachytherapy. Tumour cell killing by ionizing radiation is well described by the linear-quadratic equation that contains two independent components distinguished by dose kinetics. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves that contain six or more dose points usually provide good estimates of the alpha- and beta-inactivation coefficients. Superior estimates of tumour cell intrinsic radiosensitivity are obtained when synchronized populations are employed. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation of tumour cells are reviewed and compared with the characteristics of beta-inactivation. Potential molecular targets associated with single-hit inactivation are discussed along with strategies for potentiating cell killing by this mechanism. The single-hit mechanism of tumour cell killing shows no dependence on dose-rate and, consequently, no evidence of sublethal damage repair. It is uniquely potentiated by high linear-energy-transfer radiation, exhibits a smaller oxygen enhancement ratio and exhibits a larger indirect effect by hydroxyl radicals than the beta-mechanism. alpha-inactivation coefficients vary slightly throughout interphase but mitotic cells exhibit extremely high alpha-coefficients in the range of those observed for lymphocytes and some repair-deficient cells. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that chromatin in compacted form could be a radiation-hypersensitive target associated with single-hit radiation killing. Analyses of tumour cell survival curves demonstrate that it is the single-hit mechanism (alpha) that determines the majority of cell killing after doses of 2Gy and that this mechanism is highly variable between tumour cell lines. The characteristics of single-hit inactivation are qualitatively and quantitatively distinct from those of beta-inactivation. Compacted chromatin in tumour cells

  17. Comprehensive Study for an Optimized Redesign of the CERN's Antiproton Decelerator Target

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2089345; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Muñoz-Cobo, Jose-Luis

    2018-04-16

    The Antiproton Decelerator Target (AD-Target) is a unique device responsible for the production of antiprotons at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). During operation, intense 26 GeV energy proton beams are impacted into its core, made of a 3 mm diameter rod of a high density material such as iridium, creating secondary particles -including antiprotons- from the nuclear reactions induced in its interior. This thesis delves into the characteristics of antiproton production and in particular in the mechanical response of the target core material, which is exposed to a rise of temperature of approximate 2000 degrees Celsius in less than 0.5 microseconds each time is impacted by the primary proton beam. A coupled numerical-experimental approach has been applied for this purpose. Specific computational tools, called hydrocodes, have been used for simulating the extreme dynamic response taking place in the target core and its containing graphite matrix, indicating their potential damage and frag...

  18. COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, D P

    2009-06-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.

  19. Optimal strategies for controlling riverine tsetse flies using targets: a modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn A Vale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies occur in much of sub-Saharan Africa where they transmit the trypanosomes that cause the diseases of sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in livestock. One of the most economical and effective methods of tsetse control is the use of insecticide-treated screens, called targets, that simulate hosts. Targets have been ~1 m2, but recently it was shown that those tsetse that occupy riverine situations, and which are the main vectors of sleeping sickness, respond well to targets only ~0.06 m2. The cheapness of these tiny targets suggests the need to reconsider what intensity and duration of target deployments comprise the most cost-effective strategy in various riverine habitats.A deterministic model, written in Excel spreadsheets and managed by Visual Basic for Applications, simulated the births, deaths and movement of tsetse confined to a strip of riverine vegetation composed of segments of habitat in which the tsetse population was either self-sustaining, or not sustainable unless supplemented by immigrants. Results suggested that in many situations the use of tiny targets at high density for just a few months per year would be the most cost-effective strategy for rapidly reducing tsetse densities by the ~90% expected to have a great impact on the incidence of sleeping sickness. Local elimination of tsetse becomes feasible when targets are deployed in isolated situations, or where the only invasion occurs from populations that are not self-sustaining.Seasonal use of tiny targets deserves field trials. The ability to recognise habitat that contains tsetse populations which are not self-sustaining could improve the planning of all methods of tsetse control, against any species, in riverine, savannah or forest situations. Criteria to assist such recognition are suggested.

  20. Impact of uncertain head tissue conductivity in the optimization of transcranial direct current stimulation for an auditory target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Wagner, Sven; Burger, Martin; van Rienen, Ursula; Wolters, Carsten H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique to modify neural excitability. Using multi-array tDCS, we investigate the influence of inter-individually varying head tissue conductivity profiles on optimal electrode configurations for an auditory cortex stimulation. Approach. In order to quantify the uncertainty of the optimal electrode configurations, multi-variate generalized polynomial chaos expansions of the model solutions are used based on uncertain conductivity profiles of the compartments skin, skull, gray matter, and white matter. Stochastic measures, probability density functions, and sensitivity of the quantities of interest are investigated for each electrode and the current density at the target with the resulting stimulation protocols visualized on the head surface. Main results. We demonstrate that the optimized stimulation protocols are only comprised of a few active electrodes, with tolerable deviations in the stimulation amplitude of the anode. However, large deviations in the order of the uncertainty in the conductivity profiles could be noted in the stimulation protocol of the compensating cathodes. Regarding these main stimulation electrodes, the stimulation protocol was most sensitive to uncertainty in skull conductivity. Finally, the probability that the current density amplitude in the auditory cortex target region is supra-threshold was below 50%. Significance. The results suggest that an uncertain conductivity profile in computational models of tDCS can have a substantial influence on the prediction of optimal stimulation protocols for stimulation of the auditory cortex. The investigations carried out in this study present a possibility to predict the probability of providing a therapeutic effect with an optimized electrode system for future auditory clinical and experimental procedures of tDCS applications.

  1. Haemorrhagic pituitary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaro, C.M.; Philippine General Hospital, Manila; Guo, W.Y.; Sami, M.; Hindmarsch, T.; Ericson, K.; Hulting, A.L.; Wersaell, J.

    1994-01-01

    In a group of 69 patients with pituitary tumours, 12 were found to have evidence of intratumoral haemorrhage on MRI, characterized by high signal intensity on short TR/TE sequences. This was verified in all but 1 patient. The majority of the bleedings occurred in macroadenomas. Five (42%) were prolactinomas and 4 (33%) were non-functioning adenomas. There were 2 GH- and 1 ACTH-secreting tumours. All 5 patients with prolactinomas were on bromocriptine medication. Two of the patients had a clinical picture of pituitary apoplexy. The haemorrhage was not large enough to prompt surgery in any of the patients. However, surgical verification of the diagnosis was obtained in 5 cases, while 6 patients were examined with follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  2. Tumours following retinoblastoma radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollot, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Radioinduced tumours in young patients irradiated in childhood for retinoblastoma take on a particularly deadly aspect. The onset of this true clinical entity characterized by a long post-irradiation latency period induced by a dose above 6000 rads is a real tragedy. The vast majority of patients then enter into a long martyrdom ending in death. The only cure is surgical, but seldom possible. Treatment is limited to palliative radiotherapy, effective for a while, and chemiotherapy as a last resort but often difficult to prescribe. Prevention alone is the answer. The quality and reliability of the radiotherapeutic treatment depend not only on the personal talent of the radiotherapist but above all on the standard of the equipment. A strong reduction in the doses employed as well as recent technological progress improving the material, its precision and reproducibility appear already to have lowered the frequency curve of these fatal radioinduced tumours [fr

  3. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  4. Skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base

  5. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy

  6. Malignant salivary gland tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.H. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Oral Pathology)

    1982-08-01

    The most frequent malignant salivary gland tumours are the mucoepidermoid tumour, adenoid cystic carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The major salivary glands and the minor glands of the mouth and upper respiratory tract may potentially develop any of these malignant lesions. Malignant lesions most frequently present as a palpable mass and tend to enlarge more rapidly than benign neoplasms. Pain, paresthesia, muscle paralysis and fixation to surrounding tissue are all ominous signs and symptoms. The only reliable means of differential diagnosis of these lesions is biopsy and histologic analysis. Therapy involves surgery or a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. The ultimate prognosis is governed by the intrinsic biologic behaviour of the neoplasms, the extent of disease and adequate clinical therapy.

  7. Power utility generation portfolio optimization as function of specific RES and decarbonisation targets – EPBiH case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazagic, Anes; Merzic, Ajla; Redzic, Elma; Music, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Guidelines for power utilities to reach specific decarbonisation targets offered. • Optimization model of RES share to be introduced into power system is proposed. • Single criteria analysis and multicriteria sustainability assessment are applied. • The optimization method has been demonstrated on a real power system. • In the considered case, HIGH RES scenario showed to be the preferable one. - Abstract: This paper provides guidelines and principles for power utilities to reach specific energy and decarbonisation targets. Method of power generation portfolio optimization, as function of sustainability and decarbonisation, along with appropriate criteria, has been proposed. Application of this optimization method has been demonstrated on a real power system – power utility JP Elektroprivreda BiH d.d. – Sarajevo (EPBiH), a typical example of South East European power system. The software tool WASP IV has been employed in the analysis, in order to define the dynamics and an optimized expansion of generation portfolio of the power system under consideration for the next period. The mid-term generation portfolio development plan for the EPBiH power system until year 2030 has been made during this research, taking into account the shutdown dynamics of existing power units and commissioning new ones, in order to provide safe supply of electric and heat energy for local consumers. Three basic scenario of renewable energy sources (RES) expansion have been analysed to reach specific RES and decarbonisation targets set for 2030, including RES share increase from the current level of 18% up to 35% (LOW RES), 45% (MID RES) and 55% (HIGH RES). Effects to the sustainability are considered through environmental, economic and social indicators. Multicriteria sustainability assessment gave an advantage to the HIGH RES, under assumption of equal weighting factors of economic and environment groups of indicators. Also, single criteria analysis has been

  8. Imaging brain tumour microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Markus; Englund, Elisabet; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Sundgren, Pia C

    2018-05-08

    Imaging is an indispensable tool for brain tumour diagnosis, surgical planning, and follow-up. Definite diagnosis, however, often demands histopathological analysis of microscopic features of tissue samples, which have to be obtained by invasive means. A non-invasive alternative may be to probe corresponding microscopic tissue characteristics by MRI, or so called 'microstructure imaging'. The promise of microstructure imaging is one of 'virtual biopsy' with the goal to offset the need for invasive procedures in favour of imaging that can guide pre-surgical planning and can be repeated longitudinally to monitor and predict treatment response. The exploration of such methods is motivated by the striking link between parameters from MRI and tumour histology, for example the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient and cellularity. Recent microstructure imaging techniques probe even more subtle and specific features, providing parameters associated to cell shape, size, permeability, and volume distributions. However, the range of scenarios in which these techniques provide reliable imaging biomarkers that can be used to test medical hypotheses or support clinical decisions is yet unknown. Accurate microstructure imaging may moreover require acquisitions that go beyond conventional data acquisition strategies. This review covers a wide range of candidate microstructure imaging methods based on diffusion MRI and relaxometry, and explores advantages, challenges, and potential pitfalls in brain tumour microstructure imaging. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Delineation of the primary tumour Clinical Target Volumes (CTV-P) in laryngeal, hypopharyngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: AIRO, CACA, DAHANCA, EORTC, GEORCC, GORTEC, HKNPCSG, HNCIG, IAG-KHT, LPRHHT, NCIC CTG, NCRI, NRG Oncology, PHNS, SBRT, SOMERA, SRO, SSHNO, TROG consensus guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Vincent; Evans, Mererid; Le, Quynh-Thu; Bourhis, Jean; Budach, Volker; Chen, Amy; Eisbruch, Abraham; Feng, Mei; Giralt, Jordi; Gupta, Tejpal; Hamoir, Marc; Helito, Juliana K; Hu, Chaosu; Hunter, Keith; Johansen, Jorgen; Kaanders, Johannes; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Lee, Anne; Maingon, Philippe; Mäkitie, Antti; Micciche', Francesco; Nicolai, Piero; O'Sullivan, Brian; Poitevin, Adela; Porceddu, Sandro; Składowski, Krzysztof; Tribius, Silke; Waldron, John; Wee, Joseph; Yao, Min; Yom, Sue S; Zimmermann, Frank; Grau, Cai

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have reported large inter-observer variations in target volume selection and delineation in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Consensus guidelines have been published for the neck nodes (see Grégoire et al., 2003, 2014), but such recommendations are lacking for primary tumour delineation. For the latter, two main schools of thoughts are prevailing, one based on geometric expansion of the Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) as promoted by DAHANCA, and the other one based on anatomical expansion of the GTV using compartmentalization of head and neck anatomy. For each anatomic location within the larynx, hypopharynx, oropharynx and oral cavity, and for each T-stage, the DAHANCA proposal has been comprehensively reviewed and edited to include anatomic knowledge into the geometric Clinical Target Volume (CTV) delineation concept. A first proposal was put forward by the leading authors of this publication (VG and CG) and discussed with opinion leaders in head and neck radiation oncology from Europe, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, North America and South America to reach a worldwide consensus. This consensus proposes two CTVs for the primary tumour, the so called CTV-P1 and CVT-P2, corresponding to a high and lower tumour burden, and which should be associated with a high and a lower dose prescription, respectively. Implementation of these guidelines in the daily practice of radiation oncology should contribute to reduce treatment variations from clinicians to clinicians, facilitate the conduct of multi-institutional clinical trials, and contribute to improved care of patients with head and neck carcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal structure of particles-based superparamagnetic microrobots: application to MRI guided targeted drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellal, Lyès; Belharet, Karim; Folio, David; Ferreira, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an optimal design strategy for therapeutic magnetic micro carriers (TMMC) guided in real time by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. As aggregates of TMMCs must be formed to carry the most amount of drug and magnetic actuation capability, different clustering agglomerations could be arranged. Nevertheless, its difficult to predict the hydrodynamic behavior of any arbitrary-shaped object due to the nonlinear hydrodynamic effects. Indeed, the drag effect is related not only to the properties of the bolus but also to its interaction with the fluid viscosity, the free-stream velocity and the container geometry. In this work, we propose a mathematical framework to optimize the TMMC aggregates to improve the steering efficiency in experimental endovascular conditions. The proposed analysis is carried out on various sizes and geometries of microcarrier: spherical, ellipsoid-like, and chain-like of microsphere structures. We analyze the magnetophoretic behavior of such designs to exhibit the optimal configuration. Based on the optimal design of the boluses, experimental investigations were carried out in mm-sized fluidic artery phantoms to demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus using a proof-of-concept setup. The experiments demonstrate the steerability of the magnetic bolus under different velocity, shear-stress, and trajectory constraints with a laminar viscous fluidic environment. Preliminary experiments with a MRI system confirm the feasibility of the steering of these TMMCs in hepatic artery microchannel phantom

  12. The Optimal Conditions for Form-Focused Instruction: Method, Target Complexity, and Types of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-eun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates optimal conditions for form-focused instruction (FFI) by considering effects of internal (i.e., timing and types of FFI) and external (i.e., complexity and familiarity) variables of FFI when it is offered within a primarily meaning-focused context of adult second language (L2) learning. Ninety-two Korean-speaking…

  13. Optimization of the target system for the hypernuclear experiment at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Gamma spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei will be one of the main topics addressed by the PANDA experiment at the planned FAIR-facility at Darmstadt, Germany. For this project a dedicated hypernuclear detector setup will be installed. In addition to the general purpose of the PANDA detector it consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of Ξ{sup -} + anti Ξ pairs, a secondary active target for the formation of hypernuclei and the identification of associated decay products as well as a germanium detector array to perform γ spectroscopy. Results of the current hardware development will be presented in the talk: For the positioning of the primary filament target in the beam halo the functionality of piezo motors is investigated in vacuum. Stability tests of the primary target chamber are performed with various thin materials. For the secondary target the readout of silicon microstrip detectors with ultra-thin flexible cables is checked to fan out the readout electronics. Furthermore, design studies of support structures for the whole detector setup are considered. On the simulation side a compromise between the stopping probability of Ξ{sup -} hyperons and the reconstruction accuracy of weak decay pions is discussed.

  14. Numerical optimization of targeted delivery of charged nanoparticles to the ostiomeatal complex for treatment of rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jinxiang Xi,1 Jiayao Eddie Yuan,1 Xiuhua April Si,2 James Hasbany1 1School of Engineering and Technology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI, 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, California Baptist University, Riverside, CA, USA Background: Despite the prevalence of rhinosinusitis that affects 10%–15% of the population, current inhalation therapy shows limited efficacy. Standard devices deliver <5% of the drugs to the sinuses due to the complexity of nose structure, secluded location of the sinus, poor ventilation, and lack of control of particle motions inside the nasal cavity. Methods: An electric-guided delivery system was developed to guide charged particles to the ostiomeatal complex (OMC. Its performance was numerically assessed in an MRI-based nose–sinus model. Key design variables related to the delivery device, drug particles, and patient breathing were determined using sensitivity analysis. A two-stage optimization of design variables was conducted to obtain the best performance of the delivery system using the Nelder-Mead algorithm. Results and discussion: The OMC delivery system exhibited high sensitivity to the applied electric field and electrostatic charges carried by the particles. Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses. An OMC delivery efficiency of 72.4% was obtained with the optimized design, which is one order of magnitude higher than the standard nasal devices. Moreover, optimization is imperative to achieve a sound delivery protocol because of the large number of design variables. The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system. The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region

  15. Evaluating the agreement between tumour volumetry and the estimated volumes of tumour lesions using an algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubender, Ruediger P. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lynghjem, Julia; D' Anastasi, Melvin; Graser, Anno [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker; Modest, Dominik P. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Department of Medical Oncology, Munich (Germany); Mansmann, Ulrich R. [University Hospital Munich - Campus Grosshadern, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Sartorius, Ute; Schlichting, Michael [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To evaluate the agreement between tumour volume derived from semiautomated volumetry (SaV) and tumor volume defined by spherical volume using longest lesion diameter (LD) according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or ellipsoid volume using LD and longest orthogonal diameter (LOD) according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Twenty patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the CIOX trial were included. A total of 151 target lesions were defined by baseline computed tomography and followed until disease progression. All assessments were performed by a single reader. A variance component model was used to compare the three volume versions. There was a significant difference between the SaV and RECIST-based tumour volumes. The same model showed no significant difference between the SaV and WHO-based volumes. Scatter plots showed that the RECIST-based volumes overestimate lesion volume. The agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume, evaluated by intraclass correlation, showed nearly perfect agreement. Estimating the volume of metastatic lesions using both the LD and LOD (WHO) is more accurate than those based on LD only (RECIST), which overestimates lesion volume. The good agreement between the SaV and WHO-based relative changes in tumour volume enables a reasonable approximation of three-dimensional tumour burden. (orig.)

  16. Computation of the target state and feedback controls for time optimal consensus in multi-agent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Ameer K.; Patil, Deepak U.; Chakraborty, Debraj

    2018-02-01

    N identical agents with bounded inputs aim to reach a common target state (consensus) in the minimum possible time. Algorithms for computing this time-optimal consensus point, the control law to be used by each agent and the time taken for the consensus to occur, are proposed. Two types of multi-agent systems are considered, namely (1) coupled single-integrator agents on a plane and, (2) double-integrator agents on a line. At the initial time instant, each agent is assumed to have access to the state information of all the other agents. An algorithm, using convexity of attainable sets and Helly's theorem, is proposed, to compute the final consensus target state and the minimum time to achieve this consensus. Further, parts of the computation are parallelised amongst the agents such that each agent has to perform computations of O(N2) run time complexity. Finally, local feedback time-optimal control laws are synthesised to drive each agent to the target point in minimum time. During this part of the operation, the controller for each agent uses measurements of only its own states and does not need to communicate with any neighbouring agents.

  17. Optimization of ISOL targets based on Monte-Carlo simulations of ion release curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha, B.; Nolen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed model for simulating release curves from ISOL targets has been developed. The full 3D geometry is implemented using Geant-4. Produced particles are followed individually from production to release. The delay time is computed event by event. All processes involved: diffusion, effusion and decay are included to obtain the overall release curve. By fitting to the experimental data, important parameters of the release process (diffusion coefficient, sticking time, ...) are extracted. They can be used to improve the efficiency of existing targets and design new ones more suitable to produce beams of rare isotopes

  18. Optimization of ISOL targets based on Monte-Carlo simulations of ion release curves

    CERN Document Server

    Mustapha, B

    2003-01-01

    A detailed model for simulating release curves from ISOL targets has been developed. The full 3D geometry is implemented using Geant-4. Produced particles are followed individually from production to release. The delay time is computed event by event. All processes involved: diffusion, effusion and decay are included to obtain the overall release curve. By fitting to the experimental data, important parameters of the release process (diffusion coefficient, sticking time, ...) are extracted. They can be used to improve the efficiency of existing targets and design new ones more suitable to produce beams of rare isotopes.

  19. Impact of Targeted Preoperative Optimization on Clinical Outcome in Emergency Abdominal Surgeries: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Debbarma, Miltan; Narang, Neeraj; Saxena, Anudeep; Mahobia, Mamta; Tomar, Gaurav Singh

    2018-01-01

    Perforation peritonitis continues to be one of the most common surgical emergencies that need a surgical intervention most of the times. Anesthesiologists are invariably involved in managing such cases efficiently in perioperative period. The assessment and evaluation of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at presentation and 24 h after goal-directed optimization, administration of empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics, and definitive source control postoperatively. Outcome assessment in terms of duration of hospital stay and mortality in with or without optimization was also measured. It is a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study in hospital setting. One hundred and one patients aged ≥18 years, of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II (E) with clinical diagnosis of perforation peritonitis posted for surgery were enrolled. Enrolled patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A is optimized by goal-directed optimization protocol in the preoperative holding room by anesthesiology residents whereas in Group S, managed by surgery residents in the surgical wards without any fixed algorithm. The assessment of APACHE II score was done as a first step on admission and 24 h postoperatively. Duration of hospital stay and mortality in both the groups were also measured and compared. Categorical data are presented as frequency counts (percent) and compared using the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The statistical significance for categorical variables was determined by Chi-square analysis. For continuous variables, a two-sample t -test was applied. The mean APACHE II score on admission in case and control groups was comparable. Significant lowering of serial scores in case group was observed as compared to control group ( P = 0.02). There was a significant lowering of mean duration of hospital stay seen in case group (9.8 ± 1.7 days) as compared to control group ( P = 0

  20. Optimal MRI methods for direct stereotactic targeting of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Gorman, Ruth L.; Shmueli, Karin; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Selway, Richard P.; Samuel, Michael; Lythgoe, David J.; Shahidiani, Asal; Wastling, Stephen J.; Footman, Michelle; Jarosz, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Reliable identification of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) is critical for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of these structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the visibility of the STN and GPi with various MRI techniques and to assess the suitability of each technique for direct stereotactic targeting. MR images were acquired from nine volunteers with T2- and proton density-weighted (PD-W) fast spin echo, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), phase-sensitive inversion recovery and quantitative T1, T2 and T2 * mapping sequences. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for the STN and GPi were calculated for all sequences. Targeting errors on SWI were evaluated on magnetic susceptibility maps. The sequences demonstrating the best conspicuity of DBS target structures (SWI and T2*) were then applied to ten patients with movement disorders, and the CNRs for these techniques were assessed. SWI offers the highest CNR for the STN, but standard PD-W images provide the best CNR for the pallidum. Susceptibility maps indicated that the GPi margins may be shifted slightly on SWI, although no shifts were seen for the STN. SWI may improve the visibility of the STN on pre-operative MRI, potentially improving the accuracy of direct stereotactic targeting. (orig.)

  1. Optimization of the target system for the hypernuclear experiment at anti PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Turin (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    Gamma spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei will be one of the main topics addressed by the anti PANDA experiment at the planned FAIR-Facility at Darmstadt, Germany. For this project a dedicated hypernuclear detector setup will be installed. In addition to the general purpose of the anti PANDA detector it consists of a primary nuclear target for the production of Ξ{sup -}+ anti Ξ pairs, a secondary active target for the formation of hypernuclei and the identification of associated decay products as well as a germanium detector array to perform γ spectroscopy. In order to stop the Ξ{sup -} particles and track pions from the decay of the produced hypernuclei, the secondary target is composed as a compact structure of silicon microstrip detectors and absorber material. Results of the current hardware development will be presented on the poster including stability tests for the primary target chamber, the readout of silicon microstrip detectors with ultra-thin flexible cables to fan out the readout electronics and design studies of support structures for the whole detector setup. On the simulation side a compromise between the stopping of Ξ{sup -} hyperons and the reconstruction accuracy of weak decay pions is discussed.

  2. Calculation of the Target Lumbar Lordosis Angle for Restoring an Optimal Pelvic Tilt in Elderly Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Yu; Hasegawa, Tomohiko; Kobayashi, Sho; Yasuda, Tatsuya; Togawa, Daisuke; Arima, Hideyuki; Oe, Shin; Iida, Takahiro; Matsumura, Akira; Hosogane, Naobumi; Matsumoto, Morio; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    This investigation consisted of a cross-sectional study and a retrospective multicenter case series. This investigation sought to identify the ideal lumbar lordosis (LL) angle for restoring an optimal pelvic tilt (PT) in patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). To achieve successful corrective fusion in ASD patients with sagittal imbalance, it is essential to correct the sagittal spinal alignment and obtain a suitable pelvic inclination. We determined the LL angle that would restore the optimal PT following ASD surgery. The cross-sectional study included 184 elderly volunteers (mean age 64 years) with an Oswestry Disability Index score less than 20%. The relationship between PT or LL and the pelvic incidence (PI) in normal individuals was investigated. The second study included 116 ASD patients (mean age 66 years) who underwent thoracolumbar corrective fusion at 1 of 4 spine centers. The postoperative PT values were calculated using the parameters measured. On the basis of these studies, an ideal LL angle was determined. In the cross-sectional study, the linear regression equation for the optimal PT as a function of PI was "optimal PT = 0.47 × PI - 7.5." In the second study, the postoperative PT was determined as a function of PI and corrected LL, using the equation "postoperative PT = 0.7 × PI - 0.5 × corrected LL + 8.1." The target LL angle was determined by mathematically equalizing the PTs of these 2 equations: "target LL = 0.45 × PI + 31.8." The ideal LL angle can be determined using the equation "LL = 0.45 × PI + 31.8," which can be used as a reference during surgical planning in ASD cases. 4.

  3. Thin-target excitation functions: a powerful tool for optimizing yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity of cyclotron produced radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonardi, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    loci of the maxima of Y(E,ΔE) curves are present in most cases. As a relevant conclusion, use of target thickness larger than the 'effective' value, is unsuitable from technological point of view, due to larger power density deposited by the beam in target material itself, instead of target cooling system. Finally, this set of Thick-Target Yields and maxima permits calculating the optimum irradiation conditions to produce radionuclides with higher as possible yield, radionuclidic purity and specific activity. In order to join the advantages of the accurate knowledge of thin-target excitation functions and cross-sections of radionuclide of interest and its radioisotopic impurities, very selective radiochemical separations were optimized to separate the radionuclide itself from the irradiated target without any addition of isotopic carrier. A large number of very high specific activity radionuclides for environmental, toxicological and biomedical research applications have been produced in No Carrier Added form, by medium energy proton, deuteron and alpha accelerating cyclotrons. Some practical examples of radionuclides produced recently are presented. (author)

  4. An Optimized GD2-Targeting Retroviral Cassette for More Potent and Safer Cellular Therapy of Neuroblastoma and Other Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Thomas

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the commonest extra cranial solid cancer of childhood. Despite escalation of treatment regimens, a significant minority of patients die of their disease. Disialoganglioside (GD2 is consistently expressed at high-levels in neuroblastoma tumors, which have been targeted with some success using therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. GD2 is also expressed in a range of other cancer but with the exception of some peripheral nerves is largely absent from non-transformed tissues. Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs are artificial type I proteins which graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T-cell. Clinical data with early CAR designs directed against GD2 have shown some promise in Neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a GD2-targeting CAR retroviral cassette, which has been optimized for CAR T-cell persistence, efficacy and safety.

  5. Vaginal haemangioendothelioma: an unusual tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, H

    2012-02-01

    Vaginal tumours are uncommon and this is a particularly rare case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma in a 38-year-old woman. Initial presentation consisted of symptoms similar to uterovaginal prolapse with "something coming down". Examination under anaesthesia demonstrated a necrotic anterior vaginal wall tumour. Histology of the lesion revealed a haemangioendothelioma which had some features of haemangiopericytoma. While the natural history of vaginal haemangioendothelioma is uncertain, as a group, they have a propensity for local recurrence. To our knowledge this is the third reported case of a vaginal haemangioendothelioma. Management of this tumour is challenging given the paucity of literature on this tumour. There is a need to add rare tumours to our "knowledge bank" to guide management of these unusual tumours.

  6. Expression proteomics study to determine metallodrug targets and optimal drug combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ronald F S; Chernobrovkin, Alexey; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Allardyce, Claire S; Hacker, David; Johnsson, Kai; Zubarev, Roman A; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-05-08

    The emerging technique termed functional identification of target by expression proteomics (FITExP) has been shown to identify the key protein targets of anti-cancer drugs. Here, we use this approach to elucidate the proteins involved in the mechanism of action of two ruthenium(II)-based anti-cancer compounds, RAPTA-T and RAPTA-EA in breast cancer cells, revealing significant differences in the proteins upregulated. RAPTA-T causes upregulation of multiple proteins suggesting a broad mechanism of action involving suppression of both metastasis and tumorigenicity. RAPTA-EA bearing a GST inhibiting ethacrynic acid moiety, causes upregulation of mainly oxidative stress related proteins. The approach used in this work could be applied to the prediction of effective drug combinations to test in cancer chemotherapy clinical trials.

  7. Development and optimization of targeted radionuclide tumor therapy using folate based radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Josefine Astrid

    The folate receptor (FR) has been used for a quarter of a century as a tumor-associated target for selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents to cancer cells. While several folic acid radioconjugates have been successfully employed for imaging purposes in (pre)clinical studies, a therapeutic application of folic acid radioconjugates has not yet reached the critical stage which would allow a clinical translation. Due to a substantial expression of the FR in the proximal tubule cells, radiofolates accumulate in the kidneys which are at risk of damage by particle-radiation. To improve this situation, we aimed to develop and evaluate strategies for the performance of FR-targeted radionuclide therapy by decreasing the renal uptake of radiofolates and thereby reducing potential nephrotoxic effects. Two different strategies were investigated. First, the combination of radiofolates with chemotherapeutic agents such as pemetrexed (PMX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and secondly, an approach based on radioiodinated fol...

  8. Optimizations of siRNA design for the activation of gene transcription by targeting the TATA-box motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Fan

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs are widely used to repress gene expression by targeting mRNAs. Some reports reveal that siRNAs can also activate or inhibit gene expression through targeting the gene promoters. Our group has found that microRNAs (miRNAs could activate gene transcription via interaction with the TATA-box motif in gene promoters. To investigate whether siRNA targeting the same region could upregulate the promoter activity, we test the activating efficiency of siRNAs targeting the TATA-box motif of 16 genes and perform a systematic analysis to identify the common features of the functional siRNAs for effective activation of gene promoters. Further, we try various modifications to improve the activating efficiency of siRNAs and find that it is quite useful to design the promoter-targeting activating siRNA by following several rules such as (a complementary to the TATA-box-centered region; (b UA usage at the first two bases of the antisense strand; (c twenty-three nucleotides (nts in length; (d 2'-O-Methyl (2'-OMe modification at the 3' terminus of the antisense strand; (e avoiding mismatches at the 3' end of the antisense strand. The optimized activating siRNAs potently enhance the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2 gene in human and mouse primary CD4+ T cells with a long-time effect. Taken together, our study provides a guideline for rational design the promoter-targeting siRNA to sequence-specifically enhance gene expression.

  9. An Adaptive Moving Target Imaging Method for Bistatic Forward-Looking SAR Using Keystone Transform and Optimization NLCS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyu; Wu, Junjie; Huang, Yulin; Yang, Haiguang; Yang, Jianyu

    2017-01-23

    Bistatic forward-looking SAR (BFSAR) is a kind of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system that can image forward-looking terrain in the flight direction of an aircraft. Until now, BFSAR imaging theories and methods for a stationary scene have been researched thoroughly. However, for moving-target imaging with BFSAR, the non-cooperative movement of the moving target induces some new issues: (I) large and unknown range cell migration (RCM) (including range walk and high-order RCM); (II) the spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters (including the Doppler centroid and high-order Doppler) are not only unknown, but also nonlinear for different point-scatterers. In this paper, we put forward an adaptive moving-target imaging method for BFSAR. First, the large and unknown range walk is corrected by applying keystone transform over the whole received echo, and then, the relationships among the unknown high-order RCM, the nonlinear spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters, and the speed of the mover, are established. After that, using an optimization nonlinear chirp scaling (NLCS) technique, not only can the unknown high-order RCM be accurately corrected, but also the nonlinear spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters can be balanced. At last, a high-order polynomial filter is applied to compress the whole azimuth data of the moving target. Numerical simulations verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Tertiary particle production and target optimization of the H2 beam line in the SPS North Area

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079540; Tellander, Felix; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    In this note, the tertiary particle yield from secondary targets of different materials placed at the ‘filter’ position of the H2 beam line of SPS North Area are presented. The production is studied for secondary beams of different momenta in the range of 50-250 GeV/c. More specifically, we studied six different targets: two copper cylinders with a radius of 40 mm and lengths of 100 and 300 mm, one solid tungsten cylinder with a radius of 40 mm and a length of 150 mm and three polyethylene cylinders with radius of 40 mm and lengths of 550, 700 and 1000 mm. Eight different momenta of the secondary beam (50, 60, 70, 100, 120, 150, 200 and 250 GeV/c) as well as two different physics lists (QGSP_BIC and FTFP_BERT) have been extensively studied. The purpose of this study is (a) to optimize (using the appropriate filter target) the particle production from the secondary targets as demanded by the experiments (b) investigate the proton production (with respect to the pion production) in the produced tertiary bea...

  11. An Adaptive Moving Target Imaging Method for Bistatic Forward-Looking SAR Using Keystone Transform and Optimization NLCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic forward-looking SAR (BFSAR is a kind of bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR system that can image forward-looking terrain in the flight direction of an aircraft. Until now, BFSAR imaging theories and methods for a stationary scene have been researched thoroughly. However, for moving-target imaging with BFSAR, the non-cooperative movement of the moving target induces some new issues: (I large and unknown range cell migration (RCM (including range walk and high-order RCM; (II the spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters (including the Doppler centroid and high-order Doppler are not only unknown, but also nonlinear for different point-scatterers. In this paper, we put forward an adaptive moving-target imaging method for BFSAR. First, the large and unknown range walk is corrected by applying keystone transform over the whole received echo, and then, the relationships among the unknown high-order RCM, the nonlinear spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters, and the speed of the mover, are established. After that, using an optimization nonlinear chirp scaling (NLCS technique, not only can the unknown high-order RCM be accurately corrected, but also the nonlinear spatial-variances of the Doppler parameters can be balanced. At last, a high-order polynomial filter is applied to compress the whole azimuth data of the moving target. Numerical simulations verify the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Primary bone tumours in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Cohen, D.H.; Padovani, J.; Tamaela, L.; Azouz, M.; Bale, P.; Martin, H.C.; Nayanar, V.V.; Arico, M.

    1985-09-01

    Ten cases of primary bone tumours in infants (1 osteosarcoma, 3 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 chondroblastoma and 5 angiomastosis) are reported. All cases of angiomatosis showed characteristic radiographic findings. In all the other tumours the X-ray appearances were different from those usually seen in older children and adolescents. In the auhtors' opinion the precise diagnosis of malignant bone tumours in infancy is very difficult as no characteristic X-ray features are present in this age period.

  13. Radiological diagnosis of liver tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstedt, C.

    1987-01-01

    Sixty patients treated with an intra-arterial cytostatic drug for metastases from colo-rectal carcinoma were evaluated with angiography to determine prognostic parameters. The extent of tumour in the liver and an unchanged or diminished tumour volume following treatment, as demonstrated with angiography, were associated with significant prolongation of survival. Patients who developed occlusion of the hepatic artery or of branches of the portal vein, also survived longer. 189 patients examined with angiography, 161 with computed tomography (CT), 95 with computed tomographic arteriography (CTA) and 71 with ultrasound (US) were subjected to liver evaluation at laparotomy consisting of inspection and palpation. The result of this surgical liver evaluation was for the purpose of the study regarded as completely accurate and was used to assess the accuracy of the different radiological methods. The location of tumour in the liver lobes or segments was analysed, with a separate evaluation of the right and left liver lobes. The rate of detection of individual tumour nodules was also determined. Angiography detected 55% of liver areas affected by tumour and 47% of individual tumour nodules. CT detected 83% of liver lobes or segments containing tumour, and 70% of the tumour nodules. US detected 69% of the portions of liver holding tumour, and also 69% of the tumour nodules. CTA detected 85% of tumours areas and 74% of separate tumour nodules. Some lesions detected with CT were not seen with CTA and vice versa. More false-positive results were recorded with CTA than with CT using intravenous contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  14. Royal Society Scientific Meeting: Extracellular vesicles in the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Ryan Charles; Elmusrati, Areeg A; Lambert, Daniel; Carter, David Raul Francisco

    2018-01-05

    Cancer cells do not grow as an isolated homogeneous mass; tumours are, in fact, complex and heterogeneous collections of cancer and surrounding stromal cells, collectively termed the tumour microenvironment. The interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment has emerged as a key concept in the regulation of cancer progression. Understanding the intercellular dialogue in the tumour microenvironment is therefore an important goal. One aspect of this dialogue that has not been appreciated until recently is the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are small vesicles released by cells under both normal and pathological conditions; they can transfer biological molecules between cells leading to changes in phenotype. EVs have emerged as important regulators of biological processes and can be dysregulated in diseases such as cancer; rapidly growing interest in their biology and therapeutic potential led to the Royal Society hosting a Scientific Meeting to explore the roles of EVs in the tumour microenvironment. This cross-disciplinary meeting explored examples of how aberrant crosstalk between tumour and stromal cells can promote cancer progression, and how such signalling can be targeted for diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic benefit. In this review, and the special edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that follows, we will provide an overview of the content and outcomes of this exciting meeting.This article is part of the discussion meeting issue 'Extracellular vesicles and the tumour microenvironment'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. The Search for Biosignatures on Mars: Using Predictive Geology to Optimize Exploration Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Allen, Carlton C.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting geologic context from satellite data is a method used on Earth for exploration in areas with limited ground truth. The method can be used to predict facies likely to contain organic-rich shales. Such shales concentrate and preserve organics and are major repositories of organic biosignatures on Earth [1]. Since current surface conditions on Mars are unfavorable for development of abundant life or for preservation of organic remains of past life, the chances are low of encountering organics in surface samples. Thus, focusing martian exploration on sites predicted to contain organic-rich shales would optimize the chances of discovering evidence of life, if it ever existed on that planet.

  16. Neurohypophysis granular cell tumours. Upon neurohypophysis rare tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrande, G.; Kujas, M.; Gancel, A.; Turpin, G.; Bruckert, E.; Kuhn, J.M.; Luton, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Granular cell tumours of neurohypophysis are rare. These tumours are more often encountered as incidental autopsy findings seen in up to 17 % of unselected adult autopsy cases. There are few reports of para-sellar granular cell tumours large enough to cause symptoms. We present three cases of neurohypophysis granular cell tumour and a review of the literature. In one patient, the asymptomatic granular cell tumour was incidentally discovered at surgical removal of a corticotrophic micro-adenoma. The remaining 2 patients had a symptomatic tumour which caused neurological symptoms such as visual disturbance and headaches and endocrine disorders such as hypopituitarism or hyper-prolactinaemia. In these 2 cases, computerized tomography showed a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhanced, intra-sellar and supra-sellar mass. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an isointense gadolinium-enhanced mass in T1-weighted-images. Trans-sphenoidal partial resection was performed and histology was interpreted as a granular cell tumour. The immunohistochemical study was positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GEAP) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 1 of the 2 tumours and positive for S100 protein and vimentin in both tumours but negative for CD68. The histogenesis of neurohypophysis granular cell tumours is still controversial but ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies support the theory that may arise from pituicytes, the glial cells of neurohypophysis. Management of these benign, slow growing, tumours is based mainly on neurosurgical resection. Data from the literature do not support a beneficial effect of post operative radiation therapy on postoperative recurrences. (authors). 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Management of parapharyngeal space tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, F.; Waqar-Uddin; Khan, M.S.; Khawar, A.; Bangush, W.; Aslam, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the role of clinical features, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and computed tomography (CT) scan in diagnosing Para pharyngeal space (PPS) tumours and treatment options. Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: From July 2000 to July 2002 at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. Patients and Methods: Patients diagnosed as having PPS tumours were studied. The medical record of patients was reviewed for their age, gender, clinical features, investigations (FNAC and CT scan) and treatment. The mean age, percentage of different clinical features and the sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was determined. Results: The mean age of patients presenting with PPS tumours was 33.6 years. The most common clinical features were neck mass (93%) and bulge in lateral pharyngeal wall (80%). The CT scan showed exact location and extent of tumour in 11 out of 15 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of FNAC was 70% and 85% respectively. The most common tumours were neurogenic tumours and salivary gland tumours. Surgery was performed in all except 2 patients with lymphoma in whom radiation and chemotherapy was recommended. Conclusion: This study indicates that PPS tumours are usually benign neurosurgeon and salivary gland tumours presenting with neck mass and bulge in or oropharynx. FNAC and CT scan are important in diagnostic work up and treatment planning. Surgery has the best results in most cases. (author)

  18. Askin Tumour: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Carolina; Ramirez, Sandra Milena; Quesada, Diana Constanza; Unigarro Luz Adriana

    2011-01-01

    In this article we report a case of a 19 year-old woman with a final diagnosis of an extra skeletal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor/Ewing sarcoma of the chest, also known as Askin tumour. The histologic features and the immunohistochemical profile were consistent with this aggressive malignancy of the chest wall that affects young people. Because the low incidence of this entity, as well as the clear radiological findings, we considered it interesting to describe this documented case and undertake a review of the literature.

  19. Poster — Thur Eve — 65: A dosimetric comparison of isocentric and non-isocentric coplanar SBRT VMAT plans for peripheral lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, L; Liu, HW; Lau, H; Smith, WL

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers lung sterotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in shorter treatment time and less monitor units with comparable coverage and organ at risk sparing compared to conventional SBRT treatments. Isocentric VMAT treatment of peripheral lung tumours occasionally requires couch shifts that can inhibit 360° gantry rotation, resulting in additional imaging shifts for each treatment session, and increased potential for involuntary in-fraction motion. Here, we investigate whether non-isocentric VMAT plans can achieve comparable plan quality to isocentric plans for peripheral lung tumours. Three patient plans were selected with targets displaced > 8.5 cm (range: 8.8 – 9.9 cm) laterally from patient midline. For each patient, a plan with isocentre placed within the target volume (isocentric plan) was created and optimized. The same optimization parameters were then used to create a plan with the isocentre at patient midline (non-isocentric plan). Plan quality was evaluated and compared based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, high dose spillage, dose homogeneity, intermediate dose spillage, dose fall-off gradient, and organ at risk contraints. Non-isocentric plans of equivalent plan quality to isocentric plans were achieved for all patients by optimizing collimator rotations. Field isocentres can be placed at patient midline, as opposed to inside the target volume, with no significant degradation in VMAT plan quality for lateral tumour displacements up to 10 cm. Non-isocentric treatment of peripheral lung tumours could result in decreased overall treatment session time and eliminate the need for imaging shifts prior to VMAT treatment

  20. [The optimal blood glucose target in critically ill patient: comparison of two intensive insulin therapy protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raurell Torredà, Marta; del Llano Serrano, César; Almirall Solsona, Dolors; Catalan Ibars, Rosa María; Nicolás Arfelis, José María

    2014-03-04

    Recent studies in critically ill patients receiving insulin intravenous therapy (IIT) have shown an increased incidence of severe hypoglycemia, while intermittent subcutaneous insulin «sliding scales» (conventional insulin therapy [CIT]) is associated with hyperglycemia. The objective of this study is to assess whether glycemic control range IIT can affect glucose levels and their variability and to compare it with CIT. Prospective comparative cohort study in intensive care unit, with 2 study periods: Period 1, IIT with glycemic target range 110-140 mg/dL, and Period 2, IIT of 140-180 mg/dL. In both periods CIT glycemic target was 110-180 mg/dL. We assessed severe hypoglycemia ( 216 mg/L) and the variability of blood glucose. We studied 221 patients with 12.825 blood glucose determinations. Twenty-six and 17% of patients required IIT for glycemic control in Period 1 and 2, respectively. Hypoglycemia was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, glycemic target 110-140 mg/dL and low body mass index (BMI) (P = .002). Hyperglycemia was exclusively associated with a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.6 [95% CI 1.6 to 4.5]). Glycemic variability was associated with a discontinuous nutritional intake, low BMI, CIT insulinization, diabetes mellitus, elderly and high APACHE II (P < .001). The use of IIT is useful to reduce the variability of blood glucose. Although the 140-180 mg/dL range would be more secure as to presenting greater variability and hyperglycemia, the 110-140 mg/dL range is most suitable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological geroscience: targeting function to increase healthspan and achieve optimal longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Jamie N.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most nations of the world are undergoing rapid and dramatic population ageing, which presents great socio‐economic challenges, as well as opportunities, for individuals, families, governments and societies. The prevailing biomedical strategy for reducing the healthcare impact of population ageing has been ‘compression of morbidity’ and, more recently, to increase healthspan, both of which seek to extend the healthy period of life and delay the development of chronic diseases and disability until a brief period at the end of life. Indeed, a recently established field within biological ageing research, ‘geroscience’, is focused on healthspan extension. Superimposed on this background are new attitudes and demand for ‘optimal longevity’ – living long, but with good health and quality of life. A key obstacle to achieving optimal longevity is the progressive decline in physiological function that occurs with ageing, which causes functional limitations (e.g. reduced mobility) and increases the risk of chronic diseases, disability and mortality. Current efforts to increase healthspan centre on slowing the fundamental biological processes of ageing such as inflammation/oxidative stress, increased senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired proteostasis and reduced stress resistance. We propose that optimization of physiological function throughout the lifespan should be a major emphasis of any contemporary biomedical policy addressing global ageing. Effective strategies should delay, reduce in magnitude or abolish reductions in function with ageing (primary prevention) and/or improve function or slow further declines in older adults with already impaired function (secondary prevention). Healthy lifestyle practices featuring regular physical activity and ideal energy intake/diet composition represent first‐line function‐preserving strategies, with pharmacological agents, including existing and new pharmaceuticals and novel

  2. Physiological geroscience: targeting function to increase healthspan and achieve optimal longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Douglas R; Justice, Jamie N; LaRocca, Thomas J

    2016-04-15

    Most nations of the world are undergoing rapid and dramatic population ageing, which presents great socio-economic challenges, as well as opportunities, for individuals, families, governments and societies. The prevailing biomedical strategy for reducing the healthcare impact of population ageing has been 'compression of morbidity' and, more recently, to increase healthspan, both of which seek to extend the healthy period of life and delay the development of chronic diseases and disability until a brief period at the end of life. Indeed, a recently established field within biological ageing research, 'geroscience', is focused on healthspan extension. Superimposed on this background are new attitudes and demand for 'optimal longevity' - living long, but with good health and quality of life. A key obstacle to achieving optimal longevity is the progressive decline in physiological function that occurs with ageing, which causes functional limitations (e.g. reduced mobility) and increases the risk of chronic diseases, disability and mortality. Current efforts to increase healthspan centre on slowing the fundamental biological processes of ageing such as inflammation/oxidative stress, increased senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired proteostasis and reduced stress resistance. We propose that optimization of physiological function throughout the lifespan should be a major emphasis of any contemporary biomedical policy addressing global ageing. Effective strategies should delay, reduce in magnitude or abolish reductions in function with ageing (primary prevention) and/or improve function or slow further declines in older adults with already impaired function (secondary prevention). Healthy lifestyle practices featuring regular physical activity and ideal energy intake/diet composition represent first-line function-preserving strategies, with pharmacological agents, including existing and new pharmaceuticals and novel 'nutraceutical' compounds, serving as potential

  3. Relapse patterns after radiochemotherapy of glioblastoma with FET PET-guided boost irradiation and simulation to optimize radiation target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroth, Marc D.; Galldiks, Norbert; Pinkawa, Michael; Holy, Richard; Stoffels, Gabriele; Ermert, Johannes; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Shah, N. Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef; Eble, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    O-(2-18 F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine-(FET)-PET may be helpful to improve the definition of radiation target volumes in glioblastomas compared with MRI. We analyzed the relapse patterns in FET-PET after a FET- and MRI-based integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of glioblastomas to perform an optimized target volume definition. A relapse pattern analysis was performed in 13 glioblastoma patients treated with radiochemotherapy within a prospective phase-II-study between 2008 and 2009. Radiotherapy was performed as an integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IB-IMRT). The prescribed dose was 72 Gy for the boost target volume, based on baseline FET-PET (FET-1) and 60 Gy for the MRI-based (MRI-1) standard target volume. The single doses were 2.4 and 2.0 Gy, respectively. Location and volume of recurrent tumors in FET-2 and MRI-2 were analyzed related to initial tumor, detected in baseline FET-1. Variable target volumes were created theoretically based on FET-1 to optimally cover recurrent tumor. The tumor volume overlap in FET and MRI was poor both at baseline (median 12 %; range 0–32) and at time of recurrence (13 %; 0–100). Recurrent tumor volume in FET-2 was localized to 39 % (12–91) in the initial tumor volume (FET-1). Over the time a shrinking (mean 12 (5–26) ml) and shifting (mean 6 (1–10 mm) of the resection cavity was seen. A simulated target volume based on active tumor in FET-1 with an additional safety margin of 7 mm around the FET-1 volume covered recurrent FET tumor volume (FET-2) significantly better than a corresponding target volume based on contrast enhancement in MRI-1 with a same safety margin of 7 mm (100 % (54–100) versus 85 % (0–100); p < 0.01). A simulated planning target volume (PTV), based on FET-1 and additional 7 mm margin plus 5 mm margin for setup-uncertainties was significantly smaller than the conventional, MR-based PTV applied in this study (median 160 (112–297) ml versus 231 (117–386) ml, p < 0

  4. Optimized swimmer tracking system based on a novel multi-related-targets approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarab, D.; Napoléon, T.; Alfalou, A.; Verney, A.; Hellard, P.

    2017-02-01

    Robust tracking is a crucial step in automatic swimmer evaluation from video sequences. We designed a robust swimmer tracking system using a new multi-related-targets approach. The main idea is to consider the swimmer as a bloc of connected subtargets that advance at the same speed. If one of the subtargets is partially or totally occluded, it can be localized by knowing the position of the others. In this paper, we first introduce the two-dimensional direct linear transformation technique that we used to calibrate the videos. Then, we present the classical tracking approach based on dynamic fusion. Next, we highlight the main contribution of our work, which is the multi-related-targets tracking approach. This approach, the classical head-only approach and the ground truth are then compared, through testing on a database of high-level swimmers in training, national and international competitions (French National Championships, Limoges 2015, and World Championships, Kazan 2015). Tracking percentage and the accuracy of the instantaneous speed are evaluated and the findings show that our new appraoach is significantly more accurate than the classical approach.

  5. Optimal reduced-rank quadratic classifiers using the Fukunaga-Koontz transform with applications to automated target recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiaoming; Elad, Michael; Flesia, Ana G.; Muise, Robert R.; Stanfill, S. Robert; Friedman, Jerome; Popescu, Bogdan; Chen, Jihong; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Donoho, David L.

    2003-09-01

    In target recognition applications of discriminant of classification analysis, each 'feature' is a result of a convolution of an imagery with a filter, which may be derived from a feature vector. It is important to use relatively few features. We analyze an optimal reduced-rank classifier under the two-class situation. Assuming each population is Gaussian and has zero mean, and the classes differ through the covariance matrices: ∑1 and ∑2. The following matrix is considered: Λ=(∑1+∑2)-1/2∑1(∑1+∑2)-1/2. We show that the k eigenvectors of this matrix whose eigenvalues are most different from 1/2 offer the best rank k approximation to the maximum likelihood classifier. The matrix Λ and its eigenvectors have been introduced by Fukunaga and Koontz; hence this analysis gives a new interpretation of the well known Fukunaga-Koontz transform. The optimality that is promised in this method hold if the two populations are exactly Guassian with the same means. To check the applicability of this approach to real data, an experiment is performed, in which several 'modern' classifiers were used on an Infrared ATR data. In these experiments, a reduced-rank classifier-Tuned Basis Functions-outperforms others. The competitive performance of the optimal reduced-rank quadratic classifier suggests that, at least for classification purposes, the imagery data behaves in a nearly-Gaussian fashion.

  6. Optimized Mitochondrial Targeting of Proteins Encoded by Modified mRNAs Rescues Cells Harboring Mutations in mtATP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall Marcelo Chin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Mitochondrial disease may be caused by mutations in the protein-coding genes of the mitochondrial genome. A promising strategy for treating such diseases is allotopic expression—the translation of wild-type copies of these proteins in the cytosol, with subsequent translocation into the mitochondria, resulting in rescue of mitochondrial function. In this paper, we develop an automated, quantitative, and unbiased screening platform to evaluate protein localization and mitochondrial morphology. This platform was used to compare 31 mitochondrial targeting sequences and 15 3′ UTRs in their ability to localize up to 9 allotopically expressed proteins to the mitochondria and their subsequent impact on mitochondrial morphology. Taking these two factors together, we synthesized chemically modified mRNAs that encode for an optimized allotopic expression construct for mtATP6. These mRNAs were able to functionally rescue a cell line harboring the 8993T > G point mutation in the mtATP6 gene. : Allotopic expression of proteins normally encoded by mtDNA is a promising therapy for mitochondrial disease. Chin et al. use an unbiased and high-content imaging-based screening platform to optimize allotopic expression. Modified mRNAs encoding for the optimized allotopic expression constructs rescued the respiration and growth of mtATP6-deficient cells. Keywords: mitochondria, mitochondrial disease, mRNA, modified mRNA, ATP6, allotopic expression, rare disease, gene therapy, screening, high content imaging

  7. Gastric neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, David A; Donohoe, Claire L; Fitzgerald, Louise; Muldoon, Cian; Hayes, Brian; O'Toole, Dermot; Reynolds, John V

    2012-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are increasingly recognised, and management decisions may be difficult due to an incomplete understanding of aetiology, natural history and optimum therapy. This article presents a current understanding based on recent advances in epidemiology, classification, molecular profiling, and treatment. Relevant medical literature was identified from searches of PubMed and references cited in appropriate articles identified. Selection of articles was based on peer review, journal and relevance. Gastric NETs may be divided into three clinical prognostic groups: type I is associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis and hypergastrinaemia, type II is associated with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and type III lesions are gastrin-independent, have the greatest metastatic potential and poorest prognosis. There has been an increased frequency of gastric NETs reported. Management approaches have evolved in parallel with advances in endoscopic staging and surgery, as well as improved understanding of the biology and natural history of NETs. Gastric NETs present a spectrum of activity from indolent tumours to metastatic malignancy. Treatment decisions for patients must be individualised and are best managed by a multidisciplinary team approach. The current evidence base is limited to small series and efforts to treat patients within clinical networks of expertise are warranted. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Radiotherapy in ocular tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Ocular tumours at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay, form about 0.14% of all the proved cancer cases. In case of unilateral retinoblastoma with the other eye being not non-seeing for any reason, enucleation is advised, as the diagnosis may sometimes be in doubt. If after enucleation, optic nerve and/or peribulbar tissues are found to be involved, post-operative irradiation is given to the whole orbit. In bilateral retinoblastoma the more affected eye is enucleated and an attempt is made to preserve vision in the other eye. A tumour dose of 3500 to 4000 rad in about 4 weeks is given with a cobalt beam using a direct anterior field. A cataract that may develop has to be taken care of. Lateral and/or medial fields are used with deep X-rays. In certain cases, an implant of cobalt-60 or gold-198 grain is done. For carcinoma of conjuctiva, small lesions or early lesions are excised and a beta radiation dose of 2000 rad weekly for about 4 to 5 weeks is given; larger lesions require enucleation or exenteration followed by irradiation with super-voltage radiation. Post-irradiation sarcomas may develop many years later. Irradiation is repeated for recurrences. (M.G.B.)

  9. Tumour response and morphological changes of acoustic neurinomas after radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentino, V.; Raimondi, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven of the 1560 patients treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1993 had acoustic neurinomas. Four cases were excluded from this study because they had a follow-up of less than 2 years. There were 24 neurinomas treated in 23 patients as one patient had a bilateral tumour. Seven patients underwent radiosurgery for a recurrent tumour (already operated on once or twice), while it was the first treatment for 16 patients. The tumour volume ranged from 1.99 cm 3 to 18.30 cm 3 , and the patient follow-up was from 2 to 8 years. To determine the target on CT/NMR for linear accelerator stereotactic irradiation, the Greitz-Bergstroem non-invasive head fixation device was used. It was again adopted for subsequent serial imaging, and for repeat radiosurgery when necessary. The total peripheral tumour dose ranged from 12 to 45 Gy. In 9 patients there was a reduction in tumour volume varying from 39 to 100% , while 14 of the neurinomas appeared stable after an average follow-up of 3 years. In one patient there was an increase in size of the tumour. Variable morphological changes were present in 66% of the neurinomas treated. Radiosurgery is indicated as an alternative to microsurgery for inoperab1e patients and for those who refuse surgery, for recurrent tumours, and as a post-operative complementary treatment for partially removed tumours. A gradual approach to radiosurgery, depending on tumour response, allows a greater efficacy with minimal risk. In the present series no complications were observed. Hearing was preserved at almost the same level as that prior to radiosurgery in all patients. (author)

  10. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas P; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit is to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter, we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain-induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp's association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that colocalizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in colocalization with the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization, and activation of P-gp "pools" between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox-sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher-order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface, providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug "relocalization" of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulations of beam trajectory for position target optimization of extraction system output beams cyclotron proton Decy-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrus Abdul Kudus; Taufik

    2015-01-01

    Positioning and track simulation beam the cyclotron Decy-13 for laying optimization the target system have been done using lorentz force function and scilab 5.4.1 simulation. Magnetic field and electric field is calculated using Opera3D/Tosca as a simulation input. Used radio frequency is 77.66 MHz with the amplitude voltage is 40 kV is obtained energy 13 MeV. The result showed that the coordinates of the laying of the target system in a vacuum chamber is located at x = -389 mm and y = 445 mm with the width of the output beam is 10 mm. The laying stripper position for the output in center target is located at x = -76 mm and y =416 mm from the center coordinate on the center of dee with the energy of proton is 13 MeV at the point of beam extraction carbon foil. The changes position laying is carried out on range x = -70; y = 424 mm until x = - 118; y = 374 mm result for shifting area stripper which is still capable of deflection the electron beam. (author)

  12. An agro-industrial model for the optimization of biodiesel production in Spain to meet the European GHG reduction targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Neus; Manrique-de-Lara-Peñate, Casiano; Sanjuán, Neus; Clemente, Gabriela; Rozakis, Stelios

    2017-01-01

    Right after the enforcement of the Directive (EU) 2015/1513, amending the Renewable Energy Directive of the European Union, the situation of the biodiesel sector in Spain is particularly uncertain. Although domestic biodiesel production has significantly increased since 2013, many plants are still idle, leading to an excess of capacity. This paper aims to provide an operational framework that combines Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) with economic optimization to determine the feedstock combination for domestic biodiesel production in Spain in compliance with this Directive, and quantify the associated impacts. A multi-sector, mathematical programming model is proposed in a Partial Equilibrium setting, implementing an LCA module. The optimal oil mix for the sector is highly dependent on assumptions regarding land use change in crude vegetable oil exporting countries. Increasing greenhouse gas savings thresholds enhance the use of waste oils and domestic oilseeds, while preventing deforestation of carbon-rich ecosystems; the only exception is the Brazilian Cerrado savanna. A double-counting scheme for waste oil biodiesel is necessary to make plants with second-generation technology work at full capacity, delivering further environmental benefits. Although there is room for further improvement, the model can provide very good insights for biodiesel policy analysis in the context of Spain. - Highlights: • An optimization model for the domestic biodiesel production in Spain is proposed. • The model combines surplus maximization criteria with environmental constraints. • A life cycle assessment module allows evaluating the environmental performance. • The optimal feedstock mix is highly dependent on land use change assumptions. • Greenhouse gas savings targets enhance the use of waste oils and domestic oilseeds.

  13. Carcinoid Tumour of the Ovary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A case of bilateral carcinoid tumour of the ovary, with benign cystic teratoma in one ovary, in a 38 year old woman is presented. She had total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy, infracolic omentectomy and appendectomy. There was no macroscopic tumour in the vermiform appendix and the ...

  14. Optimizing the role of tax auditor in attempt to achieve tax revenue target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawan Setianto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explain the role of Tax Auditor in KPP Madya Surabaya. This study uses a case study by collecting the data from Directorate General of Taxation official sources, either in KPP Madya Surabaya, Regional Office of Directorate General of Taxation East Java I, as well as the Directorate of Potency, Compliance, and Revenue. Researcher also conducted interviews with 12 informants consisting of Tax Auditor, Account Representative, Head of Office, as well as officials from the Directorate of Inspection and Billing. There are discrepancies between the expectations of stakeholders and what being  understood/perceived and expected by the Tax Auditor in relation to the role that must be executed. This causes the Tax Auditor to experience a role ambiguity which disrupts the optimizing the implementation of the role. Things that still impede the implementation of the role of the Tax Auditor are: rejection of the Taxpayer; intervention both from inside and outside/difficult to implement the independence in appearance and independence in fact; both physically and psychologically threats; the unclear mutation policy; promotion criteria being implemented inconsistently; and databases that have not been accurate and reliable. 

  15. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  16. Methods of optimization of reactive sputtering conditions of Al target during AlN films deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chodun Rafal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Encouraged by recent studies and considering the well-documented problems occurring during AlN synthesis, we have chosen two diagnostic methods which would enable us to fully control the process of synthesis and characterize the synthesized aluminum nitride films. In our experiment we have compared the results coming from OES measurements of plasma and circulating power characteristics of the power supply with basic features of the deposited layers. The dual magnetron system operating in AC mode was used in our studies. Processes of aluminum target sputtering were carried out in an atmosphere of a mixture of argon and nitrogen. The plasma emission spectra were measured with the use of a monochromator device. Analyses were made by comparing the positions and intensities of spectral lines of the plasma components. The results obtained allowed us to characterize the sputtering process under various conditions of gas mixture compositions as well as power distribution more precisely, which is reported in this work. The measured spectra were related to the deposition rate, the structure morphology of the films and chemical composition. Our work proved that the use of plasma OES and circulating power measurements make possible to control the process of sputtering and synthesis of deposited films in situ.

  17. Cancer and tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osifo, B.

    1999-02-01

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  18. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 10"8 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer. (paper)

  19. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  20. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours.

  1. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  2. Optimization of the key geological target parameters of shale-gas horizontal wells in the Changning Block, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, great progress has been made in geologic evaluation, engineering test and development optimization of the Lower Cambrian Wufeng Fm–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Fm shale gas in the Sichuan Basin, and the main shale gas exploitation technologies have been understood preliminarily. In addition, scale productivity construction has been completed in Jiaoshiba, Changning and Weiyuan blocks. In this paper, the Wufeng Fm–Longmaxi Fm shale gas wells in Changning Block were taken as the study object to provide technical reference for the development design of similar shale-gas horizontal wells. The technology combining geology with engineering, dynamic with static, and statistical analysis with simulation prediction was applied to quantify the main factors controlling shale-gas well productivity, develop the shale-gas well production prediction model, and optimize the key technical parameters of geologic target of shale-gas horizontal wells in the block (e.g. roadway orientation, location and spacing, horizontal section length and gas well production index. In order to realize high productivity of shale gas wells, it is necessary to maximize the included angle between the horizontal section orientation and the maximum major stress and fracture development direction, deploy horizontal-well roadway in top-quality shale layers, and drill the horizontal section in type I reservoirs over 1000 m long. It is concluded that high productivity of shale gas wells is guaranteed by the horizontal-well wellbore integrity and the optimized low-viscosity slickwater and ceramsite fracturing technology for complex fracture creation. Based on the research results, the technical policies for shale gas development of Changning Block are prepared and a guidance and reference are provided for the shale gas development and productivity construction in the block and the development design of similar shale-gas horizontal wells.

  3. VIP secreting tumours in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.P.; Slavotinek, J.P.; Dorney, S.F.A.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) secreting neural crest tumours are an uncommon but important treatable cause of intractable childhood diarrhoea. The radiological appearances of two cases are presented with a review of radiological findings in childhood VIP secreting neural crest tumours. Twenty eight cases of childhood VIP secreting neural crest tumours were reviewed. Nineteen (68%) were ganglioneuroblastomas and nine (32%) were ganglioneuromas. The majority of tumours (66%) were in a paravertebral location in the abdomen indicating that a search for such a tumour should be initiated at this site. Eighteen of the twenty eight cases reviewed discussed relevant radiological investigations. Calcification was detected in 50% of abdominal radiographs. Gut dilatation was often a prominent feature. A mass was detected in 5 of 5 cases where ultrasound findings were reported, and seven of seven cases with CT findings reported. Prior to the availability of CT and ultrasound the most useful investigation was IVU which demonstrated evidence of a mass in 5 of 9 cases. The presence of paravertebral calcification and gut dilatation on the plain radiograph of a child with intractable diarrhoea suggests the presence of a VIP secreting neural crest tumour. If an abdominal tumour is not found in the appropriate clinical setting and VIP levels are elevated, a widespread search of the paravertebral region is indicated. (orig.)

  4. Tumour vasculature and angiogenic profile of paediatric pilocytic astrocytoma; is it much different from glioblastoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, M.; de Bont, E. S. J. M.; Scherpen, F. J. G.; Hoving, E. W.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Pilocytic astrocytomas are the most frequent brain tumours in children. Because of their high vascularity, this study aimed to obtain insights into potential angiogenic related therapeutic targets in these tumours by characterization of the vasculature and the angiogenic profile. In this study

  5. Monte Carlo dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Caroline; Balosso, Jacques; Esteve, Francois; Elleaume, Helene

    2005-01-01

    A radiation dose enhancement can be obtained in brain tumours after infusion of an iodinated contrast agent and irradiation with kilovoltage x-rays in tomography mode. The aim of this study was to assess dosimetric properties of the synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to humans (SSR) for preparing clinical trials. We designed an interface for dose computation based on a Monte Carlo code (MCNPX). A patient head was constructed from computed tomography (CT) data and a tumour volume was modelled. Dose distributions were calculated in SSR configuration for various energy beam and iodine content in the target volume. From the calculations, it appears that the iodine-filled target (10 mg ml -1 ) can be efficiently irradiated by a monochromatic beam of energy ranging from 50 to 85 keV. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of stereotactic radiotherapy for treating deep-seated brain tumours with monoenergetic x-rays from a synchrotron

  6. Recommendations for measurement of tumour vascularity with positron emission tomography in early phase clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboagye, Eric O.; Kenny, Laura M.; Myers, Melvyn; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Fleming, Ian N.; Beer, Ambros J.; Cunningham, Vincent J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Visvikis, Dimitris; Gee, Antony D.; Groves, Ashley M.; Cook, Gary J.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Clarke, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of drug pharmacodynamics and early tumour response are integral to current clinical trials of novel cancer therapeutics to explain or predict long term clinical benefit or to confirm dose selection. Tumour vascularity assessment by positron emission tomography could be viewed as a generic pharmacodynamic endpoint or tool for monitoring response to treatment. This review discusses methods for semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of tumour vascularity. The radioligands and radiotracers range from direct physiological functional tracers like [ 15 O]-water to macromolecular probes targeting integrin receptors expressed on neovasculature. Finally we make recommendations on ways to incorporate such measurements of tumour vascularity into early clinical trials of novel therapeutics. (orig.)

  7. Primary vertebral tumours in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.; Beluffi, G.; Masel, J.; Diard, F.; Ferrari-Ciboldi, F.; Le Dosseur, P.; Labatut, J.

    1984-03-01

    20 cases of primary benign and malignant bone tumours in children were reported. The most common tumours were Ewing's sarcoma, aneurismal bone cyst, benign osteoblastoma and osteoid osteoma. Some rare primary bone tumours in children (osteochondroma, chondroblastoma 6F, primary lymphoma of bone and neurofibromatosis with unusual cervical spinal changes) were also reported. The authors believe that radiographic findings together with clinical history and clinical examination may yield a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. Although microscopy is essential in the final diagnosis, the microscopic report should be also accepted with caution.

  8. Nanoparticle-neural stem cells for targeted ovarian cancer treatment: optimization of silica nanoparticles for efficient drug loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Z.; Berlin, J.; Abidi, W.

    2018-02-01

    One of the drugs used to treat ovarian cancer is cisplatin. However, cisplatin kills normal surrounding tissue in addition to cancer cells. To improve tumor targeting efficiency, our lab uses neural stem cells (NSCs), which migrate directly to ovarian tumors. If free cisplatin is loaded into NSCs for targeted drug delivery, it will kill the NSCs. To prevent the drug cisplatin from killing both the NSCs and normal surrounding tissue, our lab synthesizes silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) that act as a protective carrier. The big picture here is to maximize efficiency of tumor targeting using NSCs and minimize toxicity to these NSCs using SiNPs. The goal of this project is to optimize the stability of SiNPs, which is important for efficient drug loading. To do this, the concentration of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), one of the main components of SiNPs, was varied. We hypothesized that more TEOS equates to more stable SiNPs because TEOS contributes carbon to SiNPs, and thus a tightly-packed chemical structure results in a stable particle. Then, the stability of the SiNPs were checked in cell media and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Lastly, the SiNPs were analyzed for their porosity using the transmission electron microscope (TEM). TEM imaging showed white spots in the 200-800 μL TEOS batches and no white spots in the 1000-1800 μL TEOS batches. The white spots were pores, which indicate instability. We concluded that the ultimate factor that determines the stability of SiNPs (100 nm) is the concentration of organic substance.

  9. Mathematical modeling of liver metastases tumour growth and control with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Adrienne; Sivakumaran, Thiru; Wong, Eugene; Davidson, Melanie; Lock, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Generating an optimized radiation treatment plan requires understanding the factors affecting tumour control. Mathematical models of tumour dynamics may help in future studies of factors predicting tumour sensitivity to radiotherapy. In this study, a time-dependent differential model, incorporating biological cancer markers, is presented to describe pre-treatment tumour growth, response to radiation, and recurrence. The model uses Gompertzian-Exponential growth to model pre-treatment tumour growth. The effect of radiotherapy is handled by a realistic cell-kill term that includes a volume-dependent change in tumour sensitivity. Post-treatment, a Gompertzian, accelerated, delayed repopulation is employed. As proof of concept, we examined the fit of the model's prediction using various liver enzyme levels as markers of metastatic liver tumour growth in a liver cancer patient. A tumour clonogen population model was formulated. Each enzyme was coupled to the same tumour population, and served as surrogates of the tumour. This dynamical model was solved numerically and compared to the measured enzyme levels. By minimizing the mean-squared error of the model enzyme predictions, we determined the following tumour model parameters: growth rate prior to treatment was 0.52% per day; the fractional radiation cell kill for the prescribed dose (60 Gy in 15 fractions) was 42% per day, and the tumour repopulation rate was 2.9% per day. These preliminary results provided the basis to test the model in a larger series of patients, to apply biological markers for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy by determining the underlying tumour dynamics.

  10. Proton pump inhibitor-induced tumour cell death by inhibition of a detoxification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, S

    2010-05-01

    This review presents a possible new approach against cancer, as represented by inhibition of proton pumps, a mechanism used by tumour cells to avoid intracellular accumulation of toxic substances. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) belong to a family of pro-drugs that are currently used in the treatment of peptic diseases needing acidity to be activated. PPIs target the acidic tumour mass, where they are metabolized, thus blocking proton traffic. Proton pump inhibition triggers a rapid cell death as a result of intracellular acidification, caspase activation and early accumulation of reactive oxygen species into tumour cells. As a whole, the devastating effect of PPIs on tumour cells suggest the triggering of a fatal cell toxification. Many human tumours, including melanoma, osteosarcoma, lymphomas and various adenocarcinomas are responsive to PPIs. This appears highly conceivable, in as much as almost all human tumours are acidic and express high levels of proton pumps. Paradoxically, metastatic tumours appear to be more responsive to PPIs being more acidic than the majority of primary tumours. However, two clinical trials test the effectiveness of PPIs in chemosensitizing melanoma and osteosarcoma patients. Indeed, tumour acidity represents a very potent mechanism of chemoresistance. A majority of cytotoxic agents, being weak bases, are quickly protonated outside and do not enter the cells, thus preventing drugs to reach specific cellular targets. Clinical data will provide the proof of concept on the use of PPIs as a new class of antitumour agent with a very low level of systemic toxicity as compared with standard chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Evaluation of management of desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis in Dutch patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, M. H.; Mathus-Vliegen, E. M.; Baeten, C. G.; Nagengast, F. M.; van der Bijl, J.; van Dalsen, A. D.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dekker, E.; Langers, A. M.; Vecht, J.; Peters, F. T.; van Dam, R.; van Gemert, W. G.; Stuifbergen, W. N.; Schouten, W. R.; Gelderblom, H.; Vasen, H. F. A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal treatment of desmoid tumours is controversial. We evaluated desmoid management in Dutch familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. METHODS: Seventy-eight FAP patients with desmoids were identified from the Dutch Polyposis Registry. Data on desmoid morphology, management,

  12. Alpha particles induce expression of immunogenic markers on tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorin, J.B.; Gouard, S.; Cherel, M.; Davodeau, F.; Gaschet, J.; Morgenstern, A.; Bruchertseifer, F.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of the publication follows. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an approach aiming at targeting the radioelements to tumours, usually through the use of antibodies specific for tumour antigens. The radiations emitted by the radioelements then induce direct killing of the targeted cells as well as indirect killing through bystander effect. Interestingly, it has been shown that ionizing radiations, in some settings of external radiotherapy, can foster an immune response directed against tumour cells. Our research team is dedicated to the development of alpha RIT, i.e RIT using alpha particle emitters, we therefore decided to study the effects of such particles on tumour cells in regards to their immunogenicity. First, we studied the effects of bismuth 213, an alpha emitter, on cellular death and autophagy in six different tumour cell lines. Then, we measured the expression of 'danger' signals and MHC molecules at the cell surface to determine whether irradiation with 213 Bi could cause the tumour cells to be recognized by the immune system. Finally a co-culture of dendritic cells with irradiated tumour cells was performed to test whether it would induce dendritic cells to mature. No apoptosis was detected within 48 hours after irradiation in any cell line, however half of them exhibited signs of autophagy. No increase in membrane expression of 'danger' signals was observed after treatment with 213 Bi, but we showed an increase in expression of MHC class I and II for some cell lines. Moreover, the co-culture experiment indicated that the immunogenicity of a human adenocarcinoma cell line (LS 174T) was enhanced in vitro after irradiation with alpha rays. These preliminary data suggest that alpha particles could be of interest in raising an immune response associated to RIT. (authors)

  13. Sperm protein 17 is expressed in human nervous system tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grizzi, Fabio; Baena, Riccardo Rodriguez y; Dioguardi, Nicola; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Gaetani, Paolo; Franceschini, Barbara; Di Ieva, Antonio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Ceva-Grimaldi, Giorgia; Bollati, Angelo; Frezza, Eldo E; Cobos, E

    2006-01-01

    Human sperm protein 17 (Sp17) is a highly conserved protein that was originally isolated from a rabbit epididymal sperm membrane and testis membrane pellet. It has recently been included in the cancer/testis (CT) antigen family, and shown to be expressed in multiple myeloma and ovarian cancer. We investigated its immunolocalisation in specimens of nervous system (NS) malignancies, in order to establish its usefulness as a target for tumour-vaccine strategies. The expression of Sp17 was assessed by means of a standardised immunohistochemical procedure [(mAb/antigen) MF1/Sp17] in formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded surgical specimens of NS malignancies, including 28 neuroectodermal primary tumours (6 astrocytomas, 16 glioblastoma multiforme, 5 oligodendrogliomas, and 1 ependymoma), 25 meningeal tumours, and five peripheral nerve sheath tumours (4 schwannomas, and 1 neurofibroma),. A number of neuroectodermal (21%) and meningeal tumours (4%) were found heterogeneously immunopositive for Sp17. None of the peripheral nerve sheath tumours was immunopositive for Sp17. The expression pattern was heterogeneous in all of the positive samples, and did not correlate with the degree of malignancy. The frequency of expression and non-uniform cell distribution of Sp17 suggest that it cannot be used as a unique immunotherapeutic target in NS cancer. However, our results do show the immunolocalisation of Sp17 in a proportion of NS tumour cells, but not in their non-pathological counterparts. The emerging complex function of Sp17 makes further studies necessary to clarify the link between it and immunopositive cells

  14. Cystic tumours of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Univ. (Japan); Ohtomo, K. [Univ. of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In this pictorial essay we present the typical appearances of cystic pancreatic tumours, the wide spectrum of their features, and differential features among cystic pancreatic masses with an emphasis on CT. Pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesion in the pancreas and can be induced by pancreatitis, trauma or surgery. Pseudocysts appear as a round cystic mass with a definite wall. However, they can mimic cystic tumours associated with internal septation and/or necrotic mass of various shapes. Conversely, cystic tumours can appear as a simple cyst lacking any thickening of wall, septation or mural nodule. Pancreatic carcinoma not infrequently induces secondary cysts upstream of the obstructed pancreatic duct. The cysts are pseudocysts or retention cysts in nature. When cysts are formed in the pancreatic parenchyma or adjacent to pancreatic carcinoma they may mimic cystic tumour. (orig./VHE)

  15. Cystic tumours of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itai, Y.; Ohtomo, K.

    1996-01-01

    In this pictorial essay we present the typical appearances of cystic pancreatic tumours, the wide spectrum of their features, and differential features among cystic pancreatic masses with an emphasis on CT. Pseudocysts are the most common cystic lesion in the pancreas and can be induced by pancreatitis, trauma or surgery. Pseudocysts appear as a round cystic mass with a definite wall. However, they can mimic cystic tumours associated with internal septation and/or necrotic mass of various shapes. Conversely, cystic tumours can appear as a simple cyst lacking any thickening of wall, septation or mural nodule. Pancreatic carcinoma not infrequently induces secondary cysts upstream of the obstructed pancreatic duct. The cysts are pseudocysts or retention cysts in nature. When cysts are formed in the pancreatic parenchyma or adjacent to pancreatic carcinoma they may mimic cystic tumour. (orig./VHE)

  16. Imaging oxygenation of human tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhani, Anwar R.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Lewis, Jason S.; Alber, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia represents a significant challenge to the curability of human tumours leading to treatment resistance and enhanced tumour progression. Tumour hypoxia can be detected by non-invasive and invasive techniques but the inter-relationships between these remains largely undefined. 18 F-MISO and Cu-ATSM-PET, and BOLD-MRI are the lead contenders for human application based on their non-invasive nature, ease of use and robustness, measurement of hypoxia status, validity, ability to demonstrate heterogeneity and general availability, these techniques are the primary focus of this review. We discuss where developments are required for hypoxia imaging to become clinically useful and explore potential new uses for hypoxia imaging techniques including biological conformal radiotherapy. (orig.)

  17. Tumour markers in urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, L.; Fornara, P.; Fabricius, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The same applies essentially also for the bladder carcinomas: There is no reliable marker for these cancers which would be useful for clinical purposes. TPA has proven to be too non-specific in malignoma-detection and therefore hardly facilitates clinical decision-making in individual cases. The CEA is not sensitive enough to be recommendable for routine application. However, in advanced stages a CEA examination may be useful if applied within the scope of therapeutic efforts made to evaluate efficacy. In cases of carcinomas of the prostate the sour prostate-specific phosphatase (SPP) and, more recently, especially the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have proven in follow-up and therapy monitoring, whereby the PSA is superior to the SPP. Nevertheless, both these markers should be employed in therapy monitoring because differences in behaviour will be observed when the desired treatment effect is only achieved in one of the two markers producing tumour cell clonuses. Both markers, but especially the PSA, are quite reliably in agreement with the result of the introduced chemo-/hormone therapy, whereby an increase may be a sure indicator of relapse several months previous to clinical symptoms, imaging procedures, so-called routine laboratory results and subjective complaints. However, none of the 2 markers is appropriate for the purposes of screening or early diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate. (orig.) [de

  18. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour: Imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, V. Anik; Hirsch, Michelle S.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2012-01-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour is a rare, recently described neoplasm with a distinctive histological appearance. Although reported in the pathology literature, to our knowledge, no prior reports have described its imaging appearance. We describe the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features of an incidentally detected renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour that appeared as a well-marginated, solid T2-hypointense enhancing mass, in a 50-year-old woman. It is indistinguishable from a variety of benign and malignant renal neoplasms. PMID:23093565

  19. Paediatric laryngeal granular cell tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dauda Ayuba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumour (GCT affecting the larynx is not common, especially in children. Most cases are apt to be confused with respiratory papilloma and may even be mistaken for a malignant neoplasia. We present a case of laryngeal GCT in a 12-year-old child to emphasize that the tumour should be regarded in the differential of growths affecting the larynx in children.

  20. Comparative biodistribution of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Joosten, Lieke; Eek, Annemarie; Roosenburg, Susan; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Maecke, Helmut [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Aloj, Luigi [Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumouri, Naples (Italy); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary, University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, Institute of Cancer, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Several CCK-2 receptor-binding radiopeptides have been developed and some have been tested in patients. Here we aimed to compare the in vivo tumour targeting properties of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated gastrin/CCK2 receptor-binding peptides. Two CCK8-based peptides and ten gastrin-based peptide analogues were tested. All peptides were conjugated with DOTA and labelled with {sup 111}In. Biodistribution studies were performed in mice with subcutaneous CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours and with receptor-negative tumours contralaterally. Biodistribution was studied by counting dissected tissues at 1 and 4 h after injection. Both the CCK analogues displayed relatively low tumour uptake (approximately 2.5%ID/g) as compared to minigastrin analogues. Two linear minigastrin peptides (MG0 and sargastrin) displayed moderate tumour uptake at both 1 and 4 h after injection, but also very high kidney uptake (both higher than 48%ID/g). The linear MG11, lacking the penta-Glu sequence, showed lower tumour uptake and also low kidney uptake. Varying the N-terminal Glu residues in the minigastrin analogues led to improved tumour targeting properties, with PP-F11 displaying the optimal biodistribution. Besides the monomeric linear peptides, a cyclized peptide and a divalent peptide were tested. Based on these studies, optimal peptides for peptide receptor radionuclide targeting of CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours were the linear minigastrin analogue with six D-Glu residues (PP-F11), the divalent analogue MGD5 and the cyclic peptide cyclo-MG1. These peptides combined high tumour uptake with low kidney retention, and may

  1. Surgical approach to pineal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchino, F; Broggi, G; Fornari, M; Franzini, A; Solero, C L; Allegranza, A

    1989-01-01

    During a period of 10 years (1977-1986) 40 cases of tumour of the pineal region have been treated at the Istituto Neurologico "C. Besta"-of Milan. Out of these 40 cases, 27 (67.5%) were in the paediatric (10-15 years) or juvenile (15-20 years) age at the time of operation. Since 1983 a specific diagnostic and therapeutic protocol has been adopted and thereafter direct surgical removal of the tumour was performed only when the neuroradiological investigations were highly suggestive of a benign extrinsic lesion. Sixteen cases in this series underwent direct surgical removal; in the remaining 24 cases stereotactic biopsy of the tumour was performed in the first instance. On the basis of the histological diagnosis obtained by this procedure surgical excision of the tumour (9 cases) or radiotherapy (15 cases) was then performed. 25 cases underwent surgical removal of the lesion. In all the cases the infratentorial supracerebellar approach as introduced by Krause and then modified by Stein was adopted. On analysis of the data of this series it was observed that in 25% of the cases completely benign resectable tumours were found; in 25% of the cases astrocytoma (grade I-II) which could be treated at least by partial removal were present; in 30% of the cases radiosensitive lesions were encountered. In the remaining 20% of the cases highly malignant tumours were found which should be treated only by radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy.

  2. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Wang, C.C.; Wang, J.

    1999-01-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary midbrain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases. (orig.) (orig.)

  3. Biology and treatment of renal tumours in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Treger, Taryn D; Gooskens, Saskia L

    2016-01-01

    potential targeted therapies for high-risk subgroups. Our understanding of Wilms' tumourigenesis is evolving and several signalling pathways, microRNA processing and epigenetics are now known to play pivotal roles. Most rhabdoid tumours display somatic and/or germline mutations in the SMARCB1 gene, whereas...

  4. Development and application of a channelized Hotelling observer for DBT optimization on structured background test images with mass simulating targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Dimitar; Michielsen, Koen; Cockmartin, Lesley; Zhang, Gouzhi; Young, Kenneth; Marshall, Nicholas; Bosmans, Hilde

    2016-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D mammography technique that promises better visualization of low contrast lesions than conventional 2D mammography. A wide range of parameters influence the diagnostic information in DBT images and a systematic means of DBT system optimization is needed. The gold standard for image quality assessment is to perform a human observer experiment with experienced readers. Using human observers for optimization is time consuming and not feasible for the large parameter space of DBT. Our goal was to develop a model observer (MO) that can predict human reading performance for standard detection tasks of target objects within a structured phantom and subsequently apply it in a first comparative study. The phantom consists of an acrylic semi-cylindrical container with acrylic spheres of different sizes and the remaining space filled with water. Three types of lesions were included: 3D printed spiculated and non-spiculated mass lesions along with calcification groups. The images of the two mass lesion types were reconstructed with 3 different reconstruction methods (FBP, FBP with SRSAR, MLTRpr) and read by human readers. A Channelized Hotelling model observer was created for the non-spiculated lesion detection task using five Laguerre-Gauss channels, tuned for better performance. For the non-spiculated mass lesions a linear relation between the MO and human observer results was found, with correlation coefficients of 0.956 for standard FBP, 0.998 for FBP with SRSAR and 0.940 for MLTRpr. Both the MO and human observer percentage correct results for the spiculated masses were close to 100%, and showed no difference from each other for every reconstruction algorithm.

  5. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Selection of Optimal Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy for Early Breast Cancer: ASCO Clinical Practice Guideline Focused Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denduluri, Neelima; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Telli, Melinda L; Eisen, Andrea; Graff, Stephanie L; Hassett, Michael J; Holloway, Jamie N; Hurria, Arti; King, Tari A; Lyman, Gary H; Partridge, Ann H; Somerfield, Mark R; Trudeau, Maureen E; Wolff, Antonio C; Giordano, Sharon H

    2018-05-22

    Purpose To update key recommendations of the ASCO guideline adaptation of the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on the selection of optimal adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for early breast cancer and adjuvant targeted therapy for breast cancer. Methods An Expert Panel conducted targeted systematic literature reviews guided by a signals approach to identify new, potentially practice-changing data that might translate to revised practice recommendations. Results The Expert Panel reviewed phase III trials that evaluated adjuvant capecitabine after completion of standard preoperative anthracycline- and taxane-based combination chemotherapy by patients with early-stage breast cancer HER2-negative breast cancer with residual invasive disease at surgery; the addition of 1 year of adjuvant pertuzumab to combination chemotherapy and trastuzumab for patients with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer; and the use of neratinib as extended adjuvant therapy for patients after combination chemotherapy and trastuzumab-based adjuvant therapy with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Recommendations Patients with early-stage HER2-negative breast cancer with pathologic, invasive residual disease at surgery following standard anthracycline- and taxane-based preoperative therapy may be offered up to six to eight cycles of adjuvant capecitabine. Clinicians may add 1 year of adjuvant pertuzumab to trastuzumab-based combination chemotherapy in patients with high-risk, early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Clinicians may use extended adjuvant therapy with neratinib to follow trastuzumab in patients with early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. Neratinib causes substantial diarrhea, and diarrhea prophylaxis must be used. Additional information can be found at www.asco.org/breast-cancer-guidelines .

  7. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  8. Tumour angiogenesis pathways: related clinical issues and implications for nuclear medicine imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, Christophe van de; De Winter, Olivier; Dierckx, Rudi Andre; Oltenfreiter, Ruth; Slegers, Guido; Signore, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis is essential for growth, invasion and metastasis. Retrospective studies suggest that it is an independent prognostic factor that merits prospective validation. Furthermore, as tumour blood vessels show many differences from normal vessels and are not genetically unstable, they form a key area for therapy development. However, as anti-angiogenic therapy is primarily cytostatic and not cytotoxic, novel tailor-made specific end-points for treatment monitoring are required. In this regard, suitable molecular parameters for imaging tumour angiogenesis by means of nuclear medicine are being explored. Here we review current knowledge on the multiple pathways controlling tumour angiogenesis and try to assess which are the most clinically relevant for nuclear medicine imaging. Parameters that may influence the imaging potential of radiopharmaceuticals for angiogenesis imaging such as molecular weight and structure, their targeted location within the tumour and their usefulness in terms of specificity and constancy of the targeted molecular pathway are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Spatio-temporal cell dynamics in tumour spheroid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Meyer-Hermann, M.; Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Kempf, H.; Meyer-Hermann, M.

    2010-01-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids are realistic in vitro systems in radiation research that integrate cell-cell interaction and cell cycle control by factors in the medium. The dynamic reaction inside a tumour spheroid triggered by radiation is not well understood. Of special interest is the amount of cell cycle synchronization which could be triggered by irradiation, since this would allow follow-up irradiations to exploit the increased sensitivity of certain cell cycle phases. In order to investigate these questions we need to support irradiation experiments with mathematical models. In this article a new model is introduced combining the dynamics of tumour growth and irradiation treatments. The tumour spheroid growth is modelled using an agent-based Delaunay/Voronoi hybrid model in which the cells are represented by weighted dynamic vertices. Cell properties like full cell cycle dynamics are included. In order to be able to distinguish between different cell reactions in response to irradiation quality we introduce a probabilistic model for damage dynamics. The overall cell survival from this model is in agreement with predictions from the linear-quadratic model. Our model can describe the growth of avascular tumour spheroids in agreement to experimental results. Using the probabilistic model for irradiation damage dynamics the classic 'four Rs' of radiotherapy can be studied in silico. We found a pronounced reactivation of the tumour spheroid in response to irradiation. A majority of the surviving cells is synchronized in their cell cycle progression after irradiation. The cell synchronization could be actively triggered and should be exploited in an advanced fractionation scheme. Thus it has been demonstrated that our model could be used to understand the dynamics of tumour growth after irradiation and to propose optimized fractionation schemes in cooperation with experimental investigations. (authors)

  10. The Askin tumour. Neuroactodermic tumour of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez, P.; Nicolas, A. I.; Vivas, I.; Damaso Aquerreta, J.; Martinez-Cuesta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The Askin tumours is an extremely rare and malignant process in the thoracic pulmonary region during infancy and youth. The differential diagnosis has to be considered with other thoracic wall tumours that are more common in pediatrics like the undifferentiated neuroblastoma, the embionic rabdomiosarcoma, the Ewing sarcoma and the linfoma. A retrospective examination was carried out on 473 thoracic wall tumours from 1994 to 1997 at our centre, resulting in 4 patients with an anatomopathologically tested Askin tumour (ages from 13-21). All the cases were studied using simple radiography and CT. In two cases MRI was also used. The most common clinical manifestation was a palpable painful mass in the thoracic wall. In the simple radiograph the main finding was a large mass of extrapleural soft material, with costal destruction ( n=3) and a pleural effusion (n=2). In the CT study the mass was heterogeneous, with internal calcifications in one case. CT and MRI showed invasion in the mediastinum (n=1), medular channel (n=1) and phrenic and sulphrenic extension (n=1). The Askin tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic wall masses in infant-youth ages. There are no specific morphological characteristics. Both CT and MRI are useful for the diagnosis, staging and follow up. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Childhood Adrenocortical Tumours: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques-Pereira Rosana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood adrenocortical tumour (ACT is not a common disease, but in southern Brazil the prevalence is 15 times higher than in other parts of the world. One hundred and thirty-seven patients have been identified and followed by our group over the past four decades. Affected children are predominantly girls, with a female-to-male ratio of 3.5:1 in patients below 4 years of age. Virilization alone (51.6% or mixed with Cushing's syndrome (42.0% was the predominant clinical picture observed in these patients. Tumours are unilateral, affecting both glands equally. TP53 R337H germline mutations underlie most childhood ACTs in southern Brazil. Epidemiological data from our casuistic studies revealed that this mutation has ~10% penetrance for ACT. Surgery is the definitive treatment, and a complete resection should always be attempted. Although adjuvant chemotherapy has shown some encouraging results, its influence on overall outcome is small. The survival rate is directly correlated to tumour size; patients with small, completely excised tumours have survival rates close to 90%, whereas in those patients with inoperable tumours and/or metastatic disease it is less than 10%. In the group of patients with large, excisable tumours, half of them have an intermediate outcome. Recent molecular biology techniques and genomic approaches may help us to better understand the pathogenesis of ACT, the risk of developing a tumour when TP53 R337H is present, and to predict its outcome. An ongoing pilot study consisting of close monitoring of healthy carriers of the TP53 R337H mutation - siblings and first-degree relatives of known affected cases - aims at the early detection of ACTs and an improvement of the cure rate.

  12. 11C-CHO PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fangming; Nie Qing; Wang Ruimin; Chang, Susan M.; Zhao Wenrui; Zhu Qi; Liang Yingkui; Yang Ping; Zhang Jun; Jia Haiwei; Fang Henghu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We explored the clinical values of 11 C-choline ( 11 C-CHO) PET in optimization of target volume delineation and treatment regimens in postoperative radiotherapy for brain gliomas. Methods: Sixteen patients with the pathological confirmation of the diagnosis of gliomas prior to receiving radiotherapy (postoperative) were included, and on whom both MRI and CHO PET scans were performed at the same position for comparison of residual tumors with the two techniques. 11 C-CHO was used as the tracer in the PET scan. A plain T1-weighted, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging scans were performed in the MRI scan sequence. The gliomas' residual tumor volume was defined as the area with CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism (V CHO ) and one with MRI T1-weighted imaging high signal intensity (V Gd ), and was determined by a group of experienced professionals and clinicians. Results: (1) In CHO-PET images, the tumor target volume, i.e., the highly metabolic area with a high concentration of isotopes (SUV 1.016–4.21) and the corresponding contralateral normal brain tissues (SUV0.1–0.62), was well contrasted, and the boundary between lesions and surrounding normal brain tissues was better defined compared with MRI and 18 F-FDG PET images. (2) For patients with brain gliomas of WHO Grade II, the SUV was 1.016–2.5; for those with WHO Grades III and IV, SUVs were >26–4.2. (3) Both CHO PET and MRI were positive for 10 patients and negative for 2 patients. The residual tumor consistency between these two studies was 75%. Four of the 10 CHO-PET-positive patients were negative on MRI scans. The maximum distance between V Gd and V CHO margins was 1.8 cm. (4) The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and the ensuing treatment regimens were changed for 31.3% (5/16) of patients based on the CHO-PET high-affinity uptake and metabolism, in which the change rate was 80% (4/5), 14.3 % (1/7) and 0% (0/4) for patients with WHO Grade II III, and IV gliomas

  13. DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capper, David; Jones, David T W; Sill, Martin; Hovestadt, Volker; Schrimpf, Daniel; Sturm, Dominik; Koelsche, Christian; Sahm, Felix; Chavez, Lukas; Reuss, David E; Kratz, Annekathrin; Wefers, Annika K; Huang, Kristin; Pajtler, Kristian W; Schweizer, Leonille; Stichel, Damian; Olar, Adriana; Engel, Nils W; Lindenberg, Kerstin; Harter, Patrick N; Braczynski, Anne K; Plate, Karl H; Dohmen, Hildegard; Garvalov, Boyan K; Coras, Roland; Hölsken, Annett; Hewer, Ekkehard; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Schick, Matthias; Fischer, Roger; Beschorner, Rudi; Schittenhelm, Jens; Staszewski, Ori; Wani, Khalida; Varlet, Pascale; Pages, Melanie; Temming, Petra; Lohmann, Dietmar; Selt, Florian; Witt, Hendrik; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Aronica, Eleonora; Giangaspero, Felice; Rushing, Elisabeth; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Geisenberger, Christoph; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Becker, Albert; Preusser, Matthias; Haberler, Christine; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Cryan, Jane; Farrell, Michael; Deckert, Martina; Hench, Jürgen; Frank, Stephan; Serrano, Jonathan; Kannan, Kasthuri; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Brück, Wolfgang; Hofer, Silvia; Brehmer, Stefanie; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Hänggi, Daniel; Hans, Volkmar; Rozsnoki, Stephanie; Hansford, Jordan R; Kohlhof, Patricia; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Lechner, Matt; Lopes, Beatriz; Mawrin, Christian; Ketter, Ralf; Kulozik, Andreas; Khatib, Ziad; Heppner, Frank; Koch, Arend; Jouvet, Anne; Keohane, Catherine; Mühleisen, Helmut; Mueller, Wolf; Pohl, Ute; Prinz, Marco; Benner, Axel; Zapatka, Marc; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Kramm, Christof M; Müller, Hermann L; Rutkowski, Stefan; von Hoff, Katja; Frühwald, Michael C; Gnekow, Astrid; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Tippelt, Stephan; Calaminus, Gabriele; Monoranu, Camelia-Maria; Perry, Arie; Jones, Chris; Jacques, Thomas S; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Gessi, Marco; Pietsch, Torsten; Schramm, Johannes; Schackert, Gabriele; Westphal, Manfred; Reifenberger, Guido; Wesseling, Pieter; Weller, Michael; Collins, Vincent Peter; Blümcke, Ingmar; Bendszus, Martin; Debus, Jürgen; Huang, Annie; Jabado, Nada; Northcott, Paul A; Paulus, Werner; Gajjar, Amar; Robinson, Giles W; Taylor, Michael D; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Ryzhova, Marina; Platten, Michael; Unterberg, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Karajannis, Matthias A; Mittelbronn, Michel; Acker, Till; Hartmann, Christian; Aldape, Kenneth; Schüller, Ulrich; Buslei, Rolf; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Herold-Mende, Christel; Ellison, David W; Hasselblatt, Martin; Snuderl, Matija; Brandner, Sebastian; Korshunov, Andrey; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M

    2018-03-22

    Accurate pathological diagnosis is crucial for optimal management of patients with cancer. For the approximately 100 known tumour types of the central nervous system, standardization of the diagnostic process has been shown to be particularly challenging-with substantial inter-observer variability in the histopathological diagnosis of many tumour types. Here we present a comprehensive approach for the DNA methylation-based classification of central nervous system tumours across all entities and age groups, and demonstrate its application in a routine diagnostic setting. We show that the availability of this method may have a substantial impact on diagnostic precision compared to standard methods, resulting in a change of diagnosis in up to 12% of prospective cases. For broader accessibility, we have designed a free online classifier tool, the use of which does not require any additional onsite data processing. Our results provide a blueprint for the generation of machine-learning-based tumour classifiers across other cancer entities, with the potential to fundamentally transform tumour pathology.

  14. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the cellularity assessment and matrix characterization of soft tissue tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Tiziana; Chianca, Vito; Albano, Domenico; Clementi, Valeria; Piana, Raimondo; Linari, Alessandra; Comandone, Alessandro; Regis, Guido; Stratta, Maurizio; Faletti, Carlo; Borrè, Alda

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is able to investigate the histological features of soft tissue tumours. We reviewed MRIs of soft tissue tumours performed from 2012 to 2015 to calculate the average ADCs. We included 46 patients (27 male; mean age: 57 years, range 12-85 years) with histologically proven soft tissue tumours (10 benign, 2 intermediate 34 malignant) grouped into eight tumour type classes. An experienced pathologist assigned a semi-quantitative cellularity score (very high, high, medium and low) and tumour grading. The t test, ANOVA and linear regression were used to correlate ADC with clinicopathological data. Approximate receiver operating characteristic curves were created to predict possible uses of ADC to differentiate benign from malignant tumours. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in ADCs between these three groups excluding myxoid sarcomas. A significant difference was also evident between the tumour type classes (p < 0.001), grade II and III myxoid lesions (p < 0.05), tumour grading classes (p < 0.001) and cellularity scores classes (p < 0.001), with the lowest ADCs in the very high cellularity. While the linear regression analysis showed a significant relationship between ADC and tumour cellularity (r = 0.590, p ≤ 0.05) and grading (r = 0.437, p ≤ 0.05), no significant relationship was found with age, gender, tumour size and histological subtype. An optimal cut-off ADC value of 1.45 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s with 76.8% accuracy was found to differentiate benign from malignant tumours. DWI may offer adjunctive information about soft tissue tumours, but its clinical role is still to be defined.

  15. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical characterization of 172 cutaneous round cell tumours in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rios Araújo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a panel of antibodies (CD117, CD3, CD79a, CD45, cytokeratin, vimentin and E-cadherin on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of canine cutaneous round cell tumours. Neoplastic tumours were diagnosed by histology and histochemical stains and included 107 mast cell tumours, 31 cutaneous histiocytomas, two localized histiocytic sarcomas, 21 cutaneous lymphomas, three plasma cell tumours, one transmissible venereal tumour and seven unclassified round cell tumours. The histologic diagnosis was modified in 39.5% of the total 172 neoplasms. The staining for CD45 and Ecadherin were variable, and therefore, the final diagnoses of cutaneous histiocytoma and localized histiocytic sarcoma were made based on histology in association with negative results for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin. The cellular origin of unclassified round cell tumours was defined in all cases. Cutaneous B-cell lymphoma and plasma cell tumours were CD79a-positive and could be distinguished from each other by the morphological characteristics. Mast cell tumours and T cell lymphoma were CD117 and CD3 positive, respectively. The positive staining for vimentin and the negative staining for CD3, CD79a, CD117 and cytokeratin favoured the diagnosis of transmissible venereal tumours. Thus, the final diagnosis of cutaneous round cell tumours should be based on the interpretation of immunohistochemical results together with the cellular morphology observed by histology. Therefore, more studies to optimize the specific markers in formalin-fixed, paraffinembedded tissues (especially for histiocytes are required for definitive diagnosis of round cell tumours in dogs.

  16. Imaging in unilateral Wilms tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisse, Herve J.; Smets, Anne M.; Kaste, Sue C.; Owens, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    Wilms tumour is one of the most common malignancies in children, with an excellent prognosis after therapy. There is a very diverse approach to treatment according to geographical location. This variation in therapeutic attitude toward Wilms tumour, particularly between the United States and Europe, has consequences for the choice of imaging modality at diagnosis. In Europe, the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) treatment protocol is based on chemotherapy followed by surgery. Imaging (US, CT and MRI), clinical history and examination will help predict whether the findings are consistent with Wilms tumour. Furthermore, in the UK preoperative image-guided biopsy is advised to help identify the small group of patients who, despite typical imaging features of Wilms tumour, have other types of neoplasia that require alternative management. In the United States, the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS) advises surgery prior to chemo- and radiotherapy. Hence imaging must provide detailed anatomical information for surgical planning. This article discusses the role of imaging at diagnosis and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the available radiological techniques. We also focus on imaging the lung for metastatic disease and the consequences (to the patient's ultimate outcome) of CT-diagnosed small pulmonary nodules and discuss the radiological diagnosis and consequences of tumour rupture present at diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. Thymic epithelial tumours: from basic principles to individualised treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Girard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thymic epithelial tumours represent a wide range of anatomical, clinical, histological and molecular malignant entities that may be aggressive and difficult to treat. The histopathological classification distinguishes thymomas from thymic carcinomas. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune disorders. The management of thymic epithelial tumours is a paradigm of co-operation between clinicians, surgeons and pathologists, from establishing the diagnosis to organising the multimodal therapeutic strategy. Surgery is the mainstay of the curative-intent treatment, as complete resection represents the most significantly favourable prognostic factor on overall survival. In case of invasion of intra-thoracic structures and/or dissemination to the pleura and the pericardium, precluding complete resection to be achieved, primary chemotherapy has been used to reduce the tumour burden, possibly allowing subsequent surgery and/or radiotherapy. Novel strategies are needed, especially for refractory, recurrent tumours and thymic carcinomas, which carry a poor prognosis. Personalised approaches are currently being developed, as potentially “druggable” molecular targets are emerging from recent integrated genomic analyses. Along with the large variety of questions relative to the treatment strategy, thymic epithelial tumours represent a model of therapeutic implementation and achievement in orphan thoracic oncology, showing how the advent of new results induces new questions, as well as diversifies further clinical research directions and international collaborative initiatives.

  18. Planning Target Volume D95 and Mean Dose Should Be Considered for Optimal Local Control for Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhou, Shouhao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shen, Chan [Department of Health Service Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R.; Welsh, James D.; Lin, Steve H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To identify the optimal dose parameters predictive for local/lobar control after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This study encompassed a total of 1092 patients (1200 lesions) with NSCLC of clinical stage T1-T2 N0M0 who were treated with SABR of 50 Gy in 4 fractions or 70 Gy in 10 fractions, depending on tumor location/size, using computed tomography-based heterogeneity corrections and a convolution superposition calculation algorithm. Patients were monitored by chest CT or positron emission tomography/CT and/or biopsy after SABR. Factors predicting local/lobar recurrence (LR) were determined by competing risk multivariate analysis. Continuous variables were divided into 2 subgroups at cutoff values identified by receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: At a median follow-up time of 31.7 months (interquartile range, 14.8-51.3 months), the 5-year time to local recurrence within the same lobe and overall survival rates were 93.8% and 44.8%, respectively. Total cumulative number of patients experiencing LR was 40 (3.7%), occurring at a median time of 14.4 months (range, 4.8-46 months). Using multivariate competing risk analysis, independent predictive factors for LR after SABR were minimum biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) to 95% of planning target volume (PTVD95 BED{sub 10}) ≤86 Gy (corresponding to PTV D95 physics dose of 42 Gy in 4 fractions or 55 Gy in 10 fractions) and gross tumor volume ≥8.3 cm{sup 3}. The PTVmean BED{sub 10} was highly correlated with PTVD95 BED{sub 10.} In univariate analysis, a cutoff of 130 Gy for PTVmean BED{sub 10} (corresponding to PTVmean physics dose of 55 Gy in 4 fractions or 75 Gy in 10 fractions) was also significantly associated with LR. Conclusions: In addition to gross tumor volume, higher radiation dose delivered to the PTV predicts for better local/lobar control. We recommend that both PTVD95 BED

  19. Tocopherol in irradiation of temporary hypoxic tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaagerud, A.; Lund, N.; Peterson, H.I.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of tocopherol on the effect of local irradiation under induced ischaemia by temporary tourniquet of two rat tumours transplanted intramuscularly into one hindleg was evaluated. An impaired retardation of growth rate occurred in tumours irradiated under ischaemia. This effect was eliminated by pretreatment of animals with tocopherol. In separate experiments the method of inducing ischaemia was investigated by MDO-electrode measurements of tumour tissue oxygen pressure. A significant tumour hypoxia was found under tourniquet of the tumour-bearing leg of the animals. Pretreatment with tocopherol did not influence the tumour pO 2 . (Auth.)

  20. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  1. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  2. Anti-tumour activity in RAS-driven tumours by blocking AKT and MEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Khan, Khurum; Ong, Michael; Banerji, Udai; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Gandara, David R.; Patnaik, Amita; Baird, Richard D.; Olmos, David; Garrett, Christopher R.; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.; Rubin, Eric H.; Smith, Paul D.; Huang, Pearl; Learoyd, Maria; Shannon, Keith A.; Morosky, Anne; Tetteh, Ernestina; Jou, Ying-Ming; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P.; Moreno, Victor; Kaiser, Brianne; Yap, Timothy A.; Yan, Li; de Bono, Johann S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human tumours. KRAS-mutant cells may exhibit resistance to the allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) and allosteric AKT inhibitors (such as MK-2206), the combination of which may overcome resistance to both monotherapies. Experimental Design We conducted a dose/schedule-finding study evaluating MK-2206 and selumetinib in patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumours. Recommended dosing schedules were defined as MK-2206 135 mg weekly and selumetinib 100 mg once-daily. Results Grade 3 rash was the most common dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); other DLTs included grade 4 lipase increase, grade 3 stomatitis, diarrhoea, and fatigue, and grade 3 and grade 2 retinal pigment epithelium detachment. There were no meaningful pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Clinical anti-tumour activity included RECIST 1.0-confirmed partial responses in non-small cell lung cancer and low-grade ovarian carcinoma. Conclusion Responses in KRAS-mutant cancers were generally durable. Clinical co-targeting of MEK and AKT signalling may be an important therapeutic strategy in KRAS-driven human malignancies (Trial NCT number NCT01021748). PMID:25516890

  3. A targeted liposome delivery system for combretastatin A4: formulation optimization through drug loading and in vitro release studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallamothu, Ramakrishna; Wood, George C; Kiani, Mohammad F; Moore, Bob M; Horton, Frank P; Thoma, Laura A

    2006-01-01

    Efficient liposomal therapeutics require high drug loading and low leakage. The objective of this study is to develop a targeted liposome delivery system for combretastatin A4 (CA4), a novel antivascular agent, with high loading and stable drug encapsulation. Liposomes composed of hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), cholesterol, and distearoyl phosphoethanolamine-PEG-2000 conjugate (DSPE-PEG) were prepared by the lipid film hydration and extrusion process. Cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptides with affinity for alphav beta3-integrins overexpressed on tumor vascular endothelial cells were coupled to the distal end of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the liposomes sterically stabilized with PEG (non-targeted liposomes; LCLs). Effect of lipid concentration, drug-to-lipid ratio, cholesterol, and DSPE-PEG content in the formulation on CA4 loading and its release from the liposomes was studied. Total liposomal CA4 levels obtained increased with increasing lipid concentration in the formulation. As the drug-to-lipid ratio increased from 10:100 to 20:100, total drug in the liposome formulation increased from 1.05+/-0.11 mg/mL to 1.55+/-0.13 mg/mL, respectively. When the drug-to-lipid ratio was further raised to 40:100, the total drug in liposome formulation did not increase, but the amount of free drug increased significantly, thereby decreasing the percent of entrapped drug. Increasing cholesterol content in the formulation decreased drug loading. In vitro drug leakage from the liposomes increased with increase in drug-to-lipid ratio or DSPE-PEG content in the formulation; whereas increasing cholesterol content of the formulation up to 30 mol-percent, decreased CA4 leakage from the liposomes. Ligand coupling to the liposome surface increased drug leakage as a function of ligand density. Optimized liposome formulation with 100 mM lipid concentration, 20:100 drug-to-lipid ratio, 30 mol-percent cholesterol, 4 mol-percent DSPE-PEG, and 1 mol

  4. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Military target task performance after wavefront-guided (WFG) and wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Tana; Deaver, Dawne; Howell, Christopher; Moyer, Steve; Nguyen, Oanh; Mueller, Greg; Ryan, Denise; Sia, Rose K.; Stutzman, Richard; Pasternak, Joseph; Bower, Kraig

    2014-06-01

    Major decisions regarding life and death are routinely made on the modern battlefield, where visual function of the individual soldier can be of critical importance in the decision-making process. Glasses in the combat environment have considerable disadvantages: degradation of short term visual performance can occur as dust and sweat accumulate on lenses during a mission or patrol; long term visual performance can diminish as lenses become increasingly scratched and pitted; during periods of intense physical trauma, glasses can be knocked off the soldier's face and lost or broken. Although refractive surgery offers certain benefits on the battlefield when compared to wearing glasses, it is not without potential disadvantages. As a byproduct of refractive surgery, elevated optical aberrations can be induced, causing decreases in contrast sensitivity and increases in the symptoms of glare, halos, and starbursts. Typically, these symptoms occur under low light level conditions, the same conditions under which most military operations are initiated. With the advent of wavefront aberrometry, we are now seeing correction not only of myopia and astigmatism but of other, smaller optical aberrations that can cause the above symptoms. In collaboration with the Warfighter Refractive Eye Surgery Program and Research Center (WRESP-RC) at Fort Belvoir and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), the overall objective of this study is to determine the impact of wavefront guided (WFG) versus wavefront-optimized (WFO) photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) on military task visual performance. Psychophysical perception testing was conducted before and after surgery to measure each participant's performance regarding target detection and identification using thermal imagery. The results are presented here.

  6. Targeted deposition of antibodies on a multiplex CMOS microarray and optimization of a sensitive immunoassay using electrochemical detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cooper

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The CombiMatrix ElectraSense microarray is a highly multiplex, complementary metal oxide semiconductor with 12,544 electrodes that are individually addressable. This platform is commercially available as a custom DNA microarray; and, in this configuration, it has also been used to tether antibodies (Abs specifically on electrodes using complementary DNA sequences conjugated to the Abs.An empirical method is described for developing and optimizing immunoassays on the CombiMatrix ElectraSense microarray based upon targeted deposition of polypyrrole (Ppy and capture Ab. This process was automated using instrumentation that can selectively apply a potential or current to individual electrodes and also measure current generated at the electrodes by an enzyme-enhanced electrochemical (ECD reaction. By designating groups of electrodes on the array for different Ppy deposition conditions, we determined that the sensitivity and specificity of a sandwich immunoassay for staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB is influenced by the application of different voltages or currents and the application time. The sandwich immunoassay used a capture Ab adsorbed to the Ppy and a reporter Ab labeled for fluorescence detection or ECD, and results from these methods of detection were different.Using Ppy deposition conditions for optimum results, the lower limit of detection for SEB using the ECD assay was between 0.003 and 0.01 pg/ml, which represents an order of magnitude improvement over a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. In the absence of understanding the variables and complexities that affect assay performance, this highly multiplexed electrode array provided a rapid, high throughput, and empirical approach for developing a sensitive immunoassay.

  7. Modeling and optimization of energy generation and storage systems for thermal conditioning of buildings targeting conceptual building design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahovac, Milica

    2012-11-29

    minimal costs, emissions or consumption, while maintaining the quality of the supply and, where specified, achieving the targeted annual solar ratio. Two optimization algorithms, the global bounded Nelder Mead and the Exhaustive search are implemented. Simulation and optimization performance has been evaluated using building and weather data for four cities situated in four different climates. Finally a tool, entitled PROBA, has been proposed by adding a user interface to the mod-els. The major characteristic of the interface is its suitability for non-expert users. This is achieved by, firstly, reducing amount of input data by implementing preset values and, secondly, providing information support. Making this tool available to the architects repre-sents an effective way to consider the primary HVAC during the preliminary design, with-out causing additional cost. Although such a tool can never replace an HVAC engineer, its use can heighten the awareness of architects regarding the significance of building energy consumption and inspire further education in this field.

  8. Modeling and optimization of energy generation and storage systems for thermal conditioning of buildings targeting conceptual building design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahovac, Milica

    2012-11-29

    costs, emissions or consumption, while maintaining the quality of the supply and, where specified, achieving the targeted annual solar ratio. Two optimization algorithms, the global bounded Nelder Mead and the Exhaustive search are implemented. Simulation and optimization performance has been evaluated using building and weather data for four cities situated in four different climates. Finally a tool, entitled PROBA, has been proposed by adding a user interface to the mod-els. The major characteristic of the interface is its suitability for non-expert users. This is achieved by, firstly, reducing amount of input data by implementing preset values and, secondly, providing information support. Making this tool available to the architects repre-sents an effective way to consider the primary HVAC during the preliminary design, with-out causing additional cost. Although such a tool can never replace an HVAC engineer, its use can heighten the awareness of architects regarding the significance of building energy consumption and inspire further education in this field.

  9. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  10. Target volume definition for external beam partial breast radiotherapy: Clinical, pathological and technical studies informing current approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna M.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Yarnold, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Partial breast irradiation (PBI) is currently under investigation in several phase III trials and, following a recent consensus statement, its use off-study may increase despite ongoing uncertainty regarding optimal target volume definition. We review the clinical, pathological and technical evidence for target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (EB-PBI). The optimal method of tumour bed (TB) delineation requires X-ray CT imaging of implanted excision cavity wall markers. The definition of clinical target volume (CTV) as TB plus concentric 15 mm margins is based on the anatomical distribution of multifocal and multicentric disease around the primary tumour in mastectomy specimens, and the clinical locations of local tumour relapse (LR) after breast conservation surgery. If the majority of LR originate from foci of residual invasive and/or intraduct disease in the vicinity of the TB after complete microscopic resection, CTV margin logically takes account of the position of primary tumour within the surgical resection specimen. The uncertain significance of independent primary tumours as sources of preventable LR, and of wound healing responses in stimulating LR, increases the difficulties in defining optimal CTV. These uncertainties may resolve after long-term follow-up of current PBI trials. By contrast, a commonly used 10 mm clinical to planning target volume (PTV) margin has a stronger evidence base, although departmental set-up errors need to be confirmed locally. A CTV-PTV margin >10 mm may be required in women with larger breasts and/or large seromas, whilst the role of image-guided radiotherapy with or without TB markers in reducing CTV-PTV margins needs to be explored.

  11. The Succinated Proteome of FH-Mutant Tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the Krebs cycle enzyme fumarate hydratase (FH predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC. Loss of FH activity in HLRCC tumours causes accumulation of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate to high levels, which may act as an oncometabolite through various, but not necessarily mutually exclusive, mechanisms. One such mechanism, succination, is an irreversible non-enzymatic modification of cysteine residues by fumarate, to form S-(2-succinocysteine (2SC. Previous studies have demonstrated that succination of proteins including glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1 and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2 can have profound effects on cellular metabolism. Furthermore, immunostaining for 2SC is a sensitive and specific biomarker for HLRCC tumours. Here, we performed a proteomic screen on an FH-mutant tumour and two HLRCC-derived cancer cell lines and identified 60 proteins where one or more cysteine residues were succinated; 10 of which were succinated at cysteine residues either predicted, or experimentally proven, to be functionally significant. Bioinformatic enrichment analyses identified most succinated targets to be involved in redox signaling. To our knowledge, this is the first proteomic-based succination screen performed in human tumours and cancer-derived cells and has identified novel 2SC targets that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of HLRCC.

  12. Detection of apoptotic cells in tumour paraffin sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizem, J.; Coer, A.

    2003-01-01

    Apoptosis is a distinct form of cell death characterised by specific morphological features and regulated by complex molecular mechanisms. Its deregulation is fundamental for tumour growth and progression and, moreover, anticancer therapies suppress tumour growth mainly by induction of apoptosis. Since the extent of apoptosis in a tumour may have prognostic as well as therapeutic implications, much effort has been invested in developing specific methods that can be routinely used to detect apoptotic cells in archival formalin- fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Complex molecular pathways are involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Pro-apoptotic signals trigger activation of caspases that specifically cleave target proteins. Cleavage of proteins (caspase substrates) is responsible for morphological changes of apoptotic cells and DNA fragmentation. In the last decade, detection of apoptotic cells in formalin-fixed tumour tissue sections has been based mainly on morphology and characteristic DNA fragmentation. Recently, specific antibodies to activated caspases and cleaved target proteins (including cytokeratin 18, actin and PARP) have been produced that enable accurate detection of apoptosis in paraffin sections. (author)

  13. Bioactive albumin-based carriers for tumour chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Yasser; Khan, Ikram Ullah; Hussain, Talib; Alamgeer; Serra, Christophe A; Rizvi, Syed A A; Gerber, Minja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are posed as the natural counterpart of the synthetic polymers for the development of drug delivery systems and few of them, have been regarded safe for drug delivery purposes by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Serum albumin is the most abundant protein in human blood. Interest in the exploration of pharmaceutical applications of albumin-based drug delivery carriers, especially for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents, has increased in recent years. Albumin has several advantages over synthetic polymers, as it is biocompatible, biodegradable, has low cytotoxicity and has an excellent binding capacity with various drugs. Micro- and nano-carriers not only protect active pharmaceutical ingredients against degradation, but also offer a prolonged release of drugs in a controlled fashion. Since existing tumour chemotherapeutic agents neither target tumour cells, nor are they specific to tumour cells, a slow release of drugs from carriers would be beneficial in targeting carcinogenic cells intracellularly. This article aims at providing an overview of pharmaceutical applications of albumin as a drug delivery carrier in tumour chemotherapy.

  14. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anesti, Anna-Maria; Simpson, Guy R; Price, Toby; Pandha, Hardev S; Coffin, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) OncoVEX GM-CSF , we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) or artificial microRNA (miRNA) against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and β-galactosidase (lacZ). These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen in human clinical trials

  15. Perioperative management of patients with pituitary tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pituitary tumours can be very challenging for the anaesthesiologist. These patients require a thorough pre-operative assessment in view of underlying endocrine disturbances, which could cause anatomic and physiological disturbances. This needs to be optimized prior to surgery and the anaesthetic technique planned accordingly. The main intraoperative problems that could be encountered by the anaesthesiologist are airway problems, haemodynamic disturbances and potential for bleeding during surgery. The postoperative concerns are related to the endocrine system and fluid and water balance and this needs to be monitored closely and managed appropriately. The advent of minimally invasive surgery along with neuroimaging has considerably decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality following pituitary surgery. A team approach and close coordination between the endocrinologist, neurosurgeon and anaesthesiologist is imperative for a favourable outcome in patients undergoing pituitary surgery.

  16. Tumour-initiating cells vs. cancer 'stem' cells and CD133: What's in the name?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuzil, Jiri; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Chladova, Jaromira; Wang, Xiufang; Prochazka, Lubomir; Dong, Lanfeng; Andera, Ladislav; Ralph, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a subset of cells within a tumour have 'stem-like' characteristics. These tumour-initiating cells, distinct from non-malignant stem cells, show low proliferative rates, high self-renewing capacity, propensity to differentiate into actively proliferating tumour cells, resistance to chemotherapy or radiation, and they are often characterised by elevated expression of the stem cell surface marker CD133. Understanding the molecular biology of the CD133 + cancer cells is now essential for developing more effective cancer treatments. These may include drugs targeting organelles, such as mitochondria or lysosomes, using highly efficient and selective inducers of apoptosis. Alternatively, agents or treatment regimens that enhance sensitivity of these therapy-resistant 'tumour stem cells' to the current or emerging anti-tumour drugs would be of interest as well

  17. Identification of genes involved in the biology of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours using Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Eikmeier, Kristin; Linge, Anna; Kool, Marcel; Koos, Björn; Schulz, Jacqueline; Albrecht, Stefanie; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Frühwald, Michael C.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumours (AT/RT) are malignant brain tumours. Unlike most other human brain tumours, AT/RT are characterized by inactivation of one single gene, SMARCB1. SMARCB1 is a member of the evolutionarily conserved SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex, which has an important role in the control of cell differentiation and proliferation. Little is known, however, about the pathways involved in the oncogenic effects of SMARCB1 inactivation, which might also represent targets for treatment. Here we report a comprehensive genetic screen in the fruit fly that revealed several genes not yet associated with loss of snr1, the Drosophila homologue of SMARCB1. We confirm the functional role of identified genes (including merlin, kibra and expanded, known to regulate hippo signalling pathway activity) in human rhabdoid tumour cell lines and AT/RT tumour samples. These results demonstrate that fly models can be employed for the identification of clinically relevant pathways in human cancer.

  18. Tumour markers in gynaecological practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adewole, I.F.

    1999-02-01

    Gynaecological cancers are fairly common in developing countries and represent about 26 % f all cancers. Application of cervical cytology screening nationally has made cervical cancer one of the most preventable malignant diseases thus eliminating the challenges of advanced cancer management. Tumour markers has played a most crucial role in this respect

  19. Optimization of a neutron production target based on the 7Li (p,n)7Be reaction with the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Kreiner, Andres J.; Minsky, Daniel; Valda, Alejandro A.; Somacal, Hector R.

    2003-01-01

    In order to optimize a neutron production target for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT) a Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) investigation has been performed. Neutron fields from a LiF thick target (with both a D 2 O-graphite and a Al/AlF 3 -graphite moderator/reflector assembly) were evaluated along the centerline in a head phantom. The target neutron beam was simulated from the 7 Li(p,n) 7 Be nuclear reaction for 1.89, 2.0 and 2.3 MeV protons. The results show that it is more advantageous to irradiate the target with near resonance energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the high neutron yield at this energy. On the other hand, the Al/AlF 3 -graphite exhibits a more efficient performance than D 2 O. (author)

  20. Mohs micrographic surgery of rare cutaneous tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, S.C.; Lee, C.B. van; Beisenherz, J.; Mureau, M.A.M.; Overbeek, L.I.H.; Nijsten, T.; Bos, R.R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrence rates after Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for rare cutaneous tumours are poorly defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the recurrence rate after MMS for rare cutaneous tumours at a university centre. METHODS & MATERIALS: Retrospective review of all rare cutaneous tumours treated

  1. How to perform 3D reconstruction of skull base tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, N-X; Dubrulle, F; Risoud, M; Vincent, C

    2017-04-01

    The surgical management of skull base lesions is difficult due to the complex anatomy of the region and the intimate relations between the lesion and adjacent nerves and vessels. Minimally invasive approaches are increasingly used in skull base surgery to ensure an optimal functional prognosis. Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction facilitates surgical planning by visualizing the anatomical relations of the lesions in all planes (arteries, veins, nerves, inner ear) and simulation of the surgical approach in the operating position. Helical CT angiography is performed with optimal timing of the injection in terms of tumour and vessel contrast enhancement. 3D definition of each structure is based on colour coding by automatic thresholding (bone, vessels) or manual segmentation on each slice (tumour, nerves, inner ear). Imaging is generally presented in 3 dimensions (superior, coronal, sagittal) with simulation of the surgical procedure (5 to 6 reconstructions in the operating position at different depths). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Ethical frameworks for obtaining informed consent in tumour profiling: an evidence-based case for Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylstra, Yasmin; Lysaght, Tamra; Thrivikraman, Jyothi; Watson, Sangeetha; Tan, Patrick

    2017-12-08

    Genomic profiling of malignant tumours has assisted clinicians in providing targeted therapies for many serious cancer-related illnesses. Although the characterisation of somatic mutations is the primary aim of tumour profiling for treatment, germline mutations may also be detected given the heterogenous origin of mutations observed in tumours. Guidance documents address the return of germline findings that have health implications for patients and their genetic relations. However, the implications of discovering a potential but unconfirmed germline finding from tumour profiling are yet to be fully explored. Moreover, as tumour profiling is increasingly applied in oncology, robust ethical frameworks are required to encourage large-scale data sharing and data aggregation linking molecular data to clinical outcomes, to further understand the role of genetics in oncogenesis and to develop improved cancer therapies. This paper reports on the results of empirical research that is broadly aimed at developing an ethical framework for obtaining informed consent to return results from tumour profiling tests and to share the biomolecular data sourced from tumour tissues of cancer patients. Specifically, qualitative data were gathered from 36 semi-structured interviews with cancer patients and oncology clinicians at a cancer treatment centre in Singapore. The interview data indicated that patients had a limited comprehension of cancer genetics and implications of tumour testing. Furthermore, oncology clinicians stated that they lacked the time to provide in depth explanations of the tumour profile tests. However, it was accepted from both patients and oncologist that the return potential germline variants and the sharing of de-identified tumour profiling data nationally and internationally should be discussed and provided as an option during the consent process. Findings provide support for the return of tumour profiling results provided that they are accompanied with an

  3. Tumour cell heterogeneity maintained by cooperating subclones in Wnt-driven mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Allison S; Leonard, Travis L; Gestl, Shelley A; Gunther, Edward J

    2014-04-03

    Cancer genome sequencing studies indicate that a single breast cancer typically harbours multiple genetically distinct subclones. As carcinogenesis involves a breakdown in the cell-cell cooperation that normally maintains epithelial tissue architecture, individual subclones within a malignant microenvironment are commonly depicted as self-interested competitors. Alternatively, breast cancer subclones might interact cooperatively to gain a selective growth advantage in some cases. Although interclonal cooperation has been shown to drive tumorigenesis in fruitfly models, definitive evidence for functional cooperation between epithelial tumour cell subclones in mammals is lacking. Here we use mouse models of breast cancer to show that interclonal cooperation can be essential for tumour maintenance. Aberrant expression of the secreted signalling molecule Wnt1 generates mixed-lineage mammary tumours composed of basal and luminal tumour cell subtypes, which purportedly derive from a bipotent malignant progenitor cell residing atop a tumour cell hierarchy. Using somatic Hras mutations as clonal markers, we show that some Wnt tumours indeed conform to a hierarchical configuration, but that others unexpectedly harbour genetically distinct basal Hras mutant and luminal Hras wild-type subclones. Both subclones are required for efficient tumour propagation, which strictly depends on luminally produced Wnt1. When biclonal tumours were challenged with Wnt withdrawal to simulate targeted therapy, analysis of tumour regression and relapse revealed that basal subclones recruit heterologous Wnt-producing cells to restore tumour growth. Alternatively, in the absence of a substitute Wnt source, the original subclones often evolve to rescue Wnt pathway activation and drive relapse, either by restoring cooperation or by switching to a defector strategy. Uncovering similar modes of interclonal cooperation in human cancers may inform efforts aimed at eradicating tumour cell communities.

  4. Armored CAR T-cells: utilizing cytokines and pro-inflammatory ligands to enhance CAR T-cell anti-tumour efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Yeku, Oladapo O.; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2016-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells that have been genetically modified to express an artificial construct consisting of a synthetic T-cell receptor (TCR) targeted to a predetermined antigen expressed on a tumour. Coupling the T-cell receptor to a CD3ζ signalling domain paved the way for first generation CAR T-cells that were efficacious against cluster of differentiation (CD)19-expressing B-cell malignancies. Optimization with additional signalling domains such as CD28 or 4-...

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals targeting melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.Q.; Berghofer, P.; Liu, X.; Greguric, I.; Dikic, B.; Ballantyne, P.; Mattner, F.; Nguyen, V.; Loc' h, C.; Katsifis, A. [Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, N.S.W., Sydney (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers known with a high rate of mortality and increasing global incidence. So, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes could make enormous contributions to melanoma patient health care. We have been studying melanoma tumours through several targeting mechanisms including melanin or specific receptor based radiopharmaceuticals Structure activity studies indicate that the substitution patterns on radioiodinated benzamides significantly influence the uptake mechanism from melanin to sigma-receptor binding. Furthermore, the position of the iodine as well as the presence of key functional groups and substituents has resulted in compounds with varying degrees of activity uptake and retention in tumours. From these results, a novel molecule 2-(2-(4-(4-iodo benzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl)isoindoline- 1,3-dione (M.E.L.037) was synthesized, labelled with iodine-123 and evaluated for application in melanoma tumour scintigraphy and radiotherapy. The tumour imaging potential of {sup 123}IM.E.L.037 was studied in vivo in C.57 B.L./ 6 J female mice bearing the B.16 F.0. murine melanoma tumour and in BALB/c nude mice bearing the A.375 human amelanotic melanoma tumour by biodistribution, competition studies and by SPECT imaging. {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 exhibited high and rapid uptake in the B.16 F.0 melanoma tumour at 1 h (13 % I.D./g) increasing with time to reach 25 % I.D./g at 6 h. A significant uptake was also observed in the eyes (2% I.D., at 3-6 h p.i.) of black mice. No uptake was observed in the tumour or in the eyes of nude mice bearing the A.375 tumour. Due to high uptake and long retention in the tumour and rapid body clearance, standardized uptake values(S.U.V.) of {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 were 30 and 60, at 24 and 48 h p.i.,respectively. SPECT imaging of mice bearing the B.16 melanoma indicated the radioactivity was predominately located in the tumour followed by the eyes, while no

  6. Volume arc therapy of gynaecological tumours: target volume coverage improvement without dose increase for critical organs; Arctherapie volumique des tumeurs gynecologiques: amelioration de la couverture du volume cible sans augmentation de la dose aux organes critiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducteil, A.; Kerr, C.; Idri, K.; Fenoglietto, P.; Vieillot, S.; Ailleres, N.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D. [CRLC Val-d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the application of conventional intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and volume arc-therapy (RapidArc) for the treatment of cervical cancers, with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Dosimetric plans associated with each of these techniques have been compared. Dose-volume histograms of these three plans have also been compared for the previsional target volume (PTV), organs at risk, and sane tissue. IMCT techniques are equivalent in terms of sparing of organs at risk, and improve target volume coverage with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Arc-therapy reduces significantly treatment duration. Short communication

  7. Genetic and molecular analysis of radon-induced rat lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilly, M.N.; Joubert, Ch.; Levalois, C.; Dano, L.; Chevillard, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have a model of radon-induced rat lung tumours, which allow us to analyse the cytogenetic and molecular alterations of the tumours. The aim is to better understand the mechanisms of radio-induced carcinogenesis and to define if it exists a specificity of radio-induced genetic alterations as compared to the genetic alterations found in the sporadic tumours. We have started our analysis by developing global cytogenetic and molecular approaches. We have shown that some alterations are recurrent. The genes that are potentially involved are the oncogene MET and the tumour suppressor Bene p16, which are also frequently altered in human lung tumours. Simultaneously, we have focussed our analysis by targeting the search of mutation in the tumour suppressor gene TP3. We have found that 8 of 39 tumours were mutated by deletion in the coding sequence of TP53. This high frequency of deletion, which is not observed in the human p53 mutation database could constitute a signature of radio-induced alterations. On this assumption, this type of alteration should not be only found on TP53 Bene but also in other suppressor genes which are inactivated by a mutation such as p16 for example. The work we are carrying out on radio-induced tumours among humans and animals is directed to this end. (author)

  8. Total {sup 18}F-dopa PET tumour uptake reflects metabolic endocrine tumour activity in patients with a carcinoid tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Walenkamp, Annemiek M.; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Medical Oncology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Johan R. de; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Brouwers, Adrienne H. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Sluiter, Wim; Links, Thera P. [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Endocrinology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-dopa) has an excellent sensitivity to detect carcinoid tumour lesions. {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake and the levels of biochemical tumour markers are mediated by tumour endocrine metabolic activity. We evaluated whether total {sup 18}F-dopa tumour uptake on PET, defined as whole-body metabolic tumour burden (WBMTB), reflects tumour load per patient, as measured with tumour markers. Seventy-seven consecutive carcinoid patients who underwent an {sup 18}F-dopa PET scan in two previously published studies were analysed. For all tumour lesions mean standardised uptake values (SUVs) at 40% of the maximal SUV and tumour volume on {sup 18}F-dopa PET were determined and multiplied to calculate a metabolic burden per lesion. WBMTB was the sum of the metabolic burden of all individual lesions per patient. The 24-h urinary serotonin, urine and plasma 5-hydroxindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), catecholamines (nor)epinephrine, dopamine and their metabolites, measured in urine and plasma, and serum chromogranin A served as tumour markers. All but 1 were evaluable for WBMTB; 74 patients had metastatic disease. {sup 18}F-dopa PET detected 979 lesions. SUV{sub max} on {sup 18}F-dopa PET varied up to 29-fold between individual lesions within the same patients. WBMTB correlated with urinary serotonin (r = 0.51) and urinary and plasma 5-HIAA (r = 0.78 and 0.66). WBMTB also correlated with urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and plasma dopamine, but not with serum chromogranin A. Tumour load per patient measured with {sup 18}F-dopa PET correlates with tumour markers of the serotonin and catecholamine pathway in urine and plasma in carcinoid patients, reflecting metabolic tumour activity. (orig.)

  9. Mathematical models of tumour and normal tissue response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.; Dale, R.G.; Charing Cross Group of Hospitals, London

    1999-01-01

    The historical application of mathematics in the natural sciences and in radiotherapy is compared. The various forms of mathematical models and their limitations are discussed. The Linear Quadratic (LQ) model can be modified to include (i) radiobiological parameter changes that occur during fractionated radiotherapy, (ii) situations such as focal forms of radiotherapy, (iii) normal tissue responses, and (iv) to allow for the process of optimization. The inclusion of a variable cell loss factor in the LQ model repopulation term produces a more flexible clonogenic doubling time, which can simulate the phenomenon of 'accelerated repopulation'. Differential calculus can be applied to the LQ model after elimination of the fraction number integers. The optimum dose per fraction (maximum cell kill relative to a given normal tissue fractionation sensitivity) is then estimated from the clonogen doubling times and the radiosensitivity parameters (or α/β ratios). Economic treatment optimization is described. Tumour volume studies during or following teletherapy are used to optimize brachytherapy. The radiation responses of both individual tumours and tumour populations (by random sampling 'Monte-Carlo' techniques from statistical ranges of radiobiological and physical parameters) can be estimated. Computerized preclinical trials can be used to guide choice of dose fractionation scheduling in clinical trials. The potential impact of gene and other biological therapies on the results of radical radiotherapy are testable. New and experimentally testable hypotheses are generated from limited clinical data by exploratory modelling exercises. (orig.)

  10. PET imaging of alphavbeta integrin expression in tumours with Ga-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Yim, C.B.; Franssen, G.M.; Schuit, R.C.; Luurtsema, G.; Liu, S.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3)-binding characteristics of (68)Ga-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared

  11. The rationale for targeting the LOX family in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Holly E; Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic targeting of extracellular proteins is becoming hugely attractive in light of evidence implicating the tumour microenvironment as pivotal in all aspects of tumour initiation and progression. Members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins are secreted by tumours and are the ......The therapeutic targeting of extracellular proteins is becoming hugely attractive in light of evidence implicating the tumour microenvironment as pivotal in all aspects of tumour initiation and progression. Members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of proteins are secreted by tumours...... and are the subject of much effort to understand their roles in cancer. In this Review we discuss the roles of members of this family in the remodelling of the tumour microenvironment and their paradoxical roles in tumorigenesis and metastasis. We also discuss how targeting this family of proteins might lead to a new...... avenue of cancer therapeutics....

  12. Tumours of the fetal body: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avni, Fred E.; Massez, Anne; Cassart, Marie [University Clinics of Brussels - Erasme Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Tumours of the fetal body are rare, but lesions have been reported in all spaces, especially in the mediastinum, the pericardial space, the adrenals, the kidney, and the liver. Lymphangioma and teratoma are the commonest histological types encountered, followed by cardiac rhabdomyoma. Adrenal neuroblastoma is the commonest malignant tumour. Imaging plays an essential role in the detection and work-up of these tumours. In addition to assisting clinicians it also helps in counselling parents. Most tumours are detected by antenatal US, but fetal MRI is increasingly used as it brings significant additional information in terms of tumour extent, composition and complications. (orig.)

  13. Unravelling the biology of human papillomavirus (HPV) related tumours to enhance their radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vozenin, M.C.; Lord, H.K.; Deutsch, E.; Vozenin, M.C.; Hartl, D.

    2010-01-01

    HPV infection is associated with most squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix and many head and neck SCC. While recent understanding of the mechanisms of HPV-induced carcinogenesis has lead to the development of prophylactic vaccines, the principal modality of treatment is radiotherapy and despite concurrent chemotherapy, outcomes remain suboptimal. Improving the radiotherapeutic index thus remains an important challenge as well as defining predictive assays for treatment outcome of HPV-related tumours. Therefore elucidating the influence of the HPV virus on tumour radiosensitivity is of major interest due to the prevalence of HPV-related tumours worldwide and due to evidence that head and neck HPV-tumours have markedly different clinical outcomes compared to non-HPV-related tumours. This difference may allow for different treatment strategies to be developed. The present review aims to summarize the current understanding of radiosensitivity and HPV-related tumour biology in order to subsequently develop new approaches to enhance the therapeutic index. This review also emphasizes the relevance of E6 and E7 onco-proteins to tumour cell response to radiotherapy suggesting that specific targeted approaches such as concomitant modulation of additional pathways using targeted therapies should offer new therapeutic avenues. (authors)

  14. A critical role of platelet TGF-β release in podoplanin-mediated tumour invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Ai; Okitaka, Mina; Takagi, Satoshi; Takami, Miho; Sato, Shigeo; Nishio, Makoto; Okumura, Sakae; Fujita, Naoya

    2017-02-08

    The tumour microenvironment is critical for various characteristics of tumour malignancies. Platelets, as part of the tumour microenvironment, are associated with metastasis formation via increasing the rate of tumour embolus formation in microvasculature. However, the mechanisms underlying the ability of tumour cells to acquire invasiveness and extravasate into target organs at the site of embolization remain unclear. In this study, we reported that platelet aggregation-inducing factor podoplanin expressed on tumour cell surfaces were found to not only promote the formation of tumour-platelet aggregates via interaction with platelets, but also induced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumour cells by enhancing transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) release from platelets. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that podoplanin-mediated EMT resulted in increased invasiveness and extravasation of tumour cells. Treatment of mice with a TGF-β-neutralizing antibody statistically suppressed podoplanin-mediated distant metastasis in vivo, suggesting that podoplanin promoted haematogenous metastasis in part by releasing TGF-β from platelets that was essential for EMT of tumour cells. Therefore, our findings suggested that blocking the TGF-β signalling pathway might be a promising strategy for suppressing podoplanin-mediated haematogenous metastasis in vivo.

  15. MRI of primary meningeal tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, H.K.; Na, D.G.; Byun, H.S.; Han, B.K.; Kim, S.S.; Kim, I.O.; Shin, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Childhood meningeal tumours are uncommon and mostly meningiomas. We reviewed the histological and radiological findings in meningeal tumours in six children aged 12 years or less (four benign meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma). Compared to the adult counterpart, childhood meningiomas showed atypical features: cysts, haemorrhage, aggressiveness and unusual location. MRI features varied according to the site of the tumour, histology, haemorrhage, and presence of intra- or peritumoral cysts. Diagnosis of the extra-axial tumour was relatively easy in two patients with meningiomas, one malignant meningioma and one haemangiopericytoma. MRI findings strongly suggested an intra-axial tumour in two patients with benign meningiomas, because of severe adjacent edema. Awareness of the variable findings of childhood meningiomas and similar tumours may help in differentiation from brain tumours. (orig.)

  16. Primary bone tumours of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlowski, K.; Azouz, E.M.; Campbell, J.; Marton, D.; Morris, L.; Padovani, J.; Sprague, P.; Beluffi, G.; Berzero, G.F.; Cherubino, P.; Adelaide Children's Hospital; Hospital for Children, Perth; Montreal Children's Hospital, Quebec; Saint Justine Hospital, Montreal, Quebec; Children's Hospital, Denver, CO; Hopital des Enfants, 13 - Marseille; Pavia Univ.; Pavia Univ.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-one primary bone tumours of the hand in children from 8 paediatric hospitals are reported. Osteochondromas and enchondromas were not included. Our material consisted of 16 patients with common tumours (3 Ewing's sarcoma, 5 aneurysmal bone cyst, 6 osteoid osteoma and 2 epithelioma) and 5 patients with uncommon tumours (osteoma, simple bone cyst, haemangiopericytoma, capillary angiomatous tumour and benign ossifying fibroma or osteoblastoma). The X-ray diagnosis of the common tumours should have high concordance with histology, whereas that of uncommon tumours in much more difficult and uncertain. The characteristic features of Ewing's sarcoma are stressed as all our children with this tumour had a delayed diagnosis and a fatal outcome. Differential diagnosis with other short tubular bone lesions of the hand - specifically osteomyelitis - is discussed and the posibilities of microscopic diagnosis are stressed. (orig.)

  17. Radiodiagnosis of tumours of gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yu.N.; Antonovich, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Systematic description of X-ray picture of tumours of gastrointestinal tract organs is given. The possibilities of contemporary methods of X-ray examination in their revealing are shown. Clinical and X-ray trend of tumour diagnosis is underlined. The basic and accessory symptoms are analyzed from which X-ray semiotics of tumours is turned out. The expressiveness of X-ray symptoms is shown in relation to morphological forms and localization of the tumours. Much attention is given to radiodiagnosis of early tumours of stomach. Differential diagnosis of tumours with non-tumoural diseases is given. X-ray semiotics of lesions of gastrointestinal tract organs in malignant diseases of blood system is presented [ru

  18. Teratoid Wilms tumour with chemotherapy resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Gahine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of Teratoid Wilms tumour (a rare histologic variant in a 4 year old male who presented with an abdominal lump. Wilms Tumour with paracaval lymphadenopathy and tumour thrombi in right renal vein and inferior vena cava was made radiologically. FNAC report was suggestive of Wilms tumour and patient was subjected to 6 cycles of chemotherapy with not much reduction in size. Post nephrectomy histological diagnosis of Teratoid Wilms tumour was established. Resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy is thought to be due to presence of well differentiated histologic appearance. Teratoid Wilms tumour is usually not an aggressive neoplasm and prognosis is comparatively neoplasm and prognosis is comparatively good if the tumour is excised completely thus surgery being the best treatment.

  19. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  20. Soft computing model for optimized siRNA design by identifying off target possibilities using artificial neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Reena; John, Philips George; Peter S, David

    2015-05-15

    The ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to do posttranscriptional gene regulation by knocking down targeted genes is an important research topic in functional genomics, biomedical research and in cancer therapeutics. Many tools had been developed to design exogenous siRNA with high experimental inhibition. Even though considerable amount of work has been done in designing exogenous siRNA, design of effective siRNA sequences is still a challenging work because the target mRNAs must be selected such that their corresponding siRNAs are likely to be efficient against that target and unlikely to accidentally silence other transcripts due to sequence similarity. In some cases, siRNAs may tolerate mismatches with the target mRNA, but knockdown of genes other than the intended target could make serious consequences. Hence to design siRNAs, two important concepts must be considered: the ability in knocking down target genes and the off target possibility on any nontarget genes. So before doing gene silencing by siRNAs, it is essential to analyze their off target effects in addition to their inhibition efficacy against a particular target. Only a few methods have been developed by considering both efficacy and off target possibility of siRNA against a gene. In this paper we present a new design of neural network model with whole stacking energy (ΔG) that enables to identify the efficacy and off target effect of siRNAs against target genes. The tool lists all siRNAs against a particular target with their inhibition efficacy and number of matches or sequence similarity with other genes in the database. We could achieve an excellent performance of Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R=0. 74) and Area Under Curve (AUC=0.906) when the threshold of whole stacking energy is ≥-34.6 kcal/mol. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is one of the best score while considering the "combined efficacy and off target possibility" of siRNA for silencing a gene. The proposed model

  1. Instructive role of the vascular niche in promoting tumour growth and tissue repair by angiocrine factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jason M; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-02-01

    The precise mechanisms whereby anti-angiogenesis therapy blocks tumour growth or causes vascular toxicity are unknown. We propose that endothelial cells establish a vascular niche that promotes tumour growth and tissue repair not only by delivering nutrients and O2 but also through an 'angiocrine' mechanism by producing stem and progenitor cell-active trophogens. Identification of endothelial-derived instructive angiocrine factors will allow direct tumour targeting, while diminishing the unwanted side effects associated with the use of anti-angiogenic agents.

  2. [Awake craniotomy for brain tumours].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Peter; Metcalf, Kerstin; Vigren, Patrick; Lindehammar, Hans; Nilsson, Malin; Boström, Sverre

    2016-10-11

    Awake craniotomy for brain tumours  Awake neurosurgery is a useful method in lesions near eloquent brain areas, particularly low-grade gliomas.The aim is to maximise tumour resection and preserve neurological function. We performed 40 primary awake surgeries and 8 residual surgeries. Patients were operated awake throughout the procedure or with a laryngeal mask and general anaesthesia during the opening stage and then awake during intracerebral surgery. Language and motor function were mapped with direct cortical stimulation, motor evoked potential and standardised neurological testing. Radiologically, complete resection was achieved in 18 out of 40 patients in the primary surgeries. Full neurological recovery at three months was observed in 29 patients. Of the 11 patients with persisting neurological deficits at three months, symptoms were present preoperatively in 9 patients. We conclude that awake surgery, combined with intraoperative neurophysiological methods, is a safe method to improve treatment for low-grade gliomas.

  3. SU-E-T-256: Optimizing the Combination of Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Agents Using a Multi-Scale Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Dosimetry Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besemer, A; Bednarz, B; Titz, B; Grudzinski, J; Weichert, J; Hall, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Combination targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is appealing because it can potentially exploit different mechanisms of action from multiple radionuclides as well as the variable dose rates due to the different radionuclide half-lives. The work describes the development of a multiobjective optimization algorithm to calculate the optimal ratio of radionuclide injection activities for delivery of combination TRT. Methods: The ‘diapeutic’ (diagnostic and therapeutic) agent, CLR1404, was used as a proof-of-principle compound in this work. Isosteric iodine substitution in CLR1404 creates a molecular imaging agent when labeled with I-124 or a targeted radiotherapeutic agent when labeled with I-125 or I-131. PET/CT images of high grade glioma patients were acquired at 4.5, 24, and 48 hours post injection of 124I-CLR1404. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 and 125ICLR1404 absorbed dose (AD) and biological effective dose (BED) were calculated for each patient using a patient-specific Monte Carlo dosimetry platform. The optimal ratio of injection activities for each radionuclide was calculated with a multi-objective optimization algorithm using the weighted sum method. Objective functions such as the tumor dose heterogeneity and the ratio of the normal tissue to tumor doses were minimized and the relative importance weights of each optimization function were varied. Results: For each optimization function, the program outputs a Pareto surface map representing all possible combinations of radionuclide injection activities so that values that minimize the objective function can be visualized. A Pareto surface map of the weighted sum given a set of user-specified importance weights is also displayed. Additionally, the ratio of optimal injection activities as a function of the all possible importance weights is generated so that the user can select the optimal ratio based on the desired weights. Conclusion: Multi-objective optimization of radionuclide injection activities

  4. Putting tumours in context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek

    2001-10-01

    The interactions between cancer cells and their micro- and macroenvironment create a context that promotes tumor growth and protects it from immune attack. The functional association of cancer cells with their surrounding tissues forms a new 'organ' that changes as malignancy progresses. Investigation of this process might provide new insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and could also lead to new therapeutic targets. Under normal conditions, ORGANS are made up of TISSUES that exchange information with other cell types via cell-cell contact, cytokines and the EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX (ECM). The ECM, which is produced by collaboration between STROMAL fibroblasts and EPITHELIAL cells, provides structural scaffolding for cells, as well as contextual information. The endothelial vasculature provides nutrients and oxygen, and cells of the immune system combat pathogens and remove apoptotic cells. Epithelial cells associate into intact, polarized sheets. These tissues communicate through a complex network of interactions: physically, through direct contact or through the intervening ECM, and biochemically, through both soluble and insoluble signalling molecules. In combination, these interactions provide the information that is necessary to maintain cellular differentiation and to create complex tissue structures. Occasionally, the intercellular signals that define the normal context become disrupted. Alterations in epithelial tissues can lead to movement of epithelial sheets and proliferation - for example, after activation of mesenchymal fibroblasts due to wounding.Normally, these conditions are temporary and reversible, but when inflammation is sustained, an escalating feedback loop ensues.Under persistent inflammatory conditions, continual upregulation of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by stromal fibroblasts can disrupt the ECM, and invading immune cells can overproduce factors that promote abnormal proliferation. As this process

  5. Reconstructive options in pelvic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayilvahanan N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pelvic tumours present a complex problem. It is difficult to choose between limb salvage and hemipelvectomy. Method: Forty three patients of tumours of pelvis underwent limb salvage resection with reconstruction in 32 patients. The majority were chondrosarcomas (20 cases followed by Ewing sarcoma. Stage II B was the most common stage in malignant lesions and all the seven benign lesions were aggressive (B3. Surgical margins achieved were wide in 31 and marginal in 12 cases. Ilium was involved in 51% of cases and periacetabular involvement was seen in 12 patients. The resections done were mostly of types I &II of Enneking′s classification of pelvic resection. Arthrodesis was attempted in 24 patients. Customized Saddle prosthesis was used in seven patients and no reconstruction in 12 patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to all high-grade malignant tumours, combined with radiotherapy in 7 patients. Results: With a mean follow up of 48.5 months and one patient lost to follow up, the recurrence rate among the evaluated cases was 16.6%. Oncologically, 30 patients were continuously disease free with 7 local recurrences and 4 deaths due to disseminated disease and 2 patients died of other causes. During the initial years, satisfactory functional results were achieved with prosthetic replacement. Long-term functional result of 36 patients who were alive at the time of latest follow up was satisfactory in 75% who underwent arthrodesis and in those where no reconstruction was used. We also describe a method of new classification of pelvic resections that clarifies certain shortcomings of the previous systems of classification. Conclusion: Selection of a procedure depends largely on the patient factors, the tumour grade, the resultant defect and the tissue factors. Resection with proper margins gives better functional and oncological results

  6. Optimal Target Range of Closed-Loop Inspired Oxygen Support in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Cross-Over Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Maria Elisabeth Nicoletta; van Zanten, Henriette A; Bachman, Tom E; Te Pas, Arjan B; van Kaam, Anton H; Onland, Wes

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the effect of different pulse oximetry (SpO 2 ) target range settings during automated fraction of inspired oxygen control (A-FiO 2 ) on time spent within a clinically set SpO 2 alarm range in oxygen-dependent infants on noninvasive respiratory support. Forty-one preterm infants (gestational age [median] 26 weeks, age [median] 21 days) on FiO 2  >0.21 receiving noninvasive respiratory support were subjected to A-FiO 2 using 3 SpO 2 target ranges (86%-94%, 88%-92%, or 89%-91%) in random order for 24 hours each. Before switching to the next target range, SpO 2 was manually controlled for 24 hours (washout period). The primary outcome was the time spent within the clinically set alarm limits of 86%-94%. The percent time within the 86%-94% SpO 2 alarm range was similar for all 3 A-FiO 2 target ranges (74%). Time spent in hyperoxemia was not significantly different between target ranges. However, the time spent in severe hypoxemia (SpO 2  target ranges of A-FiO 2 (88%-92%; 1.9%, 89%-91%; 1.7%) compared with the wide target range (86%-94%; 3.4%, P target range. Narrowing the target range of A-FiO 2 to the desired median ±2% is effective in reducing the time spent in hypoxemia, without increasing the risk of hyperoxemia. www.trialregister.nl: NTR4368. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of the internal target system of the C V-28 cyclotron at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Sumair Gouveia de

    1996-01-01

    The C V-28 cyclotron at IPEN-CNEN/S P is used mainly for radioisotope production to be utilized in nuclear medicine for diagnostic purposes. Among these radioisotopes we can cite 67 Ga and 111 In, which are obtained by irradiation of Zn and Cd solid targets. Up to now, the irradiations were performed in the external beam line, which has limitations in beam current due to the extraction system, that can at best extract between 50 and 70% of the produced beam. This is a critical point for an efficient radioisotope production. A possible solution to achieve high beam currents is a system that allows the irradiation of these solid targets with the internal beam. In this case, the total produced beam can be used. For this, the objective of this work was to modify and improve the internal target system of the C V-28 Cyclotron, which had three critical points in the original project, that made the system useless. First, the transport of the target to the irradiation position was modified: the pneumatic tube was changed to a motor drive service. Secondly, the target cooling system was improved. Third and the most critical, the modification on the locking system of the target holder that could bring the cyclotron tank to atmosphere. These modifications implied on a change in all logical sequence of the target control. With these modifications the system became more versatile and showed more reproducibility and reliability than the original internal target system. The loss of mass in natural Zn targets irradiated with currents up to 80 μA was negligible. The production yield of 67 Ga obtained, at EOB, was 21.2 MBq/μAh (0.57 mCi/μAh), that is in good agreement with those obtained in the irradiation with external beams. (author)

  8. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s a can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s a . The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs

  9. Converting dose distributions into tumour control probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, A E [The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics

    1996-08-01

    The endpoints in radiotherapy that are truly of relevance are not dose distributions but the probability of local control, sometimes known as the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and the Probability of Normal Tissue Complications (NTCP). A model for the estimation of TCP based on simple radiobiological considerations is described. It is shown that incorporation of inter-patient heterogeneity into the radiosensitivity parameter a through s{sub a} can result in a clinically realistic slope for the dose-response curve. The model is applied to inhomogeneous target dose distributions in order to demonstrate the relationship between dose uniformity and s{sub a}. The consequences of varying clonogenic density are also explored. Finally the model is applied to the target-volume DVHs for patients in a clinical trial of conformal pelvic radiotherapy; the effect of dose inhomogeneities on distributions of TCP are shown as well as the potential benefits of customizing the target dose according to normal-tissue DVHs. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs.

  10. {sup 186}Re-maSGS-Z{sub HER2:342}, a potential affibody conjugate for systemic therapy of HER2-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, Anna; Tran, Thuy A. [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Ekblad, Torun; Karlstroem, Amelie Eriksson [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Biotechnology, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Stockholm (Sweden); Tolmachev, Vladimir [Uppsala University, Division of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Affibody molecules are a novel class of tumour-targeting proteins, which combine small size (7 kDa) and picomolar affinities. The Affibody molecule Z{sub HER2:342} has been suggested for imaging of HER2 expression in order to select patients for trastuzumab therapy. When optimizing chelators for {sup 99m}Tc-labelling, we have found that synthetic Z{sub HER2:342} conjugated with mercaptoacetyl-glycyl-glycyl-glycyl (maGGG) and mercaptoacetyl-glycyl-seryl-glycyl (maGSG) chelators provides relatively low renal uptake of radioactivity and could be suitable for therapy. maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} were labelled with {sup 186}Re and their biodistribution was studied in normal mice. Dosimetric evaluation and tumour targeting to HER2-overexpressed xenografts (SKOV-3) by {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} were studied. Gluconate-mediated labelling of maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} with {sup 186}Re provided a yield of more than 95% within 60 min. The conjugates were stable and demonstrated specific binding to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 cells. Biodistribution in normal mice demonstrated rapid blood clearance, low accumulation of radioactivity in the kidney and other organs, accumulating free perrhenate. Both {sup 186}Re-maGGG-Z{sub HER2:342} and {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} demonstrated lower renal uptake than their {sup 99m}Tc-labelled counterparts. {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} provided the lowest uptake in healthy tissues. Biodistribution of {sup 186}Re-maGSG-Z{sub HER2:342} in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts showed specific targeting of tumours. Tumour uptake 24 h after injection (5.84{+-}0.54%ID/g) exceeded the concentration in blood by more than 500-fold, and uptake in kidneys by about 8-fold. Preliminary dosimetric evaluation showed that dose-to-tumour should exceed dose-to-kidney by approximately 5-fold. Optimization of chelators improves biodistribution properties of rhenium-labelled small scaffold proteins and enables

  11. Multiple mechanisms of MYCN dysregulation in Wilms tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard D.; Chagtai, Tasnim; Alcaide-German, Marisa; Apps, John; Wegert, Jenny; Popov, Sergey; Vujanic, Gordan; van Tinteren, Harm; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Kool, Marcel; de Kraker, Jan; Gisselsson, David; Graf, Norbert; Gessler, Manfred; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Genomic gain of the proto-oncogene transcription factor gene MYCN is associated with poor prognosis in several childhood cancers. Here we present a comprehensive copy number analysis of MYCN in Wilms tumour (WT), demonstrating that gain of this gene is associated with anaplasia and with poorer relapse-free and overall survival, independent of histology. Using whole exome and gene-specific sequencing, together with methylation and expression profiling, we show that MYCN is targeted by other mechanisms, including a recurrent somatic mutation, P44L, and specific DNA hypomethylation events associated with MYCN overexpression in tumours with high risk histologies. We describe parallel evolution of genomic copy number gain and point mutation of MYCN in the contralateral tumours of a remarkable bilateral case in which independent contralateral mutations of TP53 also evolve over time. We report a second bilateral case in which MYCN gain is a germline aberration. Our results suggest a significant role for MYCN dysregulation in the molecular biology of Wilms tumour. We conclude that MYCN gain is prognostically significant, and suggest that the novel P44L somatic variant is likely to be an activating mutation. PMID:25749049

  12. Allograft in bone tumour surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    In the last twenty years, there has been a vast improvement in the prognosis of primary malignant tumours of bone. This is due to many factors including early detection, staging and classification of tumours as a result of better staining and imaging techniques, better surgical technology, e.g. endoprosthesis and most importantly adjuvant treatment with cytotoxic drugs. As a result of long term survival, amputation of limb has more or less been replaced by limb salvage surgery. This procedure consists of two parts. Primary objective is of course complete removal of the tumour by adequate soft tissue cover and secondarily by reconstruction of the locomotor system, If possible with retention of the function of the limb. These procedures include endo-prosthetic replacement or arthroplasty and arthrodesis using autologus grafts, allograft or combination. With the development of bone banks and assured safety of preserved bones, reconstructive limb salvage surgery using massive allograft is gradually replacing prosthetic implants. The advantages include replacement of articular surfaces, incorporation of the graft to the host bone, attachment of bone tissue and increased probably permanent survival. Allograft can be used for intercalary replacement, osteo-articular arthroplasty arthrodesis or filling large cavities. Inherent complication of massive allograft are disease transmission, infection, delayed and non-union, pathological fractures, mechanical failure and joint destruction. Several limb salvage procedures using allografts have been carried out in our institution with one failure due to infection. Paucity of available allograft has restricted more such procedures to be carried out

  13. Tumour-associated endothelial-FAK correlated with molecular sub-type and prognostic factors in invasive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulou, Annika N; Ho-Yen, Colan M; Papalazarou, Vassilis; Elia, George; Jones, J Louise; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into one of 4 main molecular sub-types: luminal A, luminal B, Her2 over-expressing and basal-like (BL). These tumour sub-types require different treatments and have different risks of disease progression. BL cancers can be considered a sub-group of Triple negative (TN) cancers since they lack estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and Her2 expression. No targeted treatment currently exists for TN/BL cancers. Thus it is important to identify potential therapeutic targets and describe their relationship with established prognostic factors. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is upregulated in several human cancers and also plays a functional role in tumour angiogenesis. However, the association between breast cancer sub-types and tumour endothelial-FAK expression is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we quantified FAK expression in tumour endothelial and tumour cell compartments in 149 invasive breast carcinomas and correlated expression with clinical, pathological and molecular parameters. Low endothelial-FAK expression was independently associated with luminal A tumours at univariate (p < 0.001) and multivariate (p = 0.001) analysis. There was a positive correlation between FAK expression in the vascular and tumour cell compartments (Spearman’s correlation co-efficient = 0.394, p < 0.001). Additionally, endothelial and tumour cell FAK expression were significantly increased in TN tumours (p = 0.043 and p = 0.033 respectively), in tumours with negative ER and PR status, and in high grade tumours at univariate analysis. Our findings establish a relationship between endothelial-FAK expression levels and the molecular sub-type of invasive breast cancer, and suggest that endothelial-FAK expression is potentially more clinically relevant than tumour cell FAK expression in breast cancer

  14. Why are tumour blood vessels abnormal and why is it important to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, J A; Chang, S-H; Dvorak, A M; Dvorak, H F

    2009-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels differ from their normal counterparts for reasons that have received little attention. We report here that they are of at least six distinct types, we describe how each forms, and, looking forward, encourage the targeting of tumour vessel subsets that have lost their vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) dependency and so are likely unresponsive to anti-VEGF-A therapies. PMID:19240721

  15. Proposed Optimal Fluoroscopic Targets for Cooled Radiofrequency Neurotomy of the Sacral Lateral Branches to Improve Clinical Outcomes: An Anatomical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Alison; Dreyfuss, Paul; Swain, Nathan; Roberts, Shannon; Loh, Eldon; Agur, Anne

    2017-11-23

    Current sacroiliac joint (SIJ) cooled radiofrequency (RF) is based on fluoroscopic anatomy of lateral branches (LBs) in three specimens. Recent studies confirm significant variation in LB positions. To determine if common fluoroscopic needle placements for cooled SIJ RF are adequate to lesion all S1-3 LBs. If not, would different targets improve lesion accuracy? The LBs of 20 cadavers were dissected bilaterally (40 SIJs), and 26 G radiopaque wires were sutured to the LBs. With a 10-mm radius ruler centered at each foramen, standard targets were assessed, as judged by a clockface on the right, for S1 and S2 at 2:30, 4:00, and 5:30 positions and at S3 at 2:30 and 4:00. Mirror image targets were assessed on the left. Assuming an 8-mm lesion diameter, the percentage of LBs that would not be ablated for each level was determined. Imaging through the superior end plate of S1 was compared against segment specific (SS) imaging. Nine point four percent of LBs would not be ablated at S1 vs 0.99% at S2 vs 35% at S3, and 60% of the 40 SIJs would be completely denervated using current targets. SS imaging did not improve results. Alternate target locations could improve the miss rate to 2.8% at S1 and 0% at S3 and would ablate all LBs in 95% of SIJs. Using a conservative 8-mm lesion measurement, contemporary cooled RF needle targets are inadequate to lesion all target LBs. Modifications to current targets are recommended to increase the effectiveness of the procedure. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Radiopharmaceutical therapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, P.; Franceschi, G.; Frattarelli, M.; Casi, M.; Santimaria, M.; Cremonini, A.M.; Guiducci, G.; Riva, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The loco-regional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of high-grade malignant glioma may represent a further favourable therapeutic approach, able to ameliorate the ominous prognosis of these diseases. The anti-tenascin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are directly injected in the tumoral bed after the operation. In the first pilot study, 81 glioblastoma patients received the MAbs (BC2 and BC4) labelled with 131 I (mean dose 2035 MBq). The toxicity was absent. The median survival was prolonged up to 25 months and the response rate (PR + CR + NED: no evidence of disease in cases with minimal lesions after customary treatments) was 44%. More recently, 90 Y instead of 131 I was employed. The benzyl-DTPA chelator was utilized for 90 Y conjugation. A phase I study was performed in 20 glioblastoma patients, who previously received all conventional regimens, but with progressive tumour. They were intralesionally given escalating 90 Y doses (185, 370, 555, 740, 925 MBq), 4 cases were included in each incremental level. No change in haematology, liver and renal parameters were encountered. The brain MTD was 925 MBq. The radiopharmaceutical remained in high amount only in the neoplastic area and did not diffuse in normal brain region nor in normal organs. The radiation dose to the tumour was, on average, 0.54 Gy per MBq of 90 Y administered (about 4 times higher in comparison to 131 I). Now a phase II study has been initiated. 30 evaluable patients (23 glioblastoma and 7 anaplastic astrocytoma; 8 newly diagnosed and 22 recurrent tumours) who have been already treated with surgery and radiotherapy, underwent loco-regional RIT, by administering a mean 90 Y dose of 740 MBq; in many cases multiple cycles were given. The median survival of patients who had the antibody infusion when their tumour burden was reduced was 28 months. The objective response consisted of 8 PD, 5 SD, 11 PR, 1 CR and 4 NED. The global response rate (PR + CR + NED) was 53.3% (47.8% in glioblastoma and 75.7% in

  17. AAV2-mediated in vivo immune gene therapy of solid tumours

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Sara A

    2010-12-20

    Abstract Background Many strategies have been adopted to unleash the potential of gene therapy for cancer, involving a wide range of therapeutic genes delivered by various methods. Immune therapy has become one of the major strategies adopted for cancer gene therapy and seeks to stimulate the immune system to target tumour antigens. In this study, the feasibility of AAV2 mediated immunotherapy of growing tumours was examined, in isolation and combined with anti-angiogenic therapy. Methods Immune-competent Balb\\/C or C57 mice bearing subcutaneous JBS fibrosarcoma or Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumour xenografts respectively were treated by intra-tumoural administration of AAV2 vector encoding the immune up-regulating cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the co-stimulatory molecule B7-1 to subcutaneous tumours, either alone or in combination with intra-muscular (IM) delivery of AAV2 vector encoding Nk4 14 days prior to tumour induction. Tumour growth and survival was monitored for all animals. Cured animals were re-challenged with tumourigenic doses of the original tumour type. In vivo cytotoxicity assays were used to investigate establishment of cell-mediated responses in treated animals. Results AAV2-mediated GM-CSF, B7-1 treatment resulted in a significant reduction in tumour growth and an increase in survival in both tumour models. Cured animals were resistant to re-challenge, and induction of T cell mediated anti-tumour responses were demonstrated. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes to naïve animals prevented tumour establishment. Systemic production of Nk4 induced by intra-muscular (IM) delivery of Nk4 significantly reduced subcutaneous tumour growth. However, combination of Nk4 treatment with GM-CSF, B7-1 therapy reduced the efficacy of the immune therapy. Conclusions Overall, this study demonstrates the potential for in vivo AAV2 mediated immune gene therapy, and provides data on the inter-relationship between tumour

  18. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  19. Multiscale biomechanics of brain tumours favours cancer invasion by cell softening and tissue stiffening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Josef; Fritsch, Anatol; Grosser, Steffen; Friebe, Sabrina; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Müller, Wolf; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Sack, Ingolf

    Cancer progression needs two contradictory mechanical prerequisites. For metastasis individual cancer cells or small clusters have to flow through the microenvironment by overcoming the yield stress exerted by the surrounding. On the other hand a tumour has to behave as a solid to permit cell proliferation and spreading of the tumour mass against its surrounding. We determine that the high mechanical adaptability of cancer cells and the scale controlled viscoelastic properties of tissues reconcile both conflicting properties, fluid and solid, simultaneously in brain tumours. We resolve why different techniques that assess cell and tissue mechanics have produced apparently conflicting results by our finding that tumours generate different viscoelastic behaviours on different length scales, which are in concert optimal for tumour spreading and metastasis. Single cancer cells become very soft in their elastic behavior which promotes cell unjamming. On the level of direct cell-to-cell interactions cells feel their micro-environment as rigid elastic substrate that stimulates cancer on the molecular level. All over a tumour has predominately a stiff elastic character in terms of viscoelastic behaviour caused by a solid backbone. Simultaneously, the tumour mass is characterized by a large local variability in the storage and loss modulus that is caused by areas of a more fluid nature.

  20. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load.

  1. Malignant tumours of the kidney: imaging strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smets, Anne M.; Kraker, Jan de

    2010-01-01

    Primitive malignant renal tumours comprise 6% of all childhood cancers. Wilms tumour (WT) or nephroblastoma is the most frequent type accounting for more than 90%. Imaging alone cannot differentiate between these tumours with certainty but it plays an important role in screening, diagnostic workup, assessment of therapy response, preoperative evaluation and follow-up. The outcome of WT after therapy is excellent with an overall survival around 90%. In tumours such as those where the outcome is extremely good, focus can be shifted to a risk-based stratification to maintain excellent outcome in children with low risk tumours while improving quality of life and decreasing toxicity and costs. This review will discuss the imaging issues for WT from the European perspective and briefly discuss the characteristics of other malignant renal tumours occurring in children and new imaging techniques with potential in this matter. (orig.)

  2. Tumour regrowth after irradiation. An experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, H; Matsuzawa, T [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. for Tuberculosis, Leprosy and Cancer

    1979-03-01

    Structural changes in irradiated tumours and their regrowth were studied in a rat hepatoma, AH109A, using histological and transparent-chamber techniques. The development of the tumour was examined by means of vascular morphometry as observed in the chamber. Schematically, the tumour tissue was divided into four isocentric layers according to vascular morphology and measurements of vessel volume, surface area, and length per mm/sup 3/ of tissue. The vascularity was greatest in the outermost region, decreased towards the inner parts and reached an absence of vascularity at the central necrosis. The tumours were gamma- or X-irradiated with various doses. The inside hypoxic region was destroyed completely after 300 rad, and regrowths started exclusively from the outermost area of the tumour where enhancement of the effect of radiation by oxygen was thought to be greatest. Possible mechanisms of tumour regrowth are discussed.

  3. Imaging of solid kidney tumours in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugosson, C.; Nyman, R.; Jacobsson, B.; Jorulf, H.; Sackey, K.; McDonald, P.

    1995-01-01

    Eighteen children aged 6 months to 12 years with 20 solid renal tumours; 13 Wilms' tumours (WT), 2 clear cell sarcomas of the kidney, 1 malignant rhabdoid tumour of the kidney and 2 cases of bilateral nephroblastomatosis with Wilms' tumour underwent evaluation with US, CT and MR imaging. Contrast-enhanced CT and non-enhanced MR were equally accurate in determining the size and origin of the tumour but were unreliable in separation of stages I, II and III. US could only accurately assess the size of the tumours. MR characteristics varied somewhat between WTs and non-WTs but contrast-enhanced MR imaging might be useful for separation of WTs from nephroblastomatosis. (orig.)

  4. High precision conformal radiotherapy employing conservative margins in childhood benign and low-grade brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Rakesh; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Sarin, Rajiv; Sharma, Dayananda S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report local control and follow up outcome data of high precision conformal radiotherapy in childhood brain tumours. Materials and methods: Between December 1999 and December 2002, 26 children (17 boys and 9 girls, median age 11.5 years) with incompletely excised or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours [13 craniopharyngiomas, 11 low-grade gliomas (LGG) and 2 others] were treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) (12 patients) and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) (14 patients). Gross tumour volume (GTV) included neuro-imaging based visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed. Clinical target volume (CTV) consisted of GTV + 5 mm margin and planning target volume (PTV) consisted of additional 5 mm margin for CRT and 2 mm for SCRT. Treatment was delivered with 3-9 conformal fixed fields to a median dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions. Results: The actuarial 2 and 3 year disease free and overall survival was 96 and 100%, respectively (median follow up: 25 months, range 12-47 months). Radiological follow up available in 25 patients revealed complete response in 1, partial regression in 10, stable disease in 13 and progression in 1 patient (within the CTV). One patient with craniopharyngioma on a routine imaging revealed a mild asymptomatic cyst enlargement, which resolved with conservative management. A patient with chiasmatic glioma developed cystic degeneration and hydrocephalus 9 months after SCRT requiring cyst drainage and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Conclusion: High-precision conformal techniques delivering irradiation to a computer generated target volume employing 7-10 mm 3D margins beyond the visible tumour and/or resected tumour bed appear to be safe in children with incompletely resected or recurrent benign and low-grade brain tumours, based on these data

  5. Improved decision making for prioritizing tumor targeting antibodies in human xenografts: Utility of fluorescence imaging to verify tumor target expression, antibody binding and optimization of dosage and application schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Michael; Haupt, Ute; Scheuer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical efficacy studies of antibodies targeting a tumor-associated antigen are only justified when the expression of the relevant antigen has been demonstrated. Conventionally, antigen expression level is examined by immunohistochemistry of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue section. This method represents the diagnostic "gold standard" for tumor target evaluation, but is affected by a number of factors, such as epitope masking and insufficient antigen retrieval. As a consequence, variances and discrepancies in histological staining results can occur, which may influence decision-making and therapeutic outcome. To overcome these problems, we have used different fluorescence-labeled therapeutic antibodies targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family members and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) in combination with fluorescence imaging modalities to determine tumor antigen expression, drug-target interaction, and biodistribution and tumor saturation kinetics in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. For this, whole-body fluorescence intensities of labeled antibodies, applied as a single compound or antibody mixture, were measured in Calu-1 and Calu-3 tumor-bearing mice, then ex vivo multispectral tumor tissue analysis at microscopic resolution was performed. With the aid of this simple and fast imaging method, we were able to analyze the tumor cell receptor status of HER1-3 and IGF1R, monitor the antibody-target interaction and evaluate the receptor binding sites of anti-HER2-targeting antibodies. Based on this, the most suitable tumor model, best therapeutic antibody, and optimal treatment dosage and application schedule was selected. Predictions drawn from obtained imaging data were in excellent concordance with outcome of conducted preclinical efficacy studies. Our results clearly demonstrate the great potential of combined in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging for the preclinical development and characterization of

  6. An unusual presentation of a glomus tumour.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, N

    2011-02-01

    Glomus tumours are benign, soft tissue tumours, usually of fingertips. Classically they present with severe pain, temperature sensitivity and localised tenderness. The diagnosis is often delayed due to sometimes non-specific symptoms and rarity of the disorder. While usually a clinical diagnosis, imaging may be necessary for diagnosis and localisation. We present a case of glomus tumour of the fingertip with an unusual history.

  7. Surgical management of epithelial parotid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obaid, M.A.; Yusuf, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinicopathological presentation and treatment options in epithelial parotid tumours with emphasis on surgery. Subjects and Methods: Epithelial parotid tumours diagnosed and operated by an ENT surgeon and a general surgeon in 10 years during their posting in different teaching hospitals were included in the study. Clinical presentation, preoperative investigations, operative procedure, histopathology report, postoperative complications and further management were recorded. The data was collected and reviewed from the records of all the patients maintained by the authors. Results: Fifty-two patients presented with parotid tumour. Average age was 38 years. Commonest presentation was painless lump over the parotid region (85%), pain (15%), facial palsy, and enlarged neck nodes. Majority of tumours were benign, only two were recurrent. Parotid pleomorphic Adenoma (PPA) was the commonest benign tumour, others being Warthin's tumour and monomorphic adenoma. Adenoid cystic carcinoma was the commonest malignant tumour 29% followed by mucoepidermoid carcinoma. Others were carcinoma in PPA squamous cell carcinoma, malignant mixed tumour, malignant Iymphoepithelioma and undifferentiated carcinoma. Superficial parotidectomy (SP) was the commonest operation performed in 69%. Other procedures were total conservative parotidectomy in 11%, total radical surgery in 9% and enucleation in only one patient earliest in the series. Neck node dissection was done in 2 patients. Except for one child, rest of the 13 patients received postoperative radiotherapy and one patient of Iymphoepithelioma received chemotherapy in addition. Commonest postoperative complication was temporary facial weakness in 35% (18/52). Permanent facial palsy occurred in 08 patients. Of these 07 had a malignant process and only one patient had excision biopsy. Conclusion: Benign and malignant epithelial parotid tumours can be diagnosed by there clinical presentation . supplemented with

  8. Comparison of metastatic disease after local tumour treatment with radiotherapy or surgery in various tumour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, J. de; Cramer, S.J.; Lelieveld, P.; Putten, L.M. van

    1982-01-01

    Spontaneous metastases in lymph nodes and/or the lung were obtained after tumour cell inoculation of four mouse tumours and one rat tumour into the foot-pads of syngeneic animals or their F 1 hybrids. Following local radiotherapy with doses of 45-80 Gy, significantly more mice died with metastases than following local amputation of the tumour-bearing foot when the 2661 carcinoma was involved. No significant difference was observed after these treatments for the other tumours. The enhancement of metastatic growth after local radiotherapy in the 2661 carcinoma seems not to be due to incomplete killing of tumour cells in the foot. The presence of irradiated normal structures and tumour tissue after radiotherapy promoted the outgrowth of 2661 carcinoma cells which were outside the radiation field at the time of treatment. Evidently, even under similar experimental conditions, radiotherapy may enhance the growth of metastases from some tumours and not from others. (author)

  9. Using four-dimensional computed tomography images to optimize the internal target volume when using volume-modulated arc therapy to treat moving targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Winey, Brian; Killoran, Joseph; Mayo, Charles; Niedermayr, Thomas; Panayiotakis, George; Lingos, Tania; Court, Laurence

    2012-11-08

    In this work we used 4D dose calculations, which include the effects of shape deformations, to investigate an alternative approach to creating the ITV. We hypothesized that instead of needing images from all the breathing phases in the 4D CT dataset to create the outer envelope used for treatment planning, it is possible to exclude images from the phases closest to the inhale phase. We used 4D CT images from 10 patients with lung cancer. For each patient, we drew a gross tumor volume on the exhale-phase image and propagated this to the images from other phases in the 4D CT dataset using commercial image registration software. We created four different ITVs using the N phases closest to the exhale phase (where N = 10, 8, 7, 6). For each ITV contour, we created a volume-modulated arc therapy plan on the exhale-phase CT and normalized it so that the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of the ITV. Each plan was applied to CT images from each CT phase (phases 1-10), and the calculated doses were then mapped to the exhale phase using deformable registration. The effect of the motion was quantified using the dose to 95% of the target on the exhale phase (D95) and tumor control probability. For the three-dimensional and 4D dose calculations of the plan where N = 10, differences in the D95 value varied from 3% to 14%, with an average difference of 7%. For 9 of the 10 patients, the reduction in D95 was less than 5% if eight phases were used to create the ITV. For three of the 10 patients, the reduction in the D95 was less than 5% if seven phases were used to create the ITV. We were unsuccessful in creating a general rule that could be used to create the ITV. Some reduction (8/10 phases) was possible for most, but not all, of the patients, and the ITV reduction was small.

  10. Using four‐dimensional computed tomography images to optimize the internal target volume when using volume‐modulated arc therapy to treat moving targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoumakis, Nikolaos; Winey, Brian; Killoran, Joseph; Mayo, Charles; Niedermayr, Thomas; Panayiotakis, George; Lingos, Tania; Court, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    In this work we used 4D dose calculations, which include the effects of shape deformations, to investigate an alternative approach to creating the ITV. We hypothesized that instead of needing images from all the breathing phases in the 4D CT dataset to create the outer envelope used for treatment planning, it is possible to exclude images from the phases closest to the inhale phase. We used 4D CT images from 10 patients with lung cancer. For each patient, we drew a gross tumor volume on the exhale‐phase image and propagated this to the images from other phases in the 4D CT dataset using commercial image registration software. We created four different ITVs using the N phases closest to the exhale phase (where N=10, 8, 7, 6). For each ITV contour, we created a volume‐modulated arc therapy plan on the exhale‐phase CT and normalized it so that the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of the ITV. Each plan was applied to CT images from each CT phase (phases 1–10), and the calculated doses were then mapped to the exhale phase using deformable registration. The effect of the motion was quantified using the dose to 95% of the target on the exhale phase (D95) and tumor control probability. For the three‐dimensional and 4D dose calculations of the plan where N=10, differences in the D95 value varied from 3% to 14%, with an average difference of 7%. For 9 of the 10 patients, the reduction in D95 was less than 5% if eight phases were used to create the ITV. For three of the 10 patients, the reduction in the D95 was less than 5% if seven phases were used to create the ITV. We were unsuccessful in creating a general rule that could be used to create the ITV. Some reduction (8/10 phases) was possible for most, but not all, of the patients, and the ITV reduction was small. PACS number: 87.55.D‐ PMID:23149778

  11. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward