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Sample records for tumor-targeted drug delivery

  1. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

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    Xiaoli Wei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  2. Tumor Penetrating Theranostic Nanoparticles for Enhancement of Targeted and Image-guided Drug Delivery into Peritoneal Tumors following Intraperitoneal Delivery.

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    Gao, Ning; Bozeman, Erica N; Qian, Weiping; Wang, Liya; Chen, Hongyu; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2017-01-01

    The major obstacles in intraperitoneal (i.p.) chemotherapy of peritoneal tumors are fast absorption of drugs into the blood circulation, local and systemic toxicities, inadequate drug penetration into large tumors, and drug resistance. Targeted theranostic nanoparticles offer an opportunity to enhance the efficacy of i.p. therapy by increasing intratumoral drug delivery to overcome resistance, mediating image-guided drug delivery, and reducing systemic toxicity. Herein we report that i.p. delivery of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) led to intratumoral accumulation of 17% of total injected nanoparticles in an orthotopic mouse pancreatic cancer model, which was three-fold higher compared with intravenous delivery. Targeted delivery of near infrared dye labeled IONPs into orthotopic tumors could be detected by non-invasive optical and magnetic resonance imaging. Histological analysis revealed that a high level of uPAR targeted, PEGylated IONPs efficiently penetrated into both the peripheral and central tumor areas in the primary tumor as well as peritoneal metastatic tumor. Improved theranostic IONP delivery into the tumor center was not mediated by nonspecific macrophage uptake and was independent from tumor blood vessel locations. Importantly, i.p. delivery of uPAR targeted theranostic IONPs carrying chemotherapeutics, cisplatin or doxorubicin, significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumors without apparent systemic toxicity. The levels of proliferating tumor cells and tumor vessels in tumors treated with the above theranostic IONPs were also markedly decreased. The detection of strong optical signals in residual tumors following i.p. therapy suggested the feasibility of image-guided surgery to remove drug-resistant tumors. Therefore, our results support the translational development of i.p. delivery of uPAR-targeted theranostic IONPs for image-guided treatment of peritoneal tumors.

  3. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

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    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  4. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

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    Christopher Bachran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  5. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

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    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery.

  6. [Advances of tumor targeting peptides drug delivery system with pH-sensitive activities].

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    Ma, Yin-yun; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-feng; Gou, San-hu; Ni, Jing-man

    2016-05-01

    The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems, which target to acidic extracellular environment of tumor tissue, have many advantages in drug delivery. They exhibit a high specificity to tumor and low cytotoxicity, which significantly increase the efficacy of traditional anti-cancer drugs. In recent years the systems have received a great attention. The pH-sensitive peptides drug delivery systems can be divided into five types according to the difference in pH-responsive mechanism,type of peptides and carrier materials. This paper summarizes the recent progresses in the field with a focus on the five types of pH-sensitive peptides in drug delivery systems. This may provide a guideline to design and application of tumor targeting drugs.

  7. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor

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    Li X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyu Li, Meiying Wu, Limin Pan, Jianlin Shi State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4 and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors. Keywords: mesoporous silica nanoparticles, drug delivery, tumor vasculatures targeting, antiangiogenic agent

  8. Targeted drug delivery and penetration into solid tumors.

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    Corti, Angelo; Pastorino, Fabio; Curnis, Flavio; Arap, Wadih; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pasqualini, Renata

    2012-09-01

    Delivery and penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumors are limited by a number of factors related to abnormal vasculature and altered stroma composition in neoplastic tissues. Coupling of chemotherapeutic drugs with tumor vasculature-homing peptides or administration of drugs in combination with biological agents that affect the integrity of the endothelial lining of tumor vasculature is an appealing strategy to improve drug delivery to tumor cells. Promising approaches to achieve this goal are based on the use of Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR)-containing peptides as ligands for drug delivery and of NGR-TNF, a peptide-tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein that selectively alters drug penetration barriers and that is currently tested in a randomized Phase III trial in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [The development of novel tumor targeting delivery strategy].

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    Gao, Hui-le; Jiang, Xin-guo

    2016-02-01

    Tumor is one of the most serious threats for human being. Although many anti-tumor drugs are approved for clinical use, the treatment outcome is still modest because of the poor tumor targeting efficiency and low accumulation in tumor. Therefore, it is important to deliver anti-tumor drug into tumor efficiently, elevate drug concentration in tumor tissues and reduce the drug distribution in normal tissues. And it has been one of the most attractive directions of pharmaceutical academy and industry. Many kinds of strategies, especially various nanoparticulated drug delivery systems, have been developed to address the critical points of complex tumor microenvironment, which are partially or mostly satisfied for tumor treatment. In this paper, we carefully reviewed the novel targeting delivery strategies developed in recent years. The most powerful method is passive targeting delivery based on the enhanced permeability and retention(EPR) effect, and most commercial nanomedicines are based on the EPR effect. However, the high permeability and retention require different particle sizes, thus several kinds of size-changeable nanoparticles are developed, such as size reducible particles and assemble particles, to satisfy the controversial requirement for particle size and enhance both tumor retention and penetration. Surface charge reversible nanoparticles also shows a high efficiency because the anionic charge in blood circulation and normal organs decrease the unintended internalization. The charge can change into positive in tumor microenvironment, facilitating drug uptake by tumor cells. Additionally, tumor microenvironment responsive drug release is important to decrease drug side effect, and many strategies are developed, such as p H sensitive release and enzyme sensitive release. Except the responsive nanoparticles, shaping tumor microenvironment could attenuate the barriers in drug delivery, for example, decreasing tumor collagen intensity and normalizing tumor

  10. Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    development of the principal discipline(s) of the project? • We have learned that the drug PEGPH20, which degrades a component of connective tissue called...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0114 TITLE: Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NF140089 Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors 5b

  11. The exciting potential of nanotherapy in brain-tumor targeted drug delivery approaches

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    Vivek Agrahari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS and brain-tumor has been a major challenge. The current standard treatment approaches for the brain-tumor comprise of surgical resection followed by immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, the current treatments are limited in providing significant benefits to the patients and despite recent technological advancements; brain-tumor is still challenging to treat. Brain-tumor therapy is limited by the lack of effective and targeted strategies to deliver chemotherapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The BBB is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Recent advances have boosted the nanotherapeutic approaches in providing an attractive strategy in improving the drug delivery across the BBB and into the CNS. Compared to conventional formulations, nanoformulations offer significant advantages in CNS drug delivery approaches. Considering the above facts, in this review, the physiological/anatomical features of the brain-tumor and the BBB are briefly discussed. The drug transport mechanisms at the BBB are outlined. The approaches to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs across the CNS into the brain-tumor using nanocarriers are summarized. In addition, the challenges that need to be addressed in nanotherapeutic approaches for their enhanced clinical application in brain-tumor therapy are discussed.

  12. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

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    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  13. Recent advances in dendrimer-based nanovectors for tumor-targeted drug and gene delivery

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    Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the application of nanotechnology in medicine have given rise to multifunctional smart nanocarriers that can be engineered with tunable physicochemical characteristics to deliver one or more therapeutic agent(s) safely and selectively to cancer cells, including intracellular organelle-specific targeting. Dendrimers having properties resembling biomolecules, with well-defined 3D nanopolymeric architectures, are emerging as a highly attractive class of drug and gene delivery vector. The presence of numerous peripheral functional groups on hyperbranched dendrimers affords efficient conjugation of targeting ligands and biomarkers that can recognize and bind to receptors overexpressed on cancer cells for tumor-cell-specific delivery. The present review compiles the recent advances in dendrimer-mediated drug and gene delivery to tumors by passive and active targeting principles with illustrative examples. PMID:25555748

  14. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

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    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  15. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

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    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  16. hTe exciting potential of nanotherapy in brain-tumor targeted drug delivery approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Agrahari

    2017-01-01

    Delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) and brain-tumor has been a major challenge. hTe current standard treatment approaches for the brain-tumor comprise of surgical resection followed by immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, the current treatments are limited in provid-ing signiifcant beneifts to the patients and despite recent technological advancements; brain-tumor is still challenging to treat. Brain-tumor therapy is limited by the lack of effective and targeted strategies to deliver chemotherapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). hTe BBB is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Recent advances have boosted the nan-otherapeutic approaches in providing an attractive strategy in improving the drug delivery across the BBB and into the CNS. Compared to conventional formulations, nanoformulations offer signiifcant ad vantages in CNS drug delivery approaches. Considering the above facts, in this review, the physiological/anatomical features of the brain-tumor and the BBB are brielfy discussed. hTe drug transport mechanisms at the BBB are outlined. hTe approaches to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs across the CNS into the brain-tumor using nanocarriers are summarized. In addition, the challenges that need to be addressed in nanotherapeutic ap-proaches for their enhanced clinical application in brain-tumor therapy are discussed.

  17. Supporting Data for Multifunctional all-in-one drug delivery systems for tumor targeting and sequential release of three different anti-tumor drugs

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    Guowei Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although nanoparticulate drug delivery systems (NDDSs can preferentially accumulate in tumors, active targeting by targeting ligands (e.g. monoclonal antibody is necessary for increasing its targeting efficacy in vivo. We conjugated mAb198.3 on the SiO2@AuNP system surface to make it obtain active targeting efficacy. The FAT1 targeting capability of SiO2@AuNP system is the first issue to be solved. Thus, flow cytometry analysis was attempted to demonstrate that the SiO2@AuNP system could bind to native FAT1 molecules on the surface of Colo205 cells. Also, together with the drug release behavior study of self-decomposable SiO2 NPs, the continuous morphological evolution needed to be clarified. Therefore, to characterize the morphological evolution in vitro, we analyzed the morphology of inner self-decomposable NPs in different time intervals using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article “Multifunctional all-in-one drug delivery systems for tumor targeting and sequential release of three different anti-tumor drugs” in Biomaterials.

  18. Physico-Chemical Strategies to Enhance Stability and Drug Retention of Polymeric Micelles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Y.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Storm, Gerrit; Hennink, W.E.

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric micelles (PM) have been extensively used for tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic anti-cancer drugs. The lipophilic core of PM is naturally suitable for loading hydrophobic drugs and the hydrophilic shell endows them with colloidal stability and stealth properties. Decades of research on

  19. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

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    Kang E

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Eunah Kang,1 Jong Wook Shin2 1School of Chemical Engineering and Material Science, 2Division of Allergic and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. Keywords: pericytes, pericyte-targeting drug delivery, tissue engineering, platelet-derived growth factor, angiogenesis, vascular remodeling

  20. The folate receptor as a molecular target for tumor-selective radionuclide delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, C.-Y.; Mathias, Carla J.; Green, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. We review here some background on the folate receptor as tumor-associated molecular target for drug delivery, and briefly survey the literature on tumor-targeting with radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates

  1. Addressing brain tumors with targeted gold nanoparticles: a new gold standard for hydrophobic drug delivery?

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    Cheng, Yu; Meyers, Joseph D; Agnes, Richard S; Doane, Tennyson L; Kenney, Malcolm E; Broome, Ann-Marie; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2011-08-22

    EGF-modified Au NP-Pc 4 conjugates showed 10-fold improved selectivity to the brain tumor compared to untargeted conjugates. The hydrophobic photodynamic therapy drug Pc 4 can be delivered efficiently into glioma brain tumors by EGF peptide-targeted Au NPs. Compared to the untargeted conjugates, EGF-Au NP-Pc 4 conjugates showed 10-fold improved selectivity to the brain tumor. This delivery system holds promise for future delivery of a wider range of hydrophobic therapeutic drugs for the treatment of hard-to-reach cancers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hybrid protein-inorganic nanoparticles: From tumor-targeted drug delivery to cancer imaging.

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    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Hemasa, Ayman L; Freag, May S

    2016-12-10

    Recently, a great interest has been paid to the development of hybrid protein-inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) for drug delivery and cancer diagnostics in order to combine the merits of both inorganic and protein nanocarriers. This review primarily discusses the most outstanding advances in the applications of the hybrids of naturally-occurring proteins with iron oxide, gadolinium, gold, silica, calcium phosphate NPs, carbon nanotubes, and quantum dots in drug delivery and cancer imaging. Various strategies that have been utilized for the preparation of protein-functionalized inorganic NPs and the mechanisms involved in the drug loading process are discussed. How can the protein functionalization overcome the limitations of colloidal stability, poor dispersibility and toxicity associated with inorganic NPs is also investigated. Moreover, issues relating to the influence of protein hybridization on the cellular uptake, tumor targeting efficiency, systemic circulation, mucosal penetration and skin permeation of inorganic NPs are highlighted. A special emphasis is devoted to the novel approaches utilizing the protein-inorganic nanohybrids in combined cancer therapy, tumor imaging, and theranostic applications as well as stimuli-responsive drug release from the nanohybrids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

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    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanobody-Based Delivery Systems for Diagnosis and Targeted Tumor Therapy

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    Yaozhong Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of innovative targeted therapeutic approaches are expected to surpass the efficacy of current forms of treatments and cause less damage to healthy cells surrounding the tumor site. Since the first development of targeting agents from hybridoma’s, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been employed to inhibit tumor growth and proliferation directly or to deliver effector molecules to tumor cells. However, the full potential of such a delivery strategy is hampered by the size of mAbs, which will obstruct the targeted delivery system to access the tumor tissue. By serendipity, a new kind of functional homodimeric antibody format was discovered in camelidae, known as heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs. The cloning of the variable domain of HCAbs produces an attractive minimal-sized alternative for mAbs, referred to as VHH or nanobodies (Nbs. Apart from their dimensions in the single digit nanometer range, the unique characteristics of Nbs combine a high stability and solubility, low immunogenicity and excellent affinity and specificity against all possible targets including tumor markers. This stimulated the development of tumor-targeted therapeutic strategies. Some autonomous Nbs have been shown to act as antagonistic drugs, but more importantly, the targeting capacity of Nbs has been exploited to create drug delivery systems. Obviously, Nb-based targeted cancer therapy is mainly focused toward extracellular tumor markers, since the membrane barrier prevents antibodies to reach the most promising intracellular tumor markers. Potential strategies, such as lentiviral vectors and bacterial type 3 secretion system, are proposed to deliver target-specific Nbs into tumor cells and to block tumor markers intracellularly. Simultaneously, Nbs have also been employed for in vivo molecular imaging to diagnose diseased tissues and to monitor the treatment effects. Here, we review the state of the art and focus on recent developments with Nbs as

  5. Chemotherapeutic drug delivery by tumoral extracellular matrix targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raavé , R.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Daamen, W.F.

    2018-01-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is a primary strategy in the treatment of cancer, but comes with a number of limitations such as toxicity and unfavorable biodistribution. To overcome these issues, numerous targeting systems for specific delivery of chemotherapeutics to tumor cells have been designed and

  6. Folate-decorated chitosan/doxorubicin poly(butyl)cyanoacrylate nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Jinghua [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center (China); Liu Mujun [Central South University, School of Biological Science and Technology (China); Zhang Yangde; Zhao Jinfeng; Pan Yifeng [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hepatobiliary and Enteric Surgery Research Center (China); Yang Xiyun, E-mail: bax_2007@126.com [Central South University, School of Metallurgical Science and Engineering (China)

    2012-03-15

    A novel chitosan coated poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) nanoparticles loaded doxorubicin (DOX) were synthesized and then conjugated with folic acid to produce a folate-targeted drug carrier for tumor-specific drug delivery. Prepared nanoparticles were surface modified by folate for targeting cancer cells, which is confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and characterized for shape, size, and zeta potential measurements. The size and zeta potential of prepared DOX-PBCA nanoparticles (DOX-PBCA NPs) were almost 174 {+-} 8.23 nm and +23.14 {+-} 4.25 mV, respectively with 46.8 {+-} 3.32% encapsulation capacity. The transmission electron microscopy study revealed that preparation allowed the formation of spherical nanometric and homogeneous. Fluorescent microscopy imaging and flow cytometry analysis revealed that DOX-PBCA NPs were endocytosed into MCF-7 cells through the interaction with overexpressed folate receptors on the surface of the cancer cells. The results demonstrate that folate-conjugated DOX-PBCA NPs drug delivery system could provide increased therapeutic benefit by delivering the encapsulated drug to the folate receptor positive cancer cells.

  7. Folic acid-targeted disulfide-based cross-linking micelle for enhanced drug encapsulation stability and site-specific drug delivery against tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yumin Zhang,1,* Junhui Zhou,2,* Cuihong Yang,1 Weiwei Wang,3 Liping Chu,1 Fan Huang,1 Qiang Liu,1 Liandong Deng,2 Deling Kong,3 Jianfeng Liu,1 Jinjian Liu1 1Tianjin Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, 2Department of Polymer Science and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, 3Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomaterial Research, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally in this work Abstract: Although the shortcomings of small molecular antitumor drugs were efficiently improved by being entrapped into nanosized vehicles, premature drug release and insufficient tumor targeting demand innovative approaches that boost the stability and tumor responsiveness of drug-loaded nanocarriers. Here, we show the use of the core cross-linking method to generate a micelle with enhanced drug encapsulation ability and sensitivity of drug release in tumor. This kind of micelle could increase curcumin (Cur delivery to HeLa cells in vitro and improve tumor accumulation in vivo. We designed and synthesized the core cross-linked micelle (CCM with polyethylene glycol and folic acid-polyethylene glycol as the hydrophilic units, pyridyldisulfide as the cross-linkable and hydrophobic unit, and disulfide bond as the cross-linker. CCM showed spherical shape with a diameter of 91.2 nm by the characterization of dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Attributed to the core cross-linking, drug-loaded CCM displayed higher Nile Red or Cur-encapsulated stability and better sensitivity to glutathione than noncross-linked micelle (NCM. Cellular uptake and in vitro antitumor studies proved the enhanced endocytosis and better cytotoxicity of CCM-Cur against

  8. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert

    2012-07-20

    Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells, active drug targeting to endothelial cells and triggered drug delivery. Significant progress has been made in this area of research both at the preclinical and at the clinical level, and a number of (primarily passively tumor-targeted) nanomedicine formulations have been approved for clinical use. Significant progress has also been made with regard to better understanding the (patho-) physiological principles of drug targeting to tumors. This has led to the identification of several important pitfalls in tumor-targeted drug delivery, including I) overinterpretation of the EPR effect; II) poor tumor and tissue penetration of nanomedicines; III) misunderstanding of the potential usefulness of active drug targeting; IV) irrational formulation design, based on materials which are too complex and not broadly applicable; V) insufficient incorporation of nanomedicine formulations in clinically relevant combination regimens; VI) negligence of the notion that the highest medical need relates to metastasis, and not to solid tumor treatment; VII) insufficient integration of non-invasive imaging techniques and theranostics, which could be used to personalize nanomedicine-based therapeutic interventions; and VIII) lack of (efficacy analyses in) proper animal models, which are physiologically more relevant and more predictive for the clinical situation. These insights strongly suggest that besides making ever more nanomedicine formulations, future efforts should also address some of the conceptual drawbacks of drug targeting to tumors, and that strategies should be developed to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles and their application to magnetic targeting drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guiping; Wang Yongxian

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles barrier is a novel kind of drug delivery system for magnetic targeting drugs, which can effectively deliver the drug to a tumor target site and increase therapeutic benefit, with the side effects minimized. This article summarizes the most outstanding papers on the of magnetic nanoparticles used as the targeting drug's delivery systems. (authors)

  10. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huile Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the ability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood–brain tumor barrier (BBTB, and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed.

  11. Progress and perspectives on targeting nanoparticles for brain drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huile Gao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the ability of the blood–brain barrier(BBB) to prevent the entry of drugs into the brain, it is a challenge to treat central nervous system disorders pharmacologically. The development of nanotechnology provides potential to overcome this problem. In this review, the barriers to brain-targeted drug delivery are reviewed, including the BBB, blood–brain tumor barrier(BBTB), and nose-to-brain barrier. Delivery strategies are focused on overcoming the BBB, directly targeting diseased cells in the brain, and dual-targeted delivery. The major concerns and perspectives on constructing brain-targeted delivery systems are discussed.

  12. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration

    OpenAIRE

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity – properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administra...

  13. Sperm-Hybrid Micromotor for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haifeng; Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Magdanz, Veronika; Schwarz, Lukas; Hebenstreit, Franziska; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2018-01-23

    A sperm-driven micromotor is presented as a targeted drug delivery system, which is appealing to potentially treat diseases in the female reproductive tract. This system is demonstrated to be an efficient drug delivery vehicle by first loading a motile sperm cell with an anticancer drug (doxorubicin hydrochloride), guiding it magnetically, to an in vitro cultured tumor spheroid, and finally freeing the sperm cell to deliver the drug locally. The sperm release mechanism is designed to liberate the sperm when the biohybrid micromotor hits the tumor walls, allowing it to swim into the tumor and deliver the drug through the sperm-cancer cell membrane fusion. In our experiments, the sperm cells exhibited a high drug encapsulation capability and drug carrying stability, conveniently minimizing  toxic side effects and unwanted drug accumulation in healthy tissues. Overall, sperm cells are excellent candidates to operate in physiological environments, as they neither express pathogenic proteins nor proliferate to form undesirable colonies, unlike other cells or microorganisms. This sperm-hybrid micromotor is a biocompatible platform with potential application in gynecological healthcare, treating or detecting cancer or other diseases in the female reproductive system.

  14. Lipid conjugated prodrugs for enzyme-triggered liposomal drug delivery to tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig

    2011-01-01

    For some time we have been developing novel enzyme-triggered prodrugs for drug delivery targeting cancer. The liposomal prodrugs take advantage of the EPR effect to localize to tumors and of the local over-expression of secretory phospholipase A2 in tumors. Compared to conventional liposomal drug...... delivery systems, our prodrug-lipid conjugates have two main advantages: 1) the drugs are covalently linked to the lipids and thus leakage is circumvented and 2) the lipophilic bilayer of the formulated liposomes effectively shields the drugs from the aqueous environment in vivo. Consequently, the strategy...... targeting nuclear receptors and structural proteins. The presentation will highlight various strategies and recent progress towards improved systems, including chemical synthesis, enzyme activity and cytotoxicity....

  15. Addressing challenges of heterogeneous tumor treatment through bispecific protein-mediated pretargeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Parker, Christina L; McCallen, Justin D; Lai, Samuel K

    2015-12-28

    Tumors are frequently characterized by genomically and phenotypically distinct cancer cell subpopulations within the same tumor or between tumor lesions, a phenomenon termed tumor heterogeneity. These diverse cancer cell populations pose a major challenge to targeted delivery of diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents, as the conventional approach of conjugating individual ligands to nanoparticles is often unable to facilitate intracellular delivery to the full spectrum of cancer cells present in a given tumor lesion or patient. As a result, many cancers are only partially suppressed, leading to eventual tumor regrowth and/or the development of drug-resistant tumors. Pretargeting (multistep targeting) approaches involving the administration of 1) a cocktail of bispecific proteins that can collectively bind to the entirety of a mixed tumor population followed by 2) nanoparticles containing therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents that can bind to the bispecific proteins accumulated on the surface of target cells offer the potential to overcome many of the challenges associated with drug delivery to heterogeneous tumors. Despite its considerable success in improving the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy, the pretargeting strategy remains underexplored for a majority of nanoparticle therapeutic applications, especially for targeted delivery to heterogeneous tumors. In this review, we will present concepts in tumor heterogeneity, the shortcomings of conventional targeted systems, lessons learned from pretargeted radioimmunotherapy, and important considerations for harnessing the pretargeting strategy to improve nanoparticle delivery to heterogeneous tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor target amplification: Implications for nano drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Khaled; Neubauer, Heidi A; Moriggl, Richard; Jahanban-Esfahlan, Rana; Javaheri, Tahereh

    2018-04-10

    Tumor cells overexpress surface markers which are absent from normal cells. These tumor-restricted antigenic signatures are a fundamental basis for distinguishing on-target from off-target cells for ligand-directed targeting of cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumor heterogeneity impedes the establishment of a solid expression pattern for a given target marker, leading to drastic changes in quality (availability) and quantity (number) of the target. Consequently, a subset of cancer cells remains untargeted during the course of treatment, which subsequently promotes drug-resistance and cancer relapse. Since target inefficiency is only problematic for cancer treatment and not for treatment of other pathological conditions such as viral/bacterial infections, target amplification or the generation of novel targets is key to providing eligible antigenic markers for effective targeted therapy. This review summarizes the limitations of current ligand-directed targeting strategies and provides a comprehensive overview of tumor target amplification strategies, including self-amplifying systems, dual targeting, artificial markers and peptide modification. We also discuss the therapeutic and diagnostic potential of these approaches, the underlying mechanism(s) and established methodologies, mostly in the context of different nanodelivery systems, to facilitate more effective ligand-directed cancer cell monitoring and targeting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Carrier-free, functionalized pure drug nanorods as a novel cancer-targeted drug delivery platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanan; An Feifei; Zhang Xiaohong; Yang Yinlong; Liu Zhuang; Zhang Xiujuan

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional drug delivery system (1D DDS) is highly attractive since it has distinct advantages such as enhanced drug efficiency and better pharmacokinetics. However, drugs in 1D DDSs are all encapsulated in inert carriers, and problems such as low drug loading content and possible undesirable side effects caused by the carriers remain a serious challenge. In this paper, a novel, carrier-free, pure drug nanorod-based, tumor-targeted 1D DDS has been developed. Drugs are first prepared as nanorods and then surface functionalized to achieve excellent water dispersity and stability. The resulting drug nanorods show enhanced internalization rates mainly through energy-dependent endocytosis, with the shape-mediated nanorod (NR) diffusion process as a secondary pathway. The multiple endocytotic mechanisms lead to significantly improved drug efficiency of functionalized NRs with nearly ten times higher cytotoxicity than those of free molecules and unfunctionalized NRs. A targeted drug delivery system can be readily achieved through surface functionalization with targeting group linked amphipathic surfactant, which exhibits significantly enhanced drug efficacy and discriminates between cell lines with high selectivity. These results clearly show that this tumor-targeting DDS demonstrates high potential toward specific cancer cell lines. (paper)

  20. Targeted drug delivery using temperature-sensitive liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, R.L.; Niesman, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Liposomes are receiving considerable attention as vehicles for selective drug delivery. One method of targeting liposomal contents involves the combination of local hyperthermia with temperature-sensitive liposomes. Such liposomes have been used to increase the uptake of methotrexate and cis-platinum into locally heated mouse tumors. However, additional information is needed on the mechanism of liposome drug release and the physiologic deposition of liposomes in vivo before clinical trails are begun. Current research is directed at studying the encapsulation and release of water soluble drugs from temperature-sensitive liposomes. The influence of liposome size, structure, and composition on the rapid release in plasma of cytosine arabinoside, cis-platinum, and the radiation sensitizer SR-2508 are described. These results demonstrate potential applications for temperature-sensitive liposomes in selective drug delivery

  1. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  2. Contrast ultrasound targeted treatment of gliomas in mice via drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery and microvascular ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Caitlin W; Price, Richard J

    2010-12-15

    We are developing minimally-invasive contrast agent microbubble based therapeutic approaches in which the permeabilization and/or ablation of the microvasculature are controlled by varying ultrasound pulsing parameters. Specifically, we are testing whether such approaches may be used to treat malignant brain tumors through drug delivery and microvascular ablation. Preliminary studies have been performed to determine whether targeted drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery can be facilitated by the ultrasound mediated destruction of "composite" delivery agents comprised of 100nm poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) nanoparticles that are adhered to albumin shelled microbubbles. We denote these agents as microbubble-nanoparticle composite agents (MNCAs). When targeted to subcutaneous C6 gliomas with ultrasound, we observed an immediate 4.6-fold increase in nanoparticle delivery in MNCA treated tumors over tumors treated with microbubbles co-administered with nanoparticles and a 8.5 fold increase over non-treated tumors. Furthermore, in many cancer applications, we believe it may be desirable to perform targeted drug delivery in conjunction with ablation of the tumor microcirculation, which will lead to tumor hypoxia and apoptosis. To this end, we have tested the efficacy of non-theramal cavitation-induced microvascular ablation, showing that this approach elicits tumor perfusion reduction, apoptosis, significant growth inhibition, and necrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that our ultrasound-targeted approach has the potential to increase therapeutic efficiency by creating tumor necrosis through microvascular ablation and/or simultaneously enhancing the drug payload in gliomas.

  3. Ultrasound-sensitive nanoparticle aggregates for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anne-Laure; Korin, Netanel; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Amanda; Mannix, Robert; Uzun, Oktay; Johnson, Christopher; Bhatta, Deen; Cuneo, Garry; Ingber, Donald E

    2017-09-01

    Here we describe injectable, ultrasound (US)-responsive, nanoparticle aggregates (NPAs) that disintegrate into slow-release, nanoscale, drug delivery systems, which can be targeted to selective sites by applying low-energy US locally. We show that, unlike microbubble based drug carriers which may suffer from stability problems, the properties of mechanical activated NPAs, composed of polymer nanoparticles, can be tuned by properly adjusting the polymer molecular weight, the size of the nanoparticle precursors as well as the percentage of excipient utilized to hold the NPA together. We then apply this concept to practice by fabricating NPAs composed of nanoparticles loaded with Doxorubicin (Dox) and tested their ability to treat tumors via ultrasound activation. Mouse studies demonstrated significantly increased efficiency of tumor targeting of the US-activated NPAs compared to PLGA nanoparticle controls (with or without US applied) or intact NPAs. Importantly, when the Dox-loaded NPAs were injected and exposed to US energy locally, this increased ability to concentrate nanoparticles at the tumor site resulted in a significantly greater reduction in tumor volume compared to tumors treated with a 20-fold higher dose of the free drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  5. Natural material-decorated mesoporous silica nanoparticle container for multifunctional membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Y

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Hu,1 Lei Ke,2 Hao Chen,1 Ma Zhuo,1 Xinzhou Yang,1 Dan Zhao,1 Suying Zeng,1 Xincai Xiao1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Science, South-Central University for Nationalities, 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: To avoid the side effects caused by nonspecific targeting, premature release, weak selectivity, and poor therapeutic efficacy of current nanoparticle-based systems used for drug delivery, we fabricated natural material-decorated nanoparticles as a multifunctional, membrane-controlled targeted drug delivery system. The nanocomposite material coated with a membrane was biocompatible and integrated both specific tumor targeting and responsiveness to stimulation, which improved transmission efficacy and controlled drug release. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs, which are known for their biocompatibility and high drug-loading capacity, were selected as a model drug container and carrier. The membrane was established by the polyelectrolyte composite method from chitosan (CS which was sensitive to the acidic tumor microenvironment, folic acid-modified CS which recognizes the folate receptor expressed on the tumor cell surface, and a CD44 receptor-targeted polysaccharide hyaluronic acid. We characterized the structure of the nanocomposite as well as the drug release behavior under the control of the pH-sensitive membrane switch and evaluated the antitumor efficacy of the system in vitro. Our results provide a basis for the design and fabrication of novel membrane-controlled nanoparticles with improved tumor-targeting therapy. Keywords: multifunctional, membrane-controlled, natural materials, mesoporous silica nanoparticles, targeted drug delivery

  6. Inhaled Micro/Nanoparticulate Anticancer Drug Formulations: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery Strategy for Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Richard, Derek

    2018-05-24

    Local delivery of drug to the target organ via inhalation offers enormous benefits in the management of many diseases. Lung cancer is the most common of all cancers and it is the leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available treatment systems (intravenous or oral drug delivery) are not efficient in accumulating the delivered drug into the target tumor cells and are usually associated with various systemic and dose-related adverse effects. The pulmonary drug delivery technology would enable preferential accumulation of drug within the cancer cell and thus be superior to intravenous and oral delivery in reducing cancer cell proliferation and minimising the systemic adverse effects. Site-specific drug delivery via inhalation for the treatment of lung cancer is both feasible and efficient. The inhaled drug delivery system is non-invasive, produces high bioavailability at low dose and avoids first pass metabolism of the delivered drug. Various anticancer drugs including chemotherapeutics, proteins and genes have been investigated for inhalation in lung cancers with significant outcomes. Pulmonary delivery of drugs from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation is stable and has high patient compliance. Herein, we report the potential of pulmonary drug delivery from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations inhibiting lung cancer cell proliferation at very low dose with reduced unwanted adverse effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Dual tumor-targeted poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid–polyethylene glycol–folic acid nanoparticles: a novel biodegradable nanocarrier for secure and efficient antitumor drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jia Chen,1,2,* Qi Wu,1,* Li Luo,1 Yi Wang,1 Yuan Zhong,1 Han-Bin Dai,1 Da Sun,1,3 Mao-Ling Luo,4 Wei Wu,1 Gui-Xue Wang1 1Key Laboratory for Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, State and Local Joint Engineering Laboratory for Vascular Implants, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 2Institute of Laboratory Animals, Sichuan Academy of Medical Science, Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital, Chengdu, 3Institute of Life Sciences, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, 4School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Further specific target-ability development of biodegradable nanocarriers is extremely important to promote their security and efficiency in antitumor drug-delivery applications. In this study, a facilely prepared poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA–polyethylene glycol (PEG–folic acid (FA copolymer was able to self-assemble into nanoparticles with favorable hydrodynamic diameters of around 100 nm and negative surface charge in aqueous solution, which was expected to enhance intracellular antitumor drug delivery by advanced dual tumor-target effects, ie, enhanced permeability and retention induced the passive target, and FA mediated the positive target. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting and confocal laser-scanning microscopy results confirmed that doxorubicin (model drug loaded into PLGA-PEG-FA nanoparticles was able to be delivered efficiently into tumor cells and accumulated at nuclei. In addition, all hemolysis, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, and zebrafish-development experiments demonstrated that PLGA-PEG-FA nanoparticles were biocompatible and secure for biomedical applications, even at high polymer concentration (0.1 mg/mL, both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, PLGA-PEG-FA nanoparticles provide a feasible controlled-release platform for secure and efficient antitumor drug

  8. Nano-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase Therapeutic Efficacy of Anticancer Drug Through True Active Tumor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Panyam, Jayanth; Prabha, Swayam

    2018-06-01

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery has the potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and mitigate non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs. However, current drug delivery approaches rely on inefficient passive accumulation of the drug carrier in the tumor. We have developed a unique, truly active tumor-targeting strategy that relies on engineering mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Our studies using the A549 orthotopic lung tumor model show that nano-engineered MSCs carrying the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) home to tumors and create cellular drug depots that release the drug payload over several days. Despite significantly lower doses of PTX, nano-engineered MSCs resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and superior survival. Anticancer efficacy of nano-engineered MSCs was confirmed in immunocompetent C57BL/6 albino female mice bearing orthotopic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LL/2-luc) tumors. Furthermore, at doses that resulted in equivalent therapeutic efficacy, nano-engineered MSCs had no effect on white blood cell count, whereas PTX solution and PTX nanoparticle treatments caused leukopenia. Biodistribution studies showed that nano-engineered MSCs resulted in greater than 9-fold higher AUC lung of PTX (1.5 μg.day/g) than PTX solution and nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.1 μg.day/g tissue, respectively) in the target lung tumors. Furthermore, the lung-to-liver and the lung-to-spleen ratios of PTX were several folds higher for nano-engineered MSCs relative to those for PTX solution and nanoparticle groups, suggesting that nano-engineered MSCs demonstrate significantly less off-target deposition. In summary, our results demonstrate that nano-engineered MSCs can serve as an efficient carrier for tumor-specific drug delivery and significantly improved anti-cancer efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(6); 1196-206. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Targeted Delivery of siRNA Therapeutics to Malignant Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixin Leng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, a diverse group of ligands targeting surface biomarkers or receptors has been identified with several investigated to target siRNA to tumors. Many approaches to developing tumor-homing peptides, RNA and DNA aptamers, and single-chain variable fragment antibodies by using phage display, in vitro evolution, and recombinant antibody methods could not have been imagined by researchers in the 1980s. Despite these many scientific advances, there is no reason to expect that the ligand field will not continue to evolve. From development of ligands based on novel or existing biomarkers to linking ligands to drugs and gene and antisense delivery systems, several fields have coalesced to facilitate ligand-directed siRNA therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the major categories of ligand-targeted siRNA therapeutics for tumors, as well as the different strategies to identify new ligands.

  10. Nanoparticle functionalization for brain targeting drug delivery and diagnostic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, Maria João; Mendes, Bárbara; Martins, Susana

    2016-01-01

    carriers to cross the BBB and achieve brain, and their functionalization strategies are described; and finally the delivery of nanoparticles to the target moiety, as diagnostics or therapeutics. Therefore, this chapter is focused on how the nanoparticle surface may be functionalized for drug delivery......Nanobiotechnology has been demonstrated to be an efficient tool for targeted therapy as well as diagnosis, with particular emphasis on brain tumor and neurodegenerative diseases. On this regard, the aim of this chapter is focused on engineered nanoparticles targeted to the brain, so that they have...... and diagnostics. Furthermore, it is also mentioned that some BBB targets were already used as transport mediators to central nervous system by functionalization on nanoparticles. It summarizes the nanoparticles potential in therapeutics and molecular targeting to BBB, and also an approach of the nanoparticle...

  11. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wuxu; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yingge

    2011-10-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies.

  12. Multi-small molecule conjugations as new targeted delivery carriers for tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingling Shan,1 Ming Liu,2 Chao Wu,1 Liang Zhao,1 Siwen Li,3 Lisheng Xu,1 Wengen Cao,1 Guizhen Gao,1 Yueqing Gu3 1Institute of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Biology and Food Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Biology, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting ability, and harmful side effects, we developed a new tumor-targeted multi-small molecule drug delivery platform. Using paclitaxel (PTX as a model therapeutic, we prepared two prodrugs, ie, folic acid-fluorescein-5(6-isothiocyanate-arginine-paclitaxel (FA-FITC-Arg-PTX and folic acid-5-aminofluorescein-glutamic-paclitaxel (FA-5AF-Glu-PTX, composed of folic acid (FA, target, amino acids (Arg or Glu, linker, and fluorescent dye (fluorescein in vitro or near-infrared fluorescent dye in vivo in order to better understand the mechanism of PTX prodrug targeting. In vitro and acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the prodrug formulations compared with the free drug. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that folate receptor-mediated uptake of PTX-conjugated multi-small molecule carriers induced high antitumor activity. Notably, compared with free PTX and with PTX-loaded macromolecular carriers from our previous study, this multi-small molecule-conjugated strategy improved the water solubility, loading rate, targeting ability, antitumor activity, and toxicity profile of PTX. These results support the use of multi-small molecules as tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. Keywords: multi-small molecules, paclitaxel, prodrugs, targeting, tumor therapy

  13. Biodegradable Drug-Loaded Hydroxyapatite Nanotherapeutic Agent for Targeted Drug Release in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Fan, Jiangli; Wang, Suzhen; Kang, Yao; Du, Jianjun; Peng, Xiaojun

    2018-03-07

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to improve the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and reduce their toxic side effects in vivo. Focused on this point, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanorods consisting of folic acid (FA) modification (DOX@HAP-FA) were developed for efficient antitumor treatment. The DOX-loaded nanorods were synthesized through in situ coprecipitation and hydrothermal method with a DOX template, demonstrating a new procedure for drug loading in HAP materials. DOX could be efficiently released from DOX@HAP-FA within 24 h in weakly acidic buffer solution (pH = 6.0) because of the degradation of HAP nanorods. With endocytosis under the mediation of folate receptors, the nanorods exhibited enhanced cellular uptake and further degraded, and consequently, the proliferation of targeted cells was inhibited. More importantly, in a tumor-bearing mouse model, DOX@HAP-FA treatment demonstrated excellent tumor growth inhibition. In addition, no apparent side effects were observed during the treatment. These results suggested that DOX@HAP-FA may be a promising nanotherapeutic agent for effective cancer treatment in vivo.

  14. An effective tumor-targeting strategy utilizing hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system for improved anti-tumor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lin; Fan, Bo; Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Gao, Zhonggao

    2016-10-15

    Hypoxia is a feature of most solid tumors, targeting hypoxia is considered as the best validated yet not extensively exploited strategy in cancer therapy. Here, we reported a novel tumor-targeting strategy using a hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system. In the study, 2-nitroimidazole (NI), a hydrophobic component that can be converted to hydrophilic 2-aminoimidazole (AI) through bioreduction under hypoxic conditions, was conjugated to the alkylated polyethyleneimine (bPEI1.8k-C6) to form amphiphilic bPEI1.8k-C6-NI polycations. bPEI1.8k-C6-NI could self-assemble into micelle-like aggregations in aqueous, which contributed to the improved stability of the bPEI1.8k-C6-NI/siRNA polyplexes, resulted in increased cellular uptake. After being transported into the hypoxic tumor cells, the selective nitro-to-amino reduction would cause structural change and elicit a relatively loose structure to facilitate the siRNA dissociation in the cytoplasm, for enhanced gene silencing efficiency ultimately. Therefore, the conflict between the extracellular stability and the intracellular siRNA release ability of the polyplexes was solved by introducing the hypoxia-responsive unit. Consequently, the survivin-targeted siRNA loaded polyplexes shown remarkable anti-tumor effect not only in hypoxic cells, but also in tumor spheroids and tumor-bearing mice, indicating that the hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system had great potential for tumor-targeted therapy. Hypoxia is one of the most remarkable features of most solid tumors, and targeting hypoxia is considered as the best validated strategy in cancer therapy. However, in the past decades, there were few reports about using this strategy in the drug delivery system, especially in siRNA delivery system. Therefore, we constructed a hypoxia-sensitive siRNA delivery system utilizing a hypoxia-responsive unit, 2-nitroimidazole, by which the unavoidable conflict between improved extracellular stability and promoted intracellular si

  15. The Research Progress of Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiayin; Ting, Xizi Liang; Zhu, Junjie

    2017-06-01

    Targeted drug delivery system (DDS) means to selectively transport drugs to targeted tissues, organs, and cells through a variety of drugs carrier. It is usually designed to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and to overcome problems such as limited solubility, drug aggregation, poor bio distribution and lack of selectivity, controlling drug release carrier and to reduce normal tissue damage. With the characteristics of nontoxic and biodegradable, it can increase the retention of drug in lesion site and the permeability, improve the concentration of the drug in lesion site. at present, there are some kinds of DDS using at test phase, such as slow controlled release drug delivery system, targeted drug delivery systems, transdermal drug delivery system, adhesion dosing system and so on. This paper makes a review for DDS.

  16. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  17. A review on target drug delivery: magnetic microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Chandna; Deepa Batra; Satinder Kakar; Ramandeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Novel drug delivery system aims to deliver the drug at a rate directed by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the active entity to the site of action. A number of novel drug delivery systems have emerged encompassing various routes of administration, to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery, magnetic micro carriers being one of them. Magnetic microsphere is newer approach in pharmaceutical field. Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional ra...

  18. Pharmacological and physical vessel modulation strategies to improve EPR-mediated drug targeting to tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Tarun; Pathak, Vertika; Shi, Yang; Hennink, Wim E; Moonen, Chrit T W; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2017-09-15

    The performance of nanomedicine formulations depends on the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Prototypic nanomedicine-based drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, polymers and micelles, aim to exploit the EPR effect to accumulate at pathological sites, to thereby improve the balance between drug efficacy and toxicity. Thus far, however, tumor-targeted nanomedicines have not yet managed to achieve convincing therapeutic results, at least not in large cohorts of patients. This is likely mostly due to high inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in EPR. Besides developing (imaging) biomarkers to monitor and predict EPR, another strategy to address this heterogeneity is the establishment of vessel modulation strategies to homogenize and improve EPR. Over the years, several pharmacological and physical co-treatments have been evaluated to improve EPR-mediated tumor targeting. These include pharmacological strategies, such as vessel permeabilization, normalization, disruption and promotion, as well as physical EPR enhancement via hyperthermia, radiotherapy, sonoporation and phototherapy. In the present manuscript, we summarize exemplary studies showing that pharmacological and physical vessel modulation strategies can be used to improve tumor-targeted drug delivery, and we discuss how these advanced combination regimens can be optimally employed to enhance the (pre-) clinical performance of tumor-targeted nanomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice in thermo-sensitive liposomes group and doxorubicin group were significantly smaller than those of N.S. group. Meanwhile, the combination of near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm significantly enhanced the tumor growth inhibition both on SMMC-7721 cells and the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice. The quality of life such as body weight, mental state, food and water intake of sarcomaia 180 tumor-bearing mice treated with doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes were much higher than those treated with doxorubicin. In conclusion, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes combined with near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm may potentially provide viable clinical strategies for targeting delivery of anti-cancer drugs. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Novel tumor-targeting, self-assembling peptide nanofiber as a carrier for effective curcumin delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jianfeng Liu, Jinjian Liu, Hongyan Xu, Yumin Zhang, Liping Chu, Qingfen Liu, Naling Song, Cuihong YangTianjin Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin restrict its clinical application for cancer treatment. In this study, a novel tumor-targeting nanofiber carrier was developed to improve the solubility and tumor-targeting ability of curcumin using a self-assembled Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide. The morphologies of the peptide nanofiber and the curcumin-encapsulated nanofiber were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The tumor-targeting activity of the curcumin-encapsulated Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide nanofiber (f-RGD-Cur was studied in vitro and in vivo, using Nap-GFFYG-RGE peptide nanofiber (f-RGE-Cur as the control. Curcumin was encapsulated into the peptide nanofiber, which had a diameter of approximately 10–20 nm. Curcumin showed sustained-release behavior from the nanofibers in vitro. f-RGD-Cur showed much higher cellular uptake in αvβ3 integrin-positive HepG2 liver carcinoma cells than did non-targeted f-RGE-Cur, thereby leading to significantly higher cytotoxicity. Ex vivo studies further demonstrated that curcumin could accumulate markedly in mouse tumors after administration of f-RGD-Cur via the tail vein. These results indicate that Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide self-assembled nanofibers are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system for targeted treatment of cancer.Keywords: nanofiber, tumor-targeting, self-assembling, curcumin, drug delivery

  1. Targeted Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles-Encapsulated Perfluorohexane and a Hydrophobic Drug for Deep Tumor Penetration and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Lin; Fang, Jen-Hung; Liao, Chia-Ying; Lin, Chein-Ting; Li, Yun-Ting; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    A magneto-responsive energy/drug carrier that enhances deep tumor penetration with a porous nano-composite is constructed by using a tumor-targeted lactoferrin (Lf) bio-gate as a cap on mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs). With a large payload of a gas-generated molecule, perfluorohexane (PFH), and a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), Lf-MIONs can simultaneously perform bursting gas generation and on-demand drug release upon high-frequency magnetic field (MF) exposure. Biocompatible PFH was chosen and encapsulated in MIONs due to its favorable phase transition temperature (56 °C) and its hydrophobicity. After a short-duration MF treatment induces heat generation, the local pressure increase via the gasifying of the PFH embedded in MION can substantially rupture the three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro as well as enhance drug and carrier penetration. As the MF treatment duration increases, Lf-MIONs entering the tumor spheroids provide an intense heat and burst-like drug release, leading to superior drug delivery and deep tumor thermo-chemo-therapy. With their high efficiency for targeting tumors, Lf-MIONs/PTX-PFH suppressed subcutaneous tumors in 16 days after a single MF exposure. This work presents the first study of using MF-induced PFH gasification as a deep tumor-penetrating agent for drug delivery.

  2. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Ding,1,* Dan Sun,1,* Gui-Ling Wang,1 Hong-Ge Yang,1 Hai-Feng Xu,1 Jian-Hua Chen,2 Ying Xie,1,3 Zhi-Qiang Wang4 1Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Pharmaceutics and New Drug Delivery Systems, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 2School of Medicine, Jianghan University, Wuhan, 3State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kent State University Geauga, Burton, OH, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into

  3. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Phuong Thu; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Do, Hai Doan; Phan, Quoc Thong; Thi, Minh Nguyet Tran; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Thi, My Nhung Hoang; Le, Mai Huong; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Bui, Thuc Quang; Phan, Van Hieu

    2016-01-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50–100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment. (paper)

  4. Targeted drug delivery nanosystems based on copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Doan Do, Hai; Thong Phan, Quoc; Nguyet Tran Thi, Minh; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan; Nhung Hoang Thi, My; Huong Le, Mai; Nguyen, Linh Toan; Quang Bui, Thuc; Hieu Phan, Van

    2016-03-01

    Along with the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery nanosystems (DDNSs) have attracted a great deal of concern among scientists over the world, especially in cancer treatment. DDNSs not only improve water solubility of anticancer drugs but also increase therapeutic efficacy and minimize the side effects of treatment methods through targeting mechanisms including passive and active targeting. Passive targeting is based on the nano-size of drug delivery systems while active targeting is based on the specific bindings between targeting ligands attached on the drug delivery systems and the unique receptors on the cancer cell surface. In this article we present some of our results in the synthesis and testing of DDNSs prepared from copolymer poly(lactide)-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS), which carry anticancer drugs including curcumin, paclitaxel and doxorubicin. In order to increase the targeting effect to cancer cells, active targeting ligand folate was attached to the DDNSs. The results showed copolymer PLA-TPGS to be an excellent carrier for loading hydrophobic drugs (curcumin and paclitaxel). The fabricated DDNSs had a very small size (50-100 nm) and enhanced the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of drugs. Most notably, folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles (Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs) were tested on tumor-bearing nude mice. During the treatment time, Fol/PTX/PLA-TPGS NPs always exhibited the best tumor growth inhibition compared to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA-TPGS nanoparticles. All results evidenced the promising potential of copolymer PLA-TPGS in fabricating targeted DDNSs for cancer treatment.

  5. Polymeric micelles as a drug carrier for tumor targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha M Dand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric micelle can be targeted to tumor site by passive and active mechanism. Some inherent properties of polymeric micelle such as size in nanorange, stability in plasma, longevity in vivo, and pathological characteristics of tumor make polymeric micelles to be targeted at the tumor site by passive mechanism called enhanced permeability and retention effect. Polymeric micelle formed from the amphiphilic block copolymer is suitable for encapsulation of poorly water soluble, hydrophobic anticancer drugs. Other characteristics of polymeric micelles such as separated functionality at the outer shell are useful for targeting the anticancer drug to tumor by active mechanisms. Polymeric micelles can be conjugated with many ligands such as antibodies fragments, epidermal growth factors, α2 -glycoprotein, transferrine, and folate to target micelles to cancer cells. Application of heat and ultrasound are the alternative methods to enhance drug accumulation in tumoral cells. Targeting using micelles can also be done to tumor angiogenesis which is the potentially promising target for anticancer drugs. This review summarizes about recently available information regarding targeting the anticancer drug to the tumor site using polymeric micelles.

  6. Organelle targeting: third level of drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhrani NM

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Niraj M Sakhrani, Harish PadhDepartment of Cell and Molecular Biology, BV Patel Pharmaceutical Education and Research Development (PERD Centre, Gujarat, IndiaAbstract: Drug discovery and drug delivery are two main aspects for treatment of a variety of disorders. However, the real bottleneck associated with systemic drug administration is the lack of target-specific affinity toward a pathological site, resulting in systemic toxicity and innumerable other side effects as well as higher dosage requirement for efficacy. An attractive strategy to increase the therapeutic index of a drug is to specifically deliver the therapeutic molecule in its active form, not only into target tissue, nor even to target cells, but more importantly, into the targeted organelle, ie, to its intracellular therapeutic active site. This would ensure improved efficacy and minimize toxicity. Cancer chemotherapy today faces the major challenge of delivering chemotherapeutic drugs exclusively to tumor cells, while sparing normal proliferating cells. Nanoparticles play a crucial role by acting as a vehicle for delivery of drugs to target sites inside tumor cells. In this review, we spotlight active and passive targeting, followed by discussion of the importance of targeting to specific cell organelles and the potential role of cell-penetrating peptides. Finally, the discussion will address the strategies for drug/DNA targeting to lysosomes, mitochondria, nuclei and Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum.Keywords: intracellular drug delivery, cancer chemotherapy, therapeutic index, cell penetrating peptides

  7. Aptamer-Mediated Polymeric Vehicles for Enhanced Cell-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kei X; Danquah, Michael K; Sidhu, Amandeep; Yon, Lau Sie; Ongkudon, Clarence M

    2018-02-08

    The search for smart delivery systems for enhanced pre-clinical and clinical pharmaceutical delivery and cell targeting continues to be a major biomedical research endeavor owing to differences in the physicochemical characteristics and physiological effects of drug molecules, and this affects the delivery mechanisms to elicit maximum therapeutic effects. Targeted drug delivery is a smart evolution essential to address major challenges associated with conventional drug delivery systems. These challenges mostly result in poor pharmacokinetics due to the inability of the active pharmaceutical ingredients to specifically act on malignant cells thus, causing poor therapeutic index and toxicity to surrounding normal cells. Aptamers are oligonucleotides with engineered affinities to bind specifically to their cognate targets. Aptamers have gained significant interests as effective targeting elements for enhanced therapeutic delivery as they can be generated to specifically bind to wide range of targets including proteins, peptides, ions, cells and tissues. Notwithstanding, effective delivery of aptamers as therapeutic vehicles is challenged by cell membrane electrostatic repulsion, endonuclease degradation, low pH cleavage, and binding conformation stability. The application of molecularly engineered biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric particles with tunable features such as surface area and chemistry, particulate size distribution and toxicity creates opportunities to develop smart aptamer-mediated delivery systems for controlled drug release. This article discusses opportunities for particulate aptamer-drug formulations to advance current drug delivery modalities by navigating active ingredients through cellular and biomolecular traffic to target sites for sustained and controlled release at effective therapeutic dosages while minimizing systemic cytotoxic effects. A proposal for a novel drug-polymer-aptamer-polymer (DPAP) design of aptamer-drug formulation with

  8. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Huwyler

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumordrugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research.Keywords: tumor targeting, antineoplastic drugs, liposomes, pegylation, steric stabilization, immunoliposomes

  9. MODELING OF TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY PART II. MULTIPLE DRUG ADMINISTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zaborovskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In oncology practice, despite significant advances in early cancer detection, surgery, radiotherapy, laser therapy, targeted therapy, etc., chemotherapy is unlikely to lose its relevance in the near future. In this context, the development of new antitumor agents is one of the most important problems of cancer research. In spite of the importance of searching for new compounds with antitumor activity, the possibilities of the “old” agents have not been fully exhausted. Targeted delivery of antitumor agents can give them a “second life”. When developing new targeted drugs and their further introduction into clinical practice, the change in their pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics plays a special role. The paper describes a pharmacokinetic model of the targeted drug delivery. The conditions under which it is meaningful to search for a delivery vehicle for the active substance were described. Primary screening of antitumor agents was undertaken to modify them for the targeted delivery based on underlying assumptions of the model.

  10. Self-Assembled Smart Nanocarriers for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Li, Junbai; Decher, Gero

    2016-02-10

    Nanostructured drug-carrier systems promise numerous benefits for drug delivery. They can be engineered to precisely control drug-release rates or to target specific sites within the body with a specific amount of therapeutic agent. However, to achieve the best therapeutic effects, the systems should be designed for carrying the optimum amount of a drug to the desired target where it should be released at the optimum rate for a specified time. Despite numerous attempts, fulfilling all of these requirements in a synergistic way remains a huge challenge. The trend in drug delivery is consequently directed toward integrated multifunctional carrier systems, providing selective recognition in combination with sustained or triggered release. Capsules as vesicular systems enable drugs to be confined for controlled release. Furthermore, carriers modified with recognition groups can enhance the capability of encapsulated drug efficacy. Here, recent advances are reviewed regarding designing and preparing assembled capsules with targeting ligands or size controllable for selective recognition in drug delivery. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  12. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  13. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yong-Yong; Li, Lan; Dong, Hai-Qing; Cai, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Tian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ∼ 100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery. - Highlights: ► A new nuclear targeted drug delivery system based on micelles is developed. ► This micellar system features a core-shell structure with the size peaked at 100 nm. ► PV7, a short peptide sequence, is adopted as a nuclear targeting ligand. ► PV7 functionalized drug loaded micelles are more potent in killing tumor cells

  14. Autonomous self-navigating drug-delivery vehicles: from science fiction to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Valery A

    2017-12-01

    Low efficacy of targeted nanomedicines in biological experiments enforced us to challenge the traditional concept of drug targeting and suggest a paradigm of 'addressed self-navigating drug-delivery vehicles,' in which affinity selection of targeting peptides and vasculature-directed in vivo phage screening is replaced by the migration selection, which explores ability of 'promiscuous' phages and their proteins to migrate through the tumor-surrounding cellular barriers, using a 'hub and spoke' delivery strategy, and penetrate into the tumor affecting the diverse tumor cell population. The 'self-navigating' drug-delivery paradigm can be used as a theoretical and technical platform in design of a novel generation of molecular medications and imaging probes for precise and personal medicine. [Formula: see text].

  15. PEGylated Polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugated with tumor homing peptide as a potential targeted delivery system for glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Lv, Lingyan; Shi, Huihui; Hua, Yabing; Lv, Wei; Wang, Xiuzhen; Xin, Hongliang; Xu, Qunwei

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor with a short survival time. The failure of chemotherapy is ascribed to the low transport of chemotherapeutics across the Blood Brain Tumor Barrier (BBTB) and poor penetration into tumor tissue. In order to overcome the two barriers, small nanoparticles with active targeted capability are urgently needed for GBM drug delivery. In this study, we proposed PEGylated Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticles conjugated with glioma homing peptides (Pep-1) as potential glioma targeting delivery system (Pep-PEG-PAMAM), where PEGylated PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticle was utilized as carrier due to its small size and perfect penetration into tumor and Pep-1 was used to overcome BBTB via interleukin 13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) mediated endocytosis. The preliminary availability and safety of Pep-PEG-PAMAM as a nanocarrier for glioma was evaluated. In vitro results indicated that a significantly higher amount of Pep-PEG-PAMAM was endocytosed by U87 MG cells. In vivo fluorescence imaging of U87MG tumor-bearing mice confirmed that the fluorescence intensity at glioma site of targeted group was 2.02 folds higher than that of untargeted group (**p<0.01), and glioma distribution experiment further revealed that Pep-PEG-PAMAM exhibited a significantly enhanced accumulation and improved penetration at tumor site. In conclusion, Pep-1 modified PAMAM was a promising nanocarrier for targeted delivery of brain glioma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo imaging of passively tumor targeted polymer carrier and the enzymatically cleavable drug model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Robert; Heinrich, A. K.; Mueller, T.; Kostka, Libor; Mäder, K.; Pechar, Michal; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 6, 4 (Suppl) (2017), s. 90 ISSN 2325-9604. [International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery. 29.05.2017-31.05.2017, Osaka] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polymer drug carrier * tumor targeting * enzymatic release Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  17. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Drug delivery to solid tumors: the predictive value of the multicellular tumor spheroid model for nanomedicine screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Marie Millard,1,2 Ilya Yakavets,1–3 Vladimir Zorin,3,4 Aigul Kulmukhamedova,1,2,5 Sophie Marchal,1,2 Lina Bezdetnaya1,2 1Centre de Recherche en Automatique de Nancy, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7039, Université de Lorraine, 2Research Department, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, France; 3Laboratory of Biophysics and Biotechnology, 4International Sakharov Environmental Institute, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus; 5Department of Radiology, Medical Company Sunkar, Almaty, Kazakhstan Abstract: The increasing number of publications on the subject shows that nanomedicine is an attractive field for investigations aiming to considerably improve anticancer chemotherapy. Based on selective tumor targeting while sparing healthy tissue, carrier-mediated drug delivery has been expected to provide significant benefits to patients. However, despite reduced systemic toxicity, most nanodrugs approved for clinical use have been less effective than previously anticipated. The gap between experimental results and clinical outcomes demonstrates the necessity to perform comprehensive drug screening by using powerful preclinical models. In this context, in vitro three-dimensional models can provide key information on drug behavior inside the tumor tissue. The multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS model closely mimics a small avascular tumor with the presence of proliferative cells surrounding quiescent cells and a necrotic core. Oxygen, pH and nutrient gradients are similar to those of solid tumor. Furthermore, extracellular matrix (ECM components and stromal cells can be embedded in the most sophisticated spheroid design. All these elements together with the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (NPs play a key role in drug transport, and therefore, the MCTS model is appropriate to assess the ability of NP to penetrate the tumor tissue. This review presents recent developments in MCTS models for a

  19. Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cristini, Vittorio; Brinker, Lina M; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Proneth, Bettina; Lin, Yu-Shen; Dunphy, Darren R; Dogra, Prashant; Melancon, Marites P; Stafford, R Jason; Miyazono, Kohei; Gelovani, Juri G; Kataoka, Kazunori; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-16

    A major challenge of targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery in cancer is establishing a functional combination of ligand-directed cargo with a triggered release system. Here we develop a hydrogel-based nanotechnology platform that integrates tumor targeting, photon-to-heat conversion, and triggered drug delivery within a single nanostructure to enable multimodal imaging and controlled release of therapeutic cargo. In proof-of-concept experiments, we show a broad range of ligand peptide-based applications with phage particles, heat-sensitive liposomes, or mesoporous silica nanoparticles that self-assemble into a hydrogel for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Because nanoparticles pack densely within the nanocarrier, their surface plasmon resonance shifts to near-infrared, thereby enabling a laser-mediated photothermal mechanism of cargo release. We demonstrate both noninvasive imaging and targeted drug delivery in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer. Finally, we applied mathematical modeling to predict and confirm tumor targeting and drug delivery. These results are meaningful steps toward the design and initial translation of an enabling nanotechnology platform with potential for broad clinical applications.

  20. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, M; Bazmara, H; Sefidgar, M; Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm 3 , were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm 3 , was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm 3 , the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic tumors is not

  1. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, M [ohns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, and KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazmara, H [KNT university, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sefidgar, M [IKI University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm{sup 3}, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm{sup 3}, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic

  2. Smart pH- and reduction-dual-responsive folate-PEG-coated polymeric lipid vesicles for tumor-triggered targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Wang, Hanjie; Liu, Zhongyun; Wang, Liangliang; Wang, Xiaomin; Su, Lin; Chang, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To improve their therapeutic index, designed nanocarriers should preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues and then rapidly enter tumor cells to release the encapsulated drugs in a triggered manner. In this article, a new kind of a smart pH- and reduction-dual-responsive drug delivery system based on folate-PEG-coated polymeric lipid vesicles (FPPLVs) formed from amphiphilic dextran derivatives was designed and prepared successfully. PEG chains with pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds, stearyl alcohol (SA) chains with reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and folate were connected to a dextran main chain. The newly developed FPPLVs had a nano-sized structure (~50 nm) with a PEG coating. The in vitro DOX release profiles showed that the FPPLVs achieved a triggered drug release in response to acidic pH and reducing environments due to the cleavage of hydrazone bonds and disulfide bonds. It has also been demonstrated by an in vitro cellular uptake study that the FPPLVs lose their PEG coating as well as expose the folate in acidic conditions, which allows them to efficiently enter tumor cells through ligand-receptor interactions. In vitro cytotoxicity measurements also confirmed that FPPLVs exhibited pronounced antitumor activity against HeLa cells. These results suggest that FPPLVs are promising carriers for smart antitumor drug delivery applications.To improve their therapeutic index, designed nanocarriers should preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues and then rapidly enter tumor cells to release the encapsulated drugs in a triggered manner. In this article, a new kind of a smart pH- and reduction-dual-responsive drug delivery system based on folate-PEG-coated polymeric lipid vesicles (FPPLVs) formed from amphiphilic dextran derivatives was designed and prepared successfully. PEG chains with pH-sensitive hydrazone bonds, stearyl alcohol (SA) chains with reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and folate were connected to a dextran main chain. The newly developed FPPLVs had a

  3. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-01-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel

  4. Recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with ruthenium complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Thangavel,1 Buddolla Viswanath,1 Sanghyo Kim1,2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Bokjeong-Dong, Sujeong-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: In recent years, the field of metal-based drugs has been dominated by other existing precious metal drugs, and many researchers have focused their attention on the synthesis of various ruthenium (Ru complexes due to their potential medical and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial properties of Ru, which make it a highly promising therapeutic agent, include its variable oxidation states, low toxicity, high selectivity for diseased cells, ligand exchange properties, and the ability to mimic iron binding to biomolecules. In addition, Ru complexes have favorable adsorption properties, along with excellent photochemical and photophysical properties, which make them promising tools for photodynamic therapy. At present, nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes have become an efficient way to administer Ru-based anticancer drugs for cancer treatment. In this review, the recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors are discussed. In addition, information on “traditional” (ie, non-nanostructured Ru-based cancer therapies is included in a precise manner. Keywords: metallodrugs, nanotechnology, cancer treatment, cell apoptosis, DNA damage, toxicity

  5. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yun; Chen Zhilong; Yang Xiaoxia; Huang Peng; Zhou Xinping; Du Xiaoxia

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 μM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  6. Development of PLGA-lipid nanoparticles with covalently conjugated indocyanine green as a versatile nanoplatform for tumor-targeted imaging and drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yu Xin, Tie Liu, Chenlong Yang Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: We have prepared novel poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA lipid nanoparticles (PNPs that covalently conjugate folic acid (FA and indocyanine green (ICG, in addition to encapsulating resveratrol (RSV (FA-RSV/ICG-PLGA-lipid NPs, abbreviated as FA-RIPNPs; these nanoparticles have been developed for simultaneous targeted delivery of anticancer drug and fluorescence imaging. The FA-RIPNPs, with an average particle size of 92.8±2.1 nm, were prepared by a facile self-assembly-and-nanoprecipitation method, and they showed excellent stability and biocompatibility characteristics. The FA-RIPNPs exhibited an RSV encapsulation efficiency of approximately 65.6%±4.7% and a maximum release ratio of 78.2%±4.1% at pH 5.0 and 37°C. Confocal fluorescence images showed that FA-RIPNPs may facilitate a high cellular uptake via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, FA-RIPNPs (containing 50 µg/mL RSV induced a 81.4%±2.1% U87 cell inhibition rate via apoptosis, a value that proved to be higher than what has been shown for free RSV (53.1%±1.1%, equivalent RSV concentration. With a formulated polyethylene glycol (PEG shell around the PLGA core, FA-RIPNPs prolonged the blood circulation of both free RSV and ICG, which approximately increased 6.96- and 39.4-fold (t1/2, respectively. Regarding FA-RIPNP use as a near-infrared probe, in vivo fluorescence images indicated a highly efficient accumulation of FA-RIPNPs in the tumor tissue, which proved to be approximately 2.8- and 12.6-fold higher than the RIPNPs and free ICG, respectively. Intravenous injection of FA-RIPNPs into U87 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated the best tumor inhibition effect for all tested drugs, including free RSV and RIPNPs, with no relapse, showing high biocompatibility and with no significant systemic in vivo toxicity over the

  7. Evaluation of RGD-targeted albumin carriers for specific delivery of auristatin E to tumor blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temming, Kai; Meyer, Damon L; Zabinski, Roger; Dijkers, Eli C F; Poelstra, Klaas; Molema, Grietje; Kok, Robbert J

    2006-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells is considered an attractive strategy to therapeutically interfere with a solid tumor's blood supply. In the present paper, we constructed cytotoxic conjugates that specifically target angiogenic endothelial cells, thus preventing typical side effects of apoptosis-inducing drugs. For this purpose, we conjugated the potent antimitotic agent monomethyl-auristatin-E (MMAE) via a lysosomal cleavable linker to human serum albumin (HSA) and further equipped this drug-albumin conjugate with cyclic c(RGDfK) peptides for multivalent interaction with alphavbeta3-integrin. The RGD-peptides were conjugated via either an extended poly(ethylene glycol) linker or a short alkyl linker. The resulting drug-targeting conjugates RGDPEG-MMAE-HSA and RGD-MMAE-HSA demonstrated high binding affinity and specificity for alphavbeta3-integrin expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Both types of conjugates were internalized by endothelial cells and killed the target cells at low nM concentrations. Furthermore, we observed RGD-dependent binding of the conjugates to C26 carcinoma. Upon i.v. administration to C26-tumor bearing mice, both drug-targeting conjugates displayed excellent tumor homing properties. Our results demonstrate that RGD-modified albumins are suitable carriers for cell selective intracellular delivery of cytotoxic compounds, and further studies will be conducted to assess the antivascular and tumor inhibitory potential of RGDPEG-MMAE-HSA and RGD-MMAE-HSA.

  8. Mononuclear phagocytes as a target, not a barrier, for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Seok-Beom; Song, Yoonsung; Kim, Hyung Jin; Ain, Qurrat Ul; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2017-08-10

    Mononuclear phagocytes have been generally recognized as a barrier to drug delivery. Recently, a new understanding of mononuclear phagocytes (MPS) ontogeny has surfaced and their functions in disease have been unveiled, demonstrating the need for re-evaluation of perspectives on mononuclear phagocytes in drug delivery. In this review, we described mononuclear phagocyte biology and focus on their accumulation mechanisms in disease sites with explanations of monocyte heterogeneity. In the 'MPS as a barrier' section, we summarized recent studies on mechanisms to avoid phagocytosis based on two different biological principles: protein adsorption and self-recognition. In the 'MPS as a target' section, more detailed descriptions were given on mononuclear phagocyte-targeted drug delivery systems and their applications to various diseases. Collectively, we emphasize in this review that mononuclear phagocytes are potent targets for future drug delivery systems. Mononuclear phagocyte-targeted delivery systems should be created with an understanding of mononuclear phagocyte ontogeny and pathology. Each specific subset of phagocytes should be targeted differently by location and function for improved disease-drug delivery while avoiding RES clearance such as Kupffer cells and splenic macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Smart Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsoy, Gozde; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2018-02-08

    Smart nanocarriers have been designed for tissue-specific targeted drug delivery, sustained or triggered drug release and co-delivery of synergistic drug combinations to develop safer and more efficient therapeutics. Advances in drug delivery systems provide reduced side effects, longer circulation half-life and improved pharmacokinetics. Smart drug delivery systems have been achieved successfully in the case of cancer. These nanocarriers can serve as an intelligent system by considering the differences of tumor microenvironment from healthy tissue, such as low pH, low oxygen level, or high enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinases. The performance of anti-cancer agents used in cancer diagnosis and therapy is improved by enhanced cellular internalization of smart nanocarriers and controlled drug release. Here, we review targeting, cellular internalization; controlled drug release and toxicity of smart drug delivery systems. We are also emphasizing the stimulus responsive controlled drug release from smart nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Effect of radiotherapy and hyperthermia on the tumor accumulation of HPMA copolymer-based drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lammers, T.; Peschke, P.; Kühnlein, R.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Debus, J.; Huber, P. E.; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 3 (2007), s. 333-341 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/05/2255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : HPMA * drug delivery * tumor targeting Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.756, year: 2007

  11. A murine model of targeted infusion for intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minhyung; Barone, Tara A; Fedtsova, Natalia; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wilfong, Chandler D; Alosi, Julie A; Plunkett, Robert J; Gudkov, Andrei; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, intra-arterial (IA) drug administration for malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was performed as an attempt to improve drug delivery. With the advent of percutaneous neuorovascular techniques and modern microcatheters, intracranial drug delivery is readily feasible; however, the question remains whether IA administration is safe and more effective compared to other delivery modalities such as intravenous (IV) or oral administrations. Preclinical large animal models allow for comparisons between treatment routes and to test novel agents, but can be expensive and difficult to generate large numbers and rapid results. Accordingly, we developed a murine model of IA drug delivery for GBM that is reproducible with clear readouts of tumor response and neurotoxicities. Herein, we describe a novel mouse model of IA drug delivery accessing the internal carotid artery to treat ipsilateral implanted GBM tumors that is consistent and reproducible with minimal experience. The intent of establishing this unique platform is to efficiently interrogate targeted anti-tumor agents that may be designed to take advantage of a directed, regional therapy approach for brain tumors.

  12. Premature drug release of polymeric micelles and its effects on tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tobias; Breyer, Sandra; van Colen, Gwenaelle; Mier, Walter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Geissler, Simon; Voss, Senta; Weigandt, Markus; Goepferich, Achim

    2013-03-10

    Based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, nanoparticles are believed to accumulate in tumors. In this conjunction, the stability of drug encapsulation is assumed to be sufficient. For clarification purposes, PEGylated poly-(D,L-lactic acid) (PEG-PDLLA) micelles which incorporated the hydrophobic model drug dechloro-4-iodo-fenofibrate (IFF) were investigated. H2N-PEG-PDLLA was synthesized, coupled to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) and labeled with 111-indium. From this polymeric species, mixed micelles with H3CO-PEG-PDLLA were prepared which encapsulated the 125-iodine or 131-iodine labeled drug IFF. Bioimaging and biodistribution experiments in healthy and AR42J-tumor bearing mice were carried out to quantify the uptake of the drug and its carrier in single organs. As a result, upon injection of this system, a rapid dissociation of the polymeric carrier and the incorporated drug (system allowed for successful solubilization of the hydrophobic drug by physical incorporation into micelles whereas the tumor targeting properties of the drug delivery system could not be sufficiently shown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Overview of Methods Able to Overcome Impediments to tumor Drug Delivery with Special Attention to Tumor Interstitial Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco eBaronzio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Every drug used to treat cancer (chemotherapeutics, immunologic, monoclonal antibodies, nanoparticles, radionuclides must reach the targeted cells through the tumor environment at adequate concentrations, in order to exert their cell-killing effects. For any of these agents to reach the goal cells they must overcome a number of impediments created by the tumor microenvironment, beginning with tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP and a multifactorial increase in composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM. A primary modifier of tumor microenvironment is hypoxia, which increases the production of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF. These growth factors released by both tumor cells and bone marrow recruited myeloid cells (MDS, form abnormal vasculature characterized by vessels that are tortuous and more permeable. Increased leakiness combined with increased inflammatory byproducts accumulates fluid within the tumor mass [tumor interstitial fluid (TIF], ultimately creating an increased pressure (TIFP. Fibroblasts are also up-regulated by the tumor microenvironment, and deposit fibers that further augment the density of the extracellular matrix (ECM, thus, further worsening the TIFP. Increased TIFP with the ECM are the major obstacles to adequate drug delivery. By decreasing TIFP and decreasing ECM density, we can expect an associated rise in drug concentration within the tumor itself. In this overview we will describe all the methods (drugs, nutraceuticals, physical methods of treatment able to lower TIFP and to modify ECM that can be used for increasing drug concentration within the tumor tissue.

  14. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  15. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanis...

  16. Targeted multidrug delivery system to overcome chemoresistance in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Y

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuan Tang,1 Fariborz Soroush,1 Zhaohui Tong,2 Mohammad F Kiani,1 Bin Wang1,3 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 2Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Widener University, Chester, PA, USA Abstract: Chemotherapy has been widely used in breast cancer patients to reduce tumor size. However, most anticancer agents cannot differentiate between cancerous and normal cells, resulting in severe systemic toxicity. In addition, acquired drug resistance during the chemotherapy treatment further decreases treatment efficacy. With the proper treatment strategy, nanodrug carriers, such as liposomes/immunoliposomes, may be able to reduce undesired side effects of chemotherapy, to overcome the acquired multidrug resistance, and to further improve the treatment efficacy. In this study, a novel combinational targeted drug delivery system was developed by encapsulating antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab into liposomes and encapsulating chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX into immunoliposomes where the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 antibody was used as a targeting ligand. This novel combinational system was tested in vitro using a HER2 positive and multidrug resistant breast cancer cell line (BT-474/MDR, and in vivo using a xenograft mouse tumor model. In vitro cell culture experiments show that immunoliposome delivery led to a high cell nucleus accumulation of DOX, whereas free DOX was observed mostly near the cell membrane and in cytoplasm due to the action of P-gp. Combining liposomal bevacizumab with immunoliposomal DOX achieved the best tumor growth inhibition and the lowest toxicity. Tumor size decreased steadily within a 60-day observation period indicating a potential synergistic effect between DOX and bevacizumab through the targeted delivery. Our findings clearly indicate that tumor growth was significantly

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of ligand targeting the somatostatin receptor for drug delivery to tumor cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Young; Hong, Young Don; Jung, Sung Hee; Choi, Sun Ju [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Most of targeted therapies block the action of certain enzymes, proteins, or other molecules involved in the growth and spread of cancer cells to produce its cytotoxic effect. Either small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies are mostly used in targeted therapies. Unfortunately, targeted therapy has a certain degree of unwanted side effect like other cytotoxicity inducing chemotherapies. To overcome and to reduce unwanted side effects during a cancer therapy, recently radiopeptide therapies has got the worlds' attraction for the tumor targeting modalities due to its beneficial effect on less side effect compared to cytotoxic chemotherapies. Among radiopeptide therapies, {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE is a major modality as an effective one invented so far in treating neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and it has been in clinical trials at least one decade. Although it does have rather effective therapeutic effect on NET, it has less effective in rather large solid tumor. There are many ways to improve or increase therapeutic effect of radiopeptide are a finding the potent small molecules to target the tumor site selectively, or a labeling with radioisotope of emitting high energy, or an improving its biological half-life by introducing different moieties to increase lipophilicity. Present study was focus to increase a biological halflife of radio somatostatin which will target the somatostatin receptor by altering the bifunctional chelator (BFCA) by introducing lipophilic moiety to the somatostatin, which would make the labeled peptide stay longer in the tumor site and thus it can intensify the therapeutic effect on tumor cell itself and around tissues.

  18. Tumor-targeted nanomedicines for cancer theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Twan; Shi, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs have multiple drawbacks, including severe side effects and suboptimal therapeutic efficacy. Nanomedicines assist in improving the biodistribution and the target accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs, and are therefore able to enhance the balance between efficacy and toxicity. Multiple different types of nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, including liposomes, polymer-drug conjugates and polymeric micelles, which rely on strategies such as passive targeting, active targeting and triggered release for improved tumor-directed drug delivery. Based on the notion that tumors and metastases are highly heterogeneous, it is important to integrate imaging properties in nanomedicine formulations in order to enable non-invasive and quantitative assessment of targeting efficiency. By allowing for patient pre-selection, such next generation nanotheranostics are useful for facilitating clinical translation and personalizing nanomedicine treatments. PMID:27865762

  19. Self-Assembled Nanocarriers Based on Amphiphilic Natural Polymers for Anti- Cancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Sally; Abdelmoneem, Mona; Abdelwakil, Mahmoud; Mabrouk, Moustafa Taha; Anwar, Doaa; Mohamed, Rania; Khattab, Sherine; Bekhit, Adnan; Elkhodairy, Kadria; Freag, May; Elzoghby, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Micellization provides numerous merits for the delivery of water insoluble anti-cancer therapeutic agents including a nanosized 'core-shell' drug delivery system. Recently, hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides and proteins are attracting much attention as micelle forming polymers to entrap poorly soluble anti-cancer drugs. By virtue of their small size, the self-assembled micelles can passively target tumor tissues via enhanced permeation and retention effect (EPR). Moreover, the amphiphilic micelles can be exploited for active-targeted drug delivery by attaching specific targeting ligands to the outer micellar hydrophilic surface. Here, we review the conjugation techniques, drug loading methods, physicochemical characteristics of the most important amphiphilic polysaccharides and proteins used as anti-cancer drug delivery systems. Attention focuses on the mechanisms of tumor-targeting and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of the encapsulated drugs. This review will highlight the remarkable advances of hydrophobized polysaccharide and protein micelles and their potential applications as anti-cancer drug delivery nanosystems. Micellar nanocarriers fabricated from amphiphilic natural polymers hold great promise as vehicles for anti-cancer drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  1. Relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency of nanomachine-based targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingying; Li, Min; Luo, Jun

    2017-12-04

    In nanomachine applications towards targeted drug delivery, drug molecules released by nanomachines propagate and chemically react with tumor cells in aqueous environment. If the nanomachines release drug molecules faster than the tumor cells react, it will result in loss and waste of drug molecules. It is a potential issue associated with the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency. This paper aims to investigate the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency based on two drug reception models. We expect to pave a way for designing a control method of drug release. We adopted two analytical methods that one is drug reception process based on collision with tumors and another is based on Michaelis Menten enzymatic kinetics. To evaluate the analytical formulations, we used the well-known simulation framework N3Sim to establish simulations. The analytical results of the relationship among reaction rate, release rate and efficiency is obtained, which match well with the numerical simulation results in a 3-D environment. Based upon two drug reception models, the results of this paper would be beneficial for designing a control method of nanomahine-based drug release.

  2. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  3. Oxaliplatin immuno hybrid nanoparticles for active targeting: an approach for enhanced apoptotic activity and drug delivery to colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Shashank; Gowthamarajan, K; Satish Kumar, M N; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-06-01

    Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) proved to be a promising new target for colorectal cancer treatment. Elevated expression of TRAIL protein in tumor cells distinguishes it from healthy cells, thereby delivering the drug at the specific site. Here, we formulated oxaliplatin immunohybrid nanoparticles (OIHNPs) to deliver oxaliplatin and anti-TRAIL for colorectal cancer treatment in xenograft tumor models. The polymeric chitosan layer binds to the lipid film with the mixture of phospholipids by an ultra sound method followed by conjugating with thiolated antibody using DSPE-PEG-mal3400, resulting in the formation of OIHNPs. The polymer layer helps in more encapsulation of the drug (71 ± 0.09%) with appreciable particle size (95 ± 0.01 nm), and lipid layer prevents degradation of the drug in serum by preventing nanoparticle aggregation. OIHNPs have shown a 4-fold decrease in the IC50 value compared to oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells by the MTT assay. These immuno-nanoparticles represent the successful uptake and internalization of oxaliplatin in HT-29 cells rather than in MCF-7 cells determined by triple fluorescence method. Apoptotic activity in vitro of OIHNPs was determined by the change in the mitochondria membrane potential that further elevates its anti-tumor property. Furthermore, the conjugated nanoparticles can effectively deliver the drug to the tumor sites, which can be attributed to its ability in reducing tumor mass and tumor volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustaining its release in vitro. These findings indicated that the oxaliplatin immuno-hybrid nanoparticles would be a promising nano-sized active targeted formulation for colorectal-tumor targeted therapy.

  4. Targeted drug delivery to magnetic implants for therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellen, Benjamin B.; Forbes, Zachary G.; Halverson, Derek S.; Fridman, Gregory; Barbee, Kenneth A.; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert; Friedman, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A new method for locally targeted drug delivery is proposed that employs magnetic implants placed directly in the cardiovascular system to attract injected magnetic carriers. Theoretical simulations and experimental results support the assumption that using magnetic implants in combination with externally applied magnetic field will optimize the delivery of magnetic drug to selected sites within a subject

  5. Ultrasound-Mediated Drug/Gene Delivery in Solid Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is an emerging modality for drug delivery in chemotherapy. This paper reviews this novel technology by first introducing the designs and characteristics of three classes of drug/gene vehicles, microbubble (including nanoemulsion, liposomes, and micelles. In comparison to conventional free drug, the targeted drug-release and delivery through vessel wall and interstitial space to cancerous cells can be activated and enhanced under certain sonication conditions. In the acoustic field, there are several reactions of these drug vehicles, including hyperthermia, bubble cavitation, sonoporation, and sonodynamics, whose physical properties are illustrated for better understanding of this approach. In vitro and in vivo results are summarized, and future directions are discussed. Altogether, ultrasound-mediated drug/gene delivery under imaging guidance provides a promising option in cancer treatment with enhanced agent release and site specificity and reduced toxicity.

  6. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS.

  7. Drug delivery system and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the review of radiation therapy, neutron capture therapy (NCT) and drug delivery system for the latter. In cancer radiation therapy, there are problems of body movement like breathing, needless irradiation of normal tissues, difficulty to decide the correct irradiation position and tumor morphology. NCT has advantages to overcome these, and since boron has a big cross section for thermal neutron, NPT uses the reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li in the target cancer which previously incorporated the boron-containing drug. During the period 1966-1996, 246 patients were treated with this in Japan and the treatment has been continued thereafter. The tasks for NCT are developments of drug delivery system efficient to deliver the drug into the tumor and of convenient neutron source like the accelerator. (S.I.)

  8. Multitriggered Tumor-Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Protein and Polypeptide Coassembly for Enhanced Photodynamic Tumor Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fenfang; Zou, Qianli; Li, Yongxin; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-11-01

    Tumor-responsive nanocarriers are highly valuable and demanded for smart drug delivery particularly in the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT), where a quick release of photosensitizers in tumors is preferred. Herein, it is demonstrated that protein-based nanospheres, prepared by the electrostatic assembly of proteins and polypeptides with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking and surface polyethylene glycol coupling, can be used as versatile tumor-responsive drug delivery vehicles for effective PDT. These nanospheres are capable of encapsulation of various photosensitizers including Chlorin e6 (Ce6), protoporphyrin IX, and verteporfin. The Chlorin e6-encapsulated nanospheres (Ce6-Ns) are responsive to changes in pH, redox potential, and proteinase concentration, resulting in multitriggered rapid release of Ce6 in an environment mimicking tumor tissues. In vivo fluorescence imaging results indicate that Ce6-Ns selectively accumulate near tumors and the quick release of Ce6 from Ce6-Ns can be triggered by tumors. In tumors the fluorescence of released Ce6 from Ce6-Ns is observed at 0.5 h postinjection, while in normal tissues the fluorescence appeared at 12 h postinjection. Tumor ablation is demonstrated by in vivo PDT using Ce6-Ns and the biocompatibility of Ce6-Ns is evident from the histopathology imaging, confirming the enhanced in vivo PDT efficacy and the biocompatibility of the assembled drug delivery vehicles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pros and cons of the liposome platform in cancer drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabizon, Alberto A; Shmeeda, Hilary; Zalipsky, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Coating of liposomes with polyethylene-glycol (PEG) by incorporation in the liposome bilayer of PEG-derivatized lipids results in inhibition of liposome uptake by the reticulo-endothelial system and significant prolongation of liposome residence time in the blood stream. Parallel developments in drug loading technology have improved the efficiency and stability of drug entrapment in liposomes, particularly with regard to cationic amphiphiles such as anthracyclines. An example of this new generation of liposomes is a formulation of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin known as Doxil or Caelyx, whose clinical pharmacokinetic profile is characterized by slow plasma clearance and small volume of distribution. A hallmark of these long-circulating liposomal drug carriers is their enhanced accumulation in tumors. The mechanism underlying this passive targeting effect is the phenomenon known as enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) which has been described in a broad variety of experimental tumor types. Further to the passive targeting effect, the liposome drug delivery platform offers the possibility of grafting tumor-specific ligands on the liposome membrane for active targeting to tumor cells, and potentially intracellular drug delivery. The pros and cons of the liposome platform in cancer targeting are discussed vis-à-vis nontargeted drugs, using as an example a liposome drug delivery system targeted to the folate receptor.

  10. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrotsiou, O; Kotti, K; Dini, E; Kammona, O; Kiparissides, C

    2005-01-01

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively

  11. Drug targeting to tumors: principles, pitfalls and (pre-) clinical progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Many different systems and strategies have been evaluated for drug targeting to tumors over the years. Routinely used systems include liposomes, polymers, micelles, nanoparticles and antibodies, and examples of strategies are passive drug targeting, active drug targeting to cancer cells,

  12. Self-assembled peptide-based nanostructures: Smart nanomaterials toward targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Neda; Kamaly, Nazila; Memic, Adnan; Shafiee, Hadi

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly of peptides can yield an array of well-defined nanostructures that are highly attractive nanomaterials for many biomedical applications such as drug delivery. Some of the advantages of self-assembled peptide nanostructures over other delivery platforms include their chemical diversity, biocompatibility, high loading capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs, and their ability to target molecular recognition sites. Furthermore, these self-assembled nanostructures could be designed with novel peptide motifs, making them stimuli-responsive and achieving triggered drug delivery at disease sites. The goal of this work is to present a comprehensive review of the most recent studies on self-assembled peptides with a focus on their "smart" activity for formation of targeted and responsive drug-delivery carriers.

  13. Liposome-based drug delivery in breast cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, John W

    2002-01-01

    Drug delivery systems can in principle provide enhanced efficacy and/or reduced toxicity for anticancer agents. Long circulating macromolecular carriers such as liposomes can exploit the 'enhanced permeability and retention' effect for preferential extravasation from tumor vessels. Liposomal anthracyclines have achieved highly efficient drug encapsulation, resulting in significant anticancer activity with reduced cardiotoxicity, and include versions with greatly prolonged circulation such as liposomal daunorubicin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin. Pegylated liposomal doxorubucin has shown substantial efficacy in breast cancer treatment both as monotherapy and in combination with other chemotherapeutics. Additional liposome constructs are being developed for the delivery of other drugs. The next generation of delivery systems will include true molecular targeting; immunoliposomes and other ligand-directed constructs represent an integration of biological components capable of tumor recognition with delivery technologies

  14. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems.

  15. Functionalized mesoporous silicon for targeted-drug-delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasi, Ozra; Falamaki, Cavus; Khalaj, Zahra

    2012-10-01

    The present work concerns a preliminary step in the production of anticancer drug loaded porous silicon (PSi) for targeted-drug-delivery applications. A successful procedure for the covalent attachment of folic acid, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doxorubicin to hydrophilic mesoporous silicon layers is presented. A systematic approach has been followed to obtain the optimal composition of the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC)/N-hydroxysuccimide (NHS) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution for the surface activation process of the undecylenic acid (UD) grafted molecules to take place with minimal undesired byproduct formation. The effect of reactant concentration and kind of solvent (aqueous or DMSO) on the attachment of folic acid to the activated PSi layer has been investigated. The covalent attachment of the doxorubicin molecules to the PSi layer functionalized with folic acid and PEG is discussed. The drug release kinetics as a function of pH has been studied. The functionalized PSi particles show a high cytotoxicity compared to the equivalent amount of free drug. Cell toxicity tests show clearly that the incorporation of folate molecules increases substantially the toxicity of the loaded PSi particles. Accordingly this new functionalized PSi may be considered a proper candidate for targeted drug delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An efficient targeted drug delivery through apotransferrin loaded nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athuluri Divakar Sai Krishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano have diameters of 25-50 etam, which increase to 60-80 etam upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano, and showed further increase in dimension (75-95 etam in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano. The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus (b pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in

  17. A review on target drug delivery: magnetic microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Chandna

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic microsphere is newer approach in pharmaceutical field. Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional radiation methods which use highly penetrating radiation that is absorbed throughout the body. Its use is limited by toxicity and side effects. The aim of the specific targeting is to enhance the efficiency of drug delivery & at the same time to reduce the toxicity & side effects. This kind of delivery system is very much important which localises the drug to the disease site. In this larger amount of freely circulating drug can be replaced by smaller amount of magnetically targeted drug. Magnetic carriers receive magnetic responses to a magnetic field from incorporated materials that are used for magnetic microspheres are chitosan, dextran etc. magnetic microspheres can be prepared from a variety of carrier material. One of the most utilized is serum albumin from human or other appropriate species. Drug release from albumin microspheres can be sustained or controlled by various stabilization procedures generally involving heat or chemical cross-linking of the protein carrier matrix.

  18. Surface engineering of macrophages with nanoparticles to generate a cell-nanoparticle hybrid vehicle for hypoxia-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Christopher A; Yuan, Quan; Yeudall, W Andrew; Lebman, Deborah A; Yang, Hu

    2010-02-02

    Tumors frequently contain hypoxic regions that result from a shortage of oxygen due to poorly organized tumor vasculature. Cancer cells in these areas are resistant to radiation- and chemotherapy, limiting the treatment efficacy. Macrophages have inherent hypoxia-targeting ability and hold great advantages for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics to cancer cells in hypoxic areas. However, most anticancer drugs cannot be directly loaded into macrophages because of their toxicity. In this work, we designed a novel drug delivery vehicle by hybridizing macrophages with nanoparticles through cell surface modification. Nanoparticles immobilized on the cell surface provide numerous new sites for anticancer drug loading, hence potentially minimizing the toxic effect of anticancer drugs on the viability and hypoxia-targeting ability of the macrophage vehicles. In particular, quantum dots and 5-(aminoacetamido) fluorescein-labeled polyamidoamine dendrimer G4.5, both of which were coated with amine-derivatized polyethylene glycol, were immobilized to the sodium periodate-treated surface of RAW264.7 macrophages through a transient Schiff base linkage. Further, a reducing agent, sodium cyanoborohydride, was applied to reduce Schiff bases to stable secondary amine linkages. The distribution of nanoparticles on the cell surface was confirmed by fluorescence imaging, and it was found to be dependent on the stability of the linkages coupling nanoparticles to the cell surface.

  19. Image-guided, targeted and triggered drug delivery to tumors using polymer-based microbubbles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokong, S.; Theek, B.; Koczera, P.; Appold, L.; Resch-Genger, U.; van Zandvoort, M.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Microbubbles (MB) are routinely used contrast agents for functional and molecular ultrasound (US) imaging. In addition, they have been attracting more and more attention for drug delivery purposes, enabling e.g. US-mediated drug delivery across biological barriers and US-induced triggered

  20. Application of three-dimensional printing for colon targeted drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbe, Nitin B; McCarron, Paul A; Lane, Majella E; Tambuwala, Murtaza M

    2017-01-01

    Orally administered solid dosage forms currently dominate over all other dosage forms and routes of administrations. However, human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) poses a number of obstacles to delivery of the drugs to the site of interest and absorption in the GIT. Pharmaceutical scientists worldwide have been interested in colon drug delivery for several decades, not only for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of colonic diseases such as ulcerative colitis and colon cancer but also for delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides for systemic absorption. Despite extensive research in the area of colon targeted drug delivery, we have not been able to come up with an effective way of delivering drugs to the colon. The current tablets designed for colon drug release depend on either pH-dependent or time-delayed release formulations. During ulcerative colitis the gastric transit time and colon pH-levels is constantly changing depending on whether the patient is having a relapse or under remission. Hence, the current drug delivery system to the colon is based on one-size-fits-all. Fails to effectively deliver the drugs locally to the colon for colonic diseases and delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides for systemic absorption from the colon. Hence, to overcome the current issues associated with colon drug delivery, we need to provide the patients with personalized tablets which are specifically designed to match the individual's gastric transit time depending on the disease state. Three-dimensional (3D) printing (3DP) technology is getting cheaper by the day and bespoke manufacturing of 3D-printed tablets could provide the solutions in the form of personalized colon drug delivery system. This review provides a bird's eye view of applications and current advances in pharmaceutical 3DP with emphasis on the development of colon targeted drug delivery systems.

  1. Magnetically assisted intraperitoneal drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi, Milad; Sedaghatkish, Amir; Dejam, Morteza; Saghafian, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2018-11-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy has revived hopes during the past few years for the management of peritoneal disseminations of digestive and gynecological cancers. Nevertheless, a poor drug penetration is one key drawback of IP chemotherapy since peritoneal neoplasms are notoriously resistant to drug penetration. Recent preclinical studies have focused on targeting the aberrant tumor microenvironment to improve intratumoral drug transport. However, tumor stroma targeting therapies have limited therapeutic windows and show variable outcomes across different cohort of patients. Therefore, the development of new strategies for improving the efficacy of IP chemotherapy is a certain need. In this work, we propose a new magnetically assisted strategy to elevate drug penetration into peritoneal tumor nodules and improve IP chemotherapy. A computational model was developed to assess the feasibility and predictability of the proposed active drug delivery method. The key tumor pathophysiology, including a spatially heterogeneous construct of leaky vasculature, nonfunctional lymphatics, and dense extracellular matrix (ECM), was reconstructed in silico. The transport of intraperitoneally injected magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) inside tumors was simulated and compared with the transport of free cytotoxic agents. Our results on magnetically assisted delivery showed an order of magnitude increase in the final intratumoral concentration of drug-coated MNPs with respect to free cytotoxic agents. The intermediate MNPs with the radius range of 200-300 nm yield optimal magnetic drug targeting (MDT) performance in 5-10 mm tumors while the MDT performance remains essentially the same over a large particle radius range of 100-500 nm for a 1 mm radius small tumor. The success of MDT in larger tumors (5-10 mm in radius) was found to be markedly dependent on the choice of magnet strength and tumor-magnet distance while these two parameters were less of a concern in small tumors

  2. Reassessing the Role of Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery for Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment for glioblastoma (GBM will likely require targeted delivery of several specific pharmacological agents simultaneously. Intra-arterial (IA delivery is one technique for targeting the tumor site with multiple agents. Although IA chemotherapy for glioblastoma (GBM has been attempted since the 1950s, the predicted benefits remain unproven in clinical practice. This review focuses on innovative approaches to IA drug delivery in treating GBM. Guided by novel in vitro and in vivo optical measurements, newer pharmacokinetic models promise to better define the complex relationship between background cerebral blood flow and drug injection parameters. Advanced optical technologies and tracers, unique nanoparticles designs, new cellular targets, and rational drug formulations are continuously modifying the therapeutic landscape for GBM. Personalized treatment approaches are emerging; however, such tailored approaches will largely depend on effective drug delivery techniques and on the ability to simultaneously deliver multidrug regimens. These new paradigms for tumor-selective drug delivery herald dramatic improvements in the effectiveness of IA chemotherapy for GBM. Therefore, within this context of so-called “precision medicine,” the role of IA delivery for GBM is thoroughly reassessed.

  3. Simultaneous quantification of tumor uptake for targeted and non-targeted liposomes and their encapsulated contents by ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhiliang; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hui, James Z; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes are intensively being developed for biomedical applications including drug and gene delivery. However, targeted liposomal delivery in cancer treatment is a very complicated multi-step process. Unfavorable liposome biodistribution upon intravenous administration and membrane destabilization in blood circulation could result in only a very small fraction of cargo reaching the tumors. It would therefore be desirable to develop new quantitative strategies to track liposomal delivery systems to improve the therapeutic index and decrease systemic toxicity. Here, we developed a simple and non-radiative method to quantify the tumor uptake of targeted and non-targeted control liposomes as well as their encapsulated contents simultaneously. Specifically, four different chelated lanthanide metals were encapsulated or surface-conjugated onto tumor-targeted and non-targeted liposomes, respectively. The two liposome formulations were then injected into tumor-bearing mice simultaneously and their tumor delivery was determined quantitatively via inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), allowing for direct comparisons. Tumor uptake of the liposomes themselves and their encapsulated contents were consistent with targeted and non-targeted liposome formulations that were injected individually. PMID:22882145

  4. Tumor vessel normalization by the PI3K inhibitor HS-173 enhances drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Kyung Hee; Son, Mi Kwon; Park, Jung Hee; Yan, Hong Hua; Fang, Zhenghuan; Kang, Yeo Wool; Han, Boreum; Lim, Joo Han; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2017-09-10

    Tumor vessels are leaky and immature, which causes poor oxygen and nutrient supply to tumor vessels and results in cancer cell metastasis to distant organs. This instability of tumor blood vessels also makes it difficult for anticancer drugs to penetrate and reach tumors. Numerous tumor vessel normalization approaches have been investigated for improving drug delivery into tumors. In this study, we investigated whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors are able to improve vascular structure and function over the prolonged period necessary to achieve effective vessel normalization. The PI3K inhibitors, HS-173 and BEZ235 potently suppressed tumor growth and hypoxia, and increased tumor apoptosis in animal models. PI3K inhibitors also induced a regular, flat monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) in vessels, improving stability of vessel structure, and normalized tumor vessels by increasing vascular maturity, pericyte coverage, basement membrane thickness, and tight-junctions. These effects resulted in a decrease in tumor vessel tortuosity and vessel thinning, and improved vessel function and blood flow. The tumor vessel stabilization effect of the PI3K inhibitor HS-173 also decreased the number of metastatic lung nodules in vivo metastasis model. Furthermore, HS-173 improved the delivery of doxorubicin into the tumor region, enhancing its anticancer effects. Mechanistic studies suggested that PI3K inhibitor HS-173-induced vessel normalization reflected changes in endothelial Notch signaling. Taken together, our findings indicate that vessel normalization by PI3K inhibitors restrained tumor growth and metastasis while improving chemotherapy by enhancing drug delivery into the tumor, suggesting that HS-173 may have a therapeutic value as an enhancer or an anticancer drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytocompatible chitosan-graft-mPEG-based 5-fluorouracil-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniraj, M Gover; Ayyavu, Mahesh; Henry, Linda Jeeva Kumari; Nageshwar Rao, Goutham; Natesan, Subramanian; Sundar, D Sathish; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2018-03-01

    Biodegradable materials like chitosan (CH) and methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) are widely being used as drug delivery carriers for various therapeutic applications. In this study, copolymer (CH-g-mPEG) of CH and carboxylic acid terminated mPEG was synthesized by carbodiimide-mediated acid amine reaction. The resultant hydrophilic copolymer was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and 1 H NMR studies, revealing its relevant functional bands and proton peaks, respectively. Blank polymeric nanoparticles (B-PNPs) and 5-fluorouracil loaded polymeric nanoparticles (5-FU-PNPs) were formulated by ionic gelation method. Furthermore, folic acid functionalized FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs were prepared for folate receptor-targeted drug delivery. FA-5-FU-PNPs were characterized by particle size, zeta potential, and in vitro drug release studies, resulting in 197.7 nm, +29.9 mv, and sustained drug release of 88% in 24 h, respectively. Cytotoxicity studies were performed for FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs in MCF-7 cell line, which exhibited a cell viability of 80 and 41%, respectively. In vitro internalization studies were carried out for 5-FU-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs which demonstrated increased cellular uptake of FA-5-FU-PNPs by receptor-mediated transport. Significant (p drug delivery, thereby influencing better therapeutic effect.

  6. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Kulhari, Hitesh [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Medicinal Chemistry & Pharmacology Division (India); Jeengar, Manish Kumar [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Departmentof Pharmacology (India); Khan, Wahid, E-mail: wahid@niperhyd.ac.in; Sistla, Ramakrishna, E-mail: sistla@iict.res.in, E-mail: rksistla@yahoo.com [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education & Research (NIPER), Department of Pharmaceutics (India)

    2015-06-15

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by {sup 1}HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere{sup ®}). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  7. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Kulhari, Hitesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by 1 HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere ® ). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors

  8. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Kulhari, Hitesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-01

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by 1HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere®). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  9. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Yang, Da Som; Ryu, WonHyoung; Park, Yong-il

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro. (paper)

  10. Caleosin-based nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Li-Jen; Chen, Chih-Jung

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) could be assembled from plant oil, phospholipids (PLs), and oleosin (Ole) as previously reported. NOBs have a lipid-based structure that contains a central oil space enclosed by a monolayer of Ole-bound PLs. As an oil structural protein, Ole functions to maintain the integrity of NOBs. Like Ole, caleosin (Cal) is a plant oil-associated protein. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of NOBs assembled by Cal for targeted delivery of drugs. Cal was first fused with anti-HER2/neu affibody (ZH2), and the resulting fusion gene (Cal–ZH2) was then expressed in Escherichia coli. Consequently, NOBs assembled with the fusion protein were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-positive tumor cells. The internalization efficiency could reach as high as 90%. Furthermore, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT), was encapsulated into Cal-based NOBs. These CPT-loaded NOBs had a size around 200 nm and were resistant to hemolysis. Release of CPT from NOBs at the non-permissive condition followed a sustained and prolonged profile. After administration of the CPT formulation, Cal–ZH2-displayed NOBs exhibited a strong antitumor activity toward HER2/neu-positive cells both in vitro and in vivo. The result indicates the potential of Cal-based NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  11. PLGA Nanoparticles for Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery to Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marxa Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on novel approaches in the field of nanotechnology-based carriers utilizing ultrasound stimuli as a means to spatially target gene delivery in vivo, using nanoparticles made with either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or other polymers. We specifically discuss the potential for gene delivery by particles that are echogenic (amenable to destruction by ultrasound composed either of polymers (PLGA, polystyrene or other contrast agent materials (Optison, SonoVue microbubbles. The use of ultrasound is an efficient tool to further enhance gene delivery by PLGA or other echogenic particles in vivo. Echogenic PLGA nanoparticles are an attractive strategy for ultrasound-mediated gene delivery since this polymer is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for drug delivery and diagnostics in cancer, cardiovascular disease, and also other applications such as vaccines and tissue engineering. This paper will review recent successes and the potential of applying PLGA nanoparticles for gene delivery, which include (a echogenic PLGA used with ultrasound to enhance local gene delivery in tumors or muscle and (b PLGA nanoparticles currently under development, which could benefit in the future from ultrasound-enhanced tumor targeted gene delivery.

  12. Magnetic microspheres as magical novel drug delivery system: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satinder Kakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic microspheres hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery. Magnetic microspheres as an alternative to traditional radiation methods which uses highly penetrating radiations that is absorbed throughout the body. Its use is limited by toxicity and side effects. Now days, several targeted treatment systems including magnetic field, electric field, ultrasound, temperature, UV light and mechanical force are being used in many disease treatments (e.g. cancer, nerve damage, heart and artery, anti-diabetic, eye and other medical treatments. Among them, the magnetic targeted drug delivery system is one of the most attractive and promising strategy for delivering the drug to the specified site. Magnetically controlled drug targeting is one of the various possible ways of drug targeting. This technology is based on binding establish anticancer drug with ferrofluid that concentrate the drug in the area of interest (tumor site by means of magnetic fields. There has been keen interest in the development of a magnetically target drug delivery system. These drug delivery systems aim to deliver the drug at a rate directed by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the activity entity to the site of action. Magnetic microspheres were developed to overcome two major problems encountered in drug targeting namely: RES clearance and target site specificity.

  13. Toxins and derivatives in molecular pharmaceutics: Drug delivery and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Changyou; Li, Chong; Wei, Xiaoli; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-08-01

    Protein and peptide toxins offer an invaluable source for the development of actively targeted drug delivery systems. They avidly bind to a variety of cognate receptors, some of which are expressed or even up-regulated in diseased tissues and biological barriers. Protein and peptide toxins or their derivatives can act as ligands to facilitate tissue- or organ-specific accumulation of therapeutics. Some toxins have evolved from a relatively small number of structural frameworks that are particularly suitable for addressing the crucial issues of potency and stability, making them an instrumental source of leads and templates for targeted therapy. The focus of this review is on protein and peptide toxins for the development of targeted drug delivery systems and molecular therapies. We summarize disease- and biological barrier-related toxin receptors, as well as targeted drug delivery strategies inspired by those receptors. The design of new therapeutics based on protein and peptide toxins is also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeted delivery of immunotoxin by antibody to ganglioside GD3: a novel drug delivery route for tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Torres Demichelis

    Full Text Available Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids expressed on plasma membranes from nearly all vertebrate cells. The expression of ganglioside GD3, which plays essential roles in normal brain development, decreases in adults but is up regulated in neuroectodermal and epithelial derived cancers. R24 antibody, directed against ganglioside GD3, is a validated tumor target which is specifically endocytosed and accumulated in endosomes. Here, we exploit the internalization feature of the R24 antibody for the selective delivery of saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, to GD3-expressing cells [human (SK-Mel-28 and mouse (B16 melanoma cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1 cells]. This immunotoxin showed a specific cytotoxicity on tumor cells grew on 2D monolayers, which was further evident by the lack of any effect on GD3-negative cells. To estimate the potential antitumor activity of R24-saporin complex, we also evaluated the effect of the immunotoxin on the clonogenic growth of SK-Mel-28 and CHO-K1(GD3+ cells cultured in attachment-free conditions. A drastic growth inhibition (>80-90% of the cell colonies was reached after 3 days of immunotoxin treatment. By the contrary, colonies continue to growth at the same concentration of the immuntoxin, but in the absence of R24 antibody, or in the absence of both immunotoxin and R24, undoubtedly indicating the specificity of the effect observed. Thus, the ganglioside GD3 emerge as a novel and attractive class of cell surface molecule for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents and, therefore, provides a rationale for future therapeutic intervention in cancer.

  15. Peptide and low molecular weight proteins based kidney targeted drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Hailiang; Dang, Ruili; Jiang, Pei

    2018-05-30

    Renal disease is a worldwide public health problem, and unfortunately, the therapeutic index of regular drugs is limited. Thus, it is a great need to develop effective treatment strategies. Among the reported strategies, kidney-targeted drug delivery system is a promising method to increase renal efficacy and reduce extra-renal toxicity. In recent years, working as vehicles for targeted drug delivery, low molecular weight proteins (LMWP) and peptide have received immense attention due to their many advantages, such as selective accumulation in kidney, high drug loading capability, control over routes of biodegradation, convenience in modification at the amino terminus, and good biocompatibility. In this review, we describe the current LMWP and peptide carriers for kidney targeted drug delivery systems. In addition, we discuss different linking strategies between carriers and drugs. Furthermore, we briefly outline the current status and attempt to give an outlook on the further study. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  17. ORAL COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW ON CURRENT AND NOVEL PERSPECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Asija Rajesh; Chaudhari Bharat; Asija Sangeeta

    2012-01-01

    Small intestine is mostly the site for drug absorption but in some cases the drug needs to be targeted to colon due to some factors like local colonic disease, degradation related conditions, delayed release of drugs, systemic delivery of protein and peptide drugs etc. Colon targeted drug delivery is important and relatively new concept for the absorption of drugs because it offers almost neutral pH and long residence time, thereby increasing the drug absorption. Colon has proved to be a site...

  18. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  19. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaan, Kanika; Kumar, Sandeep; Poonia, Neelam; Lather, Viney; Pandita, Deepti

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach) respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity. PMID:25035633

  20. Fluorescent carbon dot-gated multifunctional mesoporous silica nanocarriers for redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted and controlled drug delivery and real-time bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Cui, Yu; Zhao, Yating; He, Bing; Shi, Xiaoli; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Siling

    2017-08-01

    A distinctive and personalized nanocarrier is described here for controlled and targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time bioimaging by combining a redox/enzyme dual-responsive disulfide-conjugated carbon dot with mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-SS-CD HA ). The carbon dot with controlling and targeting abilities was prepared through a polymerizing reaction by applying citric acid and HA as starting materials (named CD HA ). The as-prepared MSN-SS-CD HA exhibited not only superior photostability and excellent biocompatibility, but also the ability to target A549 cells with overexpression of CD44 receptors. Upon loading the antitumor drug, doxorubicin (DOX), into the mesoporous channels of MSN nanoparticles, CD HA with a diameter size of 3nm completely blocked the pore entrance of DOX-encapsulated MSN nanoparticles with a pore size of about 3nm, thus preventing the premature leakage of DOX and increasing the antitumor activity until being triggered by specific stimuli in the tumor environment. The results of the cell imaging and cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that the redox/enzyme dual-responsive DOX-encapsulated MSN-SS-CD HA nanoparticles can selectively deliver and control the release of DOX into tumor cells. Ex vivo fluorescence images showed a much stronger fluorescence of MSN-SS-CD HA -DOX in the tumor site than in normal tissues, greatly facilitating the accumulation of DOX in the target tissue. However, its counterpart, MSN-SH-DOX exhibited no or much lower tumor cytotoxicity and drug accumulation in tumor tissue. In addition, MSN-SS-CD was also used as a control to investigate the ability of MSN-SS-CD HA to target A549 cells. The results obtained indicated that MSN-SS-CD HA possessed a higher cellular uptake through the CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis compared with MSN-SS-CD in the A549 cells. Such specific redox/enzyme dual-responsive targeted nanocarriers are a useful strategy achieving selective controlled and targeted delivery of

  1. Nano-aggregates: emerging delivery tools for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinod Kumar; Jain, Ankit; Soni, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    A plethora of formulation techniques have been reported in the literature for site-specific targeting of water-soluble and -insoluble anticancer drugs. Along with other vesicular and particulate carrier systems, nano-aggregates have recently emerged as a novel supramolecular colloidal carrier with promise for using poorly water-soluble drugs in molecular targeted therapies. Nano-aggregates possess some inherent properties such as size in the nanometers, high loading efficiency, and in vivo stability. Nano-aggregates can provide site-specific drug delivery via either a passive or active targeting mechanism. Nano-aggregates are formed from a polymer-drug conjugated amphiphilic block copolymer. They are suitable for encapsulation of poorly water-soluble drugs by covalent conjugation as well as physical encapsulation. Because of physical encapsulation, a maximum amount of drug can be loaded in nano-aggregates, which helps to achieve a sufficiently high drug concentration at the target site. Active transport can be achieved by conjugating a drug with vectors or ligands that bind specifically to receptors being overexpressed in the tumor cells. In this review, we explore synthesis and tumor targeting potential of nano-aggregates with active and passive mechanisms, and we discuss various characterization parameters, ex vivo studies, biodistribution studies, clinical trials, and patents.

  2. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-04-17

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  3. IGF-1 receptor targeted nanoparticles for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M.; Zhou, Zhiyang; Wang, Liya; Wang, Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2016-05-01

    Low drug delivery efficiency and drug resistance from highly heterogeneous cancer cells and tumor microenvironment represent major challenges in clinical oncology. Growth factor receptor, IGF-1R, is overexpressed in both human tumor cells and tumor associated stromal cells. The level of IGF-1R expression is further up-regulated in drug resistant tumor cells. We have developed IGF-1R targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying multiple anticancer drugs into human tumors. This IGF-1R targeted theranostic nanoparticle delivery system has an iron core for non-invasive MR imaging, amphiphilic polymer coating to ensure the biocompatibility as well as for drug loading and conjugation of recombinant human IGF-1 as targeting molecules. Chemotherapy drugs, Doxorubicin (Dox), was encapsulated into the polymer coating and/or conjugated to the IONP surface by coupling with the carboxyl groups. The ability of IGF1R targeted theranostic nanoparticles to penetrate tumor stromal barrier and enhance tumor cell killing has been demonstrated in human pancreatic cancer patient tissue derived xenograft (PDX) models. Repeated systemic administrations of those IGF-1R targeted theranostic IONP carrying Dox led to breaking the tumor stromal barrier and improved therapeutic effect. Near infrared (NIR) optical and MR imaging enabled noninvasive monitoring of nanoparticle-drug delivery and therapeutic responses. Our results demonstrated that IGF-1R targeted nanoparticles carrying multiple drugs are promising combination therapy approaches for image-guided therapy of stroma-rich and drug resistant human cancer, such as pancreatic cancer.

  4. Peptide- and saccharide-conjugated dendrimers for targeted drug delivery: a concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Gray, Warren D.; Davis, Michael E.; Luo, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Dendrimers comprise a category of branched materials with diverse functions that can be constructed with defined architectural and chemical structures. When decorated with bioactive ligands made of peptides and saccharides through peripheral chemical groups, dendrimer conjugates are turned into nanomaterials possessing attractive binding properties with the cognate receptors. At the cellular level, bioactive dendrimer conjugates can interact with cells with avidity and selectivity, and this function has particularly stimulated interests in investigating the targeting potential of dendrimer materials for the design of drug delivery systems. In addition, bioactive dendrimer conjugates have so far been studied for their versatile capabilities to enhance stability, solubility and absorption of various types of therapeutics. This review presents a brief discussion on three aspects of the recent studies to use peptide- and saccharide-conjugated dendrimers for drug delivery: (i) synthesis methods, (ii) cell- and tissue-targeting properties and (iii) applications of conjugated dendrimers in drug delivery nanodevices. With more studies to elucidate the structure–function relationship of ligand–dendrimer conjugates in transporting drugs, the conjugated dendrimers hold promise to facilitate targeted delivery and improve drug efficacy for discovery and development of modern pharmaceutics. PMID:23741608

  5. Mechanisms and biomaterials in pH-responsive tumour targeted drug delivery: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamala, Manju; Wilson, William R; Yang, Mimi; Palmer, Brian D; Wu, Zimei

    2016-04-01

    As the mainstay in the treatment of various cancers, chemotherapy plays a vital role, but still faces many challenges, such as poor tumour selectivity and multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology has provided a new strategy for addressing the limitations of the conventional chemotherapy. In the last decade, the volume of research published in this area has increased tremendously, especially with functional nano drug delivery systems (nanocarriers). Coupling a specific stimuli-triggered drug release mechanism with these delivery systems is one of the most prevalent approaches for improving therapeutic outcomes. Among the various stimuli, pH triggered delivery is regarded as the most general strategy, targeting the acidic extracellular microenvironment and intracellular organelles of solid tumours. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of pH-sensitive nanocarriers for tumour-targeted drug delivery. The review focuses on the chemical design of pH-sensitive biomaterials, which are used to fabricate nanocarriers for extracellular and/or intracellular tumour site-specific drug release. The pH-responsive biomaterials bring forth conformational changes in these nanocarriers through various mechanisms such as protonation, charge reversal or cleavage of a chemical bond, facilitating tumour specific cell uptake or drug release. A greater understanding of these mechanisms will help to design more efficient drug delivery systems to address the challenges encountered in conventional chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermosensitive liposomal drug delivery systems: state of the art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kneidl B

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Kneidl,1,2 Michael Peller,3 Gerhard Winter,2 Lars H Lindner,1 Martin Hossann11Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Munich, 2Department of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, 3Institute for Clinical Radiology, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, GermanyAbstract: Thermosensitive liposomes are a promising tool for external targeting of drugs to solid tumors when used in combination with local hyperthermia or high intensity focused ultrasound. In vivo results have demonstrated strong evidence that external targeting is superior over passive targeting achieved by highly stable long-circulating drug formulations like PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Up to March 2014, the Web of Science listed 371 original papers in this field, with 45 in 2013 alone. Several formulations have been developed since 1978, with lysolipid-containing, low temperature-sensitive liposomes currently under clinical investigation. This review summarizes the historical development and effects of particular phospholipids and surfactants on the biophysical properties and in vivo efficacy of thermosensitive liposome formulations. Further, treatment strategies for solid tumors are discussed. Here we focus on temperature-triggered intravascular and interstitial drug release. Drug delivery guided by magnetic resonance imaging further adds the possibility of performing online monitoring of a heating focus to calculate locally released drug concentrations and to externally control drug release by steering the heating volume and power. The combination of external targeting with thermosensitive liposomes and magnetic resonance-guided drug delivery will be the unique characteristic of this nanotechnology approach in medicine.Keywords: thermosensitive liposomes, phosphatidyloligoglycerol, hyperthermia, high intensity focused ultrasound, drug delivery, drug targeting

  7. Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonists enhance transvascular drug delivery into malignant brain tumors by increasing drug half-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intravenous co-infusion of labradimil, a metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonist, has been shown to temporarily enhance the transvascular delivery of small chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, across the blood-brain tumor barrier. It has been thought that the primary mechanism by which labradimil does so is by acting selectively on tumor microvasculature to increase the local transvascular flow rate across the blood-brain tumor barrier. This mechanism of action does not explain why, in the clinical setting, carboplatin dosing based on patient renal function over-estimates the carboplatin dose required for target carboplatin exposure. In this study we investigated the systemic actions of labradimil, as well as other bradykinin B2 receptor agonists with a range of metabolic stabilities, in context of the local actions of the respective B2 receptor agonists on the blood-brain tumor barrier of rodent malignant gliomas. Methods Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA, a small MRI contrast agent, were imaged in rodents bearing orthotopic RG-2 malignant gliomas. Baseline blood and brain tumor tissue pharmacokinetics were imaged with the 1st bolus of Gd-DTPA over the first hour, and then re-imaged with a 2nd bolus of Gd-DTPA over the second hour, during which normal saline or a bradykinin B2 receptor agonist was infused intravenously for 15 minutes. Changes in mean arterial blood pressure were recorded. Imaging data was analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results The decrease in systemic blood pressure correlated with the known metabolic stability of the bradykinin B2 receptor agonist infused. Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 agonists, methionine-lysine-bradykinin and labradimil, had differential effects on the transvascular flow rate of Gd-DTPA across the blood-brain tumor barrier. Both methionine

  8. Chondroitin sulfate-functionalized polyamidoamine as a tumor-targeted carrier for miR-34a delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenqi; Liu, Yong; Liang, Xiao; Huang, Yu; Li, Quanshun

    2017-07-15

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) was modified on a polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) through Michael addition to construct a tumor-targeted carrier CS-PAMAM for miR-34a delivery. The derivative CS-PAMAM was demonstrated to achieve an efficient cellular uptake of miR-34a in a CD44-dependent endocytosis way and further facilitate the endosomal escape of miR-34a after 4h. Through the miR-34a delivery, obvious inhibition of cell proliferation could be detected which was attributed to the enhancement of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and meanwhile the cell migration and invasion has been observed to be inhibited. Finally, the intravenous injection of CS-PAMAM/miR-34a formulation into mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549 xenografts could efficiently inhibit the tumor growth and induce the tumor apoptosis owing to the enhanced accumulation of miR-34a in tumor tissue. Overall, CS-PAMAM is potential to be used as a tumor-targeted oligonucleotide carrier for achieving tumor gene therapy. The cationic dendrimer PAMAM was modified by chondroitin sulfate (CS) through Michael addition to construct a tumor-targeted carrier CS-PAMAM for miR-34a delivery. The introduction of CS could achieve an efficient cellular uptake and intracellular transfection of miR-34a in a CD44-dependent endocytosis manner. The miR-34a delivery could execute the anti-proliferation activity by simultaneously inducing cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, and also the anti-migration activity. The CS-PAMAM-mediated systemic delivery of miR-34a showed significant inhibition of tumor growth and induction of tumor apoptosis using a mice model of subcutaneously implanted tumors. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs to macrophages: targeting mannose receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L. Yu; Klyachko, N. L.; Kudryashova, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The development of systems for targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs is a challenge of modern biotechnology. Currently, these drugs are encapsulated in a variety of carriers such as liposomes, polymers, emulsions and so on. Despite successful in vitro testing of these systems, virtually no success was achieved in vivo, because of low accessibility of the foci of infection located in alveolar macrophage cells. A promising strategy for increasing the efficiency of therapeutic action of anti-tuberculosis drugs is to encapsulate the agents into mannosylated carriers targeting the mannose receptors of alveolar macrophages. The review addresses the methods for modification of drug substance carriers, such as liposomes and biodegradable polymers, with mannose residues. The use of mannosylated carriers to deliver anti-tuberculosis agents increases the drug circulation time in the blood stream and increases the drug concentration in alveolar macrophage cells. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  10. Immunoliposomes for the targeted delivery of antitumor drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrobattista, E; Koning, GA; Storm, G

    1999-01-01

    This review presents an overview of the field of immunoliposome-mediated targeting of anticancer agents. First, problems that are encountered when immunoliposomes are used for systemic anticancer drug delivery and potential solutions are discussed. Second, an update is given of the in vivo results

  11. Development and characterization of multifunctional nanoparticles for drug delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahire, Rahul Rajaram

    Lipid and polymeric nanoparticles, although proven to be effective drug delivery systems compared to free drugs, have shown considerable limitations pertaining to their uptake and release at tumor sites. Spatial and temporal control over the delivery of anticancer drugs has always been challenge to drug delivery scientists. Here, we have developed and characterized multifunctional nanoparticles (liposomes and polymersomes) which are targeted specifically to cancer cells, and release their contents with tumor specific internal triggers. To enable these nanoparticles to be tracked in blood circulation, we have imparted them with echogenic characteristic. Echogenicity of nanoparticles is evaluated using ultrasound scattering and imaging experiments. Nanoparticles demonstrated effective release with internal triggers such as elevated levels of MMP-9 enzyme found in the extracellular matrix of tumor cells, decreased pH of lysosome, and differential concentration of reducing agents in cytosol of cancer cells. We have also successfully demonstrated the sensitivity of these particles towards ultrasound to further enhance the release with internal triggers. To ensure the selective uptake by folate receptor- overexpressing cancer cells, we decorated these nanoparticles with folic acid on their surface. Fluorescence microscopic images showed significantly higher uptake of folate-targeted nanoparticles by MCF-7 (breast cancer) and PANC-1 (pancreatic cancer) cells compared to particles without any targeting ligand on their surface. To demonstrate the effectiveness of these nanoparticles to carry the drugs inside and kill cancer cells, we encapsulated doxorubicin and/or gemcitabine employing the pH gradient method. Drug loaded nanoparticles showed significantly higher killing of the cancer cells compared to their non-targeted counterparts and free drugs. With further development, these nanoparticles certainly have potential to be used as a multifunctional nanocarriers for image

  12. Dynamics of different-sized solid-state nanocrystals as tracers for a drug-delivery system in the interstitium of a human tumor xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Masaaki; Higuchi, Hideo; Takeda, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent anticancer drugs have been made larger to pass selectively through tumor vessels and stay in the interstitium. Understanding drug movement in association with its size at the single-molecule level and estimating the time needed to reach the targeted organ is indispensable for optimizing drug delivery because single cell-targeted therapy is the ongoing paradigm. This report describes the tracking of single solid nanoparticles in tumor xenografts and the estimation of arrival time. Methods Different-sized nanoparticles measuring 20, 40, and 100 nm were injected into the tail vein of the female Balb/c nu/nu mice bearing human breast cancer on their backs. The movements of the nanoparticles were visualized through the dorsal skin-fold chamber with the high-speed confocal microscopy that we manufactured. Results An analysis of the particle trajectories revealed diffusion to be inversely related to the particle size and position in the tumor, whereas the velocity of the directed movement was related to the position. The difference in the velocity was the greatest for 40-nm particles in the perivascular to the intercellular region: difference = 5.8 nm/s. The arrival time of individual nanoparticles at tumor cells was simulated. The estimated times for the 20-, 40-, and 100-nm particles to reach the tumor cells were 158.0, 218.5, and 389.4 minutes, respectively, after extravasation. Conclusions This result suggests that the particle size can be individually designed for each goal. These data and methods are also important for understanding drug pharmacokinetics. Although this method may be subject to interference by surface molecules attached on the particles, it has the potential to elucidate the pharmacokinetics involved in constructing novel drug-delivery systems involving cell-targeted therapy. PMID:19575785

  13. A novel delivery vector for targeted delivery of the antiangiogenic drug paclitaxel to angiogenic blood vessels: TLTYTWS-conjugated PEG–PLA nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Fei, E-mail: tanfeivip@126.com; Mo, Xiao-hui, E-mail: 675382206@qq.com [Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital (China); Zhao, Jian, E-mail: 22459402@qq.com [Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, CCK (Sweden); Liang, Hui, E-mail: nanotan@126.com [People' s Hospital of Longhua New District Shenzhen, Department of urology (China); Chen, Zhong-jian, E-mail: pfjk927627702@126.com; Wang, Xiu-li, E-mail: tanfeit@126.com [Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital (China)

    2017-02-15

    Antiangiogenesis has been widely accepted as an attractive strategy to combat tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. An actively targeting nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS) would provide an alternative method to achieve antiangiogenic antitumor therapy. In the present study, our group fabricated novel nano-DDS, TLTYTWS (TS) peptide-modified poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(lactic acid) (PEG–PLA) nanoparticles (TS-NPs) encapsulating a drug with antiangiogenic potential, paclitaxel (Ptx) (TS-Ptx-NPs). The nanoparticles were uniformly spherical and had a unimodal particle size distribution and slightly negative zeta potential. TS-NPs accumulated significantly in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via energy-dependent and caveolae- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and improved the antiproliferative, antimigratory, and antitube-forming abilities of paclitaxel in vitro. Following intravenous administration, TS-Ptx-NPs presented favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Melanoma distribution assays confirmed that TS-NPs achieved higher accumulation and penetration at melanoma sites. These results collectively indicated that TLTYTWS-decorated nanoparticles can be considered to be a promising nano-DDS for chemotherapies targeting tumor angiogenesis and have great potential to improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice.

  14. A novel delivery vector for targeted delivery of the antiangiogenic drug paclitaxel to angiogenic blood vessels: TLTYTWS-conjugated PEG–PLA nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Fei; Mo, Xiao-hui; Zhao, Jian; Liang, Hui; Chen, Zhong-jian; Wang, Xiu-li

    2017-01-01

    Antiangiogenesis has been widely accepted as an attractive strategy to combat tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. An actively targeting nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS) would provide an alternative method to achieve antiangiogenic antitumor therapy. In the present study, our group fabricated novel nano-DDS, TLTYTWS (TS) peptide-modified poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(lactic acid) (PEG–PLA) nanoparticles (TS-NPs) encapsulating a drug with antiangiogenic potential, paclitaxel (Ptx) (TS-Ptx-NPs). The nanoparticles were uniformly spherical and had a unimodal particle size distribution and slightly negative zeta potential. TS-NPs accumulated significantly in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via energy-dependent and caveolae- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and improved the antiproliferative, antimigratory, and antitube-forming abilities of paclitaxel in vitro. Following intravenous administration, TS-Ptx-NPs presented favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Melanoma distribution assays confirmed that TS-NPs achieved higher accumulation and penetration at melanoma sites. These results collectively indicated that TLTYTWS-decorated nanoparticles can be considered to be a promising nano-DDS for chemotherapies targeting tumor angiogenesis and have great potential to improve the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapy in melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice.

  15. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

  16. DNA origami as an in vivo drug delivery vehicle for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Qiao; Li, Na; Dai, Luru; Liu, Qing; Song, Linlin; Wang, Jinye; Li, Yaqian; Tian, Jie; Ding, Baoquan; Du, Yang

    2014-07-22

    Many chemotherapeutics used for cancer treatments encounter issues during delivery to tumors in vivo and may have high levels of systemic toxicity due to their nonspecific distribution. Various materials have been explored to fabricate nanoparticles as drug carriers to improve delivery efficiency. However, most of these materials suffer from multiple drawbacks, such as limited biocompatibility and inability to engineer spatially addressable surfaces that can be utilized for multifunctional activity. Here, we demonstrate that DNA origami possessed enhanced tumor passive targeting and long-lasting properties at the tumor region. Particularly, the triangle-shaped DNA origami exhibits optimal tumor passive targeting accumulation. The delivery of the known anticancer drug doxorubicin into tumors by self-assembled DNA origami nanostructures was performed, and this approach showed prominent therapeutic efficacy in vivo. The DNA origami carriers were prepared through the self-assembly of M13mp18 phage DNA and hundreds of complementary DNA helper strands; the doxorubicin was subsequently noncovalently intercalated into these nanostructures. After conducting fluorescence imaging and safety evaluation, the doxorubicin-containing DNA origami exhibited remarkable antitumor efficacy without observable systemic toxicity in nude mice bearing orthotopic breast tumors labeled with green fluorescent protein. Our results demonstrated the potential of DNA origami nanostructures as innovative platforms for the efficient and safe drug delivery of cancer therapeutics in vivo.

  17. Targeted Tumor Therapy Based on Nanodiamonds Decorated with Doxorubicin and Folic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae-Kyung; Baek, Seung Woon; Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of nanodiamond (ND)-based drug carriers for tumor-targeted drug delivery is described. The ND clusters with an average size of 52.84 nm are fabricated using a simple fluidic device combined with a precipitation method and then conjugated with folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (Dox) via carbodiimide chemistry to obtain FA/Dox-modified ND (FA/Dox-ND) clusters. Cell culture experiments revealed that KB (folate receptor-positive) cells are preferentially ablated by FA/Dox-ND clusters compared to A549 (folate receptor-negative) cells. In vivo results revealed that FA/Dox-ND clusters are specifically accumulated in tumor tissues after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice, effectively reducing the volume of tumor. Based on these results, this study suggests that FA/Dox-ND clusters can be a good candidate as tumor-targeted nanovehicles for delivery of antitumor drug. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Construction of hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin copolymer nanoparticles and targeting delivery of paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao Qinghua; Li Suping; Han Siyuan [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, CAS Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety (China); Wang Zhi, E-mail: wangzhi@jlu.edu.cn [Jilin University, Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering, Ministry of Education (China); Wu Yan, E-mail: wuy@nanoctr.cn; Nie Guangjun, E-mail: niegj@nanoctr.cn [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, CAS Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety (China)

    2012-08-15

    A novel amphiphilic copolymer with p-maleimidophenyl isocyanate-hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin-polylactide-1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine to generate copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) has been designed. In order to develop an active targeting system, integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-specific targeting peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys), cRGD, was conjugated to the surface of NPs (NPs-RGD). These NPs were used to encapsulate anti-tumor drug, paclitaxel. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug-loading capacity and controlled drug release in vitro at acidic pH. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrates that paclitaxel-loaded NPs-RGD significantly inhibited B16 tumor cell (high {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}) proliferation relative to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded NPs at high concentrations. Paclitaxel-loaded NPs-RGD localized mainly in lysosomes in B16 cells as revealed by confocal microscopy. These results suggest a novel strategy for fabrication-functionalizing hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin copolymer nanoparticles for targeting delivery of paclitaxel to integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-rich tumor cells. These nanocarriers can be readily extended to couple other bioactive molecules for active targeting and delivery of various chemotherapeutic drugs.

  19. Microencapsulation of anti-tumor, antibiotic and thrombolytic drugs in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin; Cassanto, John

    1994-01-01

    Encapsulation of cytotoxic or labile drugs enables targeted delivery and sustained release kinetics that are not available with intravenous injection. A new liquid-liquid diffusion process has been developed for forming unique microcapsules that contain both aqueous and hydrocarbon soluble drugs. Microgravity experiments, on sounding rockets (1989-92) and Shuttle missions STS-52 (1992) and STS-56 (1993) using an automated Materials Dispersion Apparatus, produced multi-lamellar microcapsules containing both Cis-platinum (anti-tumor drug) and iodinated poppy seed oil (a radiocontrast medium), surrounded by a polyglyceride skin. Microcapsules formed with amoxicillin (antibiotic) or urokinase (a clot dissolving enzyme), co-encapsulated with IPO, are still intact after two years. Microcapsules were formed with the drug so concentrated that crystals formed inside. Multi-layered microspheres, with both hydrophobic drug compartments, can enable diffusion of complementary drugs from the same microcapsule, e.g. antibiotics and immuno-stimulants to treat resistant infections or multiple fibrinolytic drugs to dissolve emboli. Co-encapsulation of enough radio-contrast medium enables oncologists to monitor the delivery of anti-tumor microcapsules to target tumors using computerized tomography and radiography that would track the distribution of microcapsules after release from the intra-arterial catheter. These microcapsules could have important applications in chemotheraphy of certain liver, kidney, brain and other tumors.

  20. Nanoparticle enabled transdermal drug delivery systems for enhanced dose control and tissue targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g. patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases. PMID:27983701

  1. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian C; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2016-12-15

    Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams) enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  2. Magnetic Nanoparticle Facilitated Drug Delivery for Cancer Therapy with Targeted and Image-Guided Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Li, Yuancheng; Orza, Anamaria; Lu, Qiong; Guo, Peng; Wang, Liya; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2016-06-14

    With rapid advances in nanomedicine, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have emerged as a promising theranostic tool in biomedical applications, including diagnostic imaging, drug delivery and novel therapeutics. Significant preclinical and clinical research has explored their functionalization, targeted delivery, controllable drug release and image-guided capabilities. To further develop MNPs for theranostic applications and clinical translation in the future, we attempt to provide an overview of the recent advances in the development and application of MNPs for drug delivery, specifically focusing on the topics concerning the importance of biomarker targeting for personalized therapy and the unique magnetic and contrast-enhancing properties of theranostic MNPs that enable image-guided delivery. The common strategies and considerations to produce theranostic MNPs and incorporate payload drugs into MNP carriers are described. The notable examples are presented to demonstrate the advantages of MNPs in specific targeting and delivering under image guidance. Furthermore, current understanding of delivery mechanisms and challenges to achieve efficient therapeutic efficacy or diagnostic capability using MNP-based nanomedicine are discussed.

  3. A dual-targeting strategy for enhanced drug delivery and synergistic therapy based on thermosensitive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; You, Chaoqun; Gao, Zhiguo; Wu, Hongshuai; Sun, Baiwang; Zhu, Xiaoli; Chen, Renjie

    2018-08-01

    The functionalized nanoparticles have been widely studied and reported as carriers of drug transport recently. Furthermore, many groups have focused more on developing novel and efficient treatment methods, such as photodynamic therapy and photothermal therapy, since both therapies have shown inspiring potential in the application of antitumor. The mentioned treatments exhibited the superiority of cooperative manner and showed the ability to compensate for the adverse effects caused by conventional monotherapy in proposed strategies. In view of the above descriptions, we formulated a thermosensitive drug delivery system, which achieved the enhanced delivery of cisplatin and two photosensitizers (ICG and Ce6) by dual-targeting traction. Drawing on the thin film hydration method, cisplatin and photosensitizers were encapsulated inside nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the targeting peptide cRGD and targeting molecule folate can be modified on the surface of nanoparticles to realize the active identification of tumor cells. The measurements of dynamic light scattering showed that the prepared nanoparticles had an ideal dispersibility and uniform particle size of 102.6 nm. On the basis of the results observed from confocal laser scanning microscope, the modified nanoparticles were more efficient endocytosed by MCF-7 cells as a contrast to SGC-7901 cells. Photothermal conversion-triggered drug release and photo-therapies produced a significant apoptosis rate of 85.9% on MCF-7 cells. The distinguished results made it believed that the formulated delivery system had conducted great efforts and innovations for the realization of concise collaboration and provided a promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Liposomes containing alkylated methotrexate analogues for phospholipase A(2) mediated tumor targeted drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jensen, Simon Skøde

    2009-01-01

    of alkylated compounds in liposomes, it was demonstrated that the MTX-analogue partitioned into the water phase and thereby became available for cell uptake. It was concluded that liposomes containing alkylated MTX-analogues show promise as a drug delivery system, although the MTX-analogue needs to be more......Two lipophilic methotrexate analogues have been synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against KATO III and HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both analogues contained a C-16-alkyl chain attached to the gamma-carboxylic acid and one of the analogues had an additional benzyl group attached...... cytotoxicity was incorporated into liposomes that were designed to be particularly Susceptible to a liposome degrading enzyme, secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), which is found in high concentrations in tumors of several different cancer types. Liposome incorporation was investigated by differential...

  5. Advances in research of targeting delivery and controlled release of drug-loaded nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Zhonghua

    2003-01-01

    Biochemistry drug, at present, is still the main tool that human struggle to defeat the diseases. So, developing safe and efficacious technique of drug targeting delivery and controlled release is key to enhance curative effect, decrease drug dosage, and lessen its side effect. Drug-loaded nanoparticles, which is formed by conjugate between nanotechnology and modern pharmaceutics, is a new fashioned pharmic delivery carrier. Because of advantages in pharmic targeting transport and controlled or slow release and improving bioavailability, it has been one of developing trend of modern pharmaceutical dosage forms

  6. Ligand-targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs to malignant cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mini; Kularatne, Sumith A; Qi, Longwu; Kleindl, Paul; Leamon, Christopher P; Hansen, Michael J; Low, Philip S

    2009-09-01

    Potential clinical applications of small interfering RNA (siRNA) are hampered primarily by delivery issues. We have successfully addressed the delivery problems associated with off-site targeting of highly toxic chemotherapeutic agents by attaching the drugs to tumor-specific ligands that will carry the attached cargo into the desired cancer cell. Indeed, several such tumor-targeted drugs are currently undergoing human clinical trials. We now show that efficient targeting of siRNA to malignant cells and tissues can be achieved by covalent conjugation of small-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands, such as folic acid and DUPA (2-[3-(1, 3-dicarboxy propyl)-ureido] pentanedioic acid), to siRNA. The former ligand binds a folate receptor that is overexpressed on a variety of cancers, whereas the latter ligand binds to prostate-specific membrane antigen that is overexpressed specifically on prostate cancers and the neovasculature of all solid tumors. Using these ligands, we show remarkable receptor-mediated targeting of siRNA to cancer tissues in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Transferrin receptor-targeted pH-sensitive micellar system for diminution of drug resistance and targetable delivery in multidrug-resistant breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wei Gao,1 Guihua Ye,1 Xiaochuan Duan,1 Xiaoying Yang,1 Victor C Yang1,2 1Tianjin Key Laboratory on Technologies Enabling Development of Clinical Therapeutics and Diagnostics (Theranostics, School of Pharmacy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: The emergence of drug resistance is partially associated with overproduction of transferrin receptor (TfR. To overcome multidrug resistance (MDR and achieve tumor target delivery, we designed a novel biodegradable pH-sensitive micellar system modified with HAIYPRH, a TfR ligand (7pep. First, the polymers poly(l-histidine-coupled polyethylene glycol-2000 (PHIS-PEG2000 and 7pep-modified 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000 (7pep-DSPE-PEG2000 were synthesized, and the mixed micelles were prepared by blending of PHIS-PEG2000 and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000 or 7pep-DSPE-PEG2000 (7-pep HD micelles. The micelles exhibited good size uniformity, high encapsulation efficiency, and a low critical micelle concentration. By changing the polymer ratio in the micellar formulation, the pH response range was specially tailored to pH ~6.0. When loaded with antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX, the micelle showed an acid pH-triggering drug release profile. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity study demonstrated that 7-pep HD micelles could significantly enhance the intracellular level and antitumor efficacy of DOX in multidrug-resistant cells (MCF-7/Adr, which attributed to the synergistic effect of poly(l-histidine-triggered endolysosom escape and TfR-mediated endocytosis. Most importantly, the in vivo imaging study confirmed the targetability of 7-pep HD micelles to MDR tumor. These findings indicated that 7-pep HD micelles would be a promising drug delivery system in the treatment of drug

  8. Nanoparticle-Enabled Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems for Enhanced Dose Control and Tissue Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Palmer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal drug delivery systems have been around for decades, and current technologies (e.g., patches, ointments, and creams enhance the skin permeation of low molecular weight, lipophilic drugs that are efficacious at low doses. The objective of current transdermal drug delivery research is to discover ways to enhance skin penetration of larger, hydrophilic drugs and macromolecules for disease treatment and vaccination. Nanocarriers made of lipids, metals, or polymers have been successfully used to increase penetration of drugs or vaccines, control drug release, and target drugs to specific areas of skin in vivo. While more research is needed to identify the safety of nanocarriers, this technology has the potential to expand the use of transdermal routes of administration to a wide array of therapeutics. Here, we review the current state of nanoparticle skin delivery systems with special emphasis on targeting skin diseases.

  9. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  10. Photo-synthesis of protein-based nanoparticles and the application in drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Jinbing; Wang, Hongyang; Cao, Yi; Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Recently, protein-based nanoparticles as drug delivery systems have attracted great interests due to the excellent behavior of high biocompatibility and biodegradability, and low toxicity. However, the synthesis techniques are generally costly, chemical reagents introduced, and especially present difficulties in producing homogeneous monodispersed nanoparticles. Here, we introduce a novel physical method to synthesize protein nanoparticles which can be accomplished under physiological condition only through ultraviolet (UV) illumination. By accurately adjusting the intensity and illumination time of UV light, disulfide bonds in proteins can be selectively reduced and the subsequent self-assembly process can be well controlled. Importantly, the co-assembly can also be dominated when the proteins mixed with either anti-cancer drugs, siRNA, or active targeting molecules. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that our synthesized protein–drug nanoparticles (drug-loading content and encapsulation efficiency being ca. 8.2% and 70%, respectively) not only possess the capability of traditional drug delivery systems (DDS), but also have a greater drug delivery efficiency to the tumor sites and a better inhibition of tumor growth (only 35% of volume comparing to the natural growing state), indicating it being a novel drug delivery system in tumor therapy

  11. 3D Porous Chitosan-Alginate Scaffolds as an In Vitro Model for Evaluating Nanoparticle-Mediated Tumor Targeting and Gene Delivery to Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Florczyk, Stephen J; Stephen, Zachary R; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-12

    Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted gene delivery are conventionally evaluated using 2D in vitro cultures. However, this does not translate well to corresponding in vivo studies because of the marked difference in NP behavior in the presence of the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we investigated whether prostate cancer (PCa) cells cultured in three-dimensional (3D) chitosan-alginate (CA) porous scaffolds could model cationic NP-mediated gene targeted delivery to tumors in vitro. We assessed in vitro tumor cell proliferation, formation of tumor spheroids, and expression of marker genes that promote tumor malignancy in CA scaffolds. The efficacy of NP-targeted gene delivery was evaluated in PCa cells in 2D cultures, PCa tumor spheroids grown in CA scaffolds, and PCa tumors in a mouse TRAMP-C2 flank tumor model. PCa cells cultured in CA scaffolds grew into tumor spheroids and displayed characteristics of higher malignancy as compared to those in 2D cultures. Significantly, targeted gene delivery was only observed in cells cultured in CA scaffolds, whereas cells cultured on 2D plates showed no difference in gene delivery between targeted and nontarget control NPs. In vivo NP evaluation confirmed targeted gene delivery, indicating that only CA scaffolds correctly modeled NP-mediated targeted delivery in vivo. These findings suggest that CA scaffolds serve as a better in vitro platform than 2D cultures for evaluation of NP-mediated targeted gene delivery to PCa.

  12. pH-sensitive Au–BSA–DOX–FA nanocomposites for combined CT imaging and targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available He Huang,1 Da-Peng Yang,2 Minghuan Liu,2 Xiangsheng Wang,1 Zhiyong Zhang,1 Guangdong Zhou,1 Wei Liu,1 Yilin Cao,1 Wen Jie Zhang,1 Xiansong Wang1 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, National Tissue Engineering Center of China, Shanghai, 2College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Quanzhou Normal University, Quanzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Albumin-based nanoparticles (NPs as a drug delivery system have attracted much attention owing to their nontoxicity, non-immunogenicity, great stability and ability to bind to many therapeutic drugs. Herein, bovine serum albumin (BSA was utilized as a template to prepare Au–BSA core/shell NPs. The outer layer BSA was subsequently conjugated with cis-aconityl doxorubicin (DOX and folic acid (FA to create Au–BSA–DOX–FA nanocomposites. A list of characterizations was undertaken to identify the successful conjugation of drug molecules and targeted agents. In vitro cytotoxicity using a cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 assay indicated that Au–BSA NPs did not display obvious cytotoxicity to MGC-803 and GES-1 cells in the concentration range of 0–100 µg/mL, which can therefore be used as a safe drug delivery carrier. Furthermore, compared with free DOX, Au–BSA–DOX–FA nanocomposites exhibited a pH-sensitive drug release ability and superior antitumor activity in a drug concentration-dependent manner. In vivo computed tomography (CT imaging experiments showed that Au–BSA–DOX–FA nanocomposites could be used as an efficient and durable CT contrast agent for targeted CT imaging of the folate receptor (FR overexpressed in cancer tissues. In vivo antitumor experiments demonstrated that Au–BSA–DOX–FA nanocomposites have selective antitumor activity effects on FR-overexpressing tumors and no adverse effects on normal tissues and

  13. Preparation, Characterization, and Optimization of Folic Acid-Chitosan-Methotrexate Core-Shell Nanoparticles by Box-Behnken Design for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi Beidokhti, Hamid Reza; Ghaffarzadegan, Reza; Mirzakhanlouei, Sasan; Ghazizadeh, Leila; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the combined influence of independent variables in the preparation of folic acid-chitosan-methotrexate nanoparticles (FA-Chi-MTX NPs). These NPs were designed and prepared for targeted drug delivery in tumor. The NPs of each batch were prepared by coaxial electrospray atomization method and evaluated for particle size (PS) and particle size distribution (PSD). The independent variables were selected to be concentration of FA-chitosan, ratio of shell solution flow rate to core solution flow rate, and applied voltage. The process design of experiments (DOE) was obtained with three factors in three levels by Design expert software. Box-Behnken design was used to select 15 batches of experiments randomly. The chemical structure of FA-chitosan was examined by FTIR. The NPs of each batch were collected separately, and morphologies of NPs were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The captured pictures of all batches were analyzed by ImageJ software. Mean PS and PSD were calculated for each batch. Polynomial equation was produced for each response. The FE-SEM results showed the mean diameter of the core-shell NPs was around 304 nm, and nearly 30% of the produced NPs are in the desirable range. Optimum formulations were selected. The validation of DOE optimization results showed errors around 2.5 and 2.3% for PS and PSD, respectively. Moreover, the feasibility of using prepared NPs to target tumor extracellular pH was shown, as drug release was greater in the pH of endosome (acidic medium). Finally, our results proved that FA-Chi-MTX NPs were active against the human epithelial cervical cancer (HeLa) cells.

  14. Neutrophil targeted nano-drug delivery system for chronic obstructive lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Neeraj; Min, Taehong; Bodas, Manish; Gorde, Aakruti; Roy, Indrajit

    2016-11-01

    The success of drug delivery to target airway cell(s) remains a significant challenge due to the limited ability of nanoparticle (NP) systems to circumvent protective airway-defense mechanisms. The size, density, surface and physical-chemical properties of nanoparticles are the key features that determine their ability to navigate across the airway-barrier. We evaluated here the efficacy of a PEGylated immuno-conjugated PLGA-nanoparticle (PINP) to overcome this challenge and selectively deliver drug to specific inflammatory cells (neutrophils). We first characterized the size, shape, surface-properties and neutrophil targeting using dynamic laser scattering, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. Next, we assessed the efficacy of neutrophil-targeted PINPs in transporting through the airway followed by specific binding and release of drug to neutrophils. Finally, our results demonstrate the efficacy of PINP mediated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-(ibuprofen) delivery to neutrophils in murine models of obstructive lung diseases, based on its ability to control neutrophilic-inflammation and resulting lung disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of polymeric micelles with tumor targeted in chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Hui; Wang Xiaojun; Zhang Song; Liu Xinli

    2012-01-01

    Polymeric micelles (PMs) have gained more progress as a carrier system with the quick development of biological and nanoparticle techniques. In particular, PMs with smart targeting can deliver anti-cancer drugs directly into tumor cells at a sustained rate. PMs with core–shell structure (with diameters of 10 ∼ 100 nm) have been prepared by a variety of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers via a self-assembly process. The preparation of polymeric micelles with stimuli-responsive block copolymers or modification of target molecules on polymeric micelles’ surface are able to significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery. Polymeric micelles, which have been considered as a novel promising drug carrier for cancer therapeutics, are rapidly evolving and being introduced in an attempt to overcome several limitations of traditional chemotherapeutics, including water solubility, tumor-specific accumulation, anti-tumor efficacy, and non-specific toxicity. This review describes the preparation of polymeric micelles and the targeted modification which greatly enhance the effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Functionalized nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of a hydrophobic drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Lu, Tzu-Li; Wang, Hesin-Fu, E-mail: cjchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, China Medical University, 91 Hsue-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-14

    Effective formulations of hydrophobic drugs for cancer therapies are challenging. To address this issue, we have sought to nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) as an alternative. NOBs are lipid-based particles which consist of a central oil space surrounded by a monolayer of oleosin (Ole)-embedded phospholipids (PLs). Ole was first fused with the anti-HER2/neu affibody (Ole-ZH2), and the resulting hybrid protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli. ZH2-displayed NOBs were then assembled by sonicating the mixture containing plant oil, PLs, and isolated Ole-ZH2 in one step. To illustrate their usefulness, functionalized NOBs were employed to encapsulate a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT). As a result, these CPT-loaded NOBs remained stable in serum and the release of CPT at the non-permissive condition exhibited a sustained and prolonged profile. Moreover, plain NOBs were biocompatible whereas CPT-loaded NOBs exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on HER2/neu-positive cells in vitro. Administration of xenograft nude mice with CPT-loaded NOBs also led to the regression of solid tumors in an effective way. Overall, the result indicates the potential of NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  17. Hyaluronate tethered, "smart" multiwalled carbon nanotubes for tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datir, Satyajit R; Das, Manasmita; Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog

    2012-11-21

    The present study reports the optimized synthesis, physicochemical characterization, and biological evaluation of a novel, multiwalled carbon nanotube-hyaluronic acid (MWCNT-HA) conjugate, complexed with an anticancer agent, Doxorubicin (DOX) via π-π stacking interaction. The therapeutic conjugate was concomitantly labeled with a near-infrared fluorescent dye, Alexa-Flour-647 (AF-647), and radiotracer Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) to track its whereabouts both in vitro and in vivo via optical and scintigraphic imaging techniques. Covalent functionalization of MWCNTs with HA facilitated their internalization into human lung adenocarcinoma, A549 cells via hyaluronan receptors (HR) mediated endocytosis. Internalized nanotubes showed lysosomal trafficking, followed by low pH-triggered DOX release under endolysosomal conditions. Consequently, DOX-loaded HA-MWCNTs exhibited 3.2 times higher cytotoxicity and increased apoptotic activity than free DOX in equivalent concentrations. Organ distribution studies in Ehlrich ascites tumor (EAT) bearing mice model indicated that tumor specific localization of (99m)Tc-MWCNT-HA-DOX is significantly higher than both free drug and nontargeted MWCNTs. Pharmacodynamic studies in chemically breast-cancer-induced rats showed that the tumor-growth inhibitory effect of HA-MWCNT-DOX was 5 times higher than free DOX in equivalent concentration. DOX delivered through HA-MWCNTs was devoid of any detectable cardiotoxity, hepatotoxicity, or nephrotoxicity. All these promising attributes make HA-MWCNTs a "smart" platform for tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer agents.

  18. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  19. Nanotechnology-based combinational drug delivery: an emerging approach for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhi, Priyambada; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming more popular because it generates synergistic anticancer effects, reduces individual drug-related toxicity and suppresses multi-drug resistance through different mechanisms of action. In recent years, nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery to tumor tissues has emerged as an effective strategy by overcoming many biological, biophysical and biomedical barriers that the body stages against successful delivery of anticancer drugs. The sustained, controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in a combination approach enhanced therapeutic anticancer effects with reduced drug-associated side effects. In this article, we have reviewed the scope of various nanotechnology-based combination drug delivery approaches and also summarized the current perspective and challenges facing the successful treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential Pathways for CNS Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain interfaces restrict the cerebral bioavailability of pharmacological compounds. Various drug delivery strategies have been developed to improve drug penetration into the brain. Most strategies target the microvascular endothelium forming the blood-brain barrier proper. Targeting the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier formed by the epithelium of the choroid plexuses in addition to the blood-brain barrier may offer added-value for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. For instance, targeting the CSF spaces, adjacent tissue, or the choroid plexuses themselves is of interest for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and infectious diseases, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, selected brain tumors, hydrocephalus or neurohumoral dysregulation. Selected CSF-borne materials seem to reach deep cerebral structures by mechanisms that need to be understood in the context of chronic CSF delivery. Drug delivery through both barriers can reduce CSF sink action towards parenchymal drugs. Finally, targeting the choroid plexus-CSF system can be especially relevant in the context of neonatal and pediatric diseases of the central nervous system. Transcytosis appears the most promising mechanism to target in order to improve drug delivery through brain barriers. The choroid plexus epithelium displays strong vesicular trafficking and secretory activities that deserve to be explored in the context of cerebral drug delivery. Folate transport and exosome release into the CSF, plasma protein transport, and various receptor-mediated endocytosis pathways may prove useful mechanisms to exploit for efficient drug delivery into the CSF. This calls for a clear evaluation of transcytosis mechanisms at the blood-CSF barrier, and a thorough evaluation of CSF drug delivery rates. PMID:27464721

  1. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers. PMID:25202710

  2. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Lan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo, including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

  3. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  4. Direct Cytoplasmic Delivery and Nuclear Targeting Delivery of HPMA-MT Conjugates in a Microtubules Dependent Fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiaju; Zhu, Xi; Luo, Kui; Li, Lian; Tang, Manlin; Liu, Yanxi; Zhou, Zhou; Huang, Yuan

    2016-09-06

    As the hearts of tumor cells, the nucleus is the ultimate target of many chemotherapeutic agents and genes. However, nuclear drug delivery is always hampered by multiple intracellular obstacles, such as low efficiency of lysosome escape and insufficient nuclear trafficking. Herein, an N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) polymer-based drug delivery system was designed, which could achieve direct cytoplasmic delivery by a nonendocytic pathway and transport into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent fashion. A special targeting peptide (MT), derived from an endogenic parathyroid hormone-related protein, was conjugated to the polymer backbone, which could accumulate into the nucleus a by microtubule-mediated pathway. The in vitro studies found that low temperature and NaN3 could not influence the cell internalization of the conjugates. Besides, no obvious overlay of the conjugates with lysosome demonstrated that the polymer conjugates could enter the tumor cell cytoplasm by a nonendocytic pathway, thus avoiding the drug degradation in the lysosome. Furthermore, after suppression of the microtubule dynamics with microtubule stabilizing docetaxel (DTX) and destabilizing nocodazole (Noc), the nuclear accumulation of polymeric conjugates was significantly inhibited. Living cells fluorescence recovery after photobleaching study found that the nuclear import rate of conjugates was 2-fold faster compared with the DTX and Noc treated groups. These results demonstrated that the conjugates transported into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent way. Therefore, in addition to direct cytoplasmic delivery, our peptide conjugated polymeric platform could simultaneously mediate nuclear drug accumulation, which may open a new path for further intracellular genes/peptides delivery.

  5. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayal, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  6. Irradiation promotes Akt-targeting therapeutic gene delivery to the tumor vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonveaux, Pierre; Frerart, Francoise; Bouzin, Caroline; Brouet, Agnes; Wever, Julie de; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Gallez, Bernard; Feron, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation-induced increases in nitric oxide (NO) production can influence tumor blood flow and improve delivery of Akt-targeting therapeutic DNA lipocomplexes to the tumor. Methods and Materials: The contribution of NO to the endothelial response to radiation was identified using NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors and endothelial NOS (eNOS)-deficient mice. Reporter-encoding plasmids complexed with cationic lipids were used to document the tumor vascular specificity and the efficacy of in vivo lipofection after irradiation. A dominant-negative Akt gene construct was used to evaluate the facilitating effects of radiotherapy on the therapeutic transgene delivery. Results: The abundance of eNOS protein was increased in both irradiated tumor microvessels and endothelial cells, leading to a stimulation of NO release and an associated increase in tumor blood flow. Transgene expression was subsequently improved in the irradiated vs. nonirradiated tumor vasculature. This effect was not apparent in eNOS-deficient mice and could not be reproduced in irradiated cultured endothelial cells. Finally, we combined low-dose radiotherapy with a dominant-negative Akt gene construct and documented synergistic antitumor effects. Conclusions: This study offers a new rationale to combine radiotherapy with gene therapy, by directly exploiting the stimulatory effects of radiation on NO production by tumor endothelial cells. The preferential expression of the transgene in the tumor microvasculature underscores the potential of such an adjuvant strategy to limit the angiogenic response of irradiated tumors

  7. Applicator for in-vitro ultrasound-activated targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerold, B.; Gourevich, D.; Volovick, A.; Xu, D.; Arditti, F.; Prentice, P.; Cochran, S.; Gnaim, J.; Medan, Y.; Wang, L.; Melzer, A.

    2012-10-01

    Reducing toxicity and improving uptake of cancer drugs in tumors are important goals of targeted drug delivery (TDD). Ultrasonic drug release from various encapsulants has been a focus of many research groups. However, a single standard ultrasonic device, viable for use by biologists, is not currently present in the market. The device reported here is designed to allow investigation of the impact of ultrasound on cellular uptake and cell viability in-vitro. In it, single-element transducers with different operating frequencies are mounted below a standard 96-well plate. The plate is moved above the transducers, such that each line of wells can be sonicated at a different frequency. To assess the device, 96-well plates were seeded with cells and sonicated using different ultrasonic parameters, with and without doxorubicin. Cell viability was measured by colorimetric MTT assay and the uptake of doxorubicin by cells was also determined. The device proved to be highly viable in preliminary tests; it demonstrated that change in ultrasonic parameters produces different effect on cells. For example, increase in uptake of doxorubicin was demonstrated following ultrasound application. The growing interest in ultrasound-activated TDD emphasizes the need for standardization of the ultrasound device and the one reported here may offer some indications of how that may be achieved. It is planned to further improve the prototype by increasing the number of ultrasonic frequencies and degrees of freedom for each transducer.

  8. Physics considerations in targeted anticancer drug delivery by magnetoelectric nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimphil, Emmanuel; Nagesetti, Abhignyan; Guduru, Rakesh; Stewart, Tiffanie; Rodzinski, Alexandra; Liang, Ping; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2017-06-01

    In regard to cancer therapy, magnetoelectric nanoparticles (MENs) have proven to be in a class of its own when compared to any other nanoparticle type. Like conventional magnetic nanoparticles, they can be used for externally controlled drug delivery via application of a magnetic field gradient and image-guided delivery. However, unlike conventional nanoparticles, due to the presence of a non-zero magnetoelectric effect, MENs provide a unique mix of important properties to address key challenges in modern cancer therapy: (i) a targeting mechanism driven by a physical force rather than antibody matching, (ii) a high-specificity delivery to enhance the cellular uptake of therapeutic drugs across the cancer cell membranes only, while sparing normal cells, (iii) an externally controlled mechanism to release drugs on demand, and (iv) a capability for image guided precision medicine. These properties separate MEN-based targeted delivery from traditional biotechnology approaches and lay a foundation for the complementary approach of technobiology. The biotechnology approach stems from the underlying biology and exploits bioinformatics to find the right therapy. In contrast, the technobiology approach is geared towards using the physics of molecular-level interactions between cells and nanoparticles to treat cancer at the most fundamental level and thus can be extended to all the cancers. This paper gives an overview of the current state of the art and presents an ab initio model to describe the underlying mechanisms of cancer treatment with MENs from the perspective of basic physics.

  9. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law and sources (vessels and sinks (lymphatics for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss

  10. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  11. Synergistic effect of pH-responsive folate-functionalized poloxamer 407-TPGS-mixed micelles on targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt AM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Adeel Masood Butt, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin, Haliza Katas Centre for Drug Delivery Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Doxorubicin (DOX, an anthracycline anticancer antibiotic, is used for treating various types of cancers. However, its use is associated with toxicity to normal cells and development of resistance due to overexpression of drug efflux pumps. Poloxamer 407 (P407 and vitamin E TPGS (d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate, TPGS are widely used polymers as drug delivery carriers and excipients for enhancing the drug retention times and stability. TPGS reduces multidrug resistance, induces apoptosis, and shows selective anticancer activity against tumor cells. Keeping in view the problems, we designed a mixed micelle system encapsulating DOX comprising TPGS for its selective anticancer activity and P407 conjugated with folic acid (FA for folate-mediated receptor targeting to cancer cells. Methods: FA-functionalized P407 was prepared by carbodiimide crosslinker chemistry. P407-TPGS/FA-P407-TPGS-mixed micelles were prepared by thin-film hydration method. Cytotoxicity of blank micelles, DOX, and DOX-loaded micelles was determined by alamarBlue® assay. Results: The size of micelles was less than 200 nm with encapsulation efficiency of 85% and 73% for P407-TPGS and FA-P407-TPGS micelles, respectively. Intracellular trafficking study using nile red-loaded micelles indicated improved drug uptake and perinuclear drug localization. The micelles show minimal toxicity to normal human cell line WRL-68, enhanced cellular uptake of DOX, reduced drug efflux, increased DOX–DNA binding in SKOV3 and DOX-resistant SKOV3 human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, and enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity as compared to free DOX. Conclusion: FA-P407-TPGS-DOX micelles show potential as a targeted nano-drug delivery system for DOX due to their multiple synergistic factors of selective anticancer

  12. MRI after magnetic drug targeting in patients with advanced solid malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.-J.; Senfft von Pilsach, M.-I.; Felix, R.; Luebbe, A.; Bergemann, C.; Riess, H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to detect magnetic particle uptake into advanced solid malignant tumors and to document the extension of these tumors, carried out in the context of magnetic drug targeting. In a prospective phase I trial, 11 patients were examined with MRI before and after magnetic drug targeting. The sequence protocol included T1-WI and T2-WI in several planes, followed by quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the signal intensities and tumor extensions. In nine patients, a signal decrease was observed in the early follow-up (2-7 days after therapy) on the T2-weighted images; two patients did not show a signal change. The signal changes in T1-WI were less distinct. In late follow-up (4-6 weeks after therapy), signal within nine tumors reached their initially normal level on both T1-WI and T2-WI; two tumors showed a slight signal decrease on T2-WI and a slight signal increase on T1-WI. Within the surveillance period, tumor remission in 3 out of 11 patients was observed, and in 5 patients tumor growth had stopped. The remaining three patients showed significant tumor growth. There was no statistically significant correlation between signal change and response. MRI is a suitable method to detect magnetite particles, deposited at the tumor site via magnetic drug targeting. MRI is therefore eligible to control the success of MDT and to assess the tumor size after the end of therapy. (orig.)

  13. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-04-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood-brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood-brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo.

  14. Drug delivery across length scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcassian, Derfogail; Patel, Asha K; Cortinas, Abel B; Langer, Robert

    2018-02-20

    Over the last century, there has been a dramatic change in the nature of therapeutic, biologically active molecules available to treat disease. Therapies have evolved from extracted natural products towards rationally designed biomolecules, including small molecules, engineered proteins and nucleic acids. The use of potent drugs which target specific organs, cells or biochemical pathways, necessitates new tools which can enable controlled delivery and dosing of these therapeutics to their biological targets. Here, we review the miniaturisation of drug delivery systems from the macro to nano-scale, focussing on controlled dosing and controlled targeting as two key parameters in drug delivery device design. We describe how the miniaturisation of these devices enables the move from repeated, systemic dosing, to on-demand, targeted delivery of therapeutic drugs and highlight areas of focus for the future.

  15. An NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor targeted drug delivery in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayam, Srivardhan Reddy; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Sung, Yi-Ming; Sung, Shuo-Yuan; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this smart biocompatible carrier system showed obvious uptake and consequent release of the drug in tumor cells, could selectively induce the tumor cell death and enhance the capability of inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The controlled drug delivery system demonstrated its use as a potential theranostic material.The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this

  16. Advanced drug and gene delivery systems based on functional biodegradable polycarbonates and copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Cheng, R.; Deng, C.; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers are one of the most promising systems for targeted and controlled drug and gene delivery. They have shown several unique advantages such as excellent biocompatibility, prolonged circulation time, passive tumor targeting via the enhanced permeability and retention

  17. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 (micro)m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 (micro)m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 (micro)m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  18. Internal and External Triggering Mechanism of "Smart" Nanoparticle-Based DDSs in Targeted Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiana, Xian-Ling; Li, Jun; Wei, Ran; Lin, Hui; Xiong, Li-Xia

    2018-05-09

    Anticancer chemotherapeutics have a lot of problems via conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs), including non-specificity, burst release, severe side-effects, and damage to normal cells. Owing to its potential to circumventing these problems, nanotechnology has gained increasing attention in targeted tumor therapy. Chemotherapeutic drugs or genes encapsulated in nanoparticles could be used to target therapies to the tumor site in three ways: "passive", "active", and "smart" targeting. To summarize the mechanisms of various internal and external "smart" stimulating factors on the basis of findings from in vivo and in vitro studies. A thorough search of PubMed was conducted in order to identify the majority of trials, studies and novel articles related to the subject. Activated by internal triggering factors (pH, redox, enzyme, hypoxia, etc.) or external triggering factors (temperature, light of different wavelengths, ultrasound, magnetic fields, etc.), "smart" DDSs exhibit targeted delivery to the tumor site, and controlled release of chemotherapeutic drugs or genes. In this review article, we summarize and classify the internal and external triggering mechanism of "smart" nanoparticle-based DDSs in targeted tumor therapy, and the most recent research advances are illustrated for better understanding. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Lung surfactant microbubbles increase lipophilic drug payload for ultrasound-targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirsi, Shashank R; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y; Mountford, Paul A; Borden, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta(®), Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload.

  20. Canine parvovirus-like particles, a novel nanomaterial for tumor targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destito Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific targeting of tumor cells is an important goal for the design of nanotherapeutics for the treatment of cancer. Recently, viruses have been explored as nano-containers for specific targeting applications, however these systems typically require modification of the virus surface using chemical or genetic means to achieve tumor-specific delivery. Interestingly, there exists a subset of viruses with natural affinity for receptors on tumor cells that could be exploited for nanotechnology applications. For example, the canine parvovirus (CPV utilizes transferrin receptors (TfRs for binding and cell entry into canine as well as human cells. TfRs are over-expressed by a variety of tumor cells and are widely being investigated for tumor-targeted drug delivery. We explored whether the natural tropism of CPV to TfRs could be harnessed for targeting tumor cells. Towards this goal, CPV virus-like particles (VLPs produced by expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a baculovirus expression system were examined for attachment of small molecules and delivery to tumor cells. Structural modeling suggested that six lysines per VP2 subunit are presumably addressable for bioconjugation on the CPV capsid exterior. Between 45 and 100 of the possible 360 lysines/particle could be routinely derivatized with dye molecules depending on the conjugation conditions. Dye conjugation also demonstrated that the CPV-VLPs could withstand conditions for chemical modification on lysines. Attachment of fluorescent dyes neither impaired binding to the TfRs nor affected internalization of the 26 nm-sized VLPs into several human tumor cell lines. CPV-VLPs therefore exhibit highly favorable characteristics for development as a novel nanomaterial for tumor targeting.

  1. Synthesis of star-branched PLA-b-PMPC copolymer micelles as long blood circulation vectors to enhance tumor-targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Li-xia [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Jin, E-mail: zhaojin@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Ke; He, Li-gang; Qian, Xiao-ming; Liu, Chao-yong; Wang, Li-mei; Yang, Xin-qi [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Sun, Jinjin [Department of General Surgery, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300211 (China); Ren, Yu [Tianjin Research Center of Basic Medical Science, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Kang, Chun-sheng, E-mail: kang97061@yahoo.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Yuan, Xu-bo, E-mail: xbyuan@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-09-01

    Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer nanocarriers with high-density zwitterionic shell show great promise in drug delivery due to their controllable small size and excellent anti-biofouling properties. This gives the hydrophobic cargo with high stability and long blood circulation in vivo. In the present study, star-branched polylactic acid and poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) copolymers with (AB{sub 3}){sub 3}–type architecture (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} were conceived as drug vectors, and the copolymers were synthesized by an “arm-first” approach via the combination of ring opening polymerization (ROP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and the click reaction. The self-assembled star-branched copolymer micelles (sCPM) had an average diameter of about 64.5 nm and exhibited an ultra-hydrophilic surface with an ultralow water contact angle of about 12.7°, which efficiently suppressed the adhesion of serum proteins. In vivo experiments showed that the sCPM loading strongly enhanced the blood circulation time of DiI and the plasma half-life of DiI in sCPM was 19.3 h. The relative accumulation concentration in tumor of DiI delivered by sCPM was 2.37-fold higher than that of PLA-PEG, at 4 h after intravenous injection. These results demonstrated that the star-branched copolymer (PLA-b-PMPC{sub 3}){sub 3} is a promising alternative carrier material for intravenous delivery versus classic PEG-modified strategies. - Highlights: • Star-branched amphiphilic copolymer micelles (sCPM) with zwitterionic shells were prepared. • sCPM possess an ultra-hydrophilic surface and thus inhibited the protein absorption. • sCPM can effectively prolong the cargo’s plasma circulation time. • sCPM can enhance the cargo’s passive tumor-targeted delivery.

  2. Hierarchical pulmonary target nanoparticles via inhaled administration for anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Xu, Liu; Fan, Qin; Li, Man; Wang, Jingjing; Wu, Li; Li, Weidong; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Zhipeng

    2017-11-01

    Inhalation administration, compared with intravenous administration, significantly enhances chemotherapeutic drug exposure to the lung tissue and may increase the therapeutic effect for pulmonary anticancer. However, further identification of cancer cells after lung deposition of inhaled drugs is necessary to avoid side effects on normal lung tissue and to maximize drug efficacy. Moreover, as the action site of the major drug was intracellular organelles, drug target to the specific organelle is the final key for accurate drug delivery. Here, we designed a novel multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) for pulmonary antitumor and the material was well-designed for hierarchical target involved lung tissue target, cancer cell target, and mitochondrial target. The biodistribution in vivo determined by UHPLC-MS/MS method was employed to verify the drug concentration overwhelmingly increasing in lung tissue through inhaled administration compared with intravenous administration. Cellular uptake assay using A549 cells proved the efficient receptor-mediated cell endocytosis. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation showed the location of MNPs in cells was mitochondria. All results confirmed the intelligent material can progressively play hierarchical target functions, which could induce more cell apoptosis related to mitochondrial damage. It provides a smart and efficient nanocarrier platform for hierarchical targeting of pulmonary anticancer drug. So far, this kind of material for pulmonary mitochondrial-target has not been seen in other reports.

  3. Recent Trends in Nanotechnology-Based Drugs and Formulations for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Rodriguez, Angel M V; Khandia, Rekha; Munjal, Ashok; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2017-01-01

    In the recent past, a wider spectrum of nanotechnologybased drugs or drug-loaded devices and systems has been engineered and investigated with high interests. The key objective is to help for an enhanced/better quality of patient life in a secure way by avoiding/limiting drug abuse, or severe adverse effects of some in practice traditional therapies. Various methodological approaches including in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo techniques have been exploited, so far. Among them, nanoparticles-based therapeutic agents are of supreme interests for an enhanced and efficient delivery in the current biomedical sector of the modern world. The development of new types of novel, effective and highly reliable therapeutic drug delivery system (DDS) for multipurpose applications is essential and a core demand to tackle many human health related diseases. In this context, nanotechnology-based several advanced DDS have been engineered with novel characteristics for biomedical, pharmaceutical and cosmeceutical applications that include but not limited to the enhanced/improved bioactivity, bioavailability, drug efficacy, targeted delivery, and therapeutically safer with an extra advantage of overcoming demerits of traditional drug formulations/designs. This review work is focused on recent trends/advances in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for targeted therapeutic delivery. Moreover, information is also reviewed and given from recent patents and summarized or illustrated diagrammatically to depict a better understanding. Recent patents covering various nanotechnology-based approaches for several applications have also been reviewed. The drug-loaded nanoparticles are among versatile candidates with multifunctional characteristics for potential applications in biomedical, and tissue engineering sector. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Effect of Chemical Prevention Drugs-based MicroRNAs and Their Target Genes 
on Tumor Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui JIANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemopreventive drugs including natural chemopreventive drugs and synthetic chemopreventive drugs, it not only can prevent cancer, can also play a role in tumor treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs is a kind of short chains of non-coding RNA, regulating the expression of many genes through the way of degradation of mRNA or inhibitting mRNA translation. In recent years, more and more studies have shown that chemopreventive drugs through influence the expression of miRNAs and their target genes play a role in the prevention and treatment in a variety of tumors, and chemopreventive drugs on the experimental study of miRNAs and their target genes in tumor have demonstrated a good safety and efficacy. Effect on chemopreventive drugs-based microRNAs and their target genes into cancer cells will be expected as a new starting point for cancer research. The thesis expounds and analyzes between the natural chemopreventive drugs and synthetic chemopreventive drugs and miRNAs and their target genes in tumor research progress.

  5. Targeting Nanomedicine to Brain Tumors: Latest Progress and Achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Root, Moniek; Lowik, Clemens; Mezzanotte, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Targeting nanomedicine to brain tumors is hampered by the heterogeneity of brain tumors and the blood brain barrier. These represent the main reasons of unsuccessful treatments. Nanomedicine based approaches hold promise for improved brain tissue distribution of drugs and delivery of combination therapies. In this review, we describe the recent advancements and latest achievements in the use of nanocarriers, virus and cell-derived nanoparticles for targeted therapy of brain tumors. We provide successful examples of nanomedicine based approaches for direct targeting of receptors expressed in brain tumor cells or modulation of pathways involved in cell survival as well as approaches for indirect targeting of cells in the tumor stroma and immunotherapies. Although the field is at its infancy, clinical trials involving nanomedicine based approaches for brain tumors are ongoing and many others will start in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Self-assembled Multifunctional DNA Nanoflowers for the Circumvention of Multidrug Resistance in Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lei; Zhu, Guizhi; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Cuichen; Chen, Huapei; Liang, Hao; Cansiz, Sena; Lv, Yifan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    Cancer chemotherapy has been impeded by side effects and multidrug resistance (MDR) partially caused by drug efflux from cancer cells, which call for targeted drug delivery systems additionally able to circumvent MDR. Here we report multifunctional DNA nanoflowers (NFs) for targeted drug delivery to both chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells and circumvent MDR in both leukemia and breast cancer cell models. NFs are self-assembled via liquid crystallization of DNA generated by Rolling Circle Replication, during which NFs are incorporated with aptamers for specific cancer cell recognition, fluorophores for bioimaging, and Doxorubicin (Dox)-binding DNA for drug delivery. NF sizes are tunable (down to ~200 nm in diameter), and the densely packed drug-binding motifs and porous intrastructures endow NFs with high drug loading capacity (71.4%, wt/wt). The Dox-loaded NFs (NF-Dox) are stable at physiological pH, yet drug release is facilitated in acidic or basic conditions. NFs deliver Dox into target chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells, preventing drug efflux and enhancing drug retention in MDR cells. Consequently, NF-Dox induces potent cytotoxicity in both target chemosensitive cells and MDR cells, but not nontarget cells, thus concurrently circumventing MDR and reducing side effects. Overall, these NFs are promising to circumvent MDR in targeted cancer therapy.

  7. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood–brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood–brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood–brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo. PMID:27278929

  8. Digesting a Path Forward: The Utility of Collagenase Tumor Treatment for Improved Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Aaron; Szoka, Francis C

    2018-06-04

    Collagen and hyaluronan are the most abundant components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and their overexpression in tumors is linked to increased tumor growth and metastasis. These ECM components contribute to a protective tumor microenvironment by supporting a high interstitial fluid pressure and creating a tortuous setting for the convection and diffusion of chemotherapeutic small molecules, antibodies, and nanoparticles in the tumor interstitial space. This review focuses on the research efforts to deplete extracellular collagen with collagenases to normalize the tumor microenvironment. Although collagen synthesis inhibitors are in clinical development, the use of collagenases is contentious and clinically untested in cancer patients. Pretreatment of murine tumors with collagenases increased drug uptake and diffusion 2-10-fold. This modest improvement resulted in decreased tumor growth, but the benefits of collagenase treatment are confounded by risks of toxicity from collagen breakdown in healthy tissues. In this review, we evaluate the published in vitro and in vivo benefits and limitations of collagenase treatment to improve drug delivery.

  9. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  10. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  11. Photopatternable Magnetic Hollowbots by Nd-Fe-B Nanocomposite for Potential Targeted Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to traditional drug administration, targeted drug delivery can prolong, localize, target and have a protected drug interaction with the diseased tissue. Drug delivery carriers, such as polymeric micelles, liposomes, dendrimers, nanotubes, and so on, are hard to scale-up, costly, and have short shelf life. Here we show the novel fabrication and characterization of photopatternable magnetic hollow microrobots that can potentially be utilized in microfluidics and drug delivery applications. These magnetic hollowbots can be fabricated using standard ultraviolet (UV lithography with low cost and easily accessible equipment, which results in them being easy to scale up, and inexpensive to fabricate. Contact-free actuation of freestanding magnetic hollowbots were demonstrated by using an applied 900 G external magnetic field to achieve the movement control in an aqueous environment. According to the movement clip, the average speed of the magnetic hollowbots was estimated to be 1.9 mm/s.

  12. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX by nitroimidazole based sulfamides enhances the therapeutic effect of tumor irradiation: A new concept of dual targeting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, Ludwig; Peeters, Sarah G.J.A.; Kuijk, Simon J.A. van; Yaromina, Ala; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; Saraya, Ruchi; Biemans, Rianne; Rami, Marouan; Parvathaneni, Nanda Kumar; Vullo, Daniela; Vooijs, Marc; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) plays an important role in pH regulation processes critical for tumor cell growth and metastasis. We hypothesize that a dual targeting bioreductive nitroimidazole based anti-CAIX sulfamide drug (DH348) will reduce tumor growth and sensitize tumors to irradiation in a CAIX dependent manner. Material and methods: The effect of the dual targeting anti-CAIX (DH348) and its single targeting control drugs on extracellular acidification and radiosensitivity was examined in HT-29 colorectal carcinoma cells. Tumor growth and time to reach 4× start volume (T4×SV) was monitored for animals receiving DH348 (10 mg/kg) combined with tumor single dose irradiation (10 Gy). Results: In vitro, DH348 reduced hypoxia-induced extracellular acidosis, but did not change hypoxic radiosensitivity. In vivo, DH348 monotherapy decreased tumor growth rate and sensitized tumors to radiation (enhancement ratio 1.50) without systemic toxicity only for CAIX expressing tumors. Conclusions: A newly designed nitroimidazole and sulfamide dual targeting drug reduces hypoxic extracellular acidification, slows down tumor growth at nontoxic doses and sensitizes tumors to irradiation all in a CAIX dependent manner, suggesting no “off-target” effects. Our data therefore indicate the potential utility of a dual drug approach as a new strategy for tumor-specific targeting

  13. Folate-containing reduction-sensitive lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Yu, Ping; Cui, Can; Wu, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Lei; Wang, Cai-Xia; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Huang, Shi-Wen

    2015-04-01

    The development and evaluation of folate-targeted and reduction-triggered biodegradable nanoparticles are introduced to the research on targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). This type of folate-targeted lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (FLPNPs) is comprised of a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core, a soybean lecithin monolayer, a monomethoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-S-S-hexadecyl (mPEG-S-S-C16) reduction-sensitive shell, and a folic acid-targeted ligand. FLPNPs exhibited high size stability but fast disassembly in a simulated cancer cell reductive environment. The experiments on the release process in vitro revealed that as a reduction-sensitive drug delivery system, FLPNPs released DOX faster in the presence of 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). Results from flow cytometry, confocal image and in vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed that FLPNPs further enhanced cell uptake and generated higher cytotoxicity against human epidermoid carcinoma in the oral cavity than non-targeted redox-sensitive and targeted redox-insensitive controls. Furthermore, in vivo animal experiments demonstrated that systemic administration of DOX-loaded FLPNPs remarkably reduced tumor growth. Experiments on biodistribution of DOX-loaded FLPNPs showed that an increasing amount of DOX accumulated in the tumor. Therefore, FLPNPs formulations have proved to be a stable, controllable and targeted anticancer drug delivery system.

  14. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    -templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting....... The study shows that DNA is a highly useful tool for the assembly of proteins with potential therapeutic applications. The DNA-templated protein conjugation shows a promising application in constructing antibody-toxin conjugates or antibody-drug conjugates. In addition, DNA strands used for antibody...... either antibody engineering or special expression systems and are both time and labor consuming. To avoid the drawbacks caused by conventional chemical modification and recombinant methodologies, an ideal site specific conjugation technique would use natural amino acid residues to the protein by a new...

  15. Recent Developments in Active Tumor Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Combination Chemotherapy in Cancer Treatment and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Micah D. K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology and combination therapy are two major fields that show great promise in the treatment of cancer. The delivery of drugs via nanoparticles helps to improve drug’s therapeutic effectiveness while reducing adverse side effects associated with high dosage by improving their pharmacokinetics. Taking advantage of molecular markers over-expressing on tumor tissues compared to normal cells, an “active” molecular marker targeted approach would be beneficial for cancer therapy. These actively targeted nanoparticles would increase drug concentration at the tumor site, improving efficacy while further reducing chemo-resistance. The multidisciplinary approach may help to improve the overall efficacy in cancer therapy. This review article summarizes recent developments of targeted multifunctional nanoparticles in the delivery of various drugs for a combinational chemotherapy approach to cancer treatment and imaging. PMID:26554150

  16. Novel functionalized nanoparticles for tumor-targeting co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA to enhance cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Xia, Tiantian Xu, Changbing Wang, Yinghua Li, Zhengfang Lin, Mingqi Zhao, Bing Zhu Central Laboratory, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Human homeobox protein (Nanog is highly expressed in most cancer cells and has gradually emerged as an excellent target in cancer therapy, owing to its regulation of cancer cell proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. In this study, we prepared tumor-targeting functionalized selenium nanoparticles (RGDfC-SeNPs to load chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOX and Nanog siRNA. Herein, RGDfC peptide was used as a tumor-targeting moiety which could specifically bind to αvβ3 integrins overexpressed on various cancer cells. The sizes of RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX nanoparticles (~12 nm were confirmed by both dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The chemical structure of RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX was characterized via Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX was compacted with siRNA (anti-Nanog by electrostatic interaction to fabricate the RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX/siRNA complex. The RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX/siRNA complex nanoparticles could efficiently enter into HepG2 cells via clathrin-associated endocytosis, and showed high gene transfection efficiency that resulted in enhanced gene silencing. The in vivo biodistribution experiment indicated that RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX/siRNA nanoparticles were capable of specifically accumulating in the tumor site. Furthermore, treatment with RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX/siRNA resulted in a more significant anticancer activity than the free DOX, RGDfC-SeNPs@DOX or RGDfC-SeNPs/siRNA in vitro and in vivo. In summary, this study shows a novel type of DOX and siRNA co-delivery system, thereby providing an alternative route for cancer treatment. Keywords: nanoparticles, tumor targeting, drug delivery, doxorubicin, Nanog siRNA

  17. The neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, as a target for drug delivery and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockolosky, Jonathan T; Szoka, Francis C

    2015-08-30

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-based drugs are arguably the most successful class of protein therapeutics due in part to their remarkably long blood circulation. This arises from IgG interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn. FcRn is the central regulator of IgG and albumin homeostasis throughout life and is increasingly being recognized as an important player in autoimmune disease, mucosal immunity, and tumor immune surveillance. Various engineering approaches that hijack or disrupt the FcRn-mediated transport pathway have been devised to develop long-lasting and non-invasive protein therapeutics, protein subunit vaccines, and therapeutics for treatment of autoimmune and infectious disease. In this review, we highlight the diverse biological functions of FcRn, emerging therapeutic opportunities, as well as the associated challenges of targeting FcRn for drug delivery and disease therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capolla S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Capolla,1 Chiara Garrovo,2 Sonia Zorzet,1 Andrea Lorenzon,3 Enrico Rampazzo,4 Ruben Spretz,5 Gabriele Pozzato,6 Luis Núñez,7 Claudio Tripodo,8 Paolo Macor,1,9 Stefania Biffi2 1Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, 2Institute for Maternal and Child Health – IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, Trieste, 3Animal Care Unit, Cluster in Biomedicine (CBM scrl, Trieste, Italy; 4Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician”, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 5LNK Chemsolutions LLC, Lincoln, NE, USA; 6Department of Medical, Surgery and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy; 7Bio-Target, Inc., University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 8Department of Human Pathology, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 9Callerio Foundation Onlus, Institutes of Biological Researches, Trieste, Italy Abstract: The expectations of nanoparticle (NP-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together

  19. Docetaxel (DTX)-loaded polydopamine-modified TPGS-PLA nanoparticles as a targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dunwan; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Gan; Wang, Teng; Zhang, Linhua; Zeng, Xiaowei; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle (NP) surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed DTX-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized using D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-poly(lactide) (pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs). To target liver cancer cells, galactosamine was conjugated on the prepared NPs (Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs) to enhance the delivery of DTX via ligand-mediated endocytosis. The size and morphology of pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs changed obviously compared with TPGS-PLA/NPs. In vitro studies showed that TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs and Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had similar release profiles of DTX. Both confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometric results showed that coumarin 6-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs had the highest cellular uptake efficiency in liver cancer cell line HepG2. Moreover, DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells more potently than TPGS-PLA/NPs, pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs, and a clinically available DTX formulation (Taxotere®). The in vivo biodistribution experiments show that the Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs are specifically targeted to the tumor. Furthermore, the in vivo anti-tumor effects study showed that injecting DTX-loaded Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs reduced the tumor size most significantly on hepatoma-bearing nude mice. These results suggest that Gal-pD-TPGS-PLA/NPs prepared in the study specifically interacted with the hepatocellular carcinoma cells through ligand-receptor recognition and they may be used as a potentially eligible drug delivery system targeting liver cancers. Polydopamine-based surface modification is a simple way to functionalize polymeric nanoparticle surfaces with ligands and/or additional polymeric layers. In this work, we developed docetaxel (DTX)-loaded formulations using polydopamine-modified NPs synthesized from D-α-tocopherol polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate

  20. An update on anticancer drug development and delivery targeting carbonic anhydrase IX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justina Kazokaitė

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The expression of carbonic anhydrase (CA IX is up-regulated in many types of solid tumors in humans under hypoxic and acidic microenvironment. Inhibition of CA IX enzymatic activity with selective inhibitors, antibodies or labeled probes has been shown to reverse the acidic environment of solid tumors and reduce the tumor growth establishing the significant role of CA IX in tumorigenesis. Thus, the development of potent antitumor drugs targeting CA IX with minimal toxic effects is important for the target-specific tumor therapy. Recently, several promising antitumor agents against CA IX have been developed to treat certain types of cancers in combination with radiation and chemotherapy. Here we review the inhibition of CA IX by small molecule compounds and monoclonal antibodies. The methods of enzymatic assays, biophysical methods, animal models including zebrafish and Xenopus oocytes, and techniques of diagnostic imaging to detect hypoxic tumors using CA IX-targeted conjugates are discussed with the aim to overview the recent progress related to novel therapeutic agents that target CA IX in hypoxic tumors.

  1. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-05-10

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A drug development perspective on targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majety, Meher; Runza, Valeria; Lehmann, Christian; Hoves, Sabine; Ries, Carola H

    2018-02-01

    Despite decades of research, cancer remains a devastating disease and new treatment options are needed. Today cancer is acknowledged as a multifactorial disease not only comprising of aberrant tumor cells but also the associated stroma including tumor vasculature, fibrotic plaques, and immune cells that interact in a complex heterotypic interplay. Myeloid cells represent one of the most abundant immune cell population within the tumor stroma and are equipped with a broad functional repertoire that promotes tumor growth by suppressing cytotoxic T cell activity, stimulating neoangiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Therefore, myeloid cells have become an attractive target for pharmacological intervention. In this review, we summarize the pharmacological approaches to therapeutically target tumor-associated myeloid cells with a focus on advanced programs that are clinically evaluated. In addition, for each therapeutic strategy, the preclinical rationale as well as advantages and challenges from a drug development perspective are discussed. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Combinatorial Approaches for the Identification of Brain Drug Delivery Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Charles C.; Zhang, Xiaobin; Shusta, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a large obstacle for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Targeting endogenous nutrient transporters that transcytose the BBB is one promising approach to selectively and noninvasively deliver a drug payload to the brain. The main limitations of the currently employed transcytosing receptors are their ubiquitous expression in the peripheral vasculature and the inherent low levels of transcytosis mediated by such systems. In this review, approaches designed to increase the repertoire of transcytosing receptors which can be targeted for the purpose of drug delivery are discussed. In particular, combinatorial protein libraries can be screened on BBB cells in vitro or in vivo to isolate targeting peptides or antibodies that can trigger transcytosis. Once these targeting reagents are discovered, the cognate BBB transcytosis system can be identified using techniques such as expression cloning or immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. Continued technological advances in BBB genomics and proteomics, membrane protein manipulation, and in vitro BBB technology promise to further advance the capability to identify and optimize peptides and antibodies capable of mediating drug transport across the BBB. PMID:23789958

  4. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of paclitaxel through multistage tumor-targeting liposomes modified with RGD and KLA peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jiawei Sun,1 Lei Jiang,2 Yi Lin,3 Ethan Michael Gerhard,4 Xuehua Jiang,1 Li Li,3 Jian Yang,4 Zhongwei Gu3 1West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 3National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering Materials Research Institute, The Huck Institutes of The Life Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA Abstract: Mitochondria serve as both “energy factories” and “suicide weapon stores” of cells. Targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs to the mitochondria of tumor cells and tumor vascular cells is a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. Here, multistage tumor-targeting liposomes containing two targeted peptide-modified lipids, cRGD-PEG2000-DSPE and KLA-PEG2000-DSPE, were developed for encapsulation of the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX, RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips. Compared with Taxol (free PTX, RGD/PTX-Lips and KLA/PTX-Lips, the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value of RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips in vitro was 1.9-, 36.7- and 22.7-fold lower with 4T1 cells, respectively, because of higher levels of cellular uptake. Similar results were also observed with human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs. An apoptosis assay showed that the total apoptotic ratio of RGD-KLA/PTX-Lips was the highest because of the mitochondria-targeted drug delivery and the activation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathways, as evidenced by visible mitochondrial localization, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and increased activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3. The strongest tumor growth inhibition (TGI; 80.6% and antiangiogenesis effects without systemic toxicity were also observed in RGD-KLA/PTX-Lip-treated 4T1 tumor xenograft BALB/c mice. In conclusion, these multistage

  5. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta?, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve dr...

  6. Nanodrug-enhanced radiofrequency tumor ablation: effect of micellar or liposomal carrier on drug delivery and treatment efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Moussa

    Full Text Available To determine the effect of different drug-loaded nanocarriers (micelles and liposomes on delivery and treatment efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA combined with nanodrugs.Fischer 344 rats were used (n = 196. First, single subcutaneous R3230 tumors or normal liver underwent RFA followed by immediate administration of i.v. fluorescent beads (20, 100, and 500 nm, with fluorescent intensity measured at 4-24 hr. Next, to study carrier type on drug efficiency, RFA was combined with micellar (20 nm or liposomal (100 nm preparations of doxorubicin (Dox; targeting HIF-1α or quercetin (Qu; targeting HSP70. Animals received RFA alone, RFA with Lipo-Dox or Mic-Dox (1 mg i.v., 15 min post-RFA, and RFA with Lipo-Qu or Mic-Qu given 24 hr pre- or 15 min post-RFA (0.3 mg i.v.. Tumor coagulation and HIF-1α or HSP70 expression were assessed 24 hr post-RFA. Third, the effect of RFA combined with i.v. Lipo-Dox, Mic-Dox, Lipo-Qu, or Mic-Qu (15 min post-RFA compared to RFA alone on tumor growth and animal endpoint survival was evaluated. Finally, drug uptake was compared between RFA/Lipo-Dox and RFA/Mic-Dox at 4-72 hr.Smaller 20 nm beads had greater deposition and deeper tissue penetration in both tumor (100 nm/500 nm and liver (100 nm (p<0.05. Mic-Dox and Mic-Qu suppressed periablational HIF-1α or HSP70 rim thickness more than liposomal preparations (p<0.05. RFA/Mic-Dox had greater early (4 hr intratumoral doxorubicin, but RFA/Lipo-Dox had progressively higher intratumoral doxorubicin at 24-72 hr post-RFA (p<0.04. No difference in tumor growth and survival was seen between RFA/Lipo-Qu and RFA/Mic-Qu. Yet, RFA/Lipo-Dox led to greater animal endpoint survival compared to RFA/Mic-Dox (p<0.03.With RF ablation, smaller particle micelles have superior penetration and more effective local molecular modulation. However, larger long-circulating liposomal carriers can result in greater intratumoral drug accumulation over time and reduced tumor growth. Accordingly

  7. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of a replicating oncolytic adenovirus to tumors using focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Rifai, Bassel; Carlisle, Robert C; Choi, James; Arvanitis, Costas D; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin C

    2013-07-10

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) and ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery are powerful novel technologies. OV selectively self-amplify and kill cancer cells but their clinical use has been restricted by limited delivery from the bloodstream into the tumor. Ultrasound has been previously exploited for targeted release of OV in vivo, but its use to induce cavitation, microbubble oscillations, for enhanced OV tumor extravasation and delivery has not been previously reported. By identifying and optimizing the underlying physical mechanism, this work demonstrates that focused ultrasound significantly enhances the delivery and biodistribution of systemically administered OV co-injected with microbubbles. Up to a fiftyfold increase in tumor transgene expression was achieved, without any observable tissue damage. Ultrasound exposure parameters were optimized as a function of tumor reperfusion time to sustain inertial cavitation, a type of microbubble activity, throughout the exposure. Passive detection of acoustic emissions during treatment confirmed inertial cavitation as the mechanism responsible for enhanced delivery and enabled real-time monitoring of successful viral delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Macrophages with cellular backpacks for targeted drug delivery to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, Natalia L; Polak, Roberta; Haney, Matthew J; Zhao, Yuling; Gomes Neto, Reginaldo J; Hill, Michael C; Kabanov, Alexander V; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Batrakova, Elena V

    2017-09-01

    Most potent therapeutics are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier following systemic administration, which necessitates the development of unconventional, clinically applicable drug delivery systems. With the given challenges, biologically active vehicles are crucial to accomplishing this task. We now report a new method for drug delivery that utilizes living cells as vehicles for drug carriage across the blood brain barrier. Cellular backpacks, 7-10 μm diameter polymer patches of a few hundred nanometers in thickness, are a potentially interesting approach, because they can act as drug depots that travel with the cell-carrier, without being phagocytized. Backpacks loaded with a potent antioxidant, catalase, were attached to autologous macrophages and systemically administered into mice with brain inflammation. Using inflammatory response cells enabled targeted drug transport to the inflamed brain. Furthermore, catalase-loaded backpacks demonstrated potent therapeutic effects deactivating free radicals released by activated microglia in vitro. This approach for drug carriage and release can accelerate the development of new drug formulations for all the neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Polydopamine-Functionalized CA-(PCL-ran-PLA) Nanoparticles for Target Delivery of Docetaxel and Chemo-photothermal Therapy of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Na; Deng, Mei; Sun, Xiu-Na; Chen, Yi-Ding; Sui, Xin-Bing

    2018-01-01

    Current limitations of cancer therapy include the lack of effective strategy for target delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs, and the difficulty of achieving significant efficacy by single treatment. Herein, we reported a synergistic chemo-photothermal strategy based on aptamer (Apt)-polydopamine (pD) functionalized CA-(PCL-ran-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs) for effective delivery of docetaxel (DTX) and enhanced therapeutic effect. The developed DTX-loaded Apt-pD-CA-(PCL-ran-PLA) NPs achieved promising advantages, such as (i) improved drug loading content (LC) and encapsulation efficiency (EE) initiated by star-shaped copolymer CA-(PCL-ran-PLA); (ii) effective target delivery of drugs to tumor sites by incorporating AS1411 aptamers; (iii) significant therapeutic efficacy caused by synergistic chemo-photothermal treatment. In addition, the pD coating strategy with simple procedures could address the contradiction between targeting modification and maintaining formerly excellent bio-properties. Therefore, with excellent bio-properties and simple preparation procedures, the DTX-loaded Apt-pD-CA-(PCL-ran-PLA) NPs effectively increased the local drug concentration in tumor sites, minimized side effects, and significantly eliminated tumors, indicating the promising application of these NPs for cancer therapy. PMID:29527167

  10. Nanoparticle tumor localization, disruption of autophagosomal trafficking, and prolonged drug delivery improve survival in peritoneal mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Colby, Aaron H; Gilmore, Denis; Schulz, Morgan; Zeng, Jialiu; Padera, Robert F; Shirihai, Orian; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-09-01

    The treatment outcomes for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma are poor and associated with high co-morbidities due to suboptimal drug delivery. Thus, there is an unmet need for new approaches that concentrate drug at the tumor for a prolonged period of time yielding enhanced antitumor efficacy and improved metrics of treatment success. A paclitaxel-loaded pH-responsive expansile nanoparticle (PTX-eNP) system is described that addresses two unique challenges to improve the outcomes for peritoneal mesothelioma. First, following intraperitoneal administration, eNPs rapidly and specifically localize to tumors. The rate of eNP uptake by tumors is an order of magnitude faster than the rate of uptake in non-malignant cells; and, subsequent accumulation in autophagosomes and disruption of autophagosomal trafficking leads to prolonged intracellular retention of eNPs. The net effect of these combined mechanisms manifests as rapid localization to intraperitoneal tumors within 4 h of injection and persistent intratumoral retention for >14 days. Second, the high tumor-specificity of PTX-eNPs leads to delivery of greater than 100 times higher concentrations of drug in tumors compared to PTX alone and this is maintained for at least seven days following administration. As a result, overall survival of animals with established mesothelioma more than doubled when animals were treated with multiple doses of PTX-eNPs compared to equivalent dosing with PTX or non-responsive PTX-loaded nanoparticles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, incl...

  12. Influence of vascular normalization on interstitial flow and delivery of liposomes in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Yonucu, Sirin; Yilmaz, Defne; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure is one of the barriers of drug delivery in solid tumors. Recent studies have shown that normalization of tumor vasculature by anti-angiogenic factors may improve the delivery of conventional cytotoxic drugs, possibly by increasing blood flow, decreasing interstitial fluid pressure, and enhancing the convective transvascular transport of drug molecules. Delivery of large therapeutic agents such as nanoparticles and liposomes might also benefit from normalization therapy since their transport depends primarily on convection. In this study, a mathematical model is presented to provide supporting evidence that normalization therapy may improve the delivery of 100 nm liposomes into solid tumors, by both increasing the total drug extravasation and providing a more homogeneous drug distribution within the tumor. However these beneficial effects largely depend on tumor size and are stronger for tumors within a certain size range. It is shown that this size effect may persist under different microenvironmental conditions and for tumors with irregular margins or heterogeneous blood supply. (paper)

  13. Chrono pharmacotherapy: A pulsatile Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronopharmacotherapy refers to a treatment in which controlled drug delivery is achieved according to circadian rhythms of disease by enhancing therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side effects. Colon targeting has gained great importance not only for the treatment of local diseases such as Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease and ulcerative colitis but also very important in systemic delivery of proteins/peptides, antiasthmatic drugs, antidiabetic agents and antihypertensive drugs, which mostly show their efficacy based on circadian rhythms of the body.Colon drug delivery is one of the difficult approaches to achieve the targeted and desired outcomes through pulsatile drug delivery by avoiding dose dumping.The main reasonbehind the use of pulsatile delivery is provision ofconstant drug release where a zero-order release is notpreferred. Chronopharmacotherapy in colon targeting play its role bymany systems such ascapsular systems, pulsatile system and osmotic systems, which are based on use of rupturable membranes and biodegradable polymers.The objective of this review article is to provide latest knowledge about drugs with chrono-pharmacological behavior entails night time dosing specially to the colon.

  14. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shini Feng,1 Huijie Zhang,1 Ting Yan,1 Dandi Huang,1 Chunyi Zhi,2 Hideki Nakanishi,1 Xiao-Dong Gao1 1Key Laboratory of Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, People’s Republic of China Abstract: With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 µg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX, a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. Keywords: boron nitride nanospheres, folic acid, doxorubicin, targeted delivery, cancer therapy

  15. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Areas covered Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Expert opinion Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients. PMID:23930949

  16. pH- and ion-sensitive polymers for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) are important for effective, safe, and convenient administration of drugs. pH- and ion-responsive polymers have been widely employed in DDS for site-specific drug release due to their abilities to exploit specific pH- or ion-gradients in the human body. Having pH-sensitivity, cationic polymers can mask the taste of drugs and release drugs in the stomach by responding to gastric low pH. Anionic polymers responsive to intestinal high pH are used for preventing gastric degradation of drug, colon drug delivery and achieving high bioavailability of weak basic drugs. Tumor-targeted DDSs have been developed based on polymers with imidazole groups or poly(β-amino ester) responsive to tumoral low pH. Polymers with pH-sensitive chemical linkages, such as hydrazone, acetal, ortho ester and vinyl ester, pH-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides and cationic polymers undergoing pH-dependent protonation have been studied to utilize the pH gradient along the endocytic pathway for intracellular drug delivery. As ion-sensitive polymers, ion-exchange resins are frequently used for taste-masking, counterion-responsive drug release and sustained drug release. Polymers responding to ions in the saliva and gastrointestinal fluids are also used for controlled drug release in oral drug formulations. Stimuli-responsive DDSs are important for achieving site-specific and controlled drug release; however, intraindividual, interindividual and intercellular variations of pH should be considered when designing DDSs or drug products. Combination of polymers and other components, and deeper understanding of human physiology are important for development of pH- and ion-sensitive polymeric DDS products for patients.

  17. Efficient payload delivery by a bispecific antibody-drug conjugate targeting HER2 and CD63

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Goeij, Bart E.C.G.; Vink, Tom; Ten Napel, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are designed to be stable in circulation and to release potent cytotoxic drugs intracellularly following antigen-specific binding, uptake, and degradation in tumor cells. Efficient internalization and routing to lysosomes where proteolysis can take place is therefore......, for the first time, that intracellular trafficking of ADCs can be improved using a bsAb approach that targets the lysosomal membrane protein CD63 and provide a rationale for the development of novel bsADCs that combine tumor-specific targeting with targeting of rapidly internalizing antigens. © 2016 American...

  18. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  19. Lactoferrin modified graphene oxide iron oxide nanocomposite for glioma-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Meng-Meng; Xu, Huai-Liang; Liang, Jun-Xing; Xiang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Rui; Shen, Yu-Xian

    2017-08-01

    Targeting delivery of drugs in a specific manner represents a potential powerful technology in gliomas. Herein, we prepared a multifunctional targeted delivery system based on graphene oxide (GO) that contains a molecular bio-targeting ligand and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on the surface of GO for magnetic targeting. Superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was loaded on the surface of GO via chemical precipitation method to form GO@Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposites. Lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-transporting serum glycoprotein that binds to receptors overexpressed at the surface of glioma cells and vascular endothelial cell of the blood brain barrier, was chosen as the targeted ligand to construct the targeted delivery system Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 through EDC/NHS chemistry. With the confirmation of TEM, DLS and VSM, the resulting Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 had a size distribution of 200-1000nm and exhibited a superparamagnetic behavior. The nano delivery system had a high loading capacity and exhibited a pH-dependent release behavior. Compared with free DOX and DOX@GO@Fe 3 O 4 , Lf@GO@Fe 3 O 4 @DOX displayed greater intracellular delivery efficiency and stronger cytotoxicity against C6 glioma cells. The results demonstrated the potential utility of Lf conjugated GO@Fe 3 O 4 nanocomposites for therapeutic application in the treatment of gliomas. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mesoporous Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite composite for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Lina; He, Xiaomei; Wu, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe 3 O 4 /hydroxyapatite composite was synthesized by a simple, efficient and environmental friendly method. • The prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability. • DOX-loaded Fe 3 O 4 /hydroxyapatite composite exhibited surprising slow drug release behavior and pH-dependent behavior. - Abstract: In this contribution, we introduced a simple, efficient, and green method of preparing a mesoporous Fe 3 O 4 /hydroxyapatite (HA) composite. The as-prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability, which made it suitable for targeted drug delivery systems. The chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) was used to investigate the drug release behavior of Fe 3 O 4 /HA composite. The drug release profiles displayed a little burst effect and pH-dependent behavior. The release rate of DOX at pH 5.8 was larger than that at pH 7.4, which could be attributed to DOX protonation in acid medium. In addition, the released DOX concentrations remained at 0.83 and 1.39 μg/ml at pH 7.4 and 5.8, respectively, which indicated slow, steady, and safe release rates. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe 3 O 4 /hydroxyapatite composite could be an efficient platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery

  1. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents.

  2. Modulating the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Tumor Nanomedicine Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines including liposomes, micelles, and nanoparticles based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect have become the mainstream for tumor treatment owing to their superiority over conventional anticancer agents. Advanced design of nanomedicine including active targeting nanomedicine, tumor-responsive nanomedicine, and optimization of physicochemical properties to enable highly effective delivery of nanomedicine to tumors has further improved their therapeutic benefits. However, these strategies still could not conquer the delivery barriers of a tumor microenvironment such as heterogeneous blood flow, dense extracellular matrix, abundant stroma cells, and high interstitial fluid pressure, which severely impaired vascular transport of nanomedicines, hindered their effective extravasation, and impeded their interstitial transport to realize uniform distribution inside tumors. Therefore, modulation of tumor microenvironment has now emerged as an important strategy to improve nanomedicine delivery to tumors. Here, we review the existing strategies and approaches for tumor microenvironment modulation to improve tumor perfusion for helping more nanomedicines to reach the tumor site, to facilitate nanomedicine extravasation for enhancing transvascular transport, and to improve interstitial transport for optimizing the distribution of nanomedicines. These strategies may provide an avenue for the development of new combination chemotherapeutic regimens and reassessment of previously suboptimal agents. PMID:29311946

  3. Emerging Frontiers in Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitt, Mark W; Dahlman, James E; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-27

    Medicine relies on the use of pharmacologically active agents (drugs) to manage and treat disease. However, drugs are not inherently effective; the benefit of a drug is directly related to the manner by which it is administered or delivered. Drug delivery can affect drug pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism, duration of therapeutic effect, excretion, and toxicity. As new therapeutics (e.g., biologics) are being developed, there is an accompanying need for improved chemistries and materials to deliver them to the target site in the body, at a therapeutic concentration, and for the required period of time. In this Perspective, we provide an historical overview of drug delivery and controlled release followed by highlights of four emerging areas in the field of drug delivery: systemic RNA delivery, drug delivery for localized therapy, oral drug delivery systems, and biologic drug delivery systems. In each case, we present the barriers to effective drug delivery as well as chemical and materials advances that are enabling the field to overcome these hurdles for clinical impact.

  4. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  5. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Hagit; Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:18387177

  6. Targeted drug delivery with focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using acoustically-activated nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cherry C; Sheeran, Paul S; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O; Dayton, Paul A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-12-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of an FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. A more homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. © 2013.

  7. Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydd, Janel; Jadia, Rahul; Velpurisiva, Praveena; Gad, Aniket; Paliwal, Shailee; Rai, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells have characteristics of acquired and intrinsic resistances to chemotherapy treatment—due to the hostile tumor microenvironment—that create a significant challenge for effective therapeutic regimens. Multidrug resistance, collateral toxicity to normal cells, and detrimental systemic side effects present significant obstacles, necessitating alternative and safer treatment strategies. Traditional administration of chemotherapeutics has demonstrated minimal success due to the non-specificity of action, uptake and rapid clearance by the immune system, and subsequent metabolic alteration and poor tumor penetration. Nanomedicine can provide a more effective approach to targeting cancer by focusing on the vascular, tissue, and cellular characteristics that are unique to solid tumors. Targeted methods of treatment using nanoparticles can decrease the likelihood of resistant clonal populations of cancerous cells. Dual encapsulation of chemotherapeutic drug allows simultaneous targeting of more than one characteristic of the tumor. Several first-generation, non-targeted nanomedicines have received clinical approval starting with Doxil® in 1995. However, more than two decades later, second-generation or targeted nanomedicines have yet to be approved for treatment despite promising results in pre-clinical studies. This review highlights recent studies using targeted nanoparticles for cancer treatment focusing on approaches that target either the tumor vasculature (referred to as ‘vascular targeting’), the tumor microenvironment (‘tissue targeting’) or the individual cancer cells (‘cellular targeting’). Recent studies combining these different targeting methods are also discussed in this review. Finally, this review summarizes some of the reasons for the lack of clinical success in the field of targeted nanomedicines. PMID:29036899

  8. Targeting Strategies for the Combination Treatment of Cancer Using Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janel Kydd

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells have characteristics of acquired and intrinsic resistances to chemotherapy treatment—due to the hostile tumor microenvironment—that create a significant challenge for effective therapeutic regimens. Multidrug resistance, collateral toxicity to normal cells, and detrimental systemic side effects present significant obstacles, necessitating alternative and safer treatment strategies. Traditional administration of chemotherapeutics has demonstrated minimal success due to the non-specificity of action, uptake and rapid clearance by the immune system, and subsequent metabolic alteration and poor tumor penetration. Nanomedicine can provide a more effective approach to targeting cancer by focusing on the vascular, tissue, and cellular characteristics that are unique to solid tumors. Targeted methods of treatment using nanoparticles can decrease the likelihood of resistant clonal populations of cancerous cells. Dual encapsulation of chemotherapeutic drug allows simultaneous targeting of more than one characteristic of the tumor. Several first-generation, non-targeted nanomedicines have received clinical approval starting with Doxil® in 1995. However, more than two decades later, second-generation or targeted nanomedicines have yet to be approved for treatment despite promising results in pre-clinical studies. This review highlights recent studies using targeted nanoparticles for cancer treatment focusing on approaches that target either the tumor vasculature (referred to as ‘vascular targeting’, the tumor microenvironment (‘tissue targeting’ or the individual cancer cells (‘cellular targeting’. Recent studies combining these different targeting methods are also discussed in this review. Finally, this review summarizes some of the reasons for the lack of clinical success in the field of targeted nanomedicines.

  9. Image-guided drug delivery: preclinical applications and clinical translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ojha, Tarun; Rizzo, Larissa; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2015-01-01

    Image-guided drug delivery refers to the combination of drug targeting and imaging. Preclinically, image-guided drug delivery can be used for several different purposes, including for monitoring biodistribution, target site accumulation, off-target localization, drug release and drug efficacy.

  10. Newly engineered magnetic erythrocytes for sustained and targeted delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Cinti

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy of cancer is limited by serious, sometimes life-threatening, side effects that arise from toxicities to sensitive normal cells because the therapies are not selective for malignant cells. So how can they be selectively improved? Alternative pharmaceutical formulations of anti-cancer agents have been investigated in order to improve conventional chemotherapy treatment. These formulations are associated with problems like severe toxic side effects on healthy organs, drug resistance and limited access of the drug to the tumor sites suggested the need to focus on site-specific controlled drug delivery systems. In response to these concerns, we have developed a new drug delivery system based on magnetic erythrocytes engineered with a viral spike fusion protein. This new erythrocyte-based drug delivery system has the potential for magnetic-controlled site-specific localization and highly efficient fusion capability with the targeted cells. Here we show that the erythro-magneto-HA virosomes drug delivery system is able to attach and fuse with the target cells and to efficiently release therapeutic compounds inside the cells. The efficacy of the anti-cancer drug employed is increased and the dose required is 10 time less than that needed with conventional therapy.

  11. Newly Engineered Magnetic Erythrocytes for Sustained and Targeted Delivery of Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranta, Monia; Naldi, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy of cancer is limited by serious, sometimes life-threatening, side effects that arise from toxicities to sensitive normal cells because the therapies are not selective for malignant cells. So how can they be selectively improved? Alternative pharmaceutical formulations of anti-cancer agents have been investigated in order to improve conventional chemotherapy treatment. These formulations are associated with problems like severe toxic side effects on healthy organs, drug resistance and limited access of the drug to the tumor sites suggested the need to focus on site-specific controlled drug delivery systems. In response to these concerns, we have developed a new drug delivery system based on magnetic erythrocytes engineered with a viral spike fusion protein. This new erythrocyte-based drug delivery system has the potential for magnetic-controlled site-specific localization and highly efficient fusion capability with the targeted cells. Here we show that the erythro-magneto-HA virosomes drug delivery system is able to attach and fuse with the target cells and to efficiently release therapeutic compounds inside the cells. The efficacy of the anti-cancer drug employed is increased and the dose required is 10 time less than that needed with conventional therapy. PMID:21373641

  12. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Jao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based polymers compared to synthetic polymers have the advantages of good biocompatibility, biodegradability, environmental sustainability, cost effectiveness and availability. This review addresses the sources of protein-based polymers, compares the similarity and differences, and highlights characteristic properties and functionality of these protein materials for sustained and controlled drug release. Targeted drug delivery using highly functional multicomponent protein composites to guide active drugs to the site of interest will also be discussed. A systematical elucidation of drug-delivery efficiency in the case of molecular weight, particle size, shape, morphology, and porosity of materials will then be demonstrated to achieve increased drug absorption. Finally, several important biomedical applications of protein-based materials with drug-delivery function—including bone healing, antibiotic release, wound healing, and corneal regeneration, as well as diabetes, neuroinflammation and cancer treatments—are summarized at the end of this review.

  13. Nanomedicine: towards development of patient-friendly drug-delivery systems for oncological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ramya Ranganathan1,*, Shruthilaya Madanmohan1,*, Akila Kesavan1, Ganga Baskar1, Yoganathan Ramia Krishnamoorthy2, Roy Santosham3, D Ponraju4, Suresh Kumar Rayala2, Ganesh Venkatraman1 1Department of Human Genetics, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, 2Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, 3Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Sri Ramachandra University, Porur, Chennai, 4Safety Engineering Division, Nuclear and Engineering Safety Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, India*Authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The focus on nanotechnology in cancer treatment and diagnosis has intensified due to the serious side effects caused by anticancer agents as a result of their cytotoxic actions on normal cells. This nonspecific action of chemotherapy has awakened a need for formulations capable of definitive targeting with enhanced tumor-killing. Nanooncology, the application of nanobiotechnology to the management of cancer, is currently the most important area of nanomedicine. Currently several nanomaterial-based drug-delivery systems are in vogue and several others are in various stages of development. Tumor-targeted drug-delivery systems are envisioned as magic bullets for cancer therapy and several groups are working globally for development of robust systems.Keywords: patient-friendly, drug-delivery systems, cancer, nanomedicine

  14. Quantification of drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in rabbit liver and tumor after in vivo administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Rainer; Jurgons, Roland; Lyer, Stefan; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Richter, Heike; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: C.Alexiou@web.de

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is imminent in medical research, especially for treating cancer and vascular diseases. We used drug-labeled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were attracted to an experimental tumor in rabbits with an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting, MDT). Aim of this study was to detect and quantify the biodistribution of the magnetic nanoparticles by magnetorelaxometry. The study shows higher amount of nanoparticles in the tumor after intraarterial application and MDT compared to intravenous administration.

  15. Characterizing EPR-mediated passive drug targeting using contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theek, Benjamin; Gremse, Felix; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Fokong, Stanley; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Deckers, Roel; Storm, Gert; Ehling, Josef; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2014-05-28

    The Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect is extensively used in drug delivery research. Taking into account that EPR is a highly variable phenomenon, we have here set out to evaluate if contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound (ceUS) imaging can be employed to characterize EPR-mediated passive drug targeting to tumors. Using standard fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and two different protocols for hybrid computed tomography-fluorescence molecular tomography (CT-FMT), the tumor accumulation of a ~10 nm-sized near-infrared-fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) was evaluated in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. In the same set of animals, two different ceUS techniques (2D MIOT and 3D B-mode imaging) were employed to assess tumor vascularization. Subsequently, the degree of tumor vascularization was correlated with the degree of EPR-mediated drug targeting. Depending on the optical imaging protocol used, the tumor accumulation of the polymeric drug carrier ranged from 5 to 12% of the injected dose. The degree of tumor vascularization, determined using ceUS, varied from 4 to 11%. For both hybrid CT-FMT protocols, a good correlation between the degree of tumor vascularization and the degree of tumor accumulation was observed, within the case of reconstructed CT-FMT, correlation coefficients of ~0.8 and p-values of EPR, and potentially also to pre-select patients likely to respond to passively tumor-targeted nanomedicine treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Goeun; Piao, Huiyan; Alothman, Zeid A; Vinu, Ajayan; Yun, Chae-Ok; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection.

  17. Transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Langer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery has made an important contribution to medical practice, but has yet to fully achieve its potential as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. First-generation transdermal delivery systems have continued their steady increase in clinical use for delivery of small, lipophilic, low-dose drugs. Second-generation delivery systems using chemical enhancers, non-cavitational ultrasound and iontophoresis have also resulted in clinical products; the ability of iontophoresis to control delivery rates in real time provides added functionality. Third-generation delivery systems target their effects to skin’s barrier layer of stratum corneum using microneedles, thermal ablation, microdermabrasion, electroporation and cavitational ultrasound. Microneedles and thermal ablation are currently progressing through clinical trials for delivery of macromolecules and vaccines, such as insulin, parathyroid hormone and influenza vaccine. Using these novel second- and third-generation enhancement strategies, transdermal delivery is poised to significantly increase impact on medicine. PMID:18997767

  18. Aptamer-Gated Nanoparticles for Smart Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Avni Oktem

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are functional nucleic acid sequences which can bind specific targets. An artificial combinatorial methodology can identify aptamer sequences for any target molecule, from ions to whole cells. Drug delivery systems seek to increase efficacy and reduce side-effects by concentrating the therapeutic agents at specific disease sites in the body. This is generally achieved by specific targeting of inactivated drug molecules. Aptamers which can bind to various cancer cell types selectively and with high affinity have been exploited in a variety of drug delivery systems for therapeutic purposes. Recent progress in selection of cell-specific aptamers has provided new opportunities in targeted drug delivery. Especially functionalization of nanoparticles with such aptamers has drawn major attention in the biosensor and biomedical areas. Moreover, nucleic acids are recognized as an attractive building materials in nanomachines because of their unique molecular recognition properties and structural features. A active controlled delivery of drugs once targeted to a disease site is a major research challenge. Stimuli-responsive gating is one way of achieving controlled release of nanoparticle cargoes. Recent reports incorporate the structural properties of aptamers in controlled release systems of drug delivering nanoparticles. In this review, the strategies for using functional nucleic acids in creating smart drug delivery devices will be explained. The main focus will be on aptamer-incorporated nanoparticle systems for drug delivery purposes in order to assess the future potential of aptamers in the therapeutic area. Special emphasis will be given to the very recent progress in controlled drug release based on molecular gating achieved with aptamers.

  19. Towards antibody-drug conjugates and prodrug strategies with extracellular stimuli-responsive drug delivery in the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Nicolas; Denevault-Sabourin, Caroline; Bryden, Francesca; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude

    2017-12-15

    The design of innovative anticancer chemotherapies with superior antitumor efficacy and reduced toxicity continues to be a challenging endeavor. Recently, the success of Adcetris ® and Kadcyla ® made antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) serious contenders to reach the envied status of Paul Ehrlich's "magic bullet". However, ADCs classically target overexpressed and internalizing antigens at the surface of cancer cells, and in solid tumors are associated with poor tumor penetration, insufficient targeting in heterogeneous tumors, and appearance of several resistance mechanisms. In this context, alternative non-internalizing ADCs and prodrugs have been developed to circumvent these limitations, in which the drug can be selectively released by an extracellular stimulus in the tumor microenvironment. Each strategy and method of activation will be discussed as potential alternatives to internalizing ADCs for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Cyclic hexapeptide-conjugated nanoparticles enhance curcumin delivery to glioma tumor cells and tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Xuemei Zhang,1–3 Xuejuan Li,1,4 Hongchen Hua,1 Aiping Wang,1 Wanhui Liu,1–3 Youxin Li,1–3 Fenghua Fu,1–3 Yanan Shi,5 Kaoxiang Sun1 1School of Pharmacy, Yantai University, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Long-acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Luye Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 4National Engineering and Technology Research Center of Chirality Pharmaceutical, Lunan Pharmaceutical Group Co., Ltd., Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 5School of Pharmacy, Binzhou Medical University, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glioma has one of the highest mortality rates among primary brain tumors. The clinical treatment for glioma is very difficult due to its infiltration and specific growth locations. To achieve improved drug delivery to a brain tumor, we report the preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-NPs. The cyclic hexapeptide c(RGDf(N-meVK-C (cHP has increased affinity for cells that overexpress integrins and was designed to target Cur-NPs to tumors. Functional polyethyleneglycol-modified poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PEG-PLGA conjugated to cHP was synthesized, and targeted Cur-NPs were prepared using a self-assembly nanoprecipitation process. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro cytotoxicity, accuracy, and penetration capabilities of Cur-NPs targeting cells with high levels of integrin expression were investigated. The in vivo targeting and penetration capabilities of the NPs were also evaluated against glioma in rats using in vivo imaging equipment. The results showed that the in vitro cytotoxicity of the targeted cHP-modified curcumin nanoparticles (cHP/Cur-NPs was higher than that of either free curcumin or non-targeted Cur-NPs due to the superior ability of the cHP/Cur-NPs to target tumor cells

  1. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Baljit

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. In this review we discussed recent developments in nanotechnology for drug delivery. To overcome the problems of gene and drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different compositions and biological properties have been extensively investigated for drug and gene delivery applications. To achieve efficient drug delivery it is important to understand the interactions of nanomaterials with the biological environment, targeting cell-surface receptors, drug release, multiple drug administration, stability of therapeutic agents and molecular mechanisms of cell signalling involved in pathobiology of the disease under consideration. Several anti-cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and dexamethasone have been successfully formulated using nanomaterials. Quantom dots, chitosan, Polylactic/glycolic acid (PLGA and PLGA-based nanoparticles have also been used for in vitro RNAi delivery. Brain cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to detect and treat mainly because of the difficulty in getting imaging and therapeutic agents past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Anti-cancer drugs such as loperamide and doxorubicin bound to nanomaterials have been shown to cross the intact blood-brain barrier and released at therapeutic concentrations in the brain. The use of nanomaterials including peptide-based nanotubes to target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptor and cell adhesion molecules like integrins, cadherins and selectins, is a new approach to control disease progression.

  2. Identification of novel small-molecule Ulex europaeus I mimetics for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashin, Christa; Spindler, Lisa; Russell, Shannon; Schink, Amy; Lambkin, Imelda; O'Mahony, Daniel; Houghten, Richard; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2003-11-17

    Lectin mimetics have been identified that may have potential application towards targeted drug delivery. Synthetic multivalent polygalloyl constructs effectively competed with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) for binding to intestinal Caco-2 cell membranes.

  3. Microencapsulation: A promising technique for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M N; Hemant, K S Y; Ram, M; Shivakumar, H G

    2010-07-01

    MICROPARTICLES OFFER VARIOUS SIGNIFICANT ADVANTAGES AS DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS, INCLUDING: (i) an effective protection of the encapsulated active agent against (e.g. enzymatic) degradation, (ii) the possibility to accurately control the release rate of the incorporated drug over periods of hours to months, (iii) an easy administration (compared to alternative parenteral controlled release dosage forms, such as macro-sized implants), and (iv) Desired, pre-programmed drug release profiles can be provided which match the therapeutic needs of the patient. This article gives an overview on the general aspects and recent advances in drug-loaded microparticles to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. An appropriately designed controlled release drug delivery system can be a foot ahead towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue, and controlling the rate of drug delivery to the target site. The development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and localize the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. The objective of this paper is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to appreciate the application possibilities of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed.

  4. A33 antibody-functionalized exosomes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin against colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Gao, Yuan; Gong, Chunai; Wang, Zhuo; Xia, Qingming; Gu, Fenfen; Hu, Chuling; Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Huiling; Gao, Shen

    2018-06-20

    Exosomes have emerged as a promising drug carrier with low immunogenicity, high biocompatibility and delivery efficiency. Here in, we isolated exosomes from A33-positive LIM1215 cells (A33-Exo) and loaded them with doxorubicin (Dox). Furthermore, we coated surface-carboxyl superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (US) with A33 antibodies (A33Ab-US), expecting that these A33 antibodies on the surface of the nanoparticles could bind to A33-positive exosomes and form a complex (A33Ab-US-Exo/Dox) to target A33-positive colon cancer cells. The results showed that A33Ab-US-Exo/Dox had good binding affinity and antiproliferative effect in LIM1215 cells, as shown by increased uptake of the complex. In vivo study showed that A33Ab-US-Exo/Dox had an excellent tumor targeting ability, and was able to inhibit tumor growth and prolong the survival of the mice with reduced cardiotoxicity. In summary, exosomes functionalized by targeting ligands through coating with high-density antibodies may prove to be a novel delivery system for targeted drugs against human cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan; Lv, Piping; Wei, Wei; Tao, Shengyang; Hu, Tao; Yang, Jingbang; Meng, Changgong

    2011-10-01

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m2 g - 1, a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g - 1. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  6. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chan; Tao Shengyang; Hu Tao; Yang Jingbang; Meng Changgong; Lv Piping; Wei Wei

    2011-01-01

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m 2 g -1 , a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g -1 . Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  7. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Shu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lu, Yu-Jen [Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33305, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Health Industry and Technology, Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kwei-San, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Tai-Shan, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of

  8. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which ~60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and ~10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, ~90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and ~70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • mGO was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3 O 4 MNP on GO nano-platelets. • mGO was further modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS to synthesize mGOC-PEG. • mGOC-PEG showed higher drug loading of doxorubicin (DOX) than irinotecan. • mGOC-PEG showed pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs. • Magnetic targeting enhanced cytotoxicity of m

  9. Polymeric micelles for drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Abdullah; Xiong, Xiao-Bing; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2007-11-01

    Polymeric micelles are nano-delivery systems formed through self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in an aqueous environment. The nanoscopic dimension, stealth properties induced by the hydrophilic polymeric brush on the micellar surface, capacity for stabilized encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs offered by the hydrophobic and rigid micellar core, and finally a possibility for the chemical manipulation of the core/shell structure have made polymeric micelles one of the most promising carriers for drug targeting. To date, three generations of polymeric micellar delivery systems, i.e. polymeric micelles for passive, active and multifunctional drug targeting, have arisen from research efforts, with each subsequent generation displaying greater specificity for the diseased tissue and/or targeting efficiency. The present manuscript aims to review the research efforts made for the development of each generation and provide an assessment on the overall success of polymeric micellar delivery system in drug targeting. The emphasis is placed on the design and development of ligand modified, stimuli responsive and multifunctional polymeric micelles for drug targeting.

  10. Peptide and protein delivery using new drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish; Jain, Aviral; Gulbake, Arvind; Shilpi, Satish; Hurkat, Pooja; Jain, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnological research sorts protein drug delivery systems by importance based on their various therapeutic applications. The effective and potent action of the proteins/peptides makes them the drugs of choice for the treatment of numerous diseases. Major research issues in protein delivery include the stabilization of proteins in delivery devices and the design of appropriate target-specific protein carriers. Many efforts have been made for effective delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs through various routes of administrations for successful therapeutic effects. Nanoparticles made of biodegradable polymers such as poly lactic acid, polycaprolactone, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), the poly(fumaric-co-sebacic) anhydride chitosan, and modified chitosan, as well as solid lipids, have shown great potential in the delivery of proteins/peptidal drugs. Moreover, scientists also have used liposomes, PEGylated liposomes, niosomes, and aquasomes, among others, for peptidal drug delivery. They also have developed hydrogels and transdermal drug delivery systems for peptidal drug delivery. A receptor-mediated delivery system is another attractive strategy to overcome the limitation in drug absorption that enables the transcytosis of the protein across the epithelial barrier. Modification such as PEGnology is applied to various proteins and peptides of the desired protein and peptides also increases the circulating life, solubility and stability, pharmacokinetic properties, and antigenicity of protein. This review focuses on various approaches for effective protein/peptidal drug delivery, with special emphasis on insulin delivery.

  11. Multifunctional Nanocarriers for diagnostics, drug delivery and targeted treatment across blood-brain barrier: perspectives on tracking and neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrada Giovani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology has brought a variety of new possibilities into biological discovery and clinical practice. In particular, nano-scaled carriers have revolutionalized drug delivery, allowing for therapeutic agents to be selectively targeted on an organ, tissue and cell specific level, also minimizing exposure of healthy tissue to drugs. In this review we discuss and analyze three issues, which are considered to be at the core of nano-scaled drug delivery systems, namely functionalization of nanocarriers, delivery to target organs and in vivo imaging. The latest developments on highly specific conjugation strategies that are used to attach biomolecules to the surface of nanoparticles (NP are first reviewed. Besides drug carrying capabilities, the functionalization of nanocarriers also facilitate their transport to primary target organs. We highlight the leading advantage of nanocarriers, i.e. their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB, a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells surrounding the brain that prevents high-molecular weight molecules from entering the brain. The BBB has several transport molecules such as growth factors, insulin and transferrin that can potentially increase the efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting nanocarriers. Potential treatments for common neurological disorders, such as stroke, tumours and Alzheimer's, are therefore a much sought-after application of nanomedicine. Likewise any other drug delivery system, a number of parameters need to be registered once functionalized NPs are administered, for instance their efficiency in organ-selective targeting, bioaccumulation and excretion. Finally, direct in vivo imaging of nanomaterials is an exciting recent field that can provide real-time tracking of those nanocarriers. We review a range of systems suitable for in vivo imaging and monitoring of drug delivery, with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities based on optical

  12. Protein-gold clusters-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for high drug loading, autonomous gemcitabine/doxorubicin co-delivery, and in-vivo tumor imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Croissant, Jonas G.; Zhang, Dingyuan; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Lu, Jie; Deng, Lin; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2016-01-01

    Functional nanocarriers capable of transporting high drug contents without premature leakage and to controllably deliver several drugs are needed for better cancer treatments. To address this clinical need, gold cluster bovine serum albumin (AuNC@BSA) nanogates were engineered on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for high drug loadings and co-delivery of two different anticancer drugs. The first drug, gemcitabine (GEM, 40 wt%), was loaded in positively-charged ammonium-functionalized MSN (MSN-NH3+). The second drug, doxorubicin (DOX, 32 wt%), was bound with negatively-charged AuNC@BSA electrostatically-attached onto MSN-NH3+, affording highly loaded pH-responsive MSN-AuNC@BSA nanocarriers. The co-delivery of DOX and GEM was achieved for the first time via an inorganic nanocarrier, possessing a zero-premature leakage behavior as well as drug loading capacities seven times higher than polymersome NPs. Besides, unlike the majority of strategies used to cap the pores of MSN, AuNC@BSA nanogates are biotools and were applied for targeted red nuclear staining and in-vivo tumor imaging. The straightforward non-covalent combination of MSN and gold-protein cluster bioconjugates thus leads to a simple, yet multifunctional nanotheranostic for the next generation of cancer treatments.

  13. Protein-gold clusters-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for high drug loading, autonomous gemcitabine/doxorubicin co-delivery, and in-vivo tumor imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Croissant, Jonas G.

    2016-03-23

    Functional nanocarriers capable of transporting high drug contents without premature leakage and to controllably deliver several drugs are needed for better cancer treatments. To address this clinical need, gold cluster bovine serum albumin (AuNC@BSA) nanogates were engineered on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) for high drug loadings and co-delivery of two different anticancer drugs. The first drug, gemcitabine (GEM, 40 wt%), was loaded in positively-charged ammonium-functionalized MSN (MSN-NH3+). The second drug, doxorubicin (DOX, 32 wt%), was bound with negatively-charged AuNC@BSA electrostatically-attached onto MSN-NH3+, affording highly loaded pH-responsive MSN-AuNC@BSA nanocarriers. The co-delivery of DOX and GEM was achieved for the first time via an inorganic nanocarrier, possessing a zero-premature leakage behavior as well as drug loading capacities seven times higher than polymersome NPs. Besides, unlike the majority of strategies used to cap the pores of MSN, AuNC@BSA nanogates are biotools and were applied for targeted red nuclear staining and in-vivo tumor imaging. The straightforward non-covalent combination of MSN and gold-protein cluster bioconjugates thus leads to a simple, yet multifunctional nanotheranostic for the next generation of cancer treatments.

  14. Medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting antineoplastic drugs and invention of boron tracedrugs as innovative future-architectural drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hitoshi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiji

    2010-09-01

    We describe herein for the first time our medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting antineoplastic drugs and boron tracedrugs as newly emerging drug classes. A new area of antineoplastic drugs and treatments has recently focused on neoplastic cells of the tumor environment/microenvironment involving accessory cells. This tumor hypoxic environment is now considered as a major factor that influences not only the response to antineoplastic therapies but also the potential for malignant progression and metastasis. We review our medicinal electronomics bricolage design of hypoxia-targeting drugs, antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, sugar-hybrid hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, and hypoxia-targeting 10B delivery agents, in which we design drug candidates based on their electronic structures obtained by molecular orbital calculations, not based solely on pharmacophore development. These drugs include an antiangiogenic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer TX-2036, a sugar-hybrid hypoxic cell radiosensitizer TX-2244, new hypoxia-targeting indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, and a hypoxia-targeting BNCT agent, BSH (sodium borocaptate-10B)-hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (TPZ) hybrid drug TX-2100. We then discuss the concept of boron tracedrugs as a new drug class having broad potential in many areas.

  15. Lactoferrin bioconjugated solid lipid nanoparticles: a new drug delivery system for potential brain targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Indu; Swami, Rajan; Pooja, Deep; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of drugs to brain is a subtle task in the therapy of many severe neurological disorders. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) easily diffuse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) due to their lipophilic nature. Furthermore, ligand conjugation on SLN surface enhances the targeting efficiency. Lactoferin (Lf) conjugated SLN system is first time attempted for effective brain targeting in this study. Preparation of Lf-modified docetaxel (DTX)-loaded SLN for proficient delivery of DTX to brain. DTX-loaded SLN were prepared using emulsification and solvent evaporation method and conjugation of Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) was attained through carbodiimide chemistry. These lipidic nanoparticles were evaluated by DLS, AFM, FTIR, XRD techniques and in vitro release studies. Colloidal stability study was performed in biologically simulated environment (normal saline and serum). These lipidic nanoparticles were further evaluated for its targeting mechanism for uptake in brain tumour cells and brain via receptor saturation studies and distribution studies in brain, respectively. Particle size of lipidic nanoparticles was found to be optimum. Surface morphology (zeta potential, AFM) and surface chemistry (FTIR) confirmed conjugation of Lf on SLN surface. Cytotoxicity studies revealed augmented apoptotic activity of C-SLN than SLN and DTX. Enhanced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by receptor saturation and uptake studies. Brain concentration of DTX was elevated significantly with C-SLN than marketed formulation. It is evident from the cytotoxicity, uptake that SLN has potential to deliver drug to brain than marketed formulation but conjugating Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) further increased the targeting potential for brain tumour. Moreover, brain distribution studies corroborated the use of C-SLN as a viable vehicle to target drug to brain. Hence, C-SLN was demonstrated to be a promising DTX delivery system to brain as it possessed remarkable biocompatibility, stability and efficacy than

  16. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pectin-based colon-specific drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Shailendra Shukla; Deepak Jain; Kavita Verma; Shiddarth Verma

    2011-01-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery have a great importance in the delivery of drugs for the treatment of local colonic, as well as systemic diseases like Crohn′s disease, ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, amoebiasis, asthma, arthritis and inflammation which can be achieved by targeted delivery of drug to colon. Specific systemic absorption in the colon gave interesting possibilities for the delivery of protein and peptides. It contains relatively less proteolytic enzyme activities in the colon...

  18. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.; Frechet, Jean; Szoka, Francis C.

    2013-01-01

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting

  19. pH-Sensitive nanoparticles as smart carriers for selective intracellular drug delivery to tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Xin; Chen, Jing; Shen, Jian-Min; Zhuang, Ran; Zhang, Shi-Qi; Zhu, Zi-Yun; Ma, Jing-Bo

    2018-05-05

    Herein, a smart pH-sensitive nanoparticle (DGL-PEG-Tat-KK-DMA-DOX) was prepared to achieve the selective intracellular drug delivery. In this nanoparticle, a PEG-grafted cell penetrating peptide (PEG-Tat-KK) was designed and acted as the cell penetrating segment. By introducing the pH-sensitive amide bonds between the peptide and blocking agent (2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride, DMA), the controllable moiety (PEG-Tat-KK-DMA) endowed the nanoparticle with a charge-switchable shell and temporarily blocked penetrating function, thus improving the specific internalization. Besides, dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) used as the skeleton can greatly improve the drug loading because of the highly dendritic framework. Under the stimuli of acidic pH, this nanoparticle exhibited a remarkable charge-switchable property. The drug release showed an expected behavior with little release in the neutral pH media but relatively fast release in the acidic media. The in vitro experiments revealed that the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity were significantly enhanced after the pH was decreased. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor research indicated that the nanoparticle had noteworthy specificity and antitumor efficacy with a tumor inhibition rate of 79.7%. These results verified this nanoparticle could efficiently improve the selective intracellular delivery and possessed a great potential in tumor treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles for local drug delivery using magnetic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo [Instituto Universitario de Investigacion en Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Edif. Inter. II, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Marquina, Clara [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Ciencias, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gabriel Valdivia, J. [Instituto Universitario de Investigacion en Nanociencia de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Edif. Inter. II, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Hospital Clinico Universitario ' Lozano Blesa' , Avda Gomez Laguna, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)] (and others)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates used for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor agents. They can be concentrated on a desired region, reducing collateral effects and improving the efficiency of the chemotherapy. We propose a method in which permanent magnets are implanted by laparoscopic technique directly in the affected organ. This method proposes the use of FeC nanoparticles, which are loaded with doxorubicin and injected intravenously. The particles, once attracted to the magnet, release the drug at the tumor region. This method seems to be more promising and effective than that based on the application of external magnetic fields.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles for local drug delivery using magnetic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Marquina, Clara; Gabriel Valdivia, J.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are good candidates used for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor agents. They can be concentrated on a desired region, reducing collateral effects and improving the efficiency of the chemotherapy. We propose a method in which permanent magnets are implanted by laparoscopic technique directly in the affected organ. This method proposes the use of FeC nanoparticles, which are loaded with doxorubicin and injected intravenously. The particles, once attracted to the magnet, release the drug at the tumor region. This method seems to be more promising and effective than that based on the application of external magnetic fields

  2. Polymeric nanomedicines for image-guided drug delivery and tumor-targeted combination therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lammers, T.; Šubr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel; Hennink, W. E.; Storm, G.; Kiessling, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2010), s. 197-212 ISSN 1748-0132 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : nanomedicine s * drug targeting * polymer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.750, year: 2010

  3. Treatment Efficiency of Free and Nanoparticle-Loaded Mitoxantrone for Magnetic Drug Targeting in Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annkathrin Hornung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Major problems of cancer treatment using systemic chemotherapy are severe side effects. Magnetic drug targeting (MDT employing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION loaded with chemotherapeutic agents may overcome this dilemma by increasing drug accumulation in the tumor and reducing toxic side effects in the healthy tissue. For translation of nanomedicine from bench to bedside, nanoparticle-mediated effects have to be studied carefully. In this study, we compare the effect of SPION, unloaded or loaded with the cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone (MTO with the effect of free MTO, on the viability and proliferation of HT-29 cells within three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that both free MTO, as well as SPION-loaded MTO (SPIONMTO are able to penetrate into tumor spheroids and thereby kill tumor cells, whereas unloaded SPION did not affect cellular viability. Since SPIONMTO has herewith proven its effectivity also in complex multicellular tumor structures with its surrounding microenvironment, we conclude that it is a promising candidate for further use in magnetic drug targeting in vivo.

  4. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lee, Tae Hwa; Willmann, Jugen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB) mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  5. A smart pH-responsive nano-carrier as a drug delivery system for the targeted delivery of ursolic acid: suppresses cancer growth and metastasis by modulating P53/MMP-9/PTEN/CD44 mediated multiple signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Chi, Ting; Li, Tao; Zheng, Guirong; Fan, Lulu; Liu, Yajun; Chen, Xiufen; Chen, Sijia; Jia, Lee; Shao, Jingwei

    2017-07-13

    Ursolic acid (UA) has been recently used as a promising anti-tumor and cancer metastatic chemo-preventive agent due to its low toxicity and liver-protecting property. However, the low bioavailability and nonspecific tumor targeting restrict its further clinical application. To address the problem, a silica-based mesoporous nanosphere (MSN) controlled-release drug delivery system (denoted UA@M-CS-FA) was designed and successfully synthesized, and was functionalized with folic acid (FA) and pH-sensitive chitosan (CS) for the targeted delivery of UA to folate receptor (FR) positive tumor cells. UA@M-CS-FA were spherical with mean diameter below 150 nm, and showed about -20 mV potential. Meanwhile, UA@M-CS-FA exhibited a pH-sensitive release manner and high cellular uptake in FR over-expressing HeLa cancer cells. Also, in vitro cellular assays suggested that UA@M-CS-FA inhibited cancer cell growth, invasion and migration. Mechanistically, UA@M-CS-FA induced cancer cell apoptosis and inhibited migration via cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage, regulating the PARP/Bcl-2/MMP-9/CD44/PTEN/P53. Importantly, in vivo experiments further confirmed that UA@M-CS-FA significantly suppressed the tumor progression and lung metastasis in tumor-bearing nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that UA@M-CS-FA treatment regulated CD44, a biomarker of cancer metastasis. Overall, our data demonstrated that a CS and FA modified MSN controlled-release drug delivery system could help broaden the usage of UA and reflect the great application potential of the UA as an anticancer or cancer metastatic chemopreventive agent.

  6. Folate-modified lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Linhua Zhang,1 Dunwan Zhu,1 Xia Dong,1 Hongfan Sun,1 Cunxian Song,1 Chun Wang,2 Deling Kong1 1Tianjin Key Laboratory of Biomaterials, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid–polymer hybrid drug carrier comprised of folate (FA modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs for sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX. The core-shell NPs consist of 1 a poly(ε-caprolactone hydrophobic core based on self-assembly of poly(ε-caprolactone–poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL-PEG-PCL amphiphilic copolymers, 2 a lipid monolayer formed with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000, 3 a targeting ligand (FA on the surface, and were prepared using a thin-film hydration and ultrasonic dispersion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid monolayer on the hydrophobic polymer core. Physicochemical characterizations of PTX-loaded FLPNPs, such as particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, drug loading content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release, were also evaluated. Fluorescent microscopy proved the internalization efficiency and targeting ability of the folate conjugated on the lipid monolayer for the EMT6 cancer cells which overexpress folate receptor. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of PTX-loaded FLPNPs was lower than that of Taxol®, but higher than that of PTX-loaded LPNPs (without folate conjugation. In EMT6 breast tumor model, intratumoral administration of PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed similar antitumor efficacy but low toxicity compared to Taxol®. More

  7. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Magnetic Particle Imaging for Electromagnetic Navigation in Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Anh; Zhang, Xingming; Hoshiar, Ali Kafash; Yoon, Jungwon

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effective drug carriers. By using electromagnetic actuated systems, MNPs can be controlled noninvasively in a vascular network for targeted drug delivery (TDD). Although drugs can reach their target location through capturing schemes of MNPs by permanent magnets, drugs delivered to non-target regions can affect healthy tissues and cause undesirable side effects. Real-time monitoring of MNPs can improve the targeting efficiency of TDD systems. In this paper, a two-dimensional (2D) real-time monitoring scheme has been developed for an MNP guidance system. Resovist particles 45 to 65 nm in diameter (5 nm core) can be monitored in real-time (update rate = 2 Hz) in 2D. The proposed 2D monitoring system allows dynamic tracking of MNPs during TDD and renders magnetic particle imaging-based navigation more feasible. PMID:28880220

  8. Orally active-targeted drug delivery systems for proteins and peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuying; Yu, Miaorong; Fan, Weiwei; Gan, Yong; Hovgaard, Lars; Yang, Mingshi

    2014-09-01

    In the past decade, extensive efforts have been devoted to designing 'active targeted' drug delivery systems (ATDDS) to improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. Such ATDDS enhance cellular internalization and permeability of proteins and peptides via molecular recognition processes such as ligand-receptor or antigen-antibody interaction, and thus enhance drug absorption. This review focuses on recent advances with orally ATDDS, including ligand-protein conjugates, recombinant ligand-protein fusion proteins and ligand-modified carriers. In addition to traditional intestinal active transport systems of substrates and their corresponding receptors, transporters and carriers, new targets such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and β-integrin are also discussed. ATDDS can improve oral absorption of proteins and peptides. However, currently, no clinical studies on ATDDS for proteins and peptides are underway, perhaps due to the complexity and limited knowledge of transport mechanisms. Therefore, more research is warranted to optimize ATDDS efficiency.

  9. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wenyi Gu,1,2 Chengtie Wu,3 Jiezhong Chen,1 Yin Xiao1 1Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. Keywords: nanoparticles, nanostructured scaffold, cancer bone metastasis, bone diseases, target drug delivery, bone regeneration

  10. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Chan; Tao Shengyang; Hu Tao; Yang Jingbang; Meng Changgong [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Lv Piping; Wei Wei, E-mail: taosy@dlut.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-14

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g{sup -1}. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  11. Targeting Potassium Channels for Increasing Delivery of Imaging Agents and Therapeutics to Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Sanyasihally Ningaraj

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Every year in the US, 20,000 new primary and nearly 200,000 metastatic brain tumor cases are reported. The cerebral microvessels/ capillaries that form the blood–brain barrier (BBB not only protect the brain from toxic agents in the blood but also pose a significant hindrance to the delivery of small and large therapeutic molecules. Different strategies have been employed to circumvent the physiological barrier posed by blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. Studies in our laboratory have identified significant differences in the expression levels of certain genes and proteins between normal and brain tumor capillary endothelial cells. In this study, we validated the non-invasive and clinically relevant Dynamic Contrast Enhancing-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI method with invasive, clinically irrelevant but highly accurate Quantitative Autoradiography (QAR method using rat glioma model. We also showed that DCE-MRI metric of tissue vessel perfusion-permeability is sensitive to changes in blood vessel permeability following administration of calcium-activated potassium (BKCa channel activator NS-1619. Our results show that human gliomas and brain tumor endothelial cells that overexpress BKCa channels can be targeted for increased BTB permeability for MRI enhancing agents to brain tumors. We conclude that monitoring the outcome of increased MRI enhancing agents’ delivery to microsatellites and leading tumor edges in glioma patients would lead to beneficial clinical outcome.

  12. Targeting doxorubicin encapsulated in stealth liposomes to solid tumors by non thermal diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Magdy M; El Gebaly, Reem; Fadel, Maha

    2016-04-05

    The use of liposomes as drug delivery systems is the most promising technique for targeting drug especially for anticancer therapy. In this study sterically stabilized liposomes was prepared from DPPC/Cholesterol/PEG-PE encapsulated doxorubicin. The effect of lyophilization on liposomal stability and hence expiration date were studied. Moreover, the effect of diode laser on the drug released from liposomesin vitro and in vivo in mice carrying implanted solid tumor were also studied. The results indicated that lyophilization of the prepared liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin led to marked stability when stored at 5 °C and it is possible to use the re-hydrated lyophilized liposomes within 12 days post reconstitution. Moreover, the use of low energy diode laser for targeting anticancer drug to the tumor cells is a promising method in cancer therapy. We can conclude that lyophilization of the liposomes encapsulating doxorubicin lead to marked stability for the liposomes when stored at 5 °C. Moreover, the use of low energy diode laser for targeting anticancer drug to the tumor cells through the use of photosensitive sterically stabilized liposomes loaded with doxorubicin is a promising method. It proved to be applicable and successful for treatment of Ehrlich solid tumors implanted in mice and eliminated toxic side effects of doxorubicin.

  13. P-glycoprotein trafficking as a therapeutic target to optimize CNS drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas P; Sanchez-Covarubias, Lucy; Tome, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    The primary function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB)/neurovascular unit is to protect the central nervous system (CNS) from potentially harmful xenobiotic substances and maintain CNS homeostasis. Restricted access to the CNS is maintained via a combination of tight junction proteins as well as a variety of efflux and influx transporters that limits the transcellular and paracellular movement of solutes. Of the transporters identified at the BBB, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has emerged as the transporter that is the greatest obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. In this chapter, we provide data to support intracellular protein trafficking of P-gp within cerebral capillary microvessels as a potential target for improved drug delivery. We show that pain-induced changes in P-gp trafficking are associated with changes in P-gp's association with caveolin-1, a key scaffolding/trafficking protein that colocalizes with P-gp at the luminal membrane of brain microvessels. Changes in colocalization with the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated forms of caveolin-1, by pain, are accompanied by dynamic changes in the distribution, relocalization, and activation of P-gp "pools" between microvascular endothelial cell subcellular compartments. Since redox-sensitive processes may be involved in signaling disassembly of higher-order structures of P-gp, we feel that manipulating redox signaling, via specific protein targeting at the BBB, may protect disulfide bond integrity of P-gp reservoirs and control trafficking to the membrane surface, providing improved CNS drug delivery. The advantage of therapeutic drug "relocalization" of a protein is that the physiological impact can be modified, temporarily or long term, despite pathology-induced changes in gene transcription. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Mullick Chowdhury

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  15. Styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated zinc protoporphyrin as a candidate drug for tumor-targeted therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Liao, Long; Yin, Hongzhuan; Eguchi, Kanami; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated the potential of zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) as an antitumor agent targeting to the tumor survival factor heme oxygenase-1, and/or for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study, to achieve tumor-targeted delivery, styrene-maleic acid-copolymer conjugated ZnPP (SMA-ZnPP) was synthesized via amide bond, which showed good water solubility, having ZnPP loading of 15%. More importantly, it forms micelles in aqueous solution with a mean particle size of 111.6 nm, whereas it has an apparent Mw of 65 kDa. This micelle formation was not detracted by serum albumin, suggesting it is stable in circulation. Further SMA-ZnPP conjugate will behave as an albumin complex in blood with much larger size (235 kDa) by virtue of the albumin binding property of SMA. Consequently, SMA-ZnPP conjugate exhibited prolonged circulating retention and preferential tumor accumulation by taking advantage of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Clear tumor imaging was thus achieved by detecting the fluorescence of ZnPP. In addition, the cytotoxicity and PDT effect of SMA-ZnPP conjugate was confirmed in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Light irradiation remarkably increased the cytotoxicity (IC50, from 33 to 5 μM). These findings may provide new options and knowledge for developing ZnPP based anticancer theranostic drugs.

  16. Intracellular Protein Delivery System Using a Target-Specific Repebody and Translocation Domain of Bacterial Exotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Yeon; Kang, Jung Ae; Ryou, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Gyeong Hee; Choi, Dae Seong; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2017-11-17

    With the high efficacy of protein-based therapeutics and plenty of intracellular drug targets, cytosolic protein delivery in a cell-specific manner has attracted considerable attention in the field of precision medicine. Herein, we present an intracellular protein delivery system based on a target-specific repebody and the translocation domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. The delivery platform was constructed by genetically fusing an EGFR-specific repebody as a targeting moiety to the translocation domain, while a protein cargo was fused to the C-terminal end of the delivery platform. The delivery platform was revealed to efficiently translocate a protein cargo to the cytosol in a target-specific manner. We demonstrate the utility and potential of the delivery platform by showing a remarkable tumor regression with negligible toxicity in a xenograft mice model when gelonin was used as the cytotoxic protein cargo. The present platform can find wide applications to the cell-selective cytosolic delivery of diverse proteins in many areas.

  17. Dendrimers for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Singh Chauhan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers have come a long way in the last 25 years since their inception. Originally created as a wonder molecule of chemistry, dendrimer is now in the fourth class of polymers. Dr. Donald Tomalia first published his seminal work on Poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers in 1985. Application of dendrimers as a drug delivery system started in late 1990s. Dendrimers for drug delivery are employed using two approaches: (i formulation and (ii nanoconstruct. In the formulation approach, drugs are physically entrapped in a dendrimer using non-covalent interactions, whereas drugs are covalently coupled on dendrimers in the nanoconstruct approach. We have demonstrated the utility of PAMAM dendrimers for enhancing solubility, stability and oral bioavailability of various drugs. Drug entrapment and drug release from dendrimers can be controlled by modifying dendrimer surfaces and generations. PAMAM dendrimers are also shown to increase transdermal permeation and specific drug targeting. Dendrimer platforms can be engineered to attach targeting ligands and imaging molecules to create a nanodevice. Dendrimer nanotechnology, due to its multifunctional ability, has the potential to create next generation nanodevices.

  18. Impact of Focused Ultrasound-enhanced Drug Delivery on Survival in Rats with Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Lisa Hsu; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Malignancies of the brain remain difficult to treat with chemotherapy because the selective permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks many potent agents from reaching their target. Previous studies have illustrated the feasibility of drug and antibody delivery across the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound. In this study, we investigated the impact of focused ultrasound-enhanced delivery of doxorubicin on survival in rats with aggressive glioma. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with 9 L gliosarcoma cells in the brain. Eight days after implantation, each rat received one of the following: (1) no treatment (control), (2) a single treatment with microbubble-enhanced MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS only), (3) a single treatment with i.v. liposomal doxorubicin (DOX only), or (4) a single treatment with microbubble-enhanced MRI-guided focused ultrasound and concurrent i.v. injections of liposomal doxorubicin (FUS+DOX). The survival time from implantation to death or euthanasia was recorded. We observed a modest but significant increase in median survival time in rats treated with combined MRI-guided focused ultrasound chemotherapy, compared to chemotherapy alone (p0.10). Our study demonstrates for the first time a therapeutic benefit achieved with ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. This confirmation of efficacy in an in vivo tumor model indicates that targeted drug delivery using MRI-guided focused ultrasound has the potential to have a major impact on the treatment of patients with brain tumors and other neurological disorders.

  19. Recent trends in drug delivery system using protein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripriyalakshmi, S; Jose, Pinkybel; Ravindran, Aswathy; Anjali, C H

    2014-09-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that can facilitate drug formulation and passively target tumours have been under extensive research in recent years. These successes have driven a new wave of significant innovation in the generation of advanced particles. The fate and transport of diagnostic nanoparticles would significantly depend on nonselective drug delivery, and hence the use of high drug dosage is implemented. In this perspective, nanocarrier-based drug targeting strategies can be used which improve the selective delivery of drugs to the site of action, i.e. drug targeting. Pharmaceutical industries majorly focus on reducing the toxicity and side effects of drugs but only recently it has been realised that carrier systems themselves may pose risks to the patient. Proteins are compatible with biological systems and they are biodegradable. They offer a multitude of moieties for modifications to tailor drug binding, imaging or targeting entities. Thus, protein nanoparticles provide outstanding contributions as a carrier for drug delivery systems. This review summarises recent progress in particle-based therapeutic delivery and discusses important concepts in particle design and biological barriers for developing the next generation of particles drug delivery systems.

  20. Effective experimental tumor therapy with targeted polymer drug delivery systems based on HPMA copolymers.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šírová, Milada; Horková, Veronika; Sivák, Ladislav; Etrych, Tomáš; Říhová, Blanka; Studenovský, Martin

    SI (2016), s. 24-24 ISSN 0014-2980. [3rd Meeting of Middle – European Societies for Immunology and Allergology. 01.12.2016-03.12.2016, Budapest ] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12742S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : Tumor therapy * polymer drug * HPMA copolymers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  1. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  2. Polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Ventura, Judy; Zhuang, Jiaming; Thayumanavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we put the spotlight on crosslinked polymer nanogels, a promising platform that has the characteristics of an “ideal” drug delivery vehicle. Some of the key aspects of drug delivery vehicle design like stability, response to biologically relevant stimuli, passive targeting, active targeting, toxicity and ease of synthesis are discussed. We discuss several delivery systems in this light and highlight some examples of systems, which satisfy some or all of these design requirements. In particular, we point to the advantages that crosslinked polymeric systems bring to drug delivery. We review some of the synthetic methods of nanogel synthesis and conclude with the diverse applications in drug delivery where nanogels have been fruitfully employed. PMID:22342438

  3. Self-targeting of TNF-releasing cancer cells in preclinical models of primary and metastatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Dobroff, Andrey S; Marchiò, Serena; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Hosoya, Hitomi; Libutti, Steven K; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-23

    Circulating cancer cells can putatively colonize distant organs to form metastases or to reinfiltrate primary tumors themselves through a process termed "tumor self-seeding." Here we exploit this biological attribute to deliver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), a potent antitumor cytokine, directly to primary and metastatic tumors in a mechanism that we have defined as "tumor self-targeting." For this purpose, we genetically engineered mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (TSA), melanoma (B16-F10), and Lewis lung carcinoma cells to produce and release murine TNF. In a series of intervention trials, systemic administration of TNF-expressing tumor cells was associated with reduced growth of both primary tumors and metastatic colonies in immunocompetent mice. We show that these malignant cells home to tumors, locally release TNF, damage neovascular endothelium, and induce massive cancer cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that such tumor-cell-mediated delivery avoids or minimizes common side effects often associated with TNF-based therapy, such as acute inflammation and weight loss. Our study provides proof of concept that genetically modified circulating tumor cells may serve as targeted vectors to deliver anticancer agents. In a clinical context, this unique paradigm represents a personalized approach to be translated into applications potentially using patient-derived circulating tumor cells as self-targeted vectors for drug delivery.

  4. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pu Shi, Joshua A Gustafson, J Andrew MacKayDepartment of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins.Keywords: polymeric drug carrier, non-polymeric drug carrier, gene delivery, GE drug carriers

  5. Synergistic gene and drug tumor therapy using a chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Chen, Si; Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-06-01

    Co-delivery of gene and drug for synergistic therapy has provided a promising strategy to cure devastating diseases. Here, an amphiphilic chimeric peptide (Fmoc)2KH7-TAT with pH-responsibility for gene and drug delivery was designed and fabricated. As a drug carrier, the micelles self-assembled from the peptide exhibited a much faster doxorubicin (DOX) release rate at pH 5.0 than that at pH 7.4. As a non-viral gene vector, (Fmoc)(2)KH(7)-TAT peptide could satisfactorily mediate transfection of pGL-3 reporter plasmid with or without the existence of serum in both 293T and HeLa cell-lines. Besides, the endosome escape capability of peptide/DNA complexes was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). To evaluate the co-delivery efficiency and the synergistic anti-tumor effect of gene and drug, p53 plasmid and DOX were simultaneously loaded in the peptide micelles to form micelleplexes during the self-assembly of the peptide. Cellular uptake and intracellular delivery of gene and drug were studied by CLSM and flow cytometry respectively. And p53 protein expression was determined via Western blot analysis. The in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo tumor inhibition effect were also studied. Results suggest that the co-delivery of gene and drug from peptide micelles resulted in effective cell growth inhibition in vitro and significant tumor growth restraining in vivo. The chimeric peptide-based gene and drug co-delivery system will find great potential for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Albumin-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maja Thim; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Hvam, Michael Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of a drug is dependent on accumulation at the site of action at therapeutic levels, however, challenges such as rapid renal clearance, degradation or non-specific accumulation requires drug delivery enabling technologies. Albumin is a natural transport protein with multiple ligand...... binding sites, cellular receptor engagement, and a long circulatory half-life due to interaction with the recycling neonatal Fc receptor. Exploitation of these properties promotes albumin as an attractive candidate for half-life extension and targeted intracellular delivery of drugs attached by covalent...... conjugation, genetic fusions, association or ligand-mediated association. This review will give an overview of albumin-based products with focus on the natural biological properties and molecular interactions that can be harnessed for the design of a next-generation drug delivery platform....

  7. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jao, Dave; Xue, Ye; Medina, Jethro; Hu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based pol...

  8. Mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Lina; He, Xiaomei; Wu, Zhenyu, E-mail: zhenyuwuhn@sina.com

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite was synthesized by a simple, efficient and environmental friendly method. • The prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability. • DOX-loaded Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite exhibited surprising slow drug release behavior and pH-dependent behavior. - Abstract: In this contribution, we introduced a simple, efficient, and green method of preparing a mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite. The as-prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability, which made it suitable for targeted drug delivery systems. The chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) was used to investigate the drug release behavior of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/HA composite. The drug release profiles displayed a little burst effect and pH-dependent behavior. The release rate of DOX at pH 5.8 was larger than that at pH 7.4, which could be attributed to DOX protonation in acid medium. In addition, the released DOX concentrations remained at 0.83 and 1.39 μg/ml at pH 7.4 and 5.8, respectively, which indicated slow, steady, and safe release rates. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite could be an efficient platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  9. Spatiotemporal Control of Doxorubicin Delivery from “Stealth-Like” Prodrug Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Li; Schneider, Gregory F.; Campbell, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    In the treatment of cancer, targeting of anticancer drugs to the tumor microenvironment is highly desirable. Not only does this imply accurate tumor targeting but also minimal drug release en route to the tumor and maximal drug release once there. Here we describe high-loading, “stealth-like” doxorubicin micelles as a pro-drug delivery system, which upon light activation, leads to burst-like doxorbicin release. Through this approach, we show precise spatiotemporal control of doxorubicin delivery to cells in vitro. PMID:28937592

  10. [Study on liver targeted drug delivery system of the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yi; Ll, Tong-Hui; Tang, Chen-Kang; Zhu, Zi-Ping; Chi, Qun; Hou, Shi-Xiang

    2005-06-01

    To study the liver targeted drug delivery system of TBMS--the effective anticancer component from Bolbstemma paniculatum, and to discuss the system's function of decreasing toxicity. BCA was used as carrier material. The preparation through overall feedback dynamic techniques. The properties of preparation and toxicology were also technology of nanoparticles was optimized studied. Thenanoparticles' targeting in mice vivo was observed with transmission electron microscopy. The function of decreasing toxicity was researched by the XXTX-2000 automatic quantitative analysis management system. D50 was 0.68 microm. Drug-loading rate and entrapment rate were 37.3% and 88.6% respectively. The release in vitro accorded with Weibull equation. The reaching release balance time and the t 1/2 extended 26 times and 19 times respectively comparing with injection. Nanoparticles mainly distributed in liver tissue. Their toxicity to lung and liver was evidently lower than injection. Nanoparticles' LD50 exceeded injection's by 13.5% and their stimulus was much lower than injection. The TBMS can be targeted to liver by liver targeted drug delivery system. At the same time, the problem about the toxicity hindering clinical application could be solved, which lays the foundation for the further studies on TBMS.

  11. Dual-targeting hybrid nanoparticles for the delivery of SN38 to Her2 and CD44 overexpressed human gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Luo, Huiyan; Cao, Zhong; Chen, Ya; Gao, Jinbiao; Li, Yingqin; Jiang, Qing; Xu, Ruihua; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), particularly of the type with high expression of both human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) and cluster determinant 44 (CD44), is one of the most malignant human tumors which causes a high mortality rate due to rapid tumor growth and metastasis. To develop effective therapeutic treatments, a dual-targeting hybrid nanoparticle (NP) system was designed and constructed to deliver the SN38 agent specifically to human solid gastric tumors bearing excessive Her2 and CD44. The hybrid NPs consist of a particle core made of the biodegradable polymer PLGA and a lipoid shell prepared by conjugating the AHNP peptides and n-hexadecylamine (HDA) to the carboxyl groups of hyaluronic acid (HA). Upon encapsulation of the SN38 agent in the NPs, the AHNP peptides and HA on the NP surface allow preferential delivery of the drug to gastric cancer cells (e.g., HGC27 cells) by targeting Her2 and CD44. Cellular uptake and in vivo biodistribution experiments verified the active targeting and prolonged in vivo circulation properties of the dual-targeting hybrid NPs, leading to enhanced accumulation of the drug in tumors. Furthermore, the anti-proliferation mechanism studies revealed that the inhibition of the growth and invasive activity of HGC27 cells was not only attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of dual-targeting NPs, but also benefited from the suppression of CD44 and Her2 expression by HA and AHNP moieties. Finally, intravenous administration of the SN38-loaded dual-targeting hybrid NPs induced significant growth inhibition of HGC27 tumor xenografted in nude mice compared with a clinical antitumor agent, Irinotecan (CPT-11), and the other NP formulations. These results demonstrate that the designed dual-targeting hybrid NPs are promising for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery to treat human gastric tumors over-expressing Her2 and CD44.Gastric cancer (GC), particularly of the type with high expression of both human epidermal growth factor receptor

  12. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  14. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. The authors have studied the binding of 125 I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind =Ka[Ag total]/1 + Ka[Ag total]. Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10 8 M -1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging

  15. An effective intracellular delivery system of monoclonal antibody for treatment of tumors: erythrocyte membrane-coated self-associated antibody nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lipeng; Han, Lin; Ding, Xiaoling; Xu, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lu, Weiyue; Sun, Jihong; Yu, Lei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yiting

    2017-08-01

    Antibody-based drugs have attracted much attention for their targeting ability, high efficacy and low toxicity. But it is difficult for those intrabodies, a kind of antibody whose targets are intracellular biomarkers, to become effective drugs due to the lack of intracellular delivery strategy and their short circulation time in blood. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), an important biomarker for tumors, is expressed only in cytoplasm instead of on cell membrane. In this study, the anti-hTERT blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), as the model intrabody, was used to prepare nanoparticles (NPs), followed by the encapsulation of erythrocyte membrane (EM), to obtain the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs delivery system. The final NPs showed a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of about 197.3 nm. The in vitro cellular uptake by HeLa cells confirmed that compared with free anti-hTERT mAb, the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a significantly increased uptake by tumor cells. Besides, the pharmacokinetic study confirmed that the EM encapsulation can remarkably prolong the circulation time and increase the area under curve (AUC) of NPs in blood. The EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a remarkably decreased uptake by macrophages than uncoated NPs, which may be responsible for the prolonged circulation time and increased AUC. Furthermore, the frozen section of tumor tissue was performed and proved that the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs can be more effectively accumulated in tumor tissues than the free mAb and uncoated NPs. In summary, this study indicated that EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs are an effective delivery system for the long circulation and intracellular delivery of an intrabody, and make it possible for the intracellular biomarkers to become the potential targets of drugs.

  16. Therapeutic Role and Drug Delivery Potential of Neuroinflammation as a Target in Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhijeet; Chokriwal, Ankit; Sharma, Madan Mohan; Jain, Devendra; Saxena, Juhi; Stephen, Bjorn John

    2017-08-16

    Neuroinflammation, the condition associated with the hyperactivity of immune cells within the CNS (central nervous system), has recently been linked to a host range of neurodegenerative disorders. Targeting neuroinflammation could be of prime importance as recent research highlights the beneficial aspects associated with modulating the inflammatory mediators associated with the CNS. One of the main obstructions in neuroinflammatory treatments is the hindrance posed by the blood-brain barrier for the delivery of drugs. Hence, research has focused on novel modes of transport for drugs to cross the barrier through drug delivery and nanotechnology approaches. In this Review, we highlight the therapeutic advancement made in the field of neurodegenerative disorders by focusing on the effect neuroinflammation treatment has on these conditions.

  17. Ocular drug delivery targeted by iontophoresis in the suprachoroidal space using a microneedle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Hwan; Chiang, Bryce; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2018-05-10

    Treatment of many posterior-segment ocular indications would benefit from improved targeting of drug delivery to the back of the eye. Here, we propose the use of iontophoresis to direct delivery of negatively charged nanoparticles through the suprachoroidal space (SCS) toward the posterior pole of the eye. Injection of nanoparticles into the SCS of the rabbit eye ex vivo without iontophoresis led to a nanoparticle distribution mostly localized at the site of injection near the limbus and 9 mm from the limbus). Iontophoresis using a novel microneedle-based device increased posterior targeting with >30% of nanoparticles in the most posterior region of SCS. Posterior targeting increased with increasing iontophoresis current and increasing application time up to 3 min, but further increasing to 5 min was not better, probably due to the observed collapse of the SCS within 5 min after injection ex vivo. Reversing the direction of iontophoretic flow inhibited posterior targeting, with just ~5% of nanoparticles reaching the most posterior region of SCS. In the rabbit eye in vivo, iontophoresis at 0.14 mA for 3 min after injection of a 100 μL suspension of nanoparticles resulted in ~30% of nanoparticles delivered to the most posterior region of the SCS, which was consistent with ex vivo findings. The procedure was well tolerated, with only mild, transient tissue effects at the site of injection. We conclude that iontophoresis in the SCS using a microneedle has promise as a method to target ocular drug delivery within the eye, especially toward the posterior pole. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery.

  19. Microfabrication for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Brendan; Rubino, Ilaria; Quan, Fu-Shi; Yoo, Bongyoung; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2016-01-01

    This review is devoted to discussing the application of microfabrication technologies to target challenges encountered in life processes by the development of drug delivery systems. Recently, microfabrication has been largely applied to solve health and pharmaceutical science issues. In particular, fabrication methods along with compatible materials have been successfully designed to produce multifunctional, highly effective drug delivery systems. Microfabrication offers unique tools that can tackle problems in this field, such as ease of mass production with high quality control and low cost, complexity of architecture design and a broad range of materials. Presented is an overview of silicon- and polymer-based fabrication methods that are key in the production of microfabricated drug delivery systems. Moreover, the efforts focused on studying the biocompatibility of materials used in microfabrication are analyzed. Finally, this review discusses representative ways microfabrication has been employed to develop systems delivering drugs through the transdermal and oral route, and to improve drug eluting implants. Additionally, microfabricated vaccine delivery systems are presented due to the great impact they can have in obtaining a cold chain-free vaccine, with long-term stability. Microfabrication will continue to offer new, alternative solutions for the development of smart, advanced drug delivery systems. PMID:28773770

  20. High efficiency diffusion molecular retention tumor targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Guo

    Full Text Available Here we introduce diffusion molecular retention (DMR tumor targeting, a technique that employs PEG-fluorochrome shielded probes that, after a peritumoral (PT injection, undergo slow vascular uptake and extensive interstitial diffusion, with tumor retention only through integrin molecular recognition. To demonstrate DMR, RGD (integrin binding and RAD (control probes were synthesized bearing DOTA (for (111 In(3+, a NIR fluorochrome, and 5 kDa PEG that endows probes with a protein-like volume of 25 kDa and decreases non-specific interactions. With a GFP-BT-20 breast carcinoma model, tumor targeting by the DMR or i.v. methods was assessed by surface fluorescence, biodistribution of [(111In] RGD and [(111In] RAD probes, and whole animal SPECT. After a PT injection, both probes rapidly diffused through the normal and tumor interstitium, with retention of the RGD probe due to integrin interactions. With PT injection and the [(111In] RGD probe, SPECT indicated a highly tumor specific uptake at 24 h post injection, with 352%ID/g tumor obtained by DMR (vs 4.14%ID/g by i.v.. The high efficiency molecular targeting of DMR employed low probe doses (e.g. 25 ng as RGD peptide, which minimizes toxicity risks and facilitates clinical translation. DMR applications include the delivery of fluorochromes for intraoperative tumor margin delineation, the delivery of radioisotopes (e.g. toxic, short range alpha emitters for radiotherapy, or the delivery of photosensitizers to tumors accessible to light.

  1. Polyethylene glycol-conjugated chondroitin sulfate A derivative nanoparticles for tumor-targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Young; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Lee, Song Yi; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-10-20

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-decorated chondroitin sulfate A-deoxycholic acid (CSD) nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated for the selective delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to ovarian cancer. CSD-PEG was synthesized via amide bond formation between the NH2 group of methoxypolyethylene glycol amine and the COOH group of CSD. CSD-PEG/DOX NPs with a 247nm mean diameter, negative zeta potential, and >90% drug encapsulation efficiency were prepared. Sustained and pH-dependent DOX release profiles from CSD-PEG NPs were observed in dissolution tests. Endocytosis of NPs by SKOV-3 cells (CD44 receptor-positive human ovarian cancer cells), based on the CSA-CD44 receptor interaction, was determined by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies. PEGylation of NPs also resulted in reduced drug clearance (CL) in vivo and improved relative bioavailability, compared to non-PEGylated NPs, as determined by the pharmacokinetic study performed after intravenous administration in rats. Developed CSD-PEG NPs can be a promising delivery vehicle for the therapy of CD44 receptor-expressing ovarian cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. TNYL peptide functional chitosan-g-stearate conjugate micelles for tumor specific targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen FY

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Feng-Ying Chen,1 Jing-Jing Yan,1 Han-Xi Yi,2 Fu-Qiang Hu,2 Yong-Zhong Du,2 Hong Yuan,2 Jian You,2 Meng-Dan Zhao1 1Women’s Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nowadays, a real challenge in cancer therapy is to design drug delivery systems that can achieve high concentrations of drugs at the target site for improved therapeutic effect with reduced side effects. In this research, we designed and synthesized a homing peptide-(TNYLFSPNGPIA, TNYL modified chitosan-g-stearate (CS polymer micelle (named T-CS for targeting delivery. The peptide displayed specific binding affinity to EphB4 which is a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine protein kinases. The amphiphilic polymer T-CS can gather into micelles by themselves in an aqueous environment with a low critical micelle concentration value (91.2 µg/L and nano-scaled size (82.1±2.8 nm. The drug encapsulation efficiency reached 86.43% after loading the hydrophobic drug doxorubicin (DOX. The cytotoxicity of T-CS/DOX against SKOV3 cells was enhanced by approximately 2.3-fold when compared with CS/DOX. The quantitative and qualitative analysis for cellular uptake indicated that TNYL modification can markedly increase cellular internalization in the EphB4-overexpressing SKOV3 cell line, especially with a short incubation time. It is interesting that relatively higher uptake of the T-CS/DOX micelles by SKOV3 cells (positive-EphB4 than A549 cells (negative-EphB4 was observed when the two cells were co-incubated. Furthermore, in vivo distribution experiment using a bilateral-tumor model showed that there was more fluorescence accumulation in the SKOV3 tumor than in the A549 tumor over the whole experiment. These results suggest that TNYL-modified CS micelles may be promising drug carriers as targeting therapy for the EphB4-overexpressing

  4. Body distributioin of RGD-mediated liposome in brain-targeting drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jing; Chen, DaWei; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, MingXi; Zhao, XiuLi; Chen, Baoyu

    2007-09-01

    RGD conjugation liposomes (RGD-liposomes) were evaluated for brain-targeting drug delivery. The flow cytometric in vitro study demonstrated that RGD-liposomes could bind to monocytes and neutrophils effectively. Ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic, FA) was loaded into liposomes. Rats were subjected to intrastriatal microinjections of 100 units of human recombinant IL-1beta to produce brain inflammation and caudal vein injection of three formulations (FA solution, FA liposome and RGD-coated FA liposome). Animals were sacrificed 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after administration to study the body distribution of the FA in the three formulations. HPLC was used to determine the concentration of FA in vivo with salicylic acid as internal standard. The results of body distribution indicated that RGD-coated liposomes could be mediated into the brain with a 6-fold FA concentration compared to FA solution and 3-fold in comparison to uncoated liposome. Brain targeted delivery was achieved and a reduction in dosage might be allowed.

  5. Captopril improves tumor nanomedicine delivery by increasing tumor blood perfusion and enlarging endothelial gaps in tumor blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; Tuo, Yanyan; Jin, Kai; Luo, Zimiao; Shi, Wei; Mei, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2017-12-01

    Poor tumor perfusion and unfavorable vessel permeability compromise nanomedicine drug delivery to tumors. Captopril dilates blood vessels, reducing blood pressure clinically and bradykinin, as the downstream signaling moiety of captopril, is capable of dilating blood vessels and effectively increasing vessel permeability. The hypothesis behind this study was that captopril can dilate tumor blood vessels, improving tumor perfusion and simultaneously enlarge the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels, therefore enhancing nanomedicine drug delivery for tumor therapy. Using the U87 tumor xenograft with abundant blood vessels as the tumor model, tumor perfusion experiments were carried out using laser Doppler imaging and lectin-labeling experiments. A single treatment of captopril at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly increased the percentage of functional vessels in tumor tissues and improved tumor blood perfusion. Scanning electron microscopy of tumor vessels also indicated that the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels were enlarged after captopril treatment. Immunofluorescence-staining of tumor slices demonstrated that captopril significantly increased bradykinin expression, possibly explaining tumor perfusion improvements and endothelial gap enlargement. Additionally, imaging in vivo, imaging ex vivo and nanoparticle distribution in tumor slices indicated that after a single treatment with captopril, the accumulation of 115-nm nanoparticles in tumors had increased 2.81-fold with a more homogeneous distribution pattern in comparison to non-captopril treated controls. Finally, pharmacodynamics experiments demonstrated that captopril combined with paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles resulted in the greatest tumor shrinkage and the most extensive necrosis in tumor tissues among all treatment groups. Taken together, the data from the present study suggest a novel strategy for improving tumor perfusion and enlarging blood vessel permeability simultaneously in order to improve

  6. Improved Tumor Penetration and Single-Cell Targeting of Antibody-Drug Conjugates Increases Anticancer Efficacy and Host Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Cornelius; Menezes, Bruna; Nessler, Ian; Linderman, Jennifer; Thurber, Greg M

    2018-02-01

    Current antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have made advances in engineering the antibody, linker, conjugation site, small-molecule payload, and drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR). However, the relationship between heterogeneous intratumoral distribution and efficacy of ADCs is poorly understood. Here, we compared trastuzumab and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) to study the impact of ADC tumor distribution on efficacy. In a mouse xenograft model insensitive to trastuzumab, coadministration of trastuzumab with a fixed dose of T-DM1 at 3:1 and 8:1 ratios dramatically improved ADC tumor penetration and resulted in twice the improvement in median survival compared with T-DM1 alone. In this setting, the effective DAR was lowered, decreasing the amount of payload delivered to each targeted cell but increasing the number of cells that received payload. This result is counterintuitive because trastuzumab acts as an antagonist in vitro and has no single-agent efficacy in vivo , yet improves the effectiveness of T-DM1 in vivo Novel dual-channel fluorescence ratios quantified single-cell ADC uptake and metabolism and confirmed that the in vivo cellular dose of T-DM1 alone exceeded the minimum required for efficacy in this model. In addition, this technique characterized cellular pharmacokinetics with heterogeneous delivery after 1 day, degradation and payload release by 2 days, and in vitro cell killing and in vivo tumor shrinkage 2 to 3 days later. This work demonstrates that the intratumoral distribution of ADC, independent of payload dose or plasma clearance, plays a major role in ADC efficacy. Significance: This study shows how lowering the drug-to-antibody ratio during treatment can improve the intratumoral distribution of a antibody-drug conjugate, with implications for improving the efficacy of this class of cancer drugs. Cancer Res; 78(3); 758-68. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  8. Cancer multidrug resistance: mechanisms involved and strategies for circumvention using a drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the principal mechanism by which many cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy, is one of the major obstacles to the successful clinical treatment of various types of cancer. Several key regulators are responsible for mediating MDR, a process that renders chemotherapeutic drugs ineffective in the internal organelles of target cells. A nanoparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) is a potentially promising tool for circumventing such MDR, which can be achieved by targeting tumor cells themselves or tumor endothelial cells that support the survival of MDR cancer cells. The present article discusses key factors that are responsible for MDR in cancer cells, with a specific focus on the application of DDS to overcome MDR via the use of chemotherapy or macromolecules.

  9. Engineering bioceramic microstructure for customized drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco Gomez, Hernando Jose

    One of the most efficient approaches to treat cancer and infection is to use biomaterials as a drug delivery system (DDS). The goal is for the material to provide a sustained release of therapeutic drug dose locally to target the ill tissue without affecting other organs. Silica Calcium Phosphate nano composite (SCPC) is a drug delivery platform that successfully demonstrated the ability to bind and release several therapeutics including antibiotics, anticancer drugs, and growth factors. The aim of the present work is to analyze the role of SCPC microstructure on drug binding and release kinetics. The main crystalline phases of SCPC are alpha-cristobalite (SiO2, Cris) and beta-rhenanite (NaCaPO4, Rhe); therefore, these two phases were prepared and characterized separately. Structural and compositional features of Cris, Rhe and SCPC bioceramics demonstrated a significant influence on the loading capacity and release kinetics profile of Vancomycin (Vanc) and Cisplatin (Cis). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the P-O functional group in Rhe and SCPC has high affinity to the (C=O and N-H) of Vanc and (N-H and O-H) of Cis. By contrast, a weak chemical interaction between the Si-O functional group in Cris and SCPC and the two drugs was observed. Vanc loading per unit surface area increased in the order 8.00 microg Vanc/m2 for Rhe > 4.49 microg Vanc /m2 for SCPC>3.01 microg Vanc /m2 for Cris (pproducts and the released drug did not cause measurable negative effects on the bioactivity of the tested drugs. The therapeutic effects of the SCPC-Cis hybrid were evaluated using a rat model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Animals were treated by either systemic cisplatin injection (sCis), or with SCPC-Cis hybrid placed adjacent (ADJ) to, or within (IT), the tumor. Five days after implantation 50-55% of the total cisplatin loaded was released from the SCPC-Cis hybrids resulting in an approximately 50% decrease in tumor volume compared to

  10. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with folic acid/methionine for active targeted delivery of docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravian P

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pegah Khosravian,1 Mehdi Shafiee Ardestani,2 Mehdi Khoobi,3 Seyed Naser Ostad,4 Farid Abedin Dorkoosh,1 Hamid Akbari Javar,1,* Massoud Amanlou5,6,* 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Radiopharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Biomaterials, 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 5Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, 6Drug Design and Development Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs are known as carriers with high loading capacity and large functionalizable surface area for target-directed delivery. In this study, a series of docetaxel-loaded folic acid- or methionine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (DTX/MSN-FA or DTX/MSN-Met with large pores and amine groups at inner pore surface properties were prepared. The results showed that the MSNs were successfully synthesized, having good pay load and pH-sensitive drug release kinetics. The cellular investigation on MCF-7 cells showed better performance of cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis and an increase in cellular uptake of targeted nanoparticles. In vivo fluorescent imaging on healthy BALB/c mice proved that bare MSN-NH2 are mostly accumulated in the liver but MSN-FA or MSN-Met are more concentrated in the kidney. Importantly, ex vivo fluorescent images of tumor-induced BALB/c mice organs revealed the ability of MSN-FA to reach the tumor tissues. In conclusion, DTX/MSNs exhibited a good anticancer activity and enhanced the possibility of targeted drug delivery for breast cancer. Keywords: targeted delivery, mesoporous silica nanoparticle, folic acid, methionine, docetaxel

  11. Drug delivery approaches for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh SK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Santosh Kumar Singh,1 Shriti Singh,2 James W Lillard Jr,1 Rajesh Singh1 1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Department of Kriya Sharir, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Abstract: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide. The controlled release of drugs to the precise site of the disease using a nanocarrier vehicle increases the therapeutic efficiency of the drugs. Nanotechnology-based approaches used to endorse clinical improvement from a disease also help to understand the interaction of malignant cells with their microenvironment. Receptor-based targeting is another approach for drug delivery which is undergoing clinical trials. Nanoparticles (NPs delivery has been proven to promise high loading capacity, less toxicity, and stability of the drugs or biomolecules compared to traditional chemotherapeutic drugs. The goal of this review is to present the current problems of breast cancer therapy and discuss the NP-based targeting to overcome the hurdles of conventional drug therapy approach. Keywords: breast cancer, nanoparticles, drug delivery systems

  12. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  13. Functionalization of protein-based nanocages for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; van Hest, Jan C M

    2014-07-07

    Traditional drug delivery strategies involve drugs which are not targeted towards the desired tissue. This can lead to undesired side effects, as normal cells are affected by the drugs as well. Therefore, new systems are now being developed which combine targeting functionalities with encapsulation of drug cargo. Protein nanocages are highly promising drug delivery platforms due to their perfectly defined structures, biocompatibility, biodegradability and low toxicity. A variety of protein nanocages have been modified and functionalized for these types of applications. In this review, we aim to give an overview of different types of modifications of protein-based nanocontainers for drug delivery applications.

  14. Tumor-targeted polymeric nanostructured lipid carriers with precise ratiometric control over dual-drug loading for combination therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Tian, Baocheng; Zhang, Jing; Li, Keke; Wang, Lele; Han, Jingtian; Wu, Zimei

    2017-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM) and paclitaxel (PTX) are effective combination anticancer agents against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). At the present time, a main challenge of combination treatment is the precision of control that will maximize the combined effects. Here, we report a novel method to load GEM (hydrophilic) and PTX (hydrophobic) into simplex tumor-targeted nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for accurate control of the ratio of the two drugs. We covalently preconjugated the dual drugs through a hydrolyzable ester linker to form drug conjugates. N -acetyl-d-glucosamine (NAG) is a glucose receptor-targeting ligand. We added NAG to the formation of NAG-NLCs. In general, synthesis of poly(6- O -methacryloyl-d-galactopyranose)-GEM/PTX (PMAGP-GEM/PTX) conjugates was demonstrated, and NAG-NLCs were prepared using emulsification and solvent evaporation. NAG-NLCs displayed sphericity with an average diameter of 120.3±1.3 nm, a low polydispersity index of 0.233±0.04, and accurate ratiometric control over the two drugs. A cytotoxicity assay showed that the NAG-NLCs had better antitumor activity on NSCLC cells than normal cells. There was an optimal ratio of the two drugs, exhibiting the best cytotoxicity and combinatorial effects among all the formulations we tested. In comparison with both the free-drug combinations and separately nanopackaged drug conjugates, PMAGP-GEM/PTX NAG-NLCs (3:1) exhibited superior synergism. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NAG-NLCs exhibited higher uptake efficiency in A549 cells via glucose receptor-mediated endocytosis. This combinatorial delivery system settles problems with ratiometric coloading of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for tumor-targeted combination therapy to achieve maximal anticancer efficacy in NSCLC.

  15. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  16. Fabrication of a nanocarrier system through self-assembly of plasma protein and its tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Guangming; Zhi Feng; Wang Kaikai; Tang Xiaolei; Yuan Ahu; Zhao Lili; Ding Dawei; Hu Yiqiao

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles hold great promise as a nanocarrier system for targeted drug delivery. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of preparing size controllable albumin nanoparticles using the disulfide bond breaking reagent β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME). The results showed that the protein concentration and temperature had positive effects on the sizes of the albumin nanoparticles, while pH had a negative effect on the rate of nanoparticle formation. The addition of β-ME induced changes in HSA secondary structure and exposed the hydrophobic core of HSA, leading to the formation of nanoparticles. Human serum albumin nanoparticles could be internalized by MCF-7 cells and mainly accumulated in cytoplasm. After injection in tumor bearing mice, the HSA nanoparticles accumulated in tumor tissues, demonstrating the targeting ability of the nanoparticles. Therefore, human serum albumin can be fabricated into nanoparticles by breaking the disulfide bonds and these nanoparticles exhibit high tumor targeting ability. Human serum albumin nanoparticles could be ideal for the targeted delivery of pharmacologically active substances.

  17. Advances in nanotechnology-based carrier systems for targeted delivery of bioactive drug molecules with special emphasis on immunotherapy in drug resistant tuberculosis - a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-06-01

    From the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the present day of life, tuberculosis (TB) still is a global health threat with some new emergence of resistance. This type of emergence poses a vital challenge to control TB cases across the world. Mortality and morbidity rates are high due to this new face of TB. The newer nanotechnology-based drug-delivery approaches involving micro-metric and nano-metric carriers are much needed at this stage. These delivery systems would provide more advantages over conventional systems of treatment by producing enhanced therapeutic efficacy, uniform distribution of drug molecule to the target site, sustained and controlled release of drug molecules and lesser side effects. The main aim to develop these novel drug-delivery systems is to improve the patient compliance and reduce therapy time. This article reviews and elaborates the new concepts and drug-delivery approaches for the treatment of TB involving solid-lipid particulate drug-delivery systems (solid-lipid micro- and nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers), vesicular drug-delivery systems (liposomes, niosomes and liposphere), emulsion-based drug-delivery systems (micro and nanoemulsion) and some other novel drug-delivery systems for the effective treatment of tuberculosis and role of immunomodulators as an adjuvant therapy for management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  18. Use of Bifunctional Immunotherapeutic Agents to Target Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Science 270, 1500–1502. 32. Pasqualini , R., Koivunen, E., and Ruoslahti, E. (1997) v integrins as receptors for tumor targeting by circulating ligands...Nat. Biotech- nol. 15, 542–546. 33. Arap, W., Pasqualini , R., and Ruoslahti, E. (1998) Cancer treatment by targeted drug delivery to tumor...Cancer Res. 2, 663–673. 47. Arap, W., Pasqualini , R., and Ruoslahti, E. (1998) Cancer treatment by targeted drug delivery to tumor vasculature in a

  19. Bioresponsive matrices in drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye George JC

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For years, the field of drug delivery has focused on (1 controlling the release of a therapeutic and (2 targeting the therapeutic to a specific cell type. These research endeavors have concentrated mainly on the development of new degradable polymers and molecule-labeled drug delivery vehicles. Recent interest in biomaterials that respond to their environment have opened new methods to trigger the release of drugs and localize the therapeutic within a particular site. These novel biomaterials, usually termed "smart" or "intelligent", are able to deliver a therapeutic agent based on either environmental cues or a remote stimulus. Stimuli-responsive materials could potentially elicit a therapeutically effective dose without adverse side effects. Polymers responding to different stimuli, such as pH, light, temperature, ultrasound, magnetism, or biomolecules have been investigated as potential drug delivery vehicles. This review describes the most recent advances in "smart" drug delivery systems that respond to one or multiple stimuli.

  20. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain : An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics

  1. Nano materials for the Local and Targeted Delivery of Osteoarthritis Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Periyasamy, P.C.; Leijten, J.C.H.; Dijkstra, P.J.; Karperien, M.; Post, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    Nano technology has found its potential in every possible field of science and engineering. It offers a plethora of options to design tools at the nanometer scale, which can be expected to function more effectively than micro- and macro systems for specific applications. Although the debate regarding the safety of synthetic nano materials for clinical applications endures, it is a promising technology due to its potential to augment current treatments. Various materials such as synthetic polymer, biopolymers, or naturally occurring materials such as proteins and peptides can serve as building blocks for adaptive nano scale formulations. The choice of materials depends highly on the application. We focus on the use of nanoparticles for the treatment of degenerative cartilage diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA). Current therapies for OA focus on treating the symptoms rather than modifying the disease. The usefulness of OA disease modifying drugs is hampered by side effects and lack of suitable drug delivery systems that target, deliver, and retain drugs locally. This challenge can be overcome by using nano technological formulations. We describe the different nano drug delivery systems and their potential for cartilage repair. This paper provides the reader basal understanding of nano materials and aims at drawing new perspectives on the use of existing nano technological formulations for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  2. SMART POLYMERS: INNOVATIONS IN NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Apoorva Mahajan; Geeta Aggarwal

    2011-01-01

    Smart polymers are attracting the researchers for development of novel drug delivery systems. Importance of smart polymers is rising day by day as these polymers undergo large reversible, physical or chemical changes in response to small changes in the environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, dual- stimuli, light and phase transition. Smart polymers are representing promising means for targeted drug delivery, enhanced drug delivery, gene therapy, actuator stimuli and protein folders....

  3. Plasmonic nanocarrier grid-enhanced Raman sensor for studies of anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Santiago, Ty; Hepel, Maria

    2017-05-15

    Targeted drug delivery systems using nanoparticle nanocarriers offer remarkable promise for cancer therapy by discriminating against devastating cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs to healthy cells. To aid in the development of new drug nanocarriers, we propose a novel plasmonic nanocarrier grid-enhanced Raman sensor which can be applied for studies and testing of drug loading onto the nanocarriers, attachment of targeting ligands, dynamics of drug release, assessment of nanocarrier stability in biological environment, and general capabilities of the nanocarrier. The plasmonic nanogrid sensor offers strong Raman enhancement due to the overlapping plasmonic fields emanating from the nearest-neighbor gold nanoparticle nanocarriers and creating the enhancement "hot spots". The sensor has been tested for immobilization of an anticancer drug gemcitabine (2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine, GEM) which is used in treatment of pancreatic tumors. The drawbacks of currently applied treatment include high systemic toxicity, rapid drug decay, and low efficacy (ca. 20%). Therefore, the development of a targeted GEM delivery system is highly desired. We have demonstrated that the proposed nanocarrier SERS sensor can be utilized to investigate attachment of targeting ligands to nanocarriers (attachment of folic acid ligand recognized by folate receptors of cancer cells is described). Further testing of the nanocarrier SERS sensor involved drug release induced by lowering pH and increasing GSH levels, both occurring in cancer cells. The proposed sensor can be utilized for a variety of drugs and targeting ligands, including those which are Raman inactive, since the linkers can act as the Raman markers, as illustrated with mercaptobenzoic acid and para-aminothiophenol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydroxycamptothecin-loaded nanoparticles enhance target drug delivery and anticancer effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT has been shown to have activity against a broad spectrum of cancers. In order to enhance its tissue-specific delivery and anticancer activity, we prepared HCPT-loaded nanoparticles made from poly(ethylene glycol-poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate (PEG-PBLG, and then studied their release characteristics, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and anticancer effects. PEG-PBLG nanoparticles incorporating HCPT were prepared by a dialysis method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the shape and diameter of the nanoparticles. The HCPT release characteristics in vitro were evaluated by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC detection method for determining HCPT in rabbit plasma was established. The pharmacokinetic parameters of HCPT/PEG-PBLG nanoparticles were compared with those of HCPT. Results The HCPT-loaded nanoparticles had a core-shell spherical structure, with a core diameter of 200 nm and a shell thickness of 30 nm. Drug-loading capacity and drug encapsulation were 7.5 and 56.8%, respectively. The HCPT release profile was biphasic, with an initial abrupt release, followed by sustained release. The terminal elimination half-lives (t 1/2 β of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 4.5 and 10.1 h, respectively. Peak concentrations (Cmax of HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 2627.8 and 1513.5 μg/L, respectively. The apparent volumes of distribution of the HCPT and HCPT-loaded nanoparticles were 7.3 and 20.0 L, respectively. Compared with a blank control group, Lovo cell xenografts or Tca8113 cell xenografts in HCPT or HCPT-loaded nanoparticle treated groups grew more slowly and the tumor doubling times were increased. The tumor inhibition effect in the HCPT-loaded nanosphere-treated group was significantly higher than that of the HCPT-treated group (p 0.05. Conclusion Compared to the HCPT- and control-treated groups, the HCPT-loaded nanoparticle

  5. Molecular-Targeted Immunotherapeutic Strategy for Melanoma via Dual-Targeting Nanoparticles Delivering Small Interfering RNA to Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yuan; Qiao, Sha; Dai, Yanfeng; Xu, Guoqiang; Dai, Bolei; Lu, Lisen; Yu, Xiang; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhihong

    2017-09-26

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a promising therapeutic target for cancer immunotherapy. Targeted delivery of therapeutic drugs to the tumor-promoting M2-like TAMs is challenging. Here, we developed M2-like TAM dual-targeting nanoparticles (M2NPs), whose structure and function were controlled by α-peptide (a scavenger receptor B type 1 (SR-B1) targeting peptide) linked with M2pep (an M2 macrophage binding peptide). By loading anti-colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (anti-CSF-1R) small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the M2NPs, we developed a molecular-targeted immunotherapeutic approach to specifically block the survival signal of M2-like TAMs and deplete them from melanoma tumors. We confirmed the validity of SR-B1 for M2-like TAM targeting and demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two targeting units (α-peptide and M2pep) in the fusion peptide (α-M2pep). After being administered to tumor-bearing mice, M2NPs had higher affinity to M2-like TAMs than to tissue-resident macrophages in liver, spleen, and lung. Compared with control treatment groups, M2NP-based siRNA delivery resulted in a dramatic elimination of M2-like TAMs (52%), decreased tumor size (87%), and prolonged survival. Additionally, this molecular-targeted strategy inhibited immunosuppressive IL-10 and TGF-β production and increased immunostimulatory cytokines (IL-12 and IFN-γ) expression and CD8 + T cell infiltration (2.9-fold) in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the siRNA-carrying M2NPs down-regulated expression of the exhaustion markers (PD-1 and Tim-3) on the infiltrating CD8 + T cells and stimulated their IFN-γ secretion (6.2-fold), indicating the restoration of T cell immune function. Thus, the dual-targeting property of M2NPs combined with RNA interference provides a potential strategy of molecular-targeted cancer immunotherapy for clinical application.

  6. A Biomimic Reconstituted High-Density-Lipoprotein-Based Drug and p53 Gene Co-delivery System for Effective Antiangiogenesis Therapy of Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qiaohong; Duan, Zhongxiang; Jiao, Guangli; Lei, Jixiao

    2015-07-01

    A biomimic reconstituted high-density-lipoprotein-based drug and p53 gene co-delivery system (rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes) was fabricated as a targeted co-delivery nanovector of drug and gene for potential bladder cancer therapy. Here, CD-PEI was utilized to effectively condense the p53 plasmid, to incorporate the plasmid into rHDL, and to act as an antitumor drug to suppress tumor angiogenesis. The rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, neutral surface charge, and low cytotoxicity in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed that SR-BI-targeted function induced specific cytoplasmic delivery and high gene transfection efficiency in MBT-2 murine bladder cells. In addition, rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes co-delivering CD and p53 gene achieved synergistic angiogenesis suppression by more effectively downregulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein via different pathways in vitro. In vivo investigation on C3H/He mice bearing MBT-2 tumor xenografts revealed that rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes possessed strong antitumor activity. These findings suggested that rHDL/CD-PEI/p53 complexes could be an ideal tumor-targeting system for simultaneous transfer of drug and gene, which might be a new promising strategy for effective bladder cancer therapy.

  7. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  8. Design and syntheses of mono and multivalent mannosyl-lipoconjugates for targeted liposomal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štimac, Adela; Cvitaš, Jelena TrmĿiĿ; Frkanec, Leo; Vugrek, Oliver; Frkanec, Ruža

    2016-09-10

    Multivalent mannosyl-lipoconjugates may be of interest for glycosylation of liposomes and targeted drug delivery because the mannose specifically binds to C-type lectin receptors on the particular cells. In this paper syntheses of two types of novel O-mannosides are presented. Conjugates 1 and 2 with a COOH- and NH2-functionalized spacer and the connection to a lysine and FmocNH-PEG-COOH, are described. The coupling reactions of prepared intermediates 6 and 4 with a PEGylated-DSPE or palmitic acid, respectively, are presented. Compounds 5, mono-, 8, di- and 12, tetravalent mannosyl-lipoconjugates, were synthesized. The synthesized compounds were incorporated into liposomes and liposomal preparations featuring exposed mannose units were characterized. Carbohydrate liposomal quartz crystal microbalance based assay has been established for studying carbohydrate-lectin binding. It was demonstrated that liposomes with incorporated mannosyl-lipoconjugates were effectively recognized by Con A and have great potential to be used for targeted liposomal drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeted radionuclide therapy for solid tumors: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Nardo, Sally J.; De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-01-01

    Although radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been effective in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) as a single agent, solid tumors have shown less clinically significant therapeutic response to RIT alone. The clinical impact of RIT or other forms of targeted radionuclide therapy for solid tumors depends on the development of a high therapeutic index (TI) for the tumor vs. normal tissue effect, and the implementation of RIT as part of synergistic combined modality therapy (CMRIT). Preclinical and clinical studies have provided a wealth of information, and new prototypes or paradigms have shed light on future possibilities in many instances. Evidence suggests that combination and sequencing of RIT in CMRIT appropriately can provide effective treatment for many solid tumors. Vascular targets provide RIT enhancement opportunities and nanoparticles may prove to be effective carriers for RIT combined with intracellular drug delivery or alternating magnetic frequency (AMF) induced thermal tumor necrosis. The sequence and timing of combined modality treatments will be of critical importance to achieve synergy for therapy while minimizing toxicity. Fortunately, the radionuclide used for RIT also provides a signal useful for nondestructive quantitation of the influence of sequence and timing of CMRIT on events in animals and patients. This can be readily accomplished clinically using quantitative high-resolution imaging (e.g., positron emission tomography [PET])

  10. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associ...

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel folic acid receptor-targeted, β-cyclodextrin-based drug complexes for cancer treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Juan Yin

    Full Text Available Drug targeting is an active area of research and nano-scaled drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for the treatment of neoplasms. In this study, a novel cyclodextrin (CD-based nanoparticle drug delivery system has been assembled and characterized for the therapy of folate receptor-positive [FR(+] cancer. Water-soluble folic acid (FA-conjugated CD carriers (FACDs were successfully synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and circular dichroism. Drug complexes of adamatane (Ada and cytotoxic doxorubicin (Dox with FACD were readily obtained by mixed solvent precipitation. The average size of FACD-Ada-Dox was 1.5-2.5 nm. The host-guest association constant K a was 1,639 M(-1 as determined by induced circular dichroism and the hydrophilicity of the FACDs was greatly enhanced compared to unmodified CD. Cellular uptake and FR binding competitive experiments demonstrated an efficient and preferentially targeted delivery of Dox into FR-positive tumor cells and a sustained drug release profile was seen in vitro. The delivery of Dox into FR(+ cancer cells via endocytosis was observed by confocal microscopy and drug uptake of the targeted nanoparticles was 8-fold greater than that of non-targeted drug complexes. Our docking results suggest that FA, FACD and FACD-Ada-Dox could bind human hedgehog interacting protein that contains a FR domain. Mouse cardiomyocytes as well as fibroblast treated with FACD-Ada-Dox had significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, with increased content of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity, indicating a reduced potential for Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that the targeted drug complex possesses high drug association and sustained drug release

  12. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.

    2013-01-17

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013, 5:130-138. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1209 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: Drs Kieler-Ferguson and Fréchet declare no conflicts of interest. Dr Szoka is the founder of a liposome drug delivery company that is not working on any of the compounds mentioned in this article. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Design of colon targeting drug delivery systems using natural polymeric carriers and their evaluation by gamma scintigraphy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.; Sawarkar, S.P.; Deshpande, S.G.; Bajaj, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Of late, there has been a great awareness in the concept of drug targeting and delivery to a specific site (organ, tissue or cell) in the body to maximize therapeutic effect and reduce toxicity. The various approaches of site-specific drug delivery are implantable pumps, adhesive patches impregnated with drugs, vesicle enclosed drugs and drug carriers. Colonic drug delivery is intended for local and systemic treatment in the diseases of colon like inflammatory bowel conditions. Several approaches using viz. pro-drugs, biodegradable polymers and pH sensitive polymer coatings have been used to achieve colonic delivery. Natural polysaccarides like guar gum and pectin are promising candidates because they are susceptible to degradation by colonic bacteria and thus can release the entrapped drug in the colonic region. These indigenous natural polymers are cheaply and readily available. They comprise of polygalactouronic acid and refractory to host enzymes present in the upper gastrointestinal tract and are degraded by the enzymes produced by the colonic microflora. They were evaluated as a colonic carrier using 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) as a model drug. After successful in vitro testing, gamma scintigraphy technique was used to assess in-vivo behavior of the colon specific drug delivery after a coat of Guar gum and Pectin

  14. PET imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-scFv-anti-PSMA lipid nanoparticles (LNPs): Enhanced tumor targeting over anti-PSMA scFv or untargeted LNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Patty; Li, Lin; Chea, Junie; Delgado, Melissa K.; Crow, Desiree; Poku, Erasmus; Szpikowska, Barbara; Bowles, Nicole; Channappa, Divya; Colcher, David; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Shively, John E.; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Single chain (scFv) antibodies are ideal targeting ligands due to their modular structure, high antigen specificity and affinity. These monovalent ligands display rapid tumor targeting but have limitations due to their fast urinary clearance. Methods: An anti-prostate membrane antigen (PSMA) scFv with a site-specific cysteine was expressed and evaluated in a prostate cancer xenograft model by Cu-64 PET imaging. To enhance tumor accumulation, the scFv-cys was conjugated to the co-polymer DSPE-PEG-maleimide that spontaneously assembled into a homogeneous multivalent lipid nanoparticle (LNP). Results: The targeted LNP exhibited a 2-fold increase in tumor uptake compared to the scFv alone using two different thiol ester chemistries. The anti-PSMA scFv-LNP exhibited a 1.6 fold increase in tumor targeting over the untargeted LNP. Conclusions: The targeted anti-PSMA scFv-LNP showed enhanced tumor accumulation over the scFv alone or the untargeted DOTA-micelle providing evidence for the development of this system for drug delivery. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: Anti-tumor scFv antibody fragments have not achieved their therapeutic potential due to their fast blood clearance. Conjugation to an LNP enables multivalency to the tumor antigen as well as increased molecular size for chemotherapy drug delivery.

  15. Collagen like peptide bioconjugates for targeted drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianzhi

    the coil/globule conformational transition of the PDEGMEMA building block above its LCST with stabilization of the nanostructures by the hydrophilic CLP. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on such assembled nanostructures from collagen-like peptide containing copolymers. Due to the strong propensity for CLPs to bind to natural collagen via strand invasion processes, these nanosized vesicles may be used as drug carriers for targeted delivery. In addition to synthetic polymers, the collagen like peptide is then conjugated with a thermoresponsive elastin-like peptide (ELP). The resulting ELP-CLP diblock conjugates show a remarkable reduction in the inverse transition temperature of the ELP domain, attributed to the anchoring effect of the CLP triple helix. The lower transition temperature of the conjugate enables facile formation of well-defined vesicles at physiological temperature and the unexpected resolubilization of the vesicles at elevated temperatures upon unfolding of the CLP domain. Given the ability of CLPs to modify collagens, this work provides not only a simple and versatile avenue for controlling the inverse transition behavior of elastin-like peptides, but also suggest future opportunities for these thermoresponsive nanostructures in biologically relevant environments. In the last section, the potential of using the ELP-CLP nanoparticles as drug delivery vehicles for targeting collagen containing matrices is evaluated. A sustained release of clinically relevant amount of encapsulated modelled drug is achieved within three weeks, followed by a thermally controlled burst release. As expected, the ELP-CLP nanoparticles show strong retention on collagen substrate, via specific binding through collagen triple helix hybridization. Additionally, cell viability and proliferation studies using fibroblasts and chondrocytes suggest the nanoparticles are non-cytotoxic. Additionally, almost no TNF-alpha expression from macrophages is observed

  16. Application of drug delivery system to boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagië, Hironobu; Ogata, Aya; Sugiyama, Hirotaka; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Takamoto, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons ((10)B + (1)n --> (7)Li + (4)He (alpha) + 2.31 MeV (93.7 %)/2.79 MeV (6.3 %)). The resulting lithium ions and alphaparticles are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles which give a high biological effect. Their short range in tissue (5 - 9 mum) restricts radiation damage to those cells in which boron atoms are located at the time of neutron irradiation. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer and hepatoma. Sodium mercaptoundecahydro-dodecaborate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH: BSH) and borono-phenylalanine ((10)BPA) are currently being used in clinical treatments. These low molecule compounds are easily cleared from cancer cells and blood, so high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues and cancer cells are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage to adjacent healthy cells. In order to achieve the selective delivery of boron atoms to cancer cells, a drug delivery system (DDS) is an attractive intelligent technology for targeting and controlled release of drugs. We performed literature searches related to boron delivery systems in vitro and in vivo. We describe several DDS technologies for boron delivery to cancer tissues and cancer cells from the past to current status. We are convinced that it will be possible to use liposomes, monoclonal antibodies and WOW emulsions as boron delivery systems for BNCT clinically in accordance with the preparation of good commercial product (GCP) grade materials.

  17. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule aptamer functionalized PLGA-lecithin-curcumin-PEG nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Xiang, Dongxi; Shigdar, Sarah; Yang, Wenrong; Li, Qiong; Lin, Jia; Liu, Kexin; Duan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of drug delivery, active targeted nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are gaining considerable attention as they have the potential to reduce side effects, minimize toxicity, and improve efficacy of anticancer treatment. In this work CUR-NPs (curcumin-loaded lipid-polymer-lecithin hybrid nanoparticles) were synthesized and functionalized with ribonucleic acid (RNA) Aptamers (Apts) against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) for targeted delivery to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. These CUR-encapsulated bioconjugates (Apt-CUR-NPs) were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation, stability, and release. The in vitro specific cell binding, cellular uptake, and cytotoxicity of Apt-CUR-NPs were also studied. The Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates exhibited increased binding to HT29 colon cancer cells and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to CUR-NPs functionalized with a control Apt (P<0.01). Furthermore, a substantial improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved toward HT29 cells with Apt-CUR-NP bioconjugates. The encapsulation of CUR in Apt-CUR-NPs resulted in the increased bioavailability of delivered CUR over a period of 24 hours compared to that of free CUR in vivo. These results show that the EpCAM Apt-functionalized CUR-NPs enhance the targeting and drug delivery of CUR to colorectal cancer cells. Further development of CUR-encapsulated, nanosized carriers will lead to improved targeted delivery of novel chemotherapeutic agents to colorectal cancer cells. PMID:24591829

  18. Recent Advances in Stimuli-Responsive Release Function Drug Delivery Systems for Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chendi Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Benefiting from the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery systems (DDSs with stimuli-responsive controlled release function show great potential in clinical anti-tumor applications. By using a DDS, the harsh side effects of traditional anti-cancer drug treatments and damage to normal tissues and organs can be avoided to the greatest extent. An ideal DDS must firstly meet bio-safety standards and secondarily the efficiency-related demands of a large drug payload and controlled release function. This review highlights recent research progress on DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. The first section briefly reviews the nanoscale scaffolds of DDSs, including mesoporous nanoparticles, polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The second section presents the main types of stimuli-responsive mechanisms and classifies these into two categories: intrinsic (pH, redox state, biomolecules and extrinsic (temperature, light irradiation, magnetic field and ultrasound ones. Clinical applications of DDS, future challenges and perspectives are also mentioned.

  19. A nanomedicine-promising approach to provide an appropriate colon-targeted drug delivery system for 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sima Singh,1,* Niranjan G Kotla,2,* Sonia Tomar,3 Balaji Maddiboyina,4 Thomas J Webster,5,6 Dinesh Sharma,7 Omprakash Sunnapu2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra, Ranchi, Jharkhand, 2Technologies for the Advancement of Science, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Bangalore, Karnataka, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, Ram Gopal College of Pharmacy, Rohtak, Haryana, 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Mullana, Ambala, Haryana, India; 5Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 6Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 7Ranbaxy Laboratory Ltd, Gurgaon, Haryana, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Targeted drug delivery plays a significant role in disease treatment associated with the colon, affording therapeutic responses for a prolonged period of time with low side effects. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women with an estimated 102,480 cases of colon cancer and 40,340 cases of rectal cancer in 2013 as reported by the American Cancer Society. In the present investigation, we developed an improved oral delivery system for existing anticancer drugs meant for colon cancer via prebiotic and probiotic approaches. The system comprises three components, namely, nanoparticles of drug coated with natural materials such as guar gum, xanthan gum (that serve as prebiotics, and probiotics. The natural gums play a dual role of protecting the drug in the gastric as well as intestinal conditions to allow its release only in the colon. In vitro results obtained from these experiments indicated the successful targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the colon. Electron microscopy results demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and 200 nm in size. The in vitro release data

  20. Extraction and encapsulation of prodigiosin in chitosan microspheres for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO), P.M.B 186, Garki, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Danyuo, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, Malete (Nigeria); Obayemi, J.D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Odusanya, O.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Advanced Laboratory, Sheda Science and Technology Complex (SHESTCO), P.M.B 186, Garki, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Malatesta, K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Soboyejo, W.O., E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology (AUST) Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Bowen Hall, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The encapsulation of drugs in polymeric materials has brought opportunities to the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. These polymeric delivery systems are capable of maximizing the therapeutic activity, as well as reducing the side effects of anti-cancer agents. Prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite extracted from the bacteria, Serratia marcescens, exhibits anti-cancer properties. Prodigiosin-loaded chitosan microspheres were prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion technique, using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The morphologies of the microspheres were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The average sizes of the microspheres were between 40 μm and 60 μm, while the percentage yields ranged from 42 ± 2% to 55.5 ± 3%. The resulting encapsulation efficiencies were between 66.7 ± 3% and 90 ± 4%. The in-vitro drug release from the microspheres was characterized by zeroth order, first order and Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas models. - Highlights: • Prodigiosin of ~ 92.8% purity was extracted from locally isolated Serratia marcescens. • This approach reduces the cost and ensure availability of drugs for cancer treatment. • High encapsulation efficiency which increased with increasing drug:polymer ratio • The percentage yield was generally poor due to the recovery process. • Prodigiosin greatly reduced the viability of the breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231).

  1. Extraction and encapsulation of prodigiosin in chitosan microspheres for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozie-Nwachukwu, S.O.; Danyuo, Y.; Obayemi, J.D.; Odusanya, O.S.; Malatesta, K.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    2017-01-01

    The encapsulation of drugs in polymeric materials has brought opportunities to the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. These polymeric delivery systems are capable of maximizing the therapeutic activity, as well as reducing the side effects of anti-cancer agents. Prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite extracted from the bacteria, Serratia marcescens, exhibits anti-cancer properties. Prodigiosin-loaded chitosan microspheres were prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion technique, using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linker. The morphologies of the microspheres were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The average sizes of the microspheres were between 40 μm and 60 μm, while the percentage yields ranged from 42 ± 2% to 55.5 ± 3%. The resulting encapsulation efficiencies were between 66.7 ± 3% and 90 ± 4%. The in-vitro drug release from the microspheres was characterized by zeroth order, first order and Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas models. - Highlights: • Prodigiosin of ~ 92.8% purity was extracted from locally isolated Serratia marcescens. • This approach reduces the cost and ensure availability of drugs for cancer treatment. • High encapsulation efficiency which increased with increasing drug:polymer ratio • The percentage yield was generally poor due to the recovery process. • Prodigiosin greatly reduced the viability of the breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231).

  2. Natural products to improve quality of life targeting for colon drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjo

    2012-03-01

    The colon is largely being investigated as a site for administration of protein and peptides, which are degraded by digestive enzymes in the upper GIT. Also for local diseases of the colon such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and ameobiasis, drug administration to the site of action can not only reduce the dose to be administered, but also decrease the side effects. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) such as Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Intestinal bacteria initiate the activation of intestinal inflammatory processes, which are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. Increased chemokine expression has also been observed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Future trials of specific agents capable of inhibiting chemokine synthesis and secretion or blocking chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction will be important to study in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Many important bioactive compounds have been discovered from natural sources using bioactivity directed fractionation and isolation (BDFl) Continuing discovery has also been facilitated by the recent development of new bioassay methods. These bioactive compounds are mostly plant secondary metabolites, and many naturally occurring pure compounds have become medicines, dietary supplements, and other useful commercial products. The present review includes various approaches investigated for colon drug delivery and their site specificity. To achieve successful colonic delivery, a drug needs to be protected from absorption and the environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract and then be abruptly released into the proximal colon, which is considered the optimum site for colon targeted delivery of drugs.

  3. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  4. Tumor-targeted polymeric nanostructured lipid carriers with precise ratiometric control over dual-drug loading for combination therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yan Liang,1 Baocheng Tian,1 Jing Zhang,1 Keke Li,1 Lele Wang,1 Jingtian Han,1,* Zimei Wu2,* 1School of Pharmacy, Binzhou Medical University, 2School of Pharmacy, Yantai University, Yantai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gemcitabine (GEM and paclitaxel (PTX are effective combination anticancer agents against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. At the present time, a main challenge of combination treatment is the precision of control that will maximize the combined effects. Here, we report a novel method to load GEM (hydrophilic and PTX (hydrophobic into simplex tumor-targeted nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs for accurate control of the ratio of the two drugs. We covalently preconjugated the dual drugs through a hydrolyzable ester linker to form drug conjugates. N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (NAG is a glucose receptor-targeting ligand. We added NAG to the formation of NAG-NLCs. In general, synthesis of poly(6-O-methacryloyl-d-galactopyranose–GEM/PTX (PMAGP-GEM/PTX conjugates was demonstrated, and NAG-NLCs were prepared using emulsification and solvent evaporation. NAG-NLCs displayed sphericity with an average diameter of 120.3±1.3 nm, a low polydispersity index of 0.233±0.04, and accurate ratiometric control over the two drugs. A cytotoxicity assay showed that the NAG-NLCs had better antitumor activity on NSCLC cells than normal cells. There was an optimal ratio of the two drugs, exhibiting the best cytotoxicity and combinatorial effects among all the formulations we tested. In comparison with both the free-drug combinations and separately nanopackaged drug conjugates, PMAGP-GEM/PTX NAG-NLCs (3:1 exhibited superior synergism. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that NAG-NLCs exhibited higher uptake efficiency in A549 cells via glucose receptor-mediated endocytosis. This combinatorial delivery system settles problems with ratiometric coloading of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs for tumor-targeted

  5. Microcontainers for Intestinal Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tentor, Fabio; Mazzoni, Chiara; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    Among all the drug administration routes, the oral one is the most preferred by the patients being less invasive, faster and easier. Oral drug delivery systems designed to target the intestine are produced by powder technology and capsule formulations. Those systems including micro- and nano...

  6. Potential Development of Tumor-Targeted Oral Anti-Cancer Prodrugs: Amino Acid and Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Drelich, Adam J; Smith, David E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-08-10

    One of the main obstacles for cancer therapies is to deliver medicines effectively to target sites. Since stroma cells are developed around tumors, chemotherapeutic agents have to go through stroma cells in order to reach tumors. As a method to improve drug delivery to the tumor site, a prodrug approach for gemcitabine was adopted. Amino acid and dipeptide monoester prodrugs of gemcitabine were synthesized and their chemical stability in buffers, resistance to thymidine phosphorylase and cytidine deaminase, antiproliferative activity, and uptake/permeability in HFF cells as a surrogate to stroma cells were determined and compared to their parent drug, gemcitabine. The activation of all gemcitabine prodrugs was faster in pancreatic cell homogenates than their hydrolysis in buffer, suggesting enzymatic action. All prodrugs exhibited great stability in HFF cell homogenate, enhanced resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism by thymidine phosphorylase, and deamination by cytidine deaminase compared to their parent drug. All gemcitabine prodrugs exhibited higher uptake in HFF cells and better permeability across HFF monolayers than gemcitabine, suggesting a better delivery to tumor sites. Cell antiproliferative assays in Panc-1 and Capan-2 pancreatic ductal cell lines indicated that the gemcitabine prodrugs were more potent than their parent drug gemcitabine. The transport and enzymatic profiles of gemcitabine prodrugs suggest their potential for delayed enzymatic bioconversion and enhanced resistance to metabolic enzymes, as well as for enhanced drug delivery to tumor sites, and cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. These attributes would facilitate the prolonged systemic circulation and improved therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine prodrugs.

  7. A REVIEW ON OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Harnish Patel; Upendra Patel; Hiren Kadikar; Bhavin Bhimani; Dhiren Daslaniya; Ghanshyam Patel

    2012-01-01

    Conventional oral drug delivery systems supply an instantaneous release of drug, which cannot control the release of the drug and effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the process of osmosis. Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. They are the most reliable con...

  8. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Julia V; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S

    2014-11-17

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood-brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier-drug system ("Trojan horse complex") is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain.

  9. Bacteria-mediated in vivo delivery of quantum dots into solid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Mei; Luo, Dan; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai; Yang, Yepeng; Sha, Yinlin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New approach using the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum as a vehicle to deliver QDs into the deep tissue of solid tumors in vivo was achieved. ► Bifidobacterium bifidum delivery system has intrinsic biocompatibility. ► The targeting efficacy was improved by folic acids. -- Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals, so-called quantum dots (QDs), promise potential application in bioimaging and diagnosis in vitro and in vivo owing to their high-quality photoluminescence and excellent photostability as well as size-tunable spectra. Here, we describe a biocompatible, comparatively safe bacteria-based system that can deliver QDs specifically into solid tumor of living animals. In our strategy, anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (B. bifidum) that colonizes selectively in hypoxic regions of animal body was successfully used as a vehicle to load with QDs and transported into the deep tissue of solid tumors. The internalization of lipid-encapsuled QDs into B. bifidum was conveniently carried by electroporation. To improve the efficacy and specificity of tumor targeting, the QDs-carrying bacterium surface was further conjugated with folic acids (FAs) that can bind to the folic acid receptor overexpressed tumor cells. This new approach opens a pathway for delivering different types of functional cargos such as nanoparticles and drugs into solid tumor of live animals for imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  11. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically.

  12. Polymer architecture and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li Yan; Bae, You Han

    2006-01-01

    Polymers occupy a major portion of materials used for controlled release formulations and drug-targeting systems because this class of materials presents seemingly endless diversity in topology and chemistry. This is a crucial advantage over other classes of materials to meet the ever-increasing requirements of new designs of drug delivery formulations. The polymer architecture (topology) describes the shape of a single polymer molecule. Every natural, seminatural, and synthetic polymer falls into one of categorized architectures: linear, graft, branched, cross-linked, block, star-shaped, and dendron/dendrimer topology. Although this topic spans a truly broad area in polymer science, this review introduces polymer architectures along with brief synthetic approaches for pharmaceutical scientists who are not familiar with polymer science, summarizes the characteristic properties of each architecture useful for drug delivery applications, and covers recent advances in drug delivery relevant to polymer architecture.

  13. Microcontainers - an oral drug delivery system for poorly soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Petersen, Ritika Singh; Marizza, Paolo

    In oral delivery, it can sometimes be necessary to employ drug delivery systems to achieve targeted delivery to the intestine. Microcontainers are polymeric, cylindrical devices in the micrometer size range (Figure 1), and are suggested as a promising oral drug delivery system [1],[2]. The purpose...... of these studies was to fabricate microcontainers in either SU-8 or biodegradable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), and fill the microcontainers with poorly soluble drugs. Furthermore, the application of the microcontainers as an oral drug delivery system was investigated in terms of release, in situ intestinal perfusion...... medium at pH 6.5 was observed. In situ intestinal perfusions were performed in rats of the Eudragit-coated ASSF-filled microcontainers and compared to a furosemide solution. At the end of the study, the small intestine was harvested from the rat and imaged under a light microscope. The absorption rate...

  14. Drug Delivery Systems: A New Frontier in Nano-technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamindri Witharana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nano-technology is a recent advancement in science, defined as “Science, engineering, and technology conducted at the Nano scale” (National nanotechnology initiatives in USA. Applications of Nano-technology cover a vast range from basic material science, personal care applications, agriculture, and medicine. Nano-technology is used in field of medicine for treatment, diagnostic, monitoring, genetic engineering, and drug delivery. There are two main types of Nano Particles (NPs used in drug delivery; organic NPs and inorganic NPs. In drug delivery, the drug-Nano- Particle (NP conjugate should be able to deliver drugs to the target site without degradation in gastrointestinal track and without reducing drug activity. Further, it should attack to target cells without causing any adverse effects. The ultimate goal of NP drug delivery is to improve proper treatment, effectiveness, less side effects with safety and patient adherence as well as reduction in the cost.

  15. 5-Fluorouracil Encapsulated Chitosan Nanoparticles for pH-Stimulated Drug Delivery: Evaluation of Controlled Release Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seda Tığlı Aydın

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles consisting of human therapeutic drugs are suggested as a promising strategy for targeted and localized drug delivery to tumor cells. In this study, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared in order to investigate potentials of localized drug delivery for tumor environment due to pH sensitivity of chitosan nanoparticles. Optimization of chitosan and 5-FU encapsulated nanoparticles production revealed 148.8±1.1 nm and 243.1±17.9 nm particle size diameters with narrow size distributions, which are confirmed by scanning electron microscope (SEM images. The challenge was to investigate drug delivery of 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles due to varied pH changes. To achieve this objective, pH sensitivity of prepared chitosan nanoparticle was evaluated and results showed a significant swelling response for pH 5 with particle diameter of ∼450 nm. In vitro release studies indicated a controlled and sustained release of 5-FU from chitosan nanoparticles with the release amounts of 29.1–60.8% due to varied pH environments after 408 h of the incubation period. pH sensitivity is confirmed by mathematical modeling of release kinetics since chitosan nanoparticles showed stimuli-induced release. Results suggested that 5-FU encapsulated chitosan nanoparticles can be launched as pH-responsive smart drug delivery agents for possible applications of cancer treatments.

  16. Enhancement of the efficiency of magnetic targeting for drug delivery: Development and evaluation of magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Quanliang; Han Xiaotao; Li Liang

    2011-01-01

    Deep magnetic capture and clinical application are the current trends for magnetic targeted drug delivery system. More promising and possible strategies are needed to overcome the current limitations and further improve the magnetic targeting technique. Recent advances in the development of targeting magnet system show promise in progressing this technology from the laboratory to the clinic. Starting from well-known basic concepts, current limitations of magnetic targeted drug delivery system are analyzed. Meanwhile, the design concepts and evaluations of some effective improvements in magnet system are discussed and reviewed with reference to (i) reasonable design of magnet system; (ii) control modes of magnet system used to generate dynamical magnetic fields; and (iii) magnetic field driving types. - Research Highlights: → The current limitations of MTDDS for deep capture and clinical application are analyzed. → The development of magnet system shows promise in progressing MTDDS to clinical application. → The design concepts and evaluations of improvements in magnet system are reviewed and discussed. → The key to improve magnet system lies in controllable magnets and different excitations.

  17. Brain Tumor Targeting of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Potential Drug Delivery: Effect of Administration Route and Magnetic Field Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated feasibility of magnetically-mediated retention of iron-oxide nanoparticles in brain tumors after intravascular administration. The purpose of this study was to elucidate strategies for further improvement of this promising approach. In particular, we explored administration of the nanoparticles via a non-occluded carotid artery as a way to increase the passive exposure of tumor vasculature to nanoparticles for subsequent magnetic entrapment. However, aggregation of nanoparticles in the afferent vasculature interfered with tumor targeting. The magnetic setup employed in our experiments was found to generate a relatively uniform magnetic flux density over a broad range, exposing the region of the afferent vasculature to high magnetic force. To overcome this problem, the magnetic setup was modified with a 9-mm diameter cylindrical NdFeB magnet to exhibit steeper magnetic field topography. Six-fold reduction of the magnetic force at the injection site, achieved with this modification, alleviated the aggregation problem under the conditions of intact carotid blood flow. Using this setup, carotid administration was found to present 1.8-fold increase in nanoparticle accumulation in glioma compared to the intravenous route at 350 mT. This increase was found to be in reasonable agreement with the theoretically estimated 1.9-fold advantage of carotid administration, Rd. The developed approach is expected to present an even greater advantage when applied to drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibiting higher values of Rd. PMID:21763736

  18. Chitosan microspheres in novel drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-07-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems.

  19. Chitosan-based nanoparticles for survivin targeted siRNA delivery in breast tumor therapy and preventing its metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao

    Nanoparticle-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery is a promising therapeutic strategy in various cancers. However, it is difficult to deliver degradative siRNA to tumor tissue, and thus a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery is essential for cancer therapy. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-modified chitosan (PEG-CS) was synthesized successfully for delivering nucleic acid drug. We deemed that PEGylated CS could improve its solubility by forming a stable siRNA loaded in nanoparticles, and enhancing transfection efficiency of siRNA-loaded CS nanoparticles in cancer cell line. The research results showed that siRNA loaded in PEGylated CS (PEG-CS/siRNA) nanoparticles with smaller particle size had superior structural stability in the physical environment compared to CS nanoparticles. The data of in vitro antitumor activity revealed that 4T1 tumor cell growth was significantly inhibited and cellular uptake of PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles in 4T1 cells was dramatically enhanced compared to naked siRNA groups. The results from flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles were more easily taken up than naked siRNA. Importantly, PEG-CS/siRNA nanoparticles significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors of 4T1 cells in vivo. It has been demonstrated that the PEG-CS is a safe and efficient vector for siRNA delivery, and it can effectively reduce tumor growth and prevent metastasis.

  20. Recent Advances in the Application of Vitamin E TPGS for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Conglian; Wu, Tingting; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Zhiping

    2018-01-01

    D-ɑ-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (Vitamin E TPGS or TPGS) has been approved by FDA as a safe adjuvant and widely used in drug delivery systems. The biological and physicochemical properties of TPGS provide multiple advantages for its applications in drug delivery like high biocompatibility, enhancement of drug solubility, improvement of drug permeation and selective antitumor activity. Notably, TPGS can inhibit the activity of ATP dependent P-glycoprotein and act as a potent excipient for overcoming multi-drug resistance (MDR) in tumor. In this review, we aim to discuss the recent advances of TPGS in drug delivery including TPGS based prodrugs, nitric oxide donor and polymers, and unmodified TPGS based formulations. These potential applications are focused on enhancing delivery efficiency as well as the therapeutic effect of agents, especially on overcoming MDR of tumors. It also demonstrates that the clinical translation of TPGS based nanomedicines is still faced with many challenges, which requires more detailed study on TPGS properties and based delivery system in the future. PMID:29290821

  1. Biodistribution of doxorubicin and nanostructured ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during magnetically controlled drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Nikolskaya, Tatiana A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Budko, Andrei P. [Oncological Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kovarskii, Alexander L. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Zontov, Sergei V. [Oncological Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kogan, Boris Ya. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com

    2009-05-15

    Biodistribution of doxorubicin and ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during and after magnetically controlled anti-tumor drug delivery and deposition was studied. Animal tests show high concentration of the cytostatic drug in the target zone, while its concentration is three orders of magnitude lower in bloodstream and other organs. A significant depot of the drug remains on the deposited particles days after the procedure. Macrophages actively phagocytose the ferrocarbon (FeC) particles and remain viable long enough to carry them to the lymph nodes.

  2. Biodistribution of doxorubicin and nanostructured ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during magnetically controlled drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Nikolskaya, Tatiana A.; Budko, Andrei P.; Kovarskii, Alexander L.; Zontov, Sergei V.; Kogan, Boris Ya.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2009-01-01

    Biodistribution of doxorubicin and ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during and after magnetically controlled anti-tumor drug delivery and deposition was studied. Animal tests show high concentration of the cytostatic drug in the target zone, while its concentration is three orders of magnitude lower in bloodstream and other organs. A significant depot of the drug remains on the deposited particles days after the procedure. Macrophages actively phagocytose the ferrocarbon (FeC) particles and remain viable long enough to carry them to the lymph nodes.

  3. Carboxymethyl starch and lecithin complex as matrix for targeted drug delivery: I. Monolithic mesalamine forms for colon delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela Friciu, Maria; Canh Le, Tien; Ispas-Szabo, Pompilia; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

    2013-11-01

    For drugs expected to act locally in the colon, and for successful treatment, a delivery device is necessary, in order to limit the systemic absorption which decreases effectiveness and causes important side effects. Various delayed release systems are currently commercialized; most of them based on pH-dependent release which is sensitive to gastrointestinal pH variation. This study proposes a novel excipient for colon delivery. This new preparation consists in the complexation between carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and Lecithin (L). As opposed to existing excipients, the new complex is pH-independent, inexpensive, and easy to manufacture and allows a high drug loading. FTIR, X-ray, and SEM structural analysis all support the hypothesis of the formation of a complex. By minor variation of the excipient content within the tablet, it is possible to modulate the release time and delivery at specific sites of the gastrointestinal tract. This study opens the door to a new pH-independent delivery system for mesalamine targeted administration. Our novel formulation fits well with the posology of mesalamine, used in the treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which requires repeated administrations (1g orally four times a day) to maintain a good quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyaluronic acid oligosaccharide modified redox-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinfu; Geng, Hongjian; Wang, Ying; Gao, Yikun; Huang, Jiahao; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jinghai; Wang, Siling

    2014-11-26

    A redox-responsive delivery system based on colloidal mesoporous silica (CMS) has been developed, in which 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was conjugated to vehicles by cleavable disulfide bonds. The oligosaccharide of hyaluronic acid (oHA) was modified on the surface of CMS by disulfide bonds as a targeting ligand and was able to increase the stability and biocompatibility of CMS under physiological conditions. In vitro release studies indicated that the cumulative release of 6-MP was less than 3% in the absence of glutathione (GSH), and reached nearly 80% within 2 h in the presence of 3 mM GSH. Confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) methods were used to evaluate the cellular uptake performance of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled CMS, with and without oHA modification. The CMS-SS-oHA exhibited a higher cellular uptake performance via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis in HCT-116 (CD44 receptor-positive) cells than in NIH-3T3 (CD44 receptor-negative) cells. 6-MP loaded CMS-SS-oHA exhibited greater cytotoxicity against HCT-116 cells than NIH-3T3 cells due to the enhanced cell uptake behavior of CMS-SS-oHA. This study provides a novel strategy to covalently link bioactive drug and targeting ligand to the interiors and exteriors of mesoporous silica to construct a stimulus-responsive targeted drug delivery system.

  5. Self-assembled silk sericin/poloxamer nanoparticles as nanocarriers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs for targeted delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, S C

    2009-01-01

    In recent times self-assembled micellar nanoparticles have been successfully employed in tissue engineering for targeted drug delivery applications. In this review, silk sericin protein from non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta tropical tasar silk cocoons was blended with pluronic F-127 and F-87 in the presence of solvents to achieve self-assembled micellar nanostructures capable of carrying both hydrophilic (FITC-inulin) and hydrophobic (anticancer drug paclitaxel) drugs. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently characterized for their size distribution, drug loading capability, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Nanoparticle sizes ranged between 100 and 110 nm in diameter as confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Rapid uptake of these particles into cells was observed in in vitro cellular uptake studies using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles against breast cancer cells showed promising results comparable to free paclitaxel drugs. Drug-encapsulated nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by FACS and confocal microscopic studies using Annexin V staining. Up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cleavage of regulatory protein PARP through Western blot analysis suggested further drug-induced apoptosis in cells. This study projects silk sericin protein as an alternative natural biomaterial for fabrication of self-assembled nanoparticles in the presence of poloxamer for successful delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to target sites.

  6. Self-assembled silk sericin/poloxamer nanoparticles as nanocarriers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs for targeted delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, S C, E-mail: kundu@hijli.iitkgp.ernet.i [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2009-09-02

    In recent times self-assembled micellar nanoparticles have been successfully employed in tissue engineering for targeted drug delivery applications. In this review, silk sericin protein from non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta tropical tasar silk cocoons was blended with pluronic F-127 and F-87 in the presence of solvents to achieve self-assembled micellar nanostructures capable of carrying both hydrophilic (FITC-inulin) and hydrophobic (anticancer drug paclitaxel) drugs. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently characterized for their size distribution, drug loading capability, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Nanoparticle sizes ranged between 100 and 110 nm in diameter as confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Rapid uptake of these particles into cells was observed in in vitro cellular uptake studies using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles against breast cancer cells showed promising results comparable to free paclitaxel drugs. Drug-encapsulated nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by FACS and confocal microscopic studies using Annexin V staining. Up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cleavage of regulatory protein PARP through Western blot analysis suggested further drug-induced apoptosis in cells. This study projects silk sericin protein as an alternative natural biomaterial for fabrication of self-assembled nanoparticles in the presence of poloxamer for successful delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to target sites.

  7. Elastin-Like Recombinamers As Smart Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, F Javier; Santos, Mercedes; Ibanez-Fonseca, Arturo; Pina, Maria Jesus; Serrano, Sofía

    2018-02-19

    Drug delivery systems that are able to control the release of bioactive molecules and designed to carry drugs to target sites are of particular interest for tissue therapy. Moreover, systems comprising materials that can respond to environmental stimuli and promote self-assembly and higher order supramolecular organization are especially useful in the biomedical field. Objetive: This review focuses on biomaterials suitable for this purpose and that include elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), a class of proteinaceous polymers bioinspired by natural elastin, designed using recombinant technologies. The self-assembly and thermoresponsive behaviour of these systems, along with their biodegradability, biocompatibility and well-defined composition as a result of their tailormade design, make them particularly attractive for controlled drug delivery. ELR-based delivery systems that allow targeted delivery are reviewed, especially ELR-drug recombinant fusion constructs, ELR-drug systems chemically bioconjugated in their monomeric and soluble forms, and drug encapsulation by nanoparticle-forming ELRs. Subsequently, the review focuses on those drug carriers in which smart release is triggered by pH or temperature with a particular focus on cancer treatments. Systems for controlled drug release based on depots and hydrogels that act as both a support and reservoir in which drugs can be stored will be described, and their applications in drug delivery discussed. Finally, smart drug-delivery systems not based on ELRs, including those comprising proteins, synthetic polymers and non-polymeric systems, will also be briefly discussed. Several different constructions based on ELRs are potential candidates for controlled drug delivery to be applied in advanced biomedical treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Ion-Responsive Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takayuki; Shakushiro, Kohsuke; Sako, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-08

    Some kinds of cations and anions are contained in body fluids such as blood, interstitial fluid, gastrointestinal juice, and tears at relatively high concentration. Ionresponsive drug delivery is available to design the unique dosage formulations which provide optimized drug therapy with effective, safe and convenient dosing of drugs. The objective of the present review was to collect, summarize, and categorize recent research findings on ion-responsive drug delivery systems. Ions in body fluid/formulations caused structural changes of polymers/molecules contained in the formulations, allow formulations exhibit functions. The polymers/molecules responding to ions were ion-exchange resins/fibers, anionic or cationic polymers, polymers exhibiting transition at lower critical solution temperature, self-assemble supramolecular systems, peptides, and metalorganic frameworks. The functions of ion-responsive drug delivery systems were categorized to controlled drug release, site-specific drug release, in situ gelation, prolonged retention at the target sites, and enhancement of drug permeation. Administration of the formulations via oral, ophthalmic, transdermal, and nasal routes has showed significant advantages in the recent literatures. Many kinds of drug delivery systems responding to ions have been reported recently for several administration routes. Improvement and advancement of these systems can maximize drugs potential and contribute to patients in the world. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Thermosensitive PLA based nanodispersion for targeting brain tumor via intranasal route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Darshana S.; Bajaj, Amrita N.; Athawale, Rajani B.; Shikhande, Shruti S.; Pandey, Abhijeet; Goel, Peeyush N.; Gude, Rajiv P.; Patil, Satish; Raut, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of drugs to the brain via nasal route has been studied by many researchers. However, low residence time, mucociliary clearance and enzymatically active environment of nasal cavity pose many challenges to successful nasal delivery of drugs. We aim to deliver methotrexate by designing thermosensitive nanodispersion exhibiting enhanced residence time in nasal cavity and bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB). PLA nanoparticles were developed using solvent evaporation technique. The developed nanoparticles were further dispersed in prepared thermosensitive vehicle of poloxamer 188 and Carbopol 934 to impart the property of increased residence time. The formulated nanoparticles demonstrated no interaction with the simulated nasal fluids (SNF), mucin, serum proteins and erythrocytes which demonstrate the safety of developed formulation for nasal administration. The penetration property of nanoparticles though the nasal mucosa was higher than the pure drug due to low mucociliary clearance. The developed nanoparticles diffused though the membrane pores and rapidly distributed into the brain portions compared to the pure drug. There was detectable and quantifiable amount of drug seen in the brain as demonstrated by in vivo brain distribution studies with considerably low amount of drug deposition in the lungs. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated the enhancement in circulation half life, area under curve (AUC) and Cmax of the drug when administered intranasal in encapsulated form. Thus, the thermosensitive nanodispersions are surely promising delivery systems for delivering anticancer agents though the nasal route for potential treatment of brain tumors. - Highlights: • The present investigation explores intra-nasal route as potential route for targeting brain tumor. • Thermosensitive nanodispersion has been formulated for enhancing nasal residence time. • PLA nanoparticles enhance penetration into the brain owing to hydrophobic nature and small size

  10. Thermosensitive PLA based nanodispersion for targeting brain tumor via intranasal route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Darshana S., E-mail: darshanaj_cup@yahoo.com [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Bajaj, Amrita N. [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Athawale, Rajani B., E-mail: rajani.athawale@gmail.com [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Shikhande, Shruti S. [C.U. Shah College of Pharmacy, S.N.D.T Women' s University, Juhu Tara Road, Santacruz (West), Mumbai 400 049 (India); Pandey, Abhijeet [H. R Patel Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Shirpur, Maharashtra (India); Goel, Peeyush N.; Gude, Rajiv P. [Gude Lab, Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research & Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai 410 210 (India); Patil, Satish; Raut, Preeti [Cipla Pvt. Ltd., Vikhroli (West), Mumbai (India)

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of drugs to the brain via nasal route has been studied by many researchers. However, low residence time, mucociliary clearance and enzymatically active environment of nasal cavity pose many challenges to successful nasal delivery of drugs. We aim to deliver methotrexate by designing thermosensitive nanodispersion exhibiting enhanced residence time in nasal cavity and bypassing the blood brain barrier (BBB). PLA nanoparticles were developed using solvent evaporation technique. The developed nanoparticles were further dispersed in prepared thermosensitive vehicle of poloxamer 188 and Carbopol 934 to impart the property of increased residence time. The formulated nanoparticles demonstrated no interaction with the simulated nasal fluids (SNF), mucin, serum proteins and erythrocytes which demonstrate the safety of developed formulation for nasal administration. The penetration property of nanoparticles though the nasal mucosa was higher than the pure drug due to low mucociliary clearance. The developed nanoparticles diffused though the membrane pores and rapidly distributed into the brain portions compared to the pure drug. There was detectable and quantifiable amount of drug seen in the brain as demonstrated by in vivo brain distribution studies with considerably low amount of drug deposition in the lungs. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated the enhancement in circulation half life, area under curve (AUC) and Cmax of the drug when administered intranasal in encapsulated form. Thus, the thermosensitive nanodispersions are surely promising delivery systems for delivering anticancer agents though the nasal route for potential treatment of brain tumors. - Highlights: • The present investigation explores intra-nasal route as potential route for targeting brain tumor. • Thermosensitive nanodispersion has been formulated for enhancing nasal residence time. • PLA nanoparticles enhance penetration into the brain owing to hydrophobic nature and small size

  11. Enhanced solubility and targeted delivery of curcumin by lipopeptide micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ju; Wu, Wenlan; Lai, Danyu; Li, Junbo; Fang, Cailin

    2015-01-01

    A lipopeptide (LP)-containing KKGRGDS as the hydrophilic heads and lauric acid (C12) as the hydrophobic tails has been designed and prepared by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis technique. LP can self-assemble into spherical micelles with the size of ~30 nm in PBS (phosphate buffer saline) (pH 7.4). Curcumin-loaded LP micelles were prepared in order to increase the water solubility, sustain the releasing rate, and improve the tumor targeted delivery of curcumin. Water solubility, cytotoxicity, in vitro release behavior, and intracellular uptake of curcumin-loaded LP micelles were investigated. The results showed that LP micelles can increase the water solubility of curcumin 1.1 × 10(3) times and sustain the release of curcumin in a low rate. Curcumin-loaded LP micelles showed much higher cell inhibition than free curcumin on human cervix carcinoma (HeLa) and HepG2 cells. When incubating these curcumin-loaded micelles with HeLa and COS7 cells, due to the over-expression of integrins on cancer cells, the micelles can efficiently use the tumor-targeting function of RGD (functionalized peptide sequences: Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence to deliver the drug into HeLa cells, and better efficiency of the self-assembled LP micelles for curcumin delivery than crude curcumin was also confirmed by LCSM (laser confocal scanning microscope) assays. Combined with the enhanced solubility and higher cell inhibition, LP micelles reported in this study may be promising in clinical application for targeted curcumin delivery.

  12. Advances and Challenges of Liposome Assisted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eSercombe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of liposomes to assist drug delivery has already had a major impact on many biomedical areas. They have been shown to be beneficial for stabilizing therapeutic compounds, overcoming obstacles to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of compounds to target sites in vivo. This enables effective delivery of encapsulated compounds to target sites while minimizing systemic toxicity. Liposomes present as an attractive delivery system due to their flexible physicochemical and biophysical properties, which allow easy manipulation to address different delivery considerations. Despite considerable research in the last 50 years and the plethora of positive results in preclinical studies, the clinical translation of liposome assisted drug delivery platforms has progressed incrementally. In this review, we will discuss the advances in liposome assisted drug delivery, biological challenges that still remain, and current clinical and experimental use of liposomes for biomedical applications. The translational obstacles of liposomal technology will also be presented.

  13. Multifunctional nanoparticle-EpCAM aptamer bioconjugates: a paradigm for targeted drug delivery and imaging in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manasi; Duan, Wei; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2015-02-01

    The promising proposition of multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics has inspired the development of theranostic approach for improved cancer therapy. Moreover, active targeting of drug carrier to specific target site is crucial for providing efficient delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. In this regard, the present study investigates the theranostic capabilities of nutlin-3a loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles, functionalized with a targeting ligand (EpCAM aptamer) and an imaging agent (quantum dots) for cancer therapy and bioimaging. A wide spectrum of in vitro analysis (cellular uptake study, cytotoxicity assay, cell cycle and apoptosis analysis, apoptosis associated proteins study) revealed superior therapeutic potentiality of targeted NPs over other formulations in EpCAM expressing cells. Moreover, our nanotheranostic system served as a superlative bio-imaging modality both in 2D monolayer culture and tumor spheroid model. Our result suggests that, these aptamer-guided multifunctional NPs may act as indispensable nanotheranostic approach toward cancer therapy. This study investigated the theranostic capabilities of nutlin-3a loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles functionalized with a targeting ligand (EpCAM aptamer) and an imaging agent (quantum dots) for cancer therapy and bioimaging. It was concluded that the studied multifunctional targeted nanoparticle may become a viable and efficient approach in cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of a drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles for anti-angiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Sachiko; Kodama, Tetsuya; Sato, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles is a molecular delivery approach using the mechanism of sonoporation. With sonoporation, an endothelium-derived negative-feedback regulator of angiogenesis, Vasohibin-1 (VASH1), was introduced specifically into tumor vessels. We found VASH1 in tumor vessels induce normalization of tumor vessels and inhibited tumor growth. A recent topic regarding tumor angiogenesis is vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are abnormal or immature that cause hyperpermeability and impaired blood flow. Tumor vascular normalization improves blood flow and tissue hypoxia, which increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy and reduce tumor cell malignancy. In this review, application of drug delivery system using ultrasound for an anti-angiogenic therapy, a tumor vessel normalization therapy to treat cancer, is summarized. (author)

  15. Biotin-Conjugated Multilayer Poly [D,L-lactide-co-glycolide]-Lecithin-Polyethylene Glycol Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Xing, Han; Song, Fuling; Yang, Yue; Qiu, Zhixia; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Qi; Ren, Shuangxia; Chen, Xijing; Li, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Multilayer nanoparticle combining the merits of liposome and polymer nanoparticle has been designed for the targeted delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) in cancer treatment. In this study, DOX-PLGA-lecithin-PEG-biotin nanoparticles (DOX-PLPB-NPs) were fabricated and functionalized with biotin for specific tumor targeting. Under the transmission electron microscopy observation, the lipid layer was found to be coated on the polymer core. The physical characteristics of PLPB-NPs were also evaluated. The confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the cellular uptake of nanoparticles and targeted delivery PLPB-NPs. The in vitro release experiment demonstrated a pH-depending release of DOX from drug-loaded PLPB-NPs. Cytotoxicity studies in HepG2 cells and in vivo antitumor experiment in tumor-bearing mice both proved DOX-PLPB-NPs showed the best inhibition effect of tumor proliferation. In biodistribution studies, DOX-PLPB-NPs showed a higher DOX concentration than free DOX and DOX-PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (DOX-PLP-NPs) in tumor site, especially in 24 h, and the lowest DOX level in normal organs. The results were coincident with the strongest antitumor ability showed among in vivo antitumor experiment. Histopathology analysis demonstrated that DOX-PLPB-NPs exhibited the strongest antitumor ability and lowest cardiotoxicity. In brief, the PLPB-NPs were proved to be an efficient delivery system for tumor-targeting treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anionic clay as the drug delivery vehicle: tumor targeting function of layered double hydroxide-methotrexate nanohybrid in C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goeun Choi,1 Huiyan Piao,1 Zeid A Alothman,2 Ajayan Vinu,3 Chae-Ok Yun,4 Jin-Ho Choy1 1Center for Intelligent Nano-Bio Materials, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea; 2Advanced Materials Research Chair, Chemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA, Australia; 4Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Methotrexate (MTX, an anticancer agent, was successfully intercalated into the anionic clay, layered double hydroxides to form a new nanohybrid drug. The coprecipitation and subsequent hydrothermal method were used to prepare chemically, structurally, and morphologically well-defined two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid. The resulting two-dimensional drug-clay nanohybrid showed excellent colloidal stability not only in deionized water but also in an electrolyte solution of Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, in which the average particle size in colloid and the polydispersity index were determined to be around 100 and 0.250 nm, respectively. The targeting property of the nanohybrid drug was confirmed by evaluating the tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-liver ratios of the MTX with anionic clay carrier, and these ratios were compared to those of free MTX in the C33A orthotopic cervical cancer model. The biodistribution studies indicated that the mice treated with the former showed 3.5-fold higher tumor-to-liver ratio and fivefold higher tumor-to-blood ratio of MTX than those treated with the latter at 30 minutes postinjection. Keywords: anionic clay, biodistribution, cervical cancer, colloidal stability, layered double hydroxide, methotrexate 

  17. Drug accumulation by means of noninvasive magnetic drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuzawa, M.; Mishima, F.; Akiyama, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2011-01-01

    The medication is one of the most general treatment methods, but drugs diffuse in the normal tissues other than the target part by the blood circulation. Therefore, side effect in the medication, particularly for a drug with strong effect such as anti-cancer drug, are a serious issue. Drug Delivery System (DDS) which accumulates the drug locally in the human body is one of the techniques to solve the side-effects. Magnetic Drug Delivery System (MDDS) is one of the active DDSs, which uses the magnetic force. The objective of this study is to accumulate the ferromagnetic drugs noninvasively in the deep part of the body by using MDDS. It is necessary to generate high magnetic field and magnetic gradient at the target part to reduce the side-effects to the tissues with no diseases. The biomimetic model was composed, which consists of multiple model organs connected with diverged blood vessel model. The arrangement of magnetic field was examined to accumulate ferromagnetic drug particles in the target model organ by using a superconducting bulk magnet which can generate high magnetic fields. The arrangement of magnet was designed to generate high and stable magnetic field at the target model organ. The accumulation experiment of ferromagnetic particles has been conducted. In this study, rotating HTS bulk magnet around the axis of blood vessels by centering on the target part was suggested, and the model experiment for magnet rotation was conducted. As a result, the accumulation of the ferromagnetic particles to the target model organ in the deep part was confirmed.

  18. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  19. Transferrin targeted core-shell nanomedicine for combinatorial delivery of doxorubicin and sorafenib against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial drug delivery is an attractive, but challenging requirement of next generation cancer nanomedicines. Here, we report a transferrin-targeted core-shell nanomedicine formed by encapsulating two clinically used single-agent drugs, doxorubicin and sorafenib against liver cancer. Doxorubicin was loaded in poly(vinyl alcohol) nano-core and sorafenib in albumin nano-shell, both formed by a sequential freeze-thaw/coacervation method. While sorafenib from the nano-shell inhibited aberrant oncogenic signaling involved in cell proliferation, doxorubicin from the nano-core evoked DNA intercalation thereby killing >75% of cancer cells. Upon targeting using transferrin ligands, the nanoparticles showed enhanced cellular uptake and synergistic cytotoxicity in ~92% of cells, particularly in iron-deficient microenvironment. Studies using 3D spheroids of liver tumor indicated efficient penetration of targeted core-shell nanoparticles throughout the tissue causing uniform cell killing. Thus, we show that rationally designed core-shell nanoparticles can effectively combine clinically relevant single-agent drugs for exerting synergistic activity against liver cancer. Transferrin-targeted core-shell nanomedicine encapsulating doxorubicin and sorafenib was studied as a drug delivery system against hepatocellular carcinoma, resulting in enhanced and synergistic therapeutic effects, paving the way towards potential future clinical applications of similar techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biodegradable polymeric nanocarriers for pulmonary drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytting, Erik; Nguyen, Juliane; Wang, Xiaoying; Kissel, Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Pulmonary drug delivery is attractive for both local and systemic drug delivery as a non-invasive route that provides a large surface area, thin epithelial barrier, high blood flow and the avoidance of first-pass metabolism. Nanoparticles can be designed to have several advantages for controlled and targeted drug delivery, including controlled deposition, sustained release, reduced dosing frequency, as well as an appropriate size for avoiding alveolar macrophage clearance or promoting transepithelial transport. This review focuses on the development and application of biodegradable polymers to nanocarrier-based strategies for the delivery of drugs, peptides, proteins, genes, siRNA and vaccines by the pulmonary route. The selection of natural or synthetic materials is important in designing particles or nanoparticle clusters with the desired characteristics, such as biocompatibility, size, charge, drug release and polymer degradation rate.

  1. PET Imaging of 64Cu-DOTA-scFv-Anti-PSMA Lipid Nanoparticles (LNPs): Enhanced Tumor Targeting over Anti-PSMA scFv or Untargeted LNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patty; Li, Lin; Chea, Junie; Delgado, Melissa K.; Crow, Desiree; Poku, Erasmus; Szpikowska, Barbara; Bowles, Nicole; Channappa, Divya; Colcher, David; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Shively, John E.; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Single chain (scFv) antibodies are ideal targeting ligands due to their modular structure, high antigen specificity and affinity. These monovalent ligands display rapid tumor targeting but have limitations due to their fast urinary clearance. Methods An anti-prostate membrane antigen (PSMA) scFv with a site-specific cysteine was expressed and evaluated in a prostate cancer xenograft model by Cu-64 PET imaging. To enhance tumor accumulation, the scFv-cys was conjugated to the co-polymer DSPE-PEG-maleimide that spontaneously assembled into a homogeneous multivalent lipid nanoparticle (LNP). Results The targeted LNP exhibited a 2-fold increase in tumor uptake compared to the scFv alone using two different thiol ester chemistries. The anti-PSMA scFv-LNP exhibited a 1.6 fold increase in tumor targeting over the untargeted LNP. Conclusions The targeted anti-PSMA scFv-LNP showed enhanced tumor accumulation over the scFv alone or the untargeted DOTA-micelle providing evidence for the development of this system for drug delivery. Advances in Knowledge and implications for patient care Anti-tumor scFv antibody fragments have not achieved their therapeutic potential due to their fast blood clearance. Conjugation to a LNP enables multivalency to the tumor antigen as well as increased molecular size for chemotherapy drug delivery. PMID:28126683

  2. A novel high drug loading mussel-inspired polydopamine hybrid nanoparticle as a pH-sensitive vehicle for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Guo, Chunlei; Shi, Yuzhi; Liu, Ergang; Dong, Weibing; Yu, Bo; Liu, Shiyuan; Gong, Junbo

    2017-11-25

    A novel high drug loading pH-cleavable polymer hybrid nanoparticle was prepared via doxorubicin (DOX) grafted onto PEGylated, mussel-inspired polydopamine (PDA) and then coated onto hollow silica nanoparticles for drug delivery. A series of characterization shed light on the formation mechanisms of PDA coatings on hollow silica. We hypothesized that dopamine was first absorbed onto the surface of hollow silica and then began self-polymerization. A Dox-containing thiol moiety was fabricated with conjugation between doxorubicin hydrochloride and Mercaptopropionyalkali with a pH-cleavable hydrozone bond. Using a Michael addition reaction, several Dox-containing thiol moieties were grafted onto the surface of the PDA. The drug loading capacity can reach 35.43%. It can minimize the metabolic problem of silica. The released behavior of Dox can be significantly enhanced at endosomal pH compared to physiological pH. After folate modification, nanoparticles can lead to more cellular endocytosis. Meanwhile animal assays showed that more Dox accumulated in tumor tissue, which can enhanced the cytotoxicity to 4T1 cancer cells with a targeting group compared to free DOX and untargeted groups. Meanwhile, the tumor growth was significantly inhibited. This promising material shows a promising future as a drug delivery system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Overcoming cellular and tissue barriers to improve liposomal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Aditya G.

    Forty years of liposome research have demonstrated that the anti-tumor efficacy of liposomal therapies is, in part, driven by three parameters: 1) liposome formulation and lipid biophysics, 2) accumulation and distribution in the tumor, and 3) release of the payload at the site of interest. This thesis outlines three studies that improve on each of these delivery steps. In the first study, we engineer a novel class of zwitterlipids with an inverted headgroup architecture that have remarkable biophysical properties and may be useful for drug delivery applications. After intravenous administration, liposomes accumulate in the tumor by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. However, the tumor stroma often limits liposome efficacy by preventing distribution into the tumor. In the second study, we demonstrate that depletion of hyaluronan in the tumor stroma improves the distribution and efficacy of DoxilRTM in murine 4T1 tumors. Once a liposome has distributed to the therapeutic site, it must release its payload over the correct timescale. Few facile methods exist to quantify the release of liposome therapeutics in vivo. In the third study, we outline and validate a simple, robust, and quantitative method for tracking the rate and extent of release of liposome contents in vivo. This tool should facilitate a better understanding of the pharmacodynamics of liposome-encapsulated drugs in animals. This work highlights aspects of liposome behavior that have prevented successful clinical translation and proposes alternative approaches to improve liposome drug delivery.

  4. Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: In-vitro studies [conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maphanga, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available of SPIE 10062, Optical Interactions with Tissue and Cells XXVIIISan Francisco, California, USA, 26 January - 03 February 2017 Targeted femtosecond laser driven drug delivery within HIV-1 infected cells: In-vitro studies Charles Maphanga 1, 2...

  5. Colloidal drug delivery system: amplify the ocular delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Javed; Fazil, Mohd; Qumbar, Mohd; Khan, Nazia; Ali, Asgar

    2016-01-01

    The ocular perceivers are the most voluntarily accessible organs in terms of location in the body, yet drug distribution to these tissues is one of the most intriguing and challenging endeavors and problematic to the pharmaceutical scientist. The most of ocular diseases are treated with topical application of conventional formulation, i.e. solutions, suspensions and ointment. Typically on installation of these conventional formulations, only <5% of the applied dose penetrates the cornea and reaches intraocular tissues, while a major fraction of the instilled dose is wastage due to the presence of many ocular barriers like external barriers, rapid loss of the instilled solution from the precorneal area and nasolacrimal drainage system. Systemic absorption caused systemic side effects varying from mild to life-threatening events. The main objective of this review is to explore the role of colloidal delivery of drug to minimize the drawbacks associated with them. This review provides an insight into the various constraints associated with ocular drug delivery, summarizes recent findings and applications of colloidal delivery systems, i.e. nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, niosomes, dendrimers and contact lenses containing nanoparticles have the capacity to distribute ocular drugs to categorical target sites and hold promise to revolutionize the therapy of many ocular perceiver diseases and minimized the circumscription of conventional delivery. Form the basis of literature review, it has been found that the novel delivery system have greater impact to maximize ocular drug absorption, and minimize systemic absorption and side effects.

  6. Doxorubicin loaded PEG-b-poly(4-vinylbenzylphosphonate) coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hałupka-Bryl, Magdalena, E-mail: magdalenahalupka@op.pl [The NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Division of Medical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Department of Materials Sciences, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Bednarowicz, Magdalena [The NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Division of Medical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Department of Materials Sciences, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Dobosz, Bernadeta; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard [The NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Division of Medical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Zalewski, Tomasz [The NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Wereszczyńska, Beata [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Jarek, Marcin [The NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań (Poland); Nagasaki, Yukio [Department of Materials Sciences, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Master’s School of Medicinal Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); International Centre for Materials Nanoarchitectonics Satellite (WPI-MANA), National Institute For Materials Sciences (NIMS) and University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Due to their unique physical properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are increasingly used in medical applications. They are very useful carriers for delivering antitumor drugs in targeted cancer treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles with chemiotherapeutic were synthesized by coprecipitation method followed by coating with biocompatible polymer. The aim of this work is to characterize physical and magnetic properties of synthesized nanoparicles. Characterization was carried out using EPR, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction, SQUID and NMR methods. The present findings show that synthesized nanosystem is promising tool for potential magnetic drug delivery. - Highlights: • Synthesized PEG-PIONs/DOX have excellent physical properties. • PEG-PIONs/DOX have a potential to in vivo application. • PEG-PIONs/DOX could be used as drug delivery system as well as contrast agents.

  7. Tuberculosis therapeutics: Engineering of nanomedicinal systems for local delivery of targeted drug cocktails

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M.

    In this thesis, a multifunctional nanocarrier drug delivery system was investigated and optimized to improve tuberculosis therapy by promoting the intracellular delivery of high payloads of antibiotics. To meet the needs of a patient population which continues to grow by close to 10 million people a year, innovative therapeutics must be formulated by robust and scalable processes. We use Flash NanoPrecipitation for the continuous precipitation of nanocarriers by block copolymer directed assembly, which enables the development of nanocarriers with tunable properties. Stable nanocarriers of Rifampicin and a hydrophobic Rifampicin prodrug have efficacy against tuberculosis in vitro that is equivalent to the soluble Rifampicin. To overcome poor in vivo efficacy of the recently discovered antitubercular drug SQ641, we co-encapsulate SQ641 and Cyclosporine A in a stable aqueous nanocarrier suspension, which enables drug administration and also enhances intracellular accumulation and antitubercular efficacy relative to SQ641 in solution. Since the mannose receptor is involved in the phagocytosis of tuberculosis bacilli, we modify the surface of nanocarriers with mannoside residues to target specific intracellular accumulation in macrophages. The surface density of mannoside terminated polyethylene glycol chains was controlled between 0 and 75% and in vitro cellular association reveals a 9% surface density is optimal for internalization mediated by the mannose receptor. We explore the preparation of large, porous aerosol carrier particles of with tunable deposition characteristics by spray freeze drying with ultrasonic atomization for direct dosing to the lungs. Nanocarriers are loaded at 3 - 50 wt% in mannitol particles with constant size, limited nanocarrier aggregation, and 63% dose delivered to the lungs, as determined by in vitro cascade impaction. There has been a lag in the development of new technologies to facilitate development and commercialization of

  8. Di/tri-peptide transporters as drug delivery targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Brodin, Birger

    2003-01-01

    -dependent, and the transporters thus belong to the Proton-dependent Oligopeptide Transporter (POT)-family. The transporters are not drug targets per se, however due to their uniquely broad substrate specificity; they have proved to be relevant drug targets at the level of drug transport. Drug molecules such as oral active beta....../tri-peptide transporters from vesicular storages 3) changes in gene transcription/mRNA stability. The aim of the present review is to discuss physiological, patho-physiological and drug-induced regulation of di/tri-peptide transporter mediated transport....

  9. Intelligently targeted drug delivery and enhanced antitumor effect by gelatinase-responsive nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutian Li

    Full Text Available AIMS: The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 2/9, also known as collagenases IV and gelatinases A/B, play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis. However, the clinical trials of the MMP inhibitors (MMPIs ended up with disappointing results. In this paper, we synthesized a gelatinase-responsive copolymer (mPEG-PCL by inserting a gelatinase cleavable peptide (PVGLIG between mPEG and PCL blocks of mPEG-PCL for anticancer drug delivery to make use of MMP2/9 as an intelligent target for drug delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: mPEG-pep-PCL copolymer was synthesized via ring-opening copolymerization and double-amidation. To evaluate whether Nanoparticles (NPs prepared from this copolymer are superior to NPs prepared from mPEG-PCL, NPs prepared from mPEG-PCL copolymer were used as positive control. Docetaxel-loading NPs using mPEG-pep-PCL and mPEG-PCL were prepared by nano-precipitation method, mentioned as Gel-NPs and Con-NPs, respectively. The morphologic changes of the NPs after treatment with gelatinases were observed macroscopically by spectrophotometer and microscopically by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The cellular uptake amount and cytotoxicity of Gel-NPs and Con-NPs, respectively, in cell lines with different levels of gelatinase expression were studied. Moreover, the cytotoxicity study on the primary cancer cells isolated from pericardial fluids from a patient with late-stage lung cancer was conducted. RESULTS: The Gel-NPs aggregated in response to gelatinases, which was confirmed macroscopically and microscopically. The cellular uptake amount of Gel-NPs was correlated with the level of gelatinases. The in vitro antitumor effect of Gel-NPs was also correlated with the level of gelatinases and was superior to Taxotere (commercially available docetaxel as well as the Con-NPs. The cytotoxicity study on the primary lung cancer cells also confirmed the effectiveness of Gel-NPs. CONCLUSION: The results in

  10. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  11. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  12. Nanomedicine: Drug Delivery Systems and Nanoparticle Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Hye Won; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, Jun Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2008-01-01

    Applications of nanotechnology in the medical field have provided the fundamentals of tremendous improvement in precise diagnosis and customized therapy. Recent advances in nanomedicine have led to establish a new concept of theragnosis, which utilizes nanomedicines as a therapeutic and diagnostic tool at the same time. The development of high affinity nanoparticles with large surface area and functional groups multiplies diagnostic and therapeutic capacities. Considering the specific conditions related to the disease of individual patient, customized therapy requires the identification of disease target at the cellular and molecular level for reducing side effects and enhancing therapeutic efficiency. Well-designed nanoparticles can minimize unnecessary exposure of cytotoxic drugs and maximize targeted localization of administrated drugs. This review will focus on major pharmaceutical nanomaterials and nanoparticles as key components of designing and surface engineering for targeted theragnostic drug development

  13. Recent advances in chitosan-based nanoparticulate pulmonary drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Ferro, Vito

    2016-07-01

    The advent of biodegradable polymer-encapsulated drug nanoparticles has made the pulmonary route of administration an exciting area of drug delivery research. Chitosan, a natural biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharide has received enormous attention as a carrier for drug delivery. Recently, nanoparticles of chitosan (CS) and its synthetic derivatives have been investigated for the encapsulation and delivery of many drugs with improved targeting and controlled release. Herein, recent advances in the preparation and use of micro-/nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives for pulmonary delivery of various therapeutic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines) are reviewed. Although chitosan has wide applications in terms of formulations and routes of drug delivery, this review is focused on pulmonary delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives. In addition, the controversial toxicological effects of chitosan nanoparticles for lung delivery will also be discussed.

  14. pH-Responsive Hyaluronic Acid-Based Mixed Micelles for the Hepatoma-Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin