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Sample records for tumor-associated nadh oxidase

  1. Update on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase in gastric cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tein-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-03-14

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and its prevalence has been shown to be well-correlated with cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regrettably, the poor prognosis of this disease is mainly due to its late diagnosis at advanced stages after the cancer has already metastasized. Recent research has emphasized the identification of cancer biomarkers in the hope of diagnosing cancer early and designing targeted therapies to reverse cancer progression. One member of a family of growth-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH or hydroquinone) oxidases is tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX; ENOX2). Unlike its counterpart CNOX (ENOX1), identified in normal rat liver plasma membranes and shown to be stimulated by growth factors and hormones, tNOX activity purified from rat hepatoma cells is constitutively active. Its activity is detectable in the sera of cancer patients but not in those of healthy volunteers, suggesting its clinical relevance. Interestingly, tNOX expression was shown to be present in an array of cancer cell lines. More importantly, inhibition of tNOX was well correlated with reduced cancer cell growth and induction of apoptosis. RNA interference targeting tNOX expression in cancer cells effectively restored non-cancerous phenotypes, further supporting the vital role of tNOX in cancer cells. Here, we review the regulatory role of tNOX in gastric cancer cell growth.

  2. hnRNP F directs formation of an exon 4 minus variant of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Kane, Vanessa D; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2011-11-01

    HUVEC or mouse 3T3 cells infected with SV-40 generate within 3 to 5 days post-infection an ENOX2 species corresponding to the exon-4 minus splice variant of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (ENOX2 or tNOX) expressed at the cancer cell surface. This study was to seek evidence for splicing factors that might direct formation of the exon 4 minus ENOX2 splice variant. To determine if silencing of ENOX2 exon 4 occurs because of motifs located in exon 4, transfections were performed on MCF-10A (mammary non-cancer), BT-20 (mammary cancer), and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells using a GFP minigene construct containing either a constitutively spliced exon (albumin exon 2) or the alternatively spliced ENOX2 exon 4 between the two GFP halves. Removal of exon 4 from the processed RNA of the GFP minigene construct occurred with HeLa and to a lesser extent with BT-20 but not in non-cancer MCF-10A cells. The Splicing Rainbow Program was used to identify all of the possible hnRNPs binding sites of exon 4 of ENOX2. There are 8 Exonic Splicing Silencers (ESSs) for hnRNP binding in the exon 4 sequences. Each of these sites were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to test if any were responsible for the splicing skip. Results showed MutG75 ESS mutation changed the GFP expression which is a sign of splicing silence, while other mutations did not. As MutG75 changed the ESS binding site for hnRNP F, this result suggests that hnRNP F directs formation of the exon 4 minus variant of ENOX2.

  3. Tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX)-NAD+-sirtuin 1 axis contributes to oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Yu; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tien-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Lin, You-Yu; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2017-02-28

    Oxaliplatin belongs to the platinum-based drug family and has shown promise in cancer treatment. The major mechanism of action of platinum compounds is to form platinum-DNA adducts, leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that they might also target non-DNA molecules for their apoptotic activity. We explored the effects of oxaliplatin on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX) in gastric cancer lines. In AGS cells, we found that the oxaliplatin-inhibited tNOX effectively attenuated the NAD+/NADH ratio and reduced the deacetylase activity of an NAD+-dependent sirtuin 1, thereby enhancing p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Similar results were also observed in tNOX-knockdown AGS cells. In the more aggressive MKN45 and TMK-1 lines, oxaliplatin did not inhibit tNOX, and induced only minimal apoptosis and cytotoxicity. However, the downregulation of either sirtuin 1 or tNOX sensitized TMK-1 cells to oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, tNOX-depletion in these resistant cells enhanced spontaneous apoptosis, reduced cyclin D expression and prolonged the cell cycle, resulting in diminished cancer cell growth. Together, our results demonstrate that oxaliplatin targets tNOX and SIRT1, and that the tNOX-NAD+-sirtuin 1 axis is essential for oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis.

  4. Capsaicin Inhibits Multiple Bladder Cancer Cell Phenotypes by Inhibiting Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (tNOX) and Sirtuin1 (SIRT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hung; Lee, Yi-Hui; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Chen, Huei-Yu; Jhuang, Fong-Han; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2016-06-28

    Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent cancers among males, and its poor survival rate reflects problems with aggressiveness and chemo-resistance. Recent interest has focused on the use of chemopreventatives (nontoxic natural agents that may suppress cancer progression) to induce targeted apoptosis for cancer therapy. Capsaicin, which has anti-cancer properties, is one such agent. It is known to preferentially inhibit a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX) that is preferentially expressed in cancer/transformed cells. Here, we set out to elucidate the correlation between tNOX expression and the inhibitory effects of capsaicin in human bladder cancer cells. We showed that capsaicin downregulates tNOX expression and decreases bladder cancer cell growth by enhancing apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin was found to reduce the expression levels of several proteins involved in cell cycle progression, in association with increases in the cell doubling time and enhanced cell cycle arrest. Capsaicin was also shown to inhibit the activation of ERK, thereby reducing the phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK, which leads to decreased cell migration. Finally, our results indicate that RNA interference-mediated tNOX depletion enhances spontaneous apoptosis, prolongs cell cycle progression, and reduces cell migration and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We also observed a downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in these tNOX-knockdown cells, a deacetylase that is important in multiple cellular functions. Taken together, our results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the growth of bladder cancer cells by inhibiting tNOX and SIRT1 and thereby reducing proliferation, attenuating migration, and prolonging cell cycle progression.

  5. Down-regulation of tumor-associated NADH oxidase, tNOX (ENOX2), enhances capsaicin-induced inhibition of gastric cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, His-Ming; Chuang, Show-Mei; Su, Yu-Ching; Li, Yi-Hui; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2011-11-01

    Gastric cancer is a common human malignancy and a major contributor to cancer-related deaths worldwide. Unfortunately, the prognosis of most gastric cancer patients is poor because they are generally diagnosed at a late stage after the cancer has already metastasized. Most current research, therefore, emphasizes selective targeting of cancer cells by apoptosis-inducing agents. One such therapeutic agent is capsaicin, a component of chili peppers that has been shown to possess anti-growth activity against various cancer cell lines. Here, we examined the effect of capsaicin on SNU-1 and TMC-1 gastric cancer cells and found differing outcomes between the two cell lines. Our results show that capsaicin induced significant cytotoxicity with increases in oxidative stress, PARP cleavage, and apoptosis in sensitive SNU-1 cells. In contrast, TMC-1 cells were much less sensitive to capsaicin, exhibiting low cytotoxicity and very little apoptosis in response to capsaicin treatment. Capsaicin-induced apoptosis in SNU-1 cells was associated with down-regulation of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX) mRNA and protein. On the contrary, tNOX expression was scarcely affected by capsaicin in TMC-1 cells. We further showed that tNOX-knockdown sensitized TMC-1 cells to capsaicin-induced apoptosis and G1 phase accumulation, and led to decreased cell growth, demonstrating that tNOX is essential for cancer cell growth. Collectively, these results indicate that capsaicin induces divergent effects of the growth of gastric cancer cells that parallel its effects on tNOX expression, and demonstrate that forced tNOX down-regulation restored capsaicin-induced growth inhibition in TMC-1 cells.

  6. Capsaicin Inhibits Multiple Bladder Cancer Cell Phenotypes by Inhibiting Tumor-Associated NADH Oxidase (tNOX and Sirtuin1 (SIRT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hung Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is one of the most frequent cancers among males, and its poor survival rate reflects problems with aggressiveness and chemo-resistance. Recent interest has focused on the use of chemopreventatives (nontoxic natural agents that may suppress cancer progression to induce targeted apoptosis for cancer therapy. Capsaicin, which has anti-cancer properties, is one such agent. It is known to preferentially inhibit a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX that is preferentially expressed in cancer/transformed cells. Here, we set out to elucidate the correlation between tNOX expression and the inhibitory effects of capsaicin in human bladder cancer cells. We showed that capsaicin downregulates tNOX expression and decreases bladder cancer cell growth by enhancing apoptosis. Moreover, capsaicin was found to reduce the expression levels of several proteins involved in cell cycle progression, in association with increases in the cell doubling time and enhanced cell cycle arrest. Capsaicin was also shown to inhibit the activation of ERK, thereby reducing the phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK, which leads to decreased cell migration. Finally, our results indicate that RNA interference-mediated tNOX depletion enhances spontaneous apoptosis, prolongs cell cycle progression, and reduces cell migration and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We also observed a downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 in these tNOX-knockdown cells, a deacetylase that is important in multiple cellular functions. Taken together, our results indicate that capsaicin inhibits the growth of bladder cancer cells by inhibiting tNOX and SIRT1 and thereby reducing proliferation, attenuating migration, and prolonging cell cycle progression.

  7. Early developmental expression of a normally tumor-associated and drug-inhibited cell surface-located NADH oxidase (ENOX2) in non-cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, NaMi; Morré, D James

    2009-04-01

    Full length mRNA to a drug-inhibited cell surface NADH oxidase, tNOX or ENOX2, is present in both non-cancer and cancer cells but is translated only in cancer cells as alternatively spliced variants. ENOX2 is a growth-related protein of the external plasma membrane surface that is shed into the circulation and is inhibited by a series of quinone site inhibitors with anticancer activity. To test the possibility that ENOX2 expression might be important to early stages of non-cancer cell development, the expression of the protein was monitored in chicken embryos during their development. Polyclonal antisera to a 34 kDa human serum form of ENOX2 cross-immunoreactive with the drug-responsive NADH oxidase of chicken hepatoma cells was used. The protein was identified based on drug-responsive enzymatic activities and analyses by western blots. The drug-responsive activity was associated with plasma membranes and sera of early chicken embryos and with chicken hepatoma plasma membranes but was absent from plasma membranes prepared from livers or from sera of normal adult chickens and from late embryo stages. The findings suggest that ENOX2 may fulfill some functions essential to the growth of early embryos which are lost in late embryo stages and absent from normal adult cells but which then reappear in cancer.

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tumor-associated, growth-related, and time-keeping hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase (tNOX) of the HeLa cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, Pin-Ju; Kim, Chinpal; Cho, NaMi; Morre, Dorothy M.; Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    NOX proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide interchange and exhibit prion-like properties. The two enzymatic activities alternate to generate a regular period length of about 24 min. Here we report the expression, cloning, and characterization of a tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX). The cDNA sequence of 1830 bp is located on gene Xq25-26 with an open reading frame encoding 610 amino acids. The activities of the bacterially expressed tNOX oscillate with a period length of 22 min as is characteristic of tNOX activities in situ. The activities are inhibited completely by capsaicin, which represents a defining characteristic of tNOX activity. Functional motifs identified by site-directed mutagenesis within the C-terminal portion of the tNOX protein corresponding to the processed plasma membrane-associated form include quinone (capsaicin), copper and adenine nucleotide binding domains, and two cysteines essential for catalytic activity. Four of the six cysteine to alanine replacements retained enzymatic activity, but the period lengths of the oscillations were increased. A single protein with two alternating enzymatic activities indicative of a time-keeping function is unprecedented in the biochemical literature.

  9. Gravity Responsive NADH Oxidase of the Plasma Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing gravity using an NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane which has been found to respond to unit gravity and low centrifugal g forces. The oxidation rate of NADH supplied to the NADH oxidase is measured and translated to represent the relative gravitational force exerted on the protein. The NADH oxidase of the plasma membrane may be obtained from plant or animal sources or may be produced recombinantly.

  10. Essential role of copper in the activity and regular periodicity of a recombinant, tumor-associated, cell surface, growth-related and time-keeping hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (ENOX2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Chueh, P-J; Jiang, Ziying; Layman, Sara; Martin, Berdine; Kim, Chinpal; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2010-10-01

    ECTO-NOX proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide interchange and exhibit time-keeping and prion-like properties. A bacterially expressed truncated recombinant 46 kDa ENOX2 with full ENOX2 activity bound ca 2 moles copper and 2 moles of zinc per mole of protein. Unfolding of the protein in trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of the copper chelator bathocuproine resulted in reversible loss of both enzymatic activities and of a characteristic pattern in the Amide I to Amide II ratios determined by FTIR with restoration by added copper. The H546-V-H together with His 562 form one copper binding site and H582 represents a second copper site as determined from site-directed mutagenesis. Bound copper emerges as having an essential role in ENOX2 both for enzymatic activity and for the structural changes that underly the periodic alternations in activity that define the time-keeping cycle of the protein.

  11. Gene cloning and characterization of NADH oxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genome search of Thermococcus kodakarensis revealed three open reading frames, Tk0304, Tk1299 and Tk1392 annotated as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidases. This study deals with cloning, and characterization of Tk0304. The gene, composed of 1320 nucleotides, encodes a protein of 439 ...

  12. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  13. Putting together a plasma membrane NADH oxidase: a tale of three laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Hans; Crane, Frederick L; Morré, D James

    2012-11-01

    The observation that high cellular concentrations of NADH were associated with low adenylate cyclase activity led to a search for the mechanism of the effect. Since cyclase is in the plasma membrane, we considered the membrane might have a site for NADH action, and that NADH might be oxidized at that site. A test for NADH oxidase showed very low activity, which could be increased by adding growth factors. The plasma membrane oxidase was not inhibited by inhibitors of mitochondrial NADH oxidase such as cyanide, rotenone or antimycin. Stimulation of the plasma membrane oxidase by iso-proterenol or triiodothyronine was different from lack of stimulation in endoplasmic reticulum. After 25 years of research, three components of a trans membrane NADH oxidase have been discovered. Flavoprotein NADH coenzyme Q reductases (NADH cytochrome b reductase) on the inside, coenzyme Q in the middle, and a coenzyme Q oxidase on the outside as a terminal oxidase. The external oxidase segment is a copper protein with unique properties in timekeeping, protein disulfide isomerase and endogenous NADH oxidase activity, which affords a mechanism for control of cell growth by the overall NADH oxidase and the remarkable inhibition of oxidase activity and growth of cancer cells by a wide range of anti-tumor drugs. A second trans plasma membrane electron transport system has been found in voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC), which has NADH ferricyanide reductase activity. This activity must be considered in relation to ferricyanide stimulation of growth and increased VDAC antibodies in patients with autism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. NADH oxidase activity of human xanthine oxidoreductase--generation of superoxide anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, S A; Eisenthal, R; Harrison, R

    1997-05-01

    Human xanthine oxidase was purified from breast milk. The dehydrogenase form of the enzyme, which predominates in most mammalian tissues, catalyses the oxidation of NADH by oxygen, generating superoxide anion significantly faster than does the oxidase form. The corresponding forms of bovine enzyme behave very similarly. The steady-state kinetics of NADH oxidation and superoxide production, including inhibition by NAD, by the dehydrogenase forms of both enzymes, are analysed in terms of a model involving two-stage recycling of oxidised enzyme. Established inhibitors of xanthine oxidoreductases (allopurinol oxypurinol, amflutizole and BOF 4272), which block all other reducing substrates, were ineffective in the case of NADH. Diphenyleneiodonium, on the other hand, was a powerful inhibitor of NADH oxidation. The potential involvement of reactive oxygen species arising from NADH oxidation by xanthine oxidoreductase in ischaemia-reperfusion injury and other disease states, as well as in normal signal transduction, is discusssed.

  15. The NADH oxidase from Pyrococcus furiosus: implications for the protection of anaerobic hyperthermophiles against oxidative stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, D.E.; Donnelly, C.; Mullendore, M.E.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.; Crane III, E.J.

    2001-01-01

    A wealth of H2O-producing NADH oxidase (NOX) homologues have been discovered in the genomes of the hyperthermophilic Archaea, including two homologues in the genome of Pyrococcus furiosus which have been designated as NOX1 and NOX2. In order to investigate the function of NOX1, the structural gene

  16. In vitro assessment of anticholinesterase and NADH oxidase inhibitory activities of an edible fern, Diplazium esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhrajyoti; Dutta, Somit; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Diplazium esculentum is the most commonly consumed edible fern throughout Asia and Oceania. Several studies have been performed so far to determine different functional properties of this plant, but there have been no reports on the anticholinesterase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidase inhibitory activities of this plant. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the anticholinesterase and NADH oxidase inhibitory activities of 70% methanolic extract of D. esculentum. The D. esculentum extract was investigated for its acetylcholinesterase and NADH oxidase inhibitory activities as well as its free radical scavenging and total antioxidant activities in the linoleic acid system. The free radical scavenging activity of the extract was determined by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) method. The total antioxidant activity of the extract was evaluated by ferric thiocyanate (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) methods. The D. esculentum extract inhibited acetylcholinesterase and NADH oxidase in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 272.97±19.38 and 265.81±21.20 μg/mL, respectively. The extract also showed a potent DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 402.88±12.70 μg/mL. Moreover, the extract showed 27.41% and 33.22% of total antioxidant activities determined by FTC and TBA methods, respectively. Results indicated that 70% methanolic extract of D. esculentum effectively inhibited the enzymes acetylcholinesterase and NADH oxidase and acted as a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger. These in vitro assays indicate that this plant extract is a significant source of natural antioxidants, which may be helpful in preventing the progression of various neurodegenerative disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  17. Auxin-activated NADH oxidase activity of soybean plasma membranes is distinct from the constitutive plasma membrane NADH oxidase and exhibits prion-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.; Ternes, Philipp

    2003-01-01

    The hormone-stimulated and growth-related cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase activity of etiolated hypocotyls of soybeans oscillates with a period of about 24 min or 60 times per 24-h day. Plasma membranes of soybean hypocotyls contain two such NADH oxidase activities that have been resolved by purification on concanavalin A columns. One in the apparent molecular weight range of 14-17 kDa is stimulated by the auxin herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The other is larger and unaffected by 2,4-D. The 2,4-D-stimulated activity absolutely requires 2,4-D for activity and exhibits a period length of about 24 min. Also exhibiting 24-min oscillations is the rate of cell enlargement induced by the addition of 2,4-D or the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Immediately following 2,4-D or IAA addition, a very complex pattern of oscillations is frequently observed. However, after several hours a dominant 24-min period emerges at the expense of the constitutive activity. A recruitment process analogous to that exhibited by prions is postulated to explain this behavior.

  18. Update on a tumor-associated NADH oxidase in gastric cancer cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Lee, Yi-Hui; Yuan, Tein-Ming; Chen, Shi-Wen; Chueh, Pin-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common human malignancies, and its prevalence has been shown to be well-correlated with cancer-related deaths worldwide. Regrettably, the poor prognosis of this disease is mainly due to its late diagnosis at advanced stages after the cancer has already metastasized. Recent research has emphasized the identification of cancer biomarkers in the hope of diagnosing cancer early and designing targeted therapies to reverse cancer progression. One member of a family...

  19. Increased Production of Hydrogen Peroxide by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus upon Aeration: Involvement of an NADH Oxidase in Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty-Teysset, C.; de la Torre, F.; Garel, J.-R.

    2000-01-01

    The growth of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) on lactose was altered upon aerating the cultures by agitation. Aeration caused the bacteria to enter early into stationary phase, thus reducing markedly the biomass production but without modifying the maximum growth rate. The early entry into stationary phase of aerated cultures was probably related to the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the medium. Indeed, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in aerated cultures was two to three times higher than in unaerated ones. Also, a similar shift from exponential to stationary phase could be induced in unaerated cultures by adding increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. A significant fraction of the hydrogen peroxide produced by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus originated from the reduction of molecular oxygen by NADH catalyzed by an NADH:H2O2 oxidase. The specific activity of this NADH oxidase was the same in aerated and unaerated cultures, suggesting that the amount of this enzyme was not directly regulated by oxygen. Aeration did not change the homolactic character of lactose fermentation by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and most of the NADH was reoxidized by lactate dehydrogenase with pyruvate. This indicated that NADH oxidase had no (or a very small) energetic role and could be involved in eliminating oxygen. PMID:10618234

  20. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  1. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidases Impairs Migration and Angiogenic Properties of Tumor-Associated Pericytes

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    Aline Lopes Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are important cellular components of the tumor microenviroment with established roles in angiogenesis and metastasis. These two cancer hallmarks are modulated by enzymes of the LOX family, but thus far, information about LOX relevance in tumor-associated pericytes is lacking. Here, we performed a comparative characterization of normal and tumoral pericytes and report for the first time the modulatory effects of LOX enzymes on activated pericyte properties. Tumoral pericytes isolated from childhood ependymoma and neuroblastoma specimens displayed angiogenic properties in vitro and expressed typical markers, including CD146, NG2, and PDGFRβ. Expression of all LOX family members could be detected in both normal and tumor-associated pericytes. In most pericyte samples, LOXL3 was the family member displaying the highest transcript levels. Inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with the inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile (βAPN significantly reduced migration of pericytes, while proliferation rates were kept unaltered. Formation of tube-like structures in vitro by pericytes was also significantly impaired upon inhibition of LOX/LOXL activity with βAPN, which induced more prominent effects in tumor-associated pericytes. These findings reveal a novel involvement of the LOX family of enzymes in migration and angiogenic properties of pericytes, with implications in tumor development and in therapeutic targeting tumor microenvironment constituents.

  2. Active site dynamics in NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus studied by NMR spin relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miletti, Teresa; Farber, Patrick J.; Mittermaier, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    We have characterized the backbone dynamics of NADH oxidase from Thermus thermophilus (NOX) using a recently-developed suite of NMR experiments designed to isolate exchange broadening, together with 15 N R 1 , R 1ρ , and { 1 H}- 15 N steady-state NOE relaxation measurements performed at 11.7 and 18.8 T. NOX is a 54 kDa homodimeric enzyme that belongs to a family of structurally homologous flavin reductases and nitroreductases with many potential biotechnology applications. Prior studies have suggested that flexibility is involved in the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. The active site residue W47 was previously identified as being particularly important, as its level of solvent exposure correlates with enzyme activity, and it was observed to undergo “gating” motions in computer simulations. The NMR data are consistent with these findings. Signals from W47 are dynamically broadened beyond detection and several other residues in the active site have significant R ex contributions to transverse relaxation rates. In addition, the backbone of S193, whose side chain hydroxyl proton hydrogen bonds directly with the FMN cofactor, exhibits extensive mobility on the ns–ps timescale. We hypothesize that these motions may facilitate structural rearrangements of the active site that allow NOX to accept both FMN and FAD as cofactors.

  3. Plasma membrane NADH oxidase of maize roots responds to gravity and imposed centrifugal forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, E.; Morre, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    NADH oxidase activities measured with excised roots of dark-grown maize (Zea mays) seedlings and with isolated plasma membrane vesicles from roots of dark-grown maize oscillated with a regular period length of 24 min and were inhibited by the synthetic auxin 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic [correction of dichorophenoxyacetic] acid. The activities also responded to orientation with respect to gravity and to imposed centrifugal forces. Turning the roots upside down resulted in stimulation of the activity with a lag of about 10 min. Returning the sections to the normal upright position resulted in a return to initial rates. The activity was stimulated reversibly to a maximum of about 2-fold with isolated plasma membrane vesicles, when subjected to centrifugal forces of 25 to 250 x g for 1 to 4 min duration. These findings are the first report of a gravity-responsive enzymatic activity of plant roots inhibited by auxin and potentially related to the gravity-induced growth response. c2001 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.

  4. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase of spinach leaves responds to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James; Penel, Claude; Greppin, Hubert; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (NOX) of spinach leaf disks is characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of ca. 24 min. Within a single population of plants exposed to light at the same time, NOX activities of all plants function synchronously. Exposure of plants transferred from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) resulted in a complex response pattern but with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity 36 (24+12) min after illumination and then with maxima in the rate of NOX activity every 24 min thereafter. Transient maxima in NOX activity were observed as well after 9.3 + /- 1.4 and 20.7 +/- 2.1 min. The blue light response differed from the response to red (650 nm, 10 min, 50 micromoles m-2 s-1) or white light where activity maxima were initiated 12 min after the light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Green or yellow light was ineffective. The light response was independent of the time in the 24-min NOX cycle when the light was given. The net effects of blue and red light were ultimately the same with a new maximum in the rate of NOX activity at 12+24=36 min (and every 24 min thereafter), but the mechanisms appear to be distinct.

  5. Xanthine dehydrogenase AtXDH1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a potent producer of superoxide anions via its NADH oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarepour, Maryam; Kaspari, Katrin; Stagge, Stefan; Rethmeier, Ralf; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2010-02-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase AtXDH1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a key enzyme in purine degradation where it oxidizes hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid. Electrons released from these substrates are either transferred to NAD(+) or to molecular oxygen, thereby yielding NADH or superoxide, respectively. By an alternative activity, AtXDH1 is capable of oxidizing NADH with concomitant formation of NAD(+) and superoxide. Here we demonstrate that in comparison to the specific activity with xanthine as substrate, the specific activity of recombinant AtXDH1 with NADH as substrate is about 15-times higher accompanied by a doubling in superoxide production. The observation that NAD(+) inhibits NADH oxidase activity of AtXDH1 while NADH suppresses NAD(+)-dependent xanthine oxidation indicates that both NAD(+) and NADH compete for the same binding-site and that both sub-activities are not expressed at the same time. Rather, each sub-activity is determined by specific conditions such as the availability of substrates and co-substrates, which allows regulation of superoxide production by AtXDH1. Since AtXDH1 exhibits the most pronounced NADH oxidase activity among all xanthine dehydrogenase proteins studied thus far, our results imply that in particular by its NADH oxidase activity AtXDH1 is an efficient producer of superoxide also in vivo.

  6. A reappraisal of xanthine dehydrogenase and oxidase in hypoxic reperfusion injury: the role of NADH as an electron donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Blake, D R; Stevens, C R; Kanczler, J M; Winyard, P G; Symons, M C; Benboubetra, M; Harrison, R

    1998-02-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is conventionally known as a generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which contribute to hypoxic-reperfusion injury in tissues. However, this role for human XO is disputed due to its distinctive lack of activity towards xanthine, and the failure of allopurinol to suppress reperfusion injury. In this paper, we have employed native gel electrophoresis together with activity staining to investigate the role human xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) and XO in hypoxic reperfusion injury. This approach has provided information which cannot be obtained by conventional spectrophotometric assays. We found that both XD and XO of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and lymphoblastic leukaemic cells (CEMs) catalysed ROS generation by oxidising NADH, but not hypoxanthine. The conversion of XD to XO was observed in both HUVECs and CEMs in response to hypoxia, although the level of conversion varied. Purified human milk XD generated ROS more efficiently in the presence of NADH than in the presence of hypoxanthine. This NADH oxidising activity was blocked by the FAD site inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), but was not suppressible by the molybdenum site inhibitor, allopurinol. However, in the presence of both DPI and allopurinol the activities of XD/XO were completely blocked with either NADH or hypoxanthine as substrates. We conclude that both human XD and XO can oxidise NADH to generate ROS. Therefore, the conversion of XD to XO is not necessary for post-ischaemic ROS generation. The hypoxic-reperfusion injury hypothesis should be reappraised to take into account the important role played by XD and XO in oxidising NADH to yield ROS.

  7. Cellular localization of D-lactate dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase from Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagala, Vishwajeeth Reddy; Park, Joohye; Reed, David W; Hartzell, Patricia L

    2002-09-01

    Members of the genus Archaeoglobus are hyperthermophilic sulfate reducers with an optimal growth temperature of 83 degrees C. Archaeoglobus fulgidus can utilize simple compounds including D-lactate, L-lactate and pyruvate as the sole substrate for carbon and electrons for dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Previously we showed that this organism makes a D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld) that requires FAD and Zn2+ for activity. To determine the cellular location and topology of Dld and to identify proteins that interact with Dld, an antibody directed against Dld was prepared. Immunocytochemical studies using gold particle-coated secondary antibodies show that more than 85% of Dld is associated with the membrane. A truncated form of Dld was detected in immunoblots of whole cells treated with protease, showing that Dld is an integral membrane protein and that a significant portion of Dld, including part of the FAD-binding pocket, is outside the membrane facing the S-layer. The gene encoding Dld is part of an operon that includes noxA2, which encodes one of several NADH oxidases in A. fulgidus. Previous studies have shown that NoxA2 remains bound to Dld during purification. Thin sections of A. fulgidus probed simultaneously with antibodies against Dld and NoxA2 show that both proteins co-localized to the same sites in the membrane. Although these data show a tight interaction between NoxA2 and Dld, the role of NoxA2 in electron transport reactions is unknown. Rather, NoxA2 may protect proteins involved in electron transfer by reducing O2 to H2O2 or H2O.

  8. Enhanced xylose fermentation by engineered yeast expressing NADH oxidase through high cell density inoculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2017-03-01

    Accumulation of reduced byproducts such as glycerol and xylitol during xylose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae hampers the economic production of biofuels and chemicals from cellulosic hydrolysates. In particular, engineered S. cerevisiae expressing NADPH-linked xylose reductase (XR) and NAD + -linked xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) produces substantial amounts of the reduced byproducts under anaerobic conditions due to the cofactor difference of XR and XDH. While the additional expression of a water-forming NADH oxidase (NoxE) from Lactococcus lactis in engineered S. cerevisiae with the XR/XDH pathway led to reduced glycerol and xylitol production and increased ethanol yields from xylose, volumetric ethanol productivities by the engineered yeast decreased because of growth defects from the overexpression of noxE. In this study, we introduced noxE into an engineered yeast strain (SR8) exhibiting near-optimal xylose fermentation capacity. To overcome the growth defect caused by the overexpression of noxE, we used a high cell density inoculum for xylose fermentation by the SR8 expressing noxE. The resulting strain, SR8N, not only showed a higher ethanol yield and lower byproduct yields, but also exhibited a high ethanol productivity during xylose fermentation. As noxE overexpression elicits a negligible growth defect on glucose conditions, the beneficial effects of noxE overexpression were substantial when a mixture of glucose and xylose was used. Consumption of glucose led to rapid cell growth and therefore enhanced the subsequent xylose fermentation. As a result, the SR8N strain produced more ethanol and fewer byproducts from a mixture of glucose and xylose than the parental SR8 strain without noxE overexpression. Our results suggest that the growth defects from noxE overexpression can be overcome in the case of fermenting lignocellulose-derived sugars such as glucose and xylose.

  9. Cofactor engineering through heterologous expression of an NADH oxidase and its impact on metabolic flux redistribution in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Xiao-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetoin is an important bio-based platform chemical. However, it is usually existed as a minor byproduct of 2,3-butanediol fermentation in bacteria. Results The present study reports introducing an exogenous NAD+ regeneration sysytem into a 2,3-butanediol producing strain Klebsiella pneumoniae to increse the accumulation of acetoin. Batch fermentation suggested that heterologous expression of the NADH oxidase in K. pneumoniae resulted in large decreases in the intracellular NADH concentration (1.4 fold and NADH/NAD+ ratio (2.0 fold. Metabolic flux analysis revealed that fluxes to acetoin and acetic acid were enhanced, whereas, production of lactic acid and ethanol were decreased, with the accumualation of 2,3-butanediol nearly unaltered. By fed-batch culture of the recombinant, the highest reported acetoin production level (25.9 g/L by Klebsiella species was obtained. Conclusions The present study indicates that microbial production of acetoin could be improved by decreasing the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio in K. pneumoniae. It demonstrated that the cofactor engineering method, which is by manipulating the level of intracellular cofactors to redirect cellular metabolism, could be employed to achieve a high efficiency of producing the NAD+-dependent microbial metabolite.

  10. New biotechnological perspectives of a NADH oxidase variant from Thermus thermophilus HB27 as NAD+-recycling enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha-Martín Javier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of biotransformations that use nicotinamide recycling systems is exponentially growing. For this reason one of the current challenges in biocatalysis is to develop and optimize more simple and efficient cofactor recycling systems. One promising approach to regenerate NAD+ pools is the use of NADH-oxidases that reduce oxygen to hydrogen peroxide while oxidizing NADH to NAD+. This class of enzymes may be applied to asymmetric reduction of prochiral substrates in order to obtain enantiopure compounds. Results The NADH-oxidase (NOX presented here is a flavoenzyme which needs exogenous FAD or FMN to reach its maximum velocity. Interestingly, this enzyme is 6-fold hyperactivated by incubation at high temperatures (80°C under limiting concentrations of flavin cofactor, a change that remains stable even at low temperatures (37°C. The hyperactivated form presented a high specific activity (37.5 U/mg at low temperatures despite isolation from a thermophile source. Immobilization of NOX onto agarose activated with glyoxyl groups yielded the most stable enzyme preparation (6-fold more stable than the hyperactivated soluble enzyme. The immobilized derivative was able to be reactivated under physiological conditions after inactivation by high solvent concentrations. The inactivation/reactivation cycle could be repeated at least three times, recovering full NOX activity in all cases after the reactivation step. This immobilized catalyst is presented as a recycling partner for a thermophile alcohol dehydrogenase in order to perform the kinetic resolution secondary alcohols. Conclusion We have designed, developed and characterized a heterogeneous and robust biocatalyst which has been used as recycling partner in the kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethanol. The high stability along with its capability to be reactivated makes this biocatalyst highly re-useable for cofactor recycling in redox biotransformations.

  11. Comparison of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and two water-forming NADH oxidases from Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Chong, Huiqing; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-12-01

    Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) is an ubiquitous facultative anaerobic bacterium, and its growth in aerobic environment correlates to the functions of its oxygen defense system. Water-forming NADH oxidase (nox-2) can catalyze the conversion of oxygen to water with concomitant NADH oxidation in anaerobic microorganisms. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of two annotated nox-2 s (nox-2(444) and nox-2(554)) from B. cereus ATCC 14579 and their comparison with another oxidative stress defense system alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpR) from this microbe, which composed of two enzymes-hydrogen peroxide-forming NADH oxidase (nox-1) and peroxidase. Both nox-2 and AhpR catalyze the same reaction in the presence of oxygen. With the stimulation of exogenously added FAD, the maximum activity of nox-1, nox-2(444), and nox-2(554) could reach 27.7 U/mg, 22.9 U/mg, and 2.4 U/mg, respectively, at pH 7.0, 30 °C. Different from nox-1, both nox-2 s were thermotolerant enzymes and could maintain above 87% of their optimum activity at 80 °C, which was not found in other nox-2 s. As for operational stability, all are turnover-limited. Exogenously added reductive reagent dithiothreitol could dramatically increase the total turnover number of nox-2(444) and nox-2(554) by twofold and threefold, respectively, but had no effect on AhpR or nox-1.

  12. Characterization of water-forming NADH oxidases for co-factor regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Gustav; Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; J. Charnock, Simon

    an environmentaland economic perspective [1]. Alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) offer one such alternative. However, the reaction requires the oxidized nicotinamide co-factor (NAD+) that must be recycled due to its high cost contribution. One regeneration method that offers certain advantages is the oxidation of NADH...

  13. NADH oxidase activity (NOX) and enlargement of HeLa cells oscillate with two different temperature-compensated period lengths of 22 and 24 minutes corresponding to different NOX forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Pogue, R.; Morre, D. M.; Morre, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    NOX proteins are cell surface-associated and growth-related hydroquinone (NADH) oxidases with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity. A defining characteristic of NOX proteins is that the two enzymatic activities alternate to generate a regular period length of about 24 min. HeLa cells exhibit at least two forms of NOX. One is tumor-associated (tNOX) and is inhibited by putative quinone site inhibitors (e.g., capsaicin or the antitumor sulfonylurea, LY181984). Another is constitutive (CNOX) and refractory to inhibition. The periodic alternation of activities and drug sensitivity of the NADH oxidase activity observed with intact HeLa cells was retained in isolated plasma membranes and with the solubilized and partially purified enzyme. At least two activities were present. One had a period length of 24 min and the other had a period length of 22 min. The lengths of both the 22 and the 24 min periods were temperature compensated (approximately the same when measured at 17, 27 or 37 degrees C) whereas the rate of NADH oxidation approximately doubled with each 10 degrees C rise in temperature. The rate of increase in cell area of HeLa cells when measured by video-enhanced light microscopy also exhibited a complex period of oscillations reflective of both 22 and 24 min period lengths. The findings demonstrate the presence of a novel oscillating NOX activity at the surface of cancer cells with a period length of 22 min in addition to the constitutive NOX of non-cancer cells and tissues with a period length of 24 min.

  14. The plasma membrane-associated NADH oxidase (ECTO-NOX) of mouse skin responds to blue light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morre, D. James; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2003-01-01

    NADH oxidases of the external plasma membrane surface (ECTO-NOX proteins) are characterized by oscillations in activity with a regular period length of 24 min. Explants of mouse skin exhibit the oscillatory activity as estimated from the decrease in A(340) suggesting that individual ECTO-NOX molecules must somehow be induced to function synchronously. Transfer of explants of mouse skin from darkness to blue light (495 nm, 2 min, 50 micromol m(-1) s(-1)) resulted in initiation of a new activity maximum (entrainment) with a midpoint 36 min after light exposure followed by maxima every 24 min thereafter. Addition of melatonin resulted in a new maximum 24 min after melatonin addition. The findings suggest that the ECTO-NOX proteins play a central role in the entrainment of the biological clock both by light and by melatonin.

  15. A water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus and its potential application in the regeneration of synthetic biomimetic cofactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eNowak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cell-free biocatalytic production of fine chemicals by oxidoreductases has continuously grown over the past years. Since especially dehydrogenases depend on the stoichiometric use of nicotinamide pyridine cofactors, an integrated efficient recycling system is crucial to allow process operation under economic conditions. Lately, the variety of cofactors for biocatalysis was broadened by the utilization of totally synthetic and cheap biomimetics. Though, to date the regeneration has been limited to chemical or electrochemical methods. Here, we report an enzymatic recycling by the flavoprotein NADH-oxidase from Lactobacillus pentosus (LpNox. Since this enzyme has not been described before, we first characterized it in regard to its optimal reaction parameters. We found that the heterologously overexpressed enzyme only contained 13 % FAD. In vitro loading of the enzyme with FAD, resulted in a higher specific activity towards its natural cofactor NADH as well as different nicotinamide derived biomimetics. Apart from the enzymatic recycling, which gives water as a by-product by transferring four electrons onto oxygen, unbound FAD can also catalyse the oxidation of biomimetic cofactors. Here a two electron process takes place yielding H2O2 instead. The enzymatic and chemical recycling was compared in regard to reaction kinetics for the natural and biomimetic cofactors. With LpNox and FAD, two recycling strategies for biomimetic cofactors are described with either water or hydrogen peroxide as a by-product.

  16. NADH Oxidase of Streptococcus thermophilus 1131 is Required for the Effective Yogurt Fermentation with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yasuko; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Hiroko; Mukai, Takao; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that dissolved oxygen (DO) suppresses yogurt fermentation with an industrial starter culture composed of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) 2038 and Streptococcus thermophilus 1131, and also found that reducing the DO in the medium prior to fermentation (deoxygenated fermentation) shortens the fermentation time. In this study, we found that deoxygenated fermentation primarily increased the cell number of S. thermophilus 1131 rather than that of L. bulgaricus 2038, resulting in earlier l-lactate and formate accumulation. Measurement of the DO concentration and hydrogen peroxide generation in the milk medium suggested that DO is mainly removed by S. thermophilus 1131. The results using an H2O-forming NADH oxidase (Nox)-defective mutant of S. thermophilus 1131 revealed that Nox is the major oxygen-consuming enzyme of the bacterium. Yogurt fermentation with the S. thermophilus Δnox mutant and L. bulgaricus 2038 was significantly slower than with S. thermophilus 1131 and L. bulgaricus 2038, and the DO concentrations of the mixed culture did not decrease to less than 2 mg/kg within 3 hr. These observations suggest that Nox of S. thermophilus 1131 contributes greatly to yogurt fermentation, presumably by removing the DO in milk.

  17. Structural Analysis of Streptococcus pyogenes NADH Oxidase: Conformational Dynamics Involved in Formation of the C(4a)-Peroxyflavin Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Jamie R; Mallett, T Conn; Okuno, Takashi; Parsonage, Derek; Sakai, Hiroaki; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Claiborne, Al

    2015-11-17

    In probing the oxygen reactivity of an Enterococcus faecalis NADH oxidase (Nox; O2 → 2H2O) C42S mutant lacking the Cys42-sulfenic acid (Cys42-SOH) redox center, we provided direct evidence of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin intermediate in the oxidative half-reaction and also described a conformational or chemical change that is rate-limiting for full reoxidation of the homodimer. In this work, the Nox from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpyNox) has been expressed and crystallized, and the overoxidized wild-type [Cys44-SOH → Cys44-sulfinic acid (Cys44-SO2H)] and C44S mutant enzyme structures have been refined at 2.0 and 2.15 Å, respectively. We show that azide binds to the two-electron reduced wild-type (EH2) enzyme and to the mutant enzyme in solution, but with a significantly higher affinity for the mutant protein. The spectral course of the titration with the SpyNox EH2 form clearly indicates progressive displacement of the Cys44-S(-) → FAD charge-transfer interaction. An azide soak with C44S Nox crystals led to the structure of the complex, as refined at 2.10 Å. The active-site N3(-) ligand is proximal to the Ser44 and His11 side chains, and a significant shift in the Ser44 side chain also appears. This provides an attractive explanation for the azide-induced loss of charge-transfer absorbance seen with the wild-type EH2 form and also permits accommodation of a C(4a)-peroxyflavin structural model. The conformation of Ser44 and the associated helical element, and the resulting steric accommodation, appear to be linked to the conformational change described in the E. faecalis C42S Nox oxidative half-reaction.

  18. An association between polymorphism of the NADH/NADPH oxidase p22phox (phagocyte oxidase) subunit and aging in Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaaltı, Zeliha; Kaya, Dilek; Bacaksız, Ayşegül; Söylemez, Esma; Söylemezoğlu, Tülin

    2013-10-01

    Aging is a complex and multifactorial process that is stimulated by a number of factors including genes and life-style. It is thought that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the face of antioxidant enzymes and molecules is related to aging and age-related diseases. NAD(P)H oxidase system is the predominant cellular source of ROS, and p22phox, the major component of that system, is essential for the activation of NAD(P)H oxidase. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between p22phox C242T single nucleotide polymorphism and aging in Turkish population. Blood samples were collected from 332 volunteers between 18 and 95 years of age and were classified into three groups according to their ages as ages and age groups, statistically significant associations were found. We showed for the first time that human aging is significantly associated with p22phox C242T genotypes in Turkish population, being highest in CC, intermediate in CT, and lowest in TT homozygote. It is plausible to suggest that CC genotype might protect people from chronic inflammation, diseases as well as from oxidative stress and, thus, individuals with CC genotype might be more advantageous for aging as compared to those with CT + TT genotypes.

  19. Alternative splicing as the basis for specific localization of tNOX, a unique hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase, to the cancer cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Tian, Zengsui; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Chen, Ssuhen; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2007-10-30

    A novel hydroquinone and NADH oxidase with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (designated ENOX2 or tNOX), associated exclusively with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at the surface of cancer cells and in sera of cancer patients, is absent from the surface of noncancer cells and from sera of healthy individuals. Full-length tNOX mRNA is present in both normal and tumor cells but appears not to be expressed in either. Our research suggests alternative splicing as the basis for the cancer specificity of tNOX expression at the cell surface. Four splice variants were found. Of these, the exon 4 minus and exon 5 minus forms present in cancer cell lines were absent in noncancer cell lines. In contrast to full-length tNOX cDNA, transfection of COS cells with tNOX exon 4 minus cDNA resulted in overexpression of mature 34 kDa tNOX protein at the plasma membrane. The exon 4 minus form resulted in initiation of translation at a downstream M231 initiation site distinct from that of full-length mRNA. With replacement of M231 by site-directed mutagenesis, no translation of exon 4 minus cDNA or cell surface expression of 34 kDa mature tNOX was observed. The unprocessed molecular mass of 47 kDa of the exon 4 minus cDNA translated from methionine 231 corresponded to that of the principal native tNOX form of the endoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, the molecular basis of cancer-cell-specific expression of 34 kDa tNOX appears to reside in the cancer-specific expression of exon 4 minus splice variant mRNA.

  20. Reciprocal relationship between cytosolic NADH and ENOX2 inhibition triggers sphingolipid-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Thomas; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2010-08-15

    ENOX2 (tNOX), a tumor-associated cell surface ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase, functions as an alternative terminal oxidase for plasma membrane electron transport. Ubiquitous in all cancer cell lines studied thus far, ENOX2 expression correlates with the abnormal growth and division associated with the malignant phenotype. ENOX2 has been proposed as the cellular target for various quinone site inhibitors that demonstrate anticancer activity such as the green tea constituent epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg) and the isoflavone phenoxodiol (PXD). Here we present a possible mechanism that explains how these substances result in apoptosis in cancer cells by ENOX2-mediated alterations of cytosolic amounts of NAD(+) and NADH. When ENOX2 is inhibited, plasma membrane electron transport is diminished, and cytosolic NADH accumulates. We show in HeLa cells that NADH levels modulate the activities of two pivotal enzymes of sphingolipid metabolism: sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) and neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase). Their respective products sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide (Cer) are key determinants of cell fate. S1P promotes cell survival and Cer promotes apoptosis. Using plasma membranes isolated from cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells as well as purified proteins of both bacterial and human origin, we demonstrate that NADH inhibits SK1 and stimulates nSMase, while NAD(+) inhibits nSMase and has no effect on SK1. Additionally, intact HeLa cells treated with ENOX2 inhibitors exhibit an increase in Cer and a decrease in S1P. Treatments that stimulate cytosolic NADH production potentiate the antiproliferative effects of ENOX2 inhibitors while those that attenuate NADH production or stimulate plasma membrane electron transport confer a survival advantage. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a candidate human growth-related and time-keeping constitutive cell surface hydroquinone (NADH) oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ziying; Gorenstein, Nina M; Morré, Dorothy M; Morré, D James

    2008-12-30

    ENOX (ECTO-NOX) proteins are growth-related cell surface proteins that catalyze both hydroquinone or NADH oxidation and protein disulfide-thiol interchange and exhibit both prion-like and time-keeping (clock) properties. The two enzymatic activities they catalyze alternate to generate a regular period of 24 min in length. Here we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of a human candidate constitutive ENOX (CNOX or ENOX1) protein. The gene encoding this 643 amino acid long protein is located on chromosome 13 (13q 14.11). Functional motifs previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis in a cancer-associated ENOX (tNOX or ENOX2) as adenine nucleotide or copper binding along with essential cysteines are present, but the drug-binding motif (EEMTE) sequence of ENOX2 is absent. The activities of the recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli were not affected by capsaicin, EGCg, and other ENOX2-inhibiting substances. The purified recombinant protein bound ca. 2 mol of copper/mol of protein. Bound copper was necessary for activity. H260 and H579 were required for copper binding as confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, loss of copper-binding capacity, and resultant loss of enzymatic activity. Addition of melatonin phased the 24 min period such that the next complete period began exactly 24 min after the melatonin addition as appears to be characteristic of ENOX1 activities in general. Oxidative activity was exhibited with both NAD(P)H and reduced coenzyme Q as substrate. Concentrated solutions of the purified candidate ENOX1 protein irreversibly formed insoluble aggregates, devoid of enzymatic activity, resembling amyloid.

  2. Mitochondrial energy-dissipating systems (alternative oxidase, uncoupling proteins, and external NADH dehydrogenase) are involved in development of frost-resistance of winter wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabelnych, O I; Borovik, O A; Tauson, E L; Pobezhimova, T P; Katyshev, A I; Pavlovskaya, N S; Koroleva, N A; Lyubushkina, I V; Bashmakov, V Yu; Popov, V N; Borovskii, G B; Voinikov, V K

    2014-06-01

    Gene expression, protein synthesis, and activities of alternative oxidase (AOX), uncoupling proteins (UCP), adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), and non-coupled NAD(P)H dehydrogenases (NDex, NDPex, and NDin) were studied in shoots of etiolated winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings after exposure to hardening low positive (2°C for 7 days) and freezing (-2°C for 2 days) temperatures. The cold hardening efficiently increased frost-resistance of the seedlings and decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during further cold shock. Functioning of mitochondrial energy-dissipating systems can represent a mechanism responsible for the decrease in ROS under these conditions. These systems are different in their response to the action of the hardening low positive and freezing temperatures. The functioning of the first system causes induction of AOX and UCP synthesis associated with an increase in electron transfer via AOX in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and also with an increase in the sensitivity of mitochondrial non-phosphorylating respiration to linoleic and palmitic acids. The increase in electron transfer via AOX upon exposure of seedlings to hardening freezing temperature is associated with retention of a high activity of NDex. It seems that NDex but not the NDPex and NDin can play an important role in maintaining the functional state of mitochondria in heterotrophic tissues of plants under the influence of freezing temperatures. The involvement of the mitochondrial energy-dissipating systems and their possible physiological role in the adaptation of winter crops to cold and frost are discussed.

  3. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) Deacetylase Activity and NAD⁺/NADH Ratio Are Imperative for Capsaicin-Mediated Programmed Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Chen, Huei-Yu; Su, Lilly J; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2015-08-26

    Capsaicin is considered a chemopreventive agent by virtue of its selective antigrowth activity, commonly associated with apoptosis, against cancer cells. However, noncancerous cells possess relatively higher tolerance to capsaicin, although the underlying mechanism for this difference remains unclear. Hence, this study aimed to elucidate the differential effects of capsaicin on cell lines from lung tissues by addressing the signal pathway leading to two types of cell death. In MRC-5 human fetal lung cells, capsaicin augmented silent mating type information regulation 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity and the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, decreasing acetylation of p53 and inducing autophagy. In contrast, capsaicin decreased the intracellular NAD(+)/NADH ratio, possibly through inhibition of tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX), and diminished SIRT1 expression leading to enhanced p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Moreover, SIRT1 depletion by RNA interference attenuated capsaicin-induced apoptosis in A549 cancer cells and autophagy in MRC-5 cells, suggesting a vital role for SIRT1 in capsaicin-mediated cell death. Collectively, these data not only explain the differential cytotoxicity of capsaicin but shed light on the distinct cellular responses to capsaicin in cancerous and noncancerous cell lines.

  4. Influence of oxygen on NADH recycling and oxidative stress resistance systems in Lactobacillus panis PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R; Tanaka, Takuji

    2013-01-31

    Lactobacillus panis strain PM1 is an obligatory heterofermentative and aerotolerant microorganism that also produces 1,3-propanediol from glycerol. This study investigated the metabolic responses of L. panis PM1 to oxidative stress under aerobic conditions. Growth under aerobic culture triggered an early entrance of L. panis PM1 into the stationary phase along with marked changes in end-product profiles. A ten-fold higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide was accumulated during aerobic culture compared to microaerobic culture. This H2O2 level was sufficient for the complete inhibition of L. panis PM1 cell growth, along with a significant reduction in end-products typically found during anaerobic growth. In silico analysis revealed that L. panis possessed two genes for NADH oxidase and NADH peroxidase, but their expression levels were not significantly affected by the presence of oxygen. Specific activities for these two enzymes were observed in crude extracts from L. panis PM1. Enzyme assays demonstrated that the majority of the H2O2 in the culture media was the product of NADH: H2O2 oxidase which was constitutively-active under both aerobic and microaerobic conditions; whereas, NADH peroxidase was positively-activated by the presence of oxygen and had a long induction time in contrast to NADH oxidase. These observations indicated that a coupled NADH oxidase - NADH peroxidase system was the main oxidative stress resistance mechanism in L. panis PM1, and was regulated by oxygen availability. Under aerobic conditions, NADH is mainly reoxidized by the NADH oxidase - peroxidase system rather than through the production of ethanol (or 1,3-propanediol or succinic acid production if glycerol or citric acid is available). This system helped L. panis PM1 directly use oxygen in its energy metabolism by producing extra ATP in contrast to homofermentative lactobacilli.

  5. Characterization of vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity and isolation of yeast DNA which complements a class 1 vanadate resistance mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minasi, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    A vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity has been characterized in plasma membranes from the yeast S cerevisiae. NADH oxidation activity was maximally stimulated at pH 5.0 in phosphate buffer. NADH oxidation was not dependent on the concentration of plasma membranes. The vanadate-dependent NADH oxidation activity was abolished under anaerobic conditions and the concomitant uptake of oxygen occurred during NADH oxidation. The activity was inhibited by superoxide dismutase and stimulated by the presence of paraquat. These results indicate that the vanadate stimulation of NADH oxidation in yeast plasma membranes occurs as a result of the vanadate-dependent oxidation of NADH by superoxide, generated by a plasma membrane NADH oxidase. 51 V-NMR results indicated that a phosphate-vanadate anhydride was the stimulatory species in pH 5.0 and pH 7.0 phosphate buffer. Yeast DNA has been isolated which complements a class 1 vanadate resistance mutation

  6. Engineering the Pichia pastoris methanol oxidation pathway for improved NADH regeneration during whole-cell biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Kirsten; Peter Luef, Klaus; Stefan Hartner, Franz; Glieder, Anton; Pscheidt, Beate

    2010-01-01

    Industrial biocatalytic reduction processes require the efficient regeneration of reduced cofactors for the asymmetric reduction of prochiral compounds to chiral intermediates which are needed for the production of fine chemicals and drugs. Here, we present a new engineering strategy for improved NADH regeneration based on the Pichia pastoris methanol oxidation pathway. Studying the kinetic properties of alcohol oxidase (AOX), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and using the derived kinetic data for subsequent kinetic simulations of NADH formation rates led to the identification of FLD activity to constitute the main bottleneck for efficient NADH recycling via the methanol dissimilation pathway. The simulation results were confirmed constructing a recombinant P. pastoris strain overexpressing P. pastoris FLD and the highly active NADH-dependent butanediol dehydrogenase from S. cerevisiae. Employing the engineered strain, significantly improved butanediol production rates were achieved in whole-cell biotransformations.

  7. Increasing NADH oxidation reduces overflow metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vemuri, Goutham; Eiteman, M.A; McEwen, J.E

    2007-01-01

    Crabtree effect.’’ The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as an important model organism for studying the Crabtree effect. When subjected to increasing glycolytic fluxes under aerobic conditions, there is a threshold value of the glucose uptake rate at which the metabolism shifts from purely...... effect is due to limited respiratory capacity or is caused by glucose-mediated repression of respiration. When respiration in S. cerevisiae was increased by introducing a heterologous alternative oxidase, we observed reduced aerobic ethanol formation. In contrast, increasing nonrespiratory NADH oxidation...

  8. Gene cloning and characterization of NADH oxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... coli resulted in the production of Tk0304 in soluble form which was purified by heat treatment at 80°C ... BLAST, basic local alignment search tool; PCR, polymerase chain reaction;. SDS-PAGE, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. ..... Responses of lactic acid bacteria to oxygen.

  9. Gene cloning and characterization of NADH oxidase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... protein of 439 amino acids with a molecular weight of 48 kDa. Expression of the ... DNA Data Bank of Japan (http://clustalw.ddbj.nig.ac.jp/top-e.html). ... Protein pattern analysis was performed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Estimation of protein contents. Protein ...

  10. Natural inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magdolen, U.; Krol, J.; Sato, S.; Schmitt, M.; Magdolen, V.; Krueger, A.; Mueller, M.M.; Sperl, S.

    2002-01-01

    The turnover and remodelling of extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential part of many normal biological processes including development, morphogenesis, and wound healing. ECM turnover also occurs in severe pathological situations like artherosclerosis, fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. The major proteases involved in this turnover are serine proteases (especially the urokinase-type plasminogen activator/plasmin system), matrix metalloproteases (a family of about 20 zinc-dependent endopeptidases including collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, and membrane-type metalloproteases), and cysteine proteases. In vivo, the activity of these proteases is tightly regulated in the extracellular space by zymogen activation and/or controlled inhibition. In the present review, we give an overview on the structure and biochemical properties of important tumor-associated protease inhibitors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1, PAI-2), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and -4), and the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C. Interestingly, some of these inhibitors of tumor-associated proteases display multiple functions which rather promote than inhibit tumor progression, when the presence of inhibitors in the tumor tissue is not balanced. (author)

  11. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. (Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada (Spain)); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. (Instituto de Catalisis, Madrid (Spain))

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  12. Solid tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Madson Q; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2010-11-01

    We present an update on molecular and clinical genetics of solid tumors associated with the various multiple endocrine neoplasias (MEN) syndromes. MEN type 1 (MEN1) describes the association of pituitary, parathyroid, and pancreatic islet cell tumors with a variety of many other lesions. MEN type 2 (MEN2) conditions represent at least four different syndromes that associate pheochromocytoma with medullary thyroid carcinoma, hyperparathyroidism, and a number of other manifestations. Other pheochromocytoma-associated syndromes include von Hippel-Lindau disease; neurofibromatosis 1; the recently defined paraganglioma syndromes type 1, 3, and 4; Carney-Stratakis syndrome; and the Carney triad. Carney-Stratakis syndrome is characterized by the association of paragangliomas and familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In the Carney triad, patients can manifest gastrointestinal stromal tumors, lung chondroma, paraganglioma, adrenal adenoma and pheochromocytoma, esophageal leiomyoma, and other conditions. The Carney complex is yet another form of MEN that is characterized by skin tumors and pigmented lesions, myxomas, schwannomas, and various endocrine neoplasias. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors.

  14. Complementation of mitochondrial electron transport chain by manipulation of the NAD+/NADH ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, Denis V; Cracan, Valentin; Goodman, Russell P; Peng, Jun; Grabarek, Zenon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-04-08

    A decline in electron transport chain (ETC) activity is associated with many human diseases. Although diminished mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production is recognized as a source of pathology, the contribution of the associated reduction in the ratio of the amount of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to that of its reduced form (NADH) is less clear. We used a water-forming NADH oxidase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbNOX) as a genetic tool for inducing a compartment-specific increase of the NAD(+)/NADH ratio in human cells. We used LbNOX to demonstrate the dependence of key metabolic fluxes, gluconeogenesis, and signaling on the cytosolic or mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADH ratios. Expression of LbNOX in the cytosol or mitochondria ameliorated proliferative and metabolic defects caused by an impaired ETC. The results underscore the role of reductive stress in mitochondrial pathogenesis and demonstrate the utility of targeted LbNOX for direct, compartment-specific manipulation of redox state. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase.

  16. NADH peroxidase: kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein reductase isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed and all support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. Further support for the ping-pong nature of the kinetic mechanism are the hydrogen peroxide independent transhydrogenase activity of the enzyme, measured either with thio-NAD or with radiolabeled NAD (isotope exchange studies). Kinetic parameters will be presented for a number of reduced pyridine nucleotide analogs. Analogs which have been modified in the adenine ring exhibit much higher K/sub m/'s relative to their adenine analogs. NADH peroxidase catalyzes the stereo-specific removal of the 4S hydrogen of NADH and primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined for a number of these substrates with 4S-deuterated molecules. There is a strong correlation between their steady-state K/sub m/ and /sup D/V/K. Small values for /sup D/V are interpreted as supporting rate-limitation in the oxidative half-reaction. These data will be discussed in terms of a kinetic and chemical mechanism proposed for NADH peroxidase

  17. Converting NADH to NAD+ by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase as a novel strategy against mitochondrial pathologies during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, Abdullah

    2009-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA defects are involved supposedly via free radicals in many pathologies including aging and cancer. But, interestingly, free radical production was not found increased in prematurely aging mice having higher mutation rate in mtDNA. Therefore, some other mechanisms like the increase of mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) and ubiquinol/ubiquinone ratios, can be in action in respiratory chain defects. NADH/NAD(+) ratio can be normalized by the activation or overexpression of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT), a mitochondrial enzyme catalyzing the following very important reaction: NADH + NADP(+ ) NADPH + NAD(+). The products NAD(+) and NADPH are required in many critical biological processes, e.g., NAD(+) is used by histone deacetylase Sir2 which regulates longevity in different species. NADPH is used in a number of biosynthesis reactions (e.g., reduced glutathione synthesis), and processes like apoptosis. Increased ubiquinol/ubiquinone ratio interferes the function of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, the only mitochondrial enzyme involved in ubiquinone mediated de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Uridine and its prodrug triacetyluridine are used to compensate pyrimidine deficiency but their bioavailability is limited. Therefore, the normalization of the ubiquinol/ubiquinone ratio can be accomplished by allotopic expression of alternative oxidase, a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxidase which converts ubiquinol to ubiquinone.

  18. NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase of Leaf Plasma Membranes : Partial Purification and Immunological Relation to Potato Tuber Microsomal NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase and Spinach Leaf NADH-Nitrate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerlund, P; Laurent, P; Nakagawa, H; Kader, J C

    1991-01-01

    Plasma membranes obtained by two-phase partitioning of microsomal fractions from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv Medania) and sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) contained relatively high NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activities. Both of these activities were latent. To investigate whether these activities were due to the same enzyme, plasma membrane polypeptides were separated with SDS-PAGE and analyzed with immunoblotting methods. Antibodies raised against microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase (tentatively identified as NADH-cytochrome b(5) reductase, EC 1.6.2.2), purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Bintje) tuber microsomes, displayed one single band at 43 kilodaltons when reacted with spinach plasma membranes, whereas lgG produced against NR from spinach leaves gave a major band at 110 kilodaltons together with a few fainter bands of lower molecular mass. Immunoblotting analysis using inside-out and right-side-out plasma membrane vesicles strongly indicated that NR was not an integral protein but probably trapped inside the plasma membrane vesicles during homogenization. Proteins from spinach plasma membranes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio] 1-propane-sulfonate and separated on a Mono Q anion exchange column at pH 5.6 with fast protein liquid chromatography. One major peak of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity was found after separation. The peak fraction was enriched about 70-fold in this activity compared to the plasma membrane. When the peak fractions were analyzed with SDS-PAGE the NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity strongly correlated with a 43 kilodalton polypeptide which reacted with the antibodies against potato microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase. Thus, our data indicate that most, if not all, of the truly membrane-bound NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity of leaf plasma membranes is due to an enzyme very similar to potato tuber

  19. Loss of NAD(H from swollen yeast mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Douglas R

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial electron transport chain oxidizes matrix space NADH as part of the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria contain shuttles for the transport of cytoplasmic NADH reducing equivalents into the mitochondrial matrix. Therefore for a long time it was believed that NAD(H itself was not transported into mitochondria. However evidence has been obtained for the transport of NAD(H into and out of plant and mammalian mitochondria. Since Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria can directly oxidize cytoplasmic NADH, it remained questionable if mitochondrial NAD(H transport occurs in this organism. Results NAD(H was lost more extensively from the matrix space of swollen than normal, condensed isolated yeast mitochondria from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The loss of NAD(H in swollen organelles caused a greatly decreased respiratory rate when ethanol or other matrix space NAD-linked substrates were oxidized. Adding NAD back to the medium, even in the presence of a membrane-impermeant NADH dehydrogenase inhibitor, restored the respiratory rate of swollen mitochondria oxidizing ethanol, suggesting that NAD is transported into the matrix space. NAD addition did not restore the decreased respiratory rate of swollen mitochondria oxidizing the combination of malate, glutamate, and pyruvate. Therefore the loss of matrix space metabolites is not entirely specific for NAD(H. However, during NAD(H loss the mitochondrial levels of most other nucleotides were maintained. Either hypotonic swelling or colloid-osmotic swelling due to opening of the yeast mitochondrial unspecific channel (YMUC in a mannitol medium resulted in decreased NAD-linked respiration. However, the loss of NAD(H from the matrix space was not mediated by the YMUC, because YMUC inhibitors did not prevent decreased NAD-linked respiration during swelling and YMUC opening without swelling did not cause decreased NAD-linked respiration. Conclusion Loss of

  20. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera; Cohen, Gerald; Schaefer, Mandy; Boehringer, Falko; Tepel, Martin; Kunkel, Desiree; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2014-08-01

    Uraemia and cardiovascular disease appear to be associated with an increased oxidative burden. One of the key players in the genesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Based on initial experiments demonstrating a decreased inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity in the presence of plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis compared with before dialysis, we investigated the effect of 48 known and commercially available uraemic retention solutes on the enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase. Mononuclear leucocytes isolated from buffy coats of healthy volunteers were isolated, lysed and incubated with NADH in the presence of plasma from healthy controls and patients with CKD-5D. Furthermore, the leucocytes were lysed and incubated in the presence of uraemic retention solute of interest and diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. The effect on enzymatic activity of NADPH oxidase was quantified within an incubation time of 120 min. Thirty-nine of the 48 uraemic retention solutes tested had a significant decreasing effect on NADPH oxidase activity. Oxalate has been characterized as the strongest inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (90% of DPI inhibition). Surprisingly, none of the uraemic retention solutes we investigated was found to increase NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, plasma from patients with CKD-5D before dialysis caused significantly higher inhibitory effect on NADPH oxidase activity compared with plasma from healthy subjects. However, this effect was significantly decreased in plasma from patients with CKD-5D after dialysis. The results of this study show that uraemic retention solutes modulated the activity of the NADPH oxidase. The results of this study might be the basis for the development of inhibitors applicable as drug in the situation of increased oxidative stress. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Breast Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Histopathologist's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewe Seng Ch'ng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made since the conceptualization of tumor angiogenesis—the induction of growth of new blood vessels by tumor—as a salient feature of clinically significant primary or metastatic cancers. From a practicing histopathologist's point of view, we appraise the application of this concept in breast cancer with particular reference to the evaluation of proangiogenic factors and the assessment of new microvessels in histopathological examination. Recently, much focus has also been centered on the active roles played by tumor-associated macrophages in relation to tumor angiogenesis. We review the literature; many data supporting this facet of tumor angiogenesis were derived from the breast cancer models. We scrutinize the large body of clinical evidence exploring the link between the tumor-associated macrophages and breast tumor angiogenesis and discuss particularly the methodology and limitations of incorporating such an assessment in histopathological examination.

  2. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-02-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between (/sup 14/C)NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols.

  3. Kinetic mechanism and nucleotide specificity of NADH peroxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, V.S.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    NADH peroxidase is a flavoprotein isolated from Streptococcus faecalis which catalyzes the pyridine nucleotide-dependent reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. Initial velocity, product, and dead-end inhibition studies have been performed at pH 7.5 and support a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. In the absence of hydrogen peroxide, both transhydrogenation between NADH and thioNAD, and isotope exchange between [ 14 C]NADH and NAD, have been demonstrated, although in both these experiments, the maximal velocity of nucleotide exchange was less than 1.5% the maximal velocity of the peroxidatic reaction. We propose that NADH binds tightly to both oxidized and two-electron reduced enzyme. NADH oxidation proceeds stereospecifically with the transfer of the 4S hydrogen to enzyme, and then, via exchange, to water. No primary tritium kinetic isotope effect was observed, and no statistically significant primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V/K were determined, although primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on V were observed in the presence and absence of sodium acetate. NADH peroxidase thus shares with other flavoprotein reductases striking kinetic, spectroscopic, and stereochemical similarities. On this basis, we propose a chemical mechanism for the peroxide cleaving reaction catalyzed by NADH peroxidase which involves the obligate formation of a flavinperoxide, and peroxo bond cleavage by nucleophilic attack by enzymatic dithiols

  4. Mitigation of NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase deficiency by chronic Trolox treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, W.J.H.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Emst-de Vries, S.E. van; Grefte, S.; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.; Willems, P.H.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), is associated with a variety of clinical phenotypes such as Leigh syndrome, encephalomyopathy and cardiomyopathy. Circumstantial evidence suggests that increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels contribute to the

  5. Sensing NADH conformation using phasor analysis on fluorescence spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, Dylan; Maltas, Jeff; Risal, Laxmi; Urayama, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Phasor analysis on fluorescence signals is a sensitive approach for analyzing multicomponent systems. Initially developed for time-resolved measurements, a spectral version has been used for the rapid identification of regions during the spectral imaging of biological systems. Here we show that quantitative information regarding conformation can be obtained from phasor analysis of fluorescence spectrum shape. Methanol denaturation of NADH and NADH binding to various dehydrogenase proteins are used as model reactions. Thermodynamic constants are calculated and compared with previous studies based on more direct measures of conformation. Next, the quantitative monitoring of UV-excited autofluorescence spectrum shape during chemically-induced metabolic transitions is presented and discussed in terms of NADH-utilizing pathways. Results show how phasor analysis is useful in assessing two-state behavior, and in interpreting autofluorescence as emission from an ensemble of cellular NADH forms.

  6. NADH-Ferricyanide Reductase of Leaf Plasma Membranes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerlund, Per; Laurent, Pascal; Nakagawa, Hiroki; Kader, Jean-Claude

    1991-01-01

    Plasma membranes obtained by two-phase partitioning of microsomal fractions from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. cv Medania) and sugar beet leaves (Beta vulgaris L.) contained relatively high NADH-ferricyanide reductase and NADH-nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) activities. Both of these activities were latent. To investigate whether these activities were due to the same enzyme, plasma membrane polypeptides were separated with SDS-PAGE and analyzed with immunoblotting methods. Antibodies raised against microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase (tentatively identified as NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, EC 1.6.2.2), purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Bintje) tuber microsomes, displayed one single band at 43 kilodaltons when reacted with spinach plasma membranes, whereas lgG produced against NR from spinach leaves gave a major band at 110 kilodaltons together with a few fainter bands of lower molecular mass. Immunoblotting analysis using inside-out and right-side-out plasma membrane vesicles strongly indicated that NR was not an integral protein but probably trapped inside the plasma membrane vesicles during homogenization. Proteins from spinach plasma membranes were solubilized with the zwitterionic detergent 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio] 1-propane-sulfonate and separated on a Mono Q anion exchange column at pH 5.6 with fast protein liquid chromatography. One major peak of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity was found after separation. The peak fraction was enriched about 70-fold in this activity compared to the plasma membrane. When the peak fractions were analyzed with SDS-PAGE the NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity strongly correlated with a 43 kilodalton polypeptide which reacted with the antibodies against potato microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase. Thus, our data indicate that most, if not all, of the truly membrane-bound NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity of leaf plasma membranes is due to an enzyme very similar to potato tuber

  7. Reciprocal Supportive Interplay between Glioblastoma and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Bao, Shideng, E-mail: baos@ccf.org [Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2014-03-26

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive type of primary brain malignancy. Failures of the traditional therapies in treating GBMs raise the urgent requirement to develop new approaches with more responsive targets. The phenomenon of the high infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) into GBMs has been observed for a long time. Regardless of the limited knowledge about TAMs, the high percentage of supportive TAM in GBM tumor mass makes it possible to be a good target for GBM treatment. In this review, we discussed the unique features of TAMs in GBMs, including their origin, the tumor-supportive properties, the secreted cytokines, and the relevant mechanisms. In addition, we tried to interpret the current understandings about the interplay between GBM cancer cells and TAMs. Finally, the translational studies of targeting TAMs were also described.

  8. Autoantibodies to Tumor-Associated Antigens in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Piura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent knowledge related to circulating autoantibodies (AAbs to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs in epithelial ovarian carcinoma. So far, the following TAAs have been identified to elicit circulating AAbs in epithelial ovarian carcinoma: p53, homeobox proteins (HOXA7, HOXB7, heat shock proteins (HSP-27, HSP-90, cathepsin D, cancer-testis antigens (NY-ESO-1/LAGE-1, MUC1, GIPC-1, IL-8, Ep-CAM, and S100A7. Since AAbs to TAAs have been identified in the circulation of patients with early-stage cancer, it has been speculated that the assessment of a panel of AAbs specific for epithelial ovarian carcinoma TAAs might hold great potential as a novel tool for early diagnosis of epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

  9. Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oncolytic Virotherapy: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. Denton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy remains a challenge due to toxicity limitations of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oncolytic viruses that selectively replicate and destroy cancer cells are of increasing interest. In addition to direct cell lysis, these vectors stimulate an anti-tumor immune response. A key regulator of tumor immunity is the tumor-associated macrophage population. Macrophages can either support oncolytic virus therapy through pro-inflammatory stimulation of the anti-tumor response at the cost of hindering direct oncolysis or through immunosuppressive protection of virus replication at the cost of hindering the anti-tumor immune response. Despite similarities in macrophage interaction between adult and pediatric tumors and the abundance of research supporting macrophage modulation in adult tumors, there are few studies investigating macrophage modulation in pediatric cancers or modulation of immunotherapy. We review the current state of knowledge regarding macrophages in cancers and their influence on oncolytic virotherapy.

  10. Tumor-Associated Macrophages: Therapeutic Targets for Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fujimura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and regulatory T cells (Tregs are significant components of the microenvironment of solid tumors in the majority of cancers. TAMs sequentially develop from monocytes into functional macrophages. In each differentiation stage, TAMs obtain various immunosuppressive functions to maintain the tumor microenvironment (e.g., expression of immune checkpoint molecules, production of Treg-related chemokines and cytokines, production of arginase I. Although the main population of TAMs is immunosuppressive M2 macrophages, TAMs can be modulated into M1-type macrophages in each differential stage, leading to the suppression of tumor growth. Because the administration of certain drugs or stromal factors can stimulate TAMs to produce specific chemokines, leading to the recruitment of various tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, TAMs can serve as targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the differentiation, activation, and immunosuppressive function of TAMs, as well as their benefits in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Identification of an N-hydroxyguanidine reducing activity of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrova, M; Uhlén, S; Welch, C J; Wikberg, J E

    1998-10-01

    A guanoxabenz [1-(2,6-dichlorobenzylideneamino)-3-hydroxyguanidine; an N-hydroxyguanidine] reducing enzymatic activity of rat spleen cytosol was investigated. By means of protein purification and N-terminal amino acid sequencing, the reducing activity was shown to reside in xanthine oxidase. The action of the enzyme on guanoxabenz resulted in the formation of guanabenz [1-(2,6-dichlorobenzylidene-amino)-3-guanidine]; the product formation could be monitored by HPLC and its identity was confirmed by NMR analysis. The reduction of guanoxabenz required xanthine or NADH as reducing substrates, while the process could be blocked by allopurinol, a selective inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. By using bovine milk xanthine oxidase, the guanoxabenz reducing activity of the enzyme was also verified. We conclude that guanoxabenz is a novel electron acceptor structure for xanthine oxidase.

  12. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Minli [Department of Biochemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Türk, Karin [School of Engineering and Science, International University Bremen, 28759 Bremen (Germany); Diez, Joachim [Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Grütter, Markus G. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Fritz, Günter, E-mail: guenter.fritz@uni-konstanz.de [Fachbereich Biologie, Universität Konstanz, Postfach M665, Universitätsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Steuber, Julia, E-mail: guenter.fritz@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Biochemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2006-02-01

    The FAD domain of the NqrF subunit from the Na{sup +}-translocating NADH dehydrogenase from V. cholerae has been purified and crystallized. A complete data set was recorded at 3.1 Å. The Na{sup +}-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na{sup +}-NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na{sup +} across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 × 30 × 70 µm. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 µm. Crystals diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°.

  13. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schmitz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4+ T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  14. Genome wide in silico SNP-tumor association analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Ping; Wang, Luquan; Kostich, Mitch; Ding, Wei; Simon, Jason S; Greene, Jonathan R

    2004-01-01

    Carcinogenesis occurs, at least in part, due to the accumulation of mutations in critical genes that control the mechanisms of cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Publicly accessible databases contain millions of expressed sequence tag (EST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) records, which have the potential to assist in the identification of SNPs overrepresented in tumor tissue. An in silico SNP-tumor association study was performed utilizing tissue library and SNP information available in NCBI's dbEST (release 092002) and dbSNP (build 106). A total of 4865 SNPs were identified which were present at higher allele frequencies in tumor compared to normal tissues. A subset of 327 (6.7%) SNPs induce amino acid changes to the protein coding sequences. This approach identified several SNPs which have been previously associated with carcinogenesis, as well as a number of SNPs that now warrant further investigation This novel in silico approach can assist in prioritization of genes and SNPs in the effort to elucidate the genetic mechanisms underlying the development of cancer

  15. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  16. The reactivation of nitrate reductase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) inactivated by NADH and cyanide: effects of peroxidase and associated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J M; Notton, B A; Hewitt, E J

    1982-12-01

    Nitrate reductase of spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves which had been inactivated in vitro by treatment with NADH and cyanide, was reactivated by incubation with oxidant systems and measured as FMNH2-dependent activity. Ferricyanide, a purely chemical oxidant, produced rapid maximal reactivation (100%) which was 90% complete in less than 3 min. Reactivation occurred slowly and less completely (30-75% in 30 or 60 min) when the enzyme was incubated with pure horseradish peroxidase alone, depending on using one or 20 units and time. Addition of glucose and glucose oxidase to generate hydrogen peroxide increased reactivation slightly (10-15%) with 20 units of peroxidase but more (30-50%) with one unit and to 75-90% of ferricyanide values. Adding catalase decreased reactivation by more than half either with or without glucose oxidase. Glucose and glucose oxidase alone did not cause reactivation. Addition of superoxide dismutase increased reactivation from 50-75% of ferricyanide values with one unit of peroxidase alone but had no effect on greater reactivation obtained in the presence of glucose oxidase. The addition of p-cresol and manganese together increased reactivation with one unit of peroxidase and in the presence of glucose oxidase by about double, but omission of manganese had no effect. However, as shown previously, although trivalent manganese was formed, the residual presence of manganous ions inhibited reactivation. Nevertheless, peroxidase systems either alone or with additionally generated hydrogen peroxide can induce substantial reactivation of nitrate reductase in physiologically relevant conditions.

  17. [Conformational states of NADH molecules in hydrated shell under weak electromagnetic irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabolotnyĭ, M A; Barabash, Iu M; Kulish, N P; Dmitrienko, O P; Kuz'menko, M O

    2015-01-01

    The work deals with spectra of capillary waves of water distillate and water solution of NADH and dynamics of NADH under electromagnetic irradiation in the range of millimeters at different space frequencies of surface wave k.

  18. Tumor-associated macrophages: Oblivious confederates in invasive mammary carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The infiltrating margins of carcinomas are associated with presence of inflammatory cell infiltrate which are an integral part of the tumor microenvironment. Amongst the inflammatory cells, Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs play a key role in the tumorigenesis. This study elucidates the density of TAMs in invasive mammary carcinomas and attempts to establish aa association with the following pathological variables: tumor size, histological grade, nodal status, hormonal expression status and Her2Neu overexpression. Materials and Methods: 90 diagnosed archival cases of invasive mammary carcinomas at a tertiary care centre were included. Density of TAMs was assessed by using CD68 which is a pan-macrophage marker by immunohistochemistry on the archival tissue blocks. The density TAMs (CD68 positive cells was dichotomised into high (>50 CD68 positive cells/ HPF and low (<5050 CD68 positive cells/ HPF and compared with the above mentioned pathological variables using appropriate statistical tests. Results: The density of TAMs was significantly higher around the infiltrating edge of the carcinoma in comparison to the adjoining normal terminal duct lobular units. The density of TAMs was more in the infiltrating edge of the tumor than within the tumor nodule/nests. A higher TAM density showed a significant association in tumors having large tumor size, higher histological grade, nodal metastasis, absence of ER and PR expression and Her2Neu overexpression (p value <0.05. Conclusion: TAMs play an important role in tumor progression in invasive mammary carcinomas. This is as a result of the multiple roles enacted by TAMs in the various stages of tumor development starting from tumor growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastases. Targeted therapy against TAMs has great potential in the being important components of future treatment strategies against breast carcinomas.

  19. Monoclonal antibody against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poels, L.G.; Peters, D.; van Megen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (OV-TL 3) were raised against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens for diagnostic purposes. A cloned hybridoma cell line was obtained by fusion of murine myeloma cells with spleen lymphocytes from BALB/c mice immunized with a tumor cell suspension prepared from an ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. The antibodies were initially screened for their ability to bind on frozen sections of human ovarian carcinoma tissue and a negative reaction on gastric carcinoma tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. The reactivity of the selected OV-TL 3 clone (IgG1 subclass) was studied on normal and neoplastic tissues as well as on a cell line derived from the original tumor cell suspension used for immunization. OV-TL 3 antibodies stained frozen sections of human ovarian carcinomas of the following histological types: serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell. No reaction was found with breast cancers or other nongynecological tumors. No differences in staining pattern were observed between primary and metastatic ovarian carcinomas. OV-TL 3 antibodies brightly stained ovarian carcinoma cell clusters in ascitic fluids and left unstained mesothelial cells and peripheral blood cells. The OV-TL 3-defined antigen also remained strongly expressed on a cell line derived from the endometrioid ovarian carcinoma originally used for generation of OV-TL 3 clone. Reactivity was weak and irregular in a few ovarian cysts, while traces of fluorescence were sometimes detected in epithelial cells lining the female genital tract. In only 3 specimens of 15 endometrium carcinomas was weak focal reactivity with OV-TL 3 antibodies observed. The results of the immunofluorescence study were confirmed by the more sensitive avidin-biotin method and by 125 I-labeled OV-TL 3 antibodies

  20. MYCN: From Oncoprotein To Tumor-Associated Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePistoia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available MYCN is a well known oncogene overexpressed in different human malignancies including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, Wilms’ tumor and small cell lung cancer. In the case of neuroblastoma (NB, MYCN amplification is an established biomarker of poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to a family of transcription factors (the most important of which is CMYC that show a high degree of homology. Downregulation of MYC protein expression leads to tumor regression in animal models, indicating that MYC proteins represent interesting therapeutic targets.Pre-requisites for a candidate tumor-associated antigen (TAA to be targeted by immunotherapeutic approaches are the following, i expression should be tumor-restricted, ii the putative TAA should be up-regulated in cancer cells and iii protein should be processed into immunogenic peptides capable of associating to MHC molecules with high affinity. Indeed, the MYCN protein is not expressed in human adult tissues and upregulated variably in NB cells, and MYCN peptides capable of associating to HLA-A1 or –A2 molecules with high affinity have been identified. Thus the MYCN protein qualifies as putative TAA in NB.Additional issues that determine the feasibility of targeting a putative TAA with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and will be here discussed are the following, i the inadequacy of tumor cells per se to act as antigen-presenting cells witnessed, in the case of NB cells, by the low to absent expression of HLA- class I molecules, the lack of costimulatory molecules and multiple defects in the HLA class I related antigen processing machinery, and ii the immune evasion mechanisms operated by cancer cells to fool the host immune system, such as up-regulation of soluble immunosuppressive molecules (e.g. soluble MICA and HLA-G in the case of NB or generation of immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. A final issue that deserves consideration is the strategy used to generate

  1. Dexamethasone alleviates tumor-associated brain damage and angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Fan

    Full Text Available Children and adults with the most aggressive form of brain cancer, malignant gliomas or glioblastoma, often develop cerebral edema as a life-threatening complication. This complication is routinely treated with dexamethasone (DEXA, a steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with pleiotropic action profile. Here we show that dexamethasone reduces murine and rodent glioma tumor growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations of DEXA are already capable of inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and at higher levels induce cell death. Further, the expression of the glutamate antiporter xCT (system Xc-; SLC7a11 and VEGFA is up-regulated after DEXA treatment indicating early cellular stress responses. However, in human gliomas DEXA exerts differential cytotoxic effects, with some human glioma cells (U251, T98G resistant to DEXA, a finding corroborated by clinical data of dexamethasone non-responders. Moreover, DEXA-resistant gliomas did not show any xCT alterations, indicating that these gene expressions are associated with DEXA-induced cellular stress. Hence, siRNA-mediated xCT knockdown in glioma cells increased the susceptibility to DEXA. Interestingly, cell viability of primary human astrocytes and primary rodent neurons is not affected by DEXA. We further tested the pharmacological effects of DEXA on brain tissue and showed that DEXA reduces tumor-induced disturbances of the microenvironment such as neuronal cell death and tumor-induced angiogenesis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that DEXA inhibits glioma cell growth in a concentration and species-dependent manner. Further, DEXA executes neuroprotective effects in brains and reduces tumor-induced angiogenesis. Thus, our investigations reveal that DEXA acts pleiotropically and impacts tumor growth, tumor vasculature and tumor-associated brain damage.

  2. Stabilized NADH as a Countermeasure for Jet Lag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Gary G.; Viirre, Erik; Clark, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Current remedies for jet lag (phototherapy, melatonin, stimulant, and sedative medications) are limited in efficacy and practicality. The efficacy of a stabilized, sublingual form of reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, ENADAlert, Menuco Corp.) as a countermeasure for jet lag was examined. Because NADH increases cellular production of ATP and facilitates dopamine synthesis, it may counteract the effects of jet lag on cognitive functioning and sleepiness. Thirty-five healthy, employed subjects participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Training and baseline testing were conducted on the West Coast before subjects flew overnight to the East Coast, where they would experience a 3-hour time difference. Upon arrival, individuals were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg of sublingual stabilized ADH (n=18) or identical placebo tablets (n=17). All participants completed computer-administered tests (including CogScreen7) to assess changes in cognitive functioning, mood, and sleepiness in the morning and afternoon. Jet lag resulted in increased sleepiness for over half the participants and deterioration of cognitive functioning for approximately one third. The morning following the flight, subjects experienced lapses of attention in addition to disruptions in working memory, divided attention, and visual perceptual speed. Individuals who received NADH performed significantly better on 5 of 8 cognitive and psychomotor test measures (P less than or equal to 0.5) and showed a trend for better performance on the other three measures (P less than or equal to .l0). Subjects also reported less sleepiness compared with those who received placebo. No adverse effects were observed with NADH treatment. Stabilized NADH significantly reduced jet lag-induced disruptions of cognitive functioning, was easily administered, and was found to have no adverse side effects.

  3. 21 CFR 866.6010 - Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Class II (special controls). Tumor markers must comply with the following special controls: (1) A... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tumor-associated antigen immunological test system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen...

  4. 78 FR 50425 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Exclusive License: Development of Brachyury Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer Vaccines for Colorectal... recent approach where tumor associated antigens (TAAs), which are primarily expressed in human tumor cells and not expressed or minimally expressed in normal tissues, are employed to generate a tumor...

  5. Suppression of superoxide anion generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase with alkyl caffeates and the scavenging activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Kubo, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl caffeates are strong antioxidants and inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. However, it is unclear about the effect of caffeic acid and alkyl caffeates on superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. Effects of caffeic acid and alkyl caffeates on the uric acid formation and O2(-) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase were analyzed. The scavenging activities of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and O2(-) generated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and NADH were examined. Caffeic acid derivatives equally suppressed O2(-) generation, and the suppression is stronger than inhibition of xanthine oxidase. Scavenging activity of O2(-) is low compared to the suppression of O2(-) generation. Suppression of O2(-) generation catalyzed by xanthine oxidase with caffeic acid derivatives was not due to enzyme inhibition or O2(-) scavenging but due to the reduction of xanthine oxidase molecules. Alkyl caffeates are effective inhibitors of uric acid and O2(-) catalyzed by xanthine oxidase as well as antioxidants for edible oil.

  6. The free NADH concentration is kept constant in plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasimova, M.R.; Grigiene, J.; Krab, K.

    2006-01-01

    The reduced coenzyme NADH plays a central role in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. However, reports on the amount of free NADH in mitochondria are sparse and contradictory. We first determined the emission spectrum of NADH bound to proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry combined wit...

  7. Influence of xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol and oxypurinol on the course of body weight, on body composition and spontaneous activity in a rat model of tumour cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The pathways involved in the pathogenesis of tumor-associated cachexia are not yet fully understood. A higher activity of the enzyme xanthine oxidase was reported in this context, which could play a causative role in the course of events by raising the production of reactive oxygen species. In this thesis, the effects of medication with xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol and oxypurinol on the extent of induced tumour cachexia in rats have been investigated. A combined medication of oxypu...

  8. Peroxynitrite formation from the simultaneous reduction of nitrite and oxygen by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Timothy M

    2004-03-26

    One electron reductions of oxygen and nitrite by xanthine oxidase form peroxynitrite. The nitrite and oxygen reducing activities of xanthine oxidase are regulated by oxygen with K(oxygen) 26 and 100 microM and K(nitrite) 1.0 and 1.1 mM with xanthine and NADH as donor substrates. Optimal peroxynitrite formation occurs at 70 microM oxygen with purine substrates. Kinetic parameters: V(max) approximately 50 nmol/min/mg and K(m) of 22, 36 and 70 microM for hypoxanthine, pterin and nitrite respectively. Peroxynitrite generation is inhibited by allopurinol, superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium. A role for this enzyme activity can be found in the antibacterial activity of milk and circulating xanthine oxidase activity.

  9. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  10. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  11. Purification and partial characterization of xanthine oxidase from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadeh, S; Killacky, J; Benboubetra, M; Harrison, R

    1992-07-21

    Xanthine oxidase was purified from human milk in yields comparable with those obtained from bovine milk. The freshly purified enzyme appeared homogeneous in gel permeation FPLC and SDS-PAGE, consistent with its being a homodimer with total M(r) 290,000 +/- 6000. The ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrum differed only slightly from that of bovine milk enzyme and showed an A280/A450 ratio of 5.13 +/- 0.29, indicating a high degree of purity. Xanthine oxidase activities of purified enzyme varied with batches of milk, ranging between 3 and 46 mU/mg protein; values that are some two to three orders of magnitude smaller than those shown by the most highly purified samples of bovine milk enzyme. Direct comparison with commercially-available bovine milk enzyme showed that activities involving xanthine as reducing substrate were 1-6% that of the bovine enzyme, whereas those involving NADH, in contrast, were of the same order for the two enzymes. Anaerobic bleaching experiments indicated that less than 2% of the human enzyme was present as a form active with xanthine. These findings, together with the activity data, are consistent with a very high content, possibly greater than 98%, of demolybdo- and/or desulpho-forms of human enzyme, both of which occur, to a lesser extent, in bovine xanthine oxidase. Molybdenum assay indicated that demolybdo-enzyme could only account for some 26% of this inactive component, suggesting that desulpho-enzyme may account for the remainder.

  12. Oxidases as Breast Cancer Oncogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    the notion that xanthine oxidase (XOX), which is present in milk for possible antimicrobial activity , to keep the milk sterile, plays havoc with the...cancer. Two tasks are currently being pursued. The first deals with the overexpression of xanthine oxidase (XOX) or urate oxidase (UOX) in a non...tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell line to ascertain whether oxidase overexpressing cells undergo transformation when exposed to substrate xanthine

  13. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermáková, Petra; Verner, Zdenek; Man, Petr; Lukes, Julius; Horváth, Anton

    2007-06-01

    NADH dehydrogenase activity was characterized in the mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid flagellate parasitizing plants. Two different high molecular weight NADH dehydrogenases were characterized by native PAGE and detected by direct in-gel activity staining. The association of NADH dehydrogenase activities with two distinct multisubunit complexes was revealed in the second dimension performed under denaturing conditions. One subunit present in both complexes cross-reacted with the antibody against the 39 kDa subunit of bovine complex I. Out of several subunits analyzed by MS, one contained a domain characteristic for the LYR family subunit of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases. Spectrophotometric measurement of the NADH:ubiquinone 10 and NADH:ferricyanide dehydrogenase activities revealed their different sensitivities to rotenone, piericidin, and diphenyl iodonium.

  14. Clinical trial tests drug for tumors associated with Krebs-cycle dysfunction | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Krebs cycle is part of the complex process where cells turn food into energy. One of the elements of the Krebs cycle is succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Loss of SDH activity in cells has been linked to tumor formation. This new trial is studying guadecitabine for tumors associated with Krebs cycle dysfunction. Learn more...

  15. Impact of overexpressing NADH kinase on glucose and xylose metabolism in recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Vemuri, G. N.; Bao, X. M.

    2009-01-01

    of overexpressing the native NADH kinase (encoded by the POS5 gene) in xylose-consuming recombinant S. cerevisiae directed either into the cytosol or to the mitochondria was evaluated. The physiology of the NADH kinase containing strains was also evaluated during growth on glucose. Overexpressing NADH kinase...

  16. Comparison of the Stereospecificity and Immunoreactivity of NADH-Ferricyanide Reductases in Plant Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredlund, K. M.; Struglics, A.; Widell, S.; Askerlund, P.; Kader, J. C.; Moller, I. M.

    1994-11-01

    The substrate stereospecificity of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activities in the inner mitochondrial membrane and peroxisomal membrane of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf plasma membrane, and red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast were all specific for the [beta]-hydrogen of NADH, whereas the reductases in wheat root (Triticum aestivum L.) endoplasmic reticulum and potato tuber outer mitochondrial membrane were both [alpha]-hydrogen specific. In all isolated membrane fractions one or several polypeptides with an apparent size of 45 to 55 kD cross-reacted with antibodies raised against a microsomal NADH-ferricyanide reductase on western blots.

  17. No evidence for cognitive improvement from oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, M; Kraxberger, E; Haushofer, M; Mucke, H A; Jellinger, K A

    2000-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is advertised as an over-the-counter product or dietary supplement to treat Alzheimer's disease. We performed a 3-month open-label study with oral 10 mg/day NADH with 25 patients with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer, vascular, and fronto-temporal types in addition to their current cholinomimetic drug medication. In 19 patients who completed the study, we found no evidence for any cognitive effect as defined by established psychometric tests. We conclude that NADH is unlikely to achieve cognitive improvements in an extent reported earlier, and present theoretical arguments against an effectiveness of this compound in dementia disorders.

  18. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Derived from Circulating Inflammatory Monocytes Degrade Collagen through Cellular Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel Hargbøl; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Siersbæk, Majken Storm

    2017-01-01

    -associated macrophage (TAM)-like cells that degrade collagen in a mannose receptor-dependent manner. Accordingly, mannose-receptor-deficient mice display increased intratumoral collagen. Whole-transcriptome profiling uncovers a distinct extracellular matrix-catabolic signature of these collagen-degrading TAMs. Lineage......-ablation studies reveal that collagen-degrading TAMs originate from circulating CCR2+ monocytes. This study identifies a function of TAMs in altering the tumor microenvironment through endocytic collagen turnover and establishes macrophages as centrally engaged in tumor-associated collagen degradation. Madsen et...... al. identify a population of tumor-associated macrophages with a distinct matrix catabolic signature as key effectors of collagen turnover during invasive tumor growth. These matrix-degrading macrophages are largely derived from CCR2+ monocytes reprogrammed by the tumor microenvironment and degrade...

  19. Autophagy creates a CTL epitope that mimics tumor-associated antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Demachi-Okamura

    Full Text Available The detailed mechanisms responsible for processing tumor-associated antigens and presenting them to CTLs remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate a unique CTL epitope generated from the ubiquitous protein puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, which is presented via HLA-A24 on leukemic and pancreatic cancer cells but not on normal fibroblasts or EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cells. The generation of this epitope requires proteasomal digestion and transportation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus and is sensitive to chloroquine-induced inhibition of acidification inside the endosome/lysosome. Epitope liberation depends on constitutively active autophagy, as confirmed with immunocytochemistry for the autophagosome marker LC3 as well as RNA interference targeting two different autophagy-related genes. Therefore, ubiquitously expressed proteins may be sources of specific tumor-associated antigens when processed through a unique mechanism involving autophagy.

  20. Origin and evolution of the sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Reyes-Prieto

    Full Text Available The sodium -pumping NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR is the main ion pump and the primary entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain of many different types of pathogenic bacteria. This enzymatic complex creates a transmembrane gradient of sodium that is used by the cell to sustain ionic homeostasis, nutrient transport, ATP synthesis, flagellum rotation and other essential processes. Comparative genomics data demonstrate that the nqr operon, which encodes all Na+-NQR subunits, is found in a large variety of bacterial lineages with different habitats and metabolic strategies. Here we studied the distribution, origin and evolution of this enzymatic complex. The molecular phylogenetic analyses and the organizations of the nqr operon indicate that Na+-NQR evolved within the Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes group, after the duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of the operon that encodes the homolog RNF complex. Subsequently, the nqr operon dispersed through multiple horizontal transfer events to other bacterial lineages such as Chlamydiae, Planctomyces and α, β, γ and δ -proteobacteria. Considering the biochemical properties of the Na+-NQR complex and its physiological role in different bacteria, we propose a detailed scenario to explain the molecular mechanisms that gave rise to its novel redox- dependent sodium -pumping activity. Our model postulates that the evolution of the Na+-NQR complex involved a functional divergence from its RNF homolog, following the duplication of the rnf operon, the loss of the rnfB gene and the recruitment of the reductase subunit of an aromatic monooxygenase.

  1. Salt Specificity of a Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Oxidase Prepared from a Halophilic Bacterium1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Dalton, B. P.

    1968-01-01

    Extracts prepared from a halophilic bacterium contained a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH2) oxidase active at high solute concentrations. The cation requirement was nonspecific, since KCl, RbCl, and CsCl replaced NaCl with little or no loss of activity, and NH4Cl was only partially effective. Only LiCl failed to replace NaCl. No specific chloride requirement was observed although not all anions replaced chloride. Bromide, nitrate, and iodide were essentially ineffective, whereas acetate, formate, citrate, and sulfate proved suitable. The presence of sulfate affected the ability of a cation to satisfy the solute requirement. Sulfate enhanced the rate of NADH2 oxidation when compared with the rate observed in the presence of chloride. Cations which were inactive as chlorides (LiCl and MgCl2 at high concentrations) satisfied the cation requirement when added as sulfate salts. Although magnesium satisfied the cation requirement, a concentration effect, as well as an anion effect, was observed. In the presence of MgCl2, little NADH2 oxidation was observed at concentrations greater than 1 m. At lower concentrations, the rate of oxidation increased, reaching a maximal value at 0.1 m and remaining constant up to a concentration of 0.05 m MgCl2. Magnesium acetate and MgSO4 also replaced NaCl, and the maximal rate of oxidation occurred at 0.05 m with respect to magnesium. There was no change in the rate of oxidation at high magnesium acetate concentrations, whereas the rate of NADH2 oxidation increased at higher concentrations of MgSO4. PMID:5636829

  2. Conducting polymer and its composite materials based electrochemical sensor for Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Fatin Saiha; Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ramesh, K; Ramesh, S

    2016-05-15

    Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NADH) is an important coenzyme in the human body that participates in many metabolic reactions. The impact of abnormal concentrations of NADH significantly causes different diseases in human body. Electrochemical detection of NADH using bare electrode is a challenging task especially in the presence of main electroactive interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and dopamine (DA). Modified electrodes have been widely explored to overcome the problems of poor sensitivity and selectivity occurred from bare electrodes. This review gives an overview on the progress of using conducting polymers, polyelectrolyte and its composites (co-polymer, carbonaceous, metal, metal oxide and clay) based modified electrodes for the sensing of NADH. In addition, developments on the fabrication of numerous conducting polymer composites based modified electrodes are clearly described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Overexpression of a novel endogenous NADH kinase in Aspergillus nidulans enhances growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hofmann, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    .7.1.86) has been identified. The enzyme has a predicted molecular weight of 49 kDa. We characterised the role of this NADH kinase by genomic integration of the putative gene AN8837.2 under a strong constitutive promoter. The physiological effects of overexpressed NADH kinase in combination with different...... yield on glucose and the maximum specific growth rate increased from 0.47 g/g and 0.22 h(-1) (wild type) to 0.54 g/g and 0.26 h(-1) (NADH kinase overexpressed), respectively. The results suggest that overexpression of NADH kinase improves the growth efficiency of the cell by increasing the access...

  4. Oxidases as Breast Cancer Oncogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeldandi, Anjana

    2000-01-01

    ...) in a non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cell line to ascertain whether oxidase overexpressing cells undergo transformation when exposed to substrate xanthine for XOX and uric acid for UOX...

  5. Charakterisierung der alternativen NADH-Ubichinon-Oxidoreduktase (NDH2) aus Yarrowia lipolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Eschemann, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Neben dem protonenpumpenden Komplex I (NDH-1) der Atmungskette besitzt die obligat aerobe Hefe Yarrowia lipolytica eine alternative NADH:Ubichinon Oxidoreduktase (NDH-2). Diese Enzyme, die in den Atmungsketten von Pflanzen, Pilzen und Bakterien vorkommen, bestehen aus nur einer Untereinheit, führen jedoch dieselbe Reaktion aus wie Komplex I, nämlich die Elektronenübertragung von NADH auf Ubichinon, wobei allerdings keine Protonen über die Membran transloziert werden. Nur peripher mit der Memb...

  6. NADH oxidation on screen-printed electrode modified with a new phenothiazine diazonium salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doumeche, Bastien; Blum, Loic J. [GEMBAS, Genie Enzymatique, Membranes Biomimetiques et Assemblages Supramoleculaires, ICBMS UMR 5246, Universite Lyon 1, 43 bd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-10-15

    NADH oxidation catalysts are extremely important in the field of electrochemical biosensors and enzymatic biofuel cells. Based on the growing diazonium chemistry, we synthesized the diazonium salt of the well-known NADH mediator toluidine blue O. The electrochemical reduction of the diazonium moiety by cyclic voltammetry onto a screen-printed electrode leads to an electrocatalyst suitable for the oxidation of NADH. The amperometric response for its oxidation shows a maximal current of 1.2 {mu}A ([NADH] = 100 {mu}M). Based on electrochemical measurements, the surface coverage is found to be 3.78 x 10{sup -11} mol cm{sup -2} and the heterogeneous standard rate constant k{sub h} is 1.21 {+-} 0.16 s{sup -1}. The sensitive layer for the oxidation of NADH is improved by electrografting the diazonium salt with a potentiostatic method. Both the surface coverage and the heterogeneous standard rate constant k{sub h} are improved and found to be 6.08 {+-} 0.63 x 10{sup -11} mol cm{sup -2} and {proportional_to} 5.02 s{sup -} {sup 1}, respectively. The amperometric response is also improved by an 8 fold factor, reaching 9.87 {mu}A ([NADH] = 120 {mu}M). These remarkably high values for screen-printed electrodes are comparable to glassy carbon electrodes making this method suitable for low-cost bioelectronical devices. (author)

  7. The novel immunosuppressive enzyme IL4I1 is expressed by neoplastic cells of several B-cell lymphomas and by tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonnelle-Puscian, A; Copie-Bergman, C; Baia, M; Martin-Garcia, N; Allory, Y; Haioun, C; Crémades, A; Abd-Alsamad, I; Farcet, J-P; Gaulard, P; Castellano, F; Molinier-Frenkel, V

    2009-05-01

    We previously reported a strong IL4I1 gene expression in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) and recently identified the protein as a secreted L-phenylalanine oxidase, physiologically expressed by myeloid cells, which inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. Here, we analyzed the pattern of IL4I1 protein expression in 315 human lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies. Besides PMBL, IL4I1 expression in tumors was very frequent. IL4I1 was detected in tumor-associated macrophages from most of the tumors and in neoplastic cells from follicular lymphoma, classic and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphomas and small lymphocytic lymphoma, three of which are germinal center derived. IL4I1-positive tumor cells were also detected in rare cases of solid cancers, mainly mesothelioma. The enzymatic activity paralleled protein expression, suggesting that IL4I1 is functional in vivo. Depending on the tumor type, IL4I1 may impact on different infiltrating lymphocyte populations with consequences on tumor evolution. In the particular case of follicular lymphoma cells, which are susceptible to antitumor cytotoxic T cells killing but depend on interactions with local T helper cells for survival, a high level of IL4I1 expression seems associated with the absence of bone marrow involvement and a better outcome. These findings plead for an evaluation of IL4I1 as a prognosis factor.

  8. Evolutionary optimization of metabolic pathways. Theoretical reconstruction of the stoichiometry of ATP and NADH producing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenhöh, O; Heinrich, R

    2001-01-01

    The structural design of ATP and NADH producing systems, such as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle (TCA), is analysed using optimization principles. It is assumed that these pathways combined with oxidative phosphorylation have reached, during their evolution, a high efficiency with respect to ATP production rates. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic principles, conclusions are derived concerning the optimal stoichiometry of such pathways. Extending previous investigations, both the concentrations of adenine nucleotides as well as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides are considered variable quantities. This implies the consideration of the interaction of an ATP and NADH producing system, an ATP consuming system, a system coupling NADH consumption with ATP production and a system consuming NADH decoupled from ATP production. It is examined in what respect real metabolic pathways can be considered optimal by studying a large number of alternative pathways. The kinetics of the individual reactions are described by linear or bilinear functions of reactant concentrations. In this manner, the steady-state ATP production rate can be calculated for any possible ATP and NADH producing pathway. It is shown that most of the possible pathways result in a very low ATP production rate and that the very efficient pathways share common structural properties. Optimization with respect to the ATP production rate is performed by an evolutionary algorithm. The following results of our analysis are in close correspondence to the real design of glycolysis and the TCA cycle. (1) In all efficient pathways the ATP consuming reactions are located near the beginning. (2) In all efficient pathways NADH producing reactions as well as ATP producing reactions are located near the end. (3) The number of NADH molecules produced by the consumption of one energy-rich molecule (glucose) amounts to four in all efficient pathways. A distance measure and a measure for the internal ordering of

  9. The rotenone-insensitive reduction of quinones and nitrocompounds by mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bironaite, D A; Cenas, N K; Kulys, J J

    1991-10-18

    The rotenone-insensitive reduction of quinones and aromatic nitrocompounds by mitochondrial NADH: ubiquinone reductase (complex I, EC 1.6.99.3) has been studied. It was found that these reactions proceed via a mixed one- and two-electron transfer. The logarithms of the bimolecular rate constants of oxidation (TN/Km) are proportional to the one-electron-reduction potentials of oxidizers. The reactivities of nitrocompounds are close to those of quinones. Unlike the reduction of ferricyanide, these reactions are not inhibited by NADH. However, they are inhibited by NAD+ and ADP-ribose, which also act as the mixed-type inhibitors for ferricyanide. TN/Km of quinones and nitrocompounds depend on the NAD+/NADH ratio, but not on NAD+ concentration. They are diminished by the limiting factors of 2.5-3.5 at NAD+/NADH greater than 200. It seems that rotenone-insensitive reduction of quinones and nitrocompounds takes place near the NAD+/NADH and ferricyanide binding site, and the inhibition is caused by induced conformational changes after the binding of NAD+ or ADP-ribose.

  10. Effect of radiation on the expression of tumor-associated antigens of human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareyama, Masato

    1988-01-01

    We studied the effects of irradiation on the expression of a tumor-associated antigen (YH206 antigen) of cultured human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. YH206 antigen is preferentially expressed on adenocarcinoma cells. Irradiation of A549 cells remarkably increased the expression of YH206 antigen on the cell surface and the level of the antigen in the culture supernatant as well as in the cell lysate, whereas it significantly affected the expression of HLA (MHC-class I) antigen on the same cells. The expression of HLA antigen on the cell was also increased after treatment of the cells with interferon-γ. In an additional experiment, cells were stained simultaneously for surface antigens (fluorescein coupled antibodies) and for DNA content (propidium iodide), and then dual parameter measurements were performed by flow cytometry to analyse the relationship between antigen levels and the cell cycle. YH206 antigen and HLA antigen increased more in the S and G 2 /M phases of the cell cycle than in G 0 /G 1 . The expression of YH206 antigen was enhanced in the S and G 2 /M phases by irradiation, whereas the expression of HLA antigen was enhanced in each phase of the cell cycle with irradiation or IFN. These results suggest that irradiation plays a key role in the change of the expression of certain tumor-associated antigens. (author)

  11. Signaling Circuits and Regulation of Immune Suppression by Ovarian Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Cannon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The barriers presented by immune suppression in the ovarian tumor microenvironment present one of the biggest challenges to development of successful tumor vaccine strategies for prevention of disease recurrence and progression following primary surgery and chemotherapy. New insights gained over the last decade have revealed multiple mechanisms of immune regulation, with ovarian tumor-associated macrophages/DC likely to fulfill a central role in creating a highly immunosuppressive milieu that supports disease progression and blocks anti-tumor immunity. This review provides an appraisal of some of the key signaling pathways that may contribute to immune suppression in ovarian cancer, with a particular focus on the potential involvement of the c-KIT/PI3K/AKT, wnt/β-catenin, IL-6/STAT3 and AhR signaling pathways in regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in tumor-associated macrophages. Knowledge of intercellular and intracellular circuits that shape immune suppression may afford insights for development of adjuvant treatments that alleviate immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and enhance the clinical efficacy of ovarian tumor vaccines.

  12. Development of oligoclonal nanobodies for targeting the tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharifzadeh, Zahra; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72) is a membrane mucin whose over-expression is correlated with advanced tumor stage and increased invasion and metastasis. In this study, we identified a panel of four nanobodies, single variable domains of dromedary heavy-chain antibodies that specific......The tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72) is a membrane mucin whose over-expression is correlated with advanced tumor stage and increased invasion and metastasis. In this study, we identified a panel of four nanobodies, single variable domains of dromedary heavy-chain antibodies...... that specifically recognize the TAG-72 antigen. All selected nanobodies were shown to selectively bind to this cancer-related molecule with low-nanomolar affinities and do not cross-react with other antigens, such as MUC1 or HER2. Furthermore, they can detect TAG-72 in concentrations as low as 5 U/ml which...... nanobody recognizes a distinct epitope on the TAG-72 antigen that is different from the one recognized by the mouse anti-TAG-72 antibody, CC49. Considering their high specificity, reduced immunogenicity and multi-targeting behavior, these oligoclonal nanobodies represent a promising tool to target TAG-72...

  13. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...... to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has...... advancements in the field of colorectal cancer....

  14. Fiber optical sampling of NADH concentration in guinea pig hearts during ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, Thomas; Beuthan, Juergen; Minet, Olaf; Schmitt, Isabella; Fuchs, B.; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1995-01-01

    A new method to detect and quantify ischemic states of tissue is presented. One important indicator of the metabolic and ischemic status of a cell is the concentration ratio of NADH : NAD+. The use of time-resolved laser- induced fluorescence techniques (LIF) in combination with previous biochemical measurements of NADH (Nicotineamide Adenine Dinucleotide) concentrations in tissue offer the possibility of quantitative NADH detection. The essential of the new method is a double-rescaling procedure of the fluorescence signal taking into account both the optical limitations of the device and the individually and locally varying optical tissue properties which are the scattering coefficient (mu) s, the absorption coefficient (mu) a and the anisotropy factor g. All the data presented in this paper were acquired from experiments with in vivo guinea pig hearts.

  15. Metabolic mapping of MCF10A human breast cells via multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of the coenzyme NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Damian K; Yan, Long; Vrotsos, Kristin M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Vaughan, Emily M; Keely, Patricia J; White, John G; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2005-10-01

    Biochemical estimation of NADH concentration is a useful method for monitoring cellular metabolism, because the NADH/NAD+ reduction-oxidation pair is crucial for electron transfer in the mitochondrial electron chain. In this article, we present a novel method for deriving functional maps of intracellular reduction-oxidation ratio in vivo via measurement of the fluorescence lifetimes and the ratio of free and protein-bound NADH using two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Through systematic analysis of FLIM data from the control cells, it was observed that there is a statistically significant decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of both free and protein-bound NADH and the contribution of protein-bound NADH as cells progress from an early to logarithmic to confluent phase. Potassium cyanide (KCN) treatment and serum starvation of cells yielded similar changes. There was a statistically significant decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound and free NADH at the early and logarithmic phase of the growth curve and a statistically significant decrease in the contribution of protein-bound NADH relative to that observed in the control cells at all three phases of the growth curve. The imposed perturbations (confluence, serum starvation, and KCN treatment) are all expected to result in an increase in the ratio of NADH/NAD+. Our studies suggest that the fluorescence lifetime of both the free and the protein-bound components of NADH and the ratio of free to protein-bound NADH is related to changes in the NADH/NAD+ ratio.

  16. Lysyl oxidase in cancer research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for cancer-associated deaths and therapies are desperately needed to target the progression of cancer. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) plays a pivotal role in cancer progression, including metastasis, and is therefore is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review we...

  17. Flavoprotein oxidases : classification and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Willem P.; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W.

    This review provides an overview of oxidases that utilise a flavin cofactor for catalysis. This class of oxidative flavoenzymes has shown to harbour a large number of biotechnologically interesting enzymes. Applications range from their use as biocatalysts for the synthesis of pharmaceutical

  18. Cold stress decreases the capacity for respiratory NADH oxidation in potato leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Å.S.; Johansson, F.I.; Møller, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Cold stress effects on the expression of genes for respiratory chain enzymes were investigated in potato (Solarium tuberosum L., cv. Desiree) leaves. The nda1 and ndb1 genes, homologues to genes encoding the non-proton-pumping respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli and yeast......, were compared to genes encoding catalytic subunits of the proton-pumping NADH dehydrogenase (complex I). Using a real-time PCR system, we demonstrate a specific and gradual decrease of the NDA1 transcript after exposing the plants to 5 C. After 6 days of cold treatment the NDA1 transcript abundance...

  19. Chromate reduction by rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, R.B.; Cooke, R.T. Jr.

    1986-05-29

    Chromate was reduced during the oxidation of 1-methylnicotinamide chlorine by partially purified rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase. In addition to l-methylnicotinamide, several other electron donor substrates for aldehyde oxidase were able to support the enzymatic chromate reduction. The reduction required the presence of both enzyme and the electron donor substrate. The rate of the chromate reduction was retarded by inhibitors or aldehyde oxidase but was not affected by substrates or inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. These results are consistent with the involvement of aldehyde oxidase in the reduction of chromate by rabbit liver cytosolic enzyme preparations.

  20. Prognostic role of tumor-associated macrophages and angiogenesis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Luigi; Ronconi, Fioravante; Lepore, Marianna; Tenneriello, Valentina; Cantore, Nicola; Dell'Angelo, Antonietta Carmela; Ferbo, Umberto; Ferrara, Felicetto

    2013-11-01

    We studied by immunohistochemistry CD68 + tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and angiogenesis in 121 consecutive cases of uniformly treated classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). High TAM count showed a significant correlation with age ≥ 45, mixed cellularity subtype and high β₂-microglobulin level. Vessel density (VD) was unrelated to clinicopathological features, while a significant correlation was found between TAM count and VD. Patients with high TAMs showed a trend toward reduced progression-free survival and significantly shorter overall survival (OS). No correlation was found between VD and survival. At multivariate analysis, bulky disease was an independent predictor of reduced progression-free survival, while independent adverse prognostic factors for OS were male sex, age ≥ 45, advanced stage and bulky disease. High TAM count results in an adverse overall outcome in cHL and is significantly correlated to VD. Since VD has no prognostic relevance, the adverse effect of TAMs is presumably unrelated to angiogenesis.

  1. Ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma--report of two rare cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogge, Maritzabel; Velez, Ines; Kaltman, Steven; Movahed, Reza; Yeh, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The ghost cell odontogenic tumor (GCOT) is a neoplastic/cystic lesion with a diverse histopathological and clinical behavior It was formerly known as calcified odontogenic cyst, but in 2005 the World Health Organization categorized this lesion as an odontogenic, benign tumor rather than a cyst; nominating this neoplasm as calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. A later comprehensive classification named it ghost cell odontogenic tumor because the most remarkable histopathologic characteristic is the presence of a mass of ghost cells embedded in the epithelium. We report two cases of a rare variant of a ghost cell odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma; to our knowledge, one is the youngest patient (four month old) reported in the English literature.

  2. OK-432 Suppresses Proliferation and Metastasis by Tumor Associated Macrophages in Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan-Feng; Tang, Kun; Guan, Wei; Yang, Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhuang, Qian-Yuan; Ye, Zhang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    OK-432, a Streptococcus-derived anticancer immunotherapeutic agent, has been applied in clinic for many years and achieved great progress in various cancers. In the present study, we investigated its anticancer effect on bladder cancer through tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). MTS assay validated OK-432 could inhibit proliferation in both T24 and EJ bladder cell lines. OK-432 also induced apoptosis of bladder cancer cells in vitro. Consequently, we demonstrated that OK-432 could suppress the bladder cancer cells migration and invasion by altering the EMT-related factors. Furthermore, using SD rat model, we revealed that OK-432 inhibited tumor growth, suppressed PCNA expression and inhibited metastasis in vivo. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that OK-432 inhibits cell proliferation and metastasis through inducing macrophages to secret cytokines in bladder cancer.

  3. Purification and characterization of an NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase from spinach leaf plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérczi, A; Fredlund, K M; Møller, I M

    1995-06-20

    Plasma membranes were purified from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase was released from the membrane by Chaps solubilization and purified 360-fold by ion-exchange chromatography followed by affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography on FPLC. A major band of 45 kDa and a minor contaminant of 66 kDa were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The band at 45 kDa cross-reacted with antibodies raised against an NADH-hexacyanoferrate(III) reductase from potato tuber microsomes. The native size of the enzyme was 160 kDa as determined by size-exclusion chromatography indicating that it is a tetramer. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, followed by SDS-PAGE revealed three main bands of identical molecular weight with pI of 5.3-5.6. The enzyme contained about one flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per 45-kDa subunit as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy, was specific for the beta-hydrogen of NADH, preferred NADH over NADPH as electron donor, and preferred hexacyanoferrate(III) as electron acceptor, e.g., it reduced Fe3+-EDTA, cytochrome c, oxygen, and duroquinone at 70% whereas FAD, flavin mononucleotide, duroquinone, and ubiquinone0 did not affect the activity.

  4. The Activities of NADH-MethB Reductase and Glucose-6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities of NADH-MetHB reductase and G-6-PD were investigated in malaria patients in Calabar, Nigeria. Seventy malaria patients were selected for this study. Sixty-two age, sex – matched apparently healthy children were used as controls. Ages of subjects ranged from 6 months to 12 years (Mean = 5±1.3 years).

  5. Three-Dimensional Structure of Bovine NADH : Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Heel, Marin G. van; Bruggen, Ernst F.J. van

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the structure of bovine heart mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone (Q) oxidoreductase (EC 1.6.99.3) by image analysis of electron micrographs. A three-dimensional reconstruction was calculated from a tilt-series of a two-dimensional crystal of the molecule. Our interpretation of the

  6. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy of NADH distinguishes alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Uhlirova, Hana; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava

    2017-05-01

    Evaluating cerebral energy metabolism at microscopic resolution is important for comprehensively understanding healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. Here, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism in vivo in Sprague Dawley rats utilizing minimally-invasive 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence. Time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements enable distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. Ostensibly, these components indicate different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in glycolytic and oxidative metabolism. Classification models were developed with the experimental data and used to predict the metabolic impairments induced during separate experiments involving bicuculline-induced seizures. The models consistently predicted that prolonged focal seizure activity results in impaired activity in the electron transport chain, likely the consequence of inadequate oxygen supply. 2P-FLIM observations of cerebral NADH will help advance our understanding of cerebral energetics at a microscopic scale. Such knowledge will aid in our evaluation of healthy and diseased cerebral physiology and guide diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that target cerebral energetics.

  7. Azine/hydrogel/nanotube composite-modified electrodes for NADH catalysis and enzyme immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, Matthew T.; Giroud, Fabien; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2012-01-01

    The development of new, efficient bioelectrodes is important to the improvement of biosensor and biofuel cell technology. NAD-dependent dehydrogenase enzymes represent a diverse field of oxidoreductase enzymes that can be used to create unique biosensors and biofuel cells, but require electrocatalysts to oxidize NADH in order to harvest the electrons efficiently from fuel oxidation. This study presents a new methodology for the co-immobilization of dehydrogenase enzymes, azine-based NADH electrocatalysts, carbon nanotubes, and polymer hydrogels. The easy “one-pot” mixing and casting procedure is shown to produce electrodes that can electro-oxidize NADH at low potentials. In situ electropolymerization of the azine dyes within the composites is shown to improve NADH sensitivity, but harms enzyme activity. Biosensors and biofuel cells are constructed with a model enzyme, glucose dehydrogenase, to show the application of this system in a glucose biosensor and biofuel cell. Glucose biosensors produced limiting current densities of 400 μA/cm 2 and glucose/air-breathing biofuel cells produced power densities slightly greater than 100 μW/cm 2 .

  8. Overexpression of NADH-dependent fumarate reductase improves D-xylose fermentation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salusjärvi, Laura; Kaunisto, Sanna; Holmström, Sami; Vehkomäki, Maija-Leena; Koivuranta, Kari; Pitkänen, Juha-Pekka; Ruohonen, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deviation from optimal levels and ratios of redox cofactors NAD(H) and NADP(H) is common when microbes are metabolically engineered. The resulting redox imbalance often reduces the rate of substrate utilization as well as biomass and product formation. An example is the metabolism of D-xylose by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase encoding genes from Scheffersomyces stipitis. This pathway requires both NADPH and NAD(+). The effect of overexpressing the glycosomal NADH-dependent fumarate reductase (FRD) of Trypanosoma brucei in D-xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae alone and together with an endogenous, cytosol directed NADH-kinase (POS5Δ17) was studied as one possible solution to overcome this imbalance. Expression of FRD and FRD + POS5Δ17 resulted in 60 and 23 % increase in ethanol yield, respectively, on D-xylose under anaerobic conditions. At the same time, xylitol yield decreased in the FRD strain suggesting an improvement in redox balance. We show that fumarate reductase of T. brucei can provide an important source of NAD(+) in yeast under anaerobic conditions, and can be useful for metabolic engineering strategies where the redox cofactors need to be balanced. The effects of FRD and NADH-kinase on aerobic and anaerobic D-xylose and D-glucose metabolism are discussed.

  9. Live cell imaging of cytosolic NADH/NAD+ ratio in hepatocytes and liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Ricard; McCarty, William J; Lahmann, Carolina; Luther, Jay; Chung, Raymond T; Yarmush, Martin L; Yellen, Gary

    2018-01-01

    Fatty liver disease (FLD), the most common chronic liver disease in the United States, may be caused by alcohol or the metabolic syndrome. Alcohol is oxidized in the cytosol of hepatocytes by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which generates NADH and increases cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio. The increased ratio may be important for development of FLD, but our ability to examine this question is hindered by methodological limitations. To address this, we used the genetically encoded fluorescent sensor Peredox to obtain dynamic, real-time measurements of cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in living hepatocytes. Peredox was expressed in dissociated rat hepatocytes and HepG2 cells by transfection, and in mouse liver slices by tail-vein injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-encoded sensor. Under control conditions, hepatocytes and liver slices exhibit a relatively low (oxidized) cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio as reported by Peredox. The ratio responds rapidly and reversibly to substrates of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). Ethanol causes a robust dose-dependent increase in cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio, and this increase is mitigated by the presence of NAD + -generating substrates of LDH or SDH. In contrast to hepatocytes and slices, HepG2 cells exhibit a relatively high (reduced) ratio and show minimal responses to substrates of ADH and SDH. In slices, we show that comparable results are obtained with epifluorescence imaging and two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2p-FLIM). Live cell imaging with Peredox is a promising new approach to investigate cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in hepatocytes. Imaging in liver slices is particularly attractive because it allows preservation of liver microanatomy and metabolic zonation of hepatocytes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We describe and validate a new approach for measuring free cytosolic NADH/NAD + ratio in hepatocytes and liver slices: live cell imaging with the fluorescent biosensor Peredox. This approach yields dynamic, real

  10. Sources and implications of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance in diabetes and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinzi Wu,1Zhen Jin,1Hong Zheng,1,2Liang-Jun Yan1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNT System College of Pharmacy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA; 2Department of Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Basic Medicine, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: NAD+ is a fundamental molecule in metabolism and redox signaling. In diabetes and its complications, the balance between NADH and NAD+ can be severely perturbed. On one hand, NADH is overproduced due to influx of hyperglycemia to the glycolytic and Krebs cycle pathways and activation of the polyol pathway. On the other hand, NAD+ can be diminished or depleted by overactivation of poly ADP ribose polymerase that uses NAD+ as its substrate. Moreover, sirtuins, another class of enzymes that also use NAD+ as their substrate for catalyzing protein deacetylation reactions, can also affect cellular content of NAD+. Impairment of NAD+ regeneration enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and complex I in mitochondria can also contribute to NADH accumulation and NAD+ deficiency. The consequence of NADH/NAD+ redox imbalance is initially reductive stress that eventually leads to oxidative stress and oxidative damage to macromolecules, including DNA, lipids, and proteins. Accordingly, redox imbalance-triggered oxidative damage has been thought to be a major factor contributing to the development of diabetes and its complications. Future studies on restoring NADH/NAD+ redox balance could provide further insights into design of novel antidiabetic strategies. Keywords: mitochondria, complex I, reactive oxygen species, polyol pathway, poly ADP ribosylation, sirtuins, oxidative stress, oxidative damage

  11. NAD(H) and NADP(H) Redox Couples and Cellular Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wusheng; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2018-01-20

    The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )/reduced NAD + (NADH) and NADP + /reduced NADP + (NADPH) redox couples are essential for maintaining cellular redox homeostasis and for modulating numerous biological events, including cellular metabolism. Deficiency or imbalance of these two redox couples has been associated with many pathological disorders. Recent Advances: Newly identified biosynthetic enzymes and newly developed genetically encoded biosensors enable us to understand better how cells maintain compartmentalized NAD(H) and NADP(H) pools. The concept of redox stress (oxidative and reductive stress) reflected by changes in NAD(H)/NADP(H) has increasingly gained attention. The emerging roles of NAD + -consuming proteins in regulating cellular redox and metabolic homeostasis are active research topics. The biosynthesis and distribution of cellular NAD(H) and NADP(H) are highly compartmentalized. It is critical to understand how cells maintain the steady levels of these redox couple pools to ensure their normal functions and simultaneously avoid inducing redox stress. In addition, it is essential to understand how NAD(H)- and NADP(H)-utilizing enzymes interact with other signaling pathways, such as those regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and energy metabolism. Additional studies are needed to investigate the inter-relationships among compartmentalized NAD(H)/NADP(H) pools and how these two dinucleotide redox couples collaboratively regulate cellular redox states and cellular metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, recent studies suggest the utility of using pharmacological interventions or nutrient-based bioactive NAD + precursors as therapeutic interventions for metabolic diseases. Thus, a better understanding of the cellular functions of NAD(H) and NADP(H) may facilitate efforts to address a host of pathological disorders effectively. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 251-272.

  12. A novel tumor-associated antigen expressed in human uterine and ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, K; Nakashima, M; Kaku, T; Kamura, T; Nakano, H; Watanabe, T

    1996-04-15

    A large number of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against human tumor cells have been generated and it has been shown that these MoAbs are useful tools in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, as well as in the basic investigation of the oncogenesis and characterization of cancer cells. The 22-1-1 MoAb was established by cell fusion between mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells derived from mice immunized with the human uterine cervical adenocarcinoma cell line, SiSo. The tissue distribution and biologic characteristics of the 22-1-1 antigen (Ag) were examined. The 22-1-1 Ag was distinct from the known tumor-associated antigens such as YH 206, GA 733, CA 125, carcinoembryonic antigen, and sialyl Le(x) molecules in an expression pattern in human tumor cell lines. An immunohistochemical study revealed that 22-1-1 Ag was expressed in 87.5% of uterine cervical adenocarcinomas, 66% of uterine endometrial adenocarcinomas, and 58.8% of ovarian carcinomas. Moreover, 22-1-1 Ag was detected in 87.7% of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas; however, it was not detected in 87.7% of uterine cervical or ovarian tissues, except in uterine endometrial glands, in which its expression was observed at low levels. The 22-1-1 Ag was secreted into cell culture supernatant fluids and was also detected in the vaginal discharges of uterine cervical carcinoma patients. The antigenic epitope of 22-1-1 Ag was shown to be a protein with a molecular weight of 78 kilodaltons using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The 22-1-1 MoAb reactive to a novel tumor-associated antigen was generated. This Ag was expressed in cancer cells derived mainly from the uterus and ovary. Moreover, 22-1-1 Ag was associated in the vaginal discharges of uterine cervical carcinoma patients. 22-1-1 MoAb is a potential tool for the study of oncogenesis and the management of cancer patients.

  13. Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre-Lafay, Stéphanie; Geneix, Jeannine; Lecocq, Eric; Popovici, Cornel; Dubreuil, Patrice; Viens, Patrice; Gonçalves, Anthony; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Birnbaum, Daniel; Lopez, Marc; Monville, Florence; Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Berruyer-Pouyet, Carole; Ginestier, Christophe; Reymond, Nicolas; Finetti, Pascal; Sauvan, Richard; Adélaïde, José

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in the field of breast cancer research. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of epithelial physiology. We present here Nectin-4/PVRL4 as a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast carcinoma. Expression of Nectin-4 protein was measured on a panel of 78 primary cells and cell lines from different origins and 57 breast tumors by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Serum Nectin-4 was detected by ELISA and compared with CEA and CA15.3 markers, on panels of 45 sera from healthy donors, 53 sera from patients with non-metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) at diagnosis, and 182 sera from patients with MBC. Distribution of histological/serological molecular markers and histoclinical parameters were compared using the standard Chi-2 test. Nectin-4 was not detected in normal breast epithelium. By contrast, Nectin-4 was expressed in 61% of ductal breast carcinoma vs 6% in lobular type. Expression of Nectin-4 strongly correlated with the basal-like markers EGFR, P53, and P-cadherin, and negatively correlated with the luminal-like markers ER, PR and GATA3. All but one ER/PR-negative tumors expressed Nectin-4. The detection of Nectin-4 in serum improves the follow-up of patients with MBC: the association CEA/CA15.3/Nectin-4 allowed to monitor 74% of these patients compared to 67% with the association CEA/CA15.3. Serum Nectin-4 is a marker of disease progression, and levels correlate with the number of metastases (P = 0.038). Serum

  14. Nectin-4 is a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauvan Richard

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease at the molecular level. Evolution is difficult to predict according to classical histoclinical prognostic factors. Different studies highlight the importance of large-scale molecular expression analyses to improve taxonomy of breast cancer and prognostic classification. Identification of new molecular markers that refine this taxonomy and improve patient management is a priority in the field of breast cancer research. Nectins are cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of epithelial physiology. We present here Nectin-4/PVRL4 as a new histological and serological tumor associated marker for breast carcinoma. Methods Expression of Nectin-4 protein was measured on a panel of 78 primary cells and cell lines from different origins and 57 breast tumors by FACS analysis and immunohistochemistry (IHC, respectively. mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR. Serum Nectin-4 was detected by ELISA and compared with CEA and CA15.3 markers, on panels of 45 sera from healthy donors, 53 sera from patients with non-metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC at diagnosis, and 182 sera from patients with MBC. Distribution of histological/serological molecular markers and histoclinical parameters were compared using the standard Chi-2 test. Results Nectin-4 was not detected in normal breast epithelium. By contrast, Nectin-4 was expressed in 61% of ductal breast carcinoma vs 6% in lobular type. Expression of Nectin-4 strongly correlated with the basal-like markers EGFR, P53, and P-cadherin, and negatively correlated with the luminal-like markers ER, PR and GATA3. All but one ER/PR-negative tumors expressed Nectin-4. The detection of Nectin-4 in serum improves the follow-up of patients with MBC: the association CEA/CA15.3/Nectin-4 allowed to monitor 74% of these patients compared to 67% with the association CEA/CA15.3. Serum Nectin-4 is a marker of disease progression, and levels

  15. EXPRESSION OF XANTHINE OXIDASE IN TESTICULAR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Jun; Kumagai, Jin; Shimizu, Yasushi; Kawamura, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Toshinobu

    2009-01-01

    Objective : Previous studies showed that xanthine oxidase-related active oxygen generation was involved in heat stress-induced apoptosis in testicular cells. Hence, in the present study, the expressionof xanthine oxidase in experimental cryptorchidism and heat-stressed testicular cells was assessed to determine the involvement of xanthine oxidase-related active oxygen generation in heat stress-induced apoptosis in testicular cells. Methods : (1) Immunohistological examinationof xanthine oxida...

  16. Reprogramming Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Antibody Targeting Inhibits Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Maria Georgoudaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are composed of multiple cell types besides the tumor cells themselves, including innate immune cells such as macrophages. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells present in the tumor microenvironment (TME. Here, they contribute to immunosuppression, enabling the establishment and persistence of solid tumors as well as metastatic dissemination. We have found that the pattern recognition scavenger receptor MARCO defines a subtype of suppressive TAMs and is linked to clinical outcome. An anti-MARCO monoclonal antibody was developed, which induces anti-tumor activity in breast and colon carcinoma, as well as in melanoma models through reprogramming TAM populations to a pro-inflammatory phenotype and increasing tumor immunogenicity. This anti-tumor activity is dependent on the inhibitory Fc-receptor, FcγRIIB, and also enhances the efficacy of checkpoint therapy. These results demonstrate that immunotherapies using antibodies designed to modify myeloid cells of the TME represent a promising mode of cancer treatment.

  17. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with an odontome – a diverse lesion encountered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radheshyam C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chourasia Radheshyam,1 Bandyopadhyay Alokenath,2 Harish Kumar,2 Panda Abikshyeet2 1Shri Medishine Hospital, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Kalinga Institute of Dental Sciences, KIIT University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India Abstract: The human jaw is an exclusive habitat for odontogenic lesions. Ghost cells associated odontogenic lesions are a diverse group with a variety of presentations in the jaws. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin which demonstrates ghost cells in the epithelial component. This tumor sometimes mimics the features of a cyst clinically and radiographically, but histopathologically as well as behavior-wise shows the features of a tumor. Many classification systems have been proposed and revised from time to time. Presently a dualistic concept is highlighted to classify this group of lesions. The present case highlights a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with a complex composite odontome, which appeared like a cyst clinically and radiographically. Keywords: calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, calcifying odontogenic cyst, odontome, ghost cell

  18. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Promote Malignant Progression of Breast Phyllodes Tumors by Inducing Myofibroblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yan; Chen, Jianing; Huang, Di; Yao, Yandan; Chen, Jiewen; Ding, Lin; Zeng, Jiayi; Su, Shicheng; Chao, Xue; Su, Fengxi; Yao, Herui; Hu, Hai; Song, Erwei

    2017-07-01

    Myofibroblast differentiation plays an important role in the malignant progression of phyllodes tumor, a fast-growing neoplasm derived from periductal stromal cells of the breast. Macrophages are frequently found in close proximity with myofibroblasts, but it is uncertain whether they are involved in the myofibroblast differentiation during phyllodes tumor progression. Here we show that increased density of tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) correlates with malignant progression of phyllodes tumor. We found that TAMs stimulated myofibroblast differentiation and promoted the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that levels of the chemokine CCL18 in TAM was an independent prognostic factor of phyllodes tumor. Mechanistic investigations showed that CCL18 promoted expression of α-smooth muscle actin, a hallmark of myofibroblast, along with the proliferation and invasion of phyllodes tumor cells, and that CCL18-driven myofibroblast differentiation was mediated by an NF-κB/miR-21/PTEN/AKT signaling axis. In murine xenograft models of human phyllodes tumor, CCL18 accelerated tumor growth, induced myofibroblast differentiation, and promoted metastasis. Taken together, our findings indicated that TAM drives myofibroblast differentiation and malignant progression of phyllodes tumor through a CCL18-driven signaling cascade amenable to antibody disruption. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3605-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanmee, Theerawut [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Ontong, Pawared [Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Konno, Kenjiro [Department of Animal Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Itano, Naoki, E-mail: itanon@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Technology, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Division of Engineering (Biotechnology), Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan); Department of Molecular Biosciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-13

    During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  20. A rare case report of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma in the maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assao, Agnes; Freitas, Diogo Loureiro de; Oliveira, Denise Tostes

    2017-01-01

    The adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) associated with odontoma has been described as a new entity with overlapping features of adenomatoid-like structures and odontoma. Presentation of the case: We report the second case of AOT associated with odontoma in the posterior maxillary region. A 22-year-old patient presented expansion of the vestibular and palatine cortical wall of maxilla. Radiographic examination and computed tomography confirmed erosion of maxillary walls, root resorption, displacement of a neighboring tooth and radiopacities within the lesion. Histopathological analysis showed a cystic cavity lined by odontogenic epithelium, organized as duct like structures and tubular dentin. The diagnosis established was AOT associated with odontoma. As fewer cases have been described, the aim of this study is to report clinical behavior and evolution of adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma, as it have not yet been described and its origin is not completely established. The hamartomatous or neoplastic origin of this tumor is under debate. Therefore, it is necessary similar cases to be published to increase the knowledge about the clinical behavior and evolution of this tumor, to enable such lesions to be more clearly defined in the next classification of odontogenic tumors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Exercise, physical activity and breast cancer: the role of tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Jorming; Kirk, Elizabeth A; Lee, Shu Xian; Ladiges, Warren C

    2012-01-01

    Regular exercise and physical activity provide many health benefits and are encouraged by medical professionals for the primary prevention of and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer Current consensus in the discipline of exercise oncology is that both regular physical activity and exercise training exert some protective effect against breast cancer risk, and may reduce morbidity in some advanced cases. While there is growing interest in the role of exercise and physical activity in breast cancer prevention, it is currently unclear how exercise may modulate tumor behavior. The tumor microenvironment is populated by stromal cells such as fibroblasts and adipocytes, as well as macrophages. Termed tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), these immune cells are highly plastic and respond to different signals from the cancer microenvironment, causing them to either display tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotypes. Because of such plasticity, there has been considerable interest by immunologists to develop immunotherapies based on skewing the behavior of TAMs to become cancer-suppressive. Previous studies have indirectly shown the ability of exercise training to induce an anti-tumor effect of macrophages, although the studies did not address this in the tumor microenvironment. Nevertheless, this opens up the possibility that regular exercise training may exert a protective innate immune effect against breast cancer, potentially by inducing a cancer-suppressing phenotype of TAMs. This review will describe potential mechanisms through which exercise may modulate the behavior of TAMs.

  2. Role of tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kovaleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of tumor stroma in malignant tumor pathogenesis cannot be disputed. Macrophages are one of the crucial elements of tumor stroma. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are type 2-activated macrophages (M2. They were first described in 1992. They carry CD206, CD163, FXIIIa, βIG-H3, stabilin 1, YKL-39, SI-CLP, tenascin С, LOX-1, fibronectin, MARCO, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA and other markers. Unlike proinflammatory macrophages (M1, М2 display high anti-inflammatory activity and are responsible for inflammation reaction suppression and tissue recovery in inflamed area. TAMs significantly contribute to tumor progression by stimulating cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and suppression of antitumor immune response. Identification of macrophages in renal tumors involves a limited number of markers, which doesn’t allow making a conclusive answer about their function. However, a correlation between TAMs content and a negative disease prognosis can be considered proven. Studies of M1 and M2 using different markers have shown that renal tumors contain high levels of TAMs with mixed M1/M2 phenotype. TAMs in renal tumors are highly proangiogenic and immunosuppressive. TAMs density can be used as a prognostic marker, but development of an effective treatment strategy aimed at inhibition of TAMs antitumor activity requires systemic research involving a wide panel of M1 and M2 macrophage markers. 

  3. Tumor-Associated Macrophages Provide Significant Prognostic Information in Urothelial Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna M Boström

    Full Text Available Inflammation is an important feature of carcinogenesis. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs can be associated with either poor or improved prognosis, depending on their properties and polarization. Current knowledge of the prognostic significance of TAMs in bladder cancer is limited and was investigated in this study. We analyzed 184 urothelial bladder cancer patients undergoing transurethral resection of a bladder tumor or radical cystectomy. CD68 (pan-macrophage marker, MAC387 (polarized towards type 1 macrophages, and CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 (type 2 macrophages and lymphatic/blood vessels were detected immunohistochemically. The median follow-up time was 6.0 years. High macrophage counts associated with a higher pT category and grade. Among patients undergoing transurethral resection, all studied markers apart from CLEVER-1/Stabilin-1 were associated with increased risk of progression and poorer disease-specific and overall survival in univariate analyses. High levels of two macrophage markers (CD68/MAC387+/+ or CD68/CLEVER-1+/+ groups had an independent prognostic role after transurethral resection in multivariate analyses. In the cystectomy cohort, MAC387, alone and in combination with CD68, was associated with poorer survival in univariate analyses, but none of the markers were independent predictors of outcome in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that macrophage phenotypes provide significant independent prognostic information, particularly in bladder cancers undergoing transurethral resection.

  4. Depletion of tumor associated macrophages slows the growth of chemically-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Fritz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for lung cancer, and low dose aspirin intake reduces lung cancer risk. However, the roles that specific inflammatory cells and their products play in lung carcinogenesis have yet to be fully elucidated. In mice, alveolar macrophage numbers increase as lung tumors progress, and pulmonary macrophage programming changes within 2 weeks of carcinogen exposure. To examine how macrophages specifically affect lung tumor progression, they were depleted in mice bearing urethane-induced lung tumors using clodronate-encapsulated liposomes. Alveolar macrophage populations decreased to ≤ 50% of control levels after 4-6 weeks of liposomal clodronate treatment. Tumor burden decreased by 50% compared to vehicle treated mice, and tumor cell proliferation, as measured by Ki67 staining, was also attenuated. Pulmonary fluid levels of IGF-I, CXCL1, IL-6 and CCL2 diminished with clodronate liposome treatment. Tumor associated macrophages expressed markers of both M1 and M2 programming in vehicle and clodronate liposome treated mice. Mice lacking CCR2 (the receptor for macrophage chemotactic factor CCL2 had comparable numbers of alveolar macrophages and showed no difference in tumor growth rates when compared to similarly treated wild-type mice suggesting that while CCL2 may recruit macrophages to lung tumor microenvironments, redundant pathways can compensate when CCL2/CCR2 signaling is inactivated. Depletion of pulmonary macrophages rather than inhibition of their recruitment may be an advantageous strategy for attenuating lung cancer progression.

  5. Distribution pattern of tumor associated macrophages predicts the prognosis of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiu-Yang; Peng, Chun-Wei; Yang, Gui-Fang; Hu, Wen-Qing; Yang, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Chao-Qun; Xiong, Bin; Li, Yan

    2017-11-03

    As mayor biomarkers in tumor microenvironment (TME), tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) of gastric cancer (GC) still needs further studies in terms of the number and distribution pattern. Herein, tissue microarrays (TMA) incorporating 494 GC surgical samples in duplicate were stained for TAMs infiltration analysis. TAMs number was counted according to the locations, including infiltrating macrophages in cancer nest (MC), in invasive front (MF) and in stroma (MS). Correlations between TAMs number, distribution pattern and clinic-pathological features and survival analyses were performed. Infiltrating macrophages number in GC tissues was much higher than that in peritumoral tissues. TAMs number was not significantly correlated with the overall survival (OS). TAMs distribution pattern could be categorized into MC or MF/MS dominant pattern, and correlated with histological grade ( P =0.001). The median OS of MF/MS dominant pattern (22.1, 95%CI: 23.5-28.9) was significantly shorter than that of MC dominant pattern (25.6, 95%CI: 28.5-35.6) ( P =0.002). By receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, the predictive value of TAMs distribution pattern was superior to histological grade and pM stage, but inferior to pN and TNM stage. TAMs distribution pattern could be an independent prognostic factor for the OS of GC patients, and patients with MF/MS dominant pattern had worse outcomes.

  6. The incidence of cysts and tumors associated with impacted third molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A T Vigneswaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of cysts and tumors associated with lower impacted third molars are very low prevalence, which might be because of the fact that most pathologies go unnoticed as many practitioners discard the erupted tissue after surgical removal of the impacted teeth rather than sending the tissue for histopathological examination. Our aim was to evaluate the patients who came for third molar surgical removal with due therapeutic prophylacis and an incidental finding. A proper study protocol both inclusion and exclusion criteria was strictly followed for all the cases, which were included in the study. The period of study was 6 years and the total number of cases assessed were 2778 patients out of which 70 cases reported pathology associated with the impacted third molars. Among 70 cases 61.4% were reported as cyst and tumors and 38.6% of the cases had chronic inflammatory reaction, including two cases with normal dental follicle. High incidence rate of pathology associated with third molar occurred between age group of 20 and 30 years older age groups showed very low incidence. Most common site of impaction was found to be left side of mandible and positions were vertical and distoangular impactions. Thus was male predominance in the younger groups. The examination is necessary whether the third molars impacted cases were symptomatic or asymptomatic

  7. Iron Handling in Tumor-Associated Macrophages—Is There a New Role for Lipocalin-2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Jung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis is a multistep process. Besides somatic mutations in tumor cells, stroma-associated immunity is a major regulator of tumor growth. Tumor cells produce and secrete diverse mediators to create a local microenvironment that supports their own survival and growth. It is becoming apparent that iron acquisition, storage, and release in tumor cells is different from healthy counterparts. It is also appreciated that macrophages in the tumor microenvironment acquire a tumor-supportive, anti-inflammatory phenotype that promotes tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Apparently, this behavior is attributed, at least in part, to the ability of macrophages to support tumor cells with iron. Polarization of macrophages by apoptotic tumor cells shifts the profile of genes involved in iron metabolism from an iron sequestering to an iron-release phenotype. Iron release from macrophages is supposed to be facilitated by ferroportin. However, lipid mediators such as sphingosine-1-phosphate, released form apoptotic tumor cells, upregulate lipocalin-2 (Lcn-2 in macrophages. This protein is known to bind siderophore-complexed iron and thus, may participate in iron transport in the tumor microenvironment. We describe how macrophages handle iron in the tumor microenvironment, discuss the relevance of an iron-release macrophage phenotype for tumor progression, and propose a new role for Lcn-2 in tumor-associated macrophages.

  8. Tumor-associated auto-antibodies as early detection markers for ovarian cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Hüsing, Anika

    2018-01-01

    .08-0.40] for CTAG1A, CTAG2 and NUDT1 to 0.23 [0.10-0.44] for P53 (0.33 [0.11-0.68] for high-grade serous tumors). However, at longer lead-times the ability of these AAb markers to distinguish future ovarian cancer cases from controls declined rapidly; at lead times >1 year, SE98 estimates were close to zero (all......Immuno-proteomic screening has identified several tumor-associated auto-antibodies (AAb) that may have diagnostic capacity for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, with AAbs to P53 proteins and cancer-testis antigens (CTAGs) as prominent examples. However, the early detection potential of these AAbs...... under usual care. CA125 was measured using electrochemo-luminiscence. Diagnostic discrimination statistics were calculated by strata of lead-time between blood collection and diagnosis. With lead times ≤6 months, ovarian cancer detection sensitivity at 0.98 specificity (SE98) varied from 0.19 [95% CI 0...

  9. Fibroblast activation protein regulates tumor-associated fibroblasts and epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dongmei; Ma, Li; Wang, Fangyuan

    2012-08-01

    The fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface serine protease which has emerged as a specific marker of tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs). FAP has been shown to have both in vitro dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. However, the biological function of FAP in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. In this study, we first show that TAFs isolated from ovarian cancer samples have the characteristics of stem cells. To explore the functional role of FAP, the protein was silenced by siRNA lentiviral vector transfection. FAP silencing inhibited the growth of TAFs in vitro, accompanied with cell cycle arrest at the G2 and S phase in TAFs. FAP silencing also reduced the stem cell marker gene expression in TAFs. SKOV3 cells do not express FAP. Although FAP-silenced SKOV3 cells induced ovarian tumors, the rate of tumor growth was significantly decreased, as shown in the xenograft mouse model. TAF phenotypes in the xenograft tumor tissues were further assayed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of TAF markers, including fibroblast-specific protein, FAP, smooth muscle actin, desmin, vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor was decreased in the tumor stroma induced by FAP-silenced SKOV3 cells. In conclusion, FAP is an important regulator of the microenvironment in tumor formation and targeting FAP is a potential therapeutic strategy to combat ovarian cancer.

  10. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Major Players in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerawut Chanmee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During tumor progression, circulating monocytes and macrophages are actively recruited into tumors where they alter the tumor microenvironment to accelerate tumor progression. Macrophages shift their functional phenotypes in response to various microenvironmental signals generated from tumor and stromal cells. Based on their function, macrophages are divided broadly into two categories: classical M1 and alternative M2 macrophages. The M1 macrophage is involved in the inflammatory response, pathogen clearance, and antitumor immunity. In contrast, the M2 macrophage influences an anti-inflammatory response, wound healing, and pro-tumorigenic properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs closely resemble the M2-polarized macrophages and are critical modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Clinicopathological studies have suggested that TAM accumulation in tumors correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Consistent with that evidence, experimental and animal studies have supported the notion that TAMs can provide a favorable microenvironment to promote tumor development and progression. In this review article, we present an overview of mechanisms responsible for TAM recruitment and highlight the roles of TAMs in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, immunosuppression, and chemotherapeutic resistance. Finally, we discuss TAM-targeting therapy as a promising novel strategy for an indirect cancer therapy.

  11. Chloroquine modulates antitumor immune response by resetting tumor-associated macrophages toward M1 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Degao; Xie, Jing; Fiskesund, Roland; Dong, Wenqian; Liang, Xiaoyu; Lv, Jiadi; Jin, Xun; Liu, Jinyan; Mo, Siqi; Zhang, Tianzhen; Cheng, Feiran; Zhou, Yabo; Zhang, Huafeng; Tang, Ke; Ma, Jingwei; Liu, Yuying; Huang, Bo

    2018-02-28

    Resetting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is a promising strategy to ameliorate the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and improve innate and adaptive antitumor immunity. Here we show that chloroquine (CQ), a proven anti-malarial drug, can function as an antitumor immune modulator that switches TAMs from M2 to tumor-killing M1 phenotype. Mechanistically, CQ increases macrophage lysosomal pH, causing Ca 2+ release via the lysosomal Ca 2+ channel mucolipin-1 (Mcoln1), which induces the activation of p38 and NF-κB, thus polarizing TAMs to M1 phenotype. In parallel, the released Ca 2+ activates transcription factor EB (TFEB), which reprograms the metabolism of TAMs from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. As a result, CQ-reset macrophages ameliorate tumor immune microenvironment by decreasing immunosuppressive infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells, thus enhancing antitumor T-cell immunity. These data illuminate a previously unrecognized antitumor mechanism of CQ, suggesting a potential new macrophage-based tumor immunotherapeutic modality.

  12. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  13. Beyond the M-CSF receptor - novel therapeutic targets in tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonelli, Stefano; Geeraerts, Xenia; Bolli, Evangelia; Keirsse, Jiri; Kiss, Mate; Pombo Antunes, Ana Rita; Van Damme, Helena; De Vlaminck, Karen; Movahedi, Kiavash; Laoui, Damya; Raes, Geert; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2018-02-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are by now established as important regulators of tumor progression by impacting on tumor immunity, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Hence, a multitude of approaches are currently pursued to intervene with TAM's protumor activities, the most advanced of which being a blockade of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF)/M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) signaling. M-CSFR signaling largely impacts on the differentiation of macrophages, including TAM, and hence strongly influences the numbers of these cells in tumors. However, a repolarization of TAM toward a more antitumor phenotype may be more elegant and may yield stronger effects on tumor growth. In this respect, several aspects of TAM behavior could be altered, such as their intratumoral localization, metabolism and regulatory pathways. Intervention strategies could include the use of small molecules but also new generations of biologicals which may complement the current success of immune checkpoint blockers. This review highlights current work on the search for new therapeutic targets in TAM. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N.; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2012-01-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15–transduced NKT cells. PMID:22565311

  15. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2012-06-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15-transduced NKT cells.

  16. Tumor-associated proteins in rat submandibular gland induced by DMBA and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sung Ook; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo

    1997-01-01

    This study was performed in order to identify changes of the plasma membrane proteins in rat submandibular gland tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene [DMBA] and X-irradiation. Two kinds of tumor associated membrane proteins (protein A and B) were isolated with 3 M KCl extraction from rat submandibular gland tumors induced by DMBA and X-irradiation. To identify their antigenicities, immunoelectrophoresis and double immunodiffusion was carried out with various proteins extracted from liver, heart, skin and pancreas of adult rats and from embryonic liver, heart and skin. The rabbit antisera against the protein A did not cross-react with any of the proteins extracted from the above mentioned tissues, suggesting that protein A might be tumor specific antigen. However, the rabbit antisera against protein B was precipitated with proteins extracted from the liver of adult and embryonic rats. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of these two proteins (A and B) showed that protein A was a dimer with molecular weights of 69,000 and 35,000 dalton, whereas protein B was a monomer with molecular weight of 50,000 dalton.

  17. Targeted Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Cyanine 7-Labeled Mannose in Xenograft Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jiang MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose receptor is considered as a hallmark of M2-oriented tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs, but its utility in TAMs was rarely reported. Therefore, deoxymannose (DM, a high-affinity ligand of mannose receptor, was labeled with near-infrared dye cyanine 7 (Cy7, and its feasibility of targeted imaging on TAMs was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The Cy7-DM was synthesized, and its binding affinity with induced TAMs in vitro, whole-body imaging in xenograft tumor mouse model in vivo, and the cellular localization in dissected tissues were evaluated. We demonstrated a high uptake of Cy7-DM by induced M2 macrophages and TAMs in tumor tissues. In vivo near-infrared live imaging visualized abundant TAMs in tumor lesions instead of inflammatory sites by Cy7-DM imaging, and the quantity of Cy7-DM signals in tumors was significantly higher than that shown in inflammatory sites from 1 to 8 hours of imaging. Our results suggest that mannose could rapidly and specifically target TAMs and is a promising candidate for targeted diagnosis of tumor with rich TAMs.

  18. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Incessant Builders and Destroyers of the Cancer Stroma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liguori, Manuela; Solinas, Graziella; Germano, Giovanni; Mantovani, Alberto; Allavena, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAM) are key components of the reactive stroma of tumors. In most, although not all cancers, their presence is associated with poor patient prognosis. In addition to releasing cytokines and growth factors for tumor and endothelial cells, a distinguished feature of TAM is their high-rate degradation of the extra-cellular matrix. This incessant stroma remodelling favours the release of matrix-bound growth factors and promotes tumor cell motility and invasion. In addition, TAM produce matrix proteins, some of which are typical of the neoplastic tissues. The gene expression profile of TAM isolated from human tumors reveals a matrix-related signature with the up-regulation of genes coding for different matrix proteins, as well as several proteolytic enzymes. Among ECM components are: osteopontin, osteoactivin, collagens and fibronectin, including also a truncated isoform of fibronectin termed migration stimulation factor. In addition to serve as structural proteins, these matrix components have key functions in the regulation of the vessel network, in the inductionof tumor cell motility and degradation of cellular debris. Among proteolytic enzymes are: matrix metalloproteases, cathepsins, lysosomal and ADAM proteases, and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator. The degrading activity of TAM, coupled to the production of bio-active ECM proteins, co-operate to the build-up and maintenance of an inflammatory micro-environment which eventually promotes tumor progression

  19. Tumor-Associated Macrophages as Incessant Builders and Destroyers of the Cancer Stroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, Manuela; Solinas, Graziella; Germano, Giovanni [Department of Immunology and Inflammation Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 113, Rozzano-Milano 20089 (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 113, Rozzano-Milano 20089 (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milano, Milano 20089 (Italy); Allavena, Paola, E-mail: paola.allavena@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Via Manzoni 113, Rozzano-Milano 20089 (Italy)

    2011-09-28

    Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAM) are key components of the reactive stroma of tumors. In most, although not all cancers, their presence is associated with poor patient prognosis. In addition to releasing cytokines and growth factors for tumor and endothelial cells, a distinguished feature of TAM is their high-rate degradation of the extra-cellular matrix. This incessant stroma remodelling favours the release of matrix-bound growth factors and promotes tumor cell motility and invasion. In addition, TAM produce matrix proteins, some of which are typical of the neoplastic tissues. The gene expression profile of TAM isolated from human tumors reveals a matrix-related signature with the up-regulation of genes coding for different matrix proteins, as well as several proteolytic enzymes. Among ECM components are: osteopontin, osteoactivin, collagens and fibronectin, including also a truncated isoform of fibronectin termed migration stimulation factor. In addition to serve as structural proteins, these matrix components have key functions in the regulation of the vessel network, in the inductionof tumor cell motility and degradation of cellular debris. Among proteolytic enzymes are: matrix metalloproteases, cathepsins, lysosomal and ADAM proteases, and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator. The degrading activity of TAM, coupled to the production of bio-active ECM proteins, co-operate to the build-up and maintenance of an inflammatory micro-environment which eventually promotes tumor progression.

  20. Epigenetic control of MHC class II expression in tumor-associated macrophages by decoy receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yung-Chi; Chen, Tse-Ching; Lee, Chun-Ting; Yang, Chih-Ya; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Wang, Chao-Ching; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2008-05-15

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) is a member of the TNF receptor superfamily and is up-regulated in tumors originating from a diversity of lineages. DcR3 is capable of promoting angiogenesis, inducing dendritic cell apoptosis, and modulating macrophage differentiation. Since tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the major infiltrating leukocytes in most malignant tumors, we used microarray technology to investigate whether DcR3 contributes to the development of TAMs. Among the DcR3-modulated genes expressed by TAMs, those that encode proteins involved in MHC class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation were down-regulated substantially, together with the master regulator of MHC-II expression (the class II transactivator, CIITA). The ERK- and JNK-induced deacetylation of histones associated with the CIITA promoters was responsible for DcR3-mediated down-regulation of MHC-II expression. Furthermore, the expression level of DcR3 in cancer cells correlated inversely with HLA-DR levels on TAMs and with the overall survival time of pancreatic cancer patients. The role of DcR3 in the development of TAMs was further confirmed using transgenic mice overexpressing DcR3. This elucidates the molecular mechanism of impaired MHC-II-mediated antigen presentation by TAMs, and raises the possibility that subversion of TAM-induced immunosuppression via inhibition of DcR3 expression might represent a target for the design of new therapeutics.

  1. Microvesicle Cargo of Tumor-Associated MUC1 to Dendritic Cells Allows Cross-presentation and Specific Carbohydrate Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rughetti, Aurelia; Rahimi, Hassan; Belleudi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated glycoproteins are a group of antigens with high immunogenic interest: The glycoforms generated by the aberrant glycosylation are tumor-specific and the novel glycoepitopes exposed can be targets of tumor-specific immune responses. The MUC1 antigen is one of the most relevant tumo...

  2. Targeting the Stat6 pathway in tumor-associated macrophages reduces tumor growth and metastatic niche formation in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnemars-Postma, Karin; Bansal, Ruchi; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are the key effector cells in the tumor microenvironment and induce neoangiogenesis, matrix remodeling, and metastasis while suppressing the tumor immune system. These protumoral macrophages display an M2 phenotype induced by IL-4 and IL-13 cytokines. In this

  3. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... recent approach where tumor associated antigens (TAAs), which are primarily expressed in human tumor cells, and not expressed or minimally expressed in normal tissues, are employed to generate a tumor... royalty bearing and will comply with the terms and conditions of 35 U.S.C. 209 and 37 CFR Part 404.7. The...

  4. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, S; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, M

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors were...

  5. (RAPD) markers and polyphenol oxidases (PPO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and polyphenol oxidases (PPO) genes for distinguishing between the diploid ( glaucum ) and the tetraploid ( leporinum ) accessions in Hordeum murinum complex.

  6. The C-terminal peptide plays a role in the formation of an intermediate form during the transition between xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Tomoko; Okamoto, Ken; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Eger, Bryan T; Pai, Emil F; Nishino, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian xanthine oxidoreductase can exist in both dehydrogenase and oxidase forms. Conversion between the two is implicated in such diverse processes as lactation, anti-bacterial activity, reperfusion injury and a growing number of diseases. We have constructed a variant of the rat liver enzyme that lacks the carboxy-terminal amino acids 1316-1331; it appears to assume an intermediate form, exhibiting a mixture of dehydrogenase and oxidase activities. The purified variant protein retained ~ 50-70% of oxidase activity even after prolonged dithiothreitol treatment, supporting a previous prediction that the C-terminal region plays a role in the dehydrogenase to oxidase conversion. In the crystal structure of the protein variant, most of the enzyme stays in an oxidase conformation. After 15 min of incubation with a high concentration of NADH, however, the corresponding X-ray structures showed a dehydrogenase-type conformation. On the other hand, disulfide formation between Cys535 and Cys992, which can clearly be seen in the electron density map of the crystal structure of the variant after removal of dithiothreitol, goes in parallel with the complete conversion to oxidase, resulting in structural changes identical to those observed upon proteolytic cleavage of the linker peptide. These results indicate that the dehydrogenase-oxidase transformation occurs rather readily and the insertion of the C-terminal peptide into the active site cavity of its subunit stabilizes the dehydrogenase form. We propose that the intermediate form can be generated (e.g. in endothelial cells) upon interaction of the C-terminal peptide portion of the enzyme with other proteins or the cell membrane. Coordinate sets and structure factors for the four crystal structures reported in the present study have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank under the identification numbers 4YRW, 4YTZ, 4YSW, and 4YTY. © 2015 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  7. Human Urine-Fueled Light-Driven NADH Regeneration for Redox Biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sahng Ha; Ko, Jong Wan; Park, Chan Beum

    2016-07-07

    Human urine is considered as an alternative source of hydrogen and electricity owing to its abundance and high energy density. Here we show the utility of human urine as a chemical fuel for driving redox biocatalysis in a photoelectrochemical cell. Ni(OH)2 -modified α-Fe2 O3 is selected as a photoanode for the oxidation of urea in human urine and black silicon (bSi) is used as a photocathode material for nicotinamide cofactor (NADH: hydrogenated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) regeneration. The electrons extracted from human urine are used for the regeneration of NADH, an essential hydride mediator that is required for numerous redox biocatalytic reactions. The catalytic reactions at both the photoanode and the photocathode were significantly enhanced by light energy that lowered the overpotential and generated high currents in the full cell system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Thomas S.; Marsh, Richard J.; Duchen, Michael R.; Bain, Angus J.

    2013-08-01

    In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water-glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers-Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  9. The absence of genes for cytochrome c oxidase and reductase subunits in maxicircle kinetoplast DNA of the respiration-deficient plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawathean, P; Maslov, D A

    2000-08-01

    By completing the sequencing of the maxicircle conserved region in the kinetoplast DNA of Phytomonas serpens, we showed that the genes for subunits I and II (COI and COII) of cytochrome c oxidase in this organism were missing. We had previously shown that the genes for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III and apocytochrome b were also missing. These deletions did not affect the structure or expression of the remaining genes. Partial editing of the mRNA for NADH dehydrogenase subunit 8, previously found in strain IG from insects, was complete in two other strains isolated from plants. The appearance of a novel maxicircle gene for MURF2 block I gRNA, which substitutes for the gene missing due to the COII gene deletion, may illustrate a general mechanism for the origin of gRNAs.

  10. Tumor-associated autoantibody signature for the early detection of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayakin, Pawel; Ancāns, Guntis; Siliņa, Karīna; Meistere, Irēna; Kalniņa, Zane; Andrejeva, Diāna; Endzeliņš, Edgars; Ivanova, Lāsma; Pismennaja, Angelina; Ruskule, Agnese; Doniņa, Simona; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter; Leja, Mārcis; Linē, Aija

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens are very attractive biomarkers for the development of noninvasive serological tests for the early detection of cancer because of their specificity and stability in the sera. In our study, we applied T7 phage display-based serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries technique to identify a representative set of antigens eliciting humoral responses in patients with gastric cancer (GC), produced phage-antigen microarrays and exploited them for the survey of autoantibody repertoire in patients with GC and inflammatory diseases. We developed procedures for data normalization and cutoff determination to define sero-positive signals and ranked them by the signal intensity and frequency of reactivity. To identify autoantibodies with the highest diagnostic value, a 1,150-feature microarray was tested with sera from 100 patients with GC and 100 cancer-free controls, and then the top-ranked 86 antigens were used for the production of focused array that was tested with an independent validation set comprising serum samples from 235 patients with GC, 154 patients with peptic ulcer and gastritis and 213 healthy controls. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that 45-autoantibody signature could discriminate GC and healthy controls with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79 (59% sensitivity and 90% specificity), GC and peptic ulcer with AUC of 0.76 and GC and gastritis with AUC of 0.64. Moreover, it could detect early GC with equal sensitivity than advanced GC. Interestingly, the autoantibody production did not correlate with histological type, H. pylori status, grade, localization and size of the primary tumor, whereas it appeared to be associated with the metastatic disease. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  11. Nanoparticle-Based Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J. Serkova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response, mediated by tissue-resident or newly recruited macrophages, is an underlying pathophysiological condition for many diseases, including diabetes, obesity, neurodegeneration, atherosclerosis, and cancer. Paradoxically, inflammation is a double-edged sword in oncology. Macrophages are, generally speaking, the major drivers of inflammatory insult. For many solid tumors, high density of cells expressing macrophage-associated markers have generally been found in association with a poor clinical outcome, characterized by inflamed microenvironment, a high level of dissemination and resistance to conventional chemotherapies. On another hand, radiation treatment also triggers an inflammatory response in tumors (often referred to as pseudoprogression, which can be associated with a positive treatment response. As such, non-invasive imaging of cancer inflammation and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs provides a revolutionary diagnostic tool and monitoring strategy for anti-inflammatory, immuno- and radiotherapies. Recently, quantitative T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (qT2wMRI, using injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, has been reported for the assessment of TAMs non-invasively in animal models and in human trials. The SPIONs are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agents that significantly decrease T2 MR relaxation times in inflamed tissues due to the macrophage-specific uptake and retention. It has been shown that macrophage-populated tumors and metastases will accumulate iron oxide nanoparticles and decrease T2-relaxation time that will result in a negative (dark contrast in qT2wMRI. Non-invasive imaging of TAMs using SPION holds a great promise for staging the inflammatory microenvironment of primary and metastatic tumors as well monitoring the treatment response of cancer patients treated with radiation and immunotherapy.

  12. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Tumor associated macrophage × cancer cell hybrids may acquire cancer stem cell properties in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Ding

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers among women, and metastasis makes it lethal. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that acquire an alternatively activated macrophage (M2 phenotype may promote metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we examined how TAMs interact with breast cancer cells to promote metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of the M2-specific antigen CD163 in paraffin-embedded mammary carcinoma blocks to explore fusion events in breast cancer patients. U937 cells were used as a substitute for human monocytes, and these cells differentiated into M2 macrophages following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and M-CSF stimulation. M2 macrophages and the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 fused in the presence of 50% polyethylene glycol. Hybrids were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the relevant cell biological properties were compared with their parental counterparts. Breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-related markers were quantified by immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and/or western blotting. The tumor-initiating and metastatic capacities of the hybrids and their parental counterparts were assessed in NOD/SCID mice. We found that the CD163 expression rate in breast cancer tissues varied significantly and correlated with estrogen receptor status (p0.05. Characterization of the fusion hybrids revealed a more aggressive phenotype, including increased migration, invasion and tumorigenicity, but reduced proliferative ability, compared with the parental lines. The hybrids also gained a CD44(+CD24(-/low phenotype and over-expressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition-associated genes. These results indicate that TAMs may promote breast cancer metastasis through cell fusion, and the hybrids may gain a BCSC phenotype.

  14. Detection of tumor-associated cells in cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples for retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peixuan; Stanton, Melissa L; Castle, Erik P; Joseph, Richard W; Adams, Daniel L; Li, Shuhong; Amstutz, Platte; Tang, Cha-Mei; Ho, Thai H

    2016-07-02

    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are commonly collected in biobanks. However, little data exist regarding the preservation of tumor-associated cells in cryopreserved collections. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the CellSieve™ microfiltration assay for the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating cancer-associated macrophage-like cells (CAMLs) from cryopreserved PBMC samples. Blood samples spiked with breast (MCF-7), prostate (PC-3), and renal (786-O) cancer cell lines were used to establish analytical accuracy, efficiency, and reproducibility after cryopreservation. The spiked samples were processed through Ficoll separation, and cryopreservation was followed by thawing and microfiltration. MCF-7 cells were successfully retrieved with recovery efficiencies of 90.5 % without cryopreservation and 87.8 and 89.0 %, respectively, on day 7 and day 66 following cryopreservation. The corresponding recovery efficiencies of PC-3 cells were 83.3 % without cryopreservation and 85.3 and 84.7 %, respectively, after cryopreservation. Recovery efficiencies of 786-O cells were 92.7 % without cryopreservation, and 82.7 and 81.3 %, respectively, after cryopreservation. The recovered cells retained the morphologic characteristics and immunohistochemical markers that had been observed before freezing. The protocols were further validated by quantitation of CAMLs in blood samples from two patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The recovery rates of CTCs and CAMLs from cryopreserved samples were not statistically significant different (P > 0.05) from matched fresh samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report that CAMLs could be cryopreserved and analyzed after thawing with microfiltration technology. The application of microfiltration technology to cryopreserved samples will enable much greater retrospective study of cancer patients in relation to long-term outcomes.

  15. Imaging of Tumor-Associated Macrophages in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Orthotopic Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huanhuan; Chiu, Alan C; Kanada, Masamitsu; Schaar, Bruce T; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Contag, Christopher H; Dorigo, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with a poor prognosis in cancer. To gain a better understanding of cellular recruitment and dynamics of TAM biology during cancer progression, we established a novel transgenic mouse model for in vivo imaging of luciferase-expressing macrophages. B6.129P2-Lyz2 tm1(cre)Ifo /J mice, which express Cre recombinase under the control of the lysozyme M promoter (LysM) were crossed to Cre-lox Luc reporter mice (RLG), to produce LysM-LG mice whose macrophages express luciferase. Cell-type-specific luciferase expression in these mice was verified by flow cytometry, and via in vivo bioluminescence imaging under conditions where macrophages were either stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or depleted with clodronate liposomes. The distribution of activated macrophages was longitudinally imaged in two immunocompetent LysM-LG mouse models with either B16 melanoma or ID8 ovarian cancer cells. In vivo imaging of LysM-LG mice showed luciferase activity was generated by macrophages. Clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of macrophages lowered overall bioluminescence while lipopolysaccharide injection increased macrophage bioluminescence in both the B16 and ID8 models. Tracking macrophages weekly in tumor-bearing animals after intraperitoneal (i.p.) or intraovarian (i.o.) injection resulted in distinct, dynamic patterns of macrophage activity. Animals with metastatic ovarian cancer after i.p. injection exhibited significantly higher peritoneal macrophage activity compared to animals after i.o. injection. The LysM-LG model allows tracking of macrophage recruitment and activation during disease initiation and progression in a noninvasive manner. This model provides a tool to visualize and monitor the benefit of pharmacological interventions targeting macrophages in preclinical models.

  16. Preservation of NADH voltammetry for enzyme-modified electrodes based on dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, M A; Kuhr, W G

    1999-05-01

    Minimizing overpotential and generating high faradaic currents are critical issues for fast-scan voltammetry of beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) for the sensitivity of enzyme-modified electrodes based on dehydrogenases. Although NADH voltammetry exhibits high overpotential and poor voltammetric peak shape at solid electrode surfaces, modification of the electrode surface can improve the electrochemical response at carbon fibers. However, these improvements are severely degraded upon the covalent attachment of enzyme. The creation of improved electron-transfer properties and the retention of these properties throughout the enzyme attachment process is the focus of this study. A novel polishing and electrochemical pretreatment method was developed which generated a decreased overpotential and a high faradaic current at carbon-fiber electrodes for NADH. Factors that lead to a degradation of voltammetric response during the enzyme fabrication were investigated, and both the aging and the covalent modification of the pretreated surface contributed to this degradation. Attachment processes that minimized the preparation time, in turn, maximized the retention of the facile electron-transfer properties. These attachment processes included varying the surface attachment reactions for the enzyme. Preparation time reduction techniques included modeling existing techniques and then improving kinetic and mass transport issues where possible. Alternate covalent attachment methods included a direct electrochemical amine reaction and an electrochemically reductive hydrazide reaction. The surface attachment and retention of electron-transfer properties of these probes were confirmed by fluorescence and electrochemical studies.

  17. Dual utilization of NADPH and NADH cofactors enhances xylitol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jung-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Lee, Hyeun-Soo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Xylitol, a natural sweetener, can be produced by hydrogenation of xylose in hemicelluloses. In microbial processes, utilization of only NADPH cofactor limited commercialization of xylitol biosynthesis. To overcome this drawback, Saccharomyces cerevisiae D452-2 was engineered to express two types of xylose reductase (XR) with either NADPH-dependence or NADH-preference. Engineered S. cerevisiae DWM expressing both the XRs exhibited higher xylitol productivity than the yeast strain expressing NADPH-dependent XR only (DWW) in both batch and glucose-limited fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, the coexpression of S. cerevisiae ZWF1 and ACS1 genes in the DWM strain increased intracellular concentrations of NADPH and NADH and improved maximum xylitol productivity by 17%, relative to that for the DWM strain. Finally, the optimized fed-batch fermentation of S. cerevisiae DWM-ZWF1-ACS1 resulted in 196.2 g/L xylitol concentration, 4.27 g/L h productivity and almost the theoretical yield. Expression of the two types of XR utilizing both NADPH and NADH is a promising strategy to meet the industrial demands for microbial xylitol production. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Exploring flavin-containing carbohydrate oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, Alessandro Renato

    2017-01-01

    Oxidases are enzymes capable of removing one or more electrons from their substrate and transfer them to molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide. Due to their high regio- and enantioselectivity, their use is preferred over traditional organic chemistry methods. Among the oxidases, flavoprotein

  19. Genetics Home Reference: monoamine oxidase A deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep problems, such as trouble falling asleep or night terrors, can also occur in monoamine oxidase A deficiency . Some people with monoamine oxidase A deficiency have episodes of skin flushing, sweating, headaches, ... regulate mood, emotion, sleep, and appetite. Epinephrine and norepinephrine control the body's ...

  20. Preparation and electrochemical application of rutin biosensor for differential pulse voltammetric determination of NADH in the presence of acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAMID R. ZARE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic behavior of reduced nicotinamide adenine di-nucleotide (NADH was studied at the surface of a rutin biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. According to the results, the rutin biosensor had a strongly electrocatalytic effect on the oxidation of NADH with the overpotential being decreased by about 450 mV as compared to the process at a bare glassy carbon electrode, GCE. This value is significantly greater than the value of 220 mV that was reported for rutin embedded in a lipid-cast film. The kinetic parameters of the electron transfer coefficient, a, and the heterogeneous charge transfer rate constant, kh, for the electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH at the rutin biosensor were estimated. Furthermore, the linear dynamic range; sensitivity and limit of detection for NADH were evaluated using the differential pulse voltammetry method. The advantages of this biosensor for the determination of NADH are excellent catalytic activity and reproducibility, good detection limit and high exchange current density. The rutin biosensor could separate the oxidation peak potentials of NADH and acetaminophen present in the same solution while at a bare GCE, the peak potentials were indistinguishable.

  1. An electrochemical biosensor based on DNA tetrahedron/graphene composite film for highly sensitive detection of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zonglin; Su, Wenqiong; Liu, Shuopeng; Ding, Xianting

    2015-07-15

    Dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a major biomarker correlated with lethal diseases such as cancers and bacterial infection. Herein, we report a graphene-DNA tetrahedron-gold nanoparticle modified gold disk electrode for highly sensitive NADH detection. By assembling the DNA tetrahedron/graphene composite film on the gold disk electrode surface which prior harnessed electrochemical deposition of gold nanoparticles to enhance the effective surface area, the oxidation potential of NADH was substantially decreased to 0.28V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and surface fouling effects were successfully eliminated. Furthermore, the lower detection limit of NADH by the presented platform was reduced down to 1fM, with an upper limit of 10pM. Both the regeneration and selectivity of composite film-modified electrode are investigated and proved to be robust. The novel sensor developed here could serve as a highly sensitive probe for NADH detection, which would further benefit the field of NADH related disease diagnostics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with compound odontoma: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borkosky Silvia S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigmented intraosseous odontogenic lesions are rare with only 47 reported cases in the English literature. Among them, pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is the most common lesion with 20 reported cases. Methods A case of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma occurring at the mandibular canine-premolar region of a young Japanese boy is presented with radiographic, and histological findings. Special staining, electron microscopic study and immunohistochemical staining were also done to characterize the pigmentation. Results The pigments in the lesion were confirmed to be melanin by Masson-Fontana staining and by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of dendritic melanocytes within the lesion was also demonstrated by S-100 immunostaining. Conclusion The present case report of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma features a comprehensive study on melanin and melanocytes, including histochemical, immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic findings.

  3. A pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with compound odontoma: a case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Phuu P; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Siar, Chong H; Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Gunduz, Mehmet; Tamamura, Ryo; Borkosky, Silvia S; Katase, Naoki; Nagai, Noriyuki

    2007-01-01

    Background Pigmented intraosseous odontogenic lesions are rare with only 47 reported cases in the English literature. Among them, pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor, formerly known as calcifying odontogenic cyst, is the most common lesion with 20 reported cases. Methods A case of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma occurring at the mandibular canine-premolar region of a young Japanese boy is presented with radiographic, and histological findings. Special staining, electron microscopic study and immunohistochemical staining were also done to characterize the pigmentation. Results The pigments in the lesion were confirmed to be melanin by Masson-Fontana staining and by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of dendritic melanocytes within the lesion was also demonstrated by S-100 immunostaining. Conclusion The present case report of pigmented calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor associated with odontoma features a comprehensive study on melanin and melanocytes, including histochemical, immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic findings. PMID:17892598

  4. Tumor Associated Fibroblasts Promote PD-L1 Expression in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang HE

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAF is an important part of TME, which inhibits the function of immune cells. CD8+ T cells play a significant role in tumor immunity. T-cell membrane possesses a distinct type of molecule with a negative regulatory function. Upon interaction with its corresponding ligand [programmed death factor ligand 1 (PD-L1], programmed death factor 1 (PD-1 is activated and thus inhibits the kinase activity of T cells. This study aims to explore the possible effects of TAF on PD-L1 expression in lung cancer cells. Methods Lung cancer cell lines H1975 and H520 were co-cultured with (experiment or without TAF (control via Transwell assay for through 48 hours under the same culture condition. H1975 and H520 cells were counted using a microscope. The protein and mRNA expression levels of PD-L1 were detected by FCM assay and PCR analysis, respectively. Results The numbers of lung cancer cells in 100 μm2 for H1975 and H520 cells are (46±21 and (38±10 in the experiment group, respectively, and (16±5 and (12±5 in the control group, respectively (P<0.05. The expression levels of the PD-L1 protein in H1975 and H520 cells are (20.93%±3.54% and (19.26%±3.04% in the experiment group, respectively, and (12.58%±2.52% and (11.60%±2.65% in the control group, respectively (P<0.05. The mRNA expression levels in H1975 and H520 cells are (16.45±1.25 and (15.38±2.02 pg/mL in the experiment group, respectively, and (7.78±1.27 and (7.20±1.58 pg/mL (P<0.05 in the control group, respectively (P<0.05. Conclusion TAF promotes the growth and increases the expression of PD-L1 in H1975 and H520 cells.

  5. The National Tumor Association Foundation (ANT: A 30 year old model of home palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonazzi Valeria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Models of palliative care delivery develop within a social, cultural, and political context. This paper describes the 30-year history of the National Tumor Association (ANT, a palliative care organization founded in the Italian province of Bologna, focusing on this model of home care for palliative cancer patients and on its evaluation. Methods Data were collected from the 1986-2008 ANT archives and documents from the Emilia-Romagna Region Health Department, Italy. Outcomes of interest were changed in: number of patients served, performance status at admission (Karnofsky Performance Status score [KPS], length of participation in the program (days of care provided, place of death (home vs. hospital/hospice, and satisfaction with care. Statistical methods included linear and quadratic regressions. A linear and a quadratic regressions were generated; the independent variable was the year, while the dependent one was the number of patients from 1986 to 2008. Two linear regressions were generated for patients died at home and in the hospital, respectively. For each regression, the R square, the unstandardized and standardized coefficients and related P-values were estimated. Results The number of patients served by ANT has increased continuously from 131 (1986 to a cumulative total of 69,336 patients (2008, at a steady rate of approximately 121 additional patients per year and with no significant gender difference. The annual number of home visits increased from 6,357 (1985 to 904,782 (2008. More ANT patients died at home than in hospice or hospital; this proportion increased from 60% (1987 to 80% (2007. The rate of growth in the number of patients dying in hospital/hospice was approximately 40 patients/year (p 40 increased. Mean days of care for patients with KPS > 40 exceeded mean days for patients with KPS Conclusions The ANT home care model of palliative care delivery has been well-received, with progressively growing numbers

  6. Conditions associated with circulating tumor-associated folate receptor 1 protein in healthy men and women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda E Kelemen

    Full Text Available Serum concentrations of the tumor-associated folate receptor 1 (FOLR1 protein may be a marker for early cancer detection, yet concentrations have also been detected in cancer-free women. We investigated the conditions associated with circulating FOLR1 protein in healthy individuals and sought to clarify the range of normal serum values.Sera of cancer-free men and women (N = 60 enrolled in a population-based cohort study in Alberta, Canada were analyzed for FOLR1 protein using an electrochemical luminescence immunoassay. Dietary, lifestyle, medical and reproductive history information was collected by questionnaires. Differences in serum FOLR1 concentrations between groups were assessed by non-parametric tests, and predictors of serum FOLR1 concentrations were estimated using multivariable linear regression.Median serum FOLR1 concentration was higher in women (491 pg/ml, range = 327-693 pg/ml than in men (404 pg/ml, range = 340-682 pg/ml, P = 0.001. FOLR1 concentration was also positively associated with vitamin A intake (P = 0.02, and showed positive trends with age and with oral contraceptive hormone use among women and an inverse trend with body mass index. All variables examined explained almost half of the variation in serum FOLR1 (model R2 = 0.44, P = 0.04; however, the retention of gender (P = 0.003 and vitamin A intake (P = 0.03 together explained 20% (P = 0.001 of serum FOLR1 variation. No other predictor was significant at P<0.05.The positive association between serum FOLR1 concentration and female gender independent of an age effect suggests caution against statements to exploit serum FOLR1 for early cancer detection without further understanding the biological underpinnings of these observations. Serum FOLR1 concentrations may be influenced by the steroid retinoic acid (vitamin A but do not appear to be associated with folate nutritional status. These findings require confirmation in larger

  7. Chemotherapy-Induced IL34 Enhances Immunosuppression by Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Mediates Survival of Chemoresistant Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baghdadi, Muhammad; Wada, Haruka; Nakanishi, Sayaka; Abe, Hirotake; Han, Nanumi; Putra, Wira Eka; Endo, Daisuke; Watari, Hidemichi; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Miyagi, Yohei; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Takano, Atsushi; Daigo, Yataro

    2016-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to escape immune destruction and their acquired resistance to chemotherapy are major obstacles to effective cancer therapy. Although immune checkpoint therapies such as anti-PD-1 address these issues in part, clinical responses remain limited to a subpopulation of patients. In this report, we identified IL34 produced by cancer cells as a driver of chemoresistance. In particular, we found that IL34 modulated the functions of tumor-associated macrophages to enhance lo...

  8. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Nobuhito

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case is presented of a 61-year-old man with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart. The primary tumor originated in the right thigh in 1982. Since then, the patient has had repeated local recurrences in spite of repeated surgical treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy. He has developed previous metastases of the lung and heart. The patient died of cardiac involvement.

  9. Tumor-associated antigens identified by mRNA expression profiling induce protective anti-tumor immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Søren; Lauemøller, S L; Ruhwald, Morten

    2001-01-01

    Defined tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are attractive targets for anti-tumor immunotherapy. Here, we describe a novel genome-wide approach to identify multiple TAA from any given tumor. A panel of transplantable thymomas was established from an inbred p53-/- mouse strain. The resulting tumors we...... imprints, which may be used to identify patient-specific arrays of TAA. This may enable a multi-epitope based immunotherapy with improved prospects of clinical tumor rejection....

  10. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived dendritic cells express tumor associated antigens: PNPT1, PMPCB, RHAMM, BSG and ERCC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, W; Kowalczuk, O; Stasiak-Barmuta, A; Ilendo, E; Krawczuk-Rybak, M; Chyczewski, L

    2009-01-01

    In all types of leukemia both in children and adults there is a need for novel therapies that could reduce the risk of relapse after standard treatment. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells are ineffective antigen presenting cells, but as shown by many authors including results from our laboratory, stimulation with CD40L restores their antigen expressing capacity. The development of T-cell therapies for leukemic patients can be based on discovery of leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) which could be recognized by the host immune system. The aim of our present study was to test the hypothesis that leukemia-derived dendritic cells maintain the expression of tumor associated antigens. Twenty five children with B-cell precursor ALL were prospectively enrolled into the study. The mononuclear cells from peripheral blood or bone marrow were cultured and stimulated (or not) with CD40L and IL-4. The assessment of costimulatory/adhesion molecules with the use of flow cytometry and real-time RT PCR were used to confirm the possibility of turning ALL cells into dendritic-like cells. Additionally 22 tumor associated antigens mRNA levels were determined by real-time PCR technique with the TaqMan chemistry using ready-to-use Low Density Arrays for Gene Expression. The results of the study showed maintained expression and even up-regulation of some (PNPT1, PMPCB, HMMR/RHAMM, BSG and ERCC1) tumor associated antigens in CD40-activated leukemic cells. CD40L stimulation leading to the differentiation of leukemic cells into DCs which combine both antigen presenting function and expression of tumor associated antigens represents an interesting approach in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Contribution of aldehyde oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase on the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I; Kouretas, Demetrios; Beedham, Christine

    2004-10-01

    Aliphatic aldehydes have a high affinity toward aldehyde dehydrogenase activity but are relatively poor substrates of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the oxidation of xenobiotic-derived aromatic aldehydes by the latter enzymes has not been studied to any great extent. The present investigation compares the relative contribution of aldehyde dehydrogenase, aldehyde oxidase, and xanthine oxidase activities in the oxidation of substituted benzaldehydes in separate preparations. The incubation of vanillin, isovanillin, and protocatechuic aldehyde with either guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase, bovine milk xanthine oxidase, or guinea pig liver aldehyde dehydrogenase demonstrated that the three aldehyde oxidizing enzymes had a complementary substrate specificity. Incubations were also performed with specific inhibitors of each enzyme (isovanillin for aldehyde oxidase, allopurinol for xanthine oxidase, and disulfiram for aldehyde dehydrogenase) to determine the relative contribution of each enzyme in the oxidation of these aldehydes. Under these conditions, vanillin was rapidly oxidized by aldehyde oxidase, isovanillin was predominantly metabolized by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and protocatechuic aldehyde was slowly oxidized, possibly by all three enzymes. Thus, aldehyde oxidase activity may be a significant factor in the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes generated from amines and alkyl benzenes during drug metabolism. In addition, this enzyme may also have a role in the catabolism of biogenic amines such as dopamine and noradrenaline where 3-methoxyphenylacetic acids are major metabolites.

  12. Identification of tumor-associated MHC class I ligands by a novel T cell-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirle, M; Keilholz, W; Weber, B; Gouttefangeas, C; Dumrese, T; Becker, H D; Stevanović, S; Rammensee, H G

    2000-08-01

    Specific immunotherapy of cancer utilizes tumor-directed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) that lyse tumor cells presenting MHC class I-associated peptides derived from tumor-associated proteins. Many tumor-associated gene products are known, but corresponding T cell epitopes are only known for relatively few of these. The most commonly used approaches to identify such antigens require pre-existing CTL lines or clones. By using a CTL-independent high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC MS)-based approach we identified HLA-A2-presented peptides from carcinoembryonic antigen and wild-type p53 with a copy number as low as eight molecules per cell. Potential epitopes were predicted from the sequences of known tumor antigens and the corresponding synthetic peptides were analyzed by nanocapillary HPLC MS. In parallel, peptides were extracted from fresh, solid tumor tissue or tumor cell lines and analyzed in the same way. Upon co-elution of a natural peptide with a predicted peptide of the same mass, the peptide sequence was confirmed by on-line tandem MS. This approach allows rapid screening of large numbers of tumor-associated gene products for naturally processed peptides presented by different MHC class I molecules as a prerequisite for efficient epitope identification and rapid transfer to therapeutic vaccine trials.

  13. Investigations on the performance of poly(o-anisidine)/graphene nanocomposites for the electrochemical detection of NADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangamithirai, D. [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Narayanan, V. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Muthuraaman, B. [Department of Energy, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Stephen, A., E-mail: stephen_arum@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2015-10-01

    The electrocatalytic oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) based on poly(o-anisidine)/graphene (POA/GR) nanocomposites modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was explored for the first time. POA/GR nanocomposites were synthesized via chemical oxidative polymerization method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, and UV–Vis spectroscopy results demonstrate that nanocomposites are successfully synthesized. An intriguing composite structure was observed using different ratios of o-anisidine monomer and graphene. The electrical properties and electrochemical properties of these nanocomposites are investigated by impedance spectroscopy technique and cyclic voltammetric (CV) method, respectively. The synthesized nanocomposites were used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and the modified electrodes were found to exhibit electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of NADH at low potential range of + 0.045 V in a neutral environment. The fabricated sensor based on POA/GR31-modified GCE exhibited enhanced current response with very high sensitivity of 47.1 μA μM{sup −1} for the detection of NADH. The developed POA/GR-modified GCE exhibited excellent reproducibility, stability, and selectivity for the determination of NADH. The practical analytical utility of the proposed method was demonstrated by NADH spiked ascorbic acid (AA) and the results confirmed that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of NADH in the presence of AA. This can open up new opportunities for simple and selective detection of NADH and provide a promising platform for biosensor designs. - Highlights: • NADH sensor was prepared by poly(o-anisidine)/graphene nanocomposite modified GCE. • FESEM technique revealed the growth of POA nanofibers on the surface of graphene. • Good

  14. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase, a tasteful biocatalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Fraaije, M.W.; Mattevi, A.; Laane, C.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The covalent flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO) is a versatile biocatalyst. It converts a wide range of phenolic compounds by catalysing oxidation, deamination, demethylation, dehydrogenation and hydroxylation reactions. The production of natural vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, coniferyl

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cytochrome c oxidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... features known as Leigh syndrome . The signs and symptoms of Leigh syndrome include loss of mental function, movement problems, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, eating difficulties, and brain abnormalities. Cytochrome c oxidase ...

  16. Roles of Pyruvate, NADH, and Mitochondrial Complex I in Redox Balance and Imbalance in β Cell Function and Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells not only use glucose as an energy source, but also sense blood glucose levels for insulin secretion. While pyruvate and NADH metabolic pathways are known to be involved in regulating insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation, the roles of many other components along the metabolic pathways remain poorly understood. Such is the case for mitochondrial complex I (NADH/ubiquinone oxidoreductase. It is known that normal complex I function is absolutely required for episodic insulin secretion after a meal, but the role of complex I in β cells in the diabetic pancreas remains to be investigated. In this paper, we review the roles of pyruvate, NADH, and complex I in insulin secretion and hypothesize that complex I plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of β cell dysfunction in the diabetic pancreas. This hypothesis is based on the establishment that chronic hyperglycemia overloads complex I with NADH leading to enhanced complex I production of reactive oxygen species. As nearly all metabolic pathways are impaired in diabetes, understanding how complex I in the β cells copes with elevated levels of NADH in the diabetic pancreas may provide potential therapeutic strategies for diabetes.

  17. Acrolein inhibits NADH-linked mitochondrial enzyme activity: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocernich, Chava B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2003-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain increased lipid peroxidation and decreased energy utilization are found. Mitochondria membranes contain a significant amount of arachidonic and linoleic acids, precursors of lipid peroxidation products, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 2-propen-1-al (acrolein), that are extremely reactive. Both alkenals are increased in AD brain. In this study, we examined the effects of nanomolar levels of acrolein on the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-linked mitochondrial enzymes. Acrolein decreased PDH and KGDH activities significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), acrolein was found to bind lipoic acid, a component in both the PDH and KGDH complexes, most likely explaining the loss of enzyme activity. Acrolein also interacted with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) in such a way as to decrease the production of NADH. Acrolein, which is increased in AD brain, may be partially responsible for the dysfunction of mitochondria and loss of energy found in AD brain by inhibition of PDH and KGDH activities, potentially contributing to the neurodegeneration in this disorder.

  18. Highly stable and reusable immobilized formate dehydrogenases: Promising biocatalysts for in situ regeneration of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Binay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to prepare robust immobilized formate dehydrogenase (FDH preparations which can be used as effective biocatalysts along with functional oxidoreductases, in which in situ regeneration of NADH is required. For this purpose, Candida methylica FDH was covalently immobilized onto Immobead 150 support (FDHI150, Immobead 150 support modified with ethylenediamine and then activated with glutaraldehyde (FDHIGLU, and Immobead 150 support functionalized with aldehyde groups (FDHIALD. The highest immobilization yield and activity yield were obtained as 90% and 132%, respectively when Immobead 150 functionalized with aldehyde groups was used as support. The half-life times (t1/2 of free FDH, FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD were calculated as 10.6, 28.9, 22.4 and 38.5 h, respectively at 35 °C. FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD retained 69, 38 and 51% of their initial activities, respectively after 10 reuses. The results show that the FDHI150, FDHIGLU and FDHIALD offer feasible potentials for in situ regeneration of NADH.

  19. NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in the kinetoplasts of the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Halphen, Diego; Maslov, Dmitri A

    2004-03-01

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity is present in mitochondrial lysates of Phytomonas serpens. Rotenone at 2-10 microM inhibited the activity 50-75%, indicating that it belongs to respiratory complex I. The activity was also inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 10-30 nM atovaquone suggesting that inhibition of complex I represents a likely mechanism of the known antileishmanial activity of this drug. The complex was partially purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel-filtration on Sepharose CL-2B. The NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity in this preparation was completely inactivated by 20 nM atovaquone. The partially purified complex was present in a low amount and its subunits could not be discerned by staining with Coomassie. However, one of its components, a homologue of the 39 kDa subunit of the bovine complex I, was identified immunochemically in the original lysate and in the partially purified material.

  20. Mechanism of 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde electropolymerization at carbon paste electrodes : catalytic detection of NADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delbem Maria Flávia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic voltammetry was used to study 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (3,4-DHB electropolymerization processes on carbon paste electrodes. The characteristics of the electropolymerized films were highly dependent on pH, anodic switching potential, scan rate, 3,4-DHB concentrations and number of cycles. Film stability was determined in citrate/phosphate buffer solutions at the same pH used during the electropolymerization process. The best conditions to prepare carbon paste modified electrodes were pH 7.8; 0.0 <= Eapl <= 0.25 V; 10 mV s-1; 0.25 mmol L-1 3,4-DHB and 10 scans. These carbon paste modified electrodes were used for NADH catalytic detection at 0.23 V in the range 0.015 <= [NADH] <= 0.21 mmol L-1. Experimental data were used to propose a mechanism for the 3,4--DHB electropolymerization processes, which involves initial phenoxyl radical formation.

  1. RNAi-Mediated Specific Gene Silencing as a Tool for the Discovery of New Drug Targets in Giardia lamblia; Evaluation Using the NADH Oxidase Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Marcial-Quino

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic protozoan Giardia lamblia is the agent causing giardiasis, an intestinal parasitosis of worldwide distribution. Different pharmacotherapies have been employed against giardiasis; however, side effects in the host and reports of drug resistant strains generate the need to develop new strategies that identify novel biological targets for drug design. To support this requirement, we have designed and evaluated a vector containing a cassette for the synthesis of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, which can silence expression of a target gene through the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Small silencing RNAs were detected and quantified in transformants expressing dsRNA by a stem-loop RT-qPCR approach. The results showed that, in transformants expressing dsRNA of 100–200 base pairs, the level of NADHox mRNA was reduced by around 30%, concomitant with a decrease in enzyme activity and a reduction in the number of trophozoites with respect to the wild type strain, indicating that NADHox is indeed an important enzyme for Giardia viability. These results suggest that it is possible to induce the G. lamblia RNAi machinery for attenuating the expression of genes encoding proteins of interest. We propose that our silencing strategy can be used to identify new potential drug targets, knocking down genes encoding different structural proteins and enzymes from a wide variety of metabolic pathways.

  2. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSynTM polymer microspheres

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twala, BV

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of enzymes in industrial applications is limited by their instability, cost and difficulty in their recovery and re-use. Immobilisation is a technique which has been shown to alleviate these limitations in biocatalysis. Here we describe...

  3. RNAi-Mediated Specific Gene Silencing as a Tool for the Discovery of New Drug Targets in Giardia lamblia; Evaluation Using the NADH Oxidase Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Rufino-González, Yadira; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Vanoye-Carlo, America; González-Valdez, Abigail; Torres-Arroyo, Angélica; Oria-Hernández, Jesús; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    The microaerophilic protozoan Giardia lamblia is the agent causing giardiasis, an intestinal parasitosis of worldwide distribution. Different pharmacotherapies have been employed against giardiasis; however, side effects in the host and reports of drug resistant strains generate the need to develop new strategies that identify novel biological targets for drug design. To support this requirement, we have designed and evaluated a vector containing a cassette for the synthesis of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which can silence expression of a target gene through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Small silencing RNAs were detected and quantified in transformants expressing dsRNA by a stem-loop RT-qPCR approach. The results showed that, in transformants expressing dsRNA of 100–200 base pairs, the level of NADHox mRNA was reduced by around 30%, concomitant with a decrease in enzyme activity and a reduction in the number of trophozoites with respect to the wild type strain, indicating that NADHox is indeed an important enzyme for Giardia viability. These results suggest that it is possible to induce the G. lamblia RNAi machinery for attenuating the expression of genes encoding proteins of interest. We propose that our silencing strategy can be used to identify new potential drug targets, knocking down genes encoding different structural proteins and enzymes from a wide variety of metabolic pathways. PMID:29099754

  4. NADPH oxidase(s): new source(s) of reactive oxygen species in the vascular system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerebeek, L.; Meischl, C.; Stooker, W.; Meijer, C. J. L. M.; Niessen, H. W. M.; Roos, D.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in a variety of (patho)physiological vascular processes. Recent publications have produced evidence of a role for putative non-phagocyte NADP oxidase(s) in the vascular production of reactive oxygen species. In the present review, we discuss the

  5. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  6. Development of an Electrochemical Sensor for NADH Determination Based on a Caffeic Acid Redox Mediator Supported on Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zanardi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Screen-printed electrode (SPE modified with carbon black nanoparticles (CB has been tested as a new platform for the stable deposition of caffeic acid (CFA on the electrode surface. The electrochemical performance from varying the amount of CFA/CB composite has been tested with respect to NADH determination. The electrocatalytic activity of CFA/CB has also been compared with that of SPEs modified by a single component of the coating, i.e., either CFA or CB. Finally, glycerol dehydrogenase, a typical NADH-dependent enzyme, was deposited on the CFA/CB coating in order to test the applicability of the sensor in glycerol determination.

  7. Tumor-associated FGF-23-induced hypophosphatemic rickets in children: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Marie-Anne; Schifferli, Alexandra; Krieg, Andreas H; Baumhoer, Daniel; Szinnai, Gabor; Rudin, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23)-induced hypophosphatemic rickets is a rare but known pediatric entity first described in 1959. It results from local production of phosphatonins by benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors. We report an 8-year-old boy with tumor-associated hypophosphatemic rickets due to paraneoplastic FGF-23 secretion from a benign mesenchymal pelvic-bone tumor. Excessive FGF-23 production was visualized by immunohistochemistry in the resected tumor. Phosphate wasting stopped immediately after tumor resection. We reviewed 26 reports of pediatric patients with tumor-induced hypophosphatemic rickets; paraneoplastic FGF-23 secretion was documented in only three of them. All tumors developed inside bone, were benign in 21/26 cases, and were localized in femur/tibia (13/26), radius/ulna/humerus (7/26), pelvis (4/26), rib (1/26), and craniofacial (1/26) bones. Mean interval between onset of signs and/or symptoms and diagnosis was 34 months. In patients with hypophosphatemic rickets acquired beyond infancy, radiologic investigations for bone tumors need to be performed rapidly. In contrast to biochemical screening for increased circulating FGF-23 levels, immunohistochemical confirmation of FGF-23 production in resected tumor tissue can be regarded as being well established.

  8. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Choksi, Swati; Liu, Zheng-Gang, E-mail: zgliu@helix.nih.gov [Cell and Cancer Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80{sup +} macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206{sup +} TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  9. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Blocks the Occurrence of Tumor Associated Macrophages in Tobacco Smoke Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs promote tumorigenesis because of their proangiogenic and immune-suppressive functions. Here, we report that butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA blocks occurrence of tumor associated macrophages (TAMs in tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Continuous administration of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA, a ROS inhibitor, before or after NNK treatment significantly blocked tumor development, although less effectively when BHA is administered after NNK treatment. Strikingly, BHA abolished the occurrence of F4/80+ macrophages with similar efficiency no matter whether it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Detection of cells from bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF confirmed that BHA markedly inhibited the accumulation of macrophages while slightly reducing the number of lymphocytes that were induced by NNK. Immunohistological staining showed that BHA specifically abolished the occurrence of CD206+ TAMs when it was administered before or after NNK treatment. Western blot analysis of TAMs markers, arginase I and Ym-1, showed that BHA blocked NNK-induced TAMs accumulation. Our study clearly demonstrated that inhibiting the occurrence of TAMs by BHA contributes to the inhibition of tobacco smoke carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, suggesting ROS inhibitors may serve as a therapeutic target for treating smoke-induced lung cancer.

  10. Tumor-associated endothelial cells display GSTP1 and RARβ2 promoter methylation in human prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohida Thomas J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A functional blood supply is essential for tumor growth and proliferation. However, the mechanism of blood vessel recruitment to the tumor is still poorly understood. Ideally, a thorough molecular assessment of blood vessel cells would be critical in our comprehension of this process. Yet, to date, there is little known about the molecular makeup of the endothelial cells of tumor-associated blood vessels, due in part to the difficulty of isolating a pure population of endothelial cells from the heterogeneous tissue environment. Methods Here we describe the use of a recently developed technique, Expression Microdissection, to isolate endothelial cells from the tumor microenvironment. The methylation status of the dissected samples was evaluated for GSTP1 and RARβ2 promoters via the QMS-PCR method. Results Comparing GSTP1 and RARβ2 promoter methylation data, we show that 100% and 88% methylation is detected, respectively, in the tumor areas, both in epithelium and endothelium. Little to no methylation is observed in non-tumor tissue areas. Conclusion We applied an accurate microdissection technique to isolate endothelial cells from tissues, enabling DNA analysis such as promoter methylation status. The observations suggest that epigenetic alterations may play a role in determining the phenotype of tumor-associated vasculature.

  11. Characterization of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in the trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens (Kinetoplastida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermáková, P.; Verner, Zdeněk; Man, Petr; Lukeš, Julius; Horváth, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 274, č. 12 (2007), s. 3150-3158 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Grant - others:Vedecká grantová agentúra Ministerstva školstva SR a Slovenskej akadémie vied(SK) VEGA(SK) VEGA1/3241/06; Comenius University(SK) UK/139/2006; Comenius University(SK) UK/247/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : NADH dehydrogenase * complex I * Phytomonas * respiratory chain * trypanosomatid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2007

  12. Preparation of N-Graphdiyne Nanosheets at Liquid/Liquid Interface for Photocatalytic NADH Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qingyan; Liu, Hui; Zhao, Yingjie; Chen, Siqi; Xue, Bo; Kan, Xiaonan; Huang, Xiaowen; Liu, Jian; Li, Zhibo

    2018-04-16

    Two-dimensional (2D) N-graphdiyne (N-GDY) nanosheets containing different number of N were synthesized by polymerization of triazine, pyrazine, and pyridine-based monomers at liquid/liquid interface. The configurations and nanostructures of N-GDY were well-characterized. The wettability changed to more hydrophilic as the N contents increased. The collected N-GDY was further employed as metal-free photocatalyst for NADH regeneration. The catalytic performance was related with the N content in the graphdiyne. The N3-GDY demonstrated the best activity. This strategy provided a new promising platform of designing unique 2D N-GDY with tunable performance in biorelated catalysis.

  13. Structure of a NADH-insensitive hexameric citrate synthase that resists acid inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Julie A; Starks, Courtney M; Sivanuntakorn, Sasitorn; Jiang, Hong; Ransome, Aaron E; Nam, Jeong-Won; Constantine, Charles Z; Kappock, T Joseph

    2006-11-14

    Acetobacter aceti converts ethanol to acetic acid, and strains highly resistant to both are used to make vinegar. A. aceti survives acetic acid exposure by tolerating cytoplasmic acidification, which implies an unusual adaptation of cytoplasmic components to acidic conditions. A. aceti citrate synthase (AaCS), a hexameric type II citrate synthase, is required for acetic acid resistance and, therefore, would be expected to function at low pH. Recombinant AaCS has intrinsic acid stability that may be a consequence of strong selective pressure to function at low pH, and unexpectedly high thermal stability for a protein that has evolved to function at approximately 30 degrees C. The crystal structure of AaCS, complexed with oxaloacetate (OAA) and the inhibitor carboxymethyldethia-coenzyme A (CMX), was determined to 1.85 A resolution using protein purified by a tandem affinity purification procedure. This is the first crystal structure of a "closed" type II CS, and its active site residues interact with OAA and CMX in the same manner observed in the corresponding type I chicken CS.OAA.CMX complex. While AaCS is not regulated by NADH, it retains many of the residues used by Escherichia coli CS (EcCS) for NADH binding. The surface of AaCS is abundantly decorated with basic side chains and has many fewer uncompensated acidic charges than EcCS; this constellation of charged residues is stable in varied pH environments and may be advantageous in the A. aceti cytoplasm.

  14. FLIM data analysis of NADH and Tryptophan autofluorescence in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Melia, Meghan J.; Wallrabe, Horst; Svindrych, Zdenek; Rehman, Shagufta; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is one of the most sensitive techniques to measure metabolic activity in living cells, tissues and whole animals. We used two- and three-photon fluorescence excitation together with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) to acquire FLIM signals from normal and prostate cancer cell lines. FLIM requires complex data fitting and analysis; we explored different ways to analyze the data to match diverse cellular morphologies. After non-linear least square fitting of the multi-photon TCSPC images by the SPCImage software (Becker & Hickl), all image data are exported and further processed in ImageJ. Photon images provide morphological, NAD(P)H signal-based autofluorescent features, for which regions of interest (ROIs) are created. Applying these ROIs to all image data parameters with a custom ImageJ macro, generates a discrete, ROI specific database. A custom Excel (Microsoft) macro further analyzes the data with charts and statistics. Applying this highly automated assay we compared normal and cancer prostate cell lines with respect to their glycolytic activity by analyzing the NAD(P)H-bound fraction (a2%), NADPH/NADH ratio and efficiency of energy transfer (E%) for Tryptophan (Trp). Our results show that this assay is able to differentiate the effects of glucose stimulation and Doxorubicin in these prostate cell lines by tracking the changes in a2% of NAD(P)H, NADPH/NADH ratio and the changes in Trp E%. The ability to isolate a large, ROI-based data set, reflecting the heterogeneous cellular environment and highlighting even subtle changes -- rather than whole cell averages - makes this assay particularly valuable.

  15. Neutral red interlinked gold nanoparticles/multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid nanomaterial and its application for the detection of NADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Ida; Gupta, Mandakini

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabricated a nanostructured hybrid material of GNPs/neutral red/MWCNTs. • GNPs decorated on MWCNT template by using neutral red as interlinker for first time. • Nanocomposite modified electrode employed successfully as sensor for NADH. • The electrode has high stability as it does not involve any biological entity. - Abstract: A novel nanocomposite of gold nanoparticles/neutral red/MWCNTs was prepared which was used to modify glassy carbon electrode. The prepared nanocomposite was physically characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential measurement, energy dispersive X-ray, FTIR spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy. Electrochemical characterization was done using cyclic voltammetry technique. The modified glassy carbon electrode showed electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution, pH 5.0. The modified electrode has better adhesion over the electrode surface, good stability as no leaching of neutral red based nanocomposite was observed. The oxidation of NADH started at 0.37 V and reached maxima at 0.52 V at the modified electrode surface. So the prepared composite modified electrode can be applied as electrochemical sensor for NADH. The sensitivity and detection limits of the modified glassy carbon electrode were found to be 0.588 μA/mM and 5 × 10 −7 at signal to noise ratio 3

  16. Carbon nanofiber vs. carbon microparticles as modifiers of glassy carbon and gold electrodes applied in electrochemical sensing of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Briza; Del Valle, Manel; Alegret, Salvador; Merkoçi, Arben

    2007-12-15

    Carbon materials (CMs), such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), and carbon microparticles (CMPs) are used as doping materials for electrochemical sensors. The efficiency of these materials (either before or after acidic treatments) while being used as electrocatalysts in electrochemical sensors is discussed for beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) detection using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The sensitivity of the electrodes (glassy carbon (GC) and gold (Au)) modified with both treated and untreated materials have been deeply studied. The response efficiencies of the GC and Au electrodes modified with CNF and CMP, using dimethylformamide (DMF) as dispersing agent are significantly different due to the peculiar physical and chemical characteristics of each doping material. Several differences between the electrocatalytic activities of CMs modified electrodes upon NADH oxidation have been observed. The CNF film promotes better the electron transfer of NADH minimizing the oxidation potential at +0.352 V. Moreover higher currents for the NADH oxidation peak have been observed for these electrodes. The shown differences in the electrochemical reactivities of CNF and CMP modified electrodes should be with interest for future applications in biosensors.

  17. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The malate–aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate–aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate–aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. PMID:25755250

  18. SIRT3-dependent GOT2 acetylation status affects the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and pancreatic tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Lisha; Shi, Qian; Zhao, Yuzheng; Lin, Huaipeng; Zhang, Mengli; Zhao, Shimin; Yang, Yi; Ling, Zhi-Qiang; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue; Ye, Dan

    2015-04-15

    The malate-aspartate shuttle is indispensable for the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria to maintain a high rate of glycolysis and to support rapid tumor cell growth. The malate-aspartate shuttle is operated by two pairs of enzymes that localize to the mitochondria and cytoplasm, glutamate oxaloacetate transaminases (GOT), and malate dehydrogenases (MDH). Here, we show that mitochondrial GOT2 is acetylated and that deacetylation depends on mitochondrial SIRT3. We have identified that acetylation occurs at three lysine residues, K159, K185, and K404 (3K), and enhances the association between GOT2 and MDH2. The GOT2 acetylation at these three residues promotes the net transfer of cytosolic NADH into mitochondria and changes the mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) redox state to support ATP production. Additionally, GOT2 3K acetylation stimulates NADPH production to suppress ROS and to protect cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, GOT2 3K acetylation promotes pancreatic cell proliferation and tumor growth in vivo. Finally, we show that GOT2 K159 acetylation is increased in human pancreatic tumors, which correlates with reduced SIRT3 expression. Our study uncovers a previously unknown mechanism by which GOT2 acetylation stimulates the malate-aspartate NADH shuttle activity and oxidative protection. © 2015 The Authors.

  19. Effect of CO2 on NADH production of denitrifying microbes via inhibiting carbon source transport and its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rui; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Huang, Haining

    2018-06-15

    The potential effect of CO 2 on environmental microbes has drawn much attention recently. As an important section of the nitrogen cycle, biological denitrification requires electron donor to reduce nitrogen oxide. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which is formed during carbon source metabolism, is a widely reported electron donor for denitrification. Here we studied the effect of CO 2 on NADH production and carbon source utilization in the denitrifying microbe Paracoccus denitrificans. We observed that NADH level was decreased by 45.5% with the increase of CO 2 concentration from 0 to 30,000ppm, which was attributed to the significantly decreased utilization of carbon source (i.e., acetate). Further study showed that CO 2 inhibited carbon source utilization because of multiple negative influences: (1) suppressing the growth and viability of denitrifier cells, (2) weakening the driving force for carbon source transport by decreasing bacterial membrane potential, and (3) downregulating the expression of genes encoding key enzymes involved in intracellular carbon metabolism, such as citrate synthase, aconitate hydratase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and fumarate reductase. This study suggests that the inhibitory effect of CO 2 on NADH production in denitrifiers might deteriorate the denitrification performance in an elevated CO 2 climate scenario. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-walled carbon nanotubes covalently functionalized with polytyrosine: A new material for the development of NADH-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguílaz, Marcos; Gutierrez, Fabiana; González-Domínguez, Jose Miguel; Martínez, María T; Rivas, Gustavo

    2016-12-15

    We report for the first time the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) covalently functionalized with polytyrosine (Polytyr) (SWCNT-Polytyr) as a new electrode material for the development of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-based biosensors. The oxidation of glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with SWCNT-Polytyr at potentials high enough to oxidize the tyrosine residues have allowed the electrooxidation of NADH at low potentials due to the catalytic activity of the quinones generated from the primary oxidation of tyrosine without any additional redox mediator. The amperometric detection of NADH at 0.200V showed a sensitivity of (217±3)µAmM(-1)cm(-2) and a detection limit of 7.9nM. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of SWCNT-Polytyr towards NADH oxidation has also made possible the development of a sensitive ethanol biosensor through the immobilization of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) via Nafion entrapment, with excellent analytical characteristics (sensitivity of (5.8±0.1)µAmM(-1)cm(-2), detection limit of 0.67µM) and very successful application for the quantification of ethanol in different commercial beverages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel strategy involved in [corrected] anti-oxidative defense: the conversion of NADH into NADPH by a metabolic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranji Singh

    Full Text Available The reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH is pivotal to the cellular anti-oxidative defence strategies in most organisms. Although its production mediated by different enzyme systems has been relatively well-studied, metabolic networks dedicated to the biogenesis of NADPH have not been fully characterized. In this report, a metabolic pathway that promotes the conversion of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, a pro-oxidant into NADPH has been uncovered in Pseudomonas fluorescens exposed to oxidative stress. Enzymes such as pyruvate carboxylase (PC, malic enzyme (ME, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, malate synthase (MS, and isocitrate lyase (ICL that are involved in disparate metabolic modules, converged to create a metabolic network aimed at the transformation of NADH into NADPH. The downregulation of phosphoenol carboxykinase (PEPCK and the upregulation of pyruvate kinase (PK ensured that this metabolic cycle fixed NADH into NADPH to combat the oxidative stress triggered by the menadione insult. This is the first demonstration of a metabolic network invoked to generate NADPH from NADH, a process that may be very effective in combating oxidative stress as the increase of an anti-oxidant is coupled to the decrease of a pro-oxidant.

  2. Structural analysis of the wheat genes encoding NADH-dependent glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferases and correlation with grain protein content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenica Nigro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrogen uptake and the efficient absorption and metabolism of nitrogen are essential elements in attempts to breed improved cereal cultivars for grain or silage production. One of the enzymes related to nitrogen metabolism is glutamine-2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase (GOGAT. Together with glutamine synthetase (GS, GOGAT maintains the flow of nitrogen from NH4 (+ into glutamine and glutamate, which are then used for several aminotransferase reactions during amino acid synthesis. RESULTS: The aim of the present work was to identify and analyse the structure of wheat NADH-GOGAT genomic sequences, and study the expression in two durum wheat cultivars characterized by low and high kernel protein content. The genomic sequences of the three homoeologous A, B and D NADH-GOGAT genes were obtained for hexaploid Triticum aestivum and the tetraploid A and B genes of Triticum turgidum ssp. durum. Analysis of the gene sequences indicates that all wheat NADH-GOGAT genes are composed of 22 exons and 21 introns. The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous genes have high conservation of sequence except intron 13 which shows differences in both length and sequence. A comparative analysis of sequences among di- and mono-cotyledonous plants shows both regions of high conservation and of divergence. qRT-PCR performed with the two durum wheat cvs Svevo and Ciccio (characterized by high and low protein content, respectively indicates different expression levels of the two NADH-GOGAT-3A and NADH-GOGAT-3B genes. CONCLUSION: The three hexaploid wheat homoeologous NADH-GOGAT gene sequences are highly conserved - consistent with the key metabolic role of this gene. However, the dicot and monocot amino acid sequences show distinctive patterns, particularly in the transit peptide, the exon 16-17 junction, and the C-terminus. The lack of conservation in the transit peptide may indicate subcellular differences between the two plant divisions - while the sequence

  3. Evidence supporting distinct functions of three cytosolic glutamine synthetases and two NADH-glutamate synthases in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaya, Tomoyuki; Kusano, Miyako

    2014-10-01

    The functions of the three isoenzymes of cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1;1, GS1;2, and GS1;3) and two NADH-glutamate synthases (NADH-GOGAT1 and NADH-GOGAT2) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) were characterized using a reverse genetics approach and spatial expression of the corresponding genes. OsGS1;2 and OsNADH-GOGAT1 were mainly expressed in surface cells of rice roots in an NH4 (+)-dependent manner. Disruption of either gene by the insertion of endogenous retrotransposon Tos17 caused reduction in active tiller number and hence panicle number at harvest. Re-introduction of OsGS1;2 cDNA under the control of its own promoter into the knockout mutants successfully restored panicle number to wild-type levels. These results indicate that GS1;2 and NADH-GOGAT1 are important in the primary assimilation of NH4 (+) taken up by rice roots. OsGS1;1 and OsNADH-GOGAT2 were mainly expressed in vascular tissues of mature leaf blades. OsGS1;1 mutants showed severe reduction in growth rate and grain filling, whereas OsNADH-GOGAT2 mutants had marked reduction in spikelet number per panicle. Complementation of phenotypes seen in the OsGS1;1 mutant was successfully observed when OsGS1;1 was re-introduced. Thus, these two enzymes could be important in remobilization of nitrogen during natural senescence. Metabolite profiling data showed a crucial role of GS1;1 in coordinating metabolic balance in rice. Expression of OsGS1:3 was spikelet-specific, indicating that it is probably important in grain ripening and/or germination. Thus, these isoenzymes seem to possess distinct and non-overlapping functions and none was able to compensate for the individual function of another. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory and antioxidant potential of Indian Muscodor species

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase is a key enzyme responsible for hyperuricemia, a pre-disposing factor for Gout and oxidative stress-related diseases. Only two clinically approved xanthine oxidase inhibitors Allopurinol and Febuxostat are currently used for treatment of hyperuricemia. However, owing to their side effects there is a need for new non-purine-based selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. In the process of exploring novel xanthine oxidase inhibitors and anti-oxidants, we screened the culture fi...

  5. Chemotherapy-Induced IL34 Enhances Immunosuppression by Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Mediates Survival of Chemoresistant Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, Muhammad; Wada, Haruka; Nakanishi, Sayaka; Abe, Hirotake; Han, Nanumi; Putra, Wira Eka; Endo, Daisuke; Watari, Hidemichi; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Miyagi, Yohei; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Takano, Atsushi; Daigo, Yataro; Seino, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-10-15

    The ability of tumor cells to escape immune destruction and their acquired resistance to chemotherapy are major obstacles to effective cancer therapy. Although immune checkpoint therapies such as anti-PD-1 address these issues in part, clinical responses remain limited to a subpopulation of patients. In this report, we identified IL34 produced by cancer cells as a driver of chemoresistance. In particular, we found that IL34 modulated the functions of tumor-associated macrophages to enhance local immunosuppression and to promote the survival of chemoresistant cancer cells by activating AKT signaling. Targeting IL34 in chemoresistant tumors resulted in a remarkable inhibition of tumor growth when accompanied with chemotherapy. Our results define a pathogenic role for IL34 in mediating immunosuppression and chemoresistance and identify it as a tractable target for anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(20); 6030-42. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Prognostic significance of tumor-associated macrophages density in gastric cancer: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiu Y; Yang, Xiao J; Geng, Xia F; Huang, Chao Q; Yu, Yang; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play a dual role in the development of gastric cancer (GC). This study aims to analyze the prognostic value of TAM density in GC patients. We conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies (N.=1043) to investigate the correlation between TAM density and the overall survival (OS) or disease free survival (DFS) of GC patients. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by the STATA statistical software. The HR of OS of GC patients with high-density TAM is 1.56 (95% CI: 0.90~2.22, Panalysis by ethnicity also revealed no significance effect between TAM density and a worse OS among both Asians and Caucasians (Asians: HR=1.47, 95% CI: 0.76~2.18, Pempirical evidence that TAM density is not an independent predictor for the survival of GC patients.

  7. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single-and double-mixing

  8. THERMOSTABILITY OF RESPIRATORY TERMINAL OXIDASES IN THE LIPID ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, Marieke G.L.; Bosmal, Tjibbe; Lolkema, Juke S.; Gleiszner, Michael; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the lipid environment on the thermostability of three respiratory terminal oxidases was determined. Cytochrome-e oxidase from beef heart and Bacillus stearothermophilus were used as representative proteins from mesophilic and thermophilic origin, respectively. Quinol oxidase from the

  9. Tumor associated stromal cells play a critical role on the outcome of the oncolytic efficacy of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Verónica Lopez

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of conditionally replicative oncolytic adenoviruses (CRAd is still limited by the inefficient infection of the tumor mass. Since tumor growth is essentially the result of a continuous cross-talk between malignant and tumor-associated stromal cells, targeting both cell compartments may profoundly influence viral efficacy. Therefore, we developed SPARC promoter-based CRAds since the SPARC gene is expressed both in malignant cells and in tumor-associated stromal cells. These CRAds, expressing or not the Herpes Simplex thymidine kinase gene (Ad-F512 and Ad(I-F512-TK, respectively exerted a lytic effect on a panel of human melanoma cells expressing SPARC; but they were completely attenuated in normal cells of different origins, including fresh melanocytes, regardless of whether cells expressed or not SPARC. Interestingly, both CRAds displayed cytotoxic activity on SPARC positive-transformed human microendothelial HMEC-1 cells and WI-38 fetal fibroblasts. Both CRAds were therapeutically effective on SPARC positive-human melanoma tumors growing in nude mice but exhibited restricted efficacy in the presence of co-administered HMEC-1 or WI-38 cells. Conversely, co-administration of HMEC-1 cells enhanced the oncolytic efficacy of Ad(I-F512-TK on SPARC-negative MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells in vivo. Moreover, conditioned media produced by stromal cells pre-infected with the CRAds enhanced the in vitro viral oncolytic activity on pancreatic cancer cells, but not on melanoma cells. The whole data indicate that stromal cells might play an important role on the outcome of the oncolytic efficacy of conditionally replicative adenoviruses.

  10. Assessment of programmed death-ligand 1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells in pediatric cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Robbie G; Simon, Jason S; Grosso, Joseph F; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce R; Santi, Mariarita; Merchant, Melinda S; Geoerger, Birgit; Hezam, Imene; Marty, Virginie; Vielh, Phillippe; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H; Mackall, Crystal L; Maris, John M

    2017-10-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling in the tumor microenvironment dampens immune responses to cancer, and blocking this axis induces antitumor effects in several malignancies. Clinical studies of PD-1 blockade are only now being initiated in pediatric patients, and little is known regarding programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in common childhood cancers. The authors characterized PD-L1 expression and tumor-associated immune cells (TAICs) (lymphocytes and macrophages) in common pediatric cancers. Whole slide sections and tissue microarrays were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for PD-L1 expression and for the presence of TAICs. TAICs were also screened for PD-L1 expression. Thirty-nine of 451 evaluable tumors (9%) expressed PD-L1 in at least 1% of tumor cells. The highest frequency histotypes comprised Burkitt lymphoma (80%; 8 of 10 tumors), glioblastoma multiforme (36%; 5 of 14 tumors), and neuroblastoma (14%; 17 of 118 tumors). PD-L1 staining was associated with inferior survival among patients with neuroblastoma (P = .004). Seventy-four percent of tumors contained lymphocytes and/or macrophages. Macrophages were significantly more likely to be identified in PD-L1-positive versus PD-L1-negative tumors (P cancers exhibit PD-L1 expression, whereas a much larger fraction demonstrates infiltration with tumor-associated lymphocytes. PD-L1 expression may be a biomarker for poor outcome in neuroblastoma. Further preclinical and clinical investigation will define the predictive nature of PD-L1 expression in childhood cancers both at diagnosis and after exposure to chemoradiotherapy. Cancer 2017;123:3807-3815. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. An Overview of l-Amino Acid Oxidase Functions from Bacteria to Mammals: Focus on the Immunoregulatory Phenylalanine Oxidase IL4I1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Castellano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available l-amino acid oxidases are flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent enzymes present in all major kingdom of life, from bacteria to mammals. They participate in defense mechanisms by limiting the growth of most bacteria and parasites. A few mammalian LAAOs have been described, of which the enzyme “interleukin-4 induced gene 1” (IL4I1 is the best characterized. IL4I1 mainly oxidizes l-phenylalanine. It is a secreted enzyme physiologically produced by antigen presenting cells of the myeloid and B cell lineages and T helper type (Th 17 cells. Important roles of IL4I1 in the fine control of the adaptive immune response in mice and humans have emerged during the last few years. Indeed, IL4I1 inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production and facilitates naïve CD4+ T-cell differentiation into regulatory T cells in vitro by limiting the capacity of T lymphocytes to respond to clonal receptor stimulation. It may also play a role in controlling the germinal center reaction for antibody production and limiting Th1 and Th17 responses. IL4I1 is expressed in tumor-associated macrophages of most human cancers and in some tumor cell types. Such expression, associated with its capacity to facilitate tumor growth by inhibiting the anti-tumor T-cell response, makes IL4I1 a new potential druggable target in the field of immunomodulation in cancer.

  12. An Overview of l-Amino Acid Oxidase Functions from Bacteria to Mammals: Focus on the Immunoregulatory Phenylalanine Oxidase IL4I1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Flavia; Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie

    2017-12-05

    l-amino acid oxidases are flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent enzymes present in all major kingdom of life, from bacteria to mammals. They participate in defense mechanisms by limiting the growth of most bacteria and parasites. A few mammalian LAAOs have been described, of which the enzyme "interleukin-4 induced gene 1" (IL4I1) is the best characterized. IL4I1 mainly oxidizes l-phenylalanine. It is a secreted enzyme physiologically produced by antigen presenting cells of the myeloid and B cell lineages and T helper type (Th) 17 cells. Important roles of IL4I1 in the fine control of the adaptive immune response in mice and humans have emerged during the last few years. Indeed, IL4I1 inhibits T cell proliferation and cytokine production and facilitates naïve CD4⁺ T-cell differentiation into regulatory T cells in vitro by limiting the capacity of T lymphocytes to respond to clonal receptor stimulation. It may also play a role in controlling the germinal center reaction for antibody production and limiting Th1 and Th17 responses. IL4I1 is expressed in tumor-associated macrophages of most human cancers and in some tumor cell types. Such expression, associated with its capacity to facilitate tumor growth by inhibiting the anti-tumor T-cell response, makes IL4I1 a new potential druggable target in the field of immunomodulation in cancer.

  13. Occurrence and Biocatalytic Potential of Carbohydrate Oxidases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellemond, van E.W.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Heuts, D.P.H.M.; Fraaije, M.W.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are found in all kingdoms of life but are mostly found in fungi. Their natural role is not always clear. Usage of molecular oxygen as electron acceptor is not a logical choice when the enzyme is part of a catabolic pathway. This chapter provides an overview of the occurrence

  14. Genetic defects of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecina, Petr; Houšťková, H.; Hansíková, H.; Zeman, J.; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 53, Suppl. 1 (2004), s. S213-S223 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/03/0749 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cytochrome c oxidase * mitochondrial disorders Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.140, year: 2004

  15. Investigation of antihemolytic, xanthine oxidase inhibition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abbreviations: SVEs: Salvia Verbenaca L. aerial part Extracts; CrE: Crud Extract; ChE: Chloroform Extract ; EAE: Ethyl Acetate Extract; AqE : Aqueous Extract ; ROS: Reactive Oxygen Spices; AAPH : 2,2, -Azobis (2-AmidinoPropane) Dihydrochloride ; DPPH: DiPhenyl- Picryl-Hydrazyl; XO: Xanthine Oxidase; Gen: Gentamicin ...

  16. Interaction of plant amine oxidases with diaminoethers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebela, M.; Jarkovská, K.; Lenobel, René; Medda, R.; Padiglia, A.; Floris, G.; Peč, P.

    Part 7, - (2007), s. 222-232 ISSN 1424-6376 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : diamine oxidase * diaminoether * inhibition Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.253, year: 2007 http://content.arkat-usa.org/ARKIVOC/JOURNAL_CONTENT/manuscripts/2007/UR-2149CP%20as%20published%20mainmanuscript.pdf

  17. The antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarchonanthus camphoratus (camphor bush) has been widely used for numerous medicinal purposes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties, cytotoxicity and monoamine oxidase inhibition activities of the crude dichloromethane leaf extract of T. camphoratus. The antioxidant activities were ...

  18. Determination of NAD+ and NADH level in a Single Cell Under H2O2 Stress by Capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Wenjun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method is developed to determine both NAD+ and NADH levels in a single cell, based on an enzymatic cycling reaction. The detection limit can reach down to 0.2 amol NAD+ and 1 amol NADH on a home-made CE-LIF setup. The method showed good reproducibility and specificity. After an intact cell was injected into the inlet of a capillary and lysed using a Tesla coil, intracellular NAD+ and NADH were separated, incubated with the cycling buffer, and quantified by the amount of fluorescent product generated. NADH and NAD+ levels of single cells of three cell lines and primary astrocyte culture were determined using this method. Comparing cellular NAD+ and NADH levels with and without exposure to oxidative stress induced by H2O2, it was found that H9c2 cells respond to the stress by reducing both cellular NAD+ and NADH levels, while astrocytes respond by increasing cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio.

  19. The increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime is associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Han Wen; Yu, Jia Sin; Hsu, Shu Han; Wei, Yau Huei; Lee, Oscar K.; Wang, Hsing Wen

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of NADH had been used as an optical marker for monitoring cellular metabolism. In our pervious studies, we have demonstrated that NADH lifetime of hMSCs increase gradually with time of osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we measured NADH lifetime of hMSCs from a different donor as well as the corresponding metabolic indices such as ATP level, oxygen consumption and lactate release. We also measure the quantity of Complex I, III, IV and V. The results show that during differentiation more oxygen consumed, higher ATP level expressed and less lactate released, and the increase of NADH lifetime was associated with ATP level. Higher expression of the total Complex protein was observed at 3 and 4 weeks after differentiation than controls. However, Complex I expression did not show significant correlation with the increase of NADH fluorescence lifetime. In summary, we demonstrated that the change of NADH lifetime was associated with the metabolic change during osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. The increase of NADH lifetime was in part due to the increased Complex protein interaction in mitochondria after differentiation.

  20. EFFECT OF CROSSLINKING ON MITOCHONDRIAL CYTOCHROME c OXIDASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Maurice; Packer, Lester

    1979-12-01

    Purified and reconstituted cytochrome {und c} oxidase and mitochondria were crosslinked with biimidates in the presence and absence of cytochrome {und c}. These experiments indicate that oxidase subunit interactions are required for activity and that cytochrome {und c} mobility may be required for electron transport activity. Biimidate treatment of purified and reconstituted oxidase crosslinks all of the oxidase protomers except subunit I when {ge} 20% of the free amines are modified and inhibits steady state oxidase activity. Transient kinetics of ferrocytochrome {und c} oxidation and ferricytochrome {und a} reduction indicates inhibition of electron transfer from heme {und a} to heme {und a}{sub 3}. Crosslinking oxidase molecules to form large aggregates displaying rotational correlation times {ge} 1 ms does not affect oxidase activity. Crosslinking of mitochondria covalently binds the bc{sub 1} and {und aa}{sub 3} complexes to cytochrome {und c}, and inhibits steady-state oxidase activity considerably more than in the case of the purified oxidase. Addition of cytochrome {und c} to the purified oxidase or to {und c}-depleted mitoplasts increases inhibition slightly. Cytochrome {und c} oligomers act as competitive inhibitors of native {und c}, however, crosslinking of cytochrome {und c} to {und c}-depleted mitoplasts or purified oxidase (with dimethyl suberimidate or hetrobifunctional crosslinking reagents) results in a catalytically inactive complex.

  1. A role for NADPH oxidase in antigen presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail J Gardiner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase expressed in phagocytes is a multi-subunit enzyme complex that generates superoxide (O2.-. This radical is an important precursor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and other reactive oxygen species (ROS needed for microbicidal activity during innate immune responses. Inherited defects in NADPH oxidase give rise to chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections and granulomatous inflammation. Interestingly, CGD, CGD carrier status, and oxidase gene polymorphisms have all been associated with autoinflammatory and autoimmune disorders, suggesting a potential role for NADPH oxidase in regulating adaptive immune responses. Here, NADPH oxidase function in antigen processing and presentation is reviewed. NADPH oxidase influences dendritic cell (DC crosspresentation by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (MHC-I through regulation of the phagosomal microenvironment, while in B lymphocytes, NADPH oxidase alters epitope selection by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC-II.

  2. Exosomal transfer of tumor-associated macrophage-derived miR-21 confers cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peiming; Chen, Lei; Yuan, Xiangliang; Luo, Qin; Liu, Yi; Xie, Guohua; Ma, Yanhui; Shen, Lisong

    2017-04-13

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is frequently used to treat advanced gastric cancer (GC). However, the resistance often occurs with the mechanisms being not well understood. Recently, emerging evidence indicates that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an important role in chemoresistance of cancer. As the important mediators in intercellular communications, exosomes secreted by host cells mediate the exchange of genetic materials and proteins to be involved in tumor aggressiveness. The aim of the study was to investigate whether exosomes derived from TAMs mediate cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer. M2 polarized macrophages were obtained from mouse bone marrow or human PBMCs stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13. Exosomes isolated from M2 macrophages culture medium were characterized, and miRNA expression profiles of M2 derived exosomes (M2-exos) were analyzed using miRNA microarray. In vitro cell coculture was further conducted to investigate M2-exos mediated crosstalk between TAMs and tumor cells. Moreover, the in vivo experiments were performed using a subcutaneous transplantation tumor model in athymic nude mice. In this study, we showed that M2 polarized macrophages promoted cisplatin (DDP) resistance in gastric cancer cells and exosomes derived from M2 macrophages (M2-exos) are involved in mediating the resistance to DDP. Using miRNA profiles assay, we identify significantly higher levels of microRNA-21 (miR21) isomiRNAs in exosomes and cell lysate isolated from M2 polarized macrophage. Functional studies revealed that exosomal miR-21 can be directly transferred from macrophages to the gastric cancer cells, where it suppresses cell apoptosis and enhances activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway by down-regulation of PTEN. Our findings suggest that exosomal transfer of tumor-associated macrophages derived miR-21 confer DDP resistance in gastric cancer, and targeting exosome communication may be a promising new therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer

  3. Role of pH in oxidase variability of Aeromonas hydrophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, L K; Overman, T L; Otero, R B

    1981-01-01

    Some strains of Aeromonas hydrophila may be oxidase negative or only weakly oxidase positive by the Kovacs method taken from the surface of a differential medium, such as MacConkey agar. Six strains of A. hydrophila, two oxidase variable, one oxidase constant, and three weakly oxidase positive on MacConkey agar, were studied to determine the cause of oxidase variability. The bacteriostatic dyes in MacConkey agar were considered possible inhibitors of the oxidase reaction. The concentration of...

  4. Na+-NQR (Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) as a novel target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibrov, Pavel; Dibrov, Elena; Pierce, Grant N

    2017-09-01

    The recent breakthrough in structural studies on Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae creates a perspective for the systematic design of inhibitors for this unique enzyme, which is the major Na+ pump in aerobic pathogens. Widespread distribution of Na+-NQR among pathogenic species, its key role in energy metabolism, its relation to virulence in different species as well as its absence in eukaryotic cells makes this enzyme especially attractive as a target for prospective antibiotics. In this review, the major biochemical, physiological and, especially, the pharmacological aspects of Na+-NQR are discussed to assess its 'target potential' for drug development. A comparison to other primary bacterial Na+ pumps supports the contention that NQR is a first rate prospective target for a new generation of antimicrobials. A new, narrowly targeted furanone inhibitor of NQR designed in our group is presented as a molecular platform for the development of anti-NQR remedies. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Electrocatalytic activity of oxidation products of guanine and 5'-GMP towards the oxidation of NADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Alvarez, Noemi de los; Lobo-Castanon, Maria Jesus; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Tunon-Blanco, Paulino [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: ptb@uniovi.es

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the potential electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of NADH of several oxidation products of guanine and its derivative guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) on pyrolytic graphite electrodes (PGE). The distribution of products generated strongly depends on the experimental conditions. Our investigations focused on the oxidation products that are adsorbed on the electrode surface, are redox active and, exhibited electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH. These compounds were electrochemically and kinetically characterized in terms of dependence of the formal potential on pH and electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}). The voltammetric and catalytic behavior of both guanine and 5'-GMP oxidation products was compared with that of other guanine derivatives we have previously studied. Some mechanistic aspects concerning the generation of the catalysts are also discussed.

  6. The sodium pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na⁺-NQR), a unique redox-driven ion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquera, Blanca

    2014-08-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is a unique Na(+) pumping respiratory complex found only in prokaryotes, that plays a key role in the metabolism of marine and pathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae and other human pathogens. Na(+)-NQR is the main entrance for reducing equivalents into the respiratory chain of these bacteria, catalyzing the oxidation of NADH and the reduction of quinone, the free energy of this redox reaction drives the selective translocation of Na(+) across the cell membrane, which energizes key cellular processes. In this review we summarize the unique properties of Na(+)-NQR in terms of its redox cofactor composition, electron transfer reactions and a possible mechanism of coupling and pumping.

  7. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 μA/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  8. Tetrahydrophthalimidobenzoates as protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase inhibiting herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Haibo; Cui, Dongliang; Li, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Tetrahydrophthalimidobenzoates are a class of protoporphyrinogen oxidase herbicides acting on the protoporphyrinogen oxidase enzyme. After the discovery of compound 1, a series of novel tetrahydrophthalimidobenzoate derivatives were designed and synthesized, and some synthesized compounds exhibited good herbicidal activity in controlling broadleaf weeds. The structure activity relationship of the synthesized compounds was also determined. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the 4-position of benzene ring resulted in better herbicidal activity than that with non-substitution. Among the conjunctional groups, methylene group with more methyl substitutions was the best. Consequently, compound 9 was found as the best of all in the synthesized compounds, and it is worthy of being developed not only because of its good herbicidal activity against broadleaf weeds with selectivity for maize, but also for its low toxicity to mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving methyl ketone production in Escherichia coli by heterologous expression of NADH-dependent FabG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ee-Been; Chen, Yan; Petzold, Christopher J; Keasling, Jay D; Beller, Harry R

    2018-05-01

    We previously engineered Escherichia coli to overproduce medium- to long-chain saturated and monounsaturated methyl ketones, which could potentially be applied as diesel fuel blending agents or in the flavor and fragrance industry. Recent efforts at strain optimization have focused on cofactor balance, as fatty acid-derived pathways face the systematic metabolic challenge of net NADPH consumption (in large part, resulting from the key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme FabG [β-ketoacyl-ACP reductase]) and net NADH production. In this study, we attempted to mitigate cofactor imbalance by heterologously expressing NADH-dependent, rather than NADPH-dependent, versions of FabG identified in previous studies. Of the four NADH-dependent versions of FabG tested in our previously best-reported methyl ketone-producing strain (EGS1895), the version from Acholeplasma laidlawii (Al_FabG) showed the greatest increase in methyl ketone yield in shake flasks (35-75% higher than for an RFP negative-control strain, depending on sugar loading). An improved strain (EGS2920) attained methyl ketone titers during fed-batch fermentation of 5.4 ± 0.5 g/L, which were, on average, ca. 40% greater than those for the base strain (EGS1895) under fermentation conditions optimized in this study. Shotgun proteomic data for strains EGS2920 and EGS1895 during fed-batch fermentation were consistent with the goal of alleviating NADPH limitation through expression of Al_FabG. For example, relative to strain EGS1895, strain EGS2920 significantly upregulated glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (directing flux into glycolysis rather than the NADPH-producing pentose phosphate pathway) and downregulated MaeB (a NADP + -dependent malate dehydrogenase). Overall, the results suggest that heterologous expression of NADH-dependent FabG in E. coli may improve sustained production of fatty acid-derived renewable fuels and chemicals. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Modulation of lysyl oxidase by dietary copper in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, R B; Romero-Chapman, N; Wong, T; Lee, J; Steinberg, F M; McGee, C; Clegg, M S; Reiser, K; Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Murphy, J; Keen, C L

    1996-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase levels were estimated in rat tissues using an enzyme-linked immunosorption assay (ELISA) and a functional assay standardized against known amounts of purified lysyl oxidase. High concentrations of lysyl oxidase (> or = 150 micrograms/g of tissue or packed cells) were detected in connective tissues, such as tendon and skin. Values for aorta, kidney, lung and liver ranged from 30 to 150 micrograms/g of tissue; values for skeletal muscle and diaphragm were tendon (r2 > 0.9). When egg white-based experimental diets containing 2 or 10 micrograms/g added copper were fed to weanling rats, values for skin lysyl oxidase functional activity in the group fed 2 micrograms/g added copper were one-third to one-half the values for skin lysyl oxidase functional activity in rats fed 10 micrograms/g copper. This reduction in lysyl oxidase activity, however, had minimal effect on indices of collagen maturation in rat skin, e.g., collagen solubility in neutral salt and dilute acid or the levels of acid stable cross-links. Moreover, copper deficiency did not influence the steady-state levels of lysyl oxidase specific mRNA in rat skin or the apparent amounts of lysyl oxidase in rat skin as determined by ELISA. These observations underscore that the concentration of lysyl oxidase is relatively high in dense corrective tissues, and although decreasing dietary copper influences functional activity, there is little apparent effect on the production of lysyl oxidase protein.

  11. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  12. Fragmented sleep accelerates tumor growth and progression through recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages and TLR4 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Fahed; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shelley X L; Zheng, Jiamao; Yolcu, Esma S; Carreras, Alba; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Shirwan, Haval; Almendros, Isaac; Gozal, David

    2014-03-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) is a highly prevalent condition and a hallmark of sleep apnea, a condition that has been associated with increased cancer incidence and mortality. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that sleep fragmentation promotes tumor growth and progression through proinflammatory TLR4 signaling. In the design, we compared mice that were exposed to sleep fragmentation one week before engraftment of syngeneic TC1 or LL3 tumor cells and tumor analysis four weeks later. We also compared host contributions through the use of mice genetically deficient in TLR4 or its effector molecules MYD88 or TRIF. We found that sleep fragmentation enhanced tumor size and weight compared with control mice. Increased invasiveness was apparent in sleep fragmentation tumors, which penetrated the tumor capsule into surrounding tissues, including adjacent muscle. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) were more numerous in sleep fragmentation tumors, where they were distributed in a relatively closer proximity to the tumor capsule compared with control mice. Although tumors were generally smaller in both MYD88(-/-) and TRIF(-/-) hosts, the more aggressive features produced by sleep fragmentation persisted. In contrast, these more aggressive features produced by sleep fragmentation were abolished completely in TLR4(-/-) mice. Our findings offer mechanistic insights into how sleep perturbations can accelerate tumor growth and invasiveness through TAM recruitment and TLR4 signaling pathways. ©2014 AACR

  13. Intermittent hypoxia-induced changes in tumor-associated macrophages and tumor malignancy in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Becker, Lev; Lennon, Frances E; Zheng, Jiamao; Coats, Brittney R; Schoenfelt, Kelly S; Carreras, Alba; Hakim, Fahed; Zhang, Shelley X; Farré, Ramon; Gozal, David

    2014-03-01

    An increased cancer aggressiveness and mortality have been recently reported among patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Intermittent hypoxia (IH), a hallmark of OSA, enhances melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. To assess whether OSA-related adverse cancer outcomes occur via IH-induced changes in host immune responses, namely tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Lung epithelial TC1 cell tumors were 84% greater in mice subjected to IH for 28 days compared with room air (RA). In addition, TAMs in IH-exposed tumors exhibited reductions in M1 polarity with a shift toward M2 protumoral phenotype. Although TAMs from tumors harvested from RA-exposed mice increased TC1 migration and extravasation, TAMs from IH-exposed mice markedly enhanced such effects and also promoted proliferative rates and invasiveness of TC1 cells. Proliferative rates of melanoma (B16F10) and TC1 cells exposed to IH either in single culture or in coculture with macrophages (RAW 264.7) increased only when RAW 264.7 macrophages were concurrently present. Our findings support the notion that IH-induced alterations in TAMs participate in the adverse cancer outcomes reported in OSA.

  14. Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells Modified with Tumor-Associated Antigen Gene Demonstrates Enhanced Antitumor Effect Against Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunotherapy using dendritic cell (DC vaccine has the potential to overcome the bottleneck of cancer therapy. METHODS: We engineered Lewis lung cancer cells (LLCs and bone marrow–derived DCs to express tumor-associated antigen (TAA ovalbumin (OVA via lentiviral vector plasmid encoding OVA gene. We then tested the antitumor effect of modified DCs both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that in vitro modified DCs could dramatically enhance T-cell proliferation (P < .01 and killing of LLCs than control groups (P < .05. Moreover, modified DCs could reduce tumor size and prolong the survival of LLC tumor-bearing mice than control groups (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively. Mechanistically, modified DCs demonstrated enhanced homing to T-cell–rich compartments and triggered more naive T cells to become cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which exhibited significant infiltration into the tumors. Interestingly, modified DCs also markedly reduced tumor cells harboring stem cell markers in mice (P < .05, suggesting the potential role on cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that DCs bioengineered with TAA could enhance antitumor effect and therefore represent a novel anticancer strategy that is worth further exploration.

  15. Review of renal tumors associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, N; Furuya, M; Nagashima, Y; Gotohda, H; Kawakami, F; Moritani, S; Ota, S; Hora, M; Michal, M; Hes, O; Nakatani, Y

    2014-06-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by clinical features of skin lesions, pulmonary lesions and renal tumor. The gene responsible for this syndrome is located on chromosome 17p11.2 and designated as FLCN. In this article, we review renal tumors associated with BHDS with a focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects. Renal tumors often occur multifocally or bilaterally in the imaging analyses or gross examination. Histological examination of renal tumors includes a variety of subtypes such as hybrid oncocytic tumor, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), oncocytoma, clear cell RCC and papillary RCC. The histologic discordance in multiple tumors seems to be characteristic of this syndrome. Oncocytosis is observed histologically in about half of the cases. Several investigations have elucidated that folliculin may be involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway recently. Renal tumors composed of clear cells may behave in an aggressive fashion. However, renal tumors including hybrid oncocytic tumor, chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma behave mostly in an indolent fashion.

  16. Cloning of partial cDNA encoding differentiation and tumor-associated mucin glycoproteins expressed by human mammary epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gender, S.J.; Burchell, J.M.; Duhig, T.; Lamport, D.; White, R.; Parker, M.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.

    1987-09-01

    Human mammary epithelial cells secrete and express on their cell surfaces complex mucin glycoproteins that are developmentally regulated, tumor-associated, and highly immunogenic. Studies using monoclonal antibodies directed to these glycoproteins suggest that their molecular structures can vary with differentiation stages in the normal gland and in malignancy. To analyze the molecular nature of these glycoproteins, milk mucin was affinity-purifed and deglycosylated with hydrogen fluoride, yielding bands at 68 and 72 kDa on silver-stained gels. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the stripped core protein were developed and used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library of cDNA made from mRNA of the mammary tumor cell line MCF-7. Seven crossreacting clones were isolated, with inserts 0.1-1.8 kilobases long. RNA blot analysis, using as a probe the 1.8-kilobase insert subcloned in plasmid pUC8 (pMUC10), revealed transcripts of 4.7 and 6.4 kilobases in MCF-7 and T47D mammary tumor cells, whereas normal mammary epithelial cells from pooled milks have additional transcripts. The expression of mRNA correlates with antigen expression as determined by binding of two previously characterized anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies (HMFG-1 and HMFG-2) to seven cell lines. Restriction enzyme analysis detected a restriction fragment length polymorphism when human genomic DNA was digested with EcoRI or HinfI.

  17. CD163+ Tumor-Associated Macrophages Correlated with Poor Prognosis and Cancer Stem Cells in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Fei He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs play an important role in the progression and prognostication of numerous cancers. However, the role and clinical significance of TAM markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC has not been elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate the correlation between the expression of TAM markers and pathological features in OSCC by tissue microarray. Tissue microarrays containing 16 normal oral mucosa, 6 oral epithelial dysplasia, and 43 OSCC specimens were studied by immunohistochemistry. We observed that the protein expression of the TAM markers CD68 and CD163 as well as the cancer stem cell (CSC markers ALDH1, CD44, and SOX2 increased successively from the normal oral mucosa to OSCC. The expressions of CD68 and CD163 were significantly associated with lymph node status, and SOX2 was significantly correlated with pathological grade and lymph node status, whereas ALDH1 was correlated with tumor stage. Furthermore, CD68 was significantly correlated with CD163, SOX2, and ALDH1 (P<0.05. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that OSCC patients overexpressing CD163 had significantly worse overall survival (P<0.05. TAM markers are associated with cancer stem cell marker and OSCC overall survival, suggesting their potential prognostic value in OSCC.

  18. Classification of 27 Tumor-Associated Antigens by Histochemical Analysis of 36 Freshly Resected Lung Cancer Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene Kurosawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60 mAbs against 27 TAAs. Comparison of the staining patterns of tumor cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and normal pulmonary alveolus cells and interalveolar septum allowed us to determine the type and location of cells that express target molecules, as well as the degree of expression. The patterns were classified into 7 categories. While multiple Abs were used against certain TAAs, the differences observed among them should be derived from differences in the binding activity and/or the epitope. Thus, such data indicate the versatility of respective clones as anti-cancer drugs. Although the information obtained was limited to the lung and bronchial tube, bronchial epithelial cells represent normal growing cells, and therefore, the data are informative. The results indicate that 9 of the 27 TAAs are suitable targets for therapeutic Abs. These 9 Ags include EGFR, HER2, TfR, and integrin α6β4. Based on our findings, a pharmaceutical company has started to develop anti-cancer drugs by using Abs to TfR and integrin α6β4. HGFR, PTP-LAR, CD147, CDCP1, and integrin αvβ3 are also appropriate targets for therapeutic purposes.

  19. Long-range and short-range tumor-stroma networks synergistically contribute to tumor-associated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Tokay, Tursonjan; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2016-05-31

    Epileptic seizures are frequently caused by brain tumors. Traditional anti-epileptic treatments do not acquire satisfactory responses. Preoperative and postoperative seizures seriously influence the quality of life of patients. Thus, tumor-associated epilepsy (TAE) is an important subject of the current research. The delineation of the etiology of epileptogenesis in patients with primary brain tumor may help to find the novel and effective drug targets for treating this disease. In this review, we describe the current status of treatment of TAE. More importantly, we focus on the factors that are involved in the functional connectivity between tumors and stromal cells. We propose that there exist two modes, namely, long-range and short-range modes, which likely trigger neuronal hyperexcitation and subsequent epileptic seizures. The long-range mode is referred to as factors released by tumors including glutamate and GABA, binding to the corresponding receptor on the cellular membrane and causing neuronal hyperactivity, while the short-range mode is considered to involve direct intracellular communication between tumor cells and stromas. Gap junctions and tunneling nanotube network are involved in cellular interconnections. Future investigations focused on those two modes may find a potential novel therapeutic target for treating TAE.

  20. Infiltration of M2 Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Kazumasa [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Hiroi, Miki [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Shimada, Jun [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Meikai University of School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan); Ohmori, Yoshihiro, E-mail: ohmori@dent.meikai.ac.jp [Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Oral Biology and Tissue Engineering, Meikai University School of Dentistry, 1-1 Keyakidai, Sakado, Saitama 350-0283 (Japan)

    2011-09-28

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a major cellular component in the tumor microenvironment of many solid tumors. The functional competence of TAMs varies depending on the type of tumors and their respective microenvironments. The classically activated M1 macrophages exhibit antitumor functions, whereas the alternatively activated M2 macrophages exhibit protumor functions that contribute to tumor development and progression. Although TAMs have been detected in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), little is known about their phenotype. In the present study, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis to identify TAMs in surgically resected specimens from 50 patients with OSCC and evaluated the relationship between infiltrated TAMs and the pathological grade of OSCC. Positive staining for CD163, which has been used as a marker for M2 macrophages, was observed in OSCC specimens, and the percentages of CD163{sup +} cells were significantly increased based on the pathological grade. CD163{sup +} cells were detected in the tumor stroma in grade I tumors, whereas an increase in the CD163{sup +} cells in the tumor nest was observed in higher grades of tumors. Although infiltrated CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells were detected in all pathological grades of OSCC, no correlation between the infiltrated T cells and the CD163{sup +} TAMs was observed. These results indicate that the infiltrated TAMs in OSCC have an M2 phenotype and that the M2 macrophages may participate in the development of OSCC.

  1. Development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for detecting ovarian tumor-associated antigen fraction OCA in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauf, S.; Urbach, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Ovarian tumor-associated antigen isolated from human tumor tissue was shown to have a different mobility from that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis in agarose. The ovarian tumor antigen is composed of six species with different electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three of these species were detected in Sephadex G-100 ovarian fraction OCA (from the void volume peak) and the other three species of lower apparent molecular weight were detected in fraction OCD (from the second peak). Fractions OCA and OCD did not share common antigenic determinants as determined by immunodiffusion. CEA was shown to share antigenic determinants with both OCA and OCD. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of detecting nanogram quantities of plasma OCA was developed. In a preliminary study of ovarian cancer patients, OCA appeared to be a more sensitive marker for ovarian cancer than CEA. There was virtually no correlation (r 2 = 0.1) between OCA and CEA levels in these patients, as determined by radioimmunoassay

  2. Transcriptomic analysis comparing tumor-associated neutrophils with granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and normal neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi G Fridlender

    Full Text Available The role of myeloid cells in supporting cancer growth is well established. Most work has focused on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC that accumulate in tumor-bearing animals, but tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN are also known to be capable of augmenting tumor growth. However, little is known about their evolution, phenotype, and relationship to naïve neutrophils (NN and to the granulocytic fraction of MDSC (G-MDSC.In the current study, a transcriptomics approach was used in mice to compare these cell types. Our data show that the three populations of neutrophils are significantly different in their mRNA profiles with NN and G-MDSC being more closely related to each other than to TAN. Structural genes and genes related to cell-cytotoxicity (i.e. respiratory burst were significantly down-regulated in TAN. In contrast, many immune-related genes and pathways, including genes related to the antigen presenting complex (e.g. all six MHC-II complex genes, and cytokines (e.g. TNF-α, IL-1-α/β, were up-regulated in G-MDSC, and further up-regulated in TAN. Thirteen of the 25 chemokines tested were markedly up-regulated in TAN compared to NN, including striking up-regulation of chemoattractants for T/B-cells, neutrophils and macrophages.This study characterizes different populations of neutrophils related to cancer, pointing out the major differences between TAN and the other neutrophil populations.

  3. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  4. NADPH oxidases in Microglia oxidant production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund-Vinding, J; McBean, G; Jaquet, V

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and constitute a self-sustaining population of CNS-adapted tissue macrophages. As mononuclear phagocytic cells, they express high levels of superoxide-producing NADPH oxidases (NOX). The sole function of members of the NOX...... excessive, badly-timed, or misplaced NOX activation in microglia may affect neuronal homeostasis in physiological or pathological conditions certainly merits further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets

  6. Bioinspired Design of Alcohol Dehydrogenase@nano TiO2 Microreactors for Sustainable Cycling of NAD+/NADH Coenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The bioinspired design and construction of enzyme@capsule microreactors with specific cell-like functionality has generated tremendous interest in recent years. Inspired by their fascinating complexity, scientists have endeavored to understand the essential aspects of a natural cell and create biomimicking microreactors so as to immobilize enzymes within the hierarchical structure of a microcapsule. In this study, simultaneous encapsulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH was achieved during the preparation of microcapsules by the Pickering emulsion method using amphiphilic modified TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs as building blocks for assembling the photocatalytic microcapsule membrane. The ADH@TiO2 NP microreactors exhibited dual catalytic functions, i.e., spatially confined enzymatic catalysis and the membrane-associated photocatalytic oxidation under visible light. The sustainable cycling of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD coenzyme between NADH and NAD+ was realized by enzymatic regeneration of NADH from NAD+ reduction, and was provided in a form that enabled further photocatalytic oxidation to NAD+ under visible light. This bioinspired ADH@TiO2 NP microreactor allowed the linking of a semiconductor mineral-based inorganic photosystem to enzymatic reactions. This is a first step toward the realization of sustainable biological cycling of NAD+/NADH coenzyme in synthetic functional microsystems operating under visible light irradiation.

  7. Renewable Molecular Flasks with NADH Models: Combination of Light-Driven Proton Reduction and Biomimetic Hydrogenation of Benzoxazinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang; Wei, Jianwei; Lu, Junhua; He, Cheng; Duan, Chunying

    2017-07-17

    Using small molecules with defined pockets to catalyze chemical transformations resulted in attractive catalytic syntheses that echo the remarkable properties of enzymes. By modulating the active site of a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) model in a redox-active molecular flask, we combined biomimetic hydrogenation with in situ regeneration of the active site in a one-pot transformation using light as a clean energy source. This molecular flask facilitates the encapsulation of benzoxazinones for biomimetic hydrogenation of the substrates within the inner space of the flask using the active sites of the NADH models. The redox-active metal centers provide an active hydrogen source by light-driven proton reduction outside the pocket, allowing the in situ regeneration of the NADH models under irradiation. This new synthetic platform, which offers control over the location of the redox events, provides a regenerating system that exhibits high selectivity and efficiency and is extendable to benzoxazinone and quinoxalinone systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. HEPATOCYTE EXPRESION OF TUMOR ASSOCIATED ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (ALDH-3) AND P21 RAS FOLLOWING DIETHYLNITROSAMINE (DEN) INITIATION AND CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO DI(2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE (DHEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phthalate esters such as di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)either promote or inhibit rat liver tumorigenesis depending on the carcinogenesis protocol. In this study, we examined the expression of two histochemical markers, the tumor associated isozyme of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD...

  9. Hydrogen peroxide inhibition of bicupin oxalate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John M; Rana, Hassan; Ndungu, Joan; Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Moomaw, Ellen W

    2017-01-01

    Oxalate oxidase is a manganese containing enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of oxalate to carbon dioxide in a reaction that is coupled with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. Oxalate oxidase from Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CsOxOx) is the first fungal and bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes this reaction. Potential applications of oxalate oxidase for use in pancreatic cancer treatment, to prevent scaling in paper pulping, and in biofuel cells have highlighted the need to understand the extent of the hydrogen peroxide inhibition of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate. We apply a membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) assay to directly measure initial rates of carbon dioxide formation and oxygen consumption in the presence and absence of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that hydrogen peroxide is both a reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of the CsOxOx catalyzed oxidation of oxalate and an irreversible inactivator. The build-up of the turnover-generated hydrogen peroxide product leads to the inactivation of the enzyme. The introduction of catalase to reaction mixtures protects the enzyme from inactivation allowing reactions to proceed to completion. Circular dichroism spectra indicate that no changes in global protein structure take place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Additionally, we show that the CsOxOx catalyzed reaction with the three carbon substrate mesoxalate consumes oxygen which is in contrast to previous proposals that it catalyzed a non-oxidative decarboxylation with this substrate.

  10. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed.

  11. Phylogenomic analysis and predicted physiological role of the proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) across bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Melanie A; Aylward, Frank O; Currie, Cameron R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2015-04-14

    The proton-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a multisubunit integral membrane enzyme found in the respiratory chains of both bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. Although much research has focused on the enzyme's central role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, comparatively little is known about its role in the diverse energetic lifestyles of different bacteria. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to better understand the distribution of complex I across bacteria, the evolution of this enzyme, and its potential roles in shaping the physiology of different bacterial groups. By surveying 970 representative bacterial genomes, we predict complex I to be present in ~50% of bacteria. While this includes bacteria with a wide range of energetic schemes, the presence of complex I is associated with specific lifestyles, including aerobic respiration and specific types of phototrophy (bacteria with only a type II reaction center). A phylogeny of bacterial complex I revealed five main clades of enzymes whose evolution is largely congruent with the evolution of the bacterial groups that encode complex I. A notable exception includes the gammaproteobacteria, whose members encode one of two distantly related complex I enzymes predicted to participate in different types of respiratory chains (aerobic versus anaerobic). Comparative genomic analyses suggest a broad role for complex I in reoxidizing NADH produced from various catabolic reactions, including the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and fatty acid beta-oxidation. Together, these findings suggest diverse roles for complex I across bacteria and highlight the importance of this enzyme in shaping diverse physiologies across the bacterial domain. Living systems use conserved energy currencies, including a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP. The respiratory chain enzyme, complex I, connects these energy currencies by using NADH produced during nutrient breakdown to generate a PMF, which is

  12. SUSD2 promotes tumor-associated macrophage recruitment by increasing levels of MCP-1 in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Hultgren

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs play a role in tumor angiogenesis and are recruited into the tumor microenvironment (TME by secreted chemokines, including Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2. Angiogenesis is required to sustain proliferation and enable metastasis of breast cancer (BCa cells. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of TAM recruitment would allow for the identification of desperately needed novel drug targets. Sushi Domain Containing 2 (SUSD2, a transmembrane protein on BCa cells, was previously shown to promote tumor angiogenesis in a murine model. To identify the role of SUSD2 in angiogenesis, 175 human breast tumors were surveyed by immunohistochemical analysis for the presence of SUSD2 and macrophages. Tumors with high levels of SUSD2 staining contained 2-fold more TAMs, mainly of the M2 pro-angiogenic phenotype. An in vitro co-culture model system was developed by differentiating SC monocytes into SC M0 macrophages. A 2-fold increase in polarized M2 macrophages was observed when M0 macrophages were incubated with SUSD2-expressing BCa cells compared to cancer cells that do not contain SUSD2. Since MCP-1 is known to recruit macrophages, levels of MCP-1 were compared between SUSD2-expressing MDA-MB-231 and MBA-MB-231-vector control cell lines. MCP-1 RNA, intracellular protein and secreted MCP-1 were all significantly increased compared to the vector control. Knockdown of SUSD2 in SKBR3 resulted in significantly decreased levels of secreted MCP-1. Consistently, increased levels of MCP-1 were observed in Susd2-expressing tumors generated from an in vivo isogeneic mouse model compared to the vector control tumors. Because SUSD2 recruits macrophages into the TME and promotes M2 polarization, inhibiting the function of SUSD2 may be an effective therapy for breast cancer patients.

  13. Enhanced Cellular Ablation by Attenuating Hypoxia Status and Reprogramming Tumor-Associated Macrophages via NIR Light-Responsive Upconversion Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Hu, Ming; Wang, Zhimin; Lyu, Linna; Zhang, Wenmin; Li, Juan; Yang, Huanghao; Lin, Jun; Xing, Bengang

    2018-02-27

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT), especially based on lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs), have been extensively investigated as a promising strategy for effective cellular ablation owing to their unique optical properties to convert NIR light excitation into multiple short-wavelength emissions. Despite the deep tissue penetration of NIR light in living systems, the therapeutic efficiency is greatly restricted by insufficient oxygen supply in hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Moreover, the coexistent tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play critical roles in tumor recurrence during the post-PDT period. Herein, we developed a unique photosensitizer-loaded UCNs nanoconjugate (PUN) by integrating manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) nanosheets and hyaluronic acid (HA) biopolymer to improve NIR light-mediated PDT efficacy through attenuating hypoxia status and synergistically reprogramming TAMs populations. After the reaction with overproduced H 2 O 2 in acidic tumor microenvironment, the MnO 2 nanosheets were degraded for the production of massive oxygen to greatly enhance the oxygen-dependent PDT efficiency upon 808 nm NIR light irradiation. More importantly, the bioinspired polymer HA could effectively reprogram the polarization of pro-tumor M2-type TAMs to anti-tumor M1-type macrophages to prevent tumor relapse after PDT treatment. Such promising results provided the great opportunities to achieve enhanced cellular ablation upon NIR light-mediated PDT treatment by attenuating hypoxic tumor microenvironment, and thus facilitated the rational design of new generations of nanoplatforms toward immunotherapy to inhibit tumor recurrence during post-PDT period.

  14. Crucial Involvement of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils in the Regulation of Chronic Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Wang, Zhen; Gu, Hong-Yu; Du, Xiang; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Chun-Lei; Chi, Ya-Yun; Mukaida, Naofumi; Li, Ying-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major form of chronic inflammation that can frequently progress to colon cancer. Several studies have demonstrated massive infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into the lamina propria and submucosa in the progression of UC-associated colon carcinogenesis. Macrophages contribute to the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC). However, the role of neutrophils is not well understood. To better understand the involvement of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the regulation of CAC, we used a mouse CAC model produced by administering azoxymethane (AOM), followed by repeated dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) ingestion. This causes severe colonic inflammation and subsequent development of multiple tumors in mice colon. We observed that colorectal mucosal inflammation became increasingly severe with AOM and DSS treatment. Macrophages infiltrated the lamina propria and submucosa, together with a marked increase in neutrophil infiltration. The chemokine CXCL2 increased in the lamina propria and submucosal regions of the colons of the treated mice, together with the infiltration of neutrophils expressing CXCR2, a specific receptor for CXCL2. This process was followed by neoplastic transformation. After AOM and DSS treatment, the mice showed enhanced production of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and neutrophil elastase (NE), accompanied by excessive vessel generation and cell proliferation. Moreover, CXCL2 promoted neutrophil recruitment and induced neutrophils to express MMP-9 and NE in vitro. Furthermore, administration of neutrophil-neutralizing antibodies after the last DSS cycle markedly reduced the number and size of tumors and decreased the expression of CXCR2, CXCL2, MMP-9, and NE. These observations indicate a crucial role for TANs in the initiation and progression of CAC and suggest that the CXCL2–CXCR2 axis might be useful in reducing the risk of UC-associated colon cancer. PMID:23272179

  15. Crucial involvement of tumor-associated neutrophils in the regulation of chronic colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.

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    Kun Shang

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a major form of chronic inflammation that can frequently progress to colon cancer. Several studies have demonstrated massive infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into the lamina propria and submucosa in the progression of UC-associated colon carcinogenesis. Macrophages contribute to the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC. However, the role of neutrophils is not well understood. To better understand the involvement of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs in the regulation of CAC, we used a mouse CAC model produced by administering azoxymethane (AOM, followed by repeated dextran sulfate sodium (DSS ingestion. This causes severe colonic inflammation and subsequent development of multiple tumors in mice colon. We observed that colorectal mucosal inflammation became increasingly severe with AOM and DSS treatment. Macrophages infiltrated the lamina propria and submucosa, together with a marked increase in neutrophil infiltration. The chemokine CXCL2 increased in the lamina propria and submucosal regions of the colons of the treated mice, together with the infiltration of neutrophils expressing CXCR2, a specific receptor for CXCL2. This process was followed by neoplastic transformation. After AOM and DSS treatment, the mice showed enhanced production of metalloproteinase (MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase (NE, accompanied by excessive vessel generation and cell proliferation. Moreover, CXCL2 promoted neutrophil recruitment and induced neutrophils to express MMP-9 and NE in vitro. Furthermore, administration of neutrophil-neutralizing antibodies after the last DSS cycle markedly reduced the number and size of tumors and decreased the expression of CXCR2, CXCL2, MMP-9, and NE. These observations indicate a crucial role for TANs in the initiation and progression of CAC and suggest that the CXCL2-CXCR2 axis might be useful in reducing the risk of UC-associated colon cancer.

  16. Effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion induced by tumor-associated macrophages.

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    Cheng-Chung Li

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are the major n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs in fish oil that decrease the risk of prostate cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs are the main leukocytes of intratumoral infiltration, and increased TAMs correlates with poor prostate cancer prognosis. However, the mechanism of n-3 PUFAs on prostate cancer cell progression induced by TAMs is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of EPA and DHA on modulating of migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells induced by TAMs-like M2-type macrophages. PC-3 prostate cancer cells were pretreated with EPA, DHA, or the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ antagonist, GW9662, before exposure to conditioned medium (CM. CM was derived from M2-polarized THP-1 macrophages. The migratory and invasive abilities of PC-3 cells were evaluated using a coculture system of M2-type macrophages and PC-3 cells. EPA/DHA administration decreased migration and invasion of PC-3 cells. The PPAR-γ DNA-binding activity and cytosolic inhibitory factor κBα (IκBα protein expression increased while the nuclear factor (NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein level decreased in PC-3 cells incubated with CM in the presence of EPA/DHA. Further, EPA/DHA downregulated mRNA expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9, cyclooxygenase-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pretreatment with GW9662 abolished the favorable effects of EPA/DHA on PC-3 cells. These results indicate that EPA/DHA administration reduced migration, invasion and macrophage chemotaxis of PC-3 cells induced by TAM-like M2-type macrophages, which may partly be explained by activation of PPAR-γ and decreased NF-κB p65 transcriptional activity.

  17. Specific Inhibition of the VEGFR-3 Tyrosine Kinase by SAR131675 Reduces Peripheral and Tumor Associated Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cells

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    Espagnolle, Nicolas [UMR5273 INSERM U1031/CNRS/EFS StromaLab, Toulouse 31432 (France); Barron, Pauline; Mandron, Marie; Blanc, Isabelle; Bonnin, Jacques [Sanofi Recherche et Développement, Early to Candidate DPU, Toulouse 31036 (France); Agnel, Magali; Kerbelec, Erwan [Molecular Biology Unit, Biologics Department, Sanofi, Vitry-sur-Seine 94400 (France); Herault, Jean Pascal; Savi, Pierre; Bono, Françoise; Alam, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.alam@sanofi.com [Sanofi Recherche et Développement, Early to Candidate DPU, Toulouse 31036 (France)

    2014-02-28

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent prominent components in cancer progression. We previously showed that inhibition of the VEGFR-3 pathway by SAR131675 leads to reduction of TAM infiltration and tumor growth. Here, we found that treatment with SAR131675 prevents the accumulation of immunosuppressive blood and splenic MDSCs which express VEGFR-3, in 4T1 tumor bearing mice. Moreover we showed that soluble factors secreted by tumor cells promote MDSCs proliferation and differentiation into M2 polarized F4/80+ macrophages. In addition, cell sorting and transcriptomic analysis of tumor infiltrating myeloid cells revealed the presence of a heterogeneous population that could be divided into 3 subpopulations: (i) immature cells with a MDSC phenotype (GR1+/CD11b+/F4/80{sup −}); (ii) “immuno-incompetent” macrophages (F4/80{sup high}/CD86{sup neg}/MHCII{sup Low}) strongly expressing M2 markers such as Legumain, CD206 and Mgl1/2 and (iii) “immuno-competent”-M1 like macrophages (F4/80{sup Low}/CD86{sup +}/MHCII{sup High}). SAR131675 treatment reduced MDSCs in lymphoid organs as well as F4/80{sup High} populations in tumors. Interestingly, in the tumor SAR131675 was able to increase the immunocompetent M1 like population (F4/80{sup low}). Altogether these results demonstrate that the specific VEGFR-3 inhibitor SAR131675 exerts its anti tumoral activity by acting on different players that orchestrate immunosuppression and cancer progression in a tumoral context: MDSCs in peripheral lymphoid organs and TAMs infiltrating the tumor.

  18. Tumor-associated macrophages in glioblastoma multiforme-a suitable target for somatostatin receptor-based imaging and therapy?

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    Constantin Lapa

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM have been shown to promote malignant growth and to correlate with poor prognosis. [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-NN',N″,N'″-tetraacetic acid]-d-Phe1,Tyr3-octreotate (DOTATATE labeled with Gallium-68 selectively binds to somatostatin receptor 2A (SSTR2A which is specifically expressed and up-regulated in activated macrophages. On the other hand, the role of SSTR2A expression on the cell surface of glioma cells has not been fully elucidated yet. The aim of this study was to non-invasively assess SSTR2A expression of both glioma cells as well as macrophages in GBM.15 samples of patient-derived GBM were stained immunohistochemically for macrophage infiltration (CD68, proliferative activity (Ki67 as well as expression of SSTR2A. Anti-CD45 staining was performed to distinguish between resident microglia and tumor-infiltrating macrophages. In a subcohort, positron emission tomography (PET imaging using 68Ga-DOTATATE was performed and the semiquantitatively evaluated tracer uptake was compared to the results of immunohistochemistry.The amount of microglia/macrophages ranged from 50% in the tumor samples with the vast majority being resident microglial cells. A strong SSTR2A immunostaining was observed in endothelial cells of proliferating vessels, in neurons and neuropile. Only faint immunostaining was identified on isolated microglial and tumor cells. Somatostatin receptor imaging revealed areas of increased tracer accumulation in every patient. However, retention of the tracer did not correlate with immunohistochemical staining patterns.SSTR2A seems not to be overexpressed in GBM samples tested, neither on the cell surface of resident microglia or infiltrating macrophages, nor on the surface of tumor cells. These data suggest that somatostatin receptor directed imaging and treatment strategies are less promising in GBM.

  19. Tumor-associated macrophages in oral premalignant lesions coexpress CD163 and STAT1 in a Th1-dominated microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kazumasa; Haraguchi, Shigeki; Hiori, Miki; Shimada, Jun; Ohmori, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are implicated in the growth, invasion and metastasis of various solid tumors. However, the phenotype of TAMs in premalignant lesions of solid tumors has not been clarified. In the present study, we identify the phenotype of TAMs in leukoplakia, an oral premalignant lesion, by immunohistochemical analysis and investigate the involvement of infiltrated T cells that participate in the polarization of TAMs. The subjects included 30 patients with oral leukoplakia and 10 individuals with normal mucosa. Hematoxylin and eosin slides were examined for the histological grades, and immunohistochemical analysis was carried out using antibodies against CD68 (pan-MΦ), CD80 (M1 MΦ), CD163 (M2 MΦ), CD4 (helper T cells: Th), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CXCR3, CCR5 (Th1), CCR4 (Th2), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1), phosphorylated STAT1 (pSTAT1) and chemokine CXCL9. The differences in the numbers of positively stained cells among the different histological grades were tested for statistical significance using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Correlations between different types of immune cells were determined using Spearman’s rank analysis. An increase in the rate of CD163 + TAM infiltration was observed in mild and moderate epithelial dysplasia, which positively correlated with the rate of intraepithelial CD4 + Th cell infiltration. Although CCR4 + cells rarely infiltrated, CXCR3 + and CCR5 + cells were observed in these lesions. Cells positive for STAT1 and chemokine CXCL9, interferon- (IFN)-induced gene products, and pSTAT1 were also observed in the same lesions. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the cells that were positive for CD163 were also positive for STAT1. CD163 + TAMs in oral premalignant lesions coexpress CD163 and STAT1, suggesting that the TAMs in oral premalignant lesions possess an M1 phenotype in a Th1-dominated micromilieu

  20. Clinical and Molecular Features of Renal and Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma Tumor Association Syndrome (RAPTAS): Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ruth T; Warren, Anne Y; Martin, Jose Ezequiel; Challis, Benjamin G; Rattenberry, Eleanor; Whitworth, James; Andrews, Katrina A; Roberts, Thomas; Clark, Graeme R; West, Hannah; Smith, Philip S; Docquier, France M; Rodger, Fay; Murray, Vicki; Simpson, Helen L; Wallis, Yvonne; Giger, Olivier; Tran, Maxine; Tomkins, Susan; Stewart, Grant D; Park, Soo-Mi; Woodward, Emma R; Maher, Eamonn R

    2017-11-01

    The co-occurrence of pheochromocytoma (PC) and renal tumors was linked to the inherited familial cancer syndrome von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease more than six decades ago. Subsequently, other shared genetic causes of predisposition to renal tumors and to PC, paraganglioma (PGL), or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL) have been described, but case series of non-VHL-related cases of renal tumor and pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma tumor association syndrome (RAPTAS) are rare. To determine the clinical and molecular features of non-VHL RAPTAS by literature review and characterization of a case series. A review of the literature was performed and a retrospective study of referrals for investigation of genetic causes of RAPTAS. Literature review revealed evidence of an association, in addition to VHL disease, between germline mutations in SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, TMEM127, and MAX genes and RAPTAS [defined here as the co-occurrence of tumors from both classes (PC/PGL/HNPGL and renal tumors) in the same individual or in first-degree relatives]. In both the literature review and our case series of 22 probands with non-VHL RAPTAS, SDHB mutations were the most frequent cause of non-VHL RAPTAS. A genetic cause was identified in 36.3% (8/22) of kindreds. Renal tumors and PC/PGL/HNPGL tumors share common molecular features and their co-occurrence in an individual or family should prompt genetic investigations. We report a case of MAX-associated renal cell carcinoma and confirm the role of TMEM127 mutations with renal cell carcinoma predisposition. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  1. Hydrophobic-ionic chromatography: its application to microbial glucose oxidase, hyaluronidase, cholesterol oxidase, and cholesterol esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, I; Gotoh, H; Yamamoto, R; Tanaka, H; Takami, K; Yamashita, K; Yamashita, J; Horio, T

    1982-05-01

    Glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger, hyaluronidase from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus, and cholesterol oxidase and cholesterol esterase from Pseudomonas fluorescens were effectively adsorbed on an Amberlite CG-50 column, when the cell-free cultured medium or the cultured medium with cell extract and without cell debris was applied without desalting but at pH less than or equal to 4.5. At the acidic pH, all the ion-exchange groups (-COOH) exist in the protonated form; the adsorption is not due to electrostatic attraction, but to hydrophobic interaction. The enzymes thus adsorbed were effectively eluted by increasing pH, at which the ion-exchange groups became dissociated. This type of adsorption-elution is called hydrophobic-ionic chromatography. By a single run of chromatography, glucose oxidase, hyaluronidase, cholesterol oxidase, and cholesterol esterase were purified 30-fold, 12-fold, 45-fold, and 20-fold with yields of 82%, 83%, 80%, and 90%, respectively. This indicates that hydrophobic-ionic chromatography on an Amberlite CG-50 column is effective for the purification of various enzymes, provided that they are stable at the acidic pH.

  2. Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Francisco R M; Araujo, Thaís L S; Abrahão, Thalita B

    2014-06-10

    Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between Noxes and the ER may provide relevant insights in Nox-related (patho)physiology.

  3. Neurônios NADH-diaforase positivos do jejuno de ratos adultos (Rattus norvegicus desnutridos: aspectos quantitativos NADH-diaphorase positive neurons of the jejunum of disnurtured adult rats (Rattus norvegicus: quantitative aspects

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    Sônia Trannin de Mello Zanin

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Temos por objetivo contribuir com informações sobre os aspectos quantitativos dos neurônios mioentéricos NADH-diaforase positivos do jejuno de ratos submetidos a desnutrição protéica. Foram utilizados 10 ratos (90 dias de idade, divididos em grupos: controle (n=5, ±278g e desnutrido (n=5, ±280g. Nos 120 dias seguintes, os ratos do grupo controle receberam ração com teor protéico de 22%, os do grupo desnutrido, 8%. Ao final deste período, os ratos do grupo controle pesaram ±394,4g e os desnutrido ±273,5g.O jejuno foi submetido à técnica histoquímica da NADH-diaforase para evidenciação de células nervosas em preparado de membranas. Foram contados os neurônios presentes em 80 campos microscópicos em ambos os grupos. Verificaram-se no controle ±674,6 neurônios e no desnutrido ±1326,8 neurônios; A dieta não alterou a organização dos neurônios entretanto, levou a um menor desenvolvimento corporal nos animais desnutridos, contribuindo para que os neurônios destes sofressem menor dispersão e apresentassem maior densidade por mm².We aim at contributing with information on the quantitative aspects of the NADH-diaphorase positive myenteric neurons of the jejunum of adult rats subjected to protein desnutrition. Ten rats aging 90 days were divided into two groups: control (n=5, ±278 g and disnurtured (n=5, ±280 g. In the following 120 days, the rats from the control group had chow with 22% protein level, and those from the disnurtured group, with 8% protein level. After this period, the control rats weighted ±394.4g and the disnurtured ±273.5g. The jejunum was subjected to the histochemical technique of the NADH-diaphorase to stain nerve cells in whole-mounts. The neurons found in 80 microscopic fields of both groups were counted. In the control ±674.6 neurons were observed, and ±1326.8 neurons were counted in the disnurtured group. The low-protein diet did not alter the organization of the neurons, but led to a

  4. Photo-excitation of electrons in cytochrome c oxidase as a theory of the mechanism of the increase of ATP production in mitochondria by laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielke, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    The hypothesis explains the molecular basis for restoring mitochondrial function by laser therapy. It also explains how laser therapy reverses both excessive oxidation (lack of NADH/FADH2) and excessive reduction (lack of O2) states of cytochrome c oxidase complex. It is proposed that photons interact with heme molecules of cytochrome c oxidase. A molecule of heme contains a porphyrin ring and an atom of iron in the center. The iron atom (Fe) can switch oxidation states back and forth between ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) by accepting or releasing an electron. The porphyrin ring is a complex aromatic molecule that has 26 pi electrons which are "delocalized", spinning in the carbon rings creating a resonating electromagnetic cloud. Photons with similar wavelengths are absorbed by the cloud increasing its energy. The energy is then passed on to the centrally located atom of iron existing in a reduced state (Fe2+). The electrons on the orbits of the iron atom accept this electromagnetic energy, and change orbitals to a higher energetic level. If the energy is sufficient, electrons leave the atom entirely. If this occurs, Fe2+ become oxidized to Fe3+ releasing electrons, thus restoring electron flow and the production of ATP. At the same time, electrons freed from complex IV may have sufficient energy to be picked by NAD+/FADH and re-enter the chain at the complex I or II amplifying the flow of electrons.

  5. Different Array CGH profiles within hereditary breast cancer tumors associated to BRCA1 expression and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Aravena, Andrés; Tapia, Teresa; Rozenblum, Ester; Solís, Luisa; Corvalán, Alejandro; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Munroe, David; Maass, Alejandro; Carvallo, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    alterations in breast tumors associated with poor survival, immune response or with a BRCAness phenotype will allow the use of a more personalized treatment in these patients

  6. The presence of tumor associated macrophages in tumor stroma as a prognostic marker for breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medrek, Catharina; Pontén, Fredrik; Jirström, Karin; Leandersson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are alternatively activated macrophages that enhance tumor progression by promoting tumor cell invasion, migration and angiogenesis. TAMs have an anti-inflammatory function resembling M2 macrophages. CD163 is regarded as a highly specific monocyte/macrophage marker for M2 macrophages. In this study we evaluated the specificity of using the M2 macrophage marker CD163 as a TAM marker and compared its prognostic value with the more frequently used pan-macrophage marker CD68. We also analyzed the prognostic value of the localization of CD163 + and CD68 + myeloid cells in human breast cancer. The extent of infiltrating CD163 + or CD68 + myeloid cells in tumor nest versus tumor stroma was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays with tumors from 144 breast cancer cases. Spearman’s Rho and χ 2 tests were used to examine the correlations between CD163 + or CD68 + myeloid cells and clinicopathological parameters. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess the impact of CD163 + and CD68 + myeloid cells in tumor stroma and tumor nest, respectively, on recurrence free survival, breast cancer specific and overall survival. We found that infiltration of CD163 + and CD68 + macrophages into tumor stroma, but not into tumor nest, were of clinical relevance. CD163 + macrophages in tumor stroma positively correlated with higher grade, larger tumor size, Ki67 positivity, estrogen receptor negativity, progesterone receptor negativity, triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer and inversely correlated with luminal A breast cancer. Some CD163 + areas lacked CD68 expression, suggesting that CD163 could be used as a general anti-inflammatory myeloid marker with prognostic impact. CD68 + macrophages in tumor stroma positively correlated to tumor size and inversely correlated to luminal A breast cancer. More importantly, CD68 in tumor stroma was an independent prognostic factor for reduced breast cancer

  7. Prognostic significance of tumor-associated macrophages in solid tumor: a meta-analysis of the literature.

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    Qiong-wen Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs are considered with the capacity to have both negative and positive effects on tumor growth. The prognostic value of TAM for survival in patients with solid tumor remains controversial. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We conducted a meta-analysis of 55 studies (n = 8,692 patients that evaluated the correlation between TAM (detected by immunohistochemistry and clinical staging, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. The impact of M1 and M2 type TAM (n = 5 on survival was also examined. RESULTS: High density of TAM was significantly associated with late clinical staging in patients with breast cancer [risk ratio (RR  = 1.20 (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.14-1.28] and bladder cancer [RR = 3.30 (95%CI, 1.56-6.96] and with early clinical staging in patients with ovarian cancer [RR = 0.52 (95%CI, 0.35-0.77]. Negative effects of TAM on OS was shown in patients with gastric cancer [RR = 1.64 (95%CI, 1.24-2.16], breast cancer [RR = 8.62 (95%CI, 3.10-23.95], bladder cancer [RR = 5.00 (95%CI, 1.98-12.63], ovarian cancer [RR = 2.55 (95%CI, 1.60-4.06], oral cancer [RR = 2.03 (95%CI, 1.47-2.80] and thyroid cancer [RR = 2.72 (95%CI, 1.26-5.86],and positive effects was displayed in patients with colorectal cancer [RR = 0.64 (95%CI, 0.43-0.96]. No significant effect was showed between TAM and DFS. There was also no significant effect of two phenotypes of TAM on survival. CONCLUSIONS: Although some modest bias cannot be excluded, high density of TAM seems to be associated with worse OS in patients with gastric cancer, urogenital cancer and head and neck cancer, with better OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase: NAD[superscript +]/NADH Binding and the Structural Basis of Disease-causing Mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, David T. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-07-13

    Human dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (hE3) is an enzymatic component common to the mitochondrial {alpha}-ketoacid dehydrogenase and glycine decarboxylase complexes. Mutations to this homodimeric flavoprotein cause the often-fatal human disease known as E3 deficiency. To catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, hE3 uses two molecules: noncovalently bound FAD and a transiently bound substrate, NAD{sup +}. To address the catalytic mechanism of hE3 and the structural basis for E3 deficiency, the crystal structures of hE3 in the presence of NAD{sup +} or NADH have been determined at resolutions of 2.5 {angstrom} and 2.1 {angstrom}, respectively. Although the overall fold of the enzyme is similar to that of yeast E3, these two structures differ at two loops that protrude from the proteins and at their FAD-binding sites. The structure of oxidized hE3 with NAD{sup +} bound demonstrates that the nicotinamide moiety is not proximal to the FAD. When NADH is present, however, the nicotinamide base stacks directly on the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD. This is the first time that this mechanistically requisite conformation of NAD{sup +} or NADH has been observed in E3 from any species. Because E3 structures were previously available only from unicellular organisms, speculations regarding the molecular mechanisms of E3 deficiency were based on homology models. The current hE3 structures show directly that the disease-causing mutations occur at three locations in the human enzyme: the dimer interface, the active site, and the FAD and NAD{sup +}-binding sites. The mechanisms by which these mutations impede the function of hE3 are discussed.

  9. The key role of glutamate 172 in the mechanism of type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductase of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipe M; Sena, Filipa V; Batista, Ana P; Athayde, Diogo; Brito, José A; Archer, Margarida; Oliveira, A Sofia F; Soares, Cláudio M; Catarino, Teresa; Pereira, Manuela M

    2017-10-01

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane bound enzymes that deliver electrons to the respiratory chain by oxidation of NADH and reduction of quinones. In this way, these enzymes also contribute to the regeneration of NAD + , allowing several metabolic pathways to proceed. As for the other members of the two-Dinucleotide Binding Domains Flavoprotein (tDBDF) superfamily, the enzymatic mechanism of NDH-2s is still little explored and elusive. In this work we addressed the role of the conserved glutamate 172 (E172) residue in the enzymatic mechanism of NDH-2 from Staphylococcus aureus. We aimed to test our earlier hypothesis that E172 plays a key role in proton transfer to allow the protonation of the quinone. For this we performed a complete biochemical characterization of the enzyme's variants E172A, E172Q and E172S. Our steady state kinetic measurements show a clear decrease in the overall reaction rate, and our substrate interaction studies indicate the binding of the two substrates is also affected by these mutations. Interestingly our fast kinetic results show quinone reduction is more affected than NADH oxidation. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of the E172S mutant (2.55Ǻ) and compared it with the structure of the wild type (2.32Ǻ). Together these results support our hypothesis for E172 being of central importance in the catalytic mechanism of NDH-2, which may be extended to other members of the tDBDF superfamily. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Initial Evidence for Adaptive Selection on the NADH Subunit Two of Freshwater Dolphins by Analyses of Mitochondrial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Susana; Duchêne, Sebastian; Garavito, Manuel F; Slikas, Beth; Baker, C Scott

    2015-01-01

    A small number of cetaceans have adapted to an entirely freshwater environment, having colonized rivers in Asia and South America from an ancestral origin in the marine environment. This includes the 'river dolphins', early divergence from the odontocete lineage, and two species of true dolphins (Family Delphinidae). Successful adaptation to the freshwater environment may have required increased demands in energy involved in processes such as the mitochondrial osmotic balance. For this reason, riverine odontocetes provide a compelling natural experiment in adaptation of mammals from marine to freshwater habitats. Here we present initial evidence of positive selection in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 of riverine odontocetes by analyses of full mitochondrial genomes, using tests of selection and protein structure modeling. The codon model with highest statistical support corresponds to three discrete categories for amino acid sites, those under positive, neutral, and purifying selection. With this model we found positive selection at site 297 of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (dN/dS>1.0,) leading to a substitution of an Ala or Val from the ancestral state of Thr. A phylogenetic reconstruction of 27 cetacean mitogenomes showed that an Ala substitution has evolved at least four times in cetaceans, once or more in the three 'river dolphins' (Families Pontoporidae, Lipotidae and Inidae), once in the riverine Sotalia fluviatilis (but not in its marine sister taxa), once in the riverine Orcaella brevirostris from the Mekong River (but not in its marine sister taxa) and once in two other related marine dolphins. We located the position of this amino acid substitution in an alpha-helix channel in the trans-membrane domain in both the E. coli structure and Sotalia fluviatilis model. In E. coli this position is located in a helix implicated in a proton translocation channel of respiratory complex 1 and may have a similar role in the NADH dehydrogenases of cetaceans.

  11. Initial Evidence for Adaptive Selection on the NADH Subunit Two of Freshwater Dolphins by Analyses of Mitochondrial Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Caballero

    Full Text Available A small number of cetaceans have adapted to an entirely freshwater environment, having colonized rivers in Asia and South America from an ancestral origin in the marine environment. This includes the 'river dolphins', early divergence from the odontocete lineage, and two species of true dolphins (Family Delphinidae. Successful adaptation to the freshwater environment may have required increased demands in energy involved in processes such as the mitochondrial osmotic balance. For this reason, riverine odontocetes provide a compelling natural experiment in adaptation of mammals from marine to freshwater habitats. Here we present initial evidence of positive selection in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 of riverine odontocetes by analyses of full mitochondrial genomes, using tests of selection and protein structure modeling. The codon model with highest statistical support corresponds to three discrete categories for amino acid sites, those under positive, neutral, and purifying selection. With this model we found positive selection at site 297 of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (dN/dS>1.0, leading to a substitution of an Ala or Val from the ancestral state of Thr. A phylogenetic reconstruction of 27 cetacean mitogenomes showed that an Ala substitution has evolved at least four times in cetaceans, once or more in the three 'river dolphins' (Families Pontoporidae, Lipotidae and Inidae, once in the riverine Sotalia fluviatilis (but not in its marine sister taxa, once in the riverine Orcaella brevirostris from the Mekong River (but not in its marine sister taxa and once in two other related marine dolphins. We located the position of this amino acid substitution in an alpha-helix channel in the trans-membrane domain in both the E. coli structure and Sotalia fluviatilis model. In E. coli this position is located in a helix implicated in a proton translocation channel of respiratory complex 1 and may have a similar role in the NADH dehydrogenases of

  12. Laboratory-evolved vanillyl-alcohol oxidase produces natural vanillin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Rovida, S.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2004-01-01

    The flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase was subjected to random mutagenesis to generate mutants with enhanced reactivity to creosol (2-methoxy-4-methylphenol). The vanillyl-alcohol oxidase-mediated conversion of creosol proceeds via a two-step process in which the initially formed vanillyl alcohol

  13. Application of glucose oxidase for the production of metal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with the application of glucose oxidase (GOX) for the production of metal gluconates by fermentation method. It provides a method for the conversion of glucose into gluconic acid and its derivatives using the enzyme glucose oxidase (GOX). Due to the presence of calcium carbonate in fermentation ...

  14. Physiological roles of plastid terminal oxidase in plant stress ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) is a plastoquinol oxidase localized in the plastids of plants. It is able to transfer electrons from plastoquinone (PQ) to molecular oxygen with the formation of water. Recent studies have suggested that PTOX is beneficial for plants under environmental stresses, since it is involved in the ...

  15. Xanthine oxidoreductase and xanthine oxidase in human cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Cejkova, J.; Ardan, T.; Filipec, M.; Midelfart, A.

    2002-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (xanthine dehydrogenase + xanthine oxidase) is a complex enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine, subsequently producing uric acid. The enzyme complex exists in separate but interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, which generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), a well known causative factor in ischemia/reperfusion injury and also in some other pathological states and diseases. Because th...

  16. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some Leguminosae plants

    OpenAIRE

    Leomel E. Argulla; Christine L. Chichioco-Hernandez

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanol leaf extracts of following Cassia javanica, Cynometra ramiflora, Cassia fistula, Senna siamea, Tamarindus indicus, Intsia bijuga, Cassia spectabilis, Saraca thaipingensis (S. thaipingensis), Caesalpinia pulcherrima (C. pulcherrima) and Bauhinia purpurea. Method: The xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was tested spectrophotometically under aerobic conditions. Absorption increments was monitored eve...

  17. Extraction and Activity of Polyphenol Oxidase from Kolanuts ( Cola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extraction and Activity of Polyphenol Oxidase from Kolanuts ( Cola nitida and Cola acuminata ) and Cocoa ( Theobroma cacao ) ... The differences in km and Vmax values showed that there are variations in the physicochemical characteristics and absolute quantity of polyphenol oxidase present in the three plant species.

  18. Purification and characterization of amine oxidase from Vigna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amine oxidases (AO) are a group of enzymes that catalyze oxidative deamination of various amines and thus are of potential use in analytical applications. Amine oxidase from five-day-old Vigna mungo L. seedlings (VAO) was purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and Q-Sepharose chromatography to 544 ...

  19. 21 CFR 866.2420 - Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxidase screening test for gonorrhea. 866.2420 Section 866.2420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2420 Oxidase...

  20. Cytochemical Localization of Glucose Oxidase in Peroxisomes of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Dijken, Johannes Pieter van

    1980-01-01

    The subcellular localization of glucose oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.4) in mycelia of Aspergillus niger has been investigated using cytochemical staining techniques. Mycelia from fermenter cultures, which produced gluconic acid from glucose, contained elevated levels of glucose oxidase and catalase. Both

  1. Oxidation of polysaccharides by galactose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, Kirsti; Leppänen, Ann-Sofie; Pitkänen, Leena; Reunanen, Markku; Willför, Stefan; Tenkanen, Maija

    2010-01-13

    Galactose oxidase was used as a catalyst to oxidize selectively the C-6 hydroxyls of terminal galactose to carbonyl groups. The polysaccharides studied included spruce galactoglucomannan, guar galactomannan, larch arabinogalactan, corn fiber arabinoxylan, and tamarind seed xyloglucan, with terminal galactose contents varying from 6% to 40%. A multienzyme system was used, with catalase and horseradish peroxidase to enhance the action of galactose oxidase. An analysis technique was developed for the quantification of the reactive aldehydes with GC-MS, utilizing NaBD4 reduction and acidic methanolysis. The best oxidation degrees of terminal galactosyls were obtained with xyloglucan (85% of galactose) and spruce galactoglucomannan (65% of galactose). The highest oxidation degree based on total carbohydrates was achieved with guar gum (28%), which had the highest galactose content. The oxidation resulted in changes in the physicochemical properties of the polysaccharide solutions, and the changes observed varied between the polysaccharides. The clearest change was in tamarind xyloglucan, which formed a gel after the oxidation. After the oxidation, larger particles were present in the solution of spruce galactoglucomannan, but changes in its rheological properties were not observed.

  2. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Garcinia esculenta twigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lun-Lun; Fu, Wen-Wei; Watanabe, Shimpei; Shao, Yi-Nuo; Tan, Hong-Sheng; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Chang-Heng; Xiu, Yan-Feng; Norimoto, Hisayoshi; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2014-12-01

    The EtOAc-soluble portion of the 80 % (v/v) EtOH extract from the twigs of Garcinia esculenta exhibited strong xanthine oxidase inhibition in vitro. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (3) and griffipavixanthone (8) as the main xanthine oxidase inhibitors, along with six additional compounds (1, 2, 4-7), including two new compounds (1 and 2). This enzyme inhibition was dose dependent with an IC50 value of approximately 1.2 µM for 3 and 6.3 µM for 8. The inhibitory activity of 3 was stronger than the control allopurinol (IC50 value: 5.3 µM). To our knowledge, compound 8 is the first bixanthone that demonstrated potent XO inhibitory activity in vitro. The structures of the new compounds were established by spectroscopic analysis, and the optical properties and absolute stereochemistry of racemic (±) esculentin A (2) were further determined by the calculation of the DP4 probability and analysis of its MTPA ester derivatives. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P xanthine oxidase in microvascular endothelial cells and an invasion of leucocytes containing xanthine oxidase. 3...

  4. Presence and removal of a contaminating NADH oxidation activity in recombinant maltose-binding protein fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengguang; Zhu, Guan

    2012-04-01

    We observed the presence of contaminating NADH oxidation activity in maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using conventional amylose resin-based affinity chromatography. This contaminating NADH oxidation activity was detectable with at least four different enzymes from Cryptosporidium parvum expressed as MBP-fusion proteins (i.e., an enoyl-reductase domain from a type I fatty acid synthase, a fatty acyl-CoA binding protein, the acyl-ligase domain from a polyketide synthase, and a putative thioesterase), regardless of their NADH dependence. However, contaminating NADH oxidation activity was not present when fusion proteins were engineered to contain a His-tag and were purified using a Ni-NTA resin-based protocol. Alternatively, for proteins containing only an MBP-tag, the contaminating activity could be eliminated through the addition of 0.1% Triton X-100 and 2% glycerol to the column buffer during homogenization of bacteria and first column wash, followed by an additional wash and elution with regular column and elution buffers. Removal of the artifactual activity is very valuable in the study of enzymes using NADH as a cofactor, particularly when the native activity is low or the recombinant proteins are inactive.

  5. Anti-xanthine oxidase antibodies in sera and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other joint inflammations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrar, L.; Hanachi, N.; Rouba, K.; Charef, N.; Khennouf, S.; Baghiani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to study anti-bovine milk xanthine oxidoreductase XOPR antibody levels in synovial fluid as well as in serum of patients suffering from rheumatoid affections to assess a possible correlation between antibody titres and severity of disease. Sera and synovial fluids were collected from volunteer donors at Setif University Hospital, Setif, Algeria from 2001-2007 with the consent of patients. Human IgG and IgM levels of free and bound anti-bovine milk XOR antibodies were determined using bovine XOR as antigen, with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA. Serum IgG anti-bovine milk XOR titres in 30 healthy normal subjects 2.74+-2.31 microgram/mL are in agreement with that reported in the literature. Immunoglobulin G and IgM anti-bovine milk XOR antibody titres were found to be significantly higher in serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis RA and latex positives subjects. Synovial IgM antibody titres to bovine XOR were found to be significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients compared to patients with other joint inflammations. In rheumatoid arthritis patients, high concentrations of antibodies against XOR were noticed. These antibodies may play a major role in RA by inhibiting both xanthine and NADH oxidase activities of XOR. They may also play a key role in eliminating XOR from serum and synovial fluid positive role but unfortunately, immune complex formation could also activate complement and participate in self maintenance of inflammation. (author)

  6. The proton spin-flip lines of Mo(V) EPR signals from sulfite oxidase and xanthine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Graham Neil

    The proton spin-flip transitions in Mo(V) EPR spectra of the different reduced forms of the enzymes xanthine oxidase and sulfite oxidase have been examined. The proton spin-flip transitions of xanthine oxidase originate from weakly coupled nonexchangeable nuclei, probably carbon-bound protons of amino acid ligands or of the molybdenum cofactor. The sulfite oxidase high-pH signal, on the other hand, in addition to proton spin-flip transitions similar to those of xanthine oxidase, shows transitions from an exchangeable, relatively strongly coupled proton. The hyperfine coupling of this proton is not resolved in the powder lineshape because of noncolinearity of A( 1H) and g, and because of the largely anisotropic nature of its coupling. The possible significance in relation to the catalytic mechanism of this latter finding is discussed.

  7. Kinetics and specificity of guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase and bovine milk xanthine oxidase towards substituted benzaldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoutsopoulos, Georgios I; Beedham, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Molybdenum-containing enzymes, aldehyde oxidase and xanthine oxidase, are important in the oxidation of N-heterocyclic xenobiotics. However, the role of these enzymes in the oxidation of drug-derived aldehydes has not been established. The present investigation describes the interaction of eleven structurally related benzaldehydes with guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase and bovine milk xanthine oxidase, since they have similar substrate specificity to human molybdenum hydroxylases. The compounds under test included mono-hydroxy and mono-methoxy benzaldehydes as well as 3,4-dihydroxy-, 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-, and 3,4-dimethoxy-benzaldehydes. In addition, various amines and catechols were tested with the molybdenum hydroxylases as inhibitors of benzaldehyde oxidation. The kinetic constants have shown that hydroxy-, and methoxy-benzaldehydes are excellent substrates for aldehyde oxidase (Km values 5x10(-6) M to 1x10(-5) M) with lower affinities for xanthine oxidase (Km values around 10(-4) M). Therefore, aldehyde oxidase activity may be a significant factor in the oxidation of the aromatic aldehydes generated from amines and alkyl benzenes during drug metabolism. Compounds with a 3-methoxy group showed relatively high Vmax values with aldehyde oxidase, whereas the presence of a 3-hydroxy group resulted in minimal Vmax values or no reaction. In addition, amines acted as weak inhibitors, whereas catechols had a more pronounced inhibitory effect on the aldehyde oxidase activity. It is therefore possible that aldehyde oxidase may be critical in the oxidation of the analogous phenylacetaldehydes derived from dopamine and noradrenaline.

  8. Catalytic properties of nickel ferrites for oxidation of glucose, β-nicotiamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, R. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guanajuato, Cerro de la Venada s/n, Pueblito de Rocha, C.P. 36040 Guanajuato, Gto (Mexico); Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco s/n, C.P. 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutiérrez, S. [Departamento de Química, Universidad de Guanajuato, Cerro de la Venada s/n, Pueblito de Rocha, C.P. 36040 Guanajuato, Gto (Mexico); Menéndez, N. [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco s/n, C.P. 28049 Madrid (Spain); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco s/n, C.P. 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles obtained by electrochemical method are effective catalyst. ► A partially inverse spinel was obtained with 57% Fe{sup 3+} in tetrahedral position. ► A non-enzymatic electrode using NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been manufactured. -- Abstract: Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) were synthesized by electrochemical method and used as catalyst for direct oxidation of glucose, NADH and methanol. Characterization of these nanoparticles was carried out by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and colloidal properties such as hydrodynamic radius and Zeta potential. To evaluate the catalytic properties of these nanoparticles against the oxidation process, paste graphite electrodes mixing nickel ferrites and different conductive materials (graphite, carbon nanotubes) and binders agents (mineral oil, 1-octylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate (nOPPF6)) were used. The results prove good catalytic properties of these materials, with an oxidation potential around 0.75, 0.5 and 0.8 V for glucose, NADH, and methanol, respectively.

  9. Ubiquinone binding site of yeast NADH dehydrogenase revealed by structures binding novel competitive- and mixed-type inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Shiba, Tomoo; Oohashi, Takumi; Iwata, So; Yagi, Takao; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Hideto; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2018-02-05

    Yeast Ndi1 is a monotopic alternative NADH dehydrogenase. Its crystal structure in complex with the electron acceptor, ubiquinone, has been determined. However, there has been controversy regarding the ubiquinone binding site. To address these points, we identified the first competitive inhibitor of Ndi1, stigmatellin, along with new mixed-type inhibitors, AC0-12 and myxothiazol, and thereby determined the crystal structures of Ndi1 in complexes with the inhibitors. Two separate binding sites of stigmatellin, STG-1 and STG-2, were observed. The electron density at STG-1, located at the vicinity of the FAD cofactor, further demonstrated two binding modes: STG-1a and STG-1b. AC0-12 and myxothiazol are also located at the vicinity of FAD. The comparison of the binding modes among stigmatellin at STG-1, AC0-12, and myxothiazol revealed a unique position for the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a. Mutations of amino acid residues that interact with this aliphatic tail at STG-1a reduced the affinity of Ndi1 for ubiquinone. In conclusion, the position of the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a provides a structural basis for its competitive inhibition of Ndi1. The inherent binding site of ubiquinone is suggested to overlap with STG-1a that is distinct from the binding site for NADH.

  10. HCA519/TPX2: a potential T-cell tumor-associated antigen for human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aref AM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Aref,1–3 Neil T Hoa,3 Lisheng Ge,3 Anshu Agrawal,4 Maria Dacosta-Iyer,5,6 Nils Lambrecht,5,6 Yi Ouyang,5,6 Andrew N Cornforth,7 Martin R Jadus5,6,8 1Biological Science Department, Modern Sciences and Arts University, Faculty of Dentistry, Cairo, Egypt; 2Southern California Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Long Beach, CA, USA; 3Research Health Care Group, Veterans Affairs Medical Center Long Beach, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Division of Basic and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 5Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Department, Veterans Affairs Medical Center Long Beach, CA, USA; 6Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 7California Stem Cells, Inc., CA, USA; 8Neuro-Oncology Program, Chao Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA Background: Immunotherapy for human hepatocellular cancer (HCC is slowly making progress towards treating these fatal cancers. The identification of new antigens can improve this approach. We describe a possible new antigen, hepatocellular carcinoma-associated antigen-519/targeting protein for Xklp-2 (HCA519/TPX2, for HCC that might be beneficial for T-cell specific HCC immunotherapy. Methods: HCC was studied for the expression for 15 tumor-associated antigens considered useful for immunotherapy within three HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, and PLC/PRF/5, lymphocytes, non-cancerous livers, and clinical HCC. The expression of tumor antigenic precursor proteins (TAPPs messenger RNA was first screened by reverse transcriptase quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Four antigens (alpha fetoprotein, aspartyl/asparaginyl β-hydroxylase, glypican-3 and HCA519/TPX2 proved to be the best expressed TAPPs within the HCC specimens by molecular analyses. HCA519/TPX2 was detected by intracellular cell flow cytometry within HCC cell lines by using a specific

  11. NADPH Oxidases, Angiogenesis, and Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Manuneedhi Cholan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is caused by narrowing of arteries in the limbs, normally occurring in the lower extremities, with severe cases resulting in amputation of the foot or leg. A potential approach for treatment is to stimulate the formation of new blood vessels to restore blood flow to limb tissues. This is a process called angiogenesis and involves the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of endothelial cells. Angiogenesis can be stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS, with NADPH oxidases (NOX being a major source of ROS in endothelial cells. This review summarizes the recent evidence implicating NOX isoforms in their ability to regulate angiogenesis in vascular endothelial cells in vitro, and in PAD in vivo. Increasing our understanding of the involvement of the NOX isoforms in promoting therapeutic angiogenesis may lead to new treatment options to slow or reverse PAD.

  12. [Isolation and identification of bacteria with ferro-oxidase activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Wensen; Zhang, Xiaorong; Wu, Xiaomei; Zhan, Xingdai; Deng, Jiacong

    2014-12-04

    We screened and isolated Ferro-oxidase producing bacteria, for adsorbing iron and manganese. The strains producing Ferro-oxidase were isolated from three samples of water. Ferro-oxidase producing strains were screened in shake flask culture, and identified according to morphological features, physiological and biochemical analysis as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We isolated a bacterium S9. The strain was identified as Sphaerotilus natans. This strain had strongest adsorption on iron and manganese among the strains we identified, with 29.02 mg/g iron adsorption amount in water, and 66.77% adsorption rate for 4 hours' adsorption. When the adsorption time is 6 h, the adsorption amount of manganese was 34.49 mg/g, and the adsorption rate was 70.68%. The optimum temperature and pH value of Ferro-oxidase were 30 degrees C and 7.5, respectively. Mg2+, Na+, K+ could activate Ferro-oxidase, whereas Cu2+ had little impact. While Mn2+, Zn2+ could strongly inhibit Ferro-Oxidase, Pb2+, Ag+ had only modest inhibitory effect. Strain S9 had a high Ferro-oxidase activity, and has application potential in sewage treatment.

  13. Antibacterial properties of xanthine oxidase in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, C R; Millar, T M; Clinch, J G; Kanczler, J M; Bodamyali, T; Blake, D R

    2000-09-02

    Formula-fed babies contract gastroenteritis more than breast-fed babies, which is of concern to mothers who cannot breastfeed or, as with HIV-infected mothers, are discouraged from breastfeeding. The ability of endogenous breastmilk xanthine oxidase to generate the antimicrobial radical nitric oxide has been measured and its influence on the growth of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritides examined. Breastmilk, but not formula feed, generated nitric oxide. Xanthine oxidase activity substantially inhibited the growth of both bacteria. An important natural antibiotic system is missing in formula feeds; the addition of xanthine oxidase may improve formula for use when breastfeeding is not a safe option.

  14. Bovine milk intake and xanthine oxidase activity in blood serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R D; Long, C A

    1976-06-01

    Xanthine oxidase activity in blood serum was measured by a sensitive radio-enzymatic assay. Pigs receiving 7.6 liters of milk daily for 100 days did not show any detectable enzymatic activity in their blood Xanthine oxidase activity in blood serum of 25 human volunteers had an average of 6.7 milliunits per liter with a range of 0 to 34.6 milliunits per liter. Neither a causal nor statistically significant relationship existed between xanthine oxidase activity in blood and average daily milk consumption, age, or sex.

  15. Platelet monoamine oxidase: specific activity and turnover number in headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, K.M.; Brown, G.K.; Craig, I.W.; Peatfield, R.; Rose, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase turnover numbers (molecules of substrate converted to product per minute per active site) have been calculated for the human platelet enzyme using [ 3 H]pargyline. Headache patients with high and low monoamine oxidase specific activities relative to controls were found to have turnover numbers very close to those for controls. This finding suggests that their specific activities vary because of differences in the concentration of active monoamine oxidase molecules, rather than differences in the ability of those enzyme molecules to catalyse the deamination reaction. (Auth.)

  16. Applications of Flavoprotein Oxidases in Organic Synthesis : Novel Reactivities that Go Beyond Amine and Alcohol Oxidations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, R.T.; Fraaije, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidases represent a distinct and interesting class of oxidative biocatalysts. A major portion of the known oxidases contain a flavin as cofactor, with glucose oxidase as best known example. While a number of oxidases are well known in the field of biocatalysis, the total number of available

  17. High-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MR angiography in glioblastoma: tumor-associated neovascularization as a biomarker for patient survival. A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Josep; Blasco, Gerard; Remollo, Sebastian; Hernandez, David; Pedraza, Salvador [Hospital Universitari Dr Josep Trueta, Research Unit of Diagnostic Imaging Institute (IDI), Department of Radiology [Girona Biomedical Research Institute] IDIBGI, Girona (Spain); Daunis-i-Estadella, Josep; Mateu, Gloria [University of Girona, Department of Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Girona (Spain); Alberich-Bayarri, Angel [La Fe Polytechnics and University Hospital, Biomedical Imaging Research Group (GIBI230), La Fe Health Research Institute, Valencia (Spain); Essig, Marco [University of Manitoba, Department of Radiology, Winnipeg (Canada); Jain, Rajan [NYU School of Medicine, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Puigdemont, Montserrat [Hospital Universitari Dr Josep Trueta, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Hospital Cancer Registry, Girona (Spain); Sanchez-Gonzalez, Javier [Philips Healthcare Iberica, Madrid (Spain); Wintermark, Max [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Division, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The objective of the study was to determine whether tumor-associated neovascularization on high-resolution gadofosveset-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a useful biomarker for predicting survival in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastomas. Before treatment, 35 patients (25 men; mean age, 64 ± 14 years) with glioblastoma underwent MRI including first-pass dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion and post-contrast T1WI sequences with gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) and, 48 h later, high-resolution MRA with gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg). Volumes of interest for contrast-enhancing lesion (CEL), non-CEL, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter were obtained, and DSC perfusion and DWI parameters were evaluated. Prognostic factors were assessed by Kaplan-Meier survival and Cox proportional hazards model. Eighteen (51.42 %) glioblastomas were hypervascular on high-resolution MRA. Hypervascular glioblastomas were associated with higher CEL volume and lower Karnofsky score. Median survival rates for patients with hypovascular and hypervascular glioblastomas treated with surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy were 15 and 9.75 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization was the best predictor of survival at 5.25 months (AUC = 0.794, 81.2 % sensitivity, 77.8 % specificity, 76.5 % positive predictive value, 82.4 % negative predictive value) and yielded the highest hazard ratio (P < 0.001). Tumor-associated neovascularization detected on high-resolution blood-pool-contrast-enhanced MRA of newly diagnosed glioblastoma seems to be a useful biomarker that correlates with worse survival. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of adenoid cystic carcinomas arising from the parotid gland vs. the submandibular gland: focus on systemic metastasis and tumor-associated blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Da-Yong; Jang, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Bo Young; Choi, Ji Eun; Yoon, Heejei; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Jeong, Han-Sin

    2014-07-01

    Although several studies reported that distant metastasis occurs more frequently in the tumors of submandibular gland (SMG) than parotid gland (PG), why SMG tumors preferentially metastasize to distant organs is not fully understood. We aimed to identify the differential tumor microenvironment for distant metastasis and possible underlying mechanisms. We retrieved 27 cases of 1-4-cm-sized adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) arising from the PG (n = 12) and SMG (n = 15). c-KIT, VEGF-R2, and CD31 staining were quantified by image-based analysis to define the positive expression or tumor-associated vessel areas in two representative sections per case. In addition, angiogenesis-related genomic expression profiling was carried out to explore the underlying mechanism, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Earlier systemic dissemination within 2 years was detected exclusively in SMG ACCs (5/15). The area of tumor-associated blood vessels was larger in SMG ACCs than PG ACCs, and ACCs showing distant metastasis had greater blood vessel area than those without metastasis. Interestingly, normal SMG had more blood vessels per area than PG. Among angiogenesis-related signals, the level of IL-6 was significantly lower in SMG ACCs than PG ACCs. Moreover, IL-6 expression decreased significantly in SMG ACCs compared with that in normal SMG, whereas it was up-regulated in PG ACCs. ACCs in the SMG microenvironment have more abundant tumor-associated blood vessels than PG ACCs, which may explain the higher risk of distant metastasis from SMG tumors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase Enhances Oxidative Stress in the Cytoplasm of Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muras, Valentin; Dogaru-Kinn, Paul; Minato, Yusuke; Häse, Claudia C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We searched for a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and addressed the mechanism of ROS formation using the dye 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in respiring cells. By comparing V. cholerae strains with or without active Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR), this respiratory sodium ion redox pump was identified as a producer of ROS in vivo. The amount of cytoplasmic ROS detected in V. cholerae cells producing variants of Na+-NQR correlated well with rates of superoxide formation by the corresponding membrane fractions. Membranes from wild-type V. cholerae showed increased superoxide production activity (9.8 ± 0.6 μmol superoxide min−1 mg−1 membrane protein) compared to membranes from the mutant lacking Na+-NQR (0.18 ± 0.01 μmol min−1 mg−1). Overexpression of plasmid-encoded Na+-NQR in the nqr deletion strain resulted in a drastic increase in the formation of superoxide (42.6 ± 2.8 μmol min−1 mg−1). By analyzing a variant of Na+-NQR devoid of quinone reduction activity, we identified the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of cytoplasmic NqrF subunit as the site for intracellular superoxide formation in V. cholerae. The impact of superoxide formation by the Na+-NQR on the virulence of V. cholerae is discussed. IMPORTANCE In several studies, it was demonstrated that the Na+-NQR in V. cholerae affects virulence in a yet unknown manner. We identified the reduced FAD cofactor in the NADH-oxidizing NqrF subunit of the Na+-NQR as the site of superoxide formation in the cytoplasm of V. cholerae. Our study provides the framework to understand how reactive oxygen species formed during respiration could participate in the regulated expression of virulence factors during the transition from aerobic to microaerophilic (intestinal) habitats. This hypothesis may turn out to be right for many other pathogens which, like V. cholerae, depend on

  20. Expression of a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase gene in peach ( Prunus persica L.) fruit in response to treatment with carbon dioxide and 1-methylcyclopropene: possible role of ethylene.

  1. Optimization of glucose oxidase production by Aspergillus niger

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-28

    . Microbiol. 89: 85-89. Hamid M, khalil-ur-Rehman, Zia MA, Asghar M (2003). Optimization of various parameters for the production of glucose oxidase from rice polishing using Aspergillus niger. Asian network Sci. Infor.

  2. Molecular activation-deactivation of xanthine oxidase in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M; Benboubetra, M; Ellison, M; Powell, D; Reckless, J D; Harrison, R

    1995-10-19

    Enzymic activity and protein levels of xanthine oxidase were measured in serial samples of breast milk donated by each of 14 mothers, starting, in all but two cases, within 7 days following parturition. Enzyme activity varied widely, usually reaching peak values during the first 15 days and falling thereafter, by as much as 98%, to basal levels that were subsequently largely maintained. Corresponding changes in xanthine oxidase protein levels were not observed and, consequently, the specific activity of xanthine oxidase followed the above pattern. The capacity of human xanthine oxidase to undergo activation-deactivation cycles at the molecular level has important implications, not only for its role in breast milk, but also for its potential as a source of reactive oxygen species in other human tissues.

  3. Aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Henrik J; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2002-12-04

    In the present study, the aldehyde-induced pro-oxidative activity of xanthine oxidase was followed in an accelerated raw milk system using spin-trap electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The aldehydes acetaldehyde, propanal, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, trans-2-heptenal, trans-2-nonenal, and 3-methyl-2-butenal were all found to initiate radical reactions when added to milk. Formation of superoxide through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity is suggested as the initial reaction, as all tested aldehydes were shown to trigger superoxide formation in an ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk model system with added xanthine oxidase. It was found that addition of aldehydes to milk initially increased the ascorbyl radical concentration with a subsequent decay due to ascorbate depletion, which renders the formation of superoxide in milk with added aldehyde. The present study shows for the first time potential acceleration of oxidative events in milk through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity.

  4. Improved Oxidase Mimetic Activity by Praseodymium Incorporation into Ceria Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Fernandez-Garcia, Susana; Tinoco, Miguel; Yan, Zhaoxia; Xue, Qi; Blanco, Ginesa; Calvino, Jose J; Hungria, Ana B; Chen, Xiaowei

    2017-06-07

    Ceria nanocubes (NC) modified with increasing concentrations of praseodymium (5, 10, 15, and 20 mol %) have been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized Pr-modified ceria nanocubes exhibit an enhanced oxidase-like activity on the organic dye TMB within a wide range of concentrations and durations. The oxidase activity increases with increasing Pr amounts in Pr-modified ceria nanocubes within the investigated concentration range. Meanwhile, these Pr-modified ceria nanocubes also show higher reducibility than pure ceria nanocubes. The kinetics of their oxidase mimetic activity is fitted with the Michaelis-Menten equation. A mechanism has been proposed on how the Pr incorporation could affect the energy level of the bands in ceria and hence facilitate the TMB oxidation reaction. The presence of Pr 3+ species on the surface also contributes to the increasing activity of the Pr-modified ceria nanocubes present higher oxidase activity than pure ceria nanocubes.

  5. Comparism of xanthine oxidase activities in cow and goat milks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The activities of xanthine oxidase were studied in cow and goat milks. The optimum temperature and pH values were 10 oC and 7.5; and 20 oC and 7.2 – 7.4 for cow and goat milk samples respectively. The substrate effect on xanthine oxidase from both milk samples followed the popular Michealis Menten's (Km) equation.

  6. INCREASED XANTHINE OXIDASE IN THE SKIN OF PREECLAMPTIC WOMEN

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Shannon A.; Deng, Jau-Shyong; Roberts, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthine oxioreductase is the holoenzyme responsible for terminal purine catabolism. Under conditions of metabolic stress or heightened pro-inflammatory cytokine production this enzyme is preferentially in it’s oxidized form, xanthine oxidase, with catalytic action that generates uric acid and the free radical superoxide. As preeclampsia is characterized by heightened inflammation, oxidative stress and hyperuricemia it has been proposed that xanthine oxidase plays a pivotal role in this hyper...

  7. Xanthine Oxidase: Isolation, Assays of Activity, and Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Kostić, Danijela A.; Dimitrijević, Danica S.; Stojanović, Gordana S.; Palić, Ivan R.; Đorđević, Aleksandra S.; Ickovski, Jovana D.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is an important enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid which is excreted by kidneys. Excessive production and/or inadequate excretion of uric acid results in hyperuricemia. This paper presents a detailed review of methods of isolation, determination of xanthine oxidase activity, and the effect of plant extracts and their constituents on it. Determining the content and activities of XO can be used for diagnostic purposes....

  8. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    OpenAIRE

    A Abdullahi; RU Hamzah; AA Jigam; A Yahya; AY Kabiru; H Muhammad; S Sakpe; FS Adefolalu; MC Isah; MZ Kolo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the inhibitory effect of various extracts from Crateva adansonii (C. adansonii) used traditionally against several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, arthritis, and gout, was investigated on purified bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. Methods: Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295 nm associated with uric acid formation. Enzy...

  9. The isolation of demolybdo xanthine oxidase from bovine milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Ventom, A M; Deistung, J; Bray, R C

    1988-01-01

    It was deduced many years ago from indirect evidence that demolybdo xanthine oxidase is present in normal bovine milk. This has now been confirmed by isolation of this enzyme form by a method based on the folate-gel affinity-chromatography procedure described Nishino & Tsushima [(1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 11242-11246]. Enzymic and spectroscopic properties of demolybdo xanthine oxidase, which retains flavin and iron-sulphur centres, are generally in accordance with expectations. Like the norma...

  10. Secondary metabolites of Hypericum L. species as xanthine oxidase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Šmelcerović, Andrija; Šmelcerović, Žaklina; Tomović, Katarina; Kocić, Gordana; Đorđević, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Nine Hypericum species (H. barbatum, H. hirsutum, H. linarioides, H. olympicum, H. perforatum, H. rochelii, H. rumeliacum, H. tetrapterum and H. umbellatum) collected in Serbia were assayed for inhibitory potential against xanthine oxidase in vitro, on the commercial enzyme, and compared with allopurinol. Seven studied Hypericum species (H. barbatum, H. rochelii, H. rumeliacum, H. umbellatum, H. perforatum, H. tetrapterum and H. olympicum) inhibit commercial xanthine oxidase with an IC50 belo...

  11. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by Puerto Rican plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R O; Guzman, A L

    1998-12-01

    This study was conducted to search for xanthine oxidase inhibitors in natural products obtained from plants collected in Puerto Rico and to assess the influence of these extracts in the prevention of cataractogenesis. Allopurinol is currently a xanthine oxidase inhibitor used in the treatment of gout. New alternatives with increased therapeutic activity and less side effects should be investigated. Preclusion of cataractogenesis in diabetic rats is also the focus of this investigation. Natural products in the form of plant extracts from Puerto Rico offer a rich and relatively untapped source for the discovery of new drugs that may address these kind of problems. Nineteen collections of Myrtaceae plant extracts were screened for xanthine oxidase inhibition. A spectrophotometrical method was used employing allopurinol as positive control and a blank as negative control. A protocol of the assay with slight modifications was followed from the literature. Two extracts with the highest percentages of xanthine oxidase inhibition were evaluated for possible prevention of cataractogenesis in streptozotocin diabetic rats. The animals were given to drink these plant extracts ad libitum for three months while controls received water. The appearance of cataracts was assessed physically. Two of the nineteen plant extracts showed high inhibition percentages of xanthine oxidase. Eucalyptus deglupta and Syzygium malaccense displayed 51% and 64% inhibitions (IC50 44.5 micrograms/ml and IC50 51 micrograms/ml), respectively. As for the cataractogenesis inhibition, laboratory animals that drank E. deglupta for three months did not develop cataracts. Two plant extracts provided positive results with varying degrees of inhibition of xanthine oxidase. S. malaccense demonstrated the greatest xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity whereas E. deglupta presented the best finding for cataractogenesis prevention. The procedures used in this investigation are useful for the in vitro screening of

  12. Histochemistry of reactive oxygen-species (ROS)-generating oxidases in cutaneous and mucous epithelia of laboratory rodents with special reference to xanthine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gossrau, R.; Frederiks, W. M.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Cutaneous and mucous epithelia of various organs of laboratory rodents were analysed histochemically for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating oxidases using cerium methods. High activities of xanthine oxidase and also superoxide dismutase were present in orthokeratotic stratified squamous

  13. Confirmation of a blocked amino terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janolino, V.G.; Morrison-Rowe, S.J.; Swaisgood, H.E.

    1990-01-01

    The isolation of sulfhydryl oxidase from bovine milk in a suitably pure form for sequencing was carried out by transient covalent affinity chromatography of diafiltered whey using cysteinylsuccinamidopropyl-glass as matrix. The glutathione-eluted proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. By radiolabeling the affinity chromatography-purified enzyme with [ 14 C]iodoacetate before subjecting to SDS-PAGE, the sulfhydryl oxidase band was identified, because sulfhydryl oxidase is known to be inactivated by alkylation of one sulfhydryl group per mole. The results confirmed that sulfhydryl oxidase corresponds to the 85 (± 5)-kDa band observed on SDS-PAGE. The protein band corresponding to radiolabeled sulfhydryl oxidase was recovered from SDS-PAGE gels by electrophoretic elution and by electroblotting on polyvinylidene difluoride membrane and subjected to gas phase sequencing. Precautions were taken during electrophoretic elution to prevent reactions that result in N-terminal blocking. Both methods of protein recovery yielded negative results when subjected to sequence analysis indicating that the N-terminus of sulfhydryl oxidase is blocked

  14. The mechanism of RNA 5' capping with NAD+, NADH and desphospho-CoA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Jeremy G.; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Yuan; Panova, Natalya; Barvík, Ivan; Greene, Landon; Liu, Min; Buckley, Brian; Krásný, Libor; Lee, Jeehiun K.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2016-07-06

    The chemical nature of the 5' end of RNA is a key determinant of RNA stability, processing, localization and translation efficiency and has been proposed to provide a layer of ‘epitranscriptomic’ gene regulation. Recently it has been shown that some bacterial RNA species carry a 5'-end structure reminiscent of the 5' 7-methylguanylate ‘cap’ in eukaryotic RNA. In particular, RNA species containing a 5'-end nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or 3'-desphospho-coenzyme A (dpCoA) have been identified in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. It has been proposed that NAD+, reduced NAD+ (NADH) and dpCoA caps are added to RNA after transcription initiation, in a manner analogous to the addition of 7-methylguanylate caps. Here we show instead that NAD+, NADH and dpCoA are incorporated into RNA during transcription initiation, by serving as non-canonical initiating nucleotides (NCINs) for de novo transcription initiation by cellular RNA polymerase (RNAP). We further show that both bacterial RNAP and eukaryotic RNAP II incorporate NCIN caps, that promoter DNA sequences at and upstream of the transcription start site determine the efficiency of NCIN capping, that NCIN capping occurs in vivo, and that NCIN capping has functional consequences. We report crystal structures of transcription initiation complexes containing NCIN-capped RNA products. Our results define the mechanism and structural basis of NCIN capping, and suggest that NCIN-mediated ‘ab initio capping’ may occur in all organisms.

  15. A novel approach to regulate cell membrane permeability for ATP and NADH formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induced by air cold plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyu; Liu, Tingting; Xiong, Yuqin

    2017-02-01

    Air cold plasma has been used as a novel method for enhancing microbial fermentation. The aim of this work was to explore the effect of plasma on membrane permeability and the formation of ATP and NADH in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, so as to provide valuable information for large-scale application of plasma in the fermentation industry. Suspensions of S. cerevisiae cells were exposed to air cold plasma for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 min, and then subjected to various analyses prior to fermentation (0 h) and at the 9 and 21 h stages of fermentation. Compared with non-exposed cells, cells exposed to plasma for 1 min exhibited a marked increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration as a result of the significant increase in membrane potential prior to fermentation. At the same time, the ATP level in the cell suspension decreased by about 40%, resulting in a reduction of about 60% in NADH prior to culturing. However, the levels of ATP and NADH in the culture at the 9 and 21 h fermentation stages were different from the level at 0 h. Taken together, the results indicated that exposure of S. cerevisiae to air cold plasma could increase its cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration by improving the cell membrane potential, consequently leading to changes in ATP and NADH levels. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 21246012, 21306015 and 21476032).

  16. Retention and regeneration of native NAD(H) in noncharged ultrafiltration membrane reactors: application to L-lactate and gluconate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obón, J M; Manjón, A; Iborra, J L

    1998-03-05

    NAD(H) was retained in a noncharged ultrafiltration membrane reactor for the simultaneous and continuous production of L-lactate and gluconate with coenzyme regeneration. Polyethyleneimine (PEI), a 50-kDa cationic polymer, achieved coenzyme retentions above 0.8 for PEI/NAD(H) molar ratios higher than 5. The ionic strength of the inlet medium caused a decrease of NAD(H) retention that can be counterbalanced by an initial addition of 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA). Continuous reactor performance in the presence of PEI and BSA showed that NAD(H), glucose dehydrogenase, and lactate dehydrogenase were retained by 10-kDa ultrafiltration membranes; L-lactate and gluconate were produced at conversions higher than 95%. PEI enhanced the thermal stability of the enzymes used and increased the catalytic efficiency of glucose dehydrogenase, while no effect was found on the kinetic parameters of lactate dehydrogenase. A model that implements the kinetic equations of the two enzymes describes the reactor behavior satisfactorily. In brief, the use of PEI to retain NAD(H) is a new interesting approach to be widely applied in continuous synthesis with the large number of known dehydrogenases. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Disruption of key NADH-binding pocket residues of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA affects DD-CoA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel J; Robb, Kirsty; Vetter, Beatrice V; Tong, Madeline; Molle, Virginie; Hunt, Neil T; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2017-07-05

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem that affects over 10 million people. There is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial therapies to combat TB. To achieve this, a thorough understanding of key validated drug targets is required. The enoyl reductase InhA, responsible for synthesis of essential mycolic acids in the mycobacterial cell wall, is the target for the frontline anti-TB drug isoniazid. To better understand the activity of this protein a series of mutants, targeted to the NADH co-factor binding pocket were created. Residues P193 and W222 comprise a series of hydrophobic residues surrounding the cofactor binding site and mutation of both residues negatively affect InhA function. Construction of an M155A mutant of InhA results in increased affinity for NADH and DD-CoA turnover but with a reduction in V max for DD-CoA, impairing overall activity. This suggests that NADH-binding geometry of InhA likely permits long-range interactions between residues in the NADH-binding pocket to facilitate substrate turnover in the DD-CoA binding region of the protein. Understanding the precise details of substrate binding and turnover in InhA and how this may affect protein-protein interactions may facilitate the development of improved inhibitors enabling the development of novel anti-TB drugs.

  18. The reaction of NADPH with bovine mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase revisited: II. Comparison of the proposed working hypothesis with literature data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The first purification of bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) was reported nearly half a century ago (Hatefi et al. J Biol Chem 237:1676-1680, 1962). The pathway of electron-transfer through the enzyme is still under debate. A major obstacle is the assignment of EPR signals to the

  19. The reaction of NADPH with bovine mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase revisited: I. Proposed consequences for electron transfer in the enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) is the first complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It has long been assumed that it contained only one FMN group. However, as demonstrated in 2003, the intact enzyme contains two FMN groups. The second FMN was proposed to be located in a

  20. NADH-fluorescence scattering correction for absolute concentration determination in a liquid tissue phantom using a novel multispectral magnetic-resonance-imaging-compatible needle probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Frank; Schalk, Robert; Heintz, Annabell; Feike, Patrick; Firmowski, Sebastian; Beuermann, Thomas; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert; Rädle, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    In this report, a quantitative nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrate (NADH) fluorescence measurement algorithm in a liquid tissue phantom using a fiber-optic needle probe is presented. To determine the absolute concentrations of NADH in this phantom, the fluorescence emission spectra at 465 nm were corrected using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy between 600 nm and 940 nm. The patented autoclavable Nitinol needle probe enables the acquisition of multispectral backscattering measurements of ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and fluorescence spectra. As a phantom, a suspension of calcium carbonate (Calcilit) and water with physiological NADH concentrations between 0 mmol l-1 and 2.0 mmol l-1 were used to mimic human tissue. The light scattering characteristics were adjusted to match the backscattering attributes of human skin by modifying the concentration of Calcilit. To correct the scattering effects caused by the matrices of the samples, an algorithm based on the backscattered remission spectrum was employed to compensate the influence of multiscattering on the optical pathway through the dispersed phase. The monitored backscattered visible light was used to correct the fluorescence spectra and thereby to determine the true NADH concentrations at unknown Calcilit concentrations. Despite the simplicity of the presented algorithm, the root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 0.093 mmol l-1.

  1. Influence of Altered NADH Metabolic Pathway on the Respiratory-deficient Mutant of Rhizopus oryzae and its L-lactate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chang; Guo, Chenchen; Luo, Shuizhong; Jiang, Shaotong; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory-deficient mutants of Rhizopus oryzae (R. oryzae) AS 3.3461 were acquired by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation to investigate changes in intracellular NADH metabolic pathway and its influence on the fermentation characteristics of the strain. Compared with R. oryzae AS 3.3461, the intracellular ATP level of the respiratory-deficient strain UV-1 decreased by 52.7 % and the glucose utilization rate rose by 8.9 %; When incubated for 36 h, the activities of phosphofructokinase (PFK), hexokinase (HK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) in the mutant rose by 74.2, 7.2, and 12.0 %, respectively; when incubated for 48 h, the intracellular NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the mutant rose by 14.6 %; when a mixed carbon source with a glucose/gluconic acid ratio of 1:1 was substituted to culture the mutant, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio decreased by 4.6 %; the ATP content dropped by 27.6 %; the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity rose by 22.7 %; and the lactate yield rose by 11.6 %. These results indicated that changes to the NADH metabolic pathway under a low-energy charge level can effectively increase the glycolytic rate and further improve the yield of L-lactate of R. oryzae.

  2. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  3. Kinetics, mechanism, and inhibition of monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Rona R; Albreht, Alen

    2018-03-07

    Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) catalyse the oxidation of neurotransmitter amines and a wide variety of primary, secondary and tertiary amine xenobiotics, including therapeutic drugs. While inhibition of MAO activity in the periphery removes protection from biogenic amines and so is undesirable, inhibition in the brain gives vital antidepressant and behavioural advantages that make MAO a major pharmaceutical target for inhibitor design. In neurodegenerative diseases, MAO inhibitors can help to maintain neurotransmitter levels, making it a common feature in novel multi-target combinations designed to combat Alzheimer's disease, albeit not yet proven clinically. Vital information for inhibitor design comes from an understanding of the structure, mechanism, and kinetics of the catalyst. This review will summarize the kinetic behaviour of MAO A and B and the kinetic evaluation of reversible inhibitors that transiently decrease catalysis. Kinetic parameters and crystal structures have enabled computational approaches to ligand discovery and validation of hits by docking. Kinetics and a wide variety of substrates and inhibitors along with theoretical modelling have also contributed to proposed schemes for the still debated chemical mechanism of amine oxidation. However, most of the marketed MAO drugs are long-lasting irreversible inactivators. The mechanism of irreversible inhibition by hydrazine, cyclopropylamine, and propargylamine drugs will be discussed. The article finishes with some examples of the propargylamine moiety in multi-target ligand design to combat neurodegeneration.

  4. Study of Drug Metabolism by Xanthine Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhou Sun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the studies of drug metabolism by xanthine oxidase (XOD with electrochemical techniques. Firstly, a pair of stable, well-defined and quasi-reversible oxidation/reduction peaks is obtained with the formal potential at −413.1 mV (vs. SCE after embedding XOD in salmon sperm DNA membrane on the surface of pyrolytic graphite electrode. Then, a new steady peak can be observed at −730 mV (vs. SCE upon the addition of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP to the electrochemical system, indicating the metabolism of 6-MP by XOD. Furthermore, the chronoamperometric response shows that the current of the catalytic peak located at −730 mV increases with addition of 6-MP in a concentration-dependent manner, and the increase of the chronoamperometric current can be inhibited by an XOD inhibitor, quercetin. Therefore, our results prove that XOD/DNA modified electrode can be efficiently used to study the metabolism of 6-MP, which may provide a convenient approach for in vitro studies on enzyme-catalyzed drug metabolism.

  5. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Covalently bound phosphate residues in bovine milk xanthine oxidase and in glucose oxidase from Aspergillus niger: A reevaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.L.; Rajagopalan, K.V. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA)); London, R.E. (National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1989-09-01

    The reported presence of covalently bound phosphate residues in flavoproteins has significant implications with regard to the catalytic mechanisms and structural stability of the specific enzymes themselves and in terms of general cellular metabolic regulation. These considerations have led to a reevaluation of the presence of covalently bound phosphorus in the flavoproteins xanthine oxidase and glucose oxidase. Milk xanthine oxidase purified by a procedure that includes anion-exchange chromatography is shown to contain three phosphate residues. All three are noncovalently associated with the protein, two with the FAD cofactor, and one with the molybdenum cofactor. Results of chemical analysis and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy indicate that enzyme purified by this method contains no phosphoserine residues. Xanthine oxidase preparations purified by chromatography on calcium phosphate gel in place of DEAE-Sephadex yielded higher phosphate-to-protein ratios, which could be reduced to the expected values by additional purification on a folate affinity column. Highly active, highly purified preparations of glucose oxidase are shown to contain only the two phosphate residues of the FAD cofactor. The covalently bound bridging phosphate reported by others may arise in aged or degraded preparations of the enzyme but appears not to be a constituent of functional glucose oxidase. These results suggest that the presence of covalent phosphate residues in other flavoproteins should be rigorously reevaluated as well.

  7. Synergistic effect of a catechin-immobilized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-modified electrode on electrocatalysis of NADH in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasantha, V.S.; Chen, S.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Catechin is a polyphenolic flavonoid that can be isolated from a variety of natural sources, including tea leaves, grape seeds, and the wood and bark of trees such as acacia and mahogany. In our experiments, catechin was immobilized on PEDOT/GC (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/glassy carbon)-modified electrodes and used as a mediator for NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) oxidation. The effect of the PEDOT thickness on the surface coverage of the catechin molecules was studied using cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical properties and the effect of pH on the redox properties of the immobilized catechin molecules were studied by cyclic voltammetry in phosphate solution. The electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH at different electrode surfaces such as the bare GC-, the PEDOT/GC-, the catechin/GC- and the catechin/PEDOT/GC-modified electrodes was explored in phosphate solution at pH 7. In the catechin/PEDOT/GC-modified electrode, the PEDOT film plays an important role in resolving the oxidation potentials of ascorbic acid and NADH into two peaks that occur at the same potential for the catechin/GC-modified electrode surface. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant for NADH oxidation at the catechin/PEDOT/GC-modified electrode was determined using the rotating disk electrode technique and found to be 9.88 x 10 3 M -1 s -1 . The amperometric determination of NADH at the catechin/PEDOT/GC electrode was tested. The sensitivity of the electrode was 19 nA/μM

  8. Cytochemical localization of catalase and several hydrogen peroxide-producing oxidases in the nucleoids and matrix of rat liver peroxisomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    1979-01-01

    The distribution of catalase, amino acid oxidase, α-hydroxy acid oxidase, urate oxidase and alcohol oxidase was studied cytochemically in rat hepatocytes. The presence of catalase was demonstrated with the conventional diaminobenzidine technique. Oxidase activities were visualized with methods based

  9. Polyamine Oxidase and Diamine Oxidase Activities in Human Milk during the First Month of Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelakovic, Ljiljana; Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Bojko; Najman, Stevo; Stojanović, Dusica; Jonovic, Marina; Pop-Trajkovic, Zoran

    2012-06-01

    Human milk (HM) is the ideal food for all newborns and infants. Apart from various bioactive compounds, including cytokines, antibodies, hormones, vitamines, it also contains polyamines, such as spermine (Sp), spermidine (Spd) and putrescine (Put). The present study investigated polyamine metabolism in colostrum and mature human milk by measuring the polyamine oxidase (PAO) and diamine oxidase (DAO) enzyme activities, which are necessary for polyamine catabolism, as well as by determining the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, the final product of polyamine biodegradation. The PAO, DAO activity and MDA levels were quantified in colostrum (1st and 2nd day) as well as in mature human milk, 30th day of lactation. We found the steady increase of PAO activity and steady decrease of DAO activity and MDA levels during first month of lactation. Since the products of PAO activity such as, amino aldehydes and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) might have potential antimicrobial effects, promoting the oxidative stress, it is likely that human milk PAO throughout the lactation period, contributes to the protective effects of human milk.

  10. Serum diamine oxidase activity in patients with histamine intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzotti, G; Breda, D; Di Gioacchino, M; Burastero, S E

    2016-03-01

    Intolerance to various foods, excluding bona fide coeliac disease and lactose intolerance, represents a growing cause of patient visits to allergy clinics.Histamine intolerance is a long-known, multifaceted clinical condition triggered by histamine-rich foods and alcohol and/or by drugs that liberate histamine or block diamine oxidase (DAO), the main enzyme involved in the metabolism of ingested histamine. Histamine limitation diets impose complex, non-standardized restrictions that may severely impact the quality of life of patients. We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients who visited allergy outpatient facilities in northern Italy with a negative diagnosis for IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, coeliac disease, conditions related to gastric hypersecretion, and systemic nickel hypersensitivity, and who previously underwent a histamine limitation diet with benefits for their main symptoms. Serum diamine oxidase levels and the clinical response to diamine oxidase supplementation were investigated. We found that 10 out of 14 patients had serum DAO activityintolerance. Moreover, 13 out of 14 patients subjectively reported a benefit in at least one of the disturbances related to food intolerances following diamine oxidase supplementation. The mean value (±SD) of diamine oxidase activity in the cohort of patients with histamine intolerance symptoms was 7.04±6.90 U/mL compared to 39.50±18.16 U/mL in 34 healthy controls (P=0.0031). In patients with symptoms triggered by histamine-rich food, measuring the serum diamine oxidase activity can help identify subjects who can benefit from a histamine limitation diet and/or diamine oxidase supplementation.Properly designed, controlled studies investigating histamine intolerance that include histamine provocation are indispensable for providing insights into the area of food intolerances, which are currently primarily managed with non-scientific approaches in Italy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by esomeprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzer, A; Pienaar, A; Petzer, J P

    2013-09-01

    Virtual screening of a library of drugs has suggested that esomeprazole, the S-enantiomer of omeprazole, may possess binding affinities for the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. Based on this finding, the current study examines the MAO inhibitory properties of esomeprazole. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, IC50 values for the inhibition of these enzymes by esomeprazole were experimentally determined. To examine the reversibility of MAO inhibition by esomeprazole, the recoveries of the enzymatic activities after dilution of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes were evaluated. In addition, reversibility of inhibition was also examined by measuring the recoveries of enzyme activities after dialysis of enzyme-inhibitor mixtures. Lineweaver-Burk plots were constructed to evaluate the mode of MAO inhibition and to measure Ki values. The results document that esomeprazole inhibits both MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 23 µM and 48 µM, respectively. The interactions of esomeprazole with MAO-A and MAO-B are reversible and most likely competitive with Ki values for the inhibition of the respective enzymes of 8.99 µM and 31.7 µM. Considering the available pharmacokinetic data and typical therapeutic doses of esomeprazole, these inhibitory potencies are unlikely to be of pharmacological relevance in humans. The MAO inhibitory effects of esomeprazole should however be taken into consideration when using this drug in animal experiments where higher doses are often administered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Aldehyde oxidase activity in fresh human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manevski, Nenad; Balavenkatraman, Kamal Kumar; Bertschi, Barbara; Swart, Piet; Walles, Markus; Camenisch, Gian; Schiller, Hilmar; Kretz, Olivier; Ling, Barbara; Wettstein, Reto; Schaefer, Dirk J; Pognan, Francois; Wolf, Armin; Litherland, Karine

    2014-12-01

    Human aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a molybdoflavoenzyme that commonly oxidizes azaheterocycles in therapeutic drugs. Although high metabolic clearance by AO resulted in several drug failures, existing in vitro-in vivo correlations are often poor and the extrahepatic role of AO practically unknown. This study investigated enzymatic activity of AO in fresh human skin, the largest organ of the body, frequently exposed to therapeutic drugs and xenobiotics. Fresh, full-thickness human skin was obtained from 13 individual donors and assayed with two specific AO substrates: carbazeran and zoniporide. Human skin explants from all donors metabolized carbazeran to 4-hydroxycarbazeran and zoniporide to 2-oxo-zoniporide. Average rates of carbazeran and zoniporide hydroxylations were 1.301 and 0.164 pmol⋅mg skin(-1)⋅h(-1), resulting in 13 and 2% substrate turnover, respectively, after 24 hours of incubation with 10 μM substrate. Hydroxylation activities for the two substrates were significantly correlated (r(2) = 0.769), with interindividual variability ranging from 3-fold (zoniporide) to 6-fold (carbazeran). Inclusion of hydralazine, an irreversible inhibitor of AO, resulted in concentration-dependent decrease of hydroxylation activities, exceeding 90% inhibition of carbazeran 4-hydroxylation at 100 μM inhibitor. Reaction rates were linear up to 4 hours and well described by Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics. Comparison of carbazeran and zoniporide hydroxylation with rates of triclosan glucuronidation and sulfation and p-toluidine N-acetylation showed that cutaneous AO activity is comparable to tested phase II metabolic reactions, indicating a significant role of AO in cutaneous drug metabolism. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of AO enzymatic activity in human skin. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Forage Polyphenol Oxidase and Ruminant Livestock Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richard F. Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenol oxidase (PPO is associated with the detrimental effect of browning fruit and vegetables, however interest within PPO containing forage crops has grown since the brownng reaction was associated with reduced nitrogen (N losses in silo and the rumen. The reduction in protein breakdown in silo of red clover (high PPO forage increased the quality of protein, improving N-use efficiency (NUE when fed to ruminants. A further benefit of red clover silage feeding is a significant reduction in lipolysis in silo and an increase in the deposition of beneficial C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA in animal products, which has also been linked to PPO activity. PPOs protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in silo is related to the deactivation of plant proteases and lipases. This deactivation occurs through PPO catalysing the conversion of diphenols to quinones which bind with cellular nucleophiles such as protein reforming a protein-bound phenol (PBP. If the protein is an enzyme the complexing denatures the enzyme. However, PPO is inactive in the anaerobic rumen and therefore any subsequent protection of plant protein and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen must be as a result of events that occurred to the forage pre-ingestion. Reduced activity of plant proteases and lipases would have little effect on NUE and glycerol based-PUFA in the rumen due to the greater concentration of rumen microbial proteases and lipases. The mechanism for PPOs protection of plant protein in the rumen is a consequence of complexing plant protein, rather than protease deactivation per se. These complexed proteins reduce protein digestibility in the rumen and subsequently increase un-degraded dietary protein flow to the small intestine. The mechanism for protecting glycerol-based PUFA has yet to be fully elucidated but may be associated with entrapment within PBP reducing access to microbial lipases or differences in rumen digestion kinetics of red clover.

  14. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Precocious puberty secondary to a mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumor associated with an ovarian yolk sac tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ovarian tumors are the least common cause of sexual precocity in girls. Mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumors associated with a yolk sac tumor of the ovary are rare neoplasms, of which only a small number of well-documented cases have been described so far. Here, we report precocious puberty in a four-year-old Egyptian girl caused by a mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumor associated with a yolk sac tumor of the ovary. Case presentation A four-year-old Egyptian girl was referred to our pediatric endocrinology unit for evaluation of bilateral breast budding, pubic hair and vaginal bleeding. On examination, we found that her breast enlargement and pubic hair were compatible with Tanner III. A thorough workup revealed a large mass in her right ovary. Magnetic resonance imaging ofher brain showed that her pituitary gland was normal. A hormonal assay revealed high levels of estradiol, 280 to 375pmol/L; progesterone, 5.3 nmol/L; testosterone 38.9 pg/mL; and androstenedione, 4.1 ng/mL. Her basal and stimulated levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were low. Tumor markers levels were high, with a total inhibin of 1,069U/L and an alpha-fetoprotein of 987 μg/L. Her chromosomes were normal (46XX. Our patient underwent an explorative laparotomy and a solid tumor localized to her right ovary was identified. A right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was a mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumorwith a yolk sac tumor of the ovary. Postoperatively, she was started on treatment with chemotherapy. Our patient is doing well without evidence of tumor recurrence or metastasis during eight months of postoperative follow-up. Conclusion Although a mixed germ cell-sex cord-stromal tumor associated with a yolk sac tumor of the ovary is a rare occurrence, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a prepubescent girl with an abdominal mass and precocious puberty.

  16. Inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and correlation of this inhibition with the occurrence of energy-coupling site 1 in various organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, T.

    1987-01-01

    The NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity of the respiratory chains of several organisms was inhibited by the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). This inhibition correlated with the presence of an energy-transducing site in this segment of the respiratory chain. Where the NADH-quinone reductase segment involved an energy-coupling site (e.g., in bovine heart and rat liver mitochondria, and in Paracoccus denitrificans, Escherichia coli, and Thermus thermophilus HB-8 membranes), DCCD acted as an inhibitor of ubiquinone reduction by NADH. By contrast, where energy-coupling site 1 was absent (e.g., in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria and BacilLus subtilis membranes), there was no inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity by DCCD. In the bovine and P. denitrificans systems, DCCD inhibition was pseudo first order with respect to incubation time, and reaction order with respect to inhibitor concentration was close to unity, indicating that inhibition resulted from the binding of one inhibitor molecule per active unit of NADH-ubiquinone reductase. In the bovine NADH-ubiquinone reductase complex (complex I), [ 14 C]DCCD was preferentially incorporated into two subunits of molecular weight 49,000 and 29,000. The time course of labeling of the 29,000 molecular weight subunit with [ 14 C]DCCD paralleled the time course of inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity

  17. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K+ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K+ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  18. NADH fluorescence imaging and the histological impact of cortical spreading depolarization during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohisa; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Nishihiro, Shingo; Shinji, Yukei; Takasugi, Yuji; Haruma, Jun; Hiramatsu, Masafumi; Kawase, Hirokazu; Sato, Sachiko; Mizoue, Ryoichi; Takeda, Yoshimasa; Sugiu, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Date, Isao

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) has been observed during the early phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in clinical settings, the pathogenicity of CSD is unclear. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of loss of membrane potential on neuronal damage during the acute phase of SAH. METHODS Twenty-four rats were subjected to SAH by the perforation method. The propagation of depolarization in the brain cortex was examined by using electrodes to monitor 2 direct-current (DC) potentials and obtaining NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence images while exposing the parietal-temporal cortex to ultraviolet light. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored in the vicinity of the lateral electrode. Twenty-four hours after onset of SAH, histological damage was evaluated at the DC potential recording sites. RESULTS Changes in DC potentials (n = 48 in total) were sorted into 3 types according to the appearance of ischemic depolarization in the entire hemisphere following induction of SAH. In Type 1 changes (n = 21), ischemic depolarization was not observed during a 1-hour observation period. In Type 2 changes (n = 13), the DC potential demonstrated ischemic depolarization on initiation of SAH and recovered 80% from the maximal DC deflection during a 1-hour observation period (33.3 ± 15.8 minutes). In Type 3 changes (n = 14), the DC potential displayed ischemic depolarization and did not recover during a 1-hour observation period. Histological evaluations at DC potential recording sites showed intact tissue at all sites in the Type 1 group, whereas in the Type 2 and Type 3 groups neuronal damage of varying severity was observed depending on the duration of ischemic depolarization. The duration of depolarization that causes injury to 50% of neurons (P 50 ) was estimated to be 22.4 minutes (95% confidence intervals 17.0-30.3 minutes). CSD was observed in 3 rats at 6 sites in the Type 1 group 5.1 ± 2.2 minutes after

  19. Identification of new tumor associated antigens and their usage for new therapeutic strategies based on the combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy for colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proietti, E.; Maccalli, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Robbins, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    The main general objective of this project was to characterize a new colorectal carcinoma (CRC) tumor-associated antigen (TAA) and validate a new therapeutic strategy combining chemotherapy and tumor vaccination for the treatment of cancer patients. To this purpose a strategic interaction between Drs. Proietti/Maccali at the ISS and the group of Drs. Rosenberg/Robbins at the NIH was established. A stage of Dr. Maccalli at the NIH allowed to carry out the first steps for the identification and the initial characterization of the CRC TAA named COA-1. A laboratory meeting with Dr. Robbins has been planned on May 24-25 2006 at the ISS, during the International Meeting on Immunotherapy of Cancer: Challenges and Needs, for discussing results and perspectives of this research project

  20. An adenoviral cancer vaccine co-encoding a tumor associated antigen together with secreted 4-1BBL leads to delayed tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ragonnaud, Emeline; Andersson, Anne-Marie C; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2016-01-01

    with the previous reports of increased anti-cancer efficacy using systemically delivered 4-1BB agonists, we incorporated a secreted version of 4-1BBL (Fc-4-1BBL) in our vaccine and co-expressed it with the Ii linked to TAA. In tumor bearing mice, this vaccine initially delayed tumor growth and slightly increased......Previous studies have shown promising results when using an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody treatment against established tumors. While this is promising, this type of treatment can induce severe side effects. Therefore, we decided to incorporate the membrane form of 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL......) in a replicative deficient adenovirus vaccine expressing the invariant chain (Ii) adjuvant fused to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). The Ii adjuvant increases and prolongs TAA specific CD8+ T cells as previously shown and local expression of 4-1BBL was chosen to avoid the toxicity associated with systemic...

  1. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-04-16

    Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the production of redox neutral products such as lactic acid from redox neutral sugars using the reducing power NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced) generated from glycolysis (2 NADH per glucose equivalent). Nevertheless, greater than two NADH per glucose catabolized is needed for the production of reduced products (such as xylitol) from redox neutral sugars by anaerobic fermentation. The Escherichia coli strain AI05 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA Δ(focA-pflB) ΔadhE ΔptsG ΔpdhR::pflBp 6-(aceEF-lpd)), previously engineered for reduction of xylose to xylitol using reducing power (NADH equivalent) of glucose catabolism, was further engineered by 1) deleting xylAB operon (encoding for xylose isomerase and xylulokinase) to prevent xylose from entering the pentose phosphate pathway; 2) anaerobically expressing the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon (encoding for succinate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase) to enable an anaerobically functional tricarboxcylic acid cycle with a theoretical 10 NAD(P)H equivalent per glucose catabolized. These reducing equivalents can be oxidized by synthetic respiration via xylose reduction, producing xylitol. The resulting strain, AI21 (pAI02), achieved a 96 % xylose to xylitol conversion, with a yield of 6 xylitol per glucose catabolized (molar yield of xylitol per glucose consumed (YRPG) = 6). This represents a 33 % improvement in xylose to xylitol conversion, and a 63 % increase in xylitol yield per glucose catabolized over

  2. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neuby human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8 + T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/ neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/ neu 369-377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/ neu 369-377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8 + T cell induction.

  3. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  4. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... and the control leg, together with venous blood samples, were obtained prior to exercise and at 45 min, 24, 48 and 96 h after exercise. The time courses of xanthine oxidase immunoreactivity and indicators of muscle damage and inflammation were examined. 2. The number of xanthine oxidase structures observed...... by immunohistological methods in the exercised muscle was up to eightfold higher than control from day 1 to day 4 after exercise (P

  5. Carboxylated aurone derivatives as potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzychka, Oksana V; Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Popova, Antonina V; Frasinyuk, Mykhaylo S; Vovk, Andriy I

    2017-07-15

    Xanthine oxidase is a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. In this study, a number of A- and B-ring carboxylated aurone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase in vitro. According to the results obtained, two different ranges of inhibitory activity were observed. The aurones with carboxylic acid group at the 4'-position of B-ring were found to be potent inhibitors of the enzyme with IC 50 values in the low micromolar range. The effects of these compounds were about 50 fold higher than of A-ring modified aurones with carboxymethoxy group at the 6-position. The binding modes of the carboxylated aurones in the active site of xanthine oxidase were explained using molecular docking calculations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III) and As(III)/Sb(III)-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxin; Yang, Birong; Shi, Manman; Yuan, Kai; Guo, Wei; Li, Mingshun; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III)]/antimonite [Sb(III)]-oxidizing strain. The As(III) oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III) oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III) oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III) oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III) oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III) oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III), ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III) and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III) oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III) and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III) oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III) would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III) oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III) stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  7. Effects upon metabolic pathways and energy production by Sb(III and As(III/Sb(III-oxidase gene aioA in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxin Li

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 is a heterotrophic arsenite [As(III]/antimonite [Sb(III]-oxidizing strain. The As(III oxidase AioAB is responsible for As(III oxidation in the periplasm and it is also involved in Sb(III oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. In addition, Sb(III oxidase AnoA and cellular H2O2 are also responsible for Sb(III oxidation in strain GW4. However, the deletion of aioA increased the Sb(III oxidation efficiency in strain GW4. In the present study, we found that the cell mobility to Sb(III, ATP and NADH contents and heat release were also increased by Sb(III and more significantly in the aioA mutant. Proteomics and transcriptional analyses showed that proteins/genes involved in Sb(III oxidation and resistance, stress responses, carbon metabolism, cell mobility, phosphonate and phosphinate metabolism, and amino acid and nucleotide metabolism were induced by Sb(III and were more significantly induced in the aioA mutant. The results suggested that Sb(III oxidation may produce energy. In addition, without periplasmic AioAB, more Sb(III would enter bacterial cells, however, the cytoplasmic AnoA and the oxidative stress response proteins were significantly up-regulated, which may contribute to the increased Sb(III oxidation efficiency. Moreover, the carbon metabolism was also activated to generate more energy against Sb(III stress. The generated energy may be used in Sb transportation, DNA repair, amino acid synthesis, and cell mobility, and may be released in the form of heat.

  8. NADPH Oxidases and Their Roles in Skin Homeostasis and Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Jana; Raad, Houssam; Taieb, Alain; Rezvani, Hamid Reza

    2017-11-17

    Skin protects the body from dehydration, pathogens, and external mutagens. NADPH oxidases are central components for regulating the cellular redox balance. There is increasing evidence indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by members of this enzyme family play important roles in the physiology and pathophysiology of the skin. Recent Advances: NADPH oxidases are active producers of ROS such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Different isoforms are found in virtually all tissues. They play pivotal roles in normal cell homeostasis and in the cellular responses to various stressors. In particular, these enzymes are integral parts of redox-sensitive prosurvival and proapoptotic signaling pathways, in which they act both as effectors and as modulators. However, continuous (re)activation of NADPH oxidases can disturb the redox balance of cells, in the worst-case scenario in a permanent manner. Abnormal NADPH oxidase activity has been associated with a wide spectrum of diseases, as well as with aging and carcinogenesis. Sunlight with its beneficial and deleterious effects induces the activation of NADPH oxidases in the skin. Evidence for the important roles of this enzyme family in skin cancer and skin aging, as well as in many chronic skin diseases, is now emerging. Understanding the precise roles of NADPH oxidases in normal skin homeostasis, in the cellular responses to solar radiation, and during carcinogenesis will pave the way for their validation as therapeutic targets not only for the prevention and treatment of skin cancers but also for many other skin-related disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  9. Two X-linked chronic granulomatous disease patients with unusual NADPH oxidase properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Baruch; Broides, Arnon; Zeeli, Tal; Gavrieli, Ronit; de Boer, Martin; van Leeuwen, Karin; Levy, Jacov; Roos, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an immune deficiency syndrome caused by defects in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, the enzyme that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytizing leukocytes. This study evaluates the NADPH oxidase capacity in two

  10. Electronic spectra and structure of allopurinol: a xanthine oxidase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    1996-10-01

    Electronic absorption, fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra of allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, have been studied in aqueous solution at different pH. The observed spectra have been interpreted in terms of the neutral, anionic and cationic forms of allopurinol with the help of molecular orbital calculations which included optimisation of geometries of the neutral keto and enol forms of the molecule in the lowest singlet excited state. Electrostatic potential mapping has been performed to identify the most probable site of binding of allopurinol with xanthine oxidase.

  11. Signal transduction and activation of the NADPH oxidase in eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Lindsay

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the eosinophil NADPH oxidase and the subsequent release of toxic oxygen radicals has been implicated in the mechanism of parasite killing and inflammation. At present, little is known of the signal transduction pathway that govern agonist-induced activation of the respiratory burst and is the subject of this review. In particular, we focus on the ability of leukotrine B4 to activate the NADPH oxidase in guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils which can be obtained in sufficient number and purity for detailed biochemical experiments to be performed.

  12. Oxygen reduction activity of carbon fibers cathode, and application for current generation from the NAD+ and NADH recycling reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Maeda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fibers treated at 700 oC for 10 min were found to have O2 reduction activity when being used as a cathode. The special type of partition combined with both cationic and anionic exchange membranes was applied between anode cell and cathode cell in order to use a highly acidic solution such as 0.5 M H2SO4 as an electrolyte of the cathode cell for increasing the efficiency of O2 reduction activity. The current generation from NAD+ and NADH recycling system combined with D-gluconolactone production from 500 mg of D-glucose was performed by applying only carbon fibers for both anode and cathode. The total current volume obtained was 81.4 mAh during the reaction for 10 h, and the current efficiency was 93%. One gram of carbon fibers was pressed with Nafion paste on a piece of carbon paper(area : 50 mm×50mm with heating to prepare the cathode, and this construct was combined with conventional fuel cell. The power density was 3.6 mW/cm2, and the total power volume was calculated to be 90 mW per 1 g of carbon fibers.

  13. A scalable metabolite supplementation strategy against antibiotic resistant pathogen Chromobacterium violaceum induced by NAD+/NADH+imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Deepanwita; Parmar, Dharmeshkumar; Bhattacharya, Nivedita; Ghanate, Avinash D; Panchagnula, Venkateswarlu; Raghunathan, Anu

    2017-04-26

    The leading edge of the global problem of antibiotic resistance necessitates novel therapeutic strategies. This study develops a novel systems biology driven approach for killing antibiotic resistant pathogens using benign metabolites. Controlled laboratory evolutions established chloramphenicol and streptomycin resistant pathogens of Chromobacterium. These resistant pathogens showed higher growth rates and required higher lethal doses of antibiotic. Growth and viability testing identified malate, maleate, succinate, pyruvate and oxoadipate as resensitising agents for antibiotic therapy. Resistant genes were catalogued through whole genome sequencing. Intracellular metabolomic profiling identified violacein as a potential biomarker for resistance. The temporal variance of metabolites captured the linearized dynamics around the steady state and correlated to growth rate. A constraints-based flux balance model of the core metabolism was used to predict the metabolic basis of antibiotic susceptibility and resistance. The model predicts electron imbalance and skewed NAD/NADH ratios as a result of antibiotics - chloramphenicol and streptomycin. The resistant pathogen rewired its metabolic networks to compensate for disruption of redox homeostasis. We foresee the utility of such scalable workflows in identifying metabolites for clinical isolates as inevitable solutions to mitigate antibiotic resistance.

  14. Mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) oxidation links the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle with methionine metabolism and nuclear DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A; Martinez-Reyes, Inmaculada; Wang, Tianyuan; Grenet, Dagoberto; Bushel, Pierre; Li, Jianying; Chandel, Navdeep; Woychik, Richard P; Santos, Janine H

    2018-04-18

    Mitochondrial function affects many aspects of cellular physiology, and, most recently, its role in epigenetics has been reported. Mechanistically, how mitochondrial function alters DNA methylation patterns in the nucleus remains ill defined. Using a cell culture model of induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion, in this study we show that progressive mitochondrial dysfunction leads to an early transcriptional and metabolic program centered on the metabolism of various amino acids, including those involved in the methionine cycle. We find that this program also increases DNA methylation, which occurs primarily in the genes that are differentially expressed. Maintenance of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced (NADH) oxidation in the context of mtDNA loss rescues methionine salvage and polyamine synthesis and prevents changes in DNA methylation and gene expression but does not affect serine/folate metabolism or transsulfuration. This work provides a novel mechanistic link between mitochondrial function and epigenetic regulation of gene expression that involves polyamine and methionine metabolism responding to changes in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Given the implications of these findings, future studies across different physiological contexts and in vivo are warranted.

  15. Mono and bimetallic nanoparticles of gold, silver and palladium-catalyzed NADH oxidation-coupled reduction of Eosin-Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhanalakshmi, J.; Venkatesan, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mono metallic (Au, Ag, Pd) and bimetallic (Au–Ag, Ag–Pd, Au–Pd) with 1:1 mol stoichiometry, nanoparticles are synthesized using one-pot, temperature controlled chemical method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping agent. The particle sizes (Au = 5.6, Ag = 5.0, Pd = 6.0, Au–Ag = 9.2, Ag–Pd = 9.6, Au–Pd = 9.4 nm) are characterized by UV–Vis, HRTEM, and XRD measurements, respectively. CTAB bindings onto mono and bimetallic nanoparticles are analyzed by FTIR spectra. The catalytic activities of mono and bimetallic nanoparticles are tested on the reaction between NADH oxidation and Eosin-Y reduction. The effects of base, pH, ionic strength, nature of mono and bimetallic catalysts are studied and the reaction conditions are optimized. Bimetallic nanoparticles exhibited better catalysis than the mono metallic nanoparticles, which may be due to the electronic effects of the core to shell metal atoms.Graphical Abstract

  16. Mono and bimetallic nanoparticles of gold, silver and palladium-catalyzed NADH oxidation-coupled reduction of Eosin-Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanalakshmi, J.; Venkatesan, P.

    2011-02-01

    Mono metallic (Au, Ag, Pd) and bimetallic (Au-Ag, Ag-Pd, Au-Pd) with 1:1 mol stoichiometry, nanoparticles are synthesized using one-pot, temperature controlled chemical method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping agent. The particle sizes (Au = 5.6, Ag = 5.0, Pd = 6.0, Au-Ag = 9.2, Ag-Pd = 9.6, Au-Pd = 9.4 nm) are characterized by UV-Vis, HRTEM, and XRD measurements, respectively. CTAB bindings onto mono and bimetallic nanoparticles are analyzed by FTIR spectra. The catalytic activities of mono and bimetallic nanoparticles are tested on the reaction between NADH oxidation and Eosin-Y reduction. The effects of base, pH, ionic strength, nature of mono and bimetallic catalysts are studied and the reaction conditions are optimized. Bimetallic nanoparticles exhibited better catalysis than the mono metallic nanoparticles, which may be due to the electronic effects of the core to shell metal atoms.

  17. Effects of the deletion of the Escherichia coli frataxin homologue CyaY on the respiratory NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grauman Peter L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frataxin is discussed as involved in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters. Recently it was discovered that a frataxin homologue is a structural component of the respiratory NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I in Thermus thermophilus. It was not clear whether frataxin is in general a component of complex I from bacteria. The Escherichia coli homologue of frataxin is coined CyaY. Results We report that complex I is completely assembled to a stable and active enzyme complex equipped with all known iron-sulfur clusters in a cyaY mutant of E. coli. However, the amount of complex I is reduced by one third compared to the parental strain. Western blot analysis and live cell imaging of CyaY engineered with a GFP demonstrated that CyaY is located in the cytoplasm and not attached to the membrane as to be expected if it were a component of complex I. Conclusion CyaY plays a non-essential role in the assembly of complex I in E. coli. It is not a structural component but may transiently interact with the complex.

  18. Electrochemiluminescence detection of NADH and ethanol based on partial sulfonation of sol-gel network with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liu; Zhang, Lihua; Shang, Li; Guo, Shaojun; Wen, Dan; Wang, Fuan; Dong, Shaojun

    2009-03-15

    We developed a stable, sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor based on the synthesis of a new sol-gel material with the ion-exchange capacity sol-gel to coimmobilize the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and enzyme. The partial sulfonated (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane sol-gel (PSSG) film acted as both an ion exchanger for the immobilization of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and a matrix to immobilize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The AuNPs/PSSG/Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) film modified electrode allowed sensitive the ECL detection of NADH as low as 1 nM. Such an ability of AuNPs/PSSG/Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) film to promote the electron transfer between Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and the electrode suggested a new, promising biocompatible platform for the development of dehydrogenase-based ECL biosensors. With alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) as a model, we then constructed an ethanol biosensor, which had a linear range of 5 microM to 5.2 mM with a detection limit of 12nM.

  19. In silico docking studies and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of commercially available terpenoids

    OpenAIRE

    MUTHUSWAMY UMAMAHESWARI; Preetha prabhu; KUPPUSAMY ASOKKUMAR; THIRUMALAISAMY SIVASHANMUGAM; Varadharajan Subhadradevi; Puliyath Jagannath; Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-01-01

    Objective Xanthine oxidase is a highly versatile enzyme that is widely distributed among different species. The hydroxylation of purines is catalysed by xanthine oxidase and especially the conversion of xanthine to uric acid. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors are much useful, since they possess lesser side effects compared to uricosuric and anti-inflammatory agents. The present study deals with in silico and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory analysis of commercially available terpenoids (bisabol...

  20. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chao; Wu, Hai-Long; Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  1. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wu, Hai-Long, E-mail: hlwu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-03-03

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  2. Peroxisomal Polyamine Oxidase and NADPH-Oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimios A. Andronis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd and spermine (Spm to putrescine (Put and Spd, respectively is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO. However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI. Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2.-, but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX. On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2.-. These results suggest that the ratio of O2.-/H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2.- by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed.

  3. Non-invasive in-cell determination of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] ratios using hyperpolarized glucose show large variations in metabolic phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Caspar Elo; Karlsson, Magnus; Winther, Jakob R.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that the pyridine nucleotide NAD has far wider biological functions than its classical role in energy metabolism. NAD is used by hundreds of enzymes that catalyse substrate oxidation and as such it plays a key role in various biological processes such as aging, cell ......+]/[NADH] ratio, the bioprobe will enable better understanding of the origin of diverse pathological states of the cell as well as monitor cellular consequences of diseases and/or treatments.......Accumulating evidence suggest that the pyridine nucleotide NAD has far wider biological functions than its classical role in energy metabolism. NAD is used by hundreds of enzymes that catalyse substrate oxidation and as such it plays a key role in various biological processes such as aging, cell...... death and oxidative stress. It has been suggested that changes in the ratio of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] reflects metabolic alterations leading to, or correlating with, pathological states. We have designed an isotopically labelled metabolic bioprobe of free cytosolic [NAD+]/[NADH] by combining...

  4. Effective immobilization of Ru(bpy)32+ by functional composite phosphomolybdic acid anion on an electrode surface for solid-state electrochemiluminescene to sensitive determination of NADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yali; Yang Xiurong; Yang Fan; Wang Yingping; Zheng Peihua; Liu Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    Phosphomolybdic acid anion ([PMo 12 O 40 ] 3− ) was used for the immobilization of ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridine) (Ru(bpy) 3 2+ ) on an electrode surface to yield a sensitive solid-state electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) sensor. [PMo 12 O 40 ] 3− anion in the prepared sensor had catalytic ability to the NADH oxidation. The ECL signal of the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ /[PMo 12 O 40 ] 3− film was about 3-fold enhancement than that for the Ru(bpy) 3 2+ /Nafion film to NADH determination. The resulting ECL sensor exhibited a wide linear range from 2.5 × 10 −7 to 5.0 × 10 −3 M (R = 0.99) with the detection limit of 1.67 × 10 −8 M (S/N = 3). In addition, it had good reproducibility and excellent long-term stability, and the relative average deviation was 0.77% of ECL intensity–time curve under continuous potential scanning for 21 cycles; after being used in two weeks, the sensor was able to keep over 90% activity toward 25 μM NADH. Fabrication of the ECL sensor by this method is simple and easy. Such superior properties will promote the application of polyoxometalates in fabricating sensors for using in electroanalytical and biochemical analysis.

  5. Crystal structures and atomic model of NADPH oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnani, Francesca; Nenci, Simone; Fananas, Elisa Millana; Ceccon, Marta; Romero, Elvira; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the only enzymes exclusively dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Dysregulation of these polytopic membrane proteins impacts the redox signaling cascades that control cell proliferation and death. We describe the atomic crystal structures of the catalytic

  6. The ultrasonic effect on the mechanism of cholesterol oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of ultrasonic radiation on cholesterol oxidase production by Brevibacterium sp. are studied in this paper. An ultrasonic wave with low intensity at 20 kHz, 200 W/ cm2 was employed to study the effects of irradiation at different lengths of time on the growth of Brevibacterium sp. cells. The result showed that the ...

  7. Polyphenol oxidase-based luminescent enzyme hydrogel: an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... (A) Photography of supramolecu- lar hydrogel [9] and (B) photography of enzyme hydrogel. type 18 Mili-Q water was used throughout the experiment. Polyphenol oxidase enzyme (10000 U) was purchased and used as received. 2.2 Instruments. Absorption and fluorescence spectra were measured in a.

  8. Cytokinin oxidase or dehydrogenase? Mechanism of cytokinin degradation in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galuszka, P.; Frebort, I.; Sebela, M.

    2001-01-01

    wheat enzyme is a monomer 60 kDa, its N-terminal amino-acid sequence shows similarity to hypothetical cytokinin oxidase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, but not to the enzyme from maize. N-6-isopentenyl-2-(2-hydroxyethylamino)-9-methyladenine is the best substrate from all the cytokinins tested...

  9. Import of alcohol oxidase into peroxisomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Distel, Ben; Veenhuis, Marten; Tabak, Henk F.

    1987-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to grow on methanol because it lacks the enzymes required for its metabolism. To study the possibility of whether or not the methanol oxidation pathway of Hansenula polymorpha can be transferred to S. cerevisiae, the gene coding for alcohol oxidase, a peroxisomal

  10. Chemoenzymatic combination of glucose oxidase with titanium silicalite -1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennestrøm, Peter Nicolai Ravnborg; Taarning, Esben; Christensen, Claus H.

    2010-01-01

    Zeozymes: A proof-of-concept is presented for the chemoenzymatic combination of titanium silicalite-1 zeolite with glucose oxidase. In this combination, glucose is oxidized to gluconic acid and the H2O2 byproduct formed in situ is used for the simultaneous oxidation of chemical substrates. Both...

  11. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of heat treatment (55°C/20 min) on polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities and total phenolic compounds was investigated in Algerian dates (Deglet Nour variety) at Tamar (fully ripe) stage and in dates stored for 5 months at ambient temperature and in cold storage (10°C). Results obtained ...

  12. Inversion of stereospecificity of vanillyl-alcohol oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, Robert H.H. van den; Fraaije, Marco W.; Ferrer, Miriam; Mattevi, Andrea; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    2000-01-01

    Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO) is the prototype of a newly recognized family of structurally related oxidoreductases sharing a conserved FAD-binding domain. The active site of VAO is formed by a cavity where the enzyme is able to catalyze many reactions with phenolic substrates. Among these

  13. Role of alternative oxidase in postharvest stress of fruit and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chilling injury (CI) imposes a limitation for extending storage of fruit and vegetables. Chilling injury can result from oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Alternative oxidase (AOX) as a ROS avoidance genes play pivotal role in defense mechanism against chilling injury derived oxidative stress.

  14. Novel thidiazuron-derived inhibitors of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nisler, Jaroslav; Kopečný, D.; Končitíková, R.; Zatloukal, Marek; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, K.; Zalabák, D.; Briozzo, P.; Strnad, Miroslav; Spíchal, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, 1-2 (2016), s. 235-248 ISSN 0167-4412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase * Crystal structure * Molecular docking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.356, year: 2016

  15. Optimization of cholesterol oxidase production by Brevibacterium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ultrasound-assisted emulsification as a pretreatment for cholesterol oxidase production by submerge fermentation using Brevibacterium sp. in a batch system was studied. Medium improvement for the production employing response surface methodology (RSM) was optimized in this paper. The concentration of ...

  16. Role of alternative oxidase in postharvest stress of fruit and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ahar

    2013-12-18

    Dec 18, 2013 ... result from oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Alternative oxidase (AOX) as a. ROS avoidance genes play pivotal role in defense mechanism against chilling injury derived oxidative stress. Postharvest treatment of fruit and vegetables through methyl salicylate, methyl jasmonate and.

  17. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene reveals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used a 298 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) to examine sequence variation in (mostly) museum specimens of the African Goshawk Accipiter tachiro. Our results showed two clades with high bootstrap support in a phylogenetic analysis and two groups in a nonmetric ...

  18. The Membrane Modulates Internal Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öjemyr, Linda Nasvik; Ballmoos, Christoph von; Faxén, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    The functionality of membrane proteins is often modulated by the surrounding membrane. Here, we investigated the effect of membrane reconstitution of purified cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) on the kinetics and thermodynamics of internal electron and proton-transfer reactions during O-2 reduction...

  19. Changes in activities of polyphenol oxidase, ascorbate, peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Activities of peroxidase (POD), Polyphenol oxidase (PPO), hydroperoxide and lipid contents were investigated during desiccation of cotyledonary tissues of Irvingia gabonensis at ambient temperature (26OC - 30OC), 35OC and 20OC. Activities of POD and PPO increased initially but declined in the latter desiccation period.

  20. Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Allelic variations of functional markers for polyphenol oxidase (PPO) genes in Indian bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars. Rajender Singh, Umesh Goutam, R. K. Gupta, G. C. Pandey, Jag Shoran and Ratan Tiwari. J. Genet. 88, 325–329. Figure 1. Phenol colour reaction of kernels. Kernels without treatment by ...

  1. in Escherichia coli with native cholesterol oxidase expressed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure and bio-activity of an endogenous cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sp. was compared to the same enzyme exogenously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with and without N- or C-terminal his-tags. The different proteins were purified with affinity and subtractive protocols. The specific activity of ...

  2. Effect of heat treatment on polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... Polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.14.18.1) catalyses enzyma- tic browning through its action on mono and o-diphenols. (Mayer and Harel, 1979; Golbeck and Camarata, 1981;. Mayer and Harel, 1991). Browning of dates was found to be related to enzymatic and non - enzymatic reactions. *Corresponding author.

  3. Polyphenol oxidase-based luminescent enzyme hydrogel: an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Polyphenol oxidase-based luminescent enzyme hydrogel: an efficient redox active immobilized scaffold. BISWAJIT DEY1,∗. , SUPRABHAT MUKHERJEE2, NILADRI MUKHERJEE2,. RANJAN KUMAR MONDAL1, BISWARUP SATPATI3 and SANTI PRASAD SINHA BABU2. 1Department of Chemistry ...

  4. Polyphenol oxidase activity in co-ensiled temperate grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and its o-diphenol substrates have been shown to effectively decrease proteolytic activity during the ensiling of forages such as red clover. Orchardgrass and smooth bromegrass both contain high levels of PPO activity, but lack appropriate levels of o-diphenols to adequately...

  5. Effects of glucose oxidase on the growth performance, serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of diets supplemented with glucose oxidase (GOD) on growth performance, serum parameters and faecal microflora of piglets. One hundred and twelve piglets (35 days old) were randomly assigned to two groups (four replicates per group, half male and half female, ...

  6. Structure-Based Redesign of Cofactor Binding in Putrescine Oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M.; Rovida, Stefano; van Duijn, Esther; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase (PuO) from Rhodococcus erythropolis is a soluble homodimeric Flavoprotein, which oxidizes small aliphatic diamines. In this study, we report the crystal structures and cofactor binding properties of wild-type and mutant enzymes. From a structural viewpoint, PuO closely resembles

  7. ADP competes with FAD binding in putrescine oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; Mazon, Hortense; Heck, Albert J.; van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2008-01-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis NCIMB 11540 (PuORh) is a soluble homodimeric flavoprotein of 100 kDa, which catalyzes the oxidative deamination of putrescine and some other aliphatic amines. The initial characterization of PuORh uncovered an intriguing feature: the enzyme appeared

  8. Kinetics of Inhibition of Xanthine Oxidase by Lycium arabicum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Four extracts of Lycium arabicum, methanol (CrE), chloroform (ChE), ethyl acetate (EaE) and aqueous (AqE) extracts, were screened for their total phenolics and potential inhibitory effects on purified bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO) activity by measuring the formation of uric acid or superoxide radical. The mode ...

  9. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...

  10. Xanthine oxidase activity during transition period and its association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to quantify xanthine oxidase (XO) levels during the transition period in Murrah buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and determine its association with certain postpartum infections. For this, six healthy buffaloes were selected from the National Dairy Research Institute (NDRI) herd and managed under standard ...

  11. The xanthine oxidoreductase/xanthine oxidase in human cornea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejková, Jitka; Filipec, M.; Ardan, Taras

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2001), s. S589 ISSN 0146-0404. [Annual Meeting. 29.04.2001-04.05.2001, Fort Laurdeldade] R&D Projects: GA MZd NG16; GA ČR GA304/00/1635; GA ČR GV307/96/K226 Keywords : human cornea * xanthine oxidase Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry

  12. IRON REGULATES XANTHINE OXIDASE ACTIVITY IN THE LUNG

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iron chelator deferoxamine has been reported to inhibit both xanthine oxidase (XO) and xanthine dehydrogenase activity, but the relationship of this effect to the availability of iron in the cellular and tissue environment remains unexplored. XO and total xanthine oxidoreduct...

  13. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some Leguminosae plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leomel E. Argulla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanol leaf extracts of following Cassia javanica, Cynometra ramiflora, Cassia fistula, Senna siamea, Tamarindus indicus, Intsia bijuga, Cassia spectabilis, Saraca thaipingensis (S. thaipingensis, Caesalpinia pulcherrima (C. pulcherrima and Bauhinia purpurea. Method: The xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was tested spectrophotometically under aerobic conditions. Absorption increments was monitored every 30 seconds for 10 min at 295 nm indicating the formation of uric acid. The extracts were also tested for the presence of terpenoids, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, phenolic compounds, alkaloids and cardiac glycosides. Results: All the extracts inhibited the action of xanthine oxidase. S. thaipingensis and C. pulcherrima exhibited higher than 50% at a concentration 0.05 mg/mL. The IC50 of S. thaipingensis and C. pulcherrima were determined as 0.033 mg/ml and 0.053 mg/mL, respectively while that of allopurinol is 0.004 mg/mL. Conclusion: S. thaipingensis and C. pulcherrima are potentially good sources of xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

  14. Molybdopterin in carbon monoxide oxidase from carboxydotrophic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, O.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    1984-02-01

    The carbon monoxide oxidases (COXs) purified from the carboxydotrophic bacteria Pseudomonas carboxydohydrogena and Pseudomonas carboxydoflava were found to be molybdenum hydroxylases, identical in cofactor composition and spectral properties to the recently characterized enzyme from Pseudomonas carboxydovorans. All three enzymes exhibited a cofactor composition of two flavin adenine dinucleotides, two molybdenums, eight irons and eight labile sulfides per dimeric molecule, typical for molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoproteins. The millimolar extinction coefficient of the COXs at 450 nm was 72 (per two flavin adenine dinucleotides), a value similar to that of milk xanthine oxidase and chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase at 450 nm. That molybdopterin, the novel prosthetic group of the molybdenum cofactor of a variety of molybdoenzymes is also a constituent of COXs from carboxydotrophic bacteria is indicated by the formation of identical fluorescent cofactor derivatives, by complementation of the nitrate reductase activity in extracts of Neurospora crassa nit-1, and by the presence of organic phosphate additional to flavin adenine dinucleotides. Molybdopterin is tightly but noncovalently bound to the protein. COX, sulfite oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and xanthine dehydrogenase each contains 2 mol of molybdopterin per mol of enzyme. The presence of a trichloroacetic acid-releasable, so-far-unidentified, phosphorous-containing moiety in COX is suggested by the results of phosphate analysis.

  15. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abdullahi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Enzyme inhibition mechanism indicated that the mode of inhibition was of a mixed type. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed Xanthine oxidase inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  16. Modulation of NADPH oxidase activity by known uraemic retention solutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna Marta; Terne, Cindy; Jankowski, Vera

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uraemia and cardiovascular disease appear to be associated with an increased oxidative burden. One of the key players in the genesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. Based on initial experiments demonstrating a decreased ...

  17. Possibility of Xanthine Oxidase and Malondialdehyde as a marker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: the serum markers of myocardial injury are used to help in establishing the diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Objective: to measure the levels of xanthine oxidase activity and malondialdehyde in myocardial infarction patients. Methods: 100 patients with myocardial infarction and 50 healthy persons were ...

  18. Models for the active site in galactose oxidase: Structure, spectra ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Galactose oxidase (GOase) is a fungal enzyme which is unusual among metalloenzymes in appearing to catalyse the two electron oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and H2O2. The crystal structure of the enzyme reveals that the coordination geometry of mononuclear copper(II) ion is square pyramidal, with two.

  19. in Escherichia coli with native cholesterol oxidase expresse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... of the exogenously expressed forms were 16 ± 0.3 U/mg for non-tagged enzyme from E. coli, 12 ± 0.1. U/mg for the N-terminal ... Key words: Cholesterol oxidase; Brevibacterium sp.; Escherichia coli; structural disruption, His-tags. ... was designed with an EcoR I restriction site (underlined) and Primer.

  20. Physiological roles of plastid terminal oxidase in plant stress ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is the terminal oxidase of chlororespiration and regulates the redox state of the PQ pool .... responses by facilitating carotenoid production could be also proposed. 3. Induced ... A summary of up-regulated level of PTOX detected in various higher plant and algae species under different stress conditions. Groups. Species.

  1. Enhanced production of glucose oxidase from UVmutant of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UV rays were used as mutagen in wild type strain of Aspergillus niger for enhanced production of glucose oxidase. After mutangenization and selection, mutant A. niger strains, resistant to 2-deoxy-Dglucose were obtained. The mutants showed 1.57 and 1.98 fold increase in activities of extra and intra cellular glucose ...

  2. Effect of a heme oxygenase-1 inducer on NADPH oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigated the effect of hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducer, on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) expression in rats with alcohol-induced liver injury. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups consisting of the control group, the ethanol (EtOH) group, ...

  3. Exploring the Biocatalytic Scope of Alditol Oxidase from Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hellemond, Erik W.; Vermote, Linda; Koolen, Wilma; Sonke, Theo; Zandvoort, Ellen; Heuts, Dominic P. H. M.; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    The substrate scope of the flavoprotein alditol oxidase (AldO) from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), recombinantly produced in Escherichia coli, was explored. While it has been established that AldO efficiently oxidizes alditols to D-aldoses. this study revealed that the enzyme is also active with a

  4. Informations on the active site of palmito polyphenol oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, C; Cadet, F; Rouch, C; Pabion, M

    1995-01-01

    pH studies of palmito polyphenol oxidase are carried out with either 4-methylcatechol or pyrogallol as substrates. The pH profile is independent of the nature of the substrates tested. The symmetrical behaviour and the very slight differences between the values obtained suggest the existence of only one site on the molecule for o-diphenol substrates.

  5. Reorganisation Energy for Internal Electron Transfer in Multicopper Oxidases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hu, L. H.; Farrokhnia, M.; Heimdal, J.; Shleev, S.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Ryde, U.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 45 (2011), s. 13111-13126 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multi-copper oxidases * reorganization energy * QM/MM calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  6. Comparative activity of polyphenol oxidase produced In vivo by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to produce polyphenol oxidase in vivo by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus seed-borne storage molds of rice (Oryzae sativa> L.) was investigated. Also, was the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of the above enzyme secreted by each of the above seed-borne storage molds of rice. The result of ...

  7. A strategy to promote the electroactive platform adopting poly(o-anisidine)-silver nanocomposites probed for the voltammetric detection of NADH and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamithirai, D; Munusamy, S; Narayanan, V; Stephen, A

    2017-11-01

    A study on the voltammetric detection of NADH (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), Dopamine (DA) and their simultaneous determination is presented in this work. The electrochemical sensor was fabricated with the hybrid nanocomposites of poly(o-anisidine) and silver nanoparticles prepared by simple and cost-effective insitu chemical oxidative polymerization technique. The nanocomposites were synthesized with different (w/w) ratios of o-anisidine and silver by increasing the amount of o-anisidine in each, by keeping silver at a fixed quantity. The XRD patterns revealed the semi-crystalline nature of poly(o-anisidine) and the face centered cubic structure of silver. The presence of silver in its metallic state and the formation of nanocomposite were established by XPS analysis. Raman studies suggested the presence of site-selective interaction between poly(o-anisidine) and silver. HRTEM studies revealed the formation of polymer matrix type nanocomposite with the embedment of silver nanoparticles. The sensing performance of the materials were studied via cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. Fabricated sensor with 3:1 (w/w) ratio of poly(o-anisidine) and silver exhibited good catalytic activity towards the detection of NADH and DA in terms of potential and current response, when compared to others. Several important electrochemical parameters regulating the performance of the sensor have been evaluated. Under the optimum condition, differential pulse voltammetry method exhibited the linear response in the range of 0.03 to 900μM and 5 to 270μM with a low detection limit of 0.006μM and 0.052μM for NADH and DA, respectively. The modified electrodes exhibited good sensitivity, stability, reproducibility and selectivity with well-separated oxidation peaks for NADH and DA in the simultaneous determination of their binary mixture. The analytical performance of the nanocomposite as an electrochemical sensor was also

  8. Expression Studies of Gibberellin Oxidases in Developing Pumpkin Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisse, Andrea; Pimenta, Maria João; Lange, Theo

    2003-01-01

    Two cDNA clones, 3-ox and 2-ox, have been isolated from developing pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) embryos that show significant amino acid homology to gibberellin (GA) 3-oxidases and 2-oxidases, respectively. Recombinant fusion protein of clone 3-ox converted GA12-aldehyde, GA12, GA15, GA24, GA25, and GA9 to GA14-aldehyde, GA14, GA37, GA36, GA13, and GA4, respectively. Recombinant 2-ox protein oxidized GA9, GA4, and GA1 to GA51, GA34, and GA8, respectively. Previously cloned GA 7-oxidase revealed additional 3β-hydroxylation activity of GA12. Transcripts of this gene were identified in endosperm and embryo of the developing seed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and localized in protoderm, root apical meristem, and quiescent center by in situ hybridization. mRNA of the previously cloned GA 20-oxidase from pumpkin seeds was localized in endosperm and in tissues of protoderm, ground meristem, and cotyledons of the embryo. However, transcripts of the recently cloned GA 20-oxidase from pumpkin seedlings were found all over the embryo, and in tissues of the inner seed coat at the micropylar end. Previously cloned GA 2β,3β-hydroxylase mRNA molecules were specifically identified in endosperm tissue. Finally, mRNA molecules of the 3-ox and 2-ox genes were found in the embryo only. 3-ox transcripts were localized in tissues of cotyledons, protoderm, and inner cell layers of the root apical meristem, and 2-ox transcripts were found in all tissues of the embryo except the root tips. These results indicate tissue-specific GA-biosynthetic pathways operating within the developing seed. PMID:12644672

  9. Cytochemical Studies on the Localization of Methanol Oxidase and Other Oxidases in Peroxisomes of Methanol-Grown Hansenula polyrnorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Dijken, J.P. van; Harder, W.

    1976-01-01

    The localization of methanol oxidase activity in cells of methanol-limited chemostat cultures of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been studied with different cytochemical staining techniques. The methods were based on enzymatic or chemical trapping of the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme

  10. A link between blood coagulation and prophenol oxidase activation in arthropod host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Kawabata, S

    2000-09-22

    Phenol oxidase, a copper-containing enzyme, is widely distributed not only in animals but also in plants and fungi, which is responsible for initiating the biosynthesis of melanin. Activation of prophenol oxidase in arthropods is important in host defense. However, the prophenol oxidase-activating system remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Here we show that the coagulation cascade of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is linked to prophenol oxidase activation, with the oxygen carrier hemocyanin functioning as a substitute for prophenol oxidase. Tachypleus clotting enzyme functionally transforms hemocyanin to phenol oxidase, and the conversion reaches a plateau at 1:1 stoichiometry without proteolytic cleavage. The active site-masked clotting enzyme also has the same effect, suggesting that complex formation of the clotting enzyme with hemocyanin is critical for the conversion. The two systems of blood coagulation and prophenol oxidase activation may have evolved from a common ancestral protease cascade.

  11. Integrating ReSET with glycosyl iodide glycosylation in step-economy syntheses of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens and immunogenic glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiao-Wu; Schombs, Matthew W; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2014-02-21

    Carbohydrates mediate a wide range of biological processes, and understanding these events and how they might be influenced is a complex undertaking that requires access to pure glycoconjugates. The isolation of sufficient quantities of carbohydrates and glycolipids from biological samples remains a significant challenge that has redirected efforts toward chemical synthesis. However, progress toward complex glycoconjugate total synthesis has been slowed by the need for multiple protection and deprotection steps owing to the large number of similarly reactive hydroxyls in carbohydrates. Two methodologies, regioselective silyl exchange technology (ReSET) and glycosyl iodide glycosylation have now been integrated to streamline the synthesis of the globo series trisaccharides (globotriaose and isoglobotriaose) and α-lactosylceramide (α-LacCer). These glycoconjugates include tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) and immunostimulatory glycolipids that hold promise as immunotherapeutics. Beyond the utility of the step-economy syntheses afforded by this synthetic platform, the studies also reveal a unique electronic interplay between acetate and silyl ether protecting groups. Incorporation of acetates proximal to silyl ethers attenuates their reactivity while reducing undesirable side reactions. This phenomenon can be used to fine-tune the reactivity of silylated/acetylated sugar building blocks.

  12. Noncanonical Pathway for Regulation of CCL2 Expression by an mTORC1-FOXK1 Axis Promotes Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nakatsumi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 plays pivotal roles in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis. Although CCL2 expression has been found to be dependent on the nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling pathway, the regulation of CCL2 production in tumor cells has remained unclear. We have identified a noncanonical pathway for regulation of CCL2 production that is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 but independent of NF-κB. Multiple phosphoproteomics approaches identified the transcription factor forkhead box K1 (FOXK1 as a downstream target of mTORC1. Activation of mTORC1 induces dephosphorylation of FOXK1, resulting in transactivation of the CCL2 gene. Inhibition of the mTORC1-FOXK1 axis attenuated insulin-induced CCL2 production as well as the accumulation of tumor-associated monocytes-macrophages and tumor progression in mice. Our results suggest that FOXK1 directly links mTORC1 signaling and CCL2 expression in a manner independent of NF-κB and that CCL2 produced by this pathway contributes to tumor progression.

  13. A Novel Strategy for Inducing the Antitumor Effects of Triterpenoid Compounds: Blocking the Protumoral Functions of Tumor-Associated Macrophages via STAT3 Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Fujiwara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many types of nontumor cells, including leukocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, in the tumor microenvironment. Among these cells, infiltrating macrophages have recently received attention as novel target cells due to their protumoral functions. Infiltrating macrophages are called tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. TAMs polarized to the M2 phenotype are involved in tumor development and are associated with a poor clinical prognosis. Therefore, the regulation of TAM activation or M2 polarization is a new strategy for antitumor therapy. We screened natural compounds possessing an inhibitory effect on the M2 polarization of human macrophages. Among 200 purified natural compounds examined, corosolic acid (CA and oleanolic acid (OA, both are categorized in triterpenoid compounds, inhibited macrophage polarization to M2 phenotype by suppressing STAT3 activation. CA and OA also directly inhibited tumor cell proliferation and sensitized tumor cells to anticancer drugs, such as adriamycin and cisplatin. The in vivo experiments showed that CA significantly suppressed subcutaneous tumor development and lung metastasis in a murine sarcoma model. The application of triterpenoid compounds, such as CA and OA, is a potential new anticancer therapy targeting macrophage activation, with synergistic effects with anticancer agents.

  14. Clinical Significance of CD163+ and CD68+ Tumor-associated Macrophages in High-risk HPV-related Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Han, Ling-Fei; Wu, Xiang-Guang; Wei, Wen-Fei; Wu, Lan-Fang; Yi, Hong-Yan; Yan, Rui-Ming; Bai, Xiang-Yang; Zhong, Mei; Yu, Yan-Hong; Liang, Li; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective . To explore the influence of M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) on high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV)-related cervical carcinogenesis and metastasis. Methods . CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were examined immunohistochemically in a series of 130 samples, including 26 cases of normal cervical tissues, 59 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 45 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and the results were statistically analyzed. The macrophage count was corrected for the epithelial and stromal compartments respectively. Clinical data were also obtained. Results. High counts of CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages were associated with hr-HPV infection (both p cancer. Notably, a high index of CD163+ macrophages was significantly associated with higher FIGO stages ( p = 0.009) and lymph node metastasis ( p = 0.012), but a similar finding was not found for CD68+ macrophages ( p = 0.067, p = 0.079, respectively). Conclusions. Our study supported a critical role of TAMs as a prospective predictor for hr-HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis. CD163, as a promising TAMs marker, is superior to CD68 for predicting the malignant transformation and metastatic potential of cervical cancer.

  15. Nondestructive Analysis of Tumor-Associated Membrane Protein Integrating Imaging and Amplified Detection in situ Based on Dual-Labeled DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Tianshu; Gao, Tao; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Genxi

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the expression level and location of tumor-associated membrane proteins (TMPs) is of vital importance for the profiling of tumor cells. Currently, two kinds of independent techniques, i.e. ex situ detection and in situ imaging, are usually required for the quantification and localization of TMPs respectively, resulting in some inevitable problems. Methods: Herein, based on a well-designed and fluorophore-labeled DNAzyme, we develop an integrated and facile method, in which imaging and quantification of TMPs in situ are achieved simultaneously in a single system. The labeled DNAzyme not only produces localized fluorescence for the visualization of TMPs but also catalyzes the cleavage of a substrate to produce quantitative fluorescent signals that can be collected from solution for the sensitive detection of TMPs. Results: Results from the DNAzyme-based in situ imaging and quantification of TMPs match well with traditional immunofluorescence and western blotting. In addition to the advantage of two-in-one, the DNAzyme-based method is highly sensitivity, allowing the detection of TMPs in only 100 cells. Moreover, the method is nondestructive. Cells after analysis could retain their physiological activity and could be cultured for other applications. Conclusion: The integrated system provides solid results for both imaging and quantification of TMPs, making it a competitive method over some traditional techniques for the analysis of TMPs, which offers potential application as a toolbox in the future.

  16. MicroRNA-17, 20a regulates the proangiogenic function of tumor-associated macrophages via targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 2α.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenqun Xu

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs constitute a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate of most solid tumors, and they usually exhibit a proangiogenic phenotype which facilitates tumor growth in most circumstances. However, the precise mechanisms regulating the proangiogenic properties of TAMs remain largely unclear. In the present study, we found that the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α was significantly up-regulated in macrophages from tumor tissues of several solid tumors. Macrophages exposed to tumor cell line derived-culture supernatants (TSN also expressed high levels of HIF-2α in vitro, without a requirement for hypoxia. We identified miR-17 and miR-20a as the key regulators of HIF-2α expression in TAMs, and autocrine IL-6 played an important role in mediating the expression of miR-17, miR-20a, and thereafter HIF-2α in TAMs. Furthermore, the elevated HIF-2α in TAMs stimulated transcription of a set of proangiogenic genes such as VEGFA and PDGFB, which might in turn contribute to the angiogenic process within tumors. Our data provide evidence in support of the critical role of HIF-2α in the proangiogenic activity of TAMs and also reveal a novel mechanism by which miRNAs regulate TAM functions through modulation of HIF-2α expression under non-hypoxic conditions.

  17. CD8+ T-cell responses to tumor-associated antigens correlate with superior relapse-free survival after allo-SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, M; Stevanović, S; Fick, K; Tan, S M; Loeffler, J; Opitz, A; Tonn, T; Stuhler, G; Einsele, H; Grigoleit, G U

    2009-03-01

    The GVL effect following allo-SCT is one of the most prominent examples showing the ability of the immune system to eliminate malignant hematological diseases. Tumor-associated Ags (TAA), for instance WT1 and proteinase-3, have been proposed as targets for T cells to establish a GVL effect. Here, we examined an additional TAA (MUC1) as a possible T-cell target of GVL-related immune responses. We have defined new peptide epitopes from the MUC1 Ag to broaden patients' screening and to expand the repertoire of immunologic monitoring as well as for therapeutic approaches in the future. Twenty-eight patients after allo-SCT have been screened for T-cell responses toward TAA (proteinase-3, WT1, MUC1). We could detect a significant relationship between relapse and the absence of a TAA-specific T-cell response, whereby only 2/13 (15%) patients with TAA-specific CTL relapsed, in contrast to 9/15 (60%) patients without TAA-specific CTL responses (P<0.05). In conclusion, CD8(+) T-cell responses directed to TAA might contribute to the GVL effect. These observations highlight both the importance and the potential of immunotherapeutic approaches after allo-SCT.

  18. The humanized anti-human AMHRII mAb 3C23K exerts an anti-tumor activity against human ovarian cancer through tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Houcine; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Massonnet, Gérald; Pugnière, Martine; Ngô, Charlotte; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Leary, Alexandra; Alexandre, Jérôme; Meseure, Didier; Barret, Jean-Marc; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Prost, Jean-François; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Decaudin, Didier

    2017-11-21

    Müllerian inhibiting substance, also called anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of AMH type II receptor-positive tumor cells, such as human ovarian cancers (OCs). On this basis, a humanized glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody (3C23K) has been developed. The aim of this study was therefore to experimentally confirm the therapeutic potential of 3C23K in human OCs. We first determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and cytofluorometry analyses the expression of AMHRII in patient's tumors and found that a majority (60 to 80% depending on the detection technique) of OCs were positive for this marker. We then provided evidence that the tumor stroma of OC is enriched in tumor-associated macrophages and that these cells are responsible for 3C23K-induced killing of tumor cells through ADCP and ADCC mechanisms. In addition, we showed that 3C23K reduced macrophages induced-T cells immunosuppression. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 3C23K alone and in combination with a carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy in a panel of OC Patient-Derived Xenografts. In those experiments, we showed that 3C23K significantly increased the proportion and the quality of chemotherapy-based in vivo responses. Altogether, our data support the potential interest of AMHRII targeting in human ovarian cancers and the evaluation of 3C23K in further clinical trials.

  19. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  20. Identification of a cDNA encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide from a human tumor associated with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangin, M.; Webb, A.C.; Dreyer, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common paraneoplastic syndrome that appears to be mediated in many instances by a parathyroid hormone-like peptide. Poly(A) + RNA from a human renal carcinoma associated with this syndrome was enriched by preparative electrophoresis and used to construct an enriched cDNA library in phage λgt10. The library was screened with a codon-preference oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of a partial N-terminal amino acid sequence from a human tumor-derived peptide, and a 2.0 kilo-base cDNA was identified. The cDNA encodes a 177 amino acid protein consisting of a 36 amino acid leader sequence and a 141 amino acid mature peptide. The first 13 amino acids of the deduced sequence of the mature peptide display strong homology to human PTH, with complete divergence thereafter. RNA blot-hybridization analysis revealed multiple transcripts in mRNA from tumors associated with the humor syndrome and also in mRNA from normal human keratinocytes. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from humans and rodents revealed a simple pattern compatible with a single-copy gene. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 12

  1. Tyrosinase versus Catechol Oxidase: One Asparagine Makes the Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Even; Tuczek, Felix; Decker, Heinz

    2016-02-18

    Tyrosinases mediate the ortho-hydroxylation and two-electron oxidation of monophenols to ortho-quinones. Catechol oxidases only catalyze the oxidation of diphenols. Although it is of significant interest, the origin of the functional discrimination between tyrosinases and catechol oxidases has been unclear. Recently, it has been postulated that a glutamate and an asparagine bind and activate a conserved water molecule towards deprotonation of monophenols. Here we demonstrate for the first time that a polyphenoloxidase, which exhibits only diphenolase activity, can be transformed to a tyrosinase by mutation to introduce an asparagine. The asparagine and a conserved glutamate are necessary to properly orient the conserved water in order to abstract a proton from the monophenol. These results provide direct evidence for the crucial importance of a proton shuttle for tyrosinase activity of type 3 copper proteins, allowing a consistent understanding of their different chemical reactivities. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Neolignans as xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Hyptis rhomboides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sheng-Fa; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2014-05-01

    The active fraction from the EtOH extract of Hyptis rhomboides against xanthine oxidase was identified by use of an HPLC microfractionation-centrifugal vacuum evaporation-bioassay hyphenated technique. Scale-up separation of the active subfractions using semi-preparative RP-HPLC provided 13 phenylpropanoid compounds, including O-styrenylneolignans, hyprhombins A-C, epihyprhombin B, and hyprhombin B methyl ester, and O-caffeoylnorneolignans, hyprhombins D and E. All of these compounds shared a common 1,4-benzodioxane skeleton, as established by spectroscopic analyses. Hyprhombin C and epihyprhombin B exhibited better anti-xanthine oxidase activity than allopurinol, with IC50 values of 0.6 and 2.0 μM, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Xanthine Oxidase: Isolation, Assays of Activity, and Inhibition

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    Danijela A. Kostić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidase (XO is an important enzyme catalyzing the hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid which is excreted by kidneys. Excessive production and/or inadequate excretion of uric acid results in hyperuricemia. This paper presents a detailed review of methods of isolation, determination of xanthine oxidase activity, and the effect of plant extracts and their constituents on it. Determining the content and activities of XO can be used for diagnostic purposes. Testing inhibition of XO is important for detection of potentially effective compounds or extracts that can be used to treat diseases that are caused by increased activity of XO. In vitro bioassays are used to examine test material for XO inhibition, as inhibitors of XO may be potentially useful for the treatment of gout or other XO induced diseases. Several authors reported on the XO inhibitory potential of traditionally used medicinal plants.

  4. The Escherichia coli CydX protein is a member of the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex and is required for cytochrome bd oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOrsdel, Caitlin E; Bhatt, Shantanu; Allen, Rondine J; Brenner, Evan P; Hobson, Jessica J; Jamil, Aqsa; Haynes, Brittany M; Genson, Allyson M; Hemm, Matthew R

    2013-08-01

    Cytochrome bd oxidase operons from more than 50 species of bacteria contain a short gene encoding a small protein that ranges from ∼30 to 50 amino acids and is predicted to localize to the cell membrane. Although cytochrome bd oxidases have been studied for more than 70 years, little is known about the role of this small protein, denoted CydX, in oxidase activity. Here we report that Escherichia coli mutants lacking CydX exhibit phenotypes associated with reduced oxidase activity. In addition, cell membrane extracts from ΔcydX mutant strains have reduced oxidase activity in vitro. Consistent with data showing that CydX is required for cytochrome bd oxidase activity, copurification experiments indicate that CydX interacts with the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex. Together, these data support the hypothesis that CydX is a subunit of the CydAB cytochrome bd oxidase complex that is required for complex activity. The results of mutation analysis of CydX suggest that few individual amino acids in the small protein are essential for function, at least in the context of protein overexpression. In addition, the results of analysis of the paralogous small transmembrane protein AppX show that the two proteins could have some overlapping functionality in the cell and that both have the potential to interact with the CydAB complex.

  5. Role of amine oxidase expression to maintain putrescine homeostasis in Rhodococcus opacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Morris, Peter C; Keane, Mark A

    2013-04-10

    While applications of amine oxidases are increasing, few have been characterised and our understanding of their biological role and strategies for bacteria exploitation are limited. By altering the nitrogen source (NH4Cl, putrescine and cadaverine (diamines) and butylamine (monoamine)) and concentration, we have identified a constitutive flavin dependent oxidase (EC 1.4.3.10) within Rhodococcus opacus. The activity of this oxidase can be increased by over two orders of magnitude in the presence of aliphatic diamines. In addition, the expression of a copper dependent diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.22) was observed at diamine concentrations>1mM or when cells were grown with butylamine, which acts to inhibit the flavin oxidase. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic treatment of the flavin oxidase delivered a Michaelis constant (KM)=190μM and maximum rate (kcat)=21.8s(-1) for the oxidative deamination of putrescine with a lower KM (=60μM) and comparable kcat (=18.2s(-1)) for the copper oxidase. MALDI-TOF and genomic analyses have indicated a metabolic clustering of functionally related genes. From a consideration of amine oxidase specificity and sequence homology, we propose a putrescine degradation pathway within Rhodococcus that utilises oxidases in tandem with subsequent dehydrogenase and transaminase enzymes. The implications of PUT homeostasis through the action of the two oxidases are discussed with respect to stressors, evolution and application in microbe-assisted phytoremediation or bio-augmentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Subpollen particles: Carriers of allergenic proteins and oxidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacsi, Attila; Choudhury, Barun K.; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is known to induce allergic asthma in atopic individuals, although only a few inhaled pollen grains penetrate into the lower respiratory tract. Objective We sought to provide evidence that subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size, possessing both antigenic and redox properties, are released from weed pollen grains and to test their role in allergic airway inflammation. Methods The release of SPPs was analyzed by means of microscopic imaging and flow cytometry. The redox properties of SPPs and the SPP-mediated oxidative effect on epithelial cells were determined by using redox-sensitive probes and specific inhibitors. Western blotting and amino acid sequence analysis were used to examine the protein components of the SPP. The allergenic properties of the SPP were determined in a murine model of experimental asthma. Results Ragweed pollen grains released 0.5 to 4.5 μm of SPPs on hydration. These contained Amb a 1, along with other allergenic proteins of ragweed pollen, and possessed nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) [NAD(P)H] oxidase activity. The SPPs significantly increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells and induced allergic airway inflammation in the experimental animals. Pretreatment of the SPPs with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors attenuated their capacity to increase ROS levels in the airway epithelial cells and subsequent airway inflammation. Conclusions The allergenic potency of SPPs released from ragweed pollen grains is mediated in tandem by ROS generated by intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidases and antigenic proteins. Clinical implications Severe clinical symptoms associated with seasonal asthma might be explained by immune responses to inhaled SPPs carrying allergenic proteins and ROS-producing NAD(P)H oxidases. PMID:17030236

  7. Multiple controls affect arsenite oxidase gene expression in Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coppée Jean-Yves

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both the speciation and toxicity of arsenic are affected by bacterial transformations, i.e. oxidation, reduction or methylation. These transformations have a major impact on environmental contamination and more particularly on arsenic contamination of drinking water. Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans has been isolated from an arsenic- contaminated environment and has developed various mechanisms for coping with arsenic, including the oxidation of As(III to As(V as a detoxification mechanism. Results In the present study, a differential transcriptome analysis was used to identify genes, including arsenite oxidase encoding genes, involved in the response of H. arsenicoxydans to As(III. To get insight into the molecular mechanisms of this enzyme activity, a Tn5 transposon mutagenesis was performed. Transposon insertions resulting in a lack of arsenite oxidase activity disrupted aoxR and aoxS genes, showing that the aox operon transcription is regulated by the AoxRS two-component system. Remarkably, transposon insertions were also identified in rpoN coding for the alternative N sigma factor (σ54 of RNA polymerase and in dnaJ coding for the Hsp70 co-chaperone. Western blotting with anti-AoxB antibodies and quantitative RT-PCR experiments allowed us to demonstrate that the rpoN and dnaJ gene products are involved in the control of arsenite oxidase gene expression. Finally, the transcriptional start site of the aoxAB operon was determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and a putative -12/-24 σ54-dependent promoter motif was identified upstream of aoxAB coding sequences. Conclusion These results reveal the existence of novel molecular regulatory processes governing arsenite oxidase expression in H. arsenicoxydans. These data are summarized in a model that functionally integrates arsenite oxidation in the adaptive response to As(III in this microorganism.

  8. Role of xanthine oxidase in thermal injury of skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Till, G. O.; Guilds, L. S.; Mahrougui, M.; Friedl, H. P.; Trentz, O.; Ward, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    These studies were designed to assess pathophysiologic factors responsible for increased vascular permeability occurring in rat skin that has been thermally injured in vivo. Under the conditions employed, permeability changes and edema formation progressed over time, with peak changes occurring 60 minutes after thermal trauma. The plasma of thermally injured rats showed dramatic increases in levels of xanthine oxidase activity, with peak values appearing as early as 15 minutes after thermal t...

  9. Molybdopterin in carbon monoxide oxidase from carboxydotrophic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, O; Rajagopalan, K V

    1984-01-01

    The carbon monoxide oxidases (COXs) purified from the carboxydotrophic bacteria Pseudomonas carboxydohydrogena and Pseudomonas carboxydoflava were found to be molybdenum hydroxylases, identical in cofactor composition and spectral properties to the recently characterized enzyme from Pseudomonas carboxydovorans (O. Meyer, J. Biol. Chem. 257:1333-1341, 1982). All three enzymes exhibited a cofactor composition of two flavin adenine dinucleotides, two molybdenums, eight irons and eight labile sul...

  10. Resolution of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bovine heart mitochondria into two subcomplexes, one of which contains the redox centers of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finel, M; Skehel, J M; Albracht, S P; Fearnley, I M; Walker, J E

    1992-11-24

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was purified from bovine heart mitochondria by solubilization with n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside (lauryl maltoside), ammonium sulfate fractionation, and chromatography on Mono Q in the presence of the detergent. Its subunit composition was very similar to complex I purified by conventional means. Complex I was dissociated in the presence of N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide and beta-mercaptoethanol, and two subcomplexes, I alpha and I beta, were isolated by chromatography. Subcomplex I alpha catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone-1. It is composed of about 22 different and mostly hydrophilic subunits and contains 2.0 nmol of FMN/mg of protein. Among its subunits is the 51-kDa subunit, which binds FMN and NADH and probably contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster also. Three other potential Fe-S proteins, the 75- and 24-kDa subunits and a 23-kDa subunit (N-terminal sequence TYKY), are also present. All of the Fe-S clusters detectable by EPR in complex I, including cluster 2, are found in subcomplex I alpha. The line shapes of the EPR spectra of the Fe-S clusters are slightly broadened relative to spectra measured on complex I purified by conventional means, and the quinone reductase activity is insensitive to rotenone. Similar changes were found in samples of the intact chromatographically purified complex I, or in complex I prepared by the conventional method and then subjected to chromatography in the presence of lauryl maltoside. Subcomplex I beta contains about 15 different subunits. The sequences of many of them contain hydrophobic segments that could be membrane spanning, including at least two mitochondrial gene products, ND4 and ND5. The role of subcomplex I beta in the intact complex remains to be elucidated.

  11. In vitro effects of myricetin, morin, apigenin, (+)-taxifolin, (+)-catechin, (−)-epicatechin, naringenin and naringin on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çelik, Haydar; Koşar, Müberra; Arinç, Emel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We assessed inhibitory effects of 8 dietary flavonoids on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. • The flavonol myricetin was the most potent in inhibiting cytochrome b5 reduction with an IC 50 value of 0.35 μM. • We investigated kinetics of myricetin-induced inhibition in detail. • We explored the structure–inhibitory activity relationship of compounds. • Modulation of cytochrome b5 reduction indicates a potential for myricetin to lead to some food–drug/xenobiotic interactions. - Abstract: The microsomal NADH-dependent electron transport system consisting of cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 participates in a number of physiologically important processes including lipid metabolism as well as is involved in the metabolism of various drug and xenobiotics. In the present study, we assessed the inhibitory effects of eight dietary flavonoids representing five distinct chemical classes on cytochrome b5 reduction by purified cytochrome b5 reductase. From the flavonoids tested, myricetin was the most potent in inhibiting cytochrome b5 reduction with an IC 50 value of 0.35 μM. Myricetin inhibited b5 reductase noncompetitively with a K i of 0.21 μM with respect to cofactor NADH, and exhibited a non-linear relationship indicating non-Michaelis–Menten kinetic binding with respect to cytochrome b5. In contrast to the potent inhibitory activity of myricetin, (+)-taxifolin was found to be a weak inhibitor (IC 50 = 9.8 μM). The remaining flavonoids were inactive within the concentration range tested (1–50 μM). Analysis of structure–activity data suggested that simultaneous presence of three OH groups in ring B is a primary structural determinant for a potent enzyme inhibition. Our results suggest that inhibition of the activity of this system by myricetin or myricetin containing diets may influence the metabolism of therapeutic drugs as well as detoxification of xenobiotics

  12. NaDC3 Induces Premature Cellular Senescence by Promoting Transport of Krebs Cycle Intermediates, Increasing NADH, and Exacerbating Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Du, Xuan; Fu, Bo; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter 3 (NaDC3) is a key metabolism-regulating membrane protein responsible for transport of Krebs cycle intermediates. NaDC3 is upregulated as organs age, but knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which NaDC3 modulates mammalian aging is limited. In this study, we showed that NaDC3 overexpression accelerated cellular senescence in young human diploid cells (MRC-5 and WI-38) and primary renal tubular cells, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and increased expression of senescent biomarkers, senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and carbonyl were significantly enhanced, and activities of respiratory complexes I and III and ATP level were significantly decreased in NaDC3-infected cells. Stressful premature senescent phenotypes induced by NaDC3 were markedly ameliorated via treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and Tempol. High expression of NaDC3 caused a prominent increase in intracellular levels of Krebs cycle intermediates and NADH. Exogenous NADH and NAD(+) may aggravate and attenuate the aging phenotypes induced by NaDC3, respectively. These results suggest that NaDC3 can induce premature cellular senescence by promoting the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates, increasing generation of NADH and reactive oxygen species and leading to oxidative damage. Our results clarify the aging signaling pathway regulated by NaDC3. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. A novel nine base deletion mutation in NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase gene in an Indian family with recessive congenital methemoglobinemia-type-II

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    Prashant Warang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recessive hereditary methemoglobinemia (RCM associated with severe neurological abnormalities is a very rare disorder caused by NADH- cytochrome b5 reductase (cb5r deficiency (Type II. We report a case of 11 month old male child who had severe mental retardation, microcephaly and gross global developmental delay with methemoglobin level of 61.1%. The diagnosis of NADH-CYB5R3 deficiency was made by the demonstration of significantly reduced NADH-CYB5R3 activity in the patient and intermediate enzyme activity in both the parents. Mutation analysis of the CYB5R gene revealed a novel nine nucleotide deletion in exon 6 leading to the elimination of 3 amino acid residues (Lys173, Ser174 and Val 175. To confirm that this mutation was not an artifact, we performed PCR-RFLP analysis using the restriction enzyme Drd I. As the normal sequence has a restriction recognition site for Drd I which was eliminated by the deletion, a single band of 603-bp was seen in the presence of the homozygous mutation. Molecular modeling analysis showed a significant effect of these 3 amino acids deletion on the protein structure and stability leading to a severe clinical presentation. A novel homozygous 9 nucleotide deletion (p.K173–p.V175del3 is shown to be segregated with the disease in this family. Knowing the profile of mutations would allow us to offer prenatal diagnosis in families with severe neurological disorders associated with RCM — Type II.

  14. Multi-Copper Oxidases and Human Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashchenko, Ganna; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases (MCOs) are a small group of enzymes that oxidize their substrate with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. Generally, multi-copper oxidases are promiscuous with regards to their reducing substrates and are capable of performing various functions in different species. To date, three multi-copper oxidases have been detected in humans—ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Each of these enzymes has a high specificity towards iron with the resulting ferroxidase activity being associated with ferroportin, the only known iron exporter protein in humans. Ferroportin exports iron as Fe2+, but transferrin, the major iron transporter protein of blood, can bind only Fe3+ effectively. Iron oxidation in enterocytes is mediated mainly by hephaestin thus allowing dietary iron to enter the bloodstream. Zyklopen is involved in iron efflux from placental trophoblasts during iron transfer from mother to fetus. Release of iron from the liver relies on ferroportin and the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin which is found in blood in a soluble form. Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen show distinctive expression patterns and have unique mechanisms for regulating their expression. These features of human multi-copper ferroxidases can serve as a basis for the precise control of iron efflux in different tissues. In this manuscript, we review the biochemical and biological properties of the three human MCOs and discuss their potential roles in human iron homeostasis. PMID:23807651

  15. Surface characterization and direct bioelectrocatalysis of multicopper oxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivnitski, Dmitri M.; Khripin, Constantine; Luckarift, Heather R.; Johnson, Glenn R.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2010-01-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCO) have been extensively studied as oxygen reduction catalysts for cathodic reactions in biofuel cells. Theoretically, direct electron transfer between an enzyme and electrode offers optimal energy conversion efficiency providing that the enzyme/electrode interface can be engineered to establish efficient electrical communication. In this study, the direct bioelectrocatalysis of three MCO (Laccase from Trametes versicolor, bilirubin oxidase (BOD) from the fungi Myrothecium verrucaria and ascorbate oxidase (AOx) from Cucurbita sp.) was investigated and compared as oxygen reduction catalysts. Protein film voltammetry and electrochemical characterization of the MCO electrodes showed that DET had been successfully established in all cases. Atomic force microscopy imaging and force measurements indicated that enzyme was immobilized as a monolayer on the electrode surface. Evidence for three clearly separated anodic and cathodic redox events related to the Type 1 (T1) and the trinculear copper centers (T2, T3) of various MCO was observed. The redox potential of the T1 center was strongly modulated by physiological factors including pH, anaerobic and aerobic conditions and the presence of inhibitors.

  16. Surface characterization and direct bioelectrocatalysis of multicopper oxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivnitski, Dmitri M., E-mail: ivnitski@unm.ed [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States)] [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States); Khripin, Constantine [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States); Luckarift, Heather R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States)] [Universal Technology Corporation, 1270 N. Fairfield Road, Dayton, OH 45432 (United States); Johnson, Glenn R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RXQL, Microbiology and Applied Biochemistry, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL 32403 (United States); Atanassov, Plamen, E-mail: plamen@unm.ed [Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Multicopper oxidases (MCO) have been extensively studied as oxygen reduction catalysts for cathodic reactions in biofuel cells. Theoretically, direct electron transfer between an enzyme and electrode offers optimal energy conversion efficiency providing that the enzyme/electrode interface can be engineered to establish efficient electrical communication. In this study, the direct bioelectrocatalysis of three MCO (Laccase from Trametes versicolor, bilirubin oxidase (BOD) from the fungi Myrothecium verrucaria and ascorbate oxidase (AOx) from Cucurbita sp.) was investigated and compared as oxygen reduction catalysts. Protein film voltammetry and electrochemical characterization of the MCO electrodes showed that DET had been successfully established in all cases. Atomic force microscopy imaging and force measurements indicated that enzyme was immobilized as a monolayer on the electrode surface. Evidence for three clearly separated anodic and cathodic redox events related to the Type 1 (T1) and the trinculear copper centers (T2, T3) of various MCO was observed. The redox potential of the T1 center was strongly modulated by physiological factors including pH, anaerobic and aerobic conditions and the presence of inhibitors.

  17. Kinetic mechanism of putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Malgorzata M; Heuts, Dominic P H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-10-01

    Putrescine oxidase from Rhodococcus erythropolis (PuO) is a flavin-containing amine oxidase from the monoamine oxidase family that performs oxidative deamination of aliphatic diamines. In this study we report pre-steady-state kinetic analyses of the enzyme with the use of single- and double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy and putrescine as a substrate. During the fast and irreversible reductive half-reaction no radical intermediates were observed, suggesting a direct hydride transfer from the substrate to the FAD. The rate constant of flavin reoxidation depends on the ligand binding; when the imine product was bound to the enzyme the rate constant was higher than with free enzyme species. Similar results were obtained with product-mimicking ligands and this indicates that a ternary complex is formed during catalysis. The obtained kinetic data were used together with steady-state rate equations derived for ping-pong, ordered sequential and bifurcated mechanisms to explore which mechanism is operative. The integrated analysis revealed that PuO employs a bifurcated mechanism due to comparable rate constants of product release from the reduced enzyme and reoxidation of the reduced enzyme-product complex. © 2014 FEBS.

  18. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 μg ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 μg ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 μg ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity.

  19. Xanthine oxidase catalyzes the synthesis of retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibi, G; Paganini, A; Gueli, M C; Ampola, F; Nicotra, C M

    2001-01-01

    Milk xanthine oxidase (xanthine: oxygen oxidoreductase; XO; EC 1.1.3.22) was found to catalyze the conversion of retinaldehyde to retinoic acid. The ability of XO to synthesize all trans-retinoic acid efficiently was assessed by its turnover number of 31.56 min-1, determined at pH 7.0 with 1 nM XO and all trans-retinaldehyde varying between 0.05 to 2 microM. The determination of both retinoid and purine content in milk was also considered in order to correlate their concentrations with kinetic parameters of retinaldehyde oxidase activity. The velocity of the reaction was dependent on the isomeric form of the substrate, the all trans- and 9-cis-forms being the preferred substrates rather than 13-cis-retinaldehyde. The enzyme was able to oxidize retinaldehyde in the presence of oxygen with NAD or without NAD addition. In this latter condition the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme was higher. The synthesis of retinoic acid was inhibited 87% and 54% by 4 microM and 2 microM allopurinol respectively and inhibited 48% by 10 microM xanthine in enzyme assays performed at 2 microM all trans-retinaldehyde. The Ki value determined for xanthine as an inhibitor of retinaldehyde oxidase activity was 4 microM.

  20. Mechanisms for suppressing NADPH oxidase in the vascular wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Dusting

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress underlies many forms of vascular disease as well as tissue injury following ischemia and reperfusion. The major source of oxidative stress in the artery wall is an NADPH oxidase. This enzyme complex as expressed in vascular cells differs from that in phagocytic leucocytes both in biochemical structure and functions. The crucial flavin-containing catalytic subunits, Nox1 and Nox4, are not found in leucocytes, but are highly expressed in vascular cells and upregulated with vascular remodeling, such as that found in hypertension and atherosclerosis. The difference in catalytic subunits offers the opportunity to develop "vascular specific" NADPH oxidase inhibitors that do not compromise the essential physiological signaling and phagocytic functions carried out by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Nitric oxide and targeted inhibitors of NADPH oxidase that block the source of oxidative stress in the vasculature are more likely to prevent the deterioration of vascular function that leads to stroke and heart attack, than are conventional antioxidants. The roles of Nox isoforms in other inflammatory conditions are yet to be explored.

  1. Recombinant Listeria vaccines containing PEST sequences are potent immune adjuvants for the tumor-associated antigen human papillomavirus-16 E7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Duane A; Shahabi, Vafa; Gunn, George R; Pan, Zhen-Kun; Dominiecki, Mary E; Paterson, Yvonne

    2004-12-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has established that the fusion of tumor-associated antigens to a truncated form of the Listeria monocytogenes virulence factor listeriolysin O (LLO) enhances the immunogenicity and antitumor efficacy of the tumor antigen when delivered by Listeria or by vaccinia. LLO contains a PEST sequence at the NH(2) terminus. These sequences, which are found in eukaryotic proteins with a short cellular half-life, target proteins for degradation in the ubiquitin-proteosome pathway. To investigate whether the enhanced immunogenicity conferred by LLO is due to the PEST sequence, we constructed new Listeria recombinants that expressed the HPV-16 E7 antigen fused to LLO, which either contained or had been deleted of this sequence. We then compared the antitumor efficacy of this set of vectors and found that Listeria expressing the fusion protein LLO-E7 or PEST-E7 were effective at regressing established macroscopic HPV-16 immortalized tumors in syngeneic mice. In contrast, Listeria recombinants expressing E7 alone or E7 fused to LLO from which the PEST sequence had been genetically removed could only slow tumor growth. Because CD8(+) T cell epitopes are generated in the ubiquitin-proteosome pathway, we also investigated the ability of the vaccines to induce E7-specific CD8(+) T cells in the spleen and to generate E7-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. A strong correlation was observed between CD8(+) T-cell induction and tumor homing and the antitumor efficacy of the Listeria-E7 vaccines. These findings suggest a strategy for the augmentation of tumor antigen-based immunotherapeutic strategies that may be broadly applicable.

  2. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu; Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues

  3. High expression of fusion proteins consisting of a single-chain variable fragment antibody against a tumor-associated antigen and interleukin-2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napathorn, Suchada Chanprateep; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a strategy for high-level production of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused with interleukin-2 (IL-2) in Escherichia coli. We constructed two fusion sequences consisting of a scFv gene derived from a mouse monoclonal antibody against a tumor-associated antigen (MK-1) and human Interleukin-2(IL-2) gene, ligated the fusions into pET15b and transformed into three different E. coli strains. The effects of temperature, isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) concentration and duration of IPTG induction were investigated. Employing E. coli strain Rosetta-gami B, which has an oxidizing cytoplasm that facilitates cytoplasmic disulfide bond formation, improved the level of soluble protein expression. Under optimal conditions, the highest levels of fusion protein expression and high percentages of the proteins were found in their soluble form. Specifically, 89.29% (0.28 g/l) of one fusion protein was soluble after a 10-h induction and 84.61% (0.26 g/l) of the other fusion protein was soluble after a separate 10-h induction. When analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the partially-purified fusion proteins retained a specific binding activity to the cell lysate of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing MK-1. Taken together, the methods described herein permit the production of substantial amounts of the fusion proteins for conducting functional studies on the biological role of these fusion proteins. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Two proliferation-related proteins, TYMS and PGK1, could be new cytotoxic T lymphocyte-directed tumor-associated antigens of HLA-A2+ colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Azuma, Kouichi; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Ito, Masaaki; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Ishihara, Yuki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to provide a scientific basis for specific immunotherapy of colon cancer. This study focused on identification of colon tumor-associated antigens and HLA-A2-restricted and tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of a colon cancer patient. A gene expression cloning method was used to identify genes coding for tumor antigens. Fifty-six peptides with HLA-A2-binding motifs encoded by these proteins were examined for their ability to induce HLA-A2-restricted and tumor-reactive CTLs. We identified the following three genes coding for proliferation-related proteins: thymidylate synthase (TYMS), which is involved in chemoresistance (5-fluorouracil); 5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribonucleotide transfolmylase/inosinicase (AICRT/I); and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PKG1), which was secreted by tumor cells and involved in the angiogenic process. TYMS was preferentially expressed in tumor cells, whereas AICRT/I and PKG1 were equally expressed in both cancer cells and normal tissues at the mRNA level. Among 56 peptides with HLA-A2-binding motifs encoded by these proteins, 8 peptides were recognized by the CTLs, and 5 of 8 peptides were also recognized by the CTL precursors without ex vivo activation in the peripheral blood of colon cancer patients. Furthermore, four of them (one each from TYMS and PKG1 and two from AICRT/1) possessed the ability to induce HLA-A2-restricted and peptide-specific CTLs cytotoxic to colon tumor cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of colon cancer patients. TYMS and PGK1, as well as their epitope peptides, might be appropriate target molecules for specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2(+) colon cancer patients because of the positive role of TYMS and PGK1 in chemoresistance (5-fluorouracil) and angiogenesis of tumor cells, respectively.

  5. Human folliculin delays cell cycle progression through late S and G2/M-phases: effect of phosphorylation and tumor associated mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Laviolette

    Full Text Available The Birt-Hogg-Dube disease occurs as a result of germline mutations in the human Folliculin gene (FLCN, and is characterized by clinical features including fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and multifocal renal neoplasia. Clinical and genetic evidence suggest that FLCN acts as a tumor suppressor gene. The human cell line UOK257, derived from the renal cell carcinoma of a patient with a germline mutation in the FLCN gene, harbors a truncated version of the FLCN protein. Reconstitution of the wild type FLCN protein into UOK257 cells delays cell cycle progression, due to a slower progression through the late S and G2/M-phases. Similarly, Flcn (-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts progress more rapidly through the cell cycle than wild type controls (Flcn (flox/flox. The reintroduction of tumor-associated FLCN mutants (FLCN ΔF157, FLCN 1-469 or FLCN K508R fails to delay cell cycle progression in UOK257 cells. Additionally, FLCN phosphorylation (on Serines 62 and 73 fluctuates throughout the cell cycle and peaks during the G2/M phase in cells treated with nocodazole. In keeping with this observation, the reintroduction of a FLCN phosphomimetic mutant into the UOK257 cell line results in faster progression through the cell cycle compared to those expressing the wild type FLCN protein. These findings suggest that the tumor suppression function of FLCN may be linked to its impact on the cell cycle and that FLCN phosphorylation is important for this activity. Additionally, these observations describe a novel in vitro assay for testing the functional significance of FLCN mutations and/or genetic polymorphisms.

  6. CXCL1-Mediated Interaction of Cancer Cells with Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Promotes Tumor Progression in Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs are reported to be associated with poor prognosis, depending on their pro-tumoral roles. Current knowledge of TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of urothelial cancer of the bladder (UCB is limited. Therefore, we investigated the paracrine effect induced by TAMs and CAFs in the tumor microenvironment of human UCB. For this, we first carried out immunohistochemical analysis for CXCL1, CD204 (TAM marker, αSMA (CAF marker, E-cadherin, and MMP2 using 155 UBC tissue samples. Next, CXCL1-overexpressing clones of THP-1-derived TAMs and NIH3T3-derived CAFs were developed by lentiviral vector infection. The immunohistochemical study showed high CXCL1 levels in UCB cells to be associated with enhanced recruitment of TAMs/CAFs, higher metastatic potential, and poor prognosis. Three-dimensional (3D co-culture of UCB cells and TAMs/CAFs suggested that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs play an important role in cell-to-cell adhesion and interaction among cancer cells and these stromal cells. CXCL1-expressing TAMs/CAFs enhanced tumor growth of subcutaneous UCB tumors in nude mice when injected together. In addition, an experiment using the orthotopic bladder cancer model revealed that CXCL1 production in TAMs/CAFs supported tumor implantation into the murine bladder wall and UCB growth when injected together, which was confirmed by clinical data of patients with bladder cancer. Thus, CXCL1 signaling in the tumor microenvironment is highly responsible for repeated intravesical recurrence, disease progression, and drug resistance through enhanced invasion ability. In conclusion, disrupting CXCL1 signaling to dysregulate this chemokine is a promising therapeutic approach for human UCB.

  7. M2-polarized tumor-associated macrophages facilitated migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of HCC cells via the TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rong-Rong; Li, Jing-Huan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Rong-Xin; Wang, Yan-Hong

    2018-01-16

    M2-polarized macrophages are tumor-associated-macrophages (TAMs), which are important contents of tumor-infiltrating immune cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a molecular biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have important roles in the immune system and M2-polarized macrophages. However, the effects of TLR4 on M2-polarized macrophages in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are unknown. Here, TLR4 expressed on HCC cells mediates the pro-tumor effects and mechanisms of M2-polarized macrophages. THP-1 cells were induced to differentiate into M2-like macrophages through treatments with IL-4, IL-13, and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). We used the HCC cell lines SMMC-7721 and MHCC97-H cultured in conditioned medium from M2-like macrophages (M2-CM) to investigate the migration potential of HCC cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated molecular genetics. Signaling pathways that mediated M2-CM-promoted HCC migration were detected using western blotting. HCC cells cultured with M2-CM displayed a fibroblast-like morphology, an increased metastatic capability, and expression of EMT markers. TLR4 expression was markedly increased in M2-CM-treated HCC cells. TLR4 overexpression promoted HCC cell migration, and a TLR4-neutralizing antibody markedly inhibited HCC EMT in cells cultured with M2-CM. Furthermore, the TLR4/(signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway contributed to the effects of M2-CM on HCC cells. Taken together, M2-polarized macrophages facilitated the migration and EMT of HCC cells via the TLR4/STAT3 signaling pathway, suggesting that TLR4 may be a novel therapeutic target. These results improve our understanding of M2-polarized macrophages.

  8. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Virtudes Céspedes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183 with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs. We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR. Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80 tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX, cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies.

  9. Lurbinectedin induces depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, an essential component of its in vivo synergism with gemcitabine, in pancreatic adenocarcinoma mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Guillén, María José; López-Casas, Pedro Pablo; Sarno, Francesca; Gallardo, Alberto; Álamo, Patricia; Cuevas, Carmen; Hidalgo, Manuel; Galmarini, Carlos María; Allavena, Paola; Avilés, Pablo; Mangues, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We explored whether the combination of lurbinectedin (PM01183) with the antimetabolite gemcitabine could result in a synergistic antitumor effect in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) mouse models. We also studied the contribution of lurbinectedin to this synergism. This drug presents a dual pharmacological effect that contributes to its in vivo antitumor activity: (i) specific binding to DNA minor grooves, inhibiting active transcription and DNA repair; and (ii) specific depletion of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We evaluated the in vivo antitumor activity of lurbinectedin and gemcitabine as single agents and in combination in SW-1990 and MIA PaCa-2 cell-line xenografts and in patient-derived PDA models (AVATAR). Lurbinectedin-gemcitabine combination induced a synergistic effect on both MIA PaCa-2 [combination index (CI)=0.66] and SW-1990 (CI=0.80) tumor xenografts. It also induced complete tumor remissions in four out of six patient-derived PDA xenografts. This synergism was associated with enhanced DNA damage (anti-γ-H2AX), cell cycle blockage, caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. In addition to the enhanced DNA damage, which is a consequence of the interaction of the two drugs with the DNA, lurbinectedin induced TAM depletion leading to cytidine deaminase (CDA) downregulation in PDA tumors. This effect could, in turn, induce an increase of gemcitabine-mediated DNA damage that was especially relevant in high-density TAM tumors. These results show that lurbinectedin can be used to develop ‘molecularly targeted’ combination strategies. PMID:27780828

  10. Pancreatic beta cells from db/db mice show cell-specific [Ca2+]i and NADH responses to glucose but not to alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Larsson-Nyrén, Gerd; Lindström, Per

    2005-01-01

    induced cell-specific NADH responses in all 3 models, but KIC did so only in lean mouse [beta] cells. CONCLUSIONS: A cell-specific response may be induced at several steps of beta-cell stimulus-secretion coupling. Mitochondrial metabolism generates a cell-specific response in normal beta cells......OBJECTIVE: We recently showed that timing and magnitude of the glucose-induced cytoplasmic calcium [Ca2+]i response are reproducible and specific for the individual beta cell. We now wanted to identify which step(s) of stimulus-secretion coupling determine the cell specificity of the [Ca2+]i...

  11. NADPH oxidase: a target for the modulation of the excessive oxidase damage induced by overtraining in rat neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jingmei; Chen, Peijie; Wang, Ru; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhang, Yajun; Xiao, Weihua

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that NADPH oxidase mediating the ROS production is the major pathway for ROS generation in neutrophils during exercise. NADPH oxidase, as a target can modulate oxidative damage induced by overtraining, which can be value to the prevention of exercise-induced immunosuppression. Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: a negative control group (C, n = 10), an overtraining group (E, n = 10) and an overtraining + DPI intervention group (D, n =10). Groups E and D were trained on a standard treadmill with progressive load for 11 weeks. After 36-40 h from the last training, eight rats were randomly selected from each group, and blood was sampled from the orbital vein. ELISAs were used to measure serum cytokine levels and lipid peroxidation in blood plasma. Flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI double staining was used to measure neutrophil apoptosis and necrosis. DNA damage in lymphocytes was tested using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). The co-localization between gp91(phox) and p47(phox) of the NADPH-oxidase was detected using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. 1) Compared with group C, the concentrations of IL-1β, IL-8, and TNF-α were significantly increased and MCP-1, and CINC were significantly decreased in blood plasma from group E (P overtraining. 1) Excessive exercise led to an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in peripheral blood, and it may have induced tissue inflammation 2) Overtraining can activate the NADPH oxidase-mediated overproduction of ROS, leading to increased lipid peroxidation. 3) NADPHoxidase in neutrophils as a target, was responsible for ROS, oxidative damage to phagocytes and lymphocytes and changes to inflammatory cytokines and immune regulatory factors all affect cellular immune functions and may be causative factors for exercise-induced immunosuppression.

  12. On the Possibility of Uphill Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Multicopper Oxidases: Electrochemical and Quantum Chemical Study of Bilirubin Oxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shleev, S.; Andoralov, V.; Falk, M.; Reimann, C. T.; Ruzgas, T.; Srnec, Martin; Ryde, U.; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2012), s. 1524-1540 ISSN 1040-0397 Grant - others:7th Framework Program(XE) NMP4-SL-2009-229255 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : bilirubin oxidase * intramolecular electron transfer * rate-limiting catalytic step * reorganization energy * QM/MM calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.817, year: 2012

  13. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by the aldehyde oxidase inhibitor raloxifene: implications for identifying molybdopterin nitrite reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidert, E R; Schoenborn, S O; Cantu-Medellin, N; Choughule, K V; Jones, J P; Kelley, E E

    2014-02-15

    Sources of nitric oxide alternative to nitric oxide synthases are gaining significant traction as crucial mediators of vessel function under hypoxic inflammatory conditions. For example, capacity to catalyze the one electron reduction of nitrite (NO2-) to ·NO has been reported for hemoglobin, myoglobin and molybdopterin-containing enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO). For XOR and AO, use of selective inhibition strategies is therefore crucial when attempting to assign relative contributions to nitrite-mediated ·NO formation in cells and tissue. To this end, XOR inhibition has been accomplished with application of classic pyrazolopyrimidine-based inhibitors allo/oxypurinol or the newly FDA-approved XOR-specific inhibitor, Uloric® (febuxostat). Likewise, raloxifene, an estrogen receptor antagonist, has been identified as a potent (Ki=1.0 nM) inhibitor of AO. Herein, we characterize the inhibition kinetics of raloxifene for XOR and describe the resultant effects on inhibiting XO-catalyzed ·NO formation. Exposure of purified XO to raloxifene (PBS, pH 7.4) resulted in a dose-dependent (12.5-100 μM) inhibition of xanthine oxidation to uric acid. Dixon plot analysis revealed a competitive inhibition process with a Ki=13 μM. This inhibitory process was more effective under acidic pH; similar to values encountered under hypoxic/inflammatory conditions. In addition, raloxifene also inhibited anoxic XO-catalyzed reduction of NO2- to NO (EC50=64 μM). In contrast to having no effect on XO-catalyzed uric acid production, the AO inhibitor menadione demonstrated potent inhibition of XO-catalyzed NO2- reduction (EC50=60 nM); somewhat similar to the XO-specific inhibitor, febuxostat (EC50=4 nM). Importantly, febuxostat was found to be a very poor inhibitor of human AO (EC50=613 μM) suggesting its usefulness for validating XO-dependent contributions to NO2- reduction in biological systems. Combined, these data indicate care should be taken

  14. Cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidase (CIO) from Gluconobacter oxydans is a unique terminal oxidase subfamily of cytochrome bd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hiroshi; Mogi, Tatsushi; Ano, Yoshitaka; Migita, Catharina T; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-06-01

    Cyanide-insensitive terminal quinol oxidase (CIO) is a subfamily of cytochrome bd present in bacterial respiratory chain. We purified CIO from the Gluconobacter oxydans membranes and characterized its properties. The air-oxidized CIO showed some or weak peaks of reduced haemes b and of oxygenated and ferric haeme d, differing from cytochrome bd. CO- and NO-binding difference spectra suggested that haeme d serves as the ligand-binding site of CIO. Notably, the purified CIO showed an extraordinary high ubiquinol-1 oxidase activity with the pH optimum of pH 5-6. The apparent Vmax value of CIO was 17-fold higher than that of G. oxydans cytochrome bo3. In addition, compared with Escherichia coli cytochrome bd, the quinol oxidase activity of CIO was much more resistant to cyanide, but sensitive to azide. The Km value for O2 of CIO was 7- to 10-fold larger than that of G. oxydans cytochrome bo3 or E. coli cytochrome bd. Our results suggest that CIO has unique features attributable to the structure and properties of the O2-binding site, and thus forms a new sub-group distinct from cytochrome bd. Furthermore, CIO of acetic acid bacteria may play some specific role for rapid oxidation of substrates under acidic growth conditions.

  15. Inhibition of Apple Polyphenol Oxidase Activity by Procyanidins and Polyphenol Oxidation Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bourvellec, Carine Le; Jean-Michel Le Quéré; Sanoner, Philippe; Drilleau, Jean-François; Guyot, Sylvain

    2004-01-01

    The rate of consumption of dissolved oxygen by apple polyphenol oxidase in cider apple juices did not correlate with polyphenol oxidase activity in the fruits and decreased faster than could be explained by the decrease of its polyphenolic substrates. The kinetics parameters of a crude polyphenol oxidase extract, prepared from apple (Braeburn cultivar), were determined using caffeoylquinic acid as a substrate. Three apple procyanidin fractions of n 80, 10.5, and 4 were purifi...

  16. Mechanism of Xanthine Oxidase Catalyzed Biotransformation of HMX Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    by mole) was obtained from Scott specialty gases, Sarnia, Ont., Canada. Enzyme preparation. Xanthine oxidase (EC 1.1.3.22) from butter- milk was...BCA) kit (Sigma Chemicals) as per company instructions using bovine serum albumin as standard. The native xanthine oxidase (XO) activity was estimated...by the xanthine oxidase . Allopurinol (s), diphenylene iodonium chloride (d). One hundred percent activity was equivalent to 10.5 0.9 nmol h1 mg

  17. Xanthine Oxidase Potentiation of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Isolated Canine Peripheral Neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    admin- istration of allopurinol. Allopurinol inhibits xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in ischemic tissues. The possible role of XO as a pathologic...Press Inc, 1985:143-50. 6. McCord JM, Fridovich I. The reduction of cytochrome c by milk xanthine oxidase . J Biol Chem 1968;243:5753-60. 7. Bindoli A...Nek York Short Communication Xanthine Oxidase Potentiation of Reactive Oxygen Intermediates in Isolated Canine Peripheral Neutrophils Dale F

  18. Amine oxidases as important agents of pathological processes of rhabdomyolysis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkova, O O; Latyshko, N V; Shandrenko, S G

    2016-01-01

    In this study we have tested an idea on the important role of amine oxidases (semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase) as an additional source of oxidative/carbonyl stress under glycerol-induced rhabdomyolysis, since the enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and reactive carbonyl species in a variety of tissues is linked to various diseases. In our experiments we used the sensitive fluorescent method devised for estimation of amine oxidases activity in the rat kidney and thymus as targeted organs under rhabdomyolysis. We have found in vivo the multiple rises in activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase, diamine oxidase, polyamine oxidase (2-4.5 times) in the corresponding cell fractions, whole cells or their lysates at the 3-6th day after glycerol injection. Aberrant antioxidant activities depended on rhabdomyolysis stage and had organ specificity. Additional treatment of animals with metal chelator ‘Unithiol’ adjusted only the activity of antioxidant enzymes but not amine oxidases in both organs. Furthermore the in vitro experiment showed that Fenton reaction (hydrogen peroxide in the presence of iron) products alone had no effect on semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity in rat liver cell fraction whereas supplementation with methylglyoxal resulted in its significant 2.5-fold enhancement. Combined action of the both agents had additive effect on semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activity. We can assume that biogenic amine and polyamine catabolism by amine oxidases is upregulated by oxidative and carbonyl stress factors directly under rhabdomyolysis progression, and the increase in catabolic products concentration contributes to tissue damage in glycerol-induced acute renal failure and apoptosis stimulation in thymus.

  19. Redox specificity of 2-hydroxyacid-coupled NAD(+/NADH dehydrogenases: a study exploiting "reactive" arginine as a reporter of protein electrostatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Gupta

    Full Text Available With "reactive" arginine as a kinetic reporter, 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases are assessed in basis of their specialization as NAD(+-reducing or NADH-oxidizing enzymes. Specifically, M4 and H4 lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenases (MDHs are compared to assess if their coenzyme specificity may involve electrostatics of cationic or neutral nicotinamide structure as the basis. The enzymes from diverse eukaryote and prokaryote sources thus are assessed in "reactivity" of functionally-critical arginine as a function of salt concentration and pH. Electrostatic calculations were performed on "reactive" arginines and found good correspondence with experiment. The reductive and oxidative LDHs and MDHs are assessed in their count over ionizable residues and in placement details of the residues in their structures as proteins. The variants found to be high or low in ΔpKa of "reactive" arginine are found to be also strong or weak cations that preferentially oxidize NADH (neutral nicotinamide structure or reduce NAD(+ (cationic nicotinamide structure. The ionized groups of protein structure may thus be important to redox specificity of the enzyme on basis of electrostatic preference for the oxidized (cationic nicotinamide or reduced (neutral nicotinamide coenzyme. Detailed comparisons of isozymes establish that the residues contributing in their redox specificity are scrambled in structure of the reductive enzyme.

  20. Redox Specificity of 2-Hydroxyacid-Coupled NAD+/NADH Dehydrogenases: A Study Exploiting “Reactive” Arginine as a Reporter of Protein Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durani, Susheel

    2013-01-01

    With “reactive” arginine as a kinetic reporter, 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases are assessed in basis of their specialization as NAD+-reducing or NADH-oxidizing enzymes. Specifically, M4 and H4 lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) are compared to assess if their coenzyme specificity may involve electrostatics of cationic or neutral nicotinamide structure as the basis. The enzymes from diverse eukaryote and prokaryote sources thus are assessed in “reactivity” of functionally-critical arginine as a function of salt concentration and pH. Electrostatic calculations were performed on “reactive” arginines and found good correspondence with experiment. The reductive and oxidative LDHs and MDHs are assessed in their count over ionizable residues and in placement details of the residues in their structures as proteins. The variants found to be high or low in ΔpKa of “reactive” arginine are found to be also strong or weak cations that preferentially oxidize NADH (neutral nicotinamide structure) or reduce NAD+ (cationic nicotinamide structure). The ionized groups of protein structure may thus be important to redox specificity of the enzyme on basis of electrostatic preference for the oxidized (cationic nicotinamide) or reduced (neutral nicotinamide) coenzyme. Detailed comparisons of isozymes establish that the residues contributing in their redox specificity are scrambled in structure of the reductive enzyme. PMID:24391777

  1. Poly(neutral red) as a NAD{sup +} reduction catalyst and a NADH oxidation catalyst: Towards the development of a rechargeable biobattery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arechederra, Marguerite N.; Addo, Paul K. [Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Minteer, Shelley D., E-mail: minteers@slu.ed [Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have established that poly(neutral red), PNR, functions as an electrocatalyst for the reduction and oxidation of NAD{sup +}/NADH in a rechargeable biobattery environment. The reversibility of this catalyst was possible only with the addition of Zn{sup 2+} for complexation to the redox polymer. The zinc ion complexation with the polymer facilitates electron and proton transfer to/from the substrate and the NAD{sup +}/NADH coenzyme without forming covalent bonds between the nicotinamide and the substrate surface. This research presents use of this reversible catalyst in a rechargeable biobattery. The rechargeable battery includes a Prussian blue cathode and a bioanode including NAD{sup +}-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase and zinc complexed PNR. This bioanode was coupled to the cathode with Nafion 212 acting as the ion exchange membrane separator between the two compartments. The biobattery has an open circuit potential of 0.545({+-}0.009) V when first assembled and 0.053({+-}0.005) V when fully discharged. However, when fully charged, the biobattery has an open circuit potential of 1.263({+-}0.051) V, a maximum power density of 16.3({+-}4.03) {mu}W cm{sup -3} and a maximum current density of 221({+-}13.2) {mu}A cm{sup -3}. The efficiency and stability of the biobattery were studied by cycling continuously at a discharging rate of 1 C and the results obtained showed reasonable stability over 50 cycles.

  2. A complicated biocomputing system based on multi-responsive P(NIPAM-co-APBA) copolymer film electrodes and electrocatalysis of NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiying; Yu, Xue; Yang, Tiangang; Li, Menglu; Shen, Li; Jin, Yue; Liu, Hongyun

    2017-08-23

    In this paper, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-3-aminophenylboronic acid) (P(NIPAM-co-APBA)) copolymer films were successfully electropolymerized on the Au electrode surface. The electroactive probe ferrocene carboxylic acid (FCA) in solution showed reversible thermal-, glucose- and pH-responsive on-off cyclic voltammetric (CV) behaviors at the film electrodes. The comparative experiments demonstrated that the thermo-responsive property of the film electrode was ascribed to the PNIPAM component of the films, whereas the glucose- and pH-sensitive behaviors came from the PAPBA constituent. The reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) could be electrocatalytically oxidized by FCA at the film electrodes, which would greatly amplify the multi-responsive CV signal difference between the on and off states. On the basis of these results, a binary 4-input/4-output logic circuit was fabricated with temperature, glucose, pH and NADH as inputs and the CV responses at 4 different levels as outputs. Moreover, a ternary CONSENSUS logic circuit was established on the same platform, which was the first report on the combination of ternary logic gate and bioelectrocatalysis without using enzymes. This work provided a novel idea for constructing complicated biocomputing systems by increasing the number of inputs/outputs with multi-sensitive interfaces and by designing new types of multi-valued logic gates on the basis of bioelectrocatalysis.

  3. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang, Wanming Li, Dezheng Yuan, Jindan Song, Jin Fang Department of Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ministry of Public Health, and Key Laboratory of Medical Cell Biology, Ministry of Education, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The large external antigen (LEA is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605 conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05, indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of

  4. Establishment of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice for the identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of tumor-associated antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Yatsuda

    Full Text Available Reports have shown that activation of tumor-specific CD4(+ helper T (Th cells is crucial for effective anti-tumor immunity and identification of Th-cell epitopes is critical for peptide vaccine-based cancer immunotherapy. Although computer algorithms are available to predict peptides with high binding affinity to a specific HLA class II molecule, the ability of those peptides to induce Th-cell responses must be evaluated. We have established HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRA*01:01/HLA-DRB1*04:05 transgenic mice (Tgm, since this HLA-DR allele is most frequent (13.6% in Japanese population, to evaluate HLA-DR4-restricted Th-cell responses to tumor-associated antigen (TAA-derived peptides predicted to bind to HLA-DR4. To avoid weak binding between mouse CD4 and HLA-DR4, Tgm were designed to express chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d, where I-E(d α1 and β1 domains were replaced with those from HLA-DR4. Th cells isolated from Tgm immunized with adjuvant and HLA-DR4-binding cytomegalovirus-derived peptide proliferated when stimulated with peptide-pulsed HLA-DR4-transduced mouse L cells, indicating chimeric HLA-DR4/I-E(d has equivalent antigen presenting capacity to HLA-DR4. Immunization with CDCA155-78 peptide, a computer algorithm-predicted HLA-DR4-binding peptide derived from TAA CDCA1, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm, while immunization of HLA-DR4-binding Wilms' tumor 1 antigen-derived peptide with identical amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog failed. This was overcome by using peptide-pulsed syngeneic bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC followed by immunization with peptide/CFA booster. BM-DC-based immunization of KIF20A494-517 peptide from another TAA KIF20A, with an almost identical HLA-binding core amino acid sequence to mouse ortholog, successfully induced Th-cell responses in Tgm. Notably, both CDCA155-78 and KIF20A494-517 peptides induced human Th-cell responses in PBMCs from HLA-DR4-positive donors. Finally, an HLA-DR4 binding DEPDC1191

  5. The number and microlocalization of tumor-associated immune cells are associated with patient's survival time in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Fuqiang; Liu, Lunxu; Che, Guowei; Yu, Nanbin; Pu, Qiang; Zhang, Shangfu; Ma, Junliang; Ma, Lin; You, Zongbing

    2010-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment is composed of tumor cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-associated immune cells may inhibit or promote tumor growth and progression. This study was conducted to determine whether the number and microlocalization of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells in non-small cell lung cancer are associated with patient's survival time. Ninety-nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this retrospective study. Paraffin-embedded NSCLC specimens and their clinicopathological data including up to 8-year follow-up information were used. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (marker for macrophages), CD83 (marker for mature dendritic cells), and CD8 (marker for cytotoxic T cells) was performed and evaluated in a blinded fashion. The numbers of immune cells in tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets, or tumor stroma were counted under a microscope. Correlation of the cell numbers and patient's survival time was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (version 13.0). The numbers of macrophages, mature dendritic cells and cytotoxic T cells were significantly more in the tumor stroma than in the tumor islets. The number of macrophages in the tumor islets was positively associated with patient's survival time, whereas the number of macrophages in the tumor stroma was negatively associated with patient's survival time in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The number of mature dendritic cells in the tumor islets and stroma, tumor islets only, or tumor stroma only was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets and stroma was positively associated with patient's survival time in a univariate analysis but not in a multivariate analysis. The number of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor islets only or stroma

  6. The cell-cell interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and small cell lung cancer cells is involved in tumor progression via STAT3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriki, Toyohisa; Ohnishi, Koji; Fujiwara, Yukio; Horlad, Hasita; Saito, Yoichi; Pan, Cheng; Ikeda, Koei; Mori, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Ichiyasu, Hidenori; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Takeya, Motohiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro

    2017-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. It is well known that various stromal cells, including macrophages, play a role in tumor progression in several types of malignant tumors; however, the significance of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in SCLC has not been fully elucidated. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a molecule well-known to be related to tumor progression. In the present study, we investigated the relationship of TAMs and SCLC cells to test the hypothesis that TAMs induce tumor progression in SCLC via STAT3 activation. We performed immunohistochemical analysis using surgically resected tumor specimens and in vitro co-culture experiments using human SCLC cell lines and human monocyte-derived macrophages. We first demonstrated via immunostaining that STAT3 activation in tumor cells was predominantly observed in the peripheral areas of tumor nests existing near TAMs in stroma. The indirect co-culture of SCLC cells and macrophages induced STAT3 activation in both cell types, and macrophage-derived culture supernatant (CS) significantly activated STAT3 in SCLC cells. Macrophage-derived CS induced tumor cell proliferation and invasion via STAT3 activation. In addition, chemo-resistance and sphere formation were also increased by macrophage-derived CS. Macrophage-derived interleukin-6 and CC chemokine ligand 4 (CCL4/MIP-1β) were suggested to be associated with STAT3 activation in SCLC cells. CS-induced STAT3 activation in SCLC cells was suppressed by anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, but not by anti-CCL4/MIP-1β antibody. These results suggest that TAMs are likely involved in SCLC progression via STAT3 activation and TAM-derived IL-6 is indicated to be one of molecules related to STAT3 activation in SCLC cells. Thus, the cell-cell interaction between TAMs and SCLC cells might be a target for therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternative oxidase pathway optimizes photosynthesis during osmotic and temperature stress by regulating cellular ROS, malate valve and antioxidative systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINAKAR eCHALLABATHULA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study reveals the importance of alternative oxidase (AOX pathway in optimizing photosynthesis under osmotic and temperature stress conditions in the mesophyll protoplasts of Pisum sativum. The responses of photosynthesis and respiration were monitored at saturating light intensity of 1000 µmoles m-2 s-1 at 25 oC under a range of sorbitol concentrations from 0.4 M to 1.0M to induce hyper-osmotic stress and by varying the temperature of the thermo-jacketed pre-incubation chamber from 25 oC to 10 oC to impose sub-optimal temperature stress. Compared to controls (0.4 M sorbitol and 25 OC, the mesophyll protoplasts showed remarkable decrease in NaHCO3-dependent O2 evolution (indicator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation, under both hyper-osmotic (1.0 M sorbitol and sub-optimal temperature stress conditions (10 OC, while the decrease in rates of respiratory O2 uptake were marginal. The capacity of AOX pathway increased significantly in parallel to increase in intracellular pyruvate and reactive oxygen species (ROS levels under both hyper-osmotic stress and sub-optimal temperature stress under the background of saturating light. The ratio of redox couple (Malate/OAA related to malate valve increased in contrast to the ratio of redox couple (GSH/GSSG related to antioxidative system during hyper-osmotic stress. Nevertheless, the ratio of GSH/GSSG decreased in the presence of sub-optimal temperature, while the ratio of Malate/OAA showed no visible changes. Also, the redox ratios of pyridine nucleotides increased under hyper-osmotic (NADH/NAD and sub-optimal temperature (NADPH/NADP stresses, respectively. However, upon restriction of AOX pathway by using salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, the observed changes in NaHCO3 dependent O2 evolution, cellular ROS, redox ratios of Malate/OAA, NAD(PH/NAD(P and GSH/GSSG were further aggravated under stress conditions with concomitant modulations in NADP-MDH and antioxidant enzymes. Taken together, the

  8. Biocompatibility selenium nanoparticles with an intrinsic oxidase-like activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Leilei; Huang, Kaixun; Liu, Hongmei, E-mail: hmliu2004@126.com [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-03-15

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) are considered to be the new selenium supplement forms with high biological activity and low toxicity; however, the molecular mechanism by which SeNPs exert the biological function is unclear. Here, we reported that biocompatibility SeNPs possessed intrinsic oxidase-like activity. Using Na{sub 2}SeO{sub 3} as a precursor and glutathione as a reductant, biocompatibility SeNPs were synthesized by the wet chemical reduction method in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). The results of structure characterization revealed that synthesized SeNPs were amorphous red elementary selenium with spherical morphology, and ranged in size from 25 to 70 nm size with a narrow distribution (41.4 ± 6.7 nm). The oxidase-like activity of the as-synthesized SeNPs was tested with 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a substrate. The results indicated that SeNPs could catalyze the oxidization of TMB by dissolved oxygen. These SeNPs showed an optimum catalytic activity at pH 4 and 30 °C, and the oxidase-like activity was higher as the concentration of SeNPs increased and the size of SeNPs decreased. The Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) values and maximal reaction velocity (V{sub max}) of the SeNPs for TMB oxidation were 0.0083 mol/L and 3.042 μmol/L min, respectively.

  9. Molybdenum and tungsten enzymes: the xanthine oxidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D; Romão, Maria João; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-04-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum and tungsten are found in the active site of a diverse group of enzymes that, in general, catalyze oxygen atom transfer reactions. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are the best-characterized mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes. Several 3D structures of diverse members of this family are known. Recently, the structures of substrate-bound and arsenite-inhibited forms of two members of this family have also been reported. In addition, spectroscopic studies have been utilized to elucidate fine details that complement the structural information. Altogether, these studies have provided an important amount of information on the characteristics of the active site and the electron transfer pathways.

  10. Electron transfer rates and equilibrium within cytochrome c oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Einarsdóttir, O; Pecht, I

    2000-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the CuA center and heme a in bovine cytochrome c oxidase was investigated by pulse radiolysis. CuA, the initial electron acceptor, was reduced by 1-methyl nicotinamide radicals in a diffusion-controlled reaction, as monitored by absorption changes...... s-1, respectively, at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4. This corresponds to an equilibrium constant of 3.4 under these conditions. Thermodynamic and activation parameters of the ET reactions were determined. The significance of these results, particularly the observed low activation barriers, are discussed...

  11. Electronic structure contributions to reactivity in xanthine oxidase family enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Benjamin W; Kirk, Martin L

    2015-03-01

    We review the xanthine oxidase (XO) family of pyranopterin molybdenum enzymes with a specific emphasis on electronic structure contributions to reactivity. In addition to xanthine and aldehyde oxidoreductases, which catalyze the two-electron oxidation of aromatic heterocycles and aldehyde substrates, this mini-review highlights recent work on the closely related carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) that catalyzes the oxidation of CO using a unique Mo-Cu heterobimetallic active site. A primary focus of this mini-review relates to how spectroscopy and computational methods have been used to develop an understanding of critical relationships between geometric structure, electronic structure, and catalytic function.

  12. Process requirements of galactose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; R. Birmingham, William; Rehn, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    , it was found that the concentration and type of buffer is essential for the activity of GOase, which was significantly more active in sodium phosphate buffer than in other buffers investigated. Enzyme stability and oxygen requirements are of crucial importance for the implementation of oxidase based processes....... GOase was shown to be completely stable for 120 h in buffer with stirring at 25 °C, and the activity even increased 30% if the enzyme solution was also aerated in a similar experiment. The high Km for oxygen of GOase (>5 mM) relative to the solubility of oxygen in water reveals a trade-off between...

  13. Graphene-glucose oxidase bioanodes for enzymatic biofuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Jing; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen; Engelbrekt, Christian

    2017-01-01

    as supporting material, polyethyleneimine (PEI) as linker and glucose oxidase (GOD) as the chosen enzyme. GOD can catalyze oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone, but needs a mediator to assist electron transfer between the enzyme and electrodes. The redox molecule ferrocene carboxylic acid (Fc......COOH) is immobilized together with GOD on the bioanode. Structure and composition of the graphene-GOD bioanode are shown in Fig. 1b. Electrochemical catalytic performance of the prepared bioanode has been observed. An EBFCs with the bioanode and the commercial Pt cathode have been successfully assembled...

  14. Redox engineering by ectopic expression of glutamate dehydrogenase genes links NADPH availability and NADH oxidation with cold growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2015-07-09

    Cold stress reduces microbial growth and metabolism being relevant in industrial processes like wine making and brewing. Knowledge on the cold transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests the need of a proper redox balance. Nevertheless, there are no direct evidence of the links between NAD(P) levels and cold growth and how engineering of enzymatic reactions requiring NAD(P) may be used to modify the performance of industrial strains at low temperature. Recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae modified for increased NADPH- and NADH-dependent Gdh1 and Gdh2 activity were tested for growth at low temperature. A high-copy number of the GDH2-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase gene stimulated growth at 15°C, while overexpression of GDH1 had detrimental effects, a difference likely caused by cofactor preferences. Indeed, neither the Trp(-) character of the tested strains, which could affect the synthesis of NAD(P), nor changes in oxidative stress susceptibility by overexpression of GDH1 and GDH2 account for the observed phenotypes. However, increased or reduced NADPH availability by knock-out or overexpression of GRE3, the NADPH-dependent aldose reductase gene, eliminated or exacerbated the cold-growth defect observed in YEpGDH1 cells. We also demonstrated that decreased capacity of glycerol production impairs growth at 15 but not at 30°C and that 15°C-grown baker's yeast cells display higher fermentative capacity than those cultivated at 30°C. Thus, increasing NADH oxidation by overexpression of GDH2 would help to avoid perturbations in the redox metabolism induced by a higher fermentative/oxidative balance at low temperature. Finally, it is shown that overexpression of GDH2 increases notably the cold growth in the wine yeast strain QA23 in both standard growth medium and synthetic grape must. Redox constraints limit the growth of S. cerevisiae at temperatures below the optimal. An adequate supply of NAD(P) precursors as well as a proper level of reducing

  15. The NADH:flavin oxidoreductase Nox from Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 is the key enzyme of 4,4'-dithiodibutyric acid degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairy, H; Wübbeler, J H; Steinbüchel, A

    2016-12-01

    The reduction of the disulphide bond is the initial catabolic step of the microbial degradation of the organic disulphide 4,4'-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB). Previously, an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 designated as Nox MI2 , which belongs to the old yellow enzyme (OYE) family, was identified. In the present study, it was proven that Nox MI2 has the ability to cleave the sulphur-sulphur bond in DTDB. In silico analysis revealed high sequence similarities to proteins of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase family identified in many strains of R. erythropolis. Therefore, nox was heterologously expressed in the pET23a(+) expression system using Escherichia coli strain BL21(DE3) pLysS, which effectively produces soluble active Nox MI2 . Nox MI2 showed a maximum specific activity (V max ) of 3·36 μmol min -1  mg -1 corresponding to a k cat of 2·5 s -1 and an apparent substrate K m of 0·6 mmol l -1 , when different DTDB concentrations were applied. No metal cofactors were required. Moreover, Nox MI2 had very low activity with other sulphur-containing compounds like 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid (8·0%), 3,3'-thiodipropionic acid (7·6%) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (8·0%). The UV/VIS spectrum of Nox MI2 revealed the presence of the cofactor FMN. Based on results obtained, Nox MI2 adds a new physiological substrate and mode of action to OYE members. It was unequivocally demonstrated in this study that an NADH:flavin oxidoreductase from Rhodococcus erythropolis MI2 (Nox MI2 ) is able to cleave the xenobiotic disulphide 4,4'-dithiodibutyric acid (DTDB) into two molecules of 4-mercaptobutyric acid (4MB) with concomitant consumption of NADH. Nox MI2 showed a high substrate specificity as well as high heat stability. This study provides the first detailed characterization of the initial cleavage of DTDB, which is considered as a promising polythioester precursor. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Altering the coenzyme preference of xylose reductase to favor utilization of NADH enhances ethanol yield from xylose in a metabolically engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidetzky Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for xylose fermentation into fuel ethanol has oftentimes relied on insertion of a heterologous pathway that consists of xylose reductase (XR and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH and brings about isomerization of xylose into xylulose via xylitol. Incomplete recycling of redox cosubstrates in the catalytic steps of the NADPH-preferring XR and the NAD+-dependent XDH results in formation of xylitol by-product and hence in lowering of the overall yield of ethanol on xylose. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis was previously employed to change the coenzyme preference of Candida tenuis XR about 170-fold from NADPH in the wild-type to NADH in a Lys274→Arg Asn276→Asp double mutant which in spite of the structural modifications introduced had retained the original catalytic efficiency for reduction of xylose by NADH. This work was carried out to assess physiological consequences in xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae resulting from a well defined alteration of XR cosubstrate specificity. Results An isogenic pair of yeast strains was derived from S. cerevisiae Cen.PK 113-7D through chromosomal integration of a three-gene cassette that carried a single copy for C. tenuis XR in wild-type or double mutant form, XDH from Galactocandida mastotermitis, and the endogenous xylulose kinase (XK. Overexpression of each gene was under control of the constitutive TDH3 promoter. Measurement of intracellular levels of XR, XDH, and XK activities confirmed the expected phenotypes. The strain harboring the XR double mutant showed 42% enhanced ethanol yield (0.34 g/g compared to the reference strain harboring wild-type XR during anaerobic bioreactor conversions of xylose (20 g/L. Likewise, the yields of xylitol (0.19 g/g and glycerol (0.02 g/g were decreased 52% and 57% respectively in the XR mutant strain. The xylose uptake rate per gram of cell dry weight was identical (0.07 ± 0.02 h-1 in both strains

  17. Thermal and pH stabilities of partially purified polyphenol oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Paul Chidoka Chikezie

    2012-07-30

    Jul 30, 2012 ... 4(2):115-124. da Silva CR, Koblitz MGB (2010). Partial characterization and inactivation of peroxidases and polyphenol-oxidases of Umbu-Cajá. (Spondias spp.). Ciência e Tecnologia de Alimentos. 30(3):11. Dogan S, Dogan M (2004). Determination of kinetic properties of polyphenol oxidase from Thymus ...

  18. Isoforms of human cytochrome-c oxidase. Subunit composition and steady-state kinetic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Dekker, H. L.; van den Bogert, C.; Nieboer, P.; van Gelder, B. F.; Muijsers, A. O.

    1991-01-01

    The subunit pattern and the steady-state kinetics of cytochrome-c oxidase from human heart, muscle, kidney and liver were investigated. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of immunopurified cytochrome-c oxidase preparations suggest that isoforms of subunit VIa exist, which show differences in

  19. Heterologous production and characterization of two glyoxal oxidases from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne Daou; François Piumi; Daniel Cullen; Eric Record; Craig B. Faulds

    2016-01-01

    The genome of the white rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus includes a large number of genes encoding enzymes implicated in lignin degradation. Among these, three genes are predicted to encode glyoxal oxidase, an enzyme previously isolated from Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The glyoxal oxidase of P. chrysosporium...

  20. Analysis of cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production by southern pine beetle associated fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduvali Valiev; Zumrut B. Ogel; Dier D. Klepzig

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the production of extracellular enzymes by fungi associated with southern pine beetle was investigated for the first time. Cellulase and polyphenol oxidase production were analyzed for three beetle associated fungi. Only the mutualistic symbiont Entomocorticium sp. A was found to produce cellulases and polyphenol oxidase....