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Sample records for tumor wt1 gene

  1. Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) in endometrial carcinoma.

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    Coosemans, An; Moerman, Philippe; Verbist, Godelieve; Maes, Wim; Neven, Patrick; Vergote, Ignace; Van Gool, Stefaan W; Amant, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    Wilms' tumor gene (WT1), located on chromosome 11, encodes a transcription factor that contributes to the carcinogenesis of uterine sarcomas. To expand the knowledge on the biological role of WT1 in other uterine cancers, we focused on its detection in endometrial carcinoma. In total, 36 paraffin-embedded tumors were available for WT1 immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis including endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (n=24), serous carcinoma (n=9) and clear cell carcinoma (n=3). Three slides from different sites of the tumor were analysed. Of these tumors, 32 snap frozen tissue samples were available for RT-PCR (endometrioid carcinoma (23), serous carcinoma (7) and clear cell carcinoma (2)). To compare, WT1 expression was also evaluated by IHC in benign endometrium (12) and benign endometrial polyps (5). WT1 positivity was noticed in tumor cells and endothelial cells, lining the intratumoral blood vessels. Overall, 72% (26/36) of tumors stained positive for WT1. RT-PCR results showed WT1 positivity in 75% (24/32) of samples. Comparing the staining patterns of the 3 different bioptic sites, tumor heterogeneity was demonstrated in the majority (72%) of samples. Although WT1 is expressed in a majority of endometrial carcinomas, a heterogeneous staining pattern is observed. This information is important for WT1-directed immunotherapy.

  2. Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is a prognostic marker in high-grade uterine sarcoma.

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    Coosemans, An; Van Calster, Ben; Verbist, Godelieve; Moerman, Philippe; Vergote, Ignace; Van Gool, Stefaan W; Amant, Frédéric

    2011-02-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) contributes to uterine sarcoma tumor biology. In this study, we aimed to clarify the prognostic value of WT1. A retrospective clinical and histopathological review of 71 women with high-grade uterine sarcoma (leiomyosarcoma [n = 24], undifferentiated sarcoma [n = 9]), and carcinosarcoma (n = 38) was performed. Patients were followed up for at least 12 months. Wilms tumor gene 1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Data on recurrence (progression-free survival) and overall survival (OS) were available for all patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses of WT1 expression were carried out using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression, respectively. Forty-nine (69%) tumors were WT1 positive. Forty-seven (66%) patients died of the disease, with a median OS time of 22 months. Wilms tumor gene 1 was a predictor of survival in the univariate analysis: the hazard ratio of WT1 positivity was 2.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.34-4.71) for progression-free survival and 2.48 (95% confidence interval, 1.26-4.90) for OS. Multivariate analysis including stage, age, tumor size, and sarcoma subtype identified only stage and WT1 positivity as independent prognostic markers for survival. The identification of WT1 as a prognostic marker confirms its role in high-grade uterine sarcoma and carcinosarcoma tumor biology.

  3. Self-association of the WT1 tumor suppressor gene product

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    Bruening, W.; Nakagama, H.: Bardessy, N. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Wilms` tumor (WT), an embryonal malignancy of the kidney, occurs most frequently in children under the age of 5 years, affecting {approximately}1 in 10,000 individuals. The WT1 tumor suppressor gene, residing at 11p13, is structurally altered in {approximately}10-15% of WT cases. Individuals with germline mutations within the WT1 gene suffer from predisposition to WT and developmental defects of the urogenital system. Patients with heterozygous deletions of the WT1 gene, or mutations predicted to cause inactivation of one WT1 allele, suffer relatively mild genital system defects (notably hypospadias and cryptorchidism in males) and a predisposition to WT. These results suggest that developing genital system development is sensitive to the absolute concentrations of the WT1 gene products. Patients with missense mutations within the WT1 gene, however, can suffer from a much more severe disorder known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). This syndrome is characterized by intersex disorders, renal nephropathy, and a predisposition to WTs. The increased severity of the developmental defects associated with DDS, compared to those individuals with mild genital system anomalies and WTs, suggests that mutations defined in patients with DDS behave in a dominant-negative fashion. We have identified a novel WT1 mutation in a patient with DDS. This mutation, predicted to produce a truncated WT1 polypeptide encompassing exons 1, 2, and 3, defines a domain capable of behaving as an antimorph. We have also demonstrated that WT1 can self-associate in vivo using yeast two-hybrid systems. Deletion analysis have mapped the interacting domains to the amino terminus of the WT1 polypeptide, within exons 1 and 2. These results provide a molecular mechanism to explain how WT1 mutations can function in a dominant-negative fashion to eliminate wild-type WT1 activity, leading to DDS.

  4. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

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    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  5. Wilms tumor (WT1 gene expression in children with acute leukemia in Serbia

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    Janković Srđa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias constitute the most common malignancy in childhood, accounting for 25-35% of all cancer in children. They are divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Genetic susceptibility is known to play a major role in childhood leukemias. Wilms tumor (WT1 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in regulating the process of cell differentiation; it has been implicated in a wide range of human neoplasms. WT1 overexpression in the bone marrow at diagnosis is reported to be an independent negative prognostic factor in adults and children with AML. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the expression of WT1 in the bone marrow of children with AML and ALL in Serbia and its possible impact on patient survival. We determined bone marrow WT1 expression levels by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR at diagnosis in 20 children with AML and 20 children with ALL (16 B-ALL and 4 T-ALL, as well as 15 age- and sex-matched controls who were evaluated for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. For children with AML, follow-up samples were also analyzed one month after treatment initiation and at variable later timepoints of control punctures. The results were normalized based on WT1 expression in controls. We found that children with AML had significantly higher WT1 expression at diagnosis (median ± SD: 139.42 ± 244.03 than those with ALL (1.18 ± 54.37; Mann-Whitney U=82; p<0.01 and ITP (0.76 ± 1.01; U=32; p<0.01. Patients with T-ALL had higher WT1 expression than those with B-ALL, though significance was not reached due to subgroup size; differences between AML subgroups according to the French-American-British (FAB classification were also below the level of significance, though a tendency toward higher values in M3 and M4 leukemias was notable. There was also a tendency toward higher values in 14 children with AML who were still alive after a median follow-up of 1.5 years

  6. The Wilms tumor gene, Wt1, is critical for mouse spermatogenesis via regulation of sertoli cell polarity and is associated with non-obstructive azoospermia in humans.

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    Xiao Na Wang

    Full Text Available Azoospermia is one of the major reproductive disorders which cause male infertility in humans; however, the etiology of this disease is largely unknown. In the present study, six missense mutations of WT1 gene were detected in 529 human patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA, indicating a strong association between WT1 mutation and NOA. The Wilms tumor gene, Wt1, is specifically expressed in Sertoli cells (SCs which support spermatogenesis. To examine the functions of this gene in spermatogenesis, Wt1 was deleted in adult testis using Wt1(flox and Cre-ER(TM mice strains. We found that inactivation of Wt1 resulted in massive germ cell death and only SCs were present in most of the seminiferous tubules which was very similar to NOA in humans. In investigating the potential mechanism for this, histological studies revealed that the blood-testis barrier (BTB was disrupted in Wt1 deficient testes. In vitro studies demonstrated that Wt1 was essential for cell polarity maintenance in SCs. Further studies found that the expression of cell polarity associated genes (Par6b and E-cadherin and Wnt signaling genes (Wnt4, Wnt11 were downregulated in Wt1 deficient SCs, and that the expression of Par6b and E-cadherin was regulated by Wnt4. Our findings suggest that Wt1 is important in spermatogenesis by regulating the polarity of SCs via Wnt signaling pathway and that WT1 mutation is one of the genetic causes of NOA in humans.

  7. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines and relationship to platelet-derived growth factor A and insulin- like growth factor 2 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. Langerak (Anton); K.A. Williamson (K.); K. Miyagawa (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); M.A. Versnel (Marjan); N. Hastie (Nick)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the WT1 tumor suppressor gene are known to contribute to the development of Wilms' tumor (WT) and associated gonadal abnormalities. WT1 is expressed principally in the fetal kidney, developing gonads, and spleen and also in the mesothelium, which lines the coelomic cavities.

  8. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma (PRAME and Wilms’ Tumor 1 (WT 1 Genes Expression in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Prognostic Role and Correlation with Survival

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    Engy El Khateeb

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: It is concluded that the expression of PRAME and WT1 genes are indicators of favorable prognosis and can be useful tools for monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD in acute leukemia especially in patients without known genetic markers. Differential expression between acute leukemia patients and healthy volunteers suggests that the immunogenic antigens (PRAME and WT1 are potential candidates for immunotherapy in childhood acute leukemia.

  9. BASP1 is a transcriptional cosuppressor for the Wilms' tumor suppressor protein WT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpenter, Brian; Hill, Kathryn J; Charalambous, Marika

    2004-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor protein WT1 is a transcriptional regulator that plays a key role in the development of the kidneys. The transcriptional activation domain of WT1 is subject to regulation by a suppression region within the N terminus of WT1. Using a functional assay, we provide direct e...

  10. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

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    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  11. Upregulation of Wilms' tumour gene 1 (WT1) in uterine sarcomas

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    Coosemans, A.; Nik, S. Amini; Caluwaerts, S.; Lambin, S.; Verbist, G.; van Bree, R.; Schelfhout, V.; de Jonge, E.; Dalle, I.; Jacomen, G.; Cassiman, J. J.; Moerman, Ph; Vergote, I.; Amant, F.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Overexpression of Wilms' tumour gene (WT1) has been proven in several tumours. Previous research of our group on the cell cycle of uterine leiomyosarcoma (LMS) and carcinosarcoma (CS) suggested a possible role for WT1. We therefore intended to further explore the expression pattern of WT1 in

  12. Reduction in WT1 gene expression during early treatment predicts the outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

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    Andersson, Charlotta; Li, Xingru; Lorenz, Fryderyk; Golovleva, Irina; Wahlin, Anders; Li, Aihong

    2012-12-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) expression has been suggested as an applicable minimal residual disease marker in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We evaluated the use of this marker in 43 adult AML patients. Quantitative assessment of WT1 gene transcripts was performed using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assay. Samples from both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow were analyzed at diagnosis and during follow-up. A strong correlation was observed between WT1 normalized with 2 different control genes (β-actin and ABL1, P0.05). A≥1-log reduction in WT1 expression in bone marrow samples taken freedom from relapse (P=0.010) when β-actin was used as control gene. Furthermore, a reduction in WT1 expression by ≥2 logs in peripheral blood samples taken at a later time point significantly correlated with a better outcome for overall survival (P=0.004) and freedom from relapse (P=0.012). This result was achieved when normalizing against both β-actin and ABL1. These results therefore suggest that WT1 gene expression can provide useful information for minimal residual disease detection in adult AML patients and that combined use of control genes can give more informative results.

  13. WT1 gene expression as a prognostic marker in advanced serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma: an immunohistochemical study

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    Netinatsunthorn, Wirote; Hanprasertpong, Jitti; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leetanaporn, Roengsak; Geater, Alan

    2006-01-01

    WT1 is a tumor suppressor gene responsible for Wilms' tumor. WT1 reactivity is limited to ovarian serous carcinomas. Recent studies have shown that WT1 plays an important role in the progression of disease and indicates a poorer prognosis of human malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia and breast cancer. The aims of this study were to determine the survival and recurrence-free survival of women with advanced serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma in relation to WT1 gene expression. The study accrued women over an 18-year period, from 1987–2004. During the study period, 163 patients were diagnosed with advanced serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma and had undergone complete post-operative chemotherapy, but the final study group comprised 99 patients. The records of these women were reviewed and the paraffin-embedded tissue of these women stained with WT1 immunostaining. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Fifty patients showed WT1 staining and forty-nine did not. Five-year survival of non-staining and staining groups were 39.4% and 10.7% (p < 0.00005); five-year recurrence-free survival of these groups were 29.8% and ≤ 7.5% (p < 0.00005), respectively. For survival the HR of WT1 staining, adjusted for residual tumor and chemotherapy response, was 1.98 (95% CI 1.28–3.79), and for recurrence-free survival the HR was 3.36 (95% CI 1.60–7.03). The HR for recurrence-free survival was not confounded by any other variables. This study suggests that expression of WT1 gene may be indicative of an unfavorable prognosis in patients with advanced serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma

  14. Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1)-- not only a diagnostic but also a prognostic marker in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

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    Taube, Eliane Tabea; Denkert, Carsten; Sehouli, Jalid; Kunze, Catarina Alisa; Dietel, Manfred; Braicu, Ioana; Letsch, Anne; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia

    2016-03-01

    Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1) expression is used in gynecological pathology as a diagnostic marker of serous differentiation, and is frequently co-expressed with ER-α. Early phase studies on WT1 vaccine in gynecological cancers are ongoing. In this study we aimed to determine the prognostic value of WT1 in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. WT1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 207 primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas. WT1 mRNA expression was evaluated in a cohort of 1137 ovarian carcinomas from publically available gene expression datasets. High WT1 expression was a significant positive prognostic factor in primary high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma regarding overall survival (OS, p=0.008) and progression free survival (PFS, p=0.015), which was independent of age, stage, and residual tumor (OS: p=0.024, PFS: p=0.047). The prognostic significance of immunohistochemical WT1 expression could be reproduced in an independent cohort of 72 patients. On the mRNA level the prognostic significance was validated in silico in publically available gene expression datasets including TCGA data (OS: p=0.002, PFS: p=0.011). WT1 expression was significantly linked to ER-α expression (p=0.001), and tumors that co-expressed both markers (WT1+/ER-α+) had a longer survival time than tumors of all other marker combinations (OS: p=0.002, PFS: p=0.013). We present WT1 as a robust prognostic marker in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, which adds prognostic information to ER-α. This should be kept in mind when WT1 is used as a biomarker in the context of WT1-targeting therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The oncogenic properties of EWS/WT1 of desmoplastic small round cell tumors are unmasked by loss of p53 in murine embryonic fibroblasts

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    Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Thomas, David M; Algar, Elizabeth; Ekert, Paul G; Jabbour, Anissa M; Riffkin, Christopher; Salmanidis, Marika; Gordon, Lavinia; Popovski, Dean; Rigby, Lin; Ashley, David M; Watkins, David N

    2013-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is characterized by the presence of a fusion protein EWS/WT1, arising from the t (11;22) (p13;q12) translocation. Here we examine the oncogenic properties of two splice variants of EWS/WT1, EWS/WT1-KTS and EWS/WT1 + KTS. We over-expressed both EWS/WT1 variants in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) of wild-type, p53 +/- and p53 -/- backgrounds and measured effects on cell-proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, clonogenicity after serum withdrawal, and sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and gamma irradiation in comparison to control cells. We examined gene expression profiles in cells expressing EWS/WT1. Finally we validated our key findings in a small series of DSRCT. Neither isoform of EWS/WT1 was sufficient to transform wild-type MEFs however the oncogenic potential of both was unmasked by p53 loss. Expression of EWS/WT1 in MEFs lacking at least one allele of p53 enhanced cell-proliferation, clonogenic survival and anchorage-independent growth. EWS/WT1 expression in wild-type MEFs conferred resistance to cell-cycle arrest after irradiation and daunorubicin induced apoptosis. We show DSRCT commonly have nuclear localization of p53, and copy-number amplification of MDM2/MDMX. Expression of either isoform of EWS/WT1 induced characteristic mRNA expression profiles. Gene-set enrichment analysis demonstrated enrichment of WNT pathway signatures in MEFs expressing EWS/WT1 + KTS. Wnt-activation was validated in cell lines with over-expression of EWS/WT1 and in DSRCT. In conclusion, we show both isoforms of EWS/WT1 have oncogenic potential in MEFs with loss of p53. In addition we provide the first link between EWS/WT1 and Wnt-pathway signaling. These data provide novel insights into the function of the EWS/WT1 fusion protein which characterize DSRCT

  16. Regulation of HtrA2 on WT1 gene expression under imatinib stimulation and its effects on the cell biology of K562 cells.

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    Zhang, Lixia; Li, Yan; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Qing; Qiu, Shaowei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Rao, Qing; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wang, Jianxiang; Mi, Yingchang

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) by serine protease high-temperature requirement protein A2 (HtrA2), a member of the Htr family, in K562 cells. In addition, the study aimed to observe the effect of this regulation on cell biological functions and its associated mechanisms. Expression of WT1 and HtrA2 mRNA, and proteins following imatinib and the HtrA2 inhibitor 5-[5-(2-nitrophenyl) furfuryl iodine]-1, 3-diphenyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (UCF-101) treatment was detected with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Subsequent to treatment with drugs and UCF-101, the proliferative function of K562 cells was detected using MTT assays, and the rate of apoptosis was detected using Annexin V with propidium iodide flow cytometry in K562 cells. The protein levels in the signaling pathway were analyzed using western blotting following treatment with imatinib and UCF-101. In K562 cells, imatinib treatment activated HtrA2 gene at a transcription level, while the WT1 gene was simultaneously downregulated. Following HtrA2 inhibitor (UCF-101) treatment, the downregulation of WT1 increased gradually. At the protein level, imatinib induced the increase in HtrA2 protein level and concomitantly downregulated WT1 protein level. Subsequent to HtrA2 inhibition by UCF-101, the WT1 protein level decreased temporarily, but eventually increased. Imatinib induced apoptosis in K562 cells, but this effect was attenuated by the HtrA2 inhibitor UCF-101, resulting in the upregulation of the WT1 protein level. However; UCF-101 did not markedly change the proliferation inhibition caused by imatinib. Imatinib activated the p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway in K562 cells, and UCF-101 affected the activation of imatinib in the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Imatinib inhibited the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) pathway markedly and persistently, but UCF-101

  17. Specificity for the tumor-associated self-antigen WT1 drives the development of fully functional memory T cells in the absence of vaccination.

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    Pospori, Constandina; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Voisine, Cecile; Perro, Mario; King, Judith; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Flutter, Barry; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Stauss, Hans J; Morris, Emma C

    2011-06-23

    Recently, vaccines against the Wilms Tumor antigen 1 (WT1) have been tested in cancer patients. However, it is currently not known whether physiologic levels of WT1 expression in stem and progenitor cells of normal tissue result in the deletion or tolerance induction of WT1-specific T cells. Here, we used an human leukocyte antigen-transgenic murine model to study the fate of human leukocyte antigen class-I restricted, WT1-specific T cells in the thymus and in the periphery. Thymocytes expressing a WT1-specific T-cell receptor derived from high avidity human CD8 T cells were positively selected into the single-positive CD8 population. In the periphery, T cells specific for the WT1 antigen differentiated into CD44-high memory phenotype cells, whereas T cells specific for a non-self-viral antigen retained a CD44(low) naive phenotype. Only the WT1-specific T cells, but not the virus-specific T cells, displayed rapid antigen-specific effector function without prior vaccination. Despite long-term persistence of WT1-specific memory T cells, the animals did not develop autoimmunity, and the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells was unimpaired. This is the first demonstration that specificity for a tumor-associated self-antigen may drive differentiation of functionally competent memory T cells.

  18. Treatment with chemotherapy and dendritic cells pulsed with multiple Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1)-specific MHC class I/II-restricted epitopes for pancreatic cancer.

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    Koido, Shigeo; Homma, Sadamu; Okamoto, Masato; Takakura, Kazuki; Mori, Masako; Yoshizaki, Shinji; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Odahara, Shunichi; Koyama, Seita; Imazu, Hiroo; Uchiyama, Kan; Kajihara, Mikio; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Misawa, Takeyuki; Toyama, Yoichi; Yanagisawa, Satoru; Ikegami, Masahiro; Kan, Shin; Hayashi, Kazumi; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Ito, Masaki; Ishidao, Takefumi; Yusa, Sei-Ichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Gong, Jianlin; Sugiyama, Haruo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-08-15

    We performed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, clinical responses, and Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1)-specific immune responses following treatment with dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with a mixture of three types of WT1 peptides, including both MHC class I and II-restricted epitopes, in combination with chemotherapy. Ten stage IV patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and 1 patient with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) who were HLA-positive for A*02:01, A*02:06, A*24:02, DRB1*04:05, DRB1*08:03, DRB1*15:01, DRB1*15:02, DPB1*05:01, or DPB1*09:01 were enrolled. The patients received one course of gemcitabine followed by biweekly intradermal vaccinations with mature DCs pulsed with MHC class I (DC/WT1-I; 2 PDA and 1 ICC), II (DC/WT1-II; 1 PDA), or I/II-restricted WT1 peptides (DC/WT1-I/II; 7 PDA), and gemcitabine. The combination therapy was well tolerated. WT1-specific IFNγ-producing CD4(+) T cells were significantly increased following treatment with DC/WT1-I/II. WT1 peptide-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) was detected in 4 of the 7 patients with PDA vaccinated with DC/WT1-I/II and in 0 of the 3 patients with PDA vaccinated with DC/WT1-I or DC/WT1-II. The WT1-specific DTH-positive patients showed significantly improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) compared with the negative control patients. In particular, all 3 patients with PDA with strong DTH reactions had a median OS of 717 days. The activation of WT1-specific immune responses by DC/WT1-I/II combined with chemotherapy may be associated with disease stability in advanced pancreatic cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Co-introduced functional CCR2 potentiates in vivo anti-lung cancer functionality mediated by T cells double gene-modified to express WT1-specific T-cell receptor.

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    Hiroaki Asai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although gene-modification of T cells to express tumor-related antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR has clinically proved promise, there still remains room to improve the clinical efficacy of re-directed T-cell based antitumor adoptive therapy. In order to achieve more objective clinical responses using ex vivo-expanded tumor-responsive T cells, the infused T cells need to show adequate localized infiltration into the tumor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human lung cancer cells variously express a tumor antigen, Wilms' Tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and an inflammatory chemokine, CCL2. However, CCR2, the relevant receptor for CCL2, is rarely expressed on activated T-lymphocytes. A HLA-A2402(+ human lung cancer cell line, LK79, which expresses high amounts of both CCL2 and WT1 mRNA, was employed as a target. Normal CD8(+ T cells were retrovirally gene-modified to express both CCR2 and HLA-A*2402-restricted and WT1(235-243 nonapeptide-specific TCR as an effector. Anti-tumor functionality mediated by these effector cells against LK79 cells was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Finally the impact of CCL2 on WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling mediated by the effector cells was studied. Introduced CCR2 was functionally validated using gene-modified Jurkat cells and human CD3(+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells successfully demonstrated both CCL2-tropic tumor trafficking and cytocidal reactivity against LK79 cells in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 augmented the WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling shown by relevant luciferase production in double gene-modified Jurkat/MA cells to express luciferase and WT1-specific TCR, and CCL2 also dose-dependently augmented WT1 epitope-responsive IFN-γ production and CD107a expression mediated by these double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Introduction of the CCL2/CCR2 axis successfully potentiated in

  20. WT1 Alternative Splicing: Role of Its Isoforms in Neuroblastoma.

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    Rasà, Daniela Maria; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2017-06-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), a tumor suppressor gene, was originally identified in the homonymous renal neoplasm but is also involved in other cancers. Its function is still unclear, since it acts both as a pro- and an anti-oncogene. At least 14 WT1 transcriptional variants have been described; yet most investigations have focused on a small number of isoforms. We describe their structural features and review the evidence of their involvement in cancer with emphasis on neuroblastoma. In future, full characterization of all WT1 isoforms is expected to identify new molecular tumor markers and/or therapeutic targets.

  1. WT1 expression and hemihypertrophy in congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

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    Abosoudah, Ibraheem; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Grant, Ronald; Weitzman, Sheila

    2008-10-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma (CMN) is a rare primary pediatric renal tumor occurring predominantly in infants. There is no known association between CMN and WT1 gene expression and the association of hemihypertrophy and CMN is not well known. We report an infant with isolated hemihypertrophy and WT1-positive CMN, and the results of WT1 immunostaining in 13 other patients with CMN diagnosed over 14 years at SickKids. Of the 14 total patients 3 had positive nuclear immunostaining for WT1. Two patients also expressed WT1 RNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, contrary to previous reports, WT1 may be expressed in CMN and CMN can be associated with hemihypertrophy in the absence of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

  2. Enhanced induction of human WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes with a 9-mer WT1 peptide modified at HLA-A*2402-binding residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Udaka, Keiko; Murakami, Masaki; Masuda, Tomoki; Nakano, Akiko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Yasukawa, Masaki; Hiraki, Akio; Oji, Yusuke; Kawakami, Manabu; Hosen, Naoki; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Wu, Fei; Taniguchi, Yuki; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Asada, Momotaro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kawase, Ichiro; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2002-12-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is overexpressed in most types of leukemias and various kinds of solid tumors, including lung and breast cancer, and participates in leukemogenesis and tumorigenesis. WT1 protein has been reported to be a promising tumor antigen in mouse and human. In the present study, a single amino-acid substitution, M-->Y, was introduced into the first anchor motif at position 2 of the natural immunogenic HLA-A*2402-restricted 9-mer WT1 peptide (CMTWNQMNL; a.a. 235-243). This substitution increased the binding affinity of the 9-mer WT1 peptide to HLA-A*2402 molecules from 1.82 x 10(-5) to 6.40 x 10(-7) M. As expected from the increased binding affinity, the modified 9-mer WT1 peptide (CYTWNQMNL) elicited WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) more effectively than the natural 9-mer WT1 peptide from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of HLA-A*2402-positive healthy volunteers. CTL induced by the modified 9-mer WT1 peptide killed the natural 9-mer WT1 peptide-pulsed CIR-A*2402 cells, primary leukemia cells with endogenous WT1 expression and lung cancer cell lines in a WT1-specific HLA-A*2402-restricted manner. These results showed that this modified 9-mer WT1 peptide was more immunogenic for the induction of WT1-specific CTL than the natural 9-mer WT1 peptide, and that CTL induced by the modified 9-mer WT1 peptide could effectively recognize and kill tumor cells with endogenous WT1 expression. Therefore, cancer immunotherapy using this modified 9-mer WT1 peptide should provide efficacious treatment for HLA-A*2402-positive patients with leukemias and solid tumors.

  3. Simultaneous analysis of the expression of 14 genes with individual prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome patients at diagnosis: WT1 detection in peripheral blood adversely affects survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Carlos; Ramos, Fernando; Puig, Noemi; Barragán, Eva; de Paz, Raquel; Pedro, Carme; Insunza, Andrés; Tormo, Mar; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Diez-Campelo, María; Xicoy, Blanca; Salido, Eduardo; Sánchez del Real, Javier; Hernández, Montserrat; Chillón, Carmen; Sanz, Guillermo F; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; González, Marcos

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have evaluated the prognostic value of the individual expression of certain genes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, none of them includes their simultaneous analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We evaluated relative expression levels of 14 molecular markers in 193 peripheral blood samples from untreated MDS patients using real-time PCR. Detectable WT1 expression levels, low TET2, and low IER3 gene expression were the only markers showing in univariate analysis a poor prognostic value for all treatment-free (TFS), progression-free (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In multivariate analysis, molecular parameters associated with a shorter TFS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.014), low TET2 (p = 0.002), and low IER3 expression (p = 0.025). WT1 detection (p = 0.006) and low TET2 (p = 0.006) expression were associated with a shorter PFS when multivariate analysis was carried out by including only molecular markers. Molecular values with an independent value in OS were: WT1 detection (p = 0.003), high EVI1 expression (p = 0.001), and undetectatable p15-CDKN2B (p = 0.037). WT1 expressers were associated with adverse clinical-biological features, high IPSS and WPSS scoring, and unfavorable molecular expression profile. In summary, detectable WT1 expression levels, and low TET2 and low IER3 expression in peripheral blood showed a strong association with adverse prognosis in MDS patients at diagnosis. However, WT1 was the only molecular marker displaying an independent prognostic value in both OS and TFS.

  4. Analysis of the tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and the tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, HAGE, MAGE-1, and MAGE-3, in benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, H; Laskawi, R; Eiffert, H; Schlott, T

    2003-08-01

    Molecular genetic changes involved in tumorigenesis and malignant transformation of human tumours are novel targets of cancer diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to analyse the expression of putative tumour suppressor genes, FHIT and WT-1, and tumour rejection genes, BAGE, GAGE-1/2, MAGE-1, MAGE-3, and HAGE (which are reported to be important in human cancers), in salivary gland neoplasms. Gene expression was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in normal salivary gland tissue and 44 benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. Aberrant FHIT transcripts were found in one of 38 normal salivary glands, three of 28 adenomas, and two of 16 carcinomas. WT-1 mRNA was detectable in two adenomas and five carcinomas. Immunoblotting showed that WT-1 mRNA expression was associated with raised WT-1 protein concentrations. RT-PCR for detection of BAGE, GAGE, and MAGE gene expression was positive in two adenomas and nine carcinomas, but negative in normal salivary gland tissue. HAGE mRNA was found in two normal salivary glands, 11 benign, and eight malignant tumours. FHIT mRNA splicing does not appear to be involved in the genesis of salivary gland neoplasms. The upregulation of WT-1 mRNA in tumours of epithelial/myoepithelial phenotype may imply a potential role of WT-1 in the genesis and/or cellular differentiation of these salivary gland tumours. The tumour rejection genes were more frequently, but not exclusively, expressed in malignant salivary gland tumours than in benign neoplasms, although none was suitable as a diagnostic marker of malignancy in salivary gland neoplasms.

  5. Immunotherapy in Acute Leukemias: Implications and Perspectives Using Wt1 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebinelli, Guilherme Cesar Martelossi; DE Sousa Pereira, Nathália; Sena, Michelle Mota; DE Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Fujita, Thiago Cezar; DA Rocha, Sérgio Paulo Dejato; DE Abreu Oliveira, Francisco José; Marinello, Poliana Camila; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2016-08-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a transcription factor involved in regulation of many cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, mRNA processing and apoptosis, besides acting as a transcription repressor of growth factors and their receptors' genes. This gene is expressed at high levels in several types of cancers, including acute leukemias. In this regard, many studies have identified WT1 protein as a tumor antigen, considered a target molecule for clinical application in human acute leukemias. Immunotherapy using WT1 antigen has been effective in stimulating immune responses against leukemic cells. Regarding adoptive immunotherapy, the use of dendritic cells (DCs) for the WT1-specific cytotoxic T cells generation proved to be efficient in the development and maintenance of immunologic cells. Therefore, these therapeutic methods, that provided enthusiasm for moving ahead, highlight several opportunities and challenges to be used in clinical practice for managing acute leukemias. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. A t (11; 22 (p13; q12 EWS-WT 1 positive desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the maxilla: An unusual case indicating the role of molecular diagnosis in round cell sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekhi B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT is an uncommon tumor characterized by polyphenotypic expression and a specific reciprocal translocation t (11; 22 (p13; q12. It has been rarely identified in the head and neck region. Herein, we describe a DSRCT in the maxilla of a young man, who was initially diagnosed with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET, based on histopathological appearance of a round cell tumor, with MIC2 and -FLI-1 positivity, on immunohistochemistry (IHC. Diagnosis of a DSRCT was confirmed on molecular analysis with positive -RT-PCR and sequencing results for EWS-WT1 transcript and negativity for EWS-FL1. The case is presented to highlight the value of molecular diagnosis in round cell sarcomas at uncommon sites, especially when similar IHC markers can be expressed in a PNET and a DSRCT. An exact diagnosis of a round cell sarcoma has a therapeutic relevance.

  7. Combined mutations of ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocquain, Julien; Birnbaum, Daniel; Gelsi-Boyer, Véronique; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joelle; Carbuccia, Nadine; Trouplin, Virginie; Raynaud, Stéphane; Murati, Anne; Nezri, Meyer; Tadrist, Zoulika; Olschwang, Sylviane; Vey, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    Gene mutation is an important mechanism of myeloid leukemogenesis. However, the number and combination of gene mutated in myeloid malignancies is still a matter of investigation. We searched for mutations in the ASXL1, CBL, FLT3, IDH1, IDH2, JAK2, KRAS, NPM1, NRAS, RUNX1, TET2 and WT1 genes in 65 myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and 64 acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) without balanced translocation or complex karyotype. Mutations in ASXL1 and CBL were frequent in refractory anemia with excess of blasts. Mutations in TET2 occurred with similar frequency in MDSs and AMLs and associated equally with either ASXL1 or NPM1 mutations. Mutations of RUNX1 were mutually exclusive with TET2 and combined with ASXL1 but not with NPM1. Mutations in FLT3 (mutation and internal tandem duplication), IDH1, IDH2, NPM1 and WT1 occurred primarily in AMLs. Only 14% MDSs but half AMLs had at least two mutations in the genes studied. Based on the observed combinations and exclusions we classified the 12 genes into four classes and propose a highly speculative model that at least a mutation in one of each class is necessary for developing AML with simple or normal karyotype

  8. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  9. Prognostic impact of Wilms tumor gene mutations in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Magda Abdel Aziz; Kamal Shaaban, Howyda M; Elghannam, Doaa M

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene mutations were detected in patients with most forms of acute leukemia. However, the biological significance and the prognostic impact of WT1 mutation in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) are still uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and clinical relevance of WT1 gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK). Exons 7 and 9 of WT1 were screened in samples from 216 adult NK-AML using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism techniques. Twenty-three patients (10.6%) harbored WT1 mutations. Younger ages and higher marrow blasts were significantly associated with WT1 mutations (P = 0.006 and 0.003 respectively). Complete remission rates were significantly lower in patients with WT1 mutations than those with WT1 wild-type (P = 0.015). Resistance, relapse, and mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with WT1 mutations than those without (P = 0.041, 0.016, and 0.008 respectively). WT1 mutations were inversely associated with NPM1 mutations (P = 0.007). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (P < 0.001) and overall survival (P < 0.001) than patients with WT1 wild-type. In multivariable analyses, WT1 mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P < 0.001; hazard ratio [HR] 0.036) and overall survival (P = 0.001; HR = 0.376) when controlling for age, total leukocytic count (TLC), and NPM1 mutational status. In conclusion, WT1 mutations are a negative prognostic indicator in intensively treated patients with AML-NK, may be a part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with AML-NK.

  10. The roadmap of WT1 protein expression in the human fetal heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duim, Sjoerd N; Smits, Anke M; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Goumans, Marie-José

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT1) is essential for cardiac development. Deletion of Wt1 in mice results in disturbed epicardial and myocardial formation and lack of cardiac vasculature, causing embryonic lethality. Little is known about the role of WT1 in the human fetal heart. Therefore, as a first step, we analyzed the expression pattern of WT1 protein during human cardiac development from week 4 till week 20. WT1 expression was apparent in epicardial, endothelial and endocardial cells in a spatiotemporal manner. The expression of WT1 follows a pattern starting at the epicardium and extending towards the lumen of the heart, with differences in timing and expression levels between the atria and ventricles. The expression of WT1 in cardiac arterial endothelial cells reduces in time, whereas WT1 expression in the endothelial cells of cardiac veins and capillaries remains present at all stages studied. This study provides for the first time a detailed description of the expression of WT1 protein during human cardiac development, which indicates an important role for WT1 also in human cardiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. WT1 expression in endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma: a study of 13 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Wonwoo; Salomão, Diva R

    2014-10-01

    Endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma (EMPSGC), a low-grade sweat gland carcinoma with a predilection for the eyelids, often shows areas of benign eccrine cysts, atypical intracystic proliferation and associated mucinous carcinoma, suggesting tumor progression. Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) protein, a transcription factor, is overexpressed in many tumors and plays a role in oncogenesis. A computer-based search for tumors diagnosed between 1989 and 2009 was conducted. Clinical data were obtained from pathology reports and patient records. Biopsies were reviewed for histologic features. Immunostaining was performed for WT1, chromogranin, synaptophysin, estrogen receptor (ER), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), polyclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (P-CEA), cytokeratin 7 (CK7), cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and MIB-1. Eight women and five men (mean age: 61.2 years; range: 40-77 years) presented with slow-growing eyelid nodules. Cases of EMPSGC were characterized by the presence of dermal nodules with various growth patterns. Adjacent eccrine cysts were present in five patients, atypical epithelial proliferation within the cyst wall in four patients, and an associated mucinous carcinoma in one patient. All tumors were positive for WT1, CK7, ER, P-CEA and EMA and negative for CK20. Tumors were positive for synaptophysin in 12 cases and chromogranin in nine cases. The MIB-1 proliferation index was low in most cases. No WT1 staining was observed in the overlying epidermis, adnexal structures or areas of benign eccrine cyst. WT1 expression was observed in areas of atypical epithelial proliferation, and the neoplastic cells. The present study shows WT1 expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells of EMPSGC, areas of atypical intraductal proliferations, and mucinous carcinoma. The absence of WT1 expression in areas of benign eccrine cyst and cutaneous sweat glands suggests WT1 upregulation plays a role in tumor cell proliferation and progression of EMPSGC. © 2014 The International

  12. Structures of native and affinity-enhanced WT1 epitopes bound to HLA-A*0201: Implications for WT1-based cancer therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2010-09-07

    Presentation of peptides by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is required for the initiation and propagation of a T cell-mediated immune response. Peptides from the Wilms Tumor 1 transcription factor (WT1), upregulated in many hematopoetic and solid tumors, can be recognized by T cells and numerous efforts are underway to engineer WT1-based cancer vaccines. Here we determined the structures of the class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201 bound to the native 126-134 epitope of the WT1 peptide and a recently described variant (R1Y) with improved MHC binding. The R1Y variant, a potential vaccine candidate, alters the positions of MHC charged side chains near the peptide N-terminus and significantly reduces the peptide/MHC electrostatic surface potential. These alterations indicate that the R1Y variant is an imperfect mimic of the native WT1 peptide, and suggest caution in its use as a therapeutic vaccine. Stability measurements revealed how the R1Y substitution enhances MHC binding affinity, and together with the structures suggest a strategy for engineering WT1 variants with improved MHC binding that retain the structural features of the native peptide/MHC complex.

  13. Osr1 Interacts Synergistically with Wt1 to Regulate Kidney Organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyue Xu

    Full Text Available Renal hypoplasia is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and several adult-onset diseases. Recent studies have associated a variant of the OSR1 gene with reduction of newborn kidney size and function in heterozygotes and neonatal lethality with kidney defects in homozygotes. How OSR1 regulates kidney development and nephron endowment is not well understood, however. In this study, by using the recently developed CRISPR genome editing technology, we genetically labeled the endogenous Osr1 protein and show that Osr1 interacts with Wt1 in the developing kidney. Whereas mice heterozygous for either an Osr1 or Wt1 null allele have normal kidneys at birth, most mice heterozygous for both Osr1 and Wt1 exhibit defects in metanephric kidney development, including unilateral or bilateral kidney agenesis or hypoplasia. The developmental defects in the Osr1+/-Wt1+/- mouse embryos were detected as early as E10.5, during specification of the metanephric mesenchyme, with the Osr1+/-Wt1+/- mouse embryos exhibiting significantly reduced Pax2-positive and Six2-positive nephron progenitor cells. Moreover, expression of Gdnf, the major nephrogenic signal for inducing ureteric bud outgrowth, was significantly reduced in the metanephric mesenchyme in Osr1+/-Wt1+/- embryos in comparison with the Osr1+/- or Wt1+/- littermates. By E11.5, as the ureteric buds invade the metanephric mesenchyme and initiate branching morphogenesis, kidney morphogenesis was significantly impaired in the Osr1+/-Wt1+/- embryos in comparison with the Osr1+/- or Wt1+/- embryos. These results indicate that Osr1 and Wt1 act synergistically to regulate nephron endowment by controlling metanephric mesenchyme specification during early nephrogenesis.

  14. Analysis list: Wt1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Wt1 Embryo,Kidney + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wt1.1....tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Wt1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyush...u-u/mm9/target/Wt1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Wt1.Embryo.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Wt1.Kidney.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedb...c.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Embryo.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Kidney.gml ...

  15. Peptide Based Vaccine Approaches for Cancer—A Novel Approach Using a WT-1 Synthetic Long Peptide and the IRX-2 Immunomodulatory Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Egan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic cancer vaccines have the potential to generate a long lasting immune response that will destroy tumor cells with specificity and safety, in contrast to many other current cancer therapies. Clinical success to date has been limited by a number of factors including choice of immunogenic cancer rejection antigens, optimization of vaccine platforms and immune adjuvants to effectively polarize the immune response, and incorporation of strategies to reverse cancer mediated immune suppression by utilization of effective adjuvant/immune modulators. WT-1 (Wilms’ tumor gene 1 is a cancer antigen that is required for tumorigenesis, expressed in a high percentage of tumor cells and rarely expressed in adult normal cells. Moreover spontaneous immunity to WT-1 is seen in cancer patients and can be augmented with various therapeutic vaccine approaches. IRX-2 is an immune modulator with demonstrated preclinical and clinical pleiotropic immune activities including enhancement of the immune response to potential tumor antigens. This paper presents the rationale and preclinical data for utilizing the WT-1 tumor antigen in a novel vaccine platform consisting of a synthetic long peptide containing multiple class I and class II epitopes in combination with the IRX-2 immunomodulatory regimen to overcome immuno-suppressive pathways and enhance the anti-tumor response.

  16. Peptide Based Vaccine Approaches for Cancer—A Novel Approach Using a WT-1 Synthetic Long Peptide and the IRX-2 Immunomodulatory Regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L., E-mail: nberinstein@irxtherapeutics.com [IRX Therapeutics, 140 W 57th Street, New York, NY 10019 (United States)

    2011-10-25

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines have the potential to generate a long lasting immune response that will destroy tumor cells with specificity and safety, in contrast to many other current cancer therapies. Clinical success to date has been limited by a number of factors including choice of immunogenic cancer rejection antigens, optimization of vaccine platforms and immune adjuvants to effectively polarize the immune response, and incorporation of strategies to reverse cancer mediated immune suppression by utilization of effective adjuvant/immune modulators. WT-1 (Wilms' tumor gene 1) is a cancer antigen that is required for tumorigenesis, expressed in a high percentage of tumor cells and rarely expressed in adult normal cells. Moreover spontaneous immunity to WT-1 is seen in cancer patients and can be augmented with various therapeutic vaccine approaches. IRX-2 is an immune modulator with demonstrated preclinical and clinical pleiotropic immune activities including enhancement of the immune response to potential tumor antigens. This paper presents the rationale and preclinical data for utilizing the WT-1 tumor antigen in a novel vaccine platform consisting of a synthetic long peptide containing multiple class I and class II epitopes in combination with the IRX-2 immunomodulatory regimen to overcome immuno-suppressive pathways and enhance the anti-tumor response.

  17. Evidence that WT1 mutations in Denys-Drash syndrome patients may act in a dominant-negative fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, M. H.; Williamson, K. A.; Mannens, M.; Kelsey, A.; Gosden, C.; Hastie, N. D.; van Heyningen, V.

    1993-01-01

    The triad of nephropathy, partial gonadal dysgenesis and Wilms' tumour (WT) is known as Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS). The WT predisposition gene WT1, which plays a vital role in both genital and renal development, is known to be mutated in DDS patients. The WT1 mutations in these patients are

  18. Use of Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Expression as a Reliable Marker for Prognosis and Minimal Residual Disease Monitoring in Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Normal Karyotype Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Irena; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Ugrin, Milena; Virijevic, Marijana; Vidovic, Ana; Tomin, Dragica; Suvajdzic Vukovic, Nada; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2017-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) represents the largest group of AML patients classified with an intermediate prognosis. A constant need exists to introduce new molecular markers for more precise risk stratification and for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene transcripts was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The bone marrow samples were collected at the diagnosis from 104 AML-NK patients and from 34 of these patients during follow-up or disease relapse. We found that overexpression of the WT1 gene (WT1 high status), present in 25.5% of patients, was an independent unfavorable factor for achieving complete remission. WT1 high status was also associated with resistance to therapy and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. Assessment of the log reduction value of WT1 expression, measured in paired diagnosis/complete remission samples, revealed that patients with a log reduction of < 2 had a tendency toward shorter disease-free survival and overall survival and a greater incidence of disease relapse. Combining WT1 gene expression status with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutational status, we found that the tumor behavior of intermediate patients (FLT3-ITD - /NPM1 - double negative) with WT1 high status is almost the same as the tumor behavior of the adverse risk group. WT1 expression status represents a good molecular marker of prognosis, response to treatment, and MRD monitoring. Above all, the usage of the WT1 expression level as an additional marker for more precise risk stratification of AML-NK patients could lead to more adapted, personalized treatment protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [WT1 mutation as a cause of progressive nephropathy in Frasier syndrome--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, Anna; Zoch-Zwierz, Walentyna; Tenderenda, Edyta; Rybi-Szumińska, Agnieszka; Kołodziejczyk, Zbigniew

    2009-06-01

    Frasier syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder featuring progressive glomerulopathy, male pseudohermaphroditism and gonadal dysgenesis. It is caused by mutations in intron 9 of the WT1 gene. Because of its rarity there is limited literature available on the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of the study was to present the clinicopathological findings and molecular analysis of phenotypically female adolescent presenting with severe proteinuria and primary amenorrhea. The significance of early recognition of Frasier syndrome and its differentiation from Denys-Drash syndrome was discussed. WT1 mutation analysis should be routinely done in females with steroid-resistant nephritic syndrome.

  20. Conditional deletion of WT1 in the septum transversum mesenchyme causes congenital diaphragmatic hernia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Rita; Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Ariza, Laura; Rojas, Anabel; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramon

    2016-09-19

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a severe birth defect. Wt1-null mouse embryos develop CDH but the mechanisms regulated by WT1 are unknown. We have generated a murine model with conditional deletion of WT1 in the lateral plate mesoderm, using the G2 enhancer of the Gata4 gene as a driver. 80% of G2-Gata4(Cre);Wt1(fl/fl) embryos developed typical Bochdalek-type CDH. We show that the posthepatic mesenchymal plate coelomic epithelium gives rise to a mesenchyme that populates the pleuroperitoneal folds isolating the pleural cavities before the migration of the somitic myoblasts. This process fails when Wt1 is deleted from this area. Mutant embryos show Raldh2 downregulation in the lateral mesoderm, but not in the intermediate mesoderm. The mutant phenotype was partially rescued by retinoic acid treatment of the pregnant females. Replacement of intermediate by lateral mesoderm recapitulates the evolutionary origin of the diaphragm in mammals. CDH might thus be viewed as an evolutionary atavism.

  1. Acute WT1-positive promyelocytic leukemia with hypogranular variant morphology, bcr-3 isoform of PML-RARα and Flt3-ITD mutation: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL accounts for 8% to 10% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Remission in cases of high-risk APL is still difficult to achieve, and relapses occur readily. CASE REPORT: Here, we describe a case of APL with high white blood cell counts in blood tests and hypogranular variant morphology in bone marrow, together with fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 with internal tandem duplication mutations (FLT3-ITD, and bcr-3 isoform of PML-RARα. Most importantly, we detected high level of Wilms’ tumor gene (WT1 in marrow blasts, through the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. To date, no clear conclusions about an association between WT1 expression levels and APL have been reached. This patient successively received a combined treatment regimen consisting of hydroxycarbamide, arsenic trioxide and idarubicin plus cytarabine, which ultimately enabled complete remission. Unfortunately, he subsequently died of sudden massive hemoptysis because of pulmonary infection. CONCLUSION: Based on our findings and a review of the literature, abnormal functioning of WT1 may be a high-risk factor in cases of APL. Further studies aimed towards evaluating the impact of WT1 expression on the prognosis for APL patients are of interest.

  2. WT1 vaccination in AML and MDS: A pilot trial with synthetic analog peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayer, Jason; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Powers, John; List, Alan; Balducci, Lodovico; Komrokji, Rami; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Peptide vaccines are capable of eliciting immune responses targeting tumor-associated antigens such as the Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) antigen, often overexpressed in myeloid malignancies. Here, we assessed the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a polyvalent WT1 peptide vaccine. Individuals with WT1-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first (CR1) or second (CR2) remission or with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following at least 1 prior line of therapy were vaccinated with a mixture of peptides derived from the WT1 protein, with sargramostim injections before vaccination to amplify immunogenicity. Six vaccinations were delivered biweekly, continuing then monthly until patients received 12 vaccinations or showed disease relapse or progression. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by progression-free and overall survival. Immune responses were evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity testing and T-cell IFNγ ELISPOT at specified intervals. In 16 patients who received at least one vaccination, 10 completed the planned course of six vaccinations and six continued for up to six additional monthly vaccinations. Vaccinations were well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing due to toxicity. One of two patients with high-risk MDS experienced a prolonged decrease in transfusion dependence. Two of 14 AML patients demonstrated relapse-free survival >1 year. Both patients were in CR2 at time of vaccination, with duration of their remission exceeding duration of their first remission, suggesting a potential benefit. Our WT1 vaccine was well-tolerated. The clinical benefit that we observed in several patients suggests engagement of a protective immune response, indicating a need for further trials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Allogeneic HLA-A*02-Restricted WT1-Specific T Cells from Mismatched Donors Are Highly Reactive but Show Off-Target Promiscuity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falkenburg, Willem J. J.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; van de Meent, Marian; Kester, Michel G. D.; Hombrink, Pleun; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Hagedoorn, Renate S.; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Barrett, A. John; Jedema, Inge

    2011-01-01

    T cells recognizing tumor-associated Ags such as Wilms tumor protein (WT1) are thought to exert potent antitumor reactivity. However, no consistent high-avidity T cell responses have been demonstrated in vaccination studies with WT1 as target in cancer immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to

  4. High WT1 expression is an early predictor for relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia in first remission with negative PML-RARa after anthracycline-based chemotherapy: a single-center cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Ho Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1 expression is a well-known predictor for relapse in acute myeloid leukemia. We monitored WT1 decrement along the treatment course to identify its significant role as a marker for residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL and tried to suggest its significance for relapse prediction. In this single center retrospective study, we serially measured PML-RARa and WT1 expression from 117 APL patients at diagnosis, at post-induction and post-consolidation chemotherapies, and at every 3 months after starting maintenance therapy. All 117 patients were in molecular remission after treatment of at least 2 consolidation chemotherapies. We used WT1 ProfileQuant™ kit (Ipsogen for WT1 monitoring. High WT1 expression (>120 copies/104 ABL1 after consolidation and at early period (3 months after maintenance therapy significantly predicted subsequent relapse. All paired PML-RARa RQ-PCR were not detected except for one sample with early relapse. Patients with high WT1 expression at 3 months after maintenance therapy (n = 40 showed a significantly higher relapse rate (30.5 vs. 6.9%, P < 0.001 and inferior disease free survival (62.8 vs. 91.4%, P < 0.001. Multivariate analysis revealed that high peak leukocyte counts at diagnosis (HR = 6.4, P < 0.001 and high WT1 expression at 3 months after maintenance therapy (HR = 7.1, P < 0.001 were significant factors for prediction of relapse. Our data showed high post-remission WT1 expression was a reliable marker for prediction of subsequent molecular relapse in APL. In this high-risk group, early intervention with ATRA ± ATO, anti-CD33 antibody therapy, and WT1-specific therapy may be used for relapse prevention. Trial registration Clinical Research Information Service (CRIS, KCT0002079

  5. Abnormal WT1 expression in human fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis and cardiac malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Ramm, Grant A

    2012-02-01

    Bilateral renal agenesis has multiple etiologies. Animal models have provided useful information on possible causes of this condition, but its etiology in humans is less clear. We recently described autopsy findings of two human fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis and abnormal expression of WT1 (Wilms tumor 1) in liver mesothelium. We have identified 14 additional fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis from autopsies performed in our institution over the past 10 years and subjected archival liver biopsy specimens from these cases to immunohistochemistry for WT1, as well as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin to assess liver mesenchymal abnormalities. Six of seven fetuses with combined bilateral renal agenesis and cardiac anomalies showed abnormalities of WT1 expression in liver mesothelial cells, which was not seen in other fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis. Except in one case, the fetuses with renal agenesis and cardiac defects also showed liver mesenchymal anomalies (assessed by increased α-SMA expression), which was not present in other renal agenesis fetuses. WT1 is widely expressed in mesothelial cells during development, and we hypothesized that some of the defects are caused by abnormal function of mesenchyme derived from mesothelial cells, similar to the mesothelium-derived defects proposed in animal models. The methods we used are available to many laboratories and can be applied to archival paraffin tissue blocks. We suggest that future similar studies could help to expand the understanding of renal agenesis in humans and could help to subclassify this condition. This would be useful in patient management and counseling. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Overexpression of Wilms Tumor 1 Gene as a Negative Prognostic Indicator in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Ruihua; Ding, Jing; Wang, Xianwei; Hu, Jieying; Fan, Ruihua; Wei, Xudong; Song, Yongping; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are useful in assessing treatment options and clinical outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. However, 40∼50% of the AML patients showed no chromosomal abnormalities, i.e., with normal cytogenetics aka the CN-AML patients. Testing of molecular aberrations such as FLT3 or NPM1 can help to define clinical outcomes in the CN-AML patients but with various successes. Goal of this study was to test the possibility of Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) gene overexpression as an additional molecular biomarker. A total of 103 CN-AML patients, among which 28% had overexpressed WT1, were studied over a period of 38 months. Patient’s response to induction chemotherapy as measured by the complete remission (CR) rate, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were measured. Our data suggested that WT1 overexpression correlated negatively with the CR rate, DFS and OS. Consistent with previous reports, CN-AML patients can be divided into three different risk subgroups based on the status of known molecular abnormalities, i.e., the favorable (NPM1mt/no FLT3ITD), the unfavorable (FLT3ITD) and the intermediate risk subgroups. The WT1 overexpression significantly reduced the CR, DFS and OS in both the favorable and unfavorable groups. As the results, patients with normal WT1 gene expression in the favorable risk group showed the best clinical outcomes and all survived with complete remission and disease-free survival over the 37 month study period; in contrast, patients with WT1 overexpression in the unfavorable risk group displayed the worst clinical outcomes. WT1 overexpression by itself is an independent and negative indicator for predicting CR rate, DFS and OS of the CN-AML patients; moreover, it increases the statistical power of predicting the same clinical outcomes when it is combined with the NPM1 mt or the FLT3 ITD genotypes that are the good or poor prognostic markers of CN-AML. PMID:24667279

  7. Gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yaowen; Cao Yongzhen; Li Jin; Wang Qin

    2008-01-01

    Tumor treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. Nowadays, a novel method which is combined gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research, and mainly includes immune gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, suicide gene therapy or tumor suppressor gene therapy combined with radiotherapy, antiangiogenesis gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and protective gene therapy combined with radiotherapy based on the technical features. This review summarized the current status of combined therapies of gene therapy and radiotherapy and possible mechanism. (authors)

  8. Developmental patterns and characteristics of epicardial cell markers Tbx18 and Wt1 in murine embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiao-feng; Cao, Feng; Zhou, Xiao-yang; Zhang, Jing

    2011-08-26

    Although recent studies have highlighted the role of epicardial cells during cardiac development and regeneration, their cardiomyogenic potential is still controversial due to the question of lineage tracing of epicardial cells. The present study therefore aimed to examine the the expression of Tbx18 and Wt1 in embryonic heart and to identify whether Tbx18 and Wt1 themselves expressed in the cardiomyocyte. Mouse embryonic hearts were collected at different stages for immunofluorescence costaining with either Tbx18 and the cardiac transcription factor Nkx2.5 or Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1) and Nkx2.5. Tbx18 and Wt1, but not Nkx2.5, were expressed in the proepicardium and epicardium. Tbx18 was expressed in cells within the heart from E10.5 to at least E14.5; these Tbx18-expressing cells were Nkx2.5 positive, except for a few cells that were Nkx2.5 negative at E14.5. Wt1 was expressed in cells within the heart from E12.5 to at least E14.5, but these Wt1-expressing cells were Nkx2.5 negative. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that Tbx18 is expressed in the cardiomyocytes from E10.5 to at least E14.5, and Wt1 is expressed within the heart from E12.5 to at least E14.5, but not in the cardiomyocyte. These findings may provide new insights on the role of the epicardial cells in cardiac regeneration.

  9. 11p Microdeletion including WT1 but not PAX6, presenting with cataract, mental retardation, genital abnormalities and seizures: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Bangsgaard, Regitze

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: WAGR syndrome (Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities and mental retardation) and Potocki-Shaffer syndrome are rare contiguous gene deletion syndromes caused by deletions of the 11p14-p12 chromosome region.We present a patient with mental retardation, unilateral cataract......, bilateral ptosis, genital abnormalities, seizures and a dysmorphic face. Cytogenetic analysis showed a deletion on 11p that was further characterized using FISH and MLPA analyses. The deletion (11p13-p12) located in the area between the deletions associated with the WAGR and Potocki-Shaffer syndromes had...... a maximum size of 8.5 Mb and encompasses 44 genes. Deletion of WT1 explains the genital abnormalities observed. As PAX6 was intact the cataract observed cannot be explained by a deletion of this gene. Seizures have been described in Potocki-Shaffer syndrome while mental retardation has been described...

  10. Gene expression profiles in primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions of Ela-c-myc transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Dezhong J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic carcinoma usually is a fatal disease with no cure, mainly due to its invasion and metastasis prior to diagnosis. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of paired primary pancreatic tumors and metastatic lesions from Ela-c-myc transgenic mice in order to identify genes that may be involved in the pancreatic cancer progression. Differentially expressed selected genes were verified by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. To further evaluate the relevance of some of the selected differentially expressed genes, we investigated their expression pattern in human pancreatic cancer cell lines with high and low metastatic potentials. Results Data indicate that genes involved in posttranscriptional regulation were a major functional category of upregulated genes in both primary pancreatic tumors (PT and liver metastatic lesions (LM compared to normal pancreas (NP. In particular, differential expression for splicing factors, RNA binding/pre-mRNA processing factors and spliceosome related genes were observed, indicating that RNA processing and editing related events may play critical roles in pancreatic tumor development and progression. High expression of insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (Igfbp1 and Serine proteinase inhibitor A1 (Serpina1, and low levels or absence of Wt1 gene expression were exclusive to liver metastatic lesion samples. Conclusion We identified Igfbp1, Serpina1 and Wt1 genes that are likely to be clinically useful biomarkers for prognostic or therapeutic purposes in metastatic pancreatic cancer, particularly in pancreatic cancer where c-Myc is overexpressed.

  11. Effects of concomitant temozolomide and radiation therapies on WT1-specific T-cells in malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting the Wilms' tumour 1 gene product has been proven safe and effective for treating malignant glioma in a phase II clinical study. Currently, radiation/temozolomide therapy is the standard treatment with only modest benefit. Whether combining radiation/temozolomide therapy with WT1 immunotherapy will have a negating effect on immunotherapy is still controversial because of the significant lymphocytopaenia induced by the former therapy. To address this issue, we investigated the changes in frequency and number of WT1-specific T-cells in patients with malignant gliomas. Twenty-two patients with newly diagnosed malignant glioma who received standard radiation/temozolomide therapy were recruited for the study. Blood samples were collected before treatment and on the sixth week of therapy. The frequencies and numbers of lymphocytes, CD8 + T-cells, WT1-specific T-cells, regulatory T-cells, natural killer cells and natural killer T-cells were measured and analysed using T-tests. Analysis of the frequency of T lymphocytes and its subpopulation showed an increase in regulatory T-cells, but no significant change was noted in the populations of T-cells, WT1-specific T-cells, natural killer (NK) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells. Reductions in the total numbers of T-cells, WT1-specific T-cells, NK cells and NKT cells were mainly a consequence of the decrease in the total lymphocyte count. Radiation/temozolomide therapy did not significantly affect the frequency of WT1-specific T-cells, suggesting that the combination with WT1 immunotherapy may be possible, although further assessment in the clinical setting is warranted. (author)

  12. Development of oral cancer vaccine using recombinant Bifidobacterium displaying Wilms' tumor 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Oda, Tsugumi; Saito, Hiroki; Araki, Ayame; Gonoi, Reina; Shigemura, Katsumi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Katayama, Takane; Fujisawa, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-06-01

    Several types of vaccine-delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been developed in basic and clinical research. Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), identified as a gene responsible for pediatric renal neoplasm, is one of the most promising TAA for cancer immunotherapy. Peptide and dendritic cell-based WT1 cancer vaccines showed some therapeutic efficacy in clinical and pre-clinical studies but as yet no oral WT1 vaccine can be administrated in a simple and easy way. In the present study, we constructed a novel oral cancer vaccine using a recombinant Bifidobacterium longum displaying WT1 protein. B. longum 420 was orally administered into mice inoculated with WT1-expressing tumor cells for 4 weeks to examine anti-tumor effects. To analyze the WT1-specific cellular immune responses to oral B. longum 420, mice splenocytes were isolated and cytokine production and cytotoxic activities were determined. Oral administrations of B. longum 420 significantly inhibited WT1-expressing tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. Immunohistochemical study and immunological assays revealed that B. longum 420 substantially induced tumor infiltration of CD4 + T and CD8 + T cells, systemic WT1-specific cytokine production, and cytotoxic activity mediated by WT1-epitope specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, with no apparent adverse effects. Our novel oral cancer vaccine safely induced WT1-specific cellular immunity via activation of the gut mucosal immune system and achieved therapeutic efficacy with several practical advantages over existing non-oral vaccines.

  13. The transcription factors Tbx18 and Wt1 control the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition through bi-directional regulation of Slug in murine primary epicardial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Takeichi

    Full Text Available During cardiac development, a subpopulation of epicardial cells migrates into the heart as part of the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and differentiates into smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. However, the roles of transcription factors in the epicardial EMT are poorly understood. Here, we show that two transcription factors expressed in the developing epicardium, T-box18 (Tbx18 and Wilms' tumor 1 homolog (Wt1, bi-directionally control the epicardial EMT through their effects on Slug expression in murine primary epicardial cells. Knockdown of Wt1 induced the epicardial EMT, which was accompanied by an increase in the migration and expression of N-cadherin and a decrease in the expression of ZO-1 as an epithelial marker. By contrast, knockdown of Tbx18 inhibited the mesenchymal transition induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. The expression of Slug but not Snail decreased as a result of Tbx18 knockdown, but Slug expression increased following knockdown of Wt1. Knockdown of Slug also attenuated the epicardial EMT induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. Furthermore, in normal murine mammary gland-C7 (NMuMG-C7 cells, Tbx18 acted to increase Slug expression, while Wt1 acted to decrease Slug expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter assay revealed that Tbx18 and Wt1 directly bound to the Slug promoter region and regulated Slug expression. These results provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control the epicardial EMT.

  14. The transcription factors Tbx18 and Wt1 control the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition through bi-directional regulation of Slug in murine primary epicardial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, Makiko; Nimura, Keisuke; Mori, Masaki; Nakagami, Hironori; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    During cardiac development, a subpopulation of epicardial cells migrates into the heart as part of the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiates into smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. However, the roles of transcription factors in the epicardial EMT are poorly understood. Here, we show that two transcription factors expressed in the developing epicardium, T-box18 (Tbx18) and Wilms' tumor 1 homolog (Wt1), bi-directionally control the epicardial EMT through their effects on Slug expression in murine primary epicardial cells. Knockdown of Wt1 induced the epicardial EMT, which was accompanied by an increase in the migration and expression of N-cadherin and a decrease in the expression of ZO-1 as an epithelial marker. By contrast, knockdown of Tbx18 inhibited the mesenchymal transition induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. The expression of Slug but not Snail decreased as a result of Tbx18 knockdown, but Slug expression increased following knockdown of Wt1. Knockdown of Slug also attenuated the epicardial EMT induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. Furthermore, in normal murine mammary gland-C7 (NMuMG-C7) cells, Tbx18 acted to increase Slug expression, while Wt1 acted to decrease Slug expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter assay revealed that Tbx18 and Wt1 directly bound to the Slug promoter region and regulated Slug expression. These results provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control the epicardial EMT.

  15. Characterisation of ATRX, DMRT1, DMRT7 and WT1 in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Lim, Shu Ly; Pask, Andrew J; Hamdan, Diana Demiyah Mohd; Renfree, Marilyn B; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    One of the most puzzling aspects of monotreme reproductive biology is how they determine sex in the absence of the SRY gene that triggers testis development in most other mammals. Although monotremes share a XX female/XY male sex chromosome system with other mammals, their sex chromosomes show homology to the chicken Z chromosome, including the DMRT1 gene, which is a dosage-dependent sex determination gene in birds. In addition, monotremes feature an extraordinary multiple sex chromosome system. However, no sex determination gene has been identified as yet on any of the five X or five Y chromosomes and there is very little knowledge about the conservation and function of other known genes in the monotreme sex determination and differentiation pathway. We have analysed the expression pattern of four evolutionarily conserved genes that are important at different stages of sexual development in therian mammals. DMRT1 is a conserved sex-determination gene that is upregulated in the male developing gonad in vertebrates, while DMRT7 is a mammal-specific spermatogenesis gene. ATRX, a chromatin remodelling protein, lies on the therian X but there is a testis-expressed Y-copy in marsupials. However, in monotremes, the ATRX orthologue is autosomal. WT1 is an evolutionarily conserved gene essential for early gonadal formation in both sexes and later in testis development. We show that these four genes in the adult platypus have the same expression pattern as in other mammals, suggesting that they have a conserved role in sexual development independent of genomic location.

  16. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hua-Sheng; Somvanshi, Sonal; Patel, Ektaben; Chen, Ting-Wen; Singh, Vivek P; Zorman, Barry; Patil, Sagar L; Pan, Yinghong; Chatterjee, Sujash S; Sood, Anil K; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Sumazin, Pavel

    2018-04-03

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes) by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs) whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor) and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs) dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Denys-Drash syndrome associated WT1 glutamine 369 mutants have altered sequence-preferences and altered responses to epigenetic modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yu; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-09-04

    Mutations in human zinc-finger transcription factor WT1 result in abnormal development of the kidneys and genitalia and an array of pediatric problems including nephropathy, blastoma, gonadal dysgenesis and genital discordance. Several overlapping phenotypes are associated with WT1 mutations, including Wilms tumors, Denys-Drash syndrome (DDS), Frasier syndrome (FS) and WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary malformations, and mental retardation). These conditions vary in severity from individual to individual; they can be fatal in early childhood, or relatively benign into adulthood. DDS mutations cluster predominantly in zinc fingers (ZF) 2 and 3 at the C-terminus of WT1, which together with ZF4 determine the sequence-specificity of DNA binding. We examined three DDS associated mutations in ZF2 of human WT1 where the normal glutamine at position 369 is replaced by arginine (Q369R), lysine (Q369K) or histidine (Q369H). These mutations alter the sequence-specificity of ZF2, we find, changing its affinity for certain bases and certain epigenetic forms of cytosine. X-ray crystallography of the DNA binding domains of normal WT1, Q369R and Q369H in complex with preferred sequences revealed the molecular interactions responsible for these affinity changes. DDS is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, implying a gain of function by mutant WT1 proteins. This gain, we speculate, might derive from the ability of the mutant proteins to sequester WT1 into unproductive oligomers, or to erroneously bind to variant target sequences.

  18. Gene expression profiling of laterally spreading tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minemura, Shoko; Tanaka, Takeshi; Arai, Makoto; Okimoto, Kenichiro; Oyamada, Arata; Saito, Keiko; Maruoka, Daisuke; Matsumura, Tomoaki; Nakagawa, Tomoo; Katsuno, Tatsuro; Kishimoto, Takashi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-06-06

    Laterally spreading tumors (LSTs) are generally defined as lesions >10 mm in diameter, are characterized by lateral expansion along the luminal wall with a low vertical axis. In contrast to other forms of tumor, LSTs are generally considered to have a superficial growth pattern and the potential for malignancy. We focused on this morphological character of LSTs, and analyzed the gene expression profile of LSTs. The expression of 168 genes in 41 colorectal tumor samples (17 LST-adenoma, 12 LST-carcinoma, 12 Ip [pedunculated type of the Paris classification)-adenoma, all of which were 10 mm or more in diameter] was analyzed by PCR array. Based on the results, we investigated the expression levels of genes up-regulated in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma, by hierarchical and K-means clustering. To confirm the results of the array analysis, using an additional 60 samples (38 LST-adenoma, 22 Ip-adenoma), we determined the localization of the gene product by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of 129 genes differed in colorectal tumors from normal mucosa by PCR array analysis. As a result of K-means clustering, the expression levels of five genes, AKT1, BCL2L1, ERBB2, MTA2 and TNFRSF25, were found to be significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) in LST-adenoma, compared to Ip-adenoma. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the BCL2L1 protein was significantly and meaningfully up-regulated in LST-adenoma compared to Ip-adenoma (p = 0.010). With respect to apoptosis status in LST-Adenoma, it assumes that BCL2L1 is anti-apoptotic protein, the samples such as BCL2L1 positive and TUNEL negative, or BCL2L1 negative and TUNEL positive are consistent with the assumption. 63.2 % LST-adenoma samples were consistent with the assumption. LSTs have an unusual profile of gene expression compared to other tumors and BCL2L1 might be concerned in the organization of LSTs.

  19. 11p Microdeletion including WT1 but not PAX6, presenting with cataract, mental retardation, genital abnormalities and seizures: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baekgaard Peter

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract WAGR syndrome (Wilms' tumor, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities and mental retardation and Potocki-Shaffer syndrome are rare contiguous gene deletion syndromes caused by deletions of the 11p14-p12 chromosome region. We present a patient with mental retardation, unilateral cataract, bilateral ptosis, genital abnormalities, seizures and a dysmorphic face. Cytogenetic analysis showed a deletion on 11p that was further characterized using FISH and MLPA analyses. The deletion (11p13-p12 located in the area between the deletions associated with the WAGR and Potocki-Shaffer syndromes had a maximum size of 8.5 Mb and encompasses 44 genes. Deletion of WT1 explains the genital abnormalities observed. As PAX6 was intact the cataract observed cannot be explained by a deletion of this gene. Seizures have been described in Potocki-Shaffer syndrome while mental retardation has been described in both WAGR and Potocki-Shaffer syndrome. Characterization of this patient contributes further to elucidate the function of the genes in the 11p14-p12 chromosome region.

  20. Pan-Cancer Analysis of lncRNA Regulation Supports Their Targeting of Cancer Genes in Each Tumor Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Sheng Chiu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are commonly dysregulated in tumors, but only a handful are known to play pathophysiological roles in cancer. We inferred lncRNAs that dysregulate cancer pathways, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors (cancer genes by modeling their effects on the activity of transcription factors, RNA-binding proteins, and microRNAs in 5,185 TCGA tumors and 1,019 ENCODE assays. Our predictions included hundreds of candidate onco- and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs (cancer lncRNAs whose somatic alterations account for the dysregulation of dozens of cancer genes and pathways in each of 14 tumor contexts. To demonstrate proof of concept, we showed that perturbations targeting OIP5-AS1 (an inferred tumor suppressor and TUG1 and WT1-AS (inferred onco-lncRNAs dysregulated cancer genes and altered proliferation of breast and gynecologic cancer cells. Our analysis indicates that, although most lncRNAs are dysregulated in a tumor-specific manner, some, including OIP5-AS1, TUG1, NEAT1, MEG3, and TSIX, synergistically dysregulate cancer pathways in multiple tumor contexts. : Chiu et al. present a pan-cancer analysis of lncRNA regulatory interactions. They suggest that the dysregulation of hundreds of lncRNAs target and alter the expression of cancer genes and pathways in each tumor context. This implies that hundreds of lncRNAs can alter tumor phenotypes in each tumor context. Keywords: lncRNA, regulation, modulation, cancer gene, pan-cancer, noncoding RNA, microRNA, RNA-binding proteins, interactome

  1. Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Salah; Sharawy, Solafa El; Sabry, Mohamed; Azmy, Emad; Raouf, Dalia Abdel; Menshawy, Nadia El

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the prognostic impact of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) among Egyptian patients. Materials and Methods: Exons 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, and 9 of WT1 were screened for mutations in samples from 82 CN-AML patients out of 203 newly diagnosed AML patients, of age ranging from 21 to 74 years, using high-resolution capillary electrophoresis. Results: Eleven patients out of 82 (13.41%) harbored WT1 mutations. Mutations were detected in exon 7 (n=7), exon 9 (n=2), exon 8 (n=1), and exon 3 (n=1), but not in exons 1 or 2. There was no statistically significant difference between the WT1 mutants and wild types as regards age, sex, French-American-British subtypes, and the prevalence of success of induction remission therapy (p=0.966; 28.6% vs. 29.3%). Patients with WT1 mutations had overall survival lower than patients with the wild type (HR=1.38; 95% CI 4.79-6.86; p=0.004). Conclusion: CN-AML patients with WT1 mutations have poor clinical outcome. We recommend molecular testing for WT1 mutations in patients with CN-AML at diagnosis in order to improve risk stratification of those patients. PMID:25035671

  2. Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Aref

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the prognostic impact of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML among Egyptian patients. METHODS: Exons 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, and 9 of WT1 were screened for mutations in samples from 82 CNAML patients out of 203 newly diagnosed AML patients, of age ranging from 21 to 74 years, using high-resolution capillary electrophoresis. RESULTS: Eleven patients out of 82 (13.41% harbored WT1 mutations. Mutations were detected in exon 7 (n=7, exon 9 (n=2, exon 8 (n=1, and exon 3 (n=1, but not in exons 1 or 2. There was no statistically significant difference between the WT1 mutants and wild types as regards age, sex, French-American-British subtypes, and the prevalence of success of induction remission therapy (p=0.966; 28.6% vs. 29.3%. Patients with WT1 mutations had overall survival lower than patients with the wild type (HR=1.38; 95% CI 4.79-6.86; p=0.004. CONCLUSION: CN-AML patients with WT1 mutations have poor clinical outcome. We recommend molecular testing for WT1 mutations in patients with CN-AML at diagnosis in order to improve risk stratification of those patients.

  3. Epigenetic Changes in the Methylation Patterns of KCNQ1 and WT1 after a Weight Loss Intervention Program in Obese Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abete, Itziar; Gómez-Úriz, Ana M; Mansego, María L; De Arce, Ana; Goyenechea, Estíbaliz; Blázquez, Vanessa; Martínez-Zabaleta, Maria T; González-Muniesa, Pedro; López De Munain, Adolfo; Martínez, J Alfredo; Campión, Javier; Milagro, Fermin I

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke patients often show high concentrations of circulating inflammatory markers that are associated with increased risk of recurrence. Epigenetic mechanisms could be involved in obesity, inflammation and stroke. The objective of this research was to investigate, in obese patients suffering a previous stroke, the effects of a nutritional program on anthropometric and biochemical variables, and on the methylation patterns of two stroke-related genes (KCNQ1: potassium channel, voltage gated KQT-like subfamily Q, member 1; and WT1: Wilms tumor 1). Twenty-two ischemic stroke patients were compared with a control group composed of eighteen obese subjects with similar age and body mass index ranges. Both groups followed a 20-week nutritional program based on an energy-restricted balanced diet with high adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern. The intervention significantly improved anthropometric and metabolic variables, such as the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein concentration, in ischemic stroke patients, and was accompanied by changes in the methylation patterns of both stroke-related genes, which correlated with anthropometric and biochemical variables.

  4. Identification of epigenetically silenced genes in tumor endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellebrekers, Debby M. E. I.; Melotte, Veerle; Vire, Emmanuelle; Langenkamp, Elise; Molema, Grietje; Fuks, Francois; Herman, James G.; Van Criekinge, Wim; Griffioen, Arjan W.; van Engeland, Manon

    2007-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis requires intricate regulation of gene expression in endothelial cells. We recently showed that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors directly repress endothelial cell growth and tumor angiogenesis, suggesting that epigenetic modifications mediated

  5. Effect of Thai saraphi flower extracts on WT1 and BCR/ABL protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the cytotoxic effects of crude ethanolic and fractional extracts including hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol fractions from M. siamensis flowers were investigated in order to determine their effect on WT1 expression in Molt4 and K562 cells and Bcr/Abl expression in K562 cells. Materials and Methods: The ...

  6. Calibration and Optimization of p53, WT1, and Napsin A Immunohistochemistry Ancillary Tests for Histotyping of Ovarian Carcinoma: Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control (CIQC) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sandra; Piskorz, Anna M; Le Page, Cécile; Mes Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Huntsman, David; Chen, Wenqian; Swanson, Paul E; Gilks, C Blake; Köbel, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control provides proficiency testing for immunohistochemistry in Canadian laboratories. Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control Run 42 assessed WT1, Napsin A, and p53; commonly used markers for histotyping ovarian carcinomas. A 42-core tissue microarray, which included the 5 major histotypes of ovarian carcinomas with a subset having known TP53 mutational status, was used for this Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control challenge. Participants included 43 laboratories for p53, 29 for WT1, and 26 for Napsin A. p53 was scored as aberrant if the staining was strong and diffuse or absent. Napsin A and WT1 were scored positive if any tumor cells stained. The reference p53 expression pattern was inferred by TP53 mutation type when available. For WT1, Napsin A, and cases lacking mutational data, the reference staining pattern was based on the majority staining result. The error rate for p53 was 8.8%. Most errors (84%) were due to weak staining. The sensitivity and specificity of aberrant p53 expression for an underlying TP53 mutation was 91.6% and 87.9%, respectively. The error rate for WT1 was 0.76% with all errors occurring in laboratories using the 6F-h2 clone. The average errors for laboratories using 6F-h2 were 2.4 compared with 0 for WT-49. The error rate for Napsin A was 4%. The average errors for laboratories using polyclonal Napsin A were 3 compared with 1.1 for monoclonal Napsin A. Weak p53 staining increases interpretative errors, primarily due to absence of staining in tumors with wild-type TP53. p53 immunohistochemistry correlates strongly with TP53 mutational status. Polyclonal Napsin A and 6F-h2 may lack specificity in comparison to monoclonal Napsin A and WT-49.

  7. PTEN, a Tumor Suppressor Gene for Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ittmann, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... The PTEN gene is a tumor suppressor gene recently cloned from human chromosome 10q23.3 that encodes a lipid phosphatase which influences a variety of cellular processes that impact on the neoplastic phenotype...

  8. Down-regulatory mechanism of mammea E/BB from Mammea siamensis seed extract on Wilms' Tumor 1 expression in K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungrojsakul, Methee; Katekunlaphan, Trinnakorn; Saiai, Aroonchai; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Okonogi, Siriporn; Sweeney, Colleen A; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2016-05-18

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) is a biological marker for predicting leukemia progression. In this study, mammea E/BB, an active compound from Saraphi (Mammea siamensis) seed extract was examined for its effect on down-regulatory mechanism of WT1 gene expression, WT1 protein and mRNA stability, and cell proliferation in K562 cell line. M. siamensis seeds were obtained from the region of Chiang Mai (North of Thailand). Mammea E/BB was extracted from seeds of M. siamensis. WT1 protein expression and stability were evaluated by Western blot analysis. WT1 mRNA stability was assessed by qRT-PCR. WT1-DNA binding and WT1 promoter activity were assayed by ChIP assay and luciferase-reporter assay, respectively. Cell cycle arrest was studied by flow cytometry. Treatment with mammea E/BB led to down-regulation of WT1 expression. The suppression of WT1 expression did not involve protein and mRNA degradation. Rather, WT1 protein was down-regulated through disruption of transcriptional auto-regulation of the WT1 gene. Mammea E/BB inhibited WT1-DNA binding at the WT1 promoter and decreased luciferase activity. It also disrupted c-Fos/AP-1 binding to the WT1 promoter via ERK1/2 signaling pathway and induced S phase cell cycle arrest in K562 cells. Mammea E/BB had pleotropic effects on kinase signaling pathways, resulting in inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation.

  9. Clinical effect and immunological response in patients with advanced malignant glioma treated with WT1-pulsed dendritic cell-based immunotherapy: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Sakai, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: WT1-pulsed DC-based vaccination for two patients with advanced malignant glioma demonstrated the safety and immunogenicity. The present cases provide clinical evidence and an immunological response that DC vaccination induces tumor regression and improves neurological findings. Prospective clinical trials are required to evaluate the efficacy of acquired immunity in response to DC vaccination in improving the prognosis of advanced malignant glioma.

  10. Semiautomated quantitative image analysis of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and WT-1 in acute and chronic rat kidney disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, J; Ott, V; Herrmann, A; Rapp, W; Raab, S; Riboulet, W; Vandjour, A; Hainaut, E; Benardeau, A; Singer, T; Jacobsen, B

    2016-03-01

    Five different glomerular immunohistochemistry markers were evaluated and compared in four different acute and chronic rat kidney disease models. Progression of glomerular or podocyte damage was shown in the puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis (PAN) and Zucker fatty/spontaneously hypertensive heart failure F1 hybrid (ZSF1) rat model. Progression and prevention of glomerular damage was demonstrated in the Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl SS) rat. Immunohistochemistry was performed for desmin, vimentin, podocin, synaptopodin and Wilms tumor protein-1 (WT-1), and evaluation of glomerular immunohistochemistry markers was done by semiautomated quantitative image analysis. We found desmin and WT-1 as the most sensitive markers for podocyte damage in both acute and chronic glomerular damage followed by vimentin, podocin and synaptopodin. We were able to demonstrate that early podocyte damage as shown by increased desmin and vimentin staining together with either a phenotypic podocyte change or podocyte loss (reduced numbers of WT-1-stained podocytes) drives the progression of glomerular damage. This is followed by a reduction in podocyte-specific proteins such as podocin and synaptopodin. Our report describes the different sensitivity of glomerular or podocyte markers and gives future guidance for the selection of the most sensitive markers for efficacy testing of new drugs as well as for the selection of tissue-based toxicity markers for glomerular or podocyte injury. In addition to functional clinical chemistry markers, desmin and WT-1 immunohistochemistry offers reliable and valuable data on the morphologic state of podocytes.

  11. Immunotherapy of Malignancy by in vivo Gene Transfer into Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plautz, Gregory E.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Wu, Bei-Yue; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Leaf; Nabel, Gary J.

    1993-05-01

    The immune system confers protection against a variety of pathogens and contributes to the surveillance and destruction of neoplastic cells. Several cell types participate in the recognition and lysis of tumors, and appropriate immune stimulation provides therapeutic effects in malignancy. Foreign major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins also serve as a potent stimulus to the immune system. In this report, a foreign MHC gene was introduced directly into malignant tumors in vivo in an effort to stimulate tumor rejection. In contrast to previous attempts to induce tumor immunity by cell-mediated gene transfer, the recombinant gene was introduced directly into tumors in vivo. Expression of the murine class I H-2K^s gene within the CT26 mouse colon adenocarcinoma (H-2K^d) or the MCA 106 fibrosarcoma (H-2K^b) induced a cytotoxic T-cell response to H-2K^s and, more importantly, to other antigens present on unmodified tumor cells. This immune response attenuated tumor growth and caused complete tumor regression in many cases. Direct gene transfer in vivo can therefore induce cell-mediated immunity against specific gene products, which provides an immunotherapeutic effect for malignancy, and potentially can be applied to the treatment of cancer and infectious diseases in man.

  12. Partial absence of pleuropericardial membranes in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Norden

    Full Text Available The pleuropericardial membranes are fibro-serous walls that separate the pericardial and pleural cavities and anchor the heart inside the mediastinum. Partial or complete absence of pleuropericardial membranes is a rare human disease, the etiology of which is poorly understood. As an attempt to better understand these defects, we wished to analyze the cellular and molecular mechanisms directing the separation of pericardial and pleural cavities by pleuropericardial membranes in the mouse. We found by histological analyses that both in Tbx18- and Wt1-deficient mice the pleural and pericardial cavities communicate due to a partial absence of the pleuropericardial membranes in the hilus region. We trace these defects to a persisting embryonic connection between these cavities, the pericardioperitoneal canals. Furthermore, we identify mesenchymal ridges in the sinus venosus region that tether the growing pleuropericardial membranes to the hilus of the lung, and thus, close the pericardioperitoneal canals. In Tbx18-deficient embryos these mesenchymal ridges are not established, whereas in Wt1-deficient embryos the final fusion process between these tissues and the body wall does not occur. We suggest that this fusion is an active rather than a passive process, and discuss the interrelation between closure of the pericardioperitoneal canals, lateral release of the pleuropericardial membranes from the lateral body wall, and sinus horn development.

  13. Frequency of WT1 and 11p15 constitutional aberrations and phenotypic correlation in childhood Wilms tumour patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, H.; Kersseboom, R.; Alders, M.; Pieters, R.; Wagner, A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In 9-17% of Wilms tumour patients a predisposing syndrome is present, in particular WT1-associated syndromes and overgrowth syndromes. Constitutional WT1 mutations or epigenetic changes on chromosome 11p15 have also been described in Wilms tumour patients without phenotypic

  14. Hypomethylation of tumor suppressor genes in odontogenic myxoma

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira,Paula Rocha; Cardoso,Fabiano Pereira; Brito,João Artur Ricieri; Batista,Aline Carvalho; Gomes,Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez,Ricardo Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an ectomesenchymal benign odontogenic tumor characterized by spindle or stellate-shaped cells embedded in an abundant myxoid or mucoid extracellular matrix. DNA methylation is characterized by the addition of methyl groups in cytosines within CpG islands in the promoter gene. DNA methylation can decrease the expression of tumor suppressor genes and contribute to the development of neoplastic lesions. The aim of study was to evaluate the methylation pattern of the tu...

  15. Molecular biology III - Oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, Amato J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this course is to introduce to radiation oncologists the basic concepts of tumorigenesis, building on the information that will be presented in the first and second part of this series of lectures. Objective: Our objective is to increase the current understanding of radiation oncologists with the process of tumorigenesis, especially focusing on genes that are altered in many tumor types that are potential candidates for novel molecular strategies. As strategies to treat cancer of cancer are becoming more sophisticated, it will be important for both the practitioner and academician to develop a basic understanding of the function of cancer 'genes'. This will be the third in a series of refresher courses that are meant to address recent advances in Cancer Biology in a way that both clinicians without previous knowledge of molecular biology or experienced researchers will find interesting. The lecture will begin with a basic overview of tumorigenesis; methods of detecting chromosome/DNA alterations, approaches used to isolate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and their role in cell killing by apoptosis. Special attention will be given to oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that are modulated by ionizing radiation and the tumor microenvironment. We will relate the biology of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes to basic aspects of radiation biology that would be important in clinical practice. Finally, we will review recent studies on the prognostic significance of p53 mutations and apoptosis in tumor specimens. The main point of this lecture is to relate both researcher and clinician what are the therapeutic ramifications of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene mutations found in human neoptasia

  16. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  17. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  18. RET is a potential tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanxin; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Park, Dong Il; Fausel, Rebecca; Kanngurn, Samornmas; Welcsh, Piri; Dzieciatkowski, Slavomir; Wang, Jianping; Grady, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer arises as the consequence of mutations and epigenetic alterations that activate oncogenes and inactivate tumor suppressor genes. Through a genome-wide screen for methylated genes in colon neoplasms, we identified aberrantly methylated RET in colorectal cancer. RET, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase and a receptor for the GDNF-family ligands, was one of the first oncogenes to be identified and has been shown to be an oncogene in thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma. However, unexpectedly, we found RET is methylated in 27% of colon adenomas and in 63% of colorectal cancers, and now provide evidence that RET has tumor suppressor activity in colon cancer. The aberrant methylation of RET correlates with decreased RET expression, whereas the restoration of RET in colorectal cancer cell lines results in apoptosis. Furthermore, in support of a tumor suppressor function of RET, mutant RET has also been found in primary colorectal cancer. We now show that these mutations inactivate RET, which is consistent with RET being a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. These findings suggest that the aberrant methylation of RET and the mutational inactivation of RET promote colorectal cancer formation and that RET can serve as a tumor suppressor gene in the colon. Moreover, the increased frequency of methylated RET in colon cancers compared to adenomas suggests RET inactivation is involved in the progression of colon adenomas to cancer. PMID:22751117

  19. OFFICIAL MEDICATIONS FOR ANTI-TUMOR GENE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Nemtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of modern literature data of official medications for anti-tumor gene therapy as well as of medications that finished clinical trials.The article discusses the concept of gene therapy, the statistical analysis results of initiated clinical trials of gene products, the most actively developing directions of anticancer gene therapy, and the characteristics of anti-tumor gene medications.Various delivery systems for gene material are being examined, including viruses that are defective in  replication (Gendicine™ and Advexin and oncolytic (tumor specific conditionally replicating viruses (Oncorine™, ONYX-015, Imlygic®.By now three preparations for intra-tumor injection have been introduced into oncology clinical practice: two of them – Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ have been registered in China, and one of them – Imlygic® has been registered in the USA. Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ are based on the wild type p53 gene and are designed for treatment of patients with head and neck malignancies. Replicating adenovirus is the delivery system in Gendicine™, whereas oncolytic adenovirus is the vector for gene material in Oncorine™. Imlygic® is based on the  recombinant replicating HSV1 virus with an introduced GM–CSF gene and is designed for treatment of  melanoma patients. These medications are well tolerated and do not cause any serious adverse events. Gendicine™ and Oncorine™ are not effective in monotherapy but demonstrate pronounced synergism with chemoand radiation therapy. Imlygic® has just started the post marketing trials.

  20. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ayatollahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 gene is originally defined as a tumor suppressor gene and a transcription factor that overexpressed in leukemic cells. It is highly expressed in more than 80% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, both in bone marrow (BM and in peripheral blood (PB, and it is used as a powerful and independent marker of minimal residual disease (MRD; we have determined the expression levels of the WT1 by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR in PB and BM in 126 newly diagnosed AML patients. Materials and Methods: This study was done in molecular pathology and cancer research center from April 2014 to June 2015, RQ-PCR method was used to determine the WT1 gene expression in BM and/or PB samples from 126 patients of AML, we cloned both WT1 and ABL genes for creating a standard curve, and we calculate copy number of WT1 genes in patients. Results: A total of 126 AML patients consist of 70 males (55.6% and 56 females (44.4%, with a median age of 26 years; 104 (81% patients out of 126 show overexpression of WT1 gene. We also concomitant monitoring of fusion transcripts (PML RARa, AML1-ETO, MLL-MLL, CBFb-MYH11, or DEK-CAN in our patients, the AML1-ETO group showing remarkably low levels of WT1 compared with other fusion transcript and the CBFB-MYH11 showing high levels of WT1. Conclusion: We conclude that WT1 expression by RQ-PCR in AML patients may be employed as an independent tool to detect MRD in the majority of normal karyotype AML patients.

  1. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Micci, Francesca; Andersen, Kristin; Kilen Andersen, Hege; Meling, Torstein R; Due-Tønnessen, Bernt; Scheie, David; Heim, Sverre; Brandal, Petter

    2016-12-01

    We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After algorithmic and manual filtering, the final list consisted of 24 potential fusion events. Raw RNA-seq read sequences and PCR validation supports two novel fusion genes: a reciprocal fusion gene involving UQCR10 and C1orf194 in an adult spinal ependymoma and a TSPAN4-CD151 fusion gene in a pediatric infratentorial anaplastic ependymoma. Our previously reported ALK rearrangements and the RELA and YAP1 fusions found in supratentorial ependymomas were until now the only known fusion genes present in ependymal tumors. The chimeric transcripts presented here are the first to be reported in infratentorial or spinal ependymomas. Further studies are required to characterize the genomic rearrangements causing these fusion genes, as well as the frequency and functional importance of the fusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular study of 32 tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lae, Marick E; Roche, Patrick C; Jin, Long; Lloyd, Ricardo V; Nascimento, Antonio G

    2002-07-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor is a rare, aggressive neoplasm that mainly affects young male patients and is characterized by a reciprocal translocation t(11;22)(p13;q12) associated with the EWS-WT1 gene fusion transcript. Clinical, histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetics features were reviewed for 32 tumors. There were 29 male and three female patients, with ages from 6 to 54 years (mean, 25 years). The main clinical signs and symptoms included abdominal pain (eight patients), weight loss (five patients), and presence of umbilical hernia (four patients). Two tumors primarily involved the ethmoid sinus and the soft tissues of the scalp; the other tumors (mean size, 10 cm) involved the abdominal cavity (88%). One patient presented initially with an axillary lymph node metastasis. Generally, all tumors showed the typical histologic findings of variably sized clusters of small, round, or spindled cells lying in a desmoplastic stroma. The neoplastic cells in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were positive for desmin (dot pattern) (81% of the cases), WT1 (91%), keratin (87%), neuron-specific enolase (84%), CD99 (23%), and actin (3%). The EWS-WT1 gene fusion transcript was detected in 29 of 30 tumors. One tumor with typical clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features did not show the gene fusion. Follow-up for 27 patients showed that 19 patients (70%) died of uncontrolled, local, or widespread metastatic disease 3-46 months (mean, 20 months) after diagnosis, and eight patients were alive with known evidence of disease. Occasionally, desmoplastic small round cell tumor lacks the classic clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical features. This study emphasizes the utility of analysis of the EWS-WT1 gene fusion transcript, which was performed on paraffin-embedded tissues, to confirm the diagnosis.

  3. Role for the Wilms tumor gene in genital development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Heyningen, V.; Bickmore, W.A.; Seawright, A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Maule, J.; Hastie, N.D. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England)); Fekete, G. (Semmelweis Univ. Medical School, Budapest (Hungary)); Gessler, M.; Bruns, G.A.P. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA)); Huerre-Jeanpierre, C.; Junien, C. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Paris (France)); Williams, B.R.G. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-07-01

    Detailed molecular definition of the WAGR region at chromosome 11p13 has been achieved by chromosome breakpoint analysis and long-range restriction mapping. Here the authors describe the molecular detection of a cytogenetically invisible 1-megabase deletion in an individual with aniridia, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias but no Wilms tumor (WT). The region of overlap between this deletion and one associated with WT and similar genital anomalies but no aniridia covers a region of 350-400 kilobases, which is coincident with the extent of homozygous deletion detected in tumor tissue from a sporadic WT. A candidate WT gene located within this region has recently been isolated, suggesting nonpenetrance for tumor expression in the first individual. The inclusion within the overlap region of a gene for WT predisposition and a gene for the best-documented WT-associated genitourinary malformations leads to suggest that both of these anomalies result from a loss-of-function mutation at the same locus. This in turn implies that the WT gene exerts pleiotropic effect on both kidney and genitourinary development, a possibility supported by the observed expression pattern of the WT candidate gene in developing kidney and gonads.

  4. Real-time PCR analysis of genes encoding tumor antigens in esophageal tumors and a cancer vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinert, Brian T; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Milano, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Tumor antigens are the primary target of therapeutic cancer vaccines. We set out to define and compare the expression pattern of tumor antigen genes in esophagus carcinoma biopsies and in an allogeneic tumor lysate-based cancer vaccine, MelCancerVac. Cells used for vaccine production were treated...... with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) to determine whether this treatment could improve the profile of tumor antigen genes expressed in these cells. In addition, the presence of MAGE-A tumor antigen protein was evaluated in the purified tumor cell lysate used...

  5. Trojan horse at cellular level for tumor gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Guillaume; Grillon, Catherine; Nadim, Mahdi; Kieda, Claudine

    2013-08-10

    Among innovative strategies developed for cancer treatments, gene therapies stand of great interest despite their well-known limitations in targeting, delivery, toxicity or stability. The success of any given gene-therapy is highly dependent on the carrier efficiency. New approaches are often revisiting the mythic trojan horse concept to carry therapeutic nucleic acid, i.e. DNAs, RNAs or small interfering RNAs, to pathologic tumor site. Recent investigations are focusing on engineering carrying modalities to overtake the above limitations bringing new promise to cancer patients. This review describes recent advances and perspectives for gene therapies devoted to tumor treatment, taking advantage of available knowledge in biotechnology and medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  7. Normalization of gene expression measurements in tumor tissues: comparison of 13 endogenous control genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, J.B. de; Roelofs, R.W.; Giesendorf, B.A.J.; Pennings, J.L.; Waas, E.T.; Feuth, A.B.; Swinkels, D.W.; Span, P.N.

    2005-01-01

    For interpretation of quantitative gene expression measurements in clinical tumor samples, a normalizer is necessary to correct expression data for differences in cellular input, RNA quality, and RT efficiency between samples. In many studies, a single housekeeping gene is used for normalization.

  8. Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms in Egyptian Cases with Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr El-Din, N.K.; Abdel-Hady, E.K.; Salem, F.K.; Settin, A.; ALI, N.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cytokines are proposed to play important roles in brain tumor biology as well as neuro degeneration or impaired neuronal function. Objectives: This work aimed to check the association of polymorphisms of cytokine genes in Egyptian cases with brain tumors. Methods: This work included 45 cases affected by brain tumors diagnosed as 24 benign and 21 malignant. Their median age was 45 years, and they were 20 males and 25 females. These cases were taken randomly from the Neurosurgery Department of Mansoura University Hospital, Egypt. Case genotypes were compared to 98 healthy unrelated controls from the same locality. DNA was amplified using PCR utilizing sequence specific primers (SSP) for detection of polymorphisms related to TNF-a-308 (G/A), IL-10-1082 (G/A), IL-6-174 (G/C) and IL-1Ra (VNTR) genes. Results: Cases affected with benign brain tumors showed a significant higher frequency of IL-10-1082 A/A [odds ratio (OR=8.0), p<0.001] and IL-6-174 C/C (OR=6.3, p=0.002) homozygous genotypes as compared to controls. Malignant cases, on the other hand, showed significantly higher frequency of IL-6-174 C/C (OR =4.8, p=0.002) homozygous genotype and TNF-a-308 A/A (OR=4.9, p<0.001) homozygous genotype when compared to controls. In the meantime, all cases showed no significant difference regarding the distribution of IL-1Ra VNTR genotype polymorphism compared to controls. Conclusions: Cytokine gene polymorphisms showed a pattern of association with brain tumors which may have potential impact on family counseling and disease management.

  9. Molecular genetic analysis of tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Je Ho; Park, Sang Yun

    1992-04-01

    To examine the loci of putative tumor suppressor genes in ovarian cancers, we performed the molecular genetic analysis with fresh human ovarian cancers and observed the following data. Frequent allelic losses were observed on chromosomes 4p(42%), 6p(50%), 7p(43%), 8q(31%), 12p(38%), 12q(33%), 16p(33%), 16q(37%), and 19p(34%) in addition to the previously reported 6q, 11p, and 17p in ovarian caroinomas. we have used an additional probe, TCP10 to narrow down the deleted region on chromosome 6q. TCP10 was reported to be mapped to 6q 25-27. Allelic loss was found to be 40% in epithelial ovarian caroinomas. This finding suggests that chromosome 6q 24-27 is one of putative region haboring the tumor suppressor gene of epithelial ovarian cancer (particularly serous type). To examine the association between FAL(Fractional Allelic Loss) and histopathological features, the FAL value on each phenotypically different tumor was calculated as the ratio of the number of allelic losses versus the number of cases informative in each chromosomal arm. The average FALs for each phenotypically different tumor were: serous cystoadenocarcinomas. FAL=0.31 : mucinous 0.12 : and clear cell carcinoma. FAL=0.20. (Author)

  10. Gene therapy for patients with advanced solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Dahlstroem, Karin; Laessoee, Line

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene electrotrotransfer describes the use of electric pulses to transfer DNA to cells. Particularly skeletal muscle has potential for systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins. Gene electrotransfer to muscle using the integrin inhibitor plasmid AMEP (Antiangiogenic MEtargidin Peptide......) was investigated in a phase I dose escalation study. Primary objective was safety. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with metastatic or locally advanced solid tumors, without further standard treatments available, were treated with once-only gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP to the femoral muscle. Safety...... not be detected, which could be due to the limit of detection. No objective responses were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP was found to be safe and tolerable. No objective responses were observed but other DNA drugs may be tested in the future using this procedure....

  11. Histone deacetylase regulation of immune gene expression in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications of chromatin, such as histone acetylation, are involved in repression of tumor antigens and multiple immune genes that are thought to facilitate tumor escape. The status of acetylation in a cell is determined by the balance of the activities of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACi) can enhance the expression of immunologically important molecules in tumor cells and HDACi treated tumor cells are able to induce immune responses in vitro and in vivo. Systemic HDACi are in clinical trails in cancer and also being used in several autoimmune disease models. To date, 18 HDACs have been reported in human cells and more than thirty HDACi identified, although only a few immune targets of these inhibitors have been identified. Here, we discuss the molecular pathways employed by HDACi and their potential role in inducing immune responses against tumors. We review data suggesting that selection of target specific HDACi and combinations with other agents and modalities, including those that activate stress pathways, may further enhance the efficacy of epigenetic therapies. PMID:18213528

  12. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  13. Alternative polyadenylation of tumor suppressor genes in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Anders Aagaard; Plass, Mireya; Døssing, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    The tumorigenesis of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) is poorly understood. Recent studies have associated alternative polyadenylation (APA) with proliferation, cell transformation, and cancer. Polyadenylation is the process in which the pre-messenger RNA is cleaved at a polyA site...... and a polyA tail is added. Genes with two or more polyA sites can undergo APA. This produces two or more distinct mRNA isoforms with different 3' untranslated regions. Additionally, APA can also produce mRNAs containing different 3'-terminal coding regions. Therefore, APA alters both the repertoire...... and the expression level of proteins. Here, we used high-throughput sequencing data to map polyA sites and characterize polyadenylation genome-wide in three SI-NETs and a reference sample. In the tumors, 16 genes showed significant changes of APA pattern, which lead to either the 3' truncation of mRNA coding regions...

  14. Molecular cloning of canine Wilms? tumor 1 for immunohistochemical analysis in canine tissues

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAI, Osamu; SAKURAI, Masashi; SAKAI, Hiroki; KUBO, Masahito; HIRAOKA, Hiroko; BABA, Kenji; OKUDA, Masaru; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2017-01-01

    Wilms? tumor 1 (WT1) expression has been investigated in various human cancers as a target molecule for cancer immunotherapy. However, few studies have focused on WT1 expression in dogs. Firstly, cDNA of canine WT1 (cWT1) was molecularly cloned from normal canine kidney. The cross-reactivity of the anti-human WT1 monoclonal antibody (6F-H2) with cWT1 was confirmed via Western blotting using cells overexpressing cWT1. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that cWT1 expression was detected in a...

  15. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  16. Tissue elasticity regulated tumor gene expression: implication for diagnostic biomarkers of primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long T Vu

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment consists of both physical and chemical factors. Tissue elasticity is one physical factor contributing to the microenvironment of tumor cells. To test the importance of tissue elasticity in cell culture, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET stem cells were cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PAA hydrogel plates that mimics the elasticity of brain tissue compared with PNET on standard polystyrene (PS plates. We report the molecular profiles of PNET grown on either PAA or PS.A whole-genome microarray profile of transcriptional expression between the two culture conditions was performed as a way to probe effects of substrate on cell behavior in culture. The results showed more genes downregulated on PAA compared to PS. This led us to propose microRNA (miRNA silencing as a potential mechanism for downregulation. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a greater number of miRNA binding sites from the 3' UTR of downregulated genes and identified as specific miRNA binding sites that were enriched when cells were grown on PAA-this supports the hypothesis that tissue elasticity plays a role in influencing miRNA expression. Thus, Dicer was examined to determine if miRNA processing was affected by tissue elasticity. Dicer genes were downregulated on PAA and had multiple predicted miRNA binding sites in its 3' UTR that matched the miRNA binding sites found enriched on PAA. Many differentially regulated genes were found to be present on PS but downregulated on PAA were mapped onto intron sequences. This suggests expression of alternative polyadenylation sites within intron regions that provide alternative 3' UTRs and alternative miRNA binding sites. This results in tissue specific transcriptional downregulation of mRNA in humans by miRNA. We propose a mechanism, driven by the physical characteristics of the microenvironment by which downregulation of genes occur. We found that tissue elasticity-mediated cytokines (TGFβ2 and TNFα signaling

  17. p53 tumor suppressor gene: significance in neoplasia - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene located on chromosome 17p13.1. Its function includes cell cycle control and apoptosis. Loss of p53 function, either due to decreased level or genetic transformation, is associated with loss of cell cycle control, decrease, apoptosis and genomic modification, such mutation of p53 gene is now assessed and the indicator of neoplasia of cancer of several organs and cell types, p53 has demonstrated to have critical role in defining various progressive stages of neoplasia, therapeutic strategies and clinical application. The present review briefly describes function of p53 in addition to its diagnostic and prognostic significance in detecting several types of neoplasia. (author)

  18. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  19. Co-administration of α-GalCer analog and TLR4 agonist induces robust CD8+ T-cell responses to PyCS protein and WT-1 antigen and activates memory-like effector NKT cells

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Pereira, Felipe V.; Funakoshi, Ryota; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combined adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, a potent α-GalCer-analog, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4 agonist, on the induction of vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses and protective immunity was evaluated. Mice were immunized with peptides corresponding to the CD8+ T-cell epitopes of a malaria antigen, a circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium yoelii, and a tumor antigen, a Wilms Tumor antigen-1 (WT-1), together with 7DW8-5 and MPLA, as an adjuvant. These immuniza...

  20. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    10-1-0699 TITLE: Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after...apoptosis. WT1 protein is highly expressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and is a rational target for immunotherapy. We have developed a...this project is to conduct a multicenter, double-blinded, randomized trial comparing treatment with the WT-1 peptide vaccine + Montanide/GM-CSF to

  1. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes: Paradigms, puzzles, and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanets, Anna; Shorstova, Tatiana; Hilmi, Khalid; Marques, Maud; Witcher, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Cancer constitutes a set of diseases with heterogeneous molecular pathologies. However, there are a number of universal aberrations common to all cancers, one of these being the epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). The silencing of TSGs is thought to be an early, driving event in the oncogenic process. With this in consideration, great efforts have been made to develop small molecules aimed at the restoration of TSGs in order to limit tumor cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular forces that drive the broad epigenetic reprogramming and transcriptional repression of these genes remain ill-defined. Undoubtedly, understanding the molecular underpinnings of transcriptionally silenced TSGs will aid us in our ability to reactivate these key anti-cancer targets. Here, we describe what we consider to be the five most logical molecular mechanisms that may account for this widely observed phenomenon: 1) ablation of transcription factor binding, 2) overexpression of DNA methyltransferases, 3) disruption of CTCF binding, 4) elevation of EZH2 activity, 5) aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs. The strengths and weaknesses of each proposed mechanism is highlighted, followed by an overview of clinical efforts to target these processes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel splice mutation in the TP53 gene associated with Leydig cell tumor and primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecher, Chalotte Willemann; Grønbaek, Kirsten; Hasle, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy presented with precocious puberty due to a Leydig cell tumor, and at the age of 6 years with a primitive neuroectodermal brain-tumor (PNET). A novel splice site mutation of the TP53-gene, likely to be associated with a nonfunctional protein, was found in the proband, his father...

  3. Growing evidence suggests WT1 effects in the kidney development are modulated by Hsp70/NO interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luciana; Manucha, Walter

    2017-02-01

    The study of kidney development at the cellular and molecular levels remains an active area of nephrology research. The functional integrity of the kidney depends on normal development as well as on physiological cell turnover. Apoptosis induction is essential for these mechanisms. A route to cell death revealed in the past decade shows that heat shock proteins (HSPs) and their cofactors are responsible for regulating the apoptotic pathway. Specifically, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), the most ubiquitous and highly conserved HSP, helps proteins adopt native conformation or regain function after misfolding. Hsp70 is an important cofactor for the function of Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) and suggests a potential role for this chaperone during kidney differentiation. In addition, we have demonstrated that WT1 expression is modulated by nitric oxide (NO) availability and Hsp70 interaction after neonatal unilateral ureteral obstruction. NO has been identified as playing an important role in the developing kidney. These findings suggest that Hsp70 and NO may play a critical and fundamental role in the capacity to modulate both apoptotic pathway and oxidative stress during kidney development. Furthermore, the design of experimental protocols that assess renal epithelial functionality in this context, could contribute to the understanding of renal development and alterations.

  4. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  5. A comparison of p53 and WT1 immunohistochemical expression patterns in tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Laura; Köbel, Martin; Ganesan, Raji; Tam, Simone; Prasad, Rajeev; Böhm, Steffen; Lockley, Michelle; Jeyarajah, Arjun J; Brockbank, Eleanor; Faruqi, Asma; Gilks, C Blake; Singh, Naveena

    2017-11-01

    The treatment of patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is increasingly based on diagnosis on small biopsy samples, and the first surgical sample is often taken post-chemotherapy. p53 and WT1 are important diagnostic markers for HGSC. The effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on p53 and WT1 expression has not been widely studied. We aimed to compare p53 and WT1 expression in paired pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy samples of HGSC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out for p53 and WT1 on paired omental HGSC samples pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy. p53 IHC was recorded as normal (wild-type) or abnormal (mutation-type), and was further classified as overexpression, complete absence, or cytoplasmic. WT1 IHC was classified as positive or negative. A subset of cases were further assessed for the extent of nuclear immunoreactivity of WT1 by use of the H-score. Fifty-seven paired samples were stained with p53. Fifty-six of 57 (98%) cases showed mutation-type p53 staining. Pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy IHC results were concordant in 55 of 57 (96%) cases. For WT1, pre-chemotherapy and post-chemotherapy IHC results were concordant in 56 of 58 (97%) cases. In 23 paired WT1 cases, the mean post-treatment H-score decreased from 227 [range 20-298, standard deviation (SD) 64] to 151 (range 0-288, SD 78) (P = 0.0008). Immunohistochemical expression of p53 (abnormal/mutation-type pattern) and WT1 in HGSC is almost universal and is largely concordant before and after chemotherapy. This finding underscores the reliability of these diagnostic markers in small samples and in surgical samples following neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with very few exceptions. A novel finding was the significant diminution in intensity of WT1 staining following chemotherapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Methylation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Sano, Kenji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Tomoyuki; Hamano, Hideaki; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Higuchi, Kayoko; Hosaka, Noriko; Shiozawa, Satoshi; Ishigame, Hiroki; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a representative IgG4-related and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. To clarify mechanisms of carcinogenesis resulting from AIP, we focused on methylation abnormalities and KRAS mutations in AIP. Six tumor suppressor genes (NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16) that exhibited hypermethylation in pancreatic carcinoma were selected for quantitative SYBR green methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in 10 AIP specimens, 10 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases without history of AIP containing carcinoma areas (CAs) and noncarcinoma areas (NCAs), and 11 normal pancreas (NP) samples. KRAS mutation in codons 12, 13, and 61 were also investigated using direct sequencing. Hypermethylation events (≥10%) were identified in NPTX2, Cyclin D2, FOXE1, TFPI2, ppENK, and p16 in 1, 2, 2, 0, 2, and 0 CA cases, respectively, but not in these 6 candidate genes in AIP, NCA, and NP. However, the TFPI2 methylation ratio was significantly higher in AIP than NCA and NP. Direct sequencing results for KRAS showed no single-point mutations in AIP. These are the first studies characterizing methylation abnormalities in AIP. AIP's inflammatory condition may be related to carcinogenesis. Further study will elucidate methylation abnormalities associated with carcinogenesis in AIP.

  7. The progress of tumor gene-radiotherapy induced by Egr-1 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Rui; Li Biao

    2010-01-01

    The promoter of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) is a cis-acting element of Egr-1, and its activity is regulated by inducers such as ionizing radiation, free radical. In designated gene-radiotherapy system, radiation combined with therapeutic gene (such as tumor necrosis factor-α gene, suicide gene) can spatially and temporally regulate therapeutic gene expression in the irradiated field, produced a marked effect, while little systemic toxicities were observed. The combination of radiotherapy and gene therapy is promising in tumor therapy. (authors)

  8. [Correlation analysis of G870A CCND1 gene polymorphism with digestive system tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Min; Shi, Ya-Lin

    2016-11-20

    To study the correlation of G870A CCND1 gene polymorphism and digestive system tumors. From August 2010 to August 2014, 164 digestive system cancer patients (including 82 patients with gastric cancer and 82 with colorectal cancer) and 82 healthy subjects (control group) were examined with PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The distribution of CCND1 gene G870A frequency in the 3 groups and its association with tumor staging and grading were analyzed. The frequencies of the GG, GA and AA genotypes in G870A CCND1 gene loci in patients with gastric cancer and colorectal cancer differed significantly from those in the control group (Pdigestive system tumors (Pdigestive system cancer risk than the GG genotype (Pdigestive system tumors. The allele A is associated with an increased risk of digestive system tumors and correlated with the tumor differentiation and staging of the tumor.

  9. Tumoral Environment Triggers Transcript Anomalies in Established Tumors: Induction of Altered Gene Expression and of Aberrant, Truncated and B2 Repeat-Containing Gene Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Rottiers

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to eugenetic changes, cancerous cells exhibit extensive modifications in the expression levels of a variety of genes. The phenotypic switch observed after inoculation of T lymphoma cells into syngenic mice illustrates the active participation of tumoral environment in the induction of an aberrant gene expression pattern. To further substantiate this contribution, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based subtraction suppression hybridization (SSH to identify genes that are differentially expressed in tumor-derived EL4/13.3 cells compared to the same cells isolated from cultures. Besides a number of unknown genes, the subtracted library contained several known genes that have been reported to be expressed at increased levels in tumors and/or to contribute to carcinogenesis. Apart from clones representing translated transcripts, the subtracted library also contained a high number of clones representing B2 repeat elements, viz. short interspersed repetitive elements that are transcribed by RNA polymerase III. Northern blotting confirmed the induction of B2 transcripts in tumor tissue and also revealed induction of chimeric, B2 repeat-containing mRNA. The appearance of chimeric transcripts was accompanied by aberrant, shorter-than-full-length transcripts, specifically from upregulated genes. Accordingly, in addition to altered gene expression, tumoral environmental triggers constitute a potent mechanism to create an epigenetic diversity in cancers by inducing extensive transcript anomalies.

  10. Review of the Results of WT1 Peptide Vaccination Strategies for Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia from Nine Different Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasi, Antonio; Jimenez, Antonio M; Minagawa, Kentaro; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    We performed a systematic review of data from nine clinical trials of WT1 peptide vaccination in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and/or acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML), published between 2004 and 2012. A total of 51 patients were eligible for analysis. Vaccination with WT1 peptides proved safe and feasible in patients with MDS/AML, in studies from different institutions. Additionally, clinical responses and clinical benefit were observed, with some patients achieving and maintaining remission long-term (more than 8 years). A significant correlation between induction of WT1-specific T cells and normalization/reduction of WT1 mRNA levels and progression-free survival was noted in a number of studies. However, larger studies are warranted to confirm these results. Interestingly, the majority of trials reported the presence of WT1-specific T cells with limited or absent functionality prior to vaccination, which increased in frequency and function after vaccination. In conclusion, WT1 peptide vaccination strategies were safe in this heterogeneous group of patient with MDS/AML. Larger and more homogeneous studies or randomized clinical trials are needed to quantify the contribution of WT1 peptide vaccines to clinical responses and long-term survival.

  11. Review of the results of WT1 peptide vaccination strategies for myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia from 9 different studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eDi Stasi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review of data from seven clinical trials of WT1 peptide vaccination in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and/or acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML, published between 2004 and 2012. A total of fifty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Vaccination with WT1 peptides proved safe and feasible in patients with MDS/AML, in studies from different institutions. Additionally, clinical responses and clinical benefit were observed, with some patients achieving and maintaining remission long term (more than 8 years. A significant correlation between induction of WT1 specific T cells and normalization/reduction of WT1 mRNA levels and progression free survival was noted in a number of studies. However larger studies are warranted to confirm these results. Interestingly, the majority of trials reported the presence of WT1 specific T cells with limited or absent functionality prior to vaccination, which increased in frequency and function after vaccination. In conclusion, WT1 peptide vaccination strategies were safe in this heterogeneous group of patient with MDS/AML. Larger and more homogeneous studies or randomized clinical trials are needed to quantify the contribution of WT1 peptide vaccines to clinical responses and long term survival.

  12. The common mechanisms of transformation by the small DNA tumor viruses: The inactivation of tumor suppressor gene products: p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Arnold J

    2009-02-20

    The small DNA tumor viruses, Polyoma virus, Simian Vacuolating Virus 40, the Papilloma viruses and the human Adenoviruses, were first described during a period of intense virus discovery (1930-1960s) and shown to produce tumors in animals. In each of these cases the viral DNA was shown to persist (commonly integrated into a host chromosome) and only a selected portion of this DNA was expressed as m-RNA and proteins in these cancers. The viral encoded tumor antigens were identified and shown to be required to both establish the tumor and maintain the transformed cell phenotype. The functions of these viral tumor antigens were explored and shown to have common features and mechanisms even though they appear to have evolved from diverse genes. The SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E7 protein and the Adenovirus E1A protein were shown to bind to and inactivate the functions of the Retinoblastoma proteins in transformed cells. This resulted in the activation of the E2F and DP transcription factors and the entry of cells into the S-phase of DNA synthesis which was required for viral DNA replication. These events triggered the activation of p53 which promotes apoptosis of these virus infected cells limiting virus replication and tumor formation. These viruses responded by evolving and producing the SV40 large tumor antigen, the human Papilloma virus E6 protein and the Adenovirus E1b-55Kd protein which binds to and inactivates the p53 functions in both the infected cells and transformed cells. Some of the human Papilloma viruses and one of the Polyoma viruses have been shown to cause selected cancers in humans. Both the p53 tumor suppressor gene, which was uncovered in the studies with these viruses, and the retinoblastoma protein, have been shown to play a central role in the origins of human cancers via both somatic and germ line mutations in those genes.

  13. The wild type p53 gene radiosensitizes malignant cells and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallardo, David; McBride, William

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To investigate the use of the wild-type p53 gene as a radiosensitizer of human malignant cells and tumors. Materials and Methods: An ovarian carcinoma cell line (SKOV) lacking the p53 gene was transfected in vitro with E1 deleted adenovirus containing the wild type p53 gene (Ad/p53). SKOV cells expressing the p53 protein were tested for intrinsic radiosensitivity with clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors growing in the flanks of SCID mice were injected with 1x10(9) PFU of Ad/p53 or Ad/luciferase. Injected tumors were either irradiated to 24 Gy in 4 Gy fractions or not irradiated. Tumor diameters were then monitored. Results: Cells expressing the p53 gene product were more sensitive to radiation than control cells expressing the luciferase gene in in vitro clonogenic survival assays. SKOV tumors injected with the Ad/p53 virus expressed the p53 protein as demonstrated through immunohistochemical analysis. Tumors injected with Ad/p53 grew more slowly than tumors injected with Ad/luciferase or saline. After irradiation with 24Gy, tumors injected with Ad/p53 were controlled while those injected with Ad/luciferase were not. Conclusions: Our results formally demonstrate that transfer of the wild-type p53 gene can increase the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of a malignant cell line lacking the p53 gene. We also demonstrate that intra-tumoral injection of an adenoviral vector containing the wild type p53 gene increases the radiation responsiveness of established tumors, consistent with the radiosensitizing activity of the wild type p53 gene demonstrated in vitro. These studies support clinical trials using p53 gene transfer to potentially improve the efficacy of radiation therapy in human malignancies

  14. The effect of endostatin gene in combination with radiotherapy on rats with implanted tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Jin Ning; Yang Haishan; Piao Chunji; Lv Zhe

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the combination therapy effect of the radiotherapy with endostatin gene therapy on the rats with implanted tumor. Methods: Immediate Walker-256 cancerous ascetic injection method was used to make a rat tumor-bearing model, then the tumor was treated with saline, endostatin gene, irradiation or endostatin gene plus irradiation. The tumor growth rate and weight were observed, Western blot and RT-PCR were adopted to check the expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein. Results: The expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein were significant in the gene therapy group and the gene plus radiotherapy group, but there was a significant difference between these two groups. As compared with the control group, the tumor growth rate and weight decreased significantly in all the therapy groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: After the pCMV-Endostatin was induced, the expressions of endostatin mRNA and protein was significant in Walker-256 tumor and the tumor growth was inhibited. However, the effect of the endostatin gene plus radiotherapy was obviously better than that of the endostatin gene therapy group or the radiotherapy group for inhibiting tumor growth. (authors)

  15. Analysis of gene expression in prostate cancer epithelial and interstitial stromal cells using laser capture microdissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, Jennifer L; Brown, Kathleen E; Mintz, Eric M; Piontkivska, Helen; Fraizer, Gail C

    2010-01-01

    The prostate gland represents a multifaceted system in which prostate epithelia and stroma have distinct physiological roles. To understand the interaction between stroma and glandular epithelia, it is essential to delineate the gene expression profiles of these two tissue types in prostate cancer. Most studies have compared tumor and normal samples by performing global expression analysis using a mixture of cell populations. This report presents the first study of prostate tumor tissue that examines patterns of differential expression between specific cell types using laser capture microdissection (LCM). LCM was used to isolate distinct cell-type populations and identify their gene expression differences using oligonucleotide microarrays. Ten differentially expressed genes were then analyzed in paired tumor and non-neoplastic prostate tissues by quantitative real-time PCR. Expression patterns of the transcription factors, WT1 and EGR1, were further compared in established prostate cell lines. WT1 protein expression was also examined in prostate tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry. The two-step method of laser capture and microarray analysis identified nearly 500 genes whose expression levels were significantly different in prostate epithelial versus stromal tissues. Several genes expressed in epithelial cells (WT1, GATA2, and FGFR-3) were more highly expressed in neoplastic than in non-neoplastic tissues; conversely several genes expressed in stromal cells (CCL5, CXCL13, IGF-1, FGF-2, and IGFBP3) were more highly expressed in non-neoplastic than in neoplastic tissues. Notably, EGR1 was also differentially expressed between epithelial and stromal tissues. Expression of WT1 and EGR1 in cell lines was consistent with these patterns of differential expression. Importantly, WT1 protein expression was demonstrated in tumor tissues and was absent in normal and benign tissues. The prostate represents a complex mix of cell types and there is a need to analyze

  16. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamm Christopher A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. Methods To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. Results The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. Conclusion This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that

  17. Microenvironment alters epigenetic and gene expression profiles in Swarm rat chondrosarcoma tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, Christopher A; Wang, Deli; Malchenko, Sergey; Fatima Bonaldo, Maria de; Casavant, Thomas L; Hendrix, Mary JC; Soares, Marcelo B; Stevens, Jeff W; Xie, Hehuang; Vanin, Elio F; Morcuende, Jose A; Abdulkawy, Hakeem; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Sredni, Simone T; Bischof, Jared M

    2010-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage tumors that do not respond to traditional chemotherapy or radiation. The 5-year survival rate of histologic grade III chondrosarcoma is less than 30%. An animal model of chondrosarcoma has been established - namely, the Swarm Rat Chondrosarcoma (SRC) - and shown to resemble the human disease. Previous studies with this model revealed that tumor microenvironment could significantly influence chondrosarcoma malignancy. To examine the effect of the microenvironment, SRC tumors were initiated at different transplantation sites. Pyrosequencing assays were utilized to assess the DNA methylation of the tumors, and SAGE libraries were constructed and sequenced to determine the gene expression profiles of the tumors. Based on the gene expression analysis, subsequent functional assays were designed to determine the relevancy of the specific genes in the development and progression of the SRC. The site of transplantation had a significant impact on the epigenetic and gene expression profiles of SRC tumors. Our analyses revealed that SRC tumors were hypomethylated compared to control tissue, and that tumors at each transplantation site had a unique expression profile. Subsequent functional analysis of differentially expressed genes, albeit preliminary, provided some insight into the role that thymosin-β4, c-fos, and CTGF may play in chondrosarcoma development and progression. This report describes the first global molecular characterization of the SRC model, and it demonstrates that the tumor microenvironment can induce epigenetic alterations and changes in gene expression in the SRC tumors. We documented changes in gene expression that accompany changes in tumor phenotype, and these gene expression changes provide insight into the pathways that may play a role in the development and progression of chondrosarcoma. Furthermore, specific functional analysis indicates that thymosin-β4 may have a role in chondrosarcoma metastasis

  18. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  19. Characterization of the tumor suppressor gene WWOX in primary human oral squamous cell carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Flávio J.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Perdigão, Paolla F.; Barbosa, Alvimar A.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Aldaz, C. Marcelo; De Marco, Luiz; Gomez, Ricardo S.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm of the oral cavity, representing ~90% of all oral carcinomas and accounting for 3–5% of all malignancies. The WWOX gene (WW-domain containing oxidoreductase) is a candidate tumor suppressor gene located at 16q23.3–24.1, spanning the second most common fragile site, FRA16D. In this report, the role of the WWOX gene was investigated in 20 tumors and 10 normal oral mucosas, and we demonstrated an altered WWOX gene in 50% (10/20) of OSCCs. Using nested RT-PCR, mRNA transcription was altered in 35% of the tumors, with the complete absence of transcripts in 2 samples as well as absence of exons 6–8 (2 tumors), exon 7 (1 tumor), exon 7 and exon 6–8 (1 tumor) and partial loss of exons 8 and 9 (1 tumor). To determine if the aberrant transcripts were translated, Western blots were performed in all samples; however, only the normal protein was detected. By immunohistochemistry, a reduction in Wwox protein expression was observed, affecting 40% of the tumors when compared with normal mucosa. In addition, a novel somatic mutation (S329F) was found. The presence of alterations in mRNA transcription correlated with the reduced expression of Wwox protein in the tumors. These results show that the WWOX gene is frequently altered in OSCC and may contribute to the carcinogenesis processes in oral cancer. PMID:16152610

  20. MDM2 SNP309, gene-gene interaction, and tumor susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wei

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in multiple cellular pathways including apoptosis, transcriptional control, and cell cycle regulation. In the last decade it has been demonstrated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at codon 72 of the p53 gene is associated with the risk for development of various neoplasms. MDM2 SNP309 is a single nucleotide T to G polymorphism located in the MDM2 gene promoter. From the time that this well-characterized functional polymorphism was identified, a variety of case-control studies have been published that investigate the possible association between MDM2 SNP309 and cancer risk. However, the results of the published studies, as well as the subsequent meta-analyses, remain contradictory. Methods To investigate whether currently published epidemiological studies can clarify the potential interaction between MDM2 SNP309 and the functional genetic variant in p53 codon72 (Arg72Pro and p53 mutation status, we performed a meta-analysis of the risk estimate on 27,813 cases with various tumor types and 30,295 controls. Results The data we reviewed indicated that variant homozygote 309GG and heterozygote 309TG were associated with a significant increased risk of all tumor types (homozygote comparison: odds ratio (OR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.13-1.37; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17. We also found that the combination of GG and Pro/Pro, TG and Pro/Pro, GG and Arg/Arg significantly increased the risk of cancer (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.77-6.47; OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.26-2.81; OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.01-3.78, respectively. In a stratified analysis by tumor location, we also found a significant increased risk in brain, liver, stomach and uterus cancer (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.06-2.03; OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.57-3.18; OR = 1.54, 95%CI = 1.04-2.29; OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.29, respectively. However, no association was seen between MDM2 SNP309 and tumor susceptibility

  1. MDM2 SNP309, gene-gene interaction, and tumor susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Yan; Wu, Wei; Yin, Zhihua; Guan, Peng; Zhou, Baosen

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is involved in multiple cellular pathways including apoptosis, transcriptional control, and cell cycle regulation. In the last decade it has been demonstrated that the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 72 of the p53 gene is associated with the risk for development of various neoplasms. MDM2 SNP309 is a single nucleotide T to G polymorphism located in the MDM2 gene promoter. From the time that this well-characterized functional polymorphism was identified, a variety of case-control studies have been published that investigate the possible association between MDM2 SNP309 and cancer risk. However, the results of the published studies, as well as the subsequent meta-analyses, remain contradictory. To investigate whether currently published epidemiological studies can clarify the potential interaction between MDM2 SNP309 and the functional genetic variant in p53 codon72 (Arg72Pro) and p53 mutation status, we performed a meta-analysis of the risk estimate on 27,813 cases with various tumor types and 30,295 controls. The data we reviewed indicated that variant homozygote 309GG and heterozygote 309TG were associated with a significant increased risk of all tumor types (homozygote comparison: odds ratio (OR) = 1.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-1.37; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17). We also found that the combination of GG and Pro/Pro, TG and Pro/Pro, GG and Arg/Arg significantly increased the risk of cancer (OR = 3.38, 95% CI = 1.77-6.47; OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.26-2.81; OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.01-3.78, respectively). In a stratified analysis by tumor location, we also found a significant increased risk in brain, liver, stomach and uterus cancer (OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.06-2.03; OR = 2.24, 95%CI = 1.57-3.18; OR = 1.54, 95%CI = 1.04-2.29; OR = 1.34, 95%CI = 1.07-1.29, respectively). However, no association was seen between MDM2 SNP309 and tumor susceptibility in the stratified analysis by p53 mutation status

  2. Applying unmixing to gene expression data for tumor phylogeny inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shackney Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While in principle a seemingly infinite variety of combinations of mutations could result in tumor development, in practice it appears that most human cancers fall into a relatively small number of "sub-types," each characterized a roughly equivalent sequence of mutations by which it progresses in different patients. There is currently great interest in identifying the common sub-types and applying them to the development of diagnostics or therapeutics. Phylogenetic methods have shown great promise for inferring common patterns of tumor progression, but suffer from limits of the technologies available for assaying differences between and within tumors. One approach to tumor phylogenetics uses differences between single cells within tumors, gaining valuable information about intra-tumor heterogeneity but allowing only a few markers per cell. An alternative approach uses tissue-wide measures of whole tumors to provide a detailed picture of averaged tumor state but at the cost of losing information about intra-tumor heterogeneity. Results The present work applies "unmixing" methods, which separate complex data sets into combinations of simpler components, to attempt to gain advantages of both tissue-wide and single-cell approaches to cancer phylogenetics. We develop an unmixing method to infer recurring cell states from microarray measurements of tumor populations and use the inferred mixtures of states in individual tumors to identify possible evolutionary relationships among tumor cells. Validation on simulated data shows the method can accurately separate small numbers of cell states and infer phylogenetic relationships among them. Application to a lung cancer dataset shows that the method can identify cell states corresponding to common lung tumor types and suggest possible evolutionary relationships among them that show good correspondence with our current understanding of lung tumor development. Conclusions Unmixing

  3. Application Progress of CRISPR/Cas9 System for Gene Editing in Tumor Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao LIU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available TCRISPR/Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 gene editing system is a new type of gene editing technology developed based on the immune mechanism of archaea resisting the invasion of exogenous nucleic acid. Compared with traditional gene editing system, CRISPR/Cas9 system is more efficient, easier operating, and less cytotoxic. Currently, CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology has been applied to many aspects of cancer research, including research on cancer genes, constructing animal tumor models, screening tumor resistance-associated and phenotypic-related genes and cancer gene therapy. In this review, the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in tumor research were introduced.

  4. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  5. Molecular characteristics of mismatch repair genes in sporadic colorectal tumors in Czech patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymetalkova, Veronika Polakova; Slyskova, Jana; Korenkova, Vlasta; Bielik, Ludovit; Langerova, Lucie; Prochazka, Pavel; Rejhova, Alexandra; Schwarzova, Lucie; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodicka, Pavel

    2014-01-31

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes are known to be frequently altered in colorectal cancer (CRC). Both genetics and epigenetics modifications seems to be relevant in this phenomenon, however it is still not clear how these two aspects are interconnected. The present study aimed at characterizing of epigenetic and gene expression profiles of MMR genes in sporadic CRC patients from the Czech Republic, a country with one of the highest incidences of this cancer all over Europe. Expression levels and CpG promoter methylation status of all MMR genes were evaluated in DNA from tumor and adjacent mucosal samples of 53 incident CRC patients. We have found significantly increased transcription levels in EXO1 gene in tumor tissues (P = 0.05) and significant over-expression of MSH3 gene in colon tumors when compared to adjacent mucosal tissues (P = 0.02). Interestingly, almost all MMR genes were differently expressed when localization of tumors was compared. In particular, colon tumors showed an up-regulation of EXO1, MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, and PMS2 genes in comparison to rectal tumors (P = 0.02). Expression levels of all MMR genes positively correlated between each other. The promoter methylation of MLH1 gene was observed in 9% of CRC tissues only. In our study, we have observed different pattern of MMR genes expression according to tumor localization. However, a lack of association between methylation in MMR genes and their corresponding expressions was noticed in this study, the relationship between these two aspects is worthy to be analyzed in larger population studies and in pre-malignant stages.

  6. Experimental study on anti-tumor effect of pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Congmei; Li Xiuyi; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-tumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy to murine melanoma and its immunologic mechanism. Methods: pcEgr-IFNγ plasmids were injected locally into tumor, and 36 hours later, the tumors were given 20 Gy X-ray irradiation. Tumor growth at different time, IFN γ expression 3 days later and immunologic indexes 15 days later were detected. Results: At 3-15 days after pcEgr-IFNγ gene-radiotherapy, the tumor growth rate was lower than that of irradiation alone group. It was also lower than that of gene therapy alone group and control plasmid combined with X-ray irradiation group significantly. Day 3 tumor IFN γ expression was higher than that of plasmid treatment alone group. NK activity, IL-2 and IFN γ secretion activities were higher than those of gene therapy alone and irradiation alone groups significantly. Conclusion: The antitumor effect of IFN γ gene-radiotherapy is better than that of either of them applied solely. Its mechanism might be concerned with the higher expression of IFN γ induced by irradiation in tumors and activation of anti-tumor immunologic functions

  7. Novel fusion genes and chimeric transcripts in ependymal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thale Kristin; Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila

    2016-01-01

    using the FusionCatcher algorithm on 12 RNA-sequenced ependymal tumors. Candidate transcripts were prioritized based on the software's filtering and manual visualization using the BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) and BLAT (BLAST-like alignment tool) tools. Genomic and reverse transcriptase PCR......We have previously identified two ALK rearrangements in a subset of ependymal tumors using a combination of cytogenetic data and RNA sequencing. The aim of this study was to perform an unbiased search for fusion transcripts in our entire series of ependymal tumors. Fusion analysis was performed...... with subsequent Sanger sequencing was used to validate the potential fusions. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using locus-specific probes was also performed. A total of 841 candidate chimeric transcripts were identified in the 12 tumors, with an average of 49 unique candidate fusions per tumor. After...

  8. DNA Methylation and Gene Expression Profiling of Ewing Sarcoma Primary Tumors Reveal Genes That Are Potential Targets of Epigenetic Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikul Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aberrant DNA methylation in Ewing sarcoma is not completely understood. The methylation status of 503 genes in 52 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded EWS tumors and 3 EWS cell lines was compared to human mesenchymal stem cell primary cultures (hMSCs using bead chip methylation analysis. Relative expression of methylated genes was assessed in 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine-(5-AZA-treated EWS cell lines and in a cohort of primary EWS samples and hMSCs by gene expression and quantitative RT-PCR. 129 genes demonstrated statistically significant hypermethylation in EWS tumors compared to hMSCs. Thirty-six genes were profoundly methylated in EWS and unmethylated in hMSCs. 5-AZA treatment of EWS cell lines resulted in upregulation of expression of hundreds of genes including 162 that were increased by at least 2-fold. The expression of 19 of 36 candidate hypermethylated genes was increased following 5-AZA. Analysis of gene expression from an independent cohort of tumors confirmed decreased expression of six of nineteen hypermethylated genes (AXL, COL1A1, CYP1B1, LYN, SERPINE1, and VCAN. Comparing gene expression and DNA methylation analyses proved to be an effective way to identify genes epigenetically regulated in EWS. Further investigation is ongoing to elucidate the role of these epigenetic alterations in EWS pathogenesis.

  9. Assessment of tumor characteristic gene expression in cell lines using a tissue similarity index (TSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Rickard; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2005-02-08

    The gene expression profiles of 60 cell lines, derived from nine different tissues, were compared with their corresponding in vivo tumors and tissues. Cell lines expressed few tissue-specific (2%) or tumor-specific (5%) genes when analyzed group-wise. A tissue similarity index (TSI) was designed based upon singular value decomposition that measured in vivo tumor characteristic gene expression in each cell line independently. Only 34 of the 60 cell lines received the highest TSI toward its tumor of origin. In addition, we identified the most appropriate cell lines to be used as model systems for different in vivo tumors. Seven cell lines were identified as being of another origin than the originally presumed one. The proposed TSI will likely become an important tool for the selection of the most appropriate cell lines in pharmaceutical screening programs and experimental and biomedical research.

  10. Differential Gene Expression in Primary Breast Tumors Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Ellsworth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph node status remains one of the most useful prognostic indicators in breast cancer; however, current methods to assess nodal status disrupt the lymphatic system and may lead to secondary complications. Identification of molecular signatures discriminating lymph node-positive from lymph node-negative primary tumors would allow for stratification of patients requiring surgical assesment of lymph nodes. Primary breast tumors from women with negative (=41 and positive (=35 lymph node status matched for possible confounding factors were subjected to laser microdissection and gene expression data generated. Although ANOVA analysis (1.5 revealed 13 differentially expressed genes, hierarchical clustering classified 90% of node-negative but only 66% of node-positive tumors correctly. The inability to derive molecular profiles of metastasis in primary tumors may reflect tumor heterogeneity, paucity of cells within the primary tumor with metastatic potential, influence of the microenvironment, or inherited host susceptibility to metastasis.

  11. Differential Gene Expression in Primary Breast Tumors Associated with Lymph Node Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E.; Field, Lori A.; Love, Brad; Kane, Jennifer L.; Hooke, Jeffrey A.; Shriver, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    Lymph node status remains one of the most useful prognostic indicators in breast cancer; however, current methods to assess nodal status disrupt the lymphatic system and may lead to secondary complications. Identification of molecular signatures discriminating lymph node-positive from lymph node-negative primary tumors would allow for stratification of patients requiring surgical assesment of lymph nodes. Primary breast tumors from women with negative (n = 41) and positive (n = 35) lymph node status matched for possible confounding factors were subjected to laser microdissection and gene expression data generated. Although ANOVA analysis (P 1.5) revealed 13 differentially expressed genes, hierarchical clustering classified 90% of node-negative but only 66% of node-positive tumors correctly. The inability to derive molecular profiles of metastasis in primary tumors may reflect tumor heterogeneity, paucity of cells within the primary tumor with metastatic potential, influence of the microenvironment, or inherited host susceptibility to metastasis. PMID:22295210

  12. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2001-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  13. The Function of PTEN Tumor Suppressor Gene in Prostate Cancer Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Hong

    2002-01-01

    .... The recently identified tumor suppressor gene PTEN is a promising candidate for being involved in prostate cancer since it is frequently deleted in prostate cancer, especially in advanced or metastatic forms...

  14. Regulation of IAP (Inhibitor of Apoptosis) Gene Expression by the p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the work proposed in this application, which has just completed Year 1, was to analyze the ability of the p53 tumor suppressor protein to repress the anti-apoptotic genes survivin and cIAP-2...

  15. Gene expression profiling of circulating tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from breast cancer patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hensler, M.; Vancurova, I.; Becht, E.; Palata, O.; Strnad, P.; Tesarova, P.; Cabinakova, M.; Švec, David; Kubista, Mikael; Bartunkova, J.; Spisek, R.; Sojka, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 4 (2016), e1102827 ISSN 2162-402X Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Breast cancer * gene expression profiling * circulating tumor cells Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 7.719, year: 2016

  16. RNA quality and gene expression analysis of ovarian tumor tissue undergoing repeated thaw-freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Kirsten Marie; Tan, Qihua; Dahlgaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    undergoes repeated thawing and freezing. We evaluated the influence of repeated division of tumor samples at room temperature, on RNA quality and quantity, in addition to the gene expression profile. Sixteen ovarian tumor samples were divided in three aliquots each, undergoing respectively one, two...... unsupervised, and supervised multivariate statistical methods, reliability analysis, as well as verification using published gene lists in ovarian cancer studies. RNA quality and quantity did not change during the division procedure and microarray data showed insignificant difference in gene expression. Tumor......Gene expression profiles evaluated by microarray-based quantization of RNA are used in studies of differential diagnosis and prognosis in cancer. RNA of good quality is mandatory for this evaluation. The RNA most often comes from tumor banks with limited amount of tissue, and the tissue often...

  17. Rad51C-ATXN7 fusion gene expression in colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvala, Arjun; Gao, Li; Aguila, Brittany; Dotts, Kathleen; Rahman, Mohammad; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Zhou, Xiaoping; Wang, Qi-En; Amann, Joseph; Otterson, Gregory A; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Duan, Wenrui

    2016-06-13

    Fusion proteins have unique oncogenic properties and their identification can be useful either as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Next generation sequencing data have previously shown a fusion gene formed between Rad51C and ATXN7 genes in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. However, the existence of this fusion gene in colorectal patient tumor tissues is largely still unknown. We evaluated for the presence of Rad51C-ATXN7 fusion gene in colorectal tumors and cells by RT-PCR, PCR, Topo TA cloning, Real time PCR, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. We identified two forms of fusion mRNAs between Rad51C and ATXN7 in the colorectal tumors, including a Variant 1 (fusion transcript between Rad51C exons 1-7 and ATXN7 exons 6-13), and a Variant 2 (between Rad51C exons 1-6 and ATXN7 exons 6-13). In silico analysis showed that the Variant 1 produces a truncated protein, whereas the Variant 2 was predicted to produce a fusion protein with molecular weight of 110 KDa. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis further showed a 110 KDa protein in colorectal tumors. 5-Azacytidine treatment of LS-174 T cells caused a 3.51-fold increase in expression of the fusion gene (Variant 2) as compared to no treatment controls evaluated by real time PCR. In conclusion we found a fusion gene between DNA repair gene Rad51C and neuro-cerebral ataxia Ataxin-7 gene in colorectal tumors. The in-frame fusion transcript of Variant 2 results in a fusion protein with molecular weight of 110 KDa. In addition, we found that expression of fusion gene is associated with functional impairment of Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway in colorectal tumors. The expression of Rad51C-ATXN7 in tumors warrants further investigation, as it suggests the potential of the fusion gene in treatment and predictive value in colorectal cancers.

  18. Hypoxia-Inducible Regulation of a Prodrug-Activating Enzyme for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Shibata

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that tumor hypoxia could be exploited for cancer gene therapy. Using hypoxia-responsive elements derived from the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene, we have generated vectors expressing a bacterial nitroreductase. (20NTR gene that can activate the anticancer prodrug CB1954. Stable transfectants of human HT1080 tumor cells with hypoxia-inducible vectors were established with G418 selection. Hypoxic induction of NTR protein correlated with increased sensitivity to in vitro exposure of HT 1080 cells to the prodrug. Growth delay assays were performed with established tumor xenografts derived from the same cells to detect the in vivo efficacy of CB1954 conversion to its cytotoxic form. Significant antitumor effects were achieved with intraperitoneal injections of CB1954 both in tumors that express NTR constitutively or with a hypoxia-inducible promoter. In addition, respiration of 10% O2 increased tumor hypoxia in vivo and enhanced the antitumor effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible vectors may be useful for tumor-selective gene therapy, although the problem of delivery of the vector to the tumors, particularly to the hypoxic cells in the tumors, is not addressed by these studies.

  19. Restriction landmark genomic scanning of mouse liver tumors for gene amplification: overexpression of cyclin A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, R; Morrow, A D; Plass, C; Held, W A

    2000-07-21

    SV40 T/t antigen-induced liver tumors from transgenic mice were analyzed by Restriction Landmark Genomic Scanning (RLGS). Using NotI as the restriction landmark, RLGS targets CpG islands found in gene-rich regions of the genome. Since many RLGS landmarks are mapped, the candidate gene approach can be used to help determine which genes are altered in tumors. RLGS analysis revealed one tumor-specific amplification mapping close to CcnA2 (cyclin A2) and Fgf2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). Southern analysis confirmed that both oncogenes are amplified in this tumor and in a second, independent liver tumor. Whereas Fgf2 RNA is undetectable in tumors, CcnA2 RNA and cyclin A2 protein was overexpressed in 25 and 50% of tumors, respectively. Combining RLGS with the candidate gene approach indicates that cyclin A2 amplification and overexpression is a likely selected event in transgenic mouse liver tumors. Our results also indicate that our mouse model for liver tumorigenesis in mice accurately recapitulates events observed in human hepatocellular carcinoma. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  20. Regional and temporal differences in gene expression of LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Samuel K; Pina, Yolanda; Clarke, Jennifer; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Scott, William K; Nathanson, Lubov; Schefler, Amy C; Murray, Timothy G

    2011-07-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by microarray the hypothesis that LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma tumors exhibit regional and temporal variations in gene expression. LH(BETA)T(AG) mice aged 12, 16, and 20 weeks were euthanatized (n = 9). Specimens were taken from five tumor areas (apex, anterior lateral, center, base, and posterior lateral). Samples were hybridized to gene microarrays. The data were preprocessed and analyzed, and genes with a P 2.5 were considered to be differentially expressed. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed for overlap with known networks by using pathway analysis tools. There were significant temporal (P 2.5, there were significant changes in gene expression of 190 genes apically, 84 genes anterolaterally, 126 genes posteriorly, 56 genes centrally, and 134 genes at the base. Differentially expressed genes overlapped with known networks, with significant involvement in regulation of cellular proliferation and growth, response to oxygen levels and hypoxia, regulation of cellular processes, cellular signaling cascades, and angiogenesis. There are significant temporal and regional variations in the LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma model. Differentially expressed genes overlap with key pathways that may play pivotal roles in murine retinoblastoma development. These findings suggest the mechanisms involved in tumor growth and progression in murine retinoblastoma tumors and identify pathways for analysis at a functional level, to determine significance in human retinoblastoma. Microarray analysis of LH(BETA)T(AG) retinal tumors showed significant regional and temporal variations in gene expression, including dysregulation of genes involved in hypoxic responses and angiogenesis.

  1. Dissecting Time- from Tumor-Related Gene Expression Variability in Bilateral Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Callari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Metachronous (MBC and synchronous bilateral breast tumors (SBC are mostly distinct primaries, whereas paired primaries and their local recurrences (LRC share a common origin. Intra-pair gene expression variability in MBC, SBC, and LRC derives from time/tumor microenvironment-related and tumor genetic background-related factors and pairs represents an ideal model for trying to dissect tumor-related from microenvironment-related variability. Pairs of tumors derived from women with SBC (n = 18, MBC (n = 11, and LRC (n = 10 undergoing local-regional treatment were profiled for gene expression; similarity between pairs was measured using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC computed for each gene and compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA. When considering biologically unselected genes, the highest correlations were found for primaries and paired LRC, and the lowest for MBC pairs. By instead limiting the analysis to the breast cancer intrinsic genes, correlations between primaries and paired LRC were enhanced, while lower similarities were observed for SBC and MBC. Focusing on stromal-related genes, the ICC values decreased for MBC and were significantly different from SBC. These findings indicate that it is possible to dissect intra-pair gene expression variability into components that are associated with genetic origin or with time and microenvironment by using specific gene subsets.

  2. Copy Number Alterations in Enzyme-Coding and Cancer-Causing Genes Reprogram Tumor Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwini Kumar; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer

    2016-07-15

    Somatic copy number alterations frequently occur in the cancer genome affecting not only oncogenic or tumor suppressive genes, but also passenger and potential codriver genes. An intrinsic feature resulting from such genomic perturbations is the deregulation in the metabolism of tumor cells. In this study, we have shown that metabolic and cancer-causing genes are unexpectedly often proximally positioned in the chromosome and share loci with coaltered copy numbers across multiple cancers (19 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas). We have developed an analysis pipeline, Identification of Metabolic Cancer Genes (iMetCG), to infer the functional impact on metabolic remodeling from such coamplifications and codeletions and delineate genes driving cancer metabolism from those that are neutral. Using our identified metabolic genes, we were able to classify tumors based on their tissue and developmental origins. These metabolic genes were similar to known cancer genes in terms of their network connectivity, isoform frequency, and evolutionary features. We further validated these identified metabolic genes by (i) using gene essentiality data from several tumor cell lines, (ii) showing that these identified metabolic genes are strong indicators for patient survival, and (iii) observing a significant overlap between our identified metabolic genes and known cancer-metabolic genes. Our analyses revealed a hitherto unknown generic mechanism for large-scale metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells based on linear gene proximities between cancer-causing and -metabolic genes. We have identified 119 new metabolic cancer genes likely to be involved in rewiring cancer cell metabolism. Cancer Res; 76(14); 4058-67. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Assessment of Tumor Heterogeneity, as Evidenced by Gene Expression Profiles, Pathway Activation, and Gene Copy Number, in Patients with Multifocal Invasive Lobular Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Nadine; Advani, Pooja P.; Serie, Daniel J.; Geiger, Xochiquetzal J.; Necela, Brian M.; Axenfeld, Bianca C.; Kachergus, Jennifer M.; Feathers, Ryan W.; Carr, Jennifer M.; Crook, Julia E.; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Anastasiadis, Panos Z.; Perez, Edith A.; Thompson, E. Aubrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) comprises approximately ~10–20% of breast cancers. In general, multifocal/multicentric (MF/MC) breast cancer has been associated with an increased rate of regional lymph node metastases. Tumor heterogeneity between foci represents a largely unstudied source of genomic variation in those rare patients with MF/MC ILC. Methods We characterized gene expression and copy number in 2 or more foci from 11 patients with MF/MC ILC (all ER+, HER2-) and adjacent normal tissue. RNA and DNA were extracted from 3x1.5mm cores from all foci. Gene expression (730 genes) and copy number (80 genes) were measured using Nanostring PanCancer and Cancer CNV panels. Linear mixed models were employed to compare expression in tumor versus normal samples from the same patient, and to assess heterogeneity (variability) in expression among multiple ILC within an individual. Results 35 and 34 genes were upregulated (FC>2) and down-regulated (FC<0.5) respectively in ILC tumor relative to adjacent normal tissue, q<0.05. 9/34 down-regulated genes (FIGF, RELN, PROM1, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2, KIT) had changes larger than CDH1, a hallmark of ILC. Copy number changes in these patients were relatively few but consistent across foci within each patient. Amplification of three genes (CCND1, FADD, ORAOV1) at 11q13.3 was present in 2/11 patients in both foci. We observed significant evidence of within-patient between-foci variability (heterogeneity) in gene expression for 466 genes (p<0.05 with FDR 8%), including CDH1, FIGF, RELN, SFRP1, MMP7, NTRK2, LAMB3, SPRY2 and KIT. Conclusions There was substantial variation in gene expression between ILC foci within patients, including known markers of ILC, suggesting an additional level of complexity that should be addressed. PMID:27078887

  4. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ostrander, Gary Kent

    1996-01-01

    ... in the retinoblastoma gene in retinoblastoma and hepatocarcinomas following induction with known environmental carcinogens. Studies to date suggest the retinoblastoma gene/protein may play a role in oncogenesis in the medaka.

  5. PCR Expression Analysis Of the Estrogeninducible Gene Bcei in Gastrointestinal and Other Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Wundrack

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed to test for tumor cell specific expression of the BCEI gene. This new marker gene, reported at first for human breast cancer, was found specifically active in various gastrointestinal carcinomas by previously applying immunohistochemistry and RNA (Northern blot analysis. Presently, by using reverse transcription -PCR analysis, a series of primary tumor tissues and established tumor cell lines were testcd for BCEI transcription. This approach was compared to immunostaining achieved by an antibody directed against the BCEI gene’s product. The result demonstrate the superior sensitivity of PCR by indicating the gene’ s expression in cases where immunohistochemical testing remained negative.

  6. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is now well-established that cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor growth and that the cancer gene, c-Myc, plays a critical role in converting cells to CSCs. However, little is known about the genes that are induced and regulated by c-Myc to generate tumors, and, in particular, tumors of the live...

  7. Helicase-like transcription factor (Hltf regulates G2/M transition, Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a cardiac transcription networks, and collagen biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Helmer

    Full Text Available HLTF/Hltf regulates transcription, remodels chromatin, and coordinates DNA damage repair. Hltf is expressed in mouse brain and heart during embryonic and postnatal development. Silencing Hltf is semilethal. Seventy-four percent of congenic C57BL/6J Hltf knockout mice died, 75% within 12-24 hours of birth. Previous studies in neonatal (6-8 hour postpartum brain revealed silencing Hltf disrupted cell cycle progression, and attenuated DNA damage repair. An RNA-Seq snapshot of neonatal heart transcriptome showed 1,536 of 20,000 total transcripts were altered (p < 0.05 - 10 up- and 1,526 downregulated. Pathway enrichment analysis with MetaCore™ showed Hltf's regulation of the G2/M transition (p=9.726E(-15 of the cell cycle in heart is nearly identical to its role in brain. In addition, Brca1 and 12 members of the Brca1 associated genome surveillance complex are also downregulated. Activation of caspase 3 coincides with transcriptional repression of Bcl-2. Hltf loss caused downregulation of Wt1/Gata4/Hif-1a signaling cascades as well as Myh7b/miR499 transcription. Hltf-specific binding to promoters and/or regulatory regions of these genes was authenticated by ChIP-PCR. Hif-1a targets for prolyl (P4ha1, P4ha2 and lysyl (Plod2 collagen hydroxylation, PPIase enzymes (Ppid, Ppif, Ppil3 for collagen trimerization, and lysyl oxidase (Loxl2 for collagen-elastin crosslinking were downregulated. However, transcription of genes for collagens, fibronectin, Mmps and their inhibitors (Timps was unaffected. The collective downregulation of genes whose protein products control collagen biogenesis caused disorganization of the interstitial and perivascular myocardial collagen fibrillar network as viewed with picrosirius red-staining, and authenticated with spectral imaging. Wavy collagen bundles in control hearts contrasted with collagen fibers that were thin, short and disorganized in Hltf null hearts. Collagen bundles in Hltf null hearts were tangled and

  8. Alterations in the K-ras and p53 genes in rat lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Finch, G.L.; Mitchell, C.E. [Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Activation of the K-ras protooncogene and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are events common to many types of human cancers. Molecular epidemiology studies have associated mutational profiles in these genes with specific exposures. The purpose of this paper is to review investigations that have examined the role of the K-ras and p53 genes in lung tumors induced in the F344 rat by mutagenic and nonmutagenic exposures. Mutation profiles within the K-ras and p53 genes, if present in rat lung tumors, would help to define some of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer induction by various environmental agents. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas were induced by tetranitromethane (TNM), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), beryllium metal, plutonium-239, X-ray, diesel exhaust, or carbon black. These agents were chosen because the tumors they produced could arise via different types of DNA damage. Mutation of the K-ras gene was determined by approaches that included DNA transfection, direct sequencing, mismatch hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The frequency for mutation of the K-ras gene was exposure dependent. The transition mutations formed could have been derived from deamination of cytosine. Alteration in the p53 gene was assessed by immunohistochemical analysis for p53 protein and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of exons 4 to 9. None of the 93 adenocarinomas examined was immunoreactive toward the anti-p53 antibody CM1. In contrast, 14 of 71 squamous cell carcinomas exhibited nuclear p53 immunoreactivity with no correlation to type of exposure. However, SSCP analysis only detected mutations in 2 of 14 squamous cell tumors that were immunoreactive, suggesting that protein stabilization did not stem from mutations within the p53 gene. Thus, the p53 gene does not appear to be involved in the genesis of most rat lung tumors. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 48 refs.

  9. Molecular cloning of canine Wilms' tumor 1 for immunohistochemical analysis in canine tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Osamu; Sakurai, Masashi; Sakai, Hiroki; Kubo, Masahito; Hiraoka, Hiroko; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Mizuno, Takuya

    2017-07-28

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) expression has been investigated in various human cancers as a target molecule for cancer immunotherapy. However, few studies have focused on WT1 expression in dogs. Firstly, cDNA of canine WT1 (cWT1) was molecularly cloned from normal canine kidney. The cross-reactivity of the anti-human WT1 monoclonal antibody (6F-H2) with cWT1 was confirmed via Western blotting using cells overexpressing cWT1. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that cWT1 expression was detected in all canine lymphoma tissues and in some normal canine tissues, including the kidney and lymph node. cWT1 is a potential immunotherapy target against canine cancers.

  10. Fanconi Anemia Gene Mutations Are Not Involved in Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adank, Muriel A.; Segers, Heidi; van Mil, Saskia E.; van Helsdingen, Yvette M.; Ameziane, Najim; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Wagner, Anja; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kool, Marcel; de Kraker, Jan; Waisfisz, Quinten; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2010-01-01

    Bi-allelic germline mutations of the Fancom anemia (FA) genes, PALB2/FANCN and BRCA2/FANCD1, have been reported in a few Wilms tumor (WT) patients with an atypical FA phenotype Therefore, we screened a random cohort of 47 Dutch WT cases for germline mutations in these two FA-genes by DNA sequencing

  11. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-independent functions for the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Martijn Paul Jung Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) on chromosome 3p have been associated with the autosomal dominant VHL disease, characterized by extensively vascularized tumors and cysts in different organs, as well as the majority of conventional kidney cancers. The VHL gene product

  12. Locally linear representation Fisher criterion based tumor gene expressive data classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Tian, Bei-Bei; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Tumor gene expressive data are characterized by a large amount of genes with only a small amount of observations, which always appear with high dimensionality. So it is necessary to reduce the dimensionality before identifying their genre. In this paper, a discriminant manifold learning method, named locally linear representation Fisher criterion (LLRFC), is applied to extract features from tumor gene expressive data. In LLRFC, an inter-class graph and an intra-class graph are constructed based on their genre information, where any tumor gene expressive data in the inter-class graph should select k nearest neighbors with different class labels and in the intra-class graph the k nearest neighbors for any tumor gene expressive data must be sampled from those with the same class. And then the locally least linear reconstruction is introduced to optimize the corresponding weights in both graphs. Moreover, a Fisher criterion is modeled to explore a low dimensional subspace where the reconstruction errors in the inter-class graph can be maximized and the reconstruction errors in the intra-class graph can be minimized, simultaneously. Experiments on some benchmark tumor gene expressive data have been conducted with some related algorithms, by which the proposed LLRFC has been validated to be efficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Promoter Hypermethylation in Tumors and Plasma of Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Young Ran; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Mi Jin; Gabrielson, Edward; Lee, Soo Jung; Hwang, Tae Yoon; Shin, Sei One

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To measure the hypermethylation of four genes in primary tumors and paired plasma samples to determine the feasibility of gene promoter hypermethylation markers for detecting breast cancer in the plasma. Materials and Methods DNA was extracted from the tumor tissues and peripheral blood plasma of 34 patients with invasive breast cancer, and the samples examined for aberrant hypermethylation in cyclin D2, retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ), twist and high in normal-1 (HIN-1) genes using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), and the results correlated with the clinicopathological parameters. Results Promoter hypermethylation was detected at high frequency in the primary tumors for cyclin D2 (53%), RARβ (56%), twist (41%) and HIN-1 (77%). Thirty-three of the 34 (97%) primary tumors displayed promoter hypermethylation in at least one of the genes examined. The corresponding plasma samples showed hyperme thylation of the same genes, although at lower frequencies (6% for cyclin D2, 16% for RARβ, 36% for twist, and 54% for HIN-1). Overall, 22 of the 33 (67%) primary tumors with hypermethylation of at least one of the four genes also had abnormally hypermethylated DNA in their matched plasma samples. No significant relationship was recognized between any of the clinical or pathological parameters (tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis, stage, or Ki-67 labeling index) with the frequency of hypermethylated DNA in the primary tumor or plasma. Conclusion The detection of aberrant promoter hypermethylation of cancer-related genes in the plasma may be a useful tool for the detection of breast cancer. PMID:19956520

  14. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) ...

  15. Radiation immunomodulatory gene tumor therapy of rats with intracerebral glioma tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bertil R R; Koch, Catrin Bauréus; Grafström, Gustav

    2010-01-01

    Single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 or 15 Gy (60)Co gamma radiation was combined with intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-transfected cells in rats with intracerebral N29 or N32 glioma tumors at days 7, 21 and 35 after inoculation. For intracerebral N29 tumors......, single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 or 15 Gy had no significant effect on the survival time. Immunization with IFN-gamma-transfected N29 cells significantly increased the survival time by 61%. Single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 Gy combined with immunization increased the survival time...... significantly by 87% and complete remissions by 75% while with 15 Gy the survival time increased 45% with 38% complete remissions. For intracerebral N32 tumors, single-fraction radiation therapy with 15 Gy increased the survival time significantly by 20%. Immunization by itself had no significant effect...

  16. Lapachol as an epithelial tumor inhibitor agent in Drosophila melanogaster heterozygote for tumor suppressor gene wts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, W F; Oliveira, A B; Nepomuceno, J C

    2011-12-22

    The search for new and effective antitumor agents with fewer cytotoxic side effects on normal tissue has increasingly become important. Lapachol, a natural organic compound isolated from the lapacho tree (Tabebuia avellandedae), is chemically identified as belonging to the naphthoquinone group and is known for its anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antibiotic properties, although there are questions about its effectiveness for treating neoplasic cells. We evaluated the antitumoral effects of lapachol by testing for clones of epithelial tumors in Drosophila melanogaster. Seventy-two-hour old larvae bred from wts/TM3, Sb(1) females and mwh/mwh males, were treated with different concentrations of lapachol (20, 40 and 60 μg/mL). Lapachol alone did not significantly increase the number of epithelial tumors. However, lapachol did significantly reduce the number of tumors provoked by doxorubicin.

  17. A mutation screening of oncogenes, tumor suppressor gene TP53 and nuclear encoded mitochondrial complex I genes in oncocytic thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Cecilia; de Biase, Dario; Kurelac, Ivana; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Caria, Paola; Vanni, Roberta; Romeo, Giovanni; Tallini, Giovanni; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Bonora, Elena

    2015-03-21

    Thyroid neoplasias with oncocytic features represent a specific phenotype in non-medullary thyroid cancer, reflecting the unique biological phenomenon of mitochondrial hyperplasia in the cytoplasm. Oncocytic thyroid cells are characterized by a prominent eosinophilia (or oxyphilia) caused by mitochondrial abundance. Although disruptive mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most significant hallmark of such tumors, oncocytomas may be envisioned as heterogeneous neoplasms, characterized by multiple nuclear and mitochondrial gene lesions. We investigated the nuclear mutational profile of oncocytic tumors to pinpoint the mutations that may trigger the early oncogenic hit. Total DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissues from 45 biopsies of oncocytic tumors. High-resolution melting was used for mutation screening of mitochondrial complex I subunits genes. Specific nuclear rearrangements were investigated by RT-PCR (RET/PTC) or on isolated nuclei by interphase FISH (PAX8/PPARγ). Recurrent point mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing. In our oncocytic tumor samples, we identified rare TP53 mutations. The series of analyzed cases did not include poorly- or undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas, and none of the TP53 mutated cases had significant mitotic activity or high-grade features. Thus, the presence of disruptive TP53 mutations was completely unexpected. In addition, novel mutations in nuclear-encoded complex I genes were identified. These findings suggest that nuclear genetic lesions altering the bioenergetics competence of thyroid cells may give rise to an aberrant mitochondria-centered compensatory mechanism and ultimately to the oncocytic phenotype.

  18. TFPI-2 is a putative tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shumin; Ma, Ning; Murata, Mariko; Huang, Guangwu; Zhang, Zhe; Xiao, Xue; Zhou, Xiaoying; Huang, Tingting; Du, Chunping; Yu, Nana; Mo, Yingxi; Lin, Longde; Zhang, Jinyan

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes play important roles in NPC tumorgenesis. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2), is a protease inhibitor. Recently, TFPI-2 was suggested to be a tumor suppressor gene involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis in some cancers. In this study, we investigated whether TFPI-2 was inactivated epigenetically in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Transcriptional expression levels of TFPI-2 was evaluated by RT-PCR. Methylation status were investigated by methylation specific PCR and bisulfate genomic sequencing. The role of TFPI-2 as a tumor suppressor gene in NPC was addressed by re-introducing TFPI-2 expression into the NPC cell line CNE2. TFPI-2 mRNA transcription was inactivated in NPC cell lines. TFPI-2 was aberrantly methylated in 66.7% (4/6) NPC cell lines and 88.6% (62/70) of NPC primary tumors, but not in normal nasopharyngeal epithelia. TFPI-2 expression could be restored in NPC cells after demethylation treatment. Ectopic expression of TFPI-2 in NPC cells induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation and cell migration. Epigenetic inactivation of TFPI-2 by promoter hypermethylation is a frequent and tumor specific event in NPC. TFPI-2 might be considering as a putative tumor suppressor gene in NPC

  19. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Choorapoikayil

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena+/−ptenb−/− or ptena−/−ptenb+/− are viable and fertile. ptena+/−ptenb−/− fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2% and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30. Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena+/−ptenb−/− and ptena−/−ptenb+/− fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena+/−ptenb−/− zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  20. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-03-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile. ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) fish develop tumors at a relatively high incidence (10.2%) and most tumors developed close to the eye (26/30). Histopathologically, the tumor masses were associated with the retrobulbar vascular network and diagnosed as hemangiosarcomas. A single tumor was identified in 42 ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish and was also diagnosed as hemangiosarcoma. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumor cells in ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) and ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-) fish proliferated rapidly and were of endothelial origin. Akt/PKB signaling was activated in the tumors, whereas Ptena was still detected in tumor tissue from ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) zebrafish. We conclude that haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding Pten predisposes to hemangiosarcoma in zebrafish.

  1. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT -1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Derived from WT1 Oncoprotein Induces T Cell Responses in Patients with Complete Remission from Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Blood 2010; 116(2):171... CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 19b

  2. Modulation and Expression of Tumor Suppressor Genes by Environmental Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Den Otter 1990). In a preliminary report (Windle et al. 1990), a transgenic mouse that develops intraocular neoplasms similar to human retinoblastoma...et al. 1974; McFall et al. 1978; Bogenmann and Mark 1983), and a very recent report of heritable ocular tumors in transgenic mice (Windle et al. 1990...additional pair of forceps (fine Halstead Mosquito hemostatic curved forceps 12.7 cm) were used to clamp off the retracted liver transversely just anterior to

  3. Prolactin gene expression in primary central nervous system tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendes Graziella Alebrant

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin (PRL is a hormone synthesized in both the pituitary gland and extrapituitary sites. It has been associated with the occurrence of neoplasms and, more recently, with central nervous system (CNS neoplasms. The aim of this study was to evaluate prolactin expression in primary central nervous system tumors through quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IH. Results Patient mean age was 49.1 years (SD 15.43, and females accounted for 70% of the sample. The most frequent subtype of histological tumor was meningioma (61.5%, followed by glioblastoma (22.9%. Twenty cases (28.6% showed prolactin expression by immunohistochemistry, most of them females (18 cases, 90%. Quantitative real-time PCR did not show any prolactin expression. Conclusions Despite the presence of prolactin expression by IH, the lack of its expression by quantitative real-time PCR indicates that its presence in primary tumors in CNS is not a reflex of local production.

  4. Oncogenic driver genes and the inflammatory microenvironment dictate liver tumor phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Matthias S; Marquardt, Jens U; Andersen, Jesper B; Quintavalle, Cristina; Korokhov, Nikolay; Stauffer, Jim K; Kaji, Kosuke; Decaens, Thomas; Quagliata, Luca; Elloumi, Fathi; Hoang, Tanya; Molinolo, Alfredo; Conner, Elizabeth A; Weber, Achim; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Factor, Valentina M; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hepatocellular carcinoma develops in the background of chronic liver inflammation caused by viral hepatitis and alcoholic or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. However, the impact of different types of chronic inflammatory microenvironments on the phenotypes of tumors generated by distinct oncogenes is largely unresolved. To address this issue, we generated murine liver tumors by constitutively active AKT-1 (AKT) and β-catenin (CAT), followed by induction of chronic liver inflammation by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) and carbon tetrachloride. Also, the impact of DDC-induced chronic liver inflammation was compared between two liver tumor models using a combination of AKT-CAT or AKT-NRAS(G12V) . Treatment with DDC and carbon tetrachloride significantly facilitated the adenoma-to-carcinoma conversion and accelerated the growth of AKT-CAT tumors. Furthermore, DDC treatment altered the morphology of AKT-CAT tumors and caused loss of lipid droplets. Transcriptome analysis of AKT-CAT tumors revealed that cellular growth and proliferation were mainly affected by chronic inflammation and caused up-regulation of Cxcl16, Galectin-3, and Nedd9, among others. Integration with transcriptome profiles from human hepatocellular carcinomas further demonstrated that AKT-CAT tumors generated in the context of chronic liver inflammation showed enrichment of poor prognosis gene sets or decrease of good prognosis gene sets. In contrast, DDC had a more subtle effect on AKT-NRAS(G12V) tumors and primarily enhanced already existent tumor characteristics as supported by transcriptome analysis. However, it also reduced lipid droplets in AKT-NRAS(G12V) tumors. Our study suggests that liver tumor phenotype is defined by a combination of driving oncogenes but also the nature of chronic liver inflammation. (Hepatology 2016;63:1888-1899). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government

  5. Mutational analysis of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in human parathyroid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Arnold, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Pollak, M.R.; Brown, E.M. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Despite recent progress, such as the identification of PRAD1/cyclin D1 as a parathyroid oncogene, it is likely that many genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of parathyroid tumors remain unknown. Individuals heterozygous for inherited mutations in the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene that reduce its biological activity exhibit a disorder termed familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia or familial benign hypercalcemia, which is characterized by reduced responsiveness of parathyroid and kidney to calcium and by PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Those who are homozygous for such mutations present with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and have marked parathroid hypercellularity. Thus, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene is a candidate parathyroid tumor suppressor gene, with inactivating mutations plausibly explaining set-point abnormalities in the regulation of both parathyroid cellular proliferation and PTH secretion by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} similar to those seen in hyperparathyroidism. Using a ribonuclease A protection assay that has detected multiple mutations in the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and covers more than 90% of its coding region, we sought somatic mutations in this gene in a total of 44 human parathyroid tumors (23 adenomas, 4 carcinomas, 5 primary hyperplasias, and 12 secondary hyperplasias). No such mutations were detected in these 44 tumors. Thus, our studies suggest that somatic mutation of the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene does not commonly contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic parathyroid tumors. As such, PTH set-point dysfunction in parathroid tumors may well be secondary to other clonal proliferative defects and/or mutations in other components of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing pathway. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Gene expression and hormone autonomy in radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study the molecular genetics of factor controlling plant cell growth, we have isolated a group of radiation-induced tumors from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tumors appeared on plants derived from 60 Co gamma-irradiated seed or seedlings, and are capable of hormone-autonomous growth in culture. We have used vertebrate oncogene probes to explore the hypothesis that the tumors arose by the radiation-induced activation of growth-regulating plant oncogenes. One probe, int-2, was used to isolate cDNA clones representing an mRNA differentially expressed between tumors and hormone-dependent callus tissue. The genomic organization and function of this and other differentially expressed Arabidopsis sequences are being further characterized. A second area of study concerns the hormonal status of individual tumors. Tumor tissue varies in color, texture, and degree of differentiation: while some tumors appear undifferentiated, one consistently produces roots, and others occasionally develop shoots or leaflets. The tumors have characteristic growth rates on hormone-free medium, and growth in response to exogenous hormones differs among the tumors themselves and from wild-type. Characterization of the relationships between hormonal status, morphogenesis, and gene expression should yield valuable insights into the mechanisms regulating plant growth and development

  7. [Sebaceous gland tumor with a rare gene mutation within a tumor syndrome: Muir-Torre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, E; Sommer, F; Geiger, K D; Pillunat, L E

    2014-04-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant subtype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma and is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of sebaceous gland neoplasms with visceral and urogenital malignancies. This article describes the case of a 72-year-old patient who was referred to our clinic for removal of an upper eyelid tumor, showing the course from the clinical findings to the rare diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome.

  8. Prediction of DNA methylation in the promoter of gene suppressor tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, Imane; Kasmi, Yassine; Allali, Karam; Ennaji, Moulay Mustapha

    2018-04-20

    The epigenetics methylation of cytosine is the most common epigenetic form in DNA sequences. It is highly concentrated in the promoter regions of the genes, leading to an inactivation of tumor suppressors regardless of their initial function. In this work, we aim to identify the highly methylated regions; the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) island located on the promoters and/or the first exon gene known for their key roles in the cell cycle, hence the need to study gene-gene interactions. The Frommer and hidden Markov model algorithms are used as computational methods to identify CpG islands with specificity and sensitivity up to 76% and 80%, respectively. The results obtained show, on the one hand, that the genes studied are suspected of developing hypermethylation in the promoter region of the gene involved in the case of a cancer. We then showed that the relative richness in CG results from a high level of methylation. On the other hand, we observe that the gene-gene interaction exhibits co-expression between the chosen genes. This let us to conclude that the hidden Markov model algorithm predicts more specific and valuable information about the hypermethylation in gene as a preventive and diagnostics tools for the personalized medicine; as that the tumor-suppresser-genes have relative co-expression and complementary relations which the hypermethylation affect in the samples studied in our work. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Tumor Restrictive Suicide Gene Therapy for Glioma Controlled by the FOS Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqing Pan

    Full Text Available Effective suicide gene delivery and expression are crucial to achieving successful effects in gene therapy. An ideal tumor-specific promoter expresses therapeutic genes in tumor cells with minimal normal tissue expression. We compared the activity of the FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog promoter with five alternative tumor-specific promoters in glioma cells and non-malignant astrocytes. The FOS promoter caused significantly higher transcriptional activity in glioma cell lines than all alternative promoters with the exception of CMV. The FOS promoter showed 13.9%, 32.4%, and 70.8% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in three glioma cell lines (U87, U251, and U373. Importantly, however, the FOS promoter showed only 1.6% of the transcriptional activity of CMV in normal astrocytes. We also tested the biologic activity of recombinant adenovirus containing the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk driven by the FOS promoter, including selective killing efficacy in vitro and tumor inhibition rate in vivo. Adenoviral-mediated delivery of the HSV-tk gene controlled by the FOS promoter conferred a cytotoxic effect on human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that use of the FOS-tk adenovirus system is a promising strategy for glioma-specific gene therapy but still much left for improvement.

  10. Tumor suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M.; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E.; Cleary, John P.; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Hess, Julian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S.; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X chromosome (chrX) genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative “Escape from X-Inactivation Tumor Suppressor” (EXITS) genes, we compared somatic alterations from >4100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) chrX genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) more frequently harbored loss-of-function mutations in males (based on false discovery rate <0.1), compared to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (P<0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence compared to males across a variety of tumor types. PMID:27869828

  11. Tumor-suppressor genes that escape from X-inactivation contribute to cancer sex bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunford, Andrew; Weinstock, David M; Savova, Virginia; Schumacher, Steven E; Cleary, John P; Yoda, Akinori; Sullivan, Timothy J; Hess, Julian M; Gimelbrant, Alexander A; Beroukhim, Rameen; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Lane, Andrew A

    2017-01-01

    There is a striking and unexplained male predominance across many cancer types. A subset of X-chromosome genes can escape X-inactivation, which would protect females from complete functional loss by a single mutation. To identify putative 'escape from X-inactivation tumor-suppressor' (EXITS) genes, we examined somatic alterations from >4,100 cancers across 21 tumor types for sex bias. Six of 783 non-pseudoautosomal region (PAR) X-chromosome genes (ATRX, CNKSR2, DDX3X, KDM5C, KDM6A, and MAGEC3) harbored loss-of-function mutations more frequently in males (based on a false discovery rate < 0.1), in comparison to zero of 18,055 autosomal and PAR genes (Fisher's exact P < 0.0001). Male-biased mutations in genes that escape X-inactivation were observed in combined analysis across many cancers and in several individual tumor types, suggesting a generalized phenomenon. We conclude that biallelic expression of EXITS genes in females explains a portion of the reduced cancer incidence in females as compared to males across a variety of tumor types.

  12. Mutations in the hedgehog pathway genes SMO and PTCH1 in human gastric tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-De Wang

    Full Text Available The causal role of the hedgehog pathway in cancer has been best documented in basal cell carcinoma of the skin. To assess potential DNA alterations of the hedgehog pathway in gastric cancer, we sequenced SMO and PTCH1 genes in a set of 39 gastric tumors. Tumors were classified by histology based on the Lauren classification and Sanger sequencing was performed to obtain full length coding sequences. Genomic instability was evident in these tumors as a number of silent or missense mutations were found. In addition to those that are potential germline polymorphisms, we found three SMO missense mutations, and one PTCH1 frameshift mutation that are novel and have not been documented in basal cell carcinoma. Mutations were found in both intestinal and diffuse type gastric tumors as well as in tumors that exhibit both intestinal and diffuse features. mRNA expression of hedgehog pathway genes was also examined and their levels do not indicate unequivocal higher pathway activity in tumors with mutations than those without. In summary, SMO and/or PTCH1 mutations are present at low frequency in different histologic subtypes of gastric tumors and these do not appear to be driver mutations.

  13. Profiling of oligosaccharides and p53 gene mutation in Filipino breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deocaris, Custer C.; De Vera, Azucena C.; Magno, Jose Donato A.; Cruz, Michael Joseph B.; Prodigalidad, Abelardo-Alan T.; Jacinto, Sonia D.

    2010-01-01

    Majority of patients are diagnosed with benign tumors, however, such benign tumors can progress to an invasive disease. Since carbohydrate-mediated cell-cell adhesion and proliferative potential play crucial roles in tumorigenesis and tumor aggressive behavior, we analyzed the qualitative changes in oligosaccharide expression and analyzed for presence of mutation in the tumor suppressor p53 gene, the most mutated gene in all human cancers. Forty-three (43) breast tumors were screened for p53 mutation in exons 2-11 using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplification coupled to temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE). Paraffin-embedded tissues were stained with biotinylated-glycoproteins containing the following sugar groups: mannose (Man), lactose (Lac), fucoidan (Fuc), N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNac), N-acetyl-b-galactosamine (GalNAc) and hyaluronic acid (Hya). Expression of carbohydrate receptors was significantly elevated (p=0.003) in malignant compared with benign tumors, particularly at receptors for GalNAc, lac and Fuc. No change in overall glycan signatures using our panel of neoglycoconjugates was noted when grouped according to p53 mutation status in both benign and malignant cases. Although the prognostic value of carbohydrate-receptors in breast cancer has not been validated to date, our results indicate that benign and malignant tumors can be defined by their affinities to our battery of neoglyconjugates. However, result from our reverse lectin histochemistry failed to correlated glycan signature with presence of p53 mutations. (author)

  14. Effect of surgical procedures on prostate tumor gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Yin, Chang-Jun; Pavlovich, Christian; Luo, Jun; Getzenberg, Robert; Zhang, Wei

    2012-09-01

    Current surgical treatment of prostate cancer is typically accomplished by either open radical prostatectomy (ORP) or robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP). Intra-operative procedural differences between the two surgical approaches may alter the molecular composition of resected surgical specimens, which are indispensable for molecular analysis and biomarker evaluation. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of different surgical procedures on RNA quality and genome-wide expression signature. RNA integrity number (RIN) values were compared between total RNA samples extracted from consecutive LRP (n=11) and ORP (n=24) prostate specimens. Expression profiling was performed using the Agilent human whole-genome expression microarrays. Expression differences by surgical type were analyzed by Volcano plot analysis and gene ontology analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used for expression validation in an independent set of LRP (n=8) and ORP (n=8) samples. The LRP procedure did not compromise RNA integrity. Differential gene expression by surgery types was limited to a small subset of genes, the number of which was smaller than that expected by chance. Unexpectedly, this small subset of differentially expressed genes was enriched for those encoding transcription factors, oxygen transporters and other previously reported surgery-induced stress-response genes, and demonstrated unidirectional reduction in LRP specimens in comparison to ORP specimens. The effect of the LRP procedure on RNA quality and genome-wide transcript levels is negligible, supporting the suitability of LRP surgical specimens for routine molecular analysis. Blunted in vivo stress response in LRP specimens, likely mediated by CO(2) insufflation but not by longer ischemia time, is manifested in the reduced expression of stress-response genes in these specimens.

  15. Differences in gene expression between sonoporation in tumor and in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kun-Che; Liao, Zhe-Kang; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Lin, Win-Li; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Hwang, Lih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2009-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a novel and effective tool for the local delivery of genes into target tissues. US can temporarily change the permeability of a cell membrane and thus enhance the delivery of naked DNA into cells. In the present study, the efficiencies of gene expression mediated by US delivery in orthotopic liver tumor, subcutaneous tumor and muscle tissue were evaluated by changing the contrast agent concentrations and US exposure durations. Plasmid DNA coding for luciferase, interleukin-12 or enhanced green fluorescence protein was mixed with SonoVue and injected intratumorally or intramuscularly. The injection sites were then exposed to US (20% duty cycle and 0.4 W/cm(2) intensity). The results obtained showed that the optimal condition was 50% SonoVue for tumors and 30% for muscle, with 10 min of US exposure. The expression levels of the transfected DNAs were in the order: muscle > subcutaneous tumor > orthotopic liver tumor. The present study indicates that muscle tissue is a good target site for producing large amounts of gene products for the purpose of gene therapy.

  16. Mutational hotspots in the TP53 gene and, possibly, other tumor suppressors evolve by positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation spectra of the TP53 gene and other tumor suppressors contain multiple hotspots, i.e., sites of non-random, frequent mutation in tumors and/or the germline. The origin of the hotspots remains unclear, the general view being that they represent highly mutable nucleotide contexts which likely reflect effects of different endogenous and exogenous factors shaping the mutation process in specific tissues. The origin of hotspots is of major importance because it has been suggested that mutable contexts could be used to infer mechanisms of mutagenesis contributing to tumorigenesis. Results Here we apply three independent tests, accounting for non-uniform base compositions in synonymous and non-synonymous sites, to test whether the hotspots emerge via selection or due to mutational bias. All three tests consistently indicate that the hotspots in the TP53 gene evolve, primarily, via positive selection. The results were robust to the elimination of the highly mutable CpG dinucleotides. By contrast, only one, the least conservative test reveals the signature of positive selection in BRCA1, BRCA2, and p16. Elucidation of the origin of the hotspots in these genes requires more data on somatic mutations in tumors. Conclusion The results of this analysis seem to indicate that positive selection for gain-of-function in tumor suppressor genes is an important aspect of tumorigenesis, blurring the distinction between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sandor Pongor, Christopher Lee and Mikhail Blagosklonny.

  17. Hypermethylation Of The Tumor Suppressor RASSF1A Gene In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among females. There is a critical need for improved molecular biomarkers that are diagnostic, prognostic and also capable of predicting the progression of benign high-risk lesions to invasive carcinoma. RAS association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) gene, is a biologically ...

  18. Bioinformatic screening of human ESTs for differentially expressed genes in normal and tumor tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouchiroud Dominique

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the explosion of information generated by human genomics, analysis of publicly available databases can help identify potential candidate genes relevant to the cancerous phenotype. The aim of this study was to scan for such genes by whole-genome in silico subtraction using Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Methods Genes differentially expressed in normal versus tumor tissues were identified using a computer-based differential display strategy. Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, was selected for confirmation by western blot analysis. Results Our genome-wide expression analysis identified a set of genes whose differential expression may be attributed to the genetic alterations associated with tumor formation and malignant growth. We propose complete lists of genes that may serve as targets for projects seeking novel candidates for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Our validation result showed increased protein levels of Bcl-xL in two different liver cancer specimens compared to normal liver. Notably, our EST-based data mining procedure indicated that most of the changes in gene expression observed in cancer cells corresponded to gene inactivation patterns. Chromosomes and chromosomal regions most frequently associated with aberrant expression changes in cancer libraries were also determined. Conclusion Through the description of several candidates (including genes encoding extracellular matrix and ribosomal components, cytoskeletal proteins, apoptotic regulators, and novel tissue-specific biomarkers, our study illustrates the utility of in silico transcriptomics to identify tumor cell signatures, tumor-related genes and chromosomal regions frequently associated with aberrant expression in cancer.

  19. A Patient With Desmoid Tumors and Familial FAP Having Frame Shift Mutation of the APC Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanambar Sadighi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Desmoids tumors, characterized by monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblasts, could occur in 5-10% of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP as an extra-colonic manifestation of the disease. FAP can develop when there is a germ-line mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene. Although mild or attenuated FAP may follow mutations in 5΄ extreme of the gene, it is more likely that 3΄ extreme mutations haveamore severe manifestation of thedisease. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran with an abdominal painful mass. She had strong family history of FAP and underwent prophylactic total colectomy. Pre-operative CT scans revealed a large mass. Microscopic observation showed diffuse fibroblast cell infiltration of the adjacent tissue structures. Peripheral blood DNA extraction followed by adenomatous polyposis coli gene exon by exon sequencing was performed to investigate the mutation in adenomatous polyposis coli gene. Analysis of DNA sequencing demonstrated a mutation of 4 bpdeletions at codon 1309-1310 of the exon 16 of adenomatous polyposis coli gene sequence which was repeated in 3 members of the family. Some of them had desmoid tumor without classical FAP history. Even when there is no familial history of adenomatous polyposis, the adenomatous polyposis coli gene mutation should be investigated in cases of familial desmoids tumors for a suitable prevention. The 3΄ extreme of the adenomatous polyposis coli gene is still the best likely location in such families.

  20. Implementation of plaid model biclustering method on microarray of carcinoma and adenoma tumor gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaneswari, Gianinna; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    A Tumor is an abnormal growth of cells that serves no purpose. Carcinoma is a tumor that grows from the top of the cell membrane and the organ adenoma is a benign tumor of the gland-like cells or epithelial tissue. In the field of molecular biology, the development of microarray technology is used in the data store of disease genetic expression. For each of microarray gene, an amount of information is stored for each trait or condition. In gene expression data clustering can be done with a bicluster algorithm, thats clustering method which not only the objects to be clustered, but also the properties or condition of the object. This research proposed Plaid Model Biclustering as one of biclustering method. In this study, we discuss the implementation of Plaid Model Biclustering Method on microarray of Carcinoma and Adenoma tumor gene expression data. From the experimental results, we found three biclusters are formed by Carcinoma gene expression data and four biclusters are formed by Adenoma gene expression data.

  1. Quantitative gene-expression of the tumor angiogenesis markers vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin alphaV and integrin beta3 in human neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxboel, Jytte; Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    compared to both colorectal liver metastases (p=0.10) and normal liver tissue (p=0.06). In neuroendocrine tumors, gene-expression was highly variable of VEGF (530-fold), integrin alphaV (23-fold) and integrin beta3 (106-fold). Quantitative gene-expression levels of the key angiogenesis molecules VEGF......, in neuroendocrine tumors. We used quantitative real-time PCR for measuring mRNA gene-expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), integrin alphaV, and integrin beta3, and CD34 for a group of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (n=13). Tissue from patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (n=14......) and normal liver tissues (n=16) was used as control. We found a lower mRNA level of VEGF in neuroendocrine tumors compared to both colorectal liver metastases (pbeta3 there was also a borderline significant lower level of mRNA in neuroendocrine tumors...

  2. Co-administration of α-GalCer analog and TLR4 agonist induces robust CD8(+) T-cell responses to PyCS protein and WT-1 antigen and activates memory-like effector NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana G; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Pereira, Felipe V; Funakoshi, Ryota; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the combined adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, a potent α-GalCer-analog, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4 agonist, on the induction of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T-cell responses and protective immunity was evaluated. Mice were immunized with peptides corresponding to the CD8(+) T-cell epitopes of a malaria antigen, a circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium yoelii, and a tumor antigen, a Wilms Tumor antigen-1 (WT-1), together with 7DW8-5 and MPLA, as an adjuvant. These immunization regimens were able to induce higher levels of CD8(+) T-cell responses and, ultimately, enhanced levels of protection against malaria and tumor challenges compared to the levels induced by immunization with peptides mixed with 7DW8-5 or MPLA alone. Co-administration of 7DW8-5 and MPLA induces activation of memory-like effector natural killer T (NKT) cells, i.e. CD44(+)CD62L(-)NKT cells. Our study indicates that 7DW8-5 greatly enhances important synergistic pathways associated to memory immune responses when co-administered with MPLA, thus rendering this combination of adjuvants a novel vaccine adjuvant formulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-administration of α-GalCer analog and TLR4 agonist induces robust CD8+ T-cell responses to PyCS protein and WT-1 antigen and activates memory-like effector NKT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Pereira, Felipe V.; Funakoshi, Ryota; Nakajima, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Haruo; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the combined adjuvant effect of 7DW8-5, a potent α-GalCer-analog, and monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4 agonist, on the induction of vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses and protective immunity was evaluated. Mice were immunized with peptides corresponding to the CD8+ T-cell epitopes of a malaria antigen, a circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium yoelii, and a tumor antigen, a Wilms Tumor antigen-1 (WT-1), together with 7DW8-5 and MPLA, as an adjuvant. These immunization regimens were able to induce higher levels of CD8+ T-cell responses and, ultimately, enhanced levels of protection against malaria and tumor challenges compared to the levels induced by immunization with peptides mixed with 7DW8-5 or MPLA alone. Co-administration of 7DW8-5 and MPLA induces activation of memory-like effector natural killer T (NKT) cells, i.e. CD44+CD62L−NKT cells. Our study indicates that 7DW8-5 greatly enhances important synergistic pathways associated to memory immune responses when co-administered with MPLA, thus rendering this combination of adjuvants a novel vaccine adjuvant formulation. PMID:27132023

  4. Indications for a tumor suppressor gene at 22q11 involved in the pathogenesis of ependymal tumors and distinct from hSNF5/INI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J A; de Millas, W; Sörensen, N; Herbold, C; Schichor, C; Tonn, J C; Wiestler, O D; von Deimling, A; Pietsch, T

    2001-07-01

    Ependymomas account for approximately 9% of all neuroepithelial tumors and represent the most frequent neuroepithelial tumors of the spinal cord. In adults, allelic loss of chromosome arm 22q occurs in up to 60% of the cases studied. Some of these tumors show an altered neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene; in others, NF2 appears to be unaffected, indicating the involvement of another tumor suppressor gene. Recently, the tumor suppressor gene hSNF5/INI1, located on 22q11.23, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of renal and extrarenal rhabdoid tumors. In addition, this gene may be responsible for a new hereditary syndrome predisposing to a variety of tumors designated "rhabdoid predisposition syndrome." In the present study, we analyzed a series of 53 ependymal tumors of 48 patients [4 myxopapillary ependymomas (WHO grade I), 3 subependymomas (WHO grade I), 18 ependymomas (WHO grade II), 21 anaplastic ependymomas (WHO grade III) and 2 ependymoblastomas (WHO grade IV)] for mutations and homozygous deletions in the coding region of the hSNF5/INI1 gene and for allelic loss of its flanking chromosomal regions in 39 ependymal tumors of 35 patients. Allelic loss was detected in 11 of 35 informative primary ependymal tumors (31%) with a common region of overlap covered by the markers D22S257 and D22S310 on 22q11 including the marker D22S301. However, a detailed molecular analysis of 53 ependymal tumors for mutations and homozygous deletion of the hSNF5/INI1 gene revealed no alterations. We conclude that the hSNF5/INI1 gene is not involved in the pathogenesis of human ependymal tumors with allelic loss on chromosome arm 22q and an intact NF2 locus. In addition, our study localizes a putative ependymoma tumor suppressor gene(s) to a domain of chromosome arm 22q flanked by the microsatellite markers D22S257 and D22S310.

  5. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  6. Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of Multimodality Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    support: Department of Defense, National Cancer Institute, Meso Foundation MSK has licensed patents on this vaccine. DAS is an inventor on the...vaccine patents and receives research funding and consulting fees from SELLAS Life Sciences Group. Disclosures 3 WT1 is ranked as #1 cancer...N % N % Age, years Median (range) 68 (34-84) 70 (34-84) 67 (48-79) Gender Male Female 35 6 85 15 17 3 85 15 18 3 86 14

  7. The Multi-Purpose Tool of Tumor Immunotherapy: Gene-Engineered T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zeming; Du, Peixin; Wang, Guoping; Wang, Yongsheng

    2017-01-01

    A detailed summary of the published clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-T) and TCR-transduced T cells (TCR-T) was constructed to understand the development trend of adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). In contrast to TCR-T, the number of CAR-T clinical trials has increased dramatically in China in the last three years. The ACT seems to be very prosperous. But, the multidimensional interaction of tumor, tumor associated antigen (TAA) and normal tissue exacerbates the uncontrolled outcome of T cells gene therapy. It reminds us the importance that optimizing treatment security to prevent the fatal serious adverse events. How to balance the safety and effectiveness of the ACT? At least six measures can potentially optimize the safety of ACT. At the same time, with the application of gene editing techniques, more endogenous receptors are disrupted while more exogenous receptors are expressed on T cells. As a multi-purpose tool of tumor immunotherapy, gene-engineered T cells (GE-T) have been given different functional weapons. A network which is likely to link radiation therapy, tumor vaccines, CAR-T and TCR-T is being built. Moreover, more and more evidences indicated that the combination of the ACT and other therapies would further enhance the anti-tumor capacity of the GE-T.

  8. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  9. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies extracellular matrix gene expression by pancreatic circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David T; Wittner, Ben S; Ligorio, Matteo; Vincent Jordan, Nicole; Shah, Ajay M; Miyamoto, David T; Aceto, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Brannigan, Brian W; Xega, Kristina; Ciciliano, Jordan C; Zhu, Huili; MacKenzie, Olivia C; Trautwein, Julie; Arora, Kshitij S; Shahid, Mohammad; Ellis, Haley L; Qu, Na; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Rivera, Miguel N; Deshpande, Vikram; Ferrone, Cristina R; Kapur, Ravi; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A

    2014-09-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation of SHOX2 Gene Amplification and DNA Methylation in Lung Cancer Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Katja U; Liebenberg, Volker; Kneip, Christoph; Seegebarth, Anke; Erdogan, Fikret; Rappold, Gudrun; Schmidt, Bernd; Dietrich, Dimo; Fleischhacker, Michael; Leschber, Gunda; Merk, Johannes; Schäper, Frank; Stapert, Henk R; Vossenaar, Erik R; Weickmann, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    DNA methylation in the SHOX2 locus was previously used to reliably detect lung cancer in a group of critical controls, including 'cytologically negative' samples with no visible tumor cell content, at a high specificity based on the analysis of bronchial lavage samples. This study aimed to investigate, if the methylation correlates with SHOX2 gene expression and/or copy number alterations. An amplification of the SHOX2 gene locus together with the observed tumor-specific hypermethylation might explain the good performance of this marker in bronchial lavage samples. SHOX2 expression, gene copy number and DNA methylation were determined in lung tumor tissues and matched morphologically normal adjacent tissues (NAT) from 55 lung cancer patients. Quantitative HeavyMethyl (HM) real-time PCR was used to detect SHOX2 DNA methylation levels. SHOX2 expression was assayed with quantitative real-time PCR, and copy numbers alterations were measured with conventional real-time PCR and array CGH. A hypermethylation of the SHOX2 locus in tumor tissue as compared to the matched NAT from the same patient was detected in 96% of tumors from a group of 55 lung cancer patients. This correlated highly significantly with the frequent occurrence of copy number amplification (p < 0.0001), while the expression of the SHOX2 gene showed no difference. Frequent gene amplification correlated with hypermethylation of the SHOX2 gene locus. This concerted effect qualifies SHOX2 DNA methylation as a biomarker for lung cancer diagnosis, especially when sensitive detection is needed, i.e. in bronchial lavage or blood samples

  11. Gene expression analysis of matched ovarian primary tumors and peritoneal metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Joel A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer due to late diagnosis at advanced stage with major peritoneal involvement. To date most research has focused on primary tumor. However the prognosis is directly related to residual disease at the end of the treatment. Therefore it is mandatory to focus and study the biology of meatastatic disease that is most frequently localized to the peritoneal caivty in ovarian cancer. Methods We used high-density gene expression arrays to investigate gene expression changes between matched primary and metastatic (peritoneal lesions. Results Here we show that gene expression profiles in peritoneal metastasis are significantly different than their matched primary tumor and these changes are affected by underlying copy number variation differences among other causes. We show that differentially expressed genes are enriched in specific pathways including JAK/STAT pathway, cytokine signaling and other immune related pathways. We show that underlying copy number variations significantly affect gene expression. Indeed patients with important differences in copy number variation displayed greater gene expression differences between their primary and matched metastatic lesions. Conclusions Our analysis shows a very specific targeting at both the genomic and transcriptomic level to upregulate certain pathways in the peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer. Moreover, while primary tumors use certain pathways we identify distinct differences with metastatic lesions. The variation between primary and metastatic lesions should be considered in personalized treatment of ovarian cancer.

  12. Tumoral tissue specific promoter hypermethylation of distinct tumor suppressor genes in a case with non--small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Sulhattin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human.

  13. Expression of iron-related genes in human brain and brain tumors

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    Britton Robert S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defective iron homeostasis may be involved in the development of some diseases within the central nervous system. Although the expression of genes involved in normal iron balance has been intensively studied in other tissues, little is known about their expression in the brain. We investigated the mRNA levels of hepcidin (HAMP, HFE, neogenin (NEO1, transferrin receptor 1 (TFRC, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2, and hemojuvelin (HFE2 in normal human brain, brain tumors, and astrocytoma cell lines. The specimens included 5 normal brain tissue samples, 4 meningiomas, one medulloblastoma, 3 oligodendrocytic gliomas, 2 oligoastrocytic gliomas, 8 astrocytic gliomas, and 3 astrocytoma cell lines. Results Except for hemojuvelin, all genes studied had detectable levels of mRNA. In most tumor types, the pattern of gene expression was diverse. Notable findings include high expression of transferrin receptor 1 in the hippocampus and medulla oblongata compared to other brain regions, low expression of HFE in normal brain with elevated HFE expression in meningiomas, and absence of hepcidin mRNA in astrocytoma cell lines despite expression in normal brain and tumor specimens. Conclusion These results indicate that several iron-related genes are expressed in normal brain, and that their expression may be dysregulated in brain tumors.

  14. Molecular characterization of the porcine deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 gene (DMBT1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Bianca; Humphray, Sean J; Lyer, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The human gene deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) is considered to play a role in tumorigenesis and pathogen defense. It encodes a protein with multiple scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, which are involved in recognition and binding of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens...

  15. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choorapoikayil, S.; Kuiper, R.V.; de Bruin, A.; den Hertog, J.

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/-)ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile.

  16. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Alders, M.; Redeker, B.; Bliek, J.; Steenman, M.; Wiesmeyer, C.; de Meulemeester, M.; Ryan, A.; Kalikin, L.; Voûte, T.; de Kraker, J.; Hoovers, J.; Slater, R.; Feinberg, A.; Little, P.; Westerveld, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated

  17. Analyses of tumor-suppressor genes in germline mouse models of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingqiang; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes are critical regulators of growth and functioning of cells, whose loss of function contributes to tumorigenesis. Accordingly, analyses of the consequences of their loss of function in genetically engineered mouse models have provided important insights into mechanisms of human cancer, as well as resources for preclinical analyses and biomarker discovery. Nowadays, most investigations of genetically engineered mouse models of tumor-suppressor function use conditional or inducible alleles, which enable analyses in specific cancer (tissue) types and overcome the consequences of embryonic lethality of germline loss of function of essential tumor-suppressor genes. However, historically, analyses of genetically engineered mouse models based on germline loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes were very important as these early studies established the principle that loss of function could be studied in mouse cancer models and also enabled analyses of these essential genes in an organismal context. Although the cancer phenotypes of these early germline models did not always recapitulate the expected phenotypes in human cancer, these models provided the essential foundation for the more sophisticated conditional and inducible models that are currently in use. Here, we describe these "first-generation" germline models of loss of function models, focusing on the important lessons learned from their analyses, which helped in the design and analyses of "next-generation" genetically engineered mouse models. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Tumor suppressor gene-based nanotherapy: from test tube to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Manish; Jin, Jiankang; Branch, Cynthia D; Miyamoto, Shinya; Grimm, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jack A; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  19. Tumor Suppressor Gene-Based Nanotherapy: From Test Tube to the Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Shanker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a major health problem in the world. Advances made in cancer therapy have improved the survival of patients in certain types of cancer. However, the overall five-year survival has not significantly improved in the majority of cancer types. Major challenges encountered in having effective cancer therapy are development of drug resistance by the tumor cells, nonspecific cytotoxicity, and inability to affect metastatic tumors by the chemodrugs. Overcoming these challenges requires development and testing of novel therapies. One attractive cancer therapeutic approach is cancer gene therapy. Several laboratories including the authors' laboratory have been investigating nonviral formulations for delivering therapeutic genes as a mode for effective cancer therapy. In this paper the authors will summarize their experience in the development and testing of a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier formulation and the results from their preclinical studies leading to a Phase I clinical trial for nonsmall cell lung cancer. Their nanocarrier formulation containing therapeutic genes such as tumor suppressor genes when administered intravenously effectively controls metastatic tumor growth. Additional Phase I clinical trials based on the results of their nanocarrier formulation have been initiated or proposed for treatment of cancer of the breast, ovary, pancreas, and metastatic melanoma, and will be discussed.

  20. Molecular Biology In Young Women With Breast Cancer: From Tumor Gene Expression To DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Flores-Ramos, Liliana; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Peña-Curiel, Omar; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Young women with breast cancer (YWBC) represent roughly 15% of breast cancer (BC) cases in Latin America and other developing regions. Breast tumors occurring at an early age are more aggressive and have an overall worse prognosis compared to breast tumors in postmenopausal women. The expression of relevant proliferation biomarkers such as endocrine receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 appears to be unique in YWBC. Moreover, histopathological, molecular, genetic, and genomic studies have shown that YWBC exhibit a higher frequency of aggressive subtypes, differential tumor gene expression, increased genetic susceptibility, and specific genomic signatures, compared to older women with BC. This article reviews the current knowledge on tumor biology and genomic signatures in YWBC.

  1. Mutations in Exons 9 and 13 of KIT Gene Are Rare Events in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Jerzy; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Rys, Janusz; Kordek, Radzislaw; Nassar, Aziza; Sobin, Leslie H.; Miettinen, Markku

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, typically express the KIT protein. Activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 11) of the c-kit gene have been shown in a subset of GISTs. These mutations lead into ligand-independent activation of the tyrosine kinase of c-kit, and have a transforming effect in vitro. Several groups have studied the clinical implication of the c-kit mutation status of exon 11 in GISTs and a possible relationship between c-kit mutations and malignant behavior has been established. Recently, a 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and missense mutations, 1945A>G in exon 13 of the c-kit gene were reported. The frequency and clinical importance of these findings are unknown. In this study we evaluated 200 GISTs for the presence of mutations in exons 9 and 13 of c-kit. Six cases revealed 1530ins6 mutation in exon 9 and two cases 1945A>G mutation in exon 13. All tumors with mutations in exon 9 and 13 lacked mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. None of the analyzed tumors had more than one type of c-kit mutation. All but one of the eight tumors with mutations in exon 9 or 13 of the c-kit gene were histologically and clinically malignant. All four of six cases with exon 9 mutation of which location of primary tumor was known, were small intestinal, suggesting that this type of mutation could preferentially occur in small intestinal tumors. Exon 9 and 13 mutations seem to be rare, and they cover only a small portion (8%) of the balance of GISTs that do not have mutations in exon 11 of c-kit. This finding indicates that other genetic alterations may activate c-kit in GISTs, or that KIT is not activated by mutations in all cases. PMID:11021812

  2. IL4-induced gene 1 promotes tumor growth by shaping the immune microenvironment in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bod, Lloyd; Lengagne, Renée; Wrobel, Ludovic; Ramspott, Jan Philipp; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Castellano, Flavia; Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2017-01-01

    Amino acid catabolizing enzymes emerged as a crucial mechanism used by tumors to dampen immune responses. The L-phenylalanine oxidase IL-4 induced gene 1 (IL4I1) is expressed by tumor-associated myeloid cells of most solid tumors, including melanoma. We previously provided the only evidence that IL4I1 accelerates tumor growth by limiting the CD8 + T cell mediated immune response, in a mouse model of melanoma cell transplantation. Here, we explored the role of IL4I1 in Ret mice, a spontaneous model of melanoma. We found that IL4I1 was expressed by CD11b + myeloid cells and that its activity correlated with disease aggressiveness. IL4I1 did not enhance tumor cell proliferation or angiogenesis, but orchestrated the remodeling of the immune compartment within the primary tumor. Indeed, the inactivation of IL4I1 limited the recruitment of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells and enhanced the infiltration by Th1 and cytotoxic T cells, thus delaying tumor development and metastatic dissemination. Accordingly, human primary melanomas that were poorly infiltrated by IL4I1 + cells exhibited a higher density of CD8 + T cells. Collectively, our findings strengthen the rationale for therapeutic targeting of IL4I1 as one of the key immune regulators.

  3. Baculovirus-based gene silencing of Humanin for the treatment of pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardo, María Florencia; Pidre, Matías L; Zuccato, Camila; Asad, Antonela S; Imsen, Mercedes; Jaita, Gabriela; Candolfi, Marianela; Romanowski, Víctor; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2018-02-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Humanin (HN) and Rattin (HNr), a rat homolog of HN, are short peptides with a cytoprotective action. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether endogenous HNr plays an antiapoptotic role in pituitary tumor cells. Thus, we used RNA interference based on short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeted to HNr (shHNr). A plasmid including the coding sequences for shHNr and dTomato fluorescent reporter gene was developed (pUC-shHNr). Transfection of somatolactotrope GH3 cells with pUC-shHNr increased apoptosis, suggesting that endogenous HNr plays a cytoprotective role in pituitary tumor cells. In order to evaluate the effect of blockade of endogenous HNr expression in vivo, we constructed a recombinant baculovirus (BV) encoding shHNr (BV-shHNr). In vitro, BV-shRNA was capable of transducing more than 80% of GH3 cells and decreased HNr mRNA. Also, BV-shHNr increased apoptosis in transduced GH3 cells. Intratumor injection of BV-shHNr to nude mice bearing s.c. GH3 tumors increased the number of apoptotic cells, delayed tumor growth and enhanced survival rate, suggesting that endogenous HNr may be involved in pituitary tumor progression. These preclinical data suggests that the silencing of HN expression could have a therapeutic impact on the treatment of pituitary tumors.

  4. Hypomethylation and Aberrant Expression of the Glioma Pathogenesis-Related 1 Gene in Wilms Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Chilukamarri

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumors (WTs have a complex etiology, displaying genetic and epigenetic changes, including loss of imprinting (LOI and tumor suppressor gene silencing. To identify new regions of epigenetic perturbation in WTs, we screened kidney and tumor DNA using CpG island (CGI tags associated with cancer-specific DNA methylation changes. One such tag corresponded to a paralog of the glioma pathogenesis-related 1/related to testis-specific, vespid, and pathogenesis proteins 1 (GLIPR1/RTVP-1 gene, previously reported to be a tumor-suppressor gene silenced by hypermethylation in prostate cancer. Here we report methylation analysis of the GLIPR1/RTVP-1 gene in WTs and normal fetal and pediatric kidneys. Hypomethylation of the GLIPR1/RTVP-1 5'-region in WTs relative to normal tissue is observed in 21/24 (87.5% of WTs analyzed. Quantitative analysis of GLIPR1/RTVP-1 expression in 24 WTs showed elevated transcript levels in 16/24 WTs (67%, with 12 WTs displaying in excess of 20-fold overexpression relative to fetal kidney (FK control samples. Immunohistochemical analysis of FK and WT corroborates the RNA expression data and reveals high GLIPR1/RTVP-1 in WT blastemal cells together with variable levels in stromal and epithelial components. Hypomethylation is also evident in the WT precursor lesions and nephrogenic rests (NRs, supporting a role for GLIPR1/RTVP-1 deregulation early in Wilms tumorigenesis. Our data show that, in addition to gene dosage changes arising from LOI and hypermethylation-induced gene silencing, gene activation resulting from hypomethylation is also prevalent in WTs.

  5. Retrospective mutational analysis of NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 and LAMB2 in children with steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis – a single-centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bińczak-Kuleta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 and LAMB2 mutations, previously reported in two thirds of patients with nephrotic syndrome with onset before the age of one year old. Genomic DNA samples from Polish children (n=33 with Steroid-ResistantNephrotic Syndrome (SRNS due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, manifesting before the age of 13 years old, underwent retrospective analysis of NPHS1, NPHS2, WT1 (exons 8, 9 and adjacent exon/intron boundaries and LAMB2. No pathogenic NPHS1 or LAMB2 mutations were found in our FSGS cohort. SRNS-causing mutations of NPHS2 and WT1 were detected in 7 of 33 patients (21%, including those with nephrotic syndrome manifesting before one year old: five of seven patients. Four patients had homozygous c.413G>A (p.Arg138Gln NPHS2 mutations; one subject was homozygous for c.868G>A (p.Val290Met NPHS2. A phenotypic female had C>T transition at position +4 of the WT1 intron 9 (c.1432+4C>T splice-donor site, and another phenotypic female was heterozygous for G>A transition at position +5 (c.1432+5G>A. Genotyping revealed a female genotypic gender (46, XX for the first subject and male (46, XY for the latter. In addition, one patient was heterozygous for c.104dup (p.Arg36Profs*34 NPHS2; two patients carried a c.686G>A (p.Arg229Gln NPHS2 non-neutral variant. Results indicate possible clustering of causative NPHS2 mutations in FSGS-proven SRNS with onset before age one year old, and provide additional evidence that patients with childhood steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome due to focal segmentalglomerulosclerosis should first undergo analysis of NPHS2 coding sequence and WT1 exons 8 and 9 and surrounding exon/intron boundary sequences, followed by gender genotyping.

  6. Overexpression and amplification of the c-myc gene in mouse tumors induced by chemical and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura; Enoki, Yoshitaka; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1989-01-01

    We examined expression of the c-myc gene by the dot blot hybridization of total cellular RNA from mouse primary tumors induced by chemicals and radiations. Expression of the c-myc gene was found to be elevated in 69 cases among 177 independently induced tumors of 12 different types. DNA from tumors overexpressing the myc gene was analyzed by Southern blotting. No case of rearrangement was detected. However, amplification of the c-myc gene was found in 7 cases of primary sarcomas. These included 4 cases out of 24 methylcholanthrene-induced sarcomas and 3 cases out of 7 α-tocopherol-induced sacromas. We also analyzed 8 cases of sarcomas induced by radiations, but could not find changes in the gene structure of the c-myc gene. Thus, our data indicate tumor type specificity and agent specificity of c-myc gene amplification. (author)

  7. Genes Associated With Prognosis After Surgery For Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Promote Tumor Cell Survival In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugarbaker David J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesothelioma is an aggressive neoplasm with few effective treatments, one being cytoreductive surgery. We previously described a test, based on differential expression levels of four genes, to predict clinical outcome in prospectively consented mesothelioma patients after surgery. In this study, we determined whether any of these four genes could be linked to a cancer relevant phenotype. Methods We conducted a high-throughput RNA inhibition screen to knockdown gene expression levels of the four genes comprising the test (ARHGDIA, COBLL1, PKM2, TM4SF1 in both a human lung-derived normal and a tumor cell line using three different small inhibitory RNA molecules per gene. Successful knockdown was confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Detection of statistically significant changes in apoptosis and mitosis was performed using immunological assays and quantified using video-assisted microscopy at a single time-point. Changes in nuclear shape, size, and numbers were used to provide additional support of initial findings. Each experiment was conducted in triplicate. Specificity was assured by requiring that at least 2 different siRNAs produced the observed change in each cell line/time-point/gene/assay combination. Results Knockdown of ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 resulted in 2- to 4-fold increased levels of apoptosis in normal cells (ARHGDIA only and tumor cells (all three genes. No statistically significant changes were observed in apoptosis after knockdown of PKM2 or for mitosis after knockdown of any gene. Conclusions We provide evidence that ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 are negative regulators of apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. These genes, and their related intracellular signaling pathways, may represent potential therapeutic targets in mesothelioma.

  8. Genes Associated With Prognosis After Surgery For Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Promote Tumor Cell Survival In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Gavin J; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J

    2011-01-01

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive neoplasm with few effective treatments, one being cytoreductive surgery. We previously described a test, based on differential expression levels of four genes, to predict clinical outcome in prospectively consented mesothelioma patients after surgery. In this study, we determined whether any of these four genes could be linked to a cancer relevant phenotype. We conducted a high-throughput RNA inhibition screen to knockdown gene expression levels of the four genes comprising the test (ARHGDIA, COBLL1, PKM2, TM4SF1) in both a human lung-derived normal and a tumor cell line using three different small inhibitory RNA molecules per gene. Successful knockdown was confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Detection of statistically significant changes in apoptosis and mitosis was performed using immunological assays and quantified using video-assisted microscopy at a single time-point. Changes in nuclear shape, size, and numbers were used to provide additional support of initial findings. Each experiment was conducted in triplicate. Specificity was assured by requiring that at least 2 different siRNAs produced the observed change in each cell line/time-point/gene/assay combination. Knockdown of ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 resulted in 2- to 4-fold increased levels of apoptosis in normal cells (ARHGDIA only) and tumor cells (all three genes). No statistically significant changes were observed in apoptosis after knockdown of PKM2 or for mitosis after knockdown of any gene. We provide evidence that ARHGDIA, COBLL1, and TM4SF1 are negative regulators of apoptosis in cultured tumor cells. These genes, and their related intracellular signaling pathways, may represent potential therapeutic targets in mesothelioma

  9. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Gohlke

    Full Text Available Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes

  10. Molecular studies on the function of tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Cheoul

    1993-01-01

    Cancer of stomach, colon and liver are a group of the most common cancer in Korea. However, results with current therapeutic modalities are still unsatisfactory. The intensive efforts have been made to understand basic pathogenesis and to find better therapeutic tools for the treatment of this miserable disease. We studies the alteration of tumor suppressor gene in various Gastrointestinal cancer in Korea. Results showed that genetic alteration of Rb gene was in 83% of colorectal cancer. Our results suggest that genetic alteration of Rb gene is crucially involved in the tumorigenesis of colorectum in Korea. (Author)

  11. Aberrations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J W; Cho, Y H; Kwon, D J; Kim, T E; Park, T C; Lee, J M; Namkoong, S E

    1995-05-01

    Aberrations of the p53 gene in 26 surgical specimens of human epithelial ovarian carcinomas were examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Seven (27%) of the tumors demonstrated a SSCP band shift in exons 4 to 9 of the gene, including 5 in the region encompassing exons 5 and 6, 1 in exon 7, and 1 in the region encompassing exons 8 and 9. Mutations were clustered in exon 5 in highly conserved regions of the p53 gene. All of the abnormal DNA fragments have been further characterized by direct DNA sequencing. These include five missense mutations (five transitions), a one-base-pair deletion introducing, by frameshift, a stop codon further downstream, and a two-base-pair insertion introducing a stop codon downstream by frameshift. Most mutations were base substitutions, and were clustered in exon 5 (71%), especially codons 175 and 179. The aberrations of the p53 gene were only found in tumors of FIGO stages III and IV. Histologic grading was also reviewed with respect to p53 aberrations. The aberrations were absent in well-differentiated carcinomas. The more undifferentiated the primary tumor, the more frequent p53 mutation (P p53 gene were common in epithelial ovarian cancers and p53 aberration may occur late during ovarian cancer evolution.

  12. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  13. PLGA Nanoparticles for Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery to Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marxa Figueiredo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on novel approaches in the field of nanotechnology-based carriers utilizing ultrasound stimuli as a means to spatially target gene delivery in vivo, using nanoparticles made with either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA or other polymers. We specifically discuss the potential for gene delivery by particles that are echogenic (amenable to destruction by ultrasound composed either of polymers (PLGA, polystyrene or other contrast agent materials (Optison, SonoVue microbubbles. The use of ultrasound is an efficient tool to further enhance gene delivery by PLGA or other echogenic particles in vivo. Echogenic PLGA nanoparticles are an attractive strategy for ultrasound-mediated gene delivery since this polymer is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for drug delivery and diagnostics in cancer, cardiovascular disease, and also other applications such as vaccines and tissue engineering. This paper will review recent successes and the potential of applying PLGA nanoparticles for gene delivery, which include (a echogenic PLGA used with ultrasound to enhance local gene delivery in tumors or muscle and (b PLGA nanoparticles currently under development, which could benefit in the future from ultrasound-enhanced tumor targeted gene delivery.

  14. Ancestry as a potential modifier of gene expression in breast tumors from Colombian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Gómez, Silvia J; Sanabria-Salas, María Carolina; Garay, Jone; Baddoo, Melody C; Hernández-Suarez, Gustavo; Mejía, Juan Carlos; García, Oscar; Miele, Lucio; Fejerman, Laura; Zabaleta, Jovanny

    2017-01-01

    Hispanic/Latino populations are a genetically admixed and heterogeneous group, with variable fractions of European, Indigenous American and African ancestries. The molecular profile of breast cancer has been widely described in non-Hispanic Whites but equivalent knowledge is lacking in Hispanic/Latinas. We have previously reported that the most prevalent breast cancer intrinsic subtype in Colombian women was Luminal B as defined by St. Gallen 2013 criteria. In this study we explored ancestry-associated differences in molecular profiles of Luminal B tumors among these highly admixed women. We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-seq analysis in 42 Luminal tumors (21 Luminal A and 21 Luminal B) from Colombian women. Genetic ancestry was estimated from a panel of 80 ancestry-informative markers (AIM). We categorized patients according to Luminal subtype and to the proportion of European and Indigenous American ancestry and performed differential expression analysis comparing Luminal B against Luminal A tumors according to the assigned ancestry groups. We found 5 genes potentially modulated by genetic ancestry: ERBB2 (log2FC = 2.367, padjancestry (p = 0.02, B = 3.11). This association was not biased by the distribution of HER2+ tumors among the groups analyzed. Our results suggest that genetic ancestry in Hispanic/Latina women might modify ERBB2 gene expression in Luminal tumors. Further analyses are needed to confirm these findings and explore their prognostic value.

  15. Oxygen Sensitivity of Reporter Genes: Implications for Preclinical Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia

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    Ivana Cecic

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Reporter gene techniques have been applied toward studying the physiologic phenomena associated with tumor hypoxia, a negative prognostic indicator. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential adverse effects of hypoxic conditions on the effectiveness of four commonly used reporter genes: Renilla luciferase, monomeric red fluorescent protein, thymidine kinase, and lacZ. Tumor-forming A375 cells expressing a trifusion reporter consisting of Renilla luciferase, monomeric red fluorescent protein, and thymidine kinase were subjected to decreasing oxygen tensions and assayed for reporter expression and activity. A375 cells expressing β-galactosidase were similarly exposed to hypoxia, with activity of the reporter monitored by cleavage of the fluorescent substrate 7-hydroxy-9H-(1, 3-dichloro-9, 9-dimethylacridin-2-one-β-galactoside (DDAOG. Generation of signal in in vivo tumor models expressing bioluminescent or β-galactosidase reporters were also examined over the course of hypoxic stresses, either by tumor clamping or the antivascular agent 5, 6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA. Our findings indicate that bioluminescent and fluorescent reporter activity are decreased under hypoxia despite minimal variations in protein production, whereas β-galactosidase reporter activity per unit protein was unchanged. These results demonstrate that combining β-galactosidase with the DDAOG optical probe may be a robust reporter system for the in vivo study of tumor hypoxia.

  16. Anti-tumor effects of gene therapy with GALV membrane fusion glycoprotein in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Yang, Jian-ru; Fu, Xin-ping; Jiang, Yue-quan

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the efficacy of gene therapy of lung adenocarcinoma using specifically controlled type I herpes simplex virus recombinant vector expressing Gibbon ape leukemia virus membrane fusion glycoprotein gene (GALV.fus). Recombinant HSV-I plasmid carrying target transgene was constructed, and recombinant viral vector was generated in Vero cells using Lipofectamine transfection. Viral vector was introduced into lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells or human fetal fibroblast HFL-I GNHu 5 cells, or inoculated into human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice. The anti-tumor and cytotoxic effects of GALV-FMG, the transgene, were examined in these cell and animal models. Expression of GALV-FMG in xenographs achieved 100 % tumorigenicity. Recombinant HSV-I viral vector also exhibited significant tumor cell killing effect in vitro. Relative survival rates of tumor cells treated with GALV-FMG or control vectors were, respectively, 20 and 70 %. GALV.fus has a potent anti-tumor effect against lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo. This anti-tumor potential provides foundation for further studies with this vector.

  17. Tumor Classification Using High-Order Gene Expression Profiles Based on Multilinear ICA

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    Ming-gang Du

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. Independent Components Analysis (ICA maximizes the statistical independence of the representational components of a training gene expression profiles (GEP ensemble, but it cannot distinguish relations between the different factors, or different modes, and it is not available to high-order GEP Data Mining. In order to generalize ICA, we introduce Multilinear-ICA and apply it to tumor classification using high order GEP. Firstly, we introduce the basis conceptions and operations of tensor and recommend Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier and Multilinear-ICA. Secondly, the higher score genes of original high order GEP are selected by using t-statistics and tabulate tensors. Thirdly, the tensors are performed by Multilinear-ICA. Finally, the SVM is used to classify the tumor subtypes. Results. To show the validity of the proposed method, we apply it to tumor classification using high order GEP. Though we only use three datasets, the experimental results show that the method is effective and feasible. Through this survey, we hope to gain some insight into the problem of high order GEP tumor classification, in aid of further developing more effective tumor classification algorithms.

  18. Mutations in cancer genes of UV-induced skin tumors of hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kranen, H J; de Gruijl, F R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a very common carcinogen in our environment. Epidemiological data on the relationship between skin cancers and ambient solar UV radiation are very limited. Hairless mice provide the possibility to study the process of UV carcinogenesis in more detail. Experiments with this animal model have yielded quantitative data on how tumor development depends on dose, time and wavelength of the UV radiation. In addition, at the molecular level the interactions between UV, specific cancer genes-like the Ras oncogene family and the p53 tumor suppressor gene, together with the role of DNA repair in this process have been addressed recently. In wildtype hairless mice mutations in the p53 gene are clearly linked to UVB but not to UVA radiation. Furthermore, the p53 alterations seem to be essential early in tumor development. However, in Xpa-deficient mice this dependency on p53 alterations appeared to be different as is the tumor type induced by UVB. Research using genetically modified hairless mice should enable us to further unravel the mechanisms of UV-induced skin cancer.

  19. An integrative CGH, MSI and candidate genes methylation analysis of colorectal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Brim

    Full Text Available Different DNA aberrations processes can cause colorectal cancer (CRC. Herein, we conducted a comprehensive molecular characterization of 27 CRCs from Iranian patients.Array CGH was performed. The MSI phenotype and the methylation status of 15 genes was established using MSP. The CGH data was compared to two established lists of 41 and 68 cancer genes, respectively, and to CGH data from African Americans. A maximum parsimony cladogram based on global aberrations was established.The number of aberrations seem to depend on the MSI status. MSI-H tumors displayed the lowest number of aberrations. MSP revealed that most markers were methylated, except RNF182 gene. P16 and MLH1 genes were primarily methylated in MSI-H tumors. Seven markers with moderate to high frequency of methylation (SYNE1, MMP2, CD109, EVL, RET, LGR and PTPRD had very low levels of chromosomal aberrations. All chromosomes were targeted by aberrations with deletions more frequent than amplifications. The most amplified markers were CD248, ERCC6, ERGIC3, GNAS, MMP2, NF1, P2RX7, SFRS6, SLC29A1 and TBX22. Most deletions were noted for ADAM29, CHL1, CSMD3, FBXW7, GALNS, MMP2, NF1, PRKD1, SMAD4 and TP53. Aberrations targeting chromosome X were primarily amplifications in male patients and deletions in female patients. A finding similar to what we reported for African American CRC patients.This first comprehensive analysis of CRC Iranian tumors reveals a high MSI rate. The MSI tumors displayed the lowest level of chromosomal aberrations but high frequency of methylation. The MSI-L were predominantly targeted with chromosomal instability in a way similar to the MSS tumors. The global chromosomal aberration profiles showed many similarities with other populations but also differences that might allow a better understanding of CRC's clinico-pathological specifics in this population.

  20. An integrative CGH, MSI and candidate genes methylation analysis of colorectal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brim, Hassan; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Nouraie, Mehdi; Salazar, Jose; Deleo, Jim; Razjouyan, Hadi; Mokarram, Pooneh; Schaffer, Alejandro A; Naghibhossaini, Fakhraddin; Ashktorab, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Different DNA aberrations processes can cause colorectal cancer (CRC). Herein, we conducted a comprehensive molecular characterization of 27 CRCs from Iranian patients. Array CGH was performed. The MSI phenotype and the methylation status of 15 genes was established using MSP. The CGH data was compared to two established lists of 41 and 68 cancer genes, respectively, and to CGH data from African Americans. A maximum parsimony cladogram based on global aberrations was established. The number of aberrations seem to depend on the MSI status. MSI-H tumors displayed the lowest number of aberrations. MSP revealed that most markers were methylated, except RNF182 gene. P16 and MLH1 genes were primarily methylated in MSI-H tumors. Seven markers with moderate to high frequency of methylation (SYNE1, MMP2, CD109, EVL, RET, LGR and PTPRD) had very low levels of chromosomal aberrations. All chromosomes were targeted by aberrations with deletions more frequent than amplifications. The most amplified markers were CD248, ERCC6, ERGIC3, GNAS, MMP2, NF1, P2RX7, SFRS6, SLC29A1 and TBX22. Most deletions were noted for ADAM29, CHL1, CSMD3, FBXW7, GALNS, MMP2, NF1, PRKD1, SMAD4 and TP53. Aberrations targeting chromosome X were primarily amplifications in male patients and deletions in female patients. A finding similar to what we reported for African American CRC patients. This first comprehensive analysis of CRC Iranian tumors reveals a high MSI rate. The MSI tumors displayed the lowest level of chromosomal aberrations but high frequency of methylation. The MSI-L were predominantly targeted with chromosomal instability in a way similar to the MSS tumors. The global chromosomal aberration profiles showed many similarities with other populations but also differences that might allow a better understanding of CRC's clinico-pathological specifics in this population.

  1. Tumor development is associated with decrease of TET gene expression and 5-methylcytosine hydroxylation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, H; Liu, Y; Bai, F; Zhang, J-Y; Ma, S-H; Liu, J; Xu, Z-D; Zhu, H-G; Ling, Z-Q; Ye, D; Guan, K-L; Xiong, Y

    2012-01-01

    The TET (ten–eleven translocation) family of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG)-dependent dioxygenases catalyzes the sequential oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine, leading to eventual DNA demethylation. The TET2 gene is a bona fide tumor suppressor frequently mutated in leukemia, and TET enzyme activity is inhibited in IDH1/2-mutated tumors by the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, an antagonist of α-KG, linking 5mC oxidation to...

  2. Candidate gene DNA methylation associations with breast cancer characteristics and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresovich, Jacob K; Gann, Peter H; Erdal, Serap; Chen, Hua Y; Argos, Maria; Rauscher, Garth H

    2018-03-12

    We examined methylation patterns with aggressive tumor phenotypes and investigated demographic, socioeconomic and reproductive predictors of gene methylation. Pyrosequencing quantified methylation of BRCA1, EGFR, GSTM2, RASSF1, TFF1 and Sat 2. We used quantile regression models to calculate adjusted median methylation values by estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) status. Bivariate associations between participant characteristics and methylation were examined. Higher percent methylation of GSTM2 was observed in ER/PR-negative compared with ER/PR-positive tumors in ductal carcinoma in situ (14 vs 2%) and invasive (35 vs 3%) tissue components. Trends in aberrant GSTM2 methylation across tissue components were stronger among ER/PR-negative tumors (p-interaction <0.001). Black women were more likely to have ER/PR-negative tumors (p = 0.01) and show hypermethylation of GSTM2 compared with other women (p = 0.05). GSTM2 promoter hypermethylation may serve as a potential biomarker of aggressive tumor development and a mechanism for ER/PR-negative tumor progression.

  3. confFuse: High-Confidence Fusion Gene Detection across Tumor Entities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiqin; Jones, David T W; Wu, Yonghe; Lichter, Peter; Zapatka, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fusion genes play an important role in the tumorigenesis of many cancers. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been successfully applied in fusion gene detection for the last several years, and a number of NGS-based tools have been developed for identifying fusion genes during this period. Most fusion gene detection tools based on RNA-seq data report a large number of candidates (mostly false positives), making it hard to prioritize candidates for experimental validation and further analysis. Selection of reliable fusion genes for downstream analysis becomes very important in cancer research. We therefore developed confFuse, a scoring algorithm to reliably select high-confidence fusion genes which are likely to be biologically relevant. Results: confFuse takes multiple parameters into account in order to assign each fusion candidate a confidence score, of which score ≥8 indicates high-confidence fusion gene predictions. These parameters were manually curated based on our experience and on certain structural motifs of fusion genes. Compared with alternative tools, based on 96 published RNA-seq samples from different tumor entities, our method can significantly reduce the number of fusion candidates (301 high-confidence from 8,083 total predicted fusion genes) and keep high detection accuracy (recovery rate 85.7%). Validation of 18 novel, high-confidence fusions detected in three breast tumor samples resulted in a 100% validation rate. Conclusions: confFuse is a novel downstream filtering method that allows selection of highly reliable fusion gene candidates for further downstream analysis and experimental validations. confFuse is available at https://github.com/Zhiqin-HUANG/confFuse.

  4. Selector genes display tumor cooperation and inhibition in Drosophila epithelium in a developmental context-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Ram Prakash Gupta; Anjali Bajpai; Pradip Sinha

    2017-01-01

    During animal development, selector genes determine identities of body segments and those of individual organs. Selector genes are also misexpressed in cancers, although their contributions to tumor progression per se remain poorly understood. Using a model of cooperative tumorigenesis, we show that gain of selector genes results in tumor cooperation, but in only select developmental domains of the wing, haltere and eye-antennal imaginal discs of Drosophila larva. Thus, the field selector, Ey...

  5. Selector genes display tumor cooperation and inhibition in Drosophila epithelium in a developmental context-dependent manner

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ram Prakash; Bajpai, Anjali; Sinha, Pradip

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT During animal development, selector genes determine identities of body segments and those of individual organs. Selector genes are also misexpressed in cancers, although their contributions to tumor progression per se remain poorly understood. Using a model of cooperative tumorigenesis, we show that gain of selector genes results in tumor cooperation, but in only select developmental domains of the wing, haltere and eye-antennal imaginal discs of Drosophila larva. Thus, the field sel...

  6. Gene methylation profile of gastric cancerous tissue according to tumor site in the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcinskaite-Noreikiene, Rita; Ugenskiene, Rasa; Noreika, Alius; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Gedminaite, Jurgita; Skieceviciene, Jurgita; Juozaityte, Elona

    2016-01-26

    There is considerable information on the methylation of the promoter regions of different genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. However, there is a lack of information on how this epigenetic process differs in tumors originating at different sites in the stomach. The aim of this study is to assess the methylation profiles of the MLH1, MGMT, and DAPK-1 genes in cancerous tissues from different stomach sites. Samples were acquired from 81 patients suffering stomach adenocarcinoma who underwent surgery for gastric cancer in the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Hospital Kaunas Clinics in 2009-2012. Gene methylation was investigated with methylation-specific PCR. The study was approved by the Lithuanian Biomedical Research Ethics Committee. The frequencies of methylation in cancerous tissues from the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the stomach were 11.1, 23.1, and 45.4%, respectively, for MLH1; 22.2, 30.8, and 57.6%, respectively, for MGMT; and 44.4, 48.7, and 51.5%, respectively, for DAPK-1. MLH1 and MGMT methylation was observed more often in the lower third of the stomach than in the upper third (p stomach (coefficient, -0.48; p = 0.01). DAPK-1 and MLH1 methylation correlated inversely in tumors in the middle-third of the stomach (coefficient, -0.41; p = 0.01). Gene promoter methylation depends on the gastric tumor location.

  7. The Ras effector RASSF2 is a novel tumor-suppressor gene in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Kimishige; Toyota, Minoru; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yasushi; Ohe-Toyota, Mutsumi; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Hinoda, Yuji; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    Activation of Ras signaling is a hallmark of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the roles of negative regulators of Ras are not fully understood. Our aim was to address that question by surveying genetic and epigenetic alterations of Ras-Ras effector genes in CRC cells. The expression and methylation status of 6 RASSF family genes were examined using RT-PCR and bisulfite PCR in CRC cell lines and in primary CRCs and colorectal adenomas. Colony formation assays and flow cytometry were used to assess the tumor suppressor activities of RASSF1 and RASSF2. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to determine the effect of altered RASSF2 expression on cell morphology. Mutations of K- ras , BRAF, and p53 were identified using single-strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing. Aberrant methylation and histone deacetylation of RASSF2 was associated with the gene's silencing in CRC. The activities of RASSF2, which were distinct from those of RASSF1, included induction of morphologic changes and apoptosis; moreover, its ability to prevent cell transformation suggests that RASSF2 acts as a tumor suppressor in CRC. Primary CRCs that showed K- ras /BRAF mutations also frequently showed RASSF2 methylation, and inactivation of RASSF2 enhanced K- ras -induced oncogenic transformation. RASSF2 methylation was also frequently identified in colorectal adenomas. RASSF2 is a novel tumor suppressor gene that regulates Ras signaling and plays a pivotal role in the early stages of colorectal tumorigenesis.

  8. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  9. P53 tumor suppressor gene and protein expression is altered in cell lines derived from spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced canine lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tierney, L.A.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequently occurring gene alterations in malignant human cancers, including lung cancer. In lung cancer, common point mutations within conserved exons of the p53 gene result in a stabilized form of mutant protein which is detectable in most cases by immunohistochemistry. In addition to point mutations, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions of the p53 gene have also been detected in both human and rodent tumors. It has been suggested that for at least some epithelial neoplasms, the loss of expression of wild-type p53 protein may be more important for malignant transformation than the acquisition of activating mutations. Mechanisms responsible for the loss of expression of wild-type protein include gene deletion or rearrangement, nonsense or stop mutations, mutations within introns or upstream regulatory regions of the gene, and accelerated rates of degradation of the protein by DNA viral oncoproteins

  10. Filaggrin gene polymorphism associated with Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumors in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Liu, Wen; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Hua; Luo, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Mutations of filaggrin gene (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris, while recently FLG mutations were found to be associated with gastric cancer. This study aimed to investigate the association of filaggrin polymorphism with Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumors in China. A total of 200 patients with three types of tumors and 117 normal control samples were genotyped at three common FLG mutation loci (rs3126085, K4671X, R501X) by using Sequenom MassARRAY technique. The χ 2 test was used to evaluate the relationship between the mutation and the three kinds of tumors. A two-sided P value of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) and EBV-negative gastric carcinoma (EBVnGC), respectively. Furthermore, allele distributions in EBVaGC and EBVnGC were verified to be different in both SNP loci.

  11. ING Genes Work as Tumor Suppressor Genes in the Carcinogenesis of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer in the world. The evolution and progression of HNSCC are considered to result from multiple stepwise alterations of cellular and molecular pathways in squamous epithelium. Recently, inhibitor of growth gene (ING family consisting of five genes, ING1 to ING5, was identified as a new tumor suppressor gene family that was implicated in the downregulation of cell cycle and chromatin remodeling. In contrast, it has been shown that ING1 and ING2 play an oncogenic role in some cancers, this situation being similar to TGF-β. In HNSCC, the ING family has been reported to be downregulated, and ING translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm may be a critical event for carcinogenesis. In this paper, we describe our recent results and briefly summarize current knowledge regarding the biologic functions of ING in HNSCC.

  12. Genetic and epigenetic silencing of the beclin 1 gene in sporadic breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yiqing

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beclin 1, an important autophagy-related protein in human cells, is involved in cell death and cell survival. Beclin 1 mapped to human chromosome 17q21. It is widely expressed in normal mammary epithelial cells. Although down-regulated expression with mono-allelic deletions of beclin 1 gene was frequently observed in breast tumors, whether there was other regulatory mechanism of beclin 1 was to be investigated. We studied the expression of beclin 1 and explored the possible regulatory mechanisms on its expression in breast tumors. Methods 20 pairs of tumors and adjacent normal tissues from patients with sporadic breast invasive ductal cancer (IDCs were collected. The mRNA expression of beclin 1 was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH was determined by real-time quantitative PCR and microsatellite methods. The protein expression of beclin 1, p53, BRCA1 and BRCA2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. CpG islands in 5' genomic region of beclin 1 gene were identified using MethylPrimer Program. Sodium bisulfite sequencing was used in examining the methylation status of each CpG island. Results Decreased beclin 1 mRNA expression was detected in 70% of the breast tumors, and the protein levels were co-related to the mRNA levels. Expression of beclin 1 mRNA was demonstrated to be much higher in the BRCA1 positive tumors than that in the BRCA1 negative ones. Loss of heterozygosity was detected in more than 45% of the breast tumors, and a dense cluster of CpG islands was found from the 5' end to the intron 2 of the beclin 1 gene. Methylation analysis showed that the promoter and the intron 2 of beclin 1 were aberrantly methylated in the tumors with decreased expression. Conclusions These data indicated that LOH and aberrant DNA methylation might be the possible reasons of the decreased expression of beclin 1 in the breast tumors. The findings here shed some new light on the regulatory mechanisms of

  13. Genetic and epigenetic silencing of the beclin 1 gene in sporadic breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zidong; Chen, Bo; Wu, Yiqing; Jin, Feng; Xia, Yongjing; Liu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    Beclin 1, an important autophagy-related protein in human cells, is involved in cell death and cell survival. Beclin 1 mapped to human chromosome 17q21. It is widely expressed in normal mammary epithelial cells. Although down-regulated expression with mono-allelic deletions of beclin 1 gene was frequently observed in breast tumors, whether there was other regulatory mechanism of beclin 1 was to be investigated. We studied the expression of beclin 1 and explored the possible regulatory mechanisms on its expression in breast tumors. 20 pairs of tumors and adjacent normal tissues from patients with sporadic breast invasive ductal cancer (IDCs) were collected. The mRNA expression of beclin 1 was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was determined by real-time quantitative PCR and microsatellite methods. The protein expression of beclin 1, p53, BRCA1 and BRCA2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. CpG islands in 5' genomic region of beclin 1 gene were identified using MethylPrimer Program. Sodium bisulfite sequencing was used in examining the methylation status of each CpG island. Decreased beclin 1 mRNA expression was detected in 70% of the breast tumors, and the protein levels were co-related to the mRNA levels. Expression of beclin 1 mRNA was demonstrated to be much higher in the BRCA1 positive tumors than that in the BRCA1 negative ones. Loss of heterozygosity was detected in more than 45% of the breast tumors, and a dense cluster of CpG islands was found from the 5' end to the intron 2 of the beclin 1 gene. Methylation analysis showed that the promoter and the intron 2 of beclin 1 were aberrantly methylated in the tumors with decreased expression. These data indicated that LOH and aberrant DNA methylation might be the possible reasons of the decreased expression of beclin 1 in the breast tumors. The findings here shed some new light on the regulatory mechanisms of beclin 1 in breast cancer

  14. Predicting survival in patients with metastatic kidney cancer by gene-expression profiling in the primary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasselli, James R; Shih, Joanna H; Iyengar, Shuba R; Maranchie, Jodi; Riss, Joseph; Worrell, Robert; Torres-Cabala, Carlos; Tabios, Ray; Mariotti, Andra; Stearman, Robert; Merino, Maria; Walther, McClellan M; Simon, Richard; Klausner, Richard D; Linehan, W Marston

    2003-06-10

    To identify potential molecular determinants of tumor biology and possible clinical outcomes, global gene-expression patterns were analyzed in the primary tumors of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer by using cDNA microarrays. We used grossly dissected tumor masses that included tumor, blood vessels, connective tissue, and infiltrating immune cells to obtain a gene-expression "profile" from each primary tumor. Two patterns of gene expression were found within this uniformly staged patient population, which correlated with a significant difference in overall survival between the two patient groups. Subsets of genes most significantly associated with survival were defined, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was the gene most predictive for survival. Therefore, despite the complex biological nature of metastatic cancer, basic clinical behavior as defined by survival may be determined by the gene-expression patterns expressed within the compilation of primary gross tumor cells. We conclude that survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer can be correlated with the expression of various genes based solely on the expression profile in the primary kidney tumor.

  15. Gene profiling and circulating tumor cells as biomarker to prognostic of patients with locoregional breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniyoshi, Renata K; Gehrke, Flávia de Sousa; Alves, Beatriz C A; Vilas-Bôas, Viviane; Coló, Anna E; Sousa, Naiara; Nunes, João; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Del Giglio, Auro

    2015-09-01

    The gene profile of primary tumors, as well as the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can provide important prognostic and predictive information. In this study, our objective was to perform tumor gene profiling (TGP) in combination with CTC characterization in women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Biological samples (from peripheral blood and tumors) from 167 patients diagnosed with stage I, II, and III mammary carcinoma, who were also referred for adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy, were assessed for the following parameters: (a) the presence of CTCs identified by the expression of CK-19 and c-erbB-2 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and (b) the TGP, which was determined by analyzing the expression of 21 genes in paraffin-embedded tissue samples by quantitative multiplex RT-PCR with the Plexor® system. We observed a statistically significant correlation between the progression-free interval (PFI) and the clinical stage (p = 0.000701), the TGP score (p = 0.006538), and the presence of hormone receptors in the tumor (p = 0.0432). We observed no correlation between the PFI and the presence or absence of CK-19 or HER2 expression in the PBMC fraction prior to the start of treatment or in the two following readouts. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the TGP score significantly correlated with the PFI (p = 0.029247). The TGP is an important prognostic variable for patients with locoregional breast cancer. The presence of CTCs adds no prognostic value to the information already provided by the TGP.

  16. Wilms' tumours: about tumour suppressor genes, an oncogene and a chameleon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vicki

    2011-02-01

    Genes identified as being mutated in Wilms' tumour include TP53, a classic tumour suppressor gene (TSG); CTNNB1 (encoding β-catenin), a classic oncogene; WTX, which accumulating data indicate is a TSG; and WT1, which is inactivated in some Wilms' tumours, similar to a TSG. However, WT1 does not always conform to the TSG label, and some data indicate that WT1 enhances cell survival and proliferation, like an oncogene. Is WT1 a chameleon, functioning as either a TSG or an oncogene, depending on cellular context? Are these labels even appropriate for describing and understanding the function of WT1?

  17. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannens, M; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Wiesmeyer, C; de Meulemeester, M; Ryan, A; Kalikin, L; Voûte, T; De Kraker, J; Hoovers, J; Slater, R; Feinberg, A; Little, P; Westerveld, A

    1996-11-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated childhood tumors to 11p15. High resolution mapping of 8 rare balanced chromosomal BWS rearrangements enabled us to identify three distinct regions on chromosome 11p15 that might harbor genes involved in the above-mentioned disorders. These results suggest genetic heterogeneity that correlates with the clinical heterogeneity seen in the patients studied. Expressed candidate gene sequences from these regions have been cloned and partly sequenced. These transcripts are either disrupted by or are at least within a few kb of these BWS chromosome breakpoints. So far, zinc-finger sequences and one Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) domain were found in independent candidate genes which are compatible with a regulating function of growth promoting genes. The abundance of expression of these genes varies from low abundant in all adult and fetal tissues tested to detectable on Northern blots of adult tissues. In addition to our 11p15 studies we have analyzed additional chromosome regions, in particular 1p. Cytogenetic, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies have identified 1p35 as a region of interest. A positional cloning effort to identify a balanced 1p35 translocation found in a Wilms tumor has led to the isolation of a YAC, crossing this breakpoint.

  18. Implication of p53-dependent cellular senescence related gene, TARSH in tumor suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Takeshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Sugimoto, Masataka; Ishigami, Akihito; Shimada, Jun-ichi; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    A novel target of NESH-SH3 (TARSH) was identified as a cellular senescence related gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) replicative senescence, the expression of which has been suppressed in primary clinical lung cancer specimens. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of TARSH involved in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the reduction of TARSH gene expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system robustly inhibited the MEFs proliferation with increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Using p53 -/- MEFs, we further suggest that this growth arrest by loss of TARSH is evoked by p53-dependent p21 Cip1 accumulation. Moreover, we also reveal that TARSH reduction induces multicentrosome in MEFs, which is linked in chromosome instability and tumor development. These results suggest that TARSH plays an important role in proliferation of replicative senescence and may serve as a trigger of tumor development.

  19. gld-1, a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, R.; Schedl, T. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Barton, M.K.; Kimble, J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-02-01

    We have characterized 31 mutations in the gld-1 (defective in germline development) gene of Caenorhabditis elegans. In gld-1 (null) hermaphrodites, oogenesis is abolished and a germline tumor forms where oocyte development would normally occur. By contrast, gld-1 (null) males are unaffected. The hermaphrodite germline tumor appears to derive from germ cells that enter the meiotic pathway normally but then exit pachytene and return to the mitotic cycle. Certain gld-1 partial loss-of-function mutations also abolish oogenesis, but germ cells arrest in pachytene rather than returning to mitosis. Our results indicate that gld-1 is a tumor suppressor gene required for oocyte development. The tumorous phenotype suggests that gld-1(+) may function to negatively regulate proliferation during meiotic prophase and/or act to direct progression through meiotic prophase. We also show that gld-1(+) has an additional nonessential role in germline sex determination: promotion of hermaphrodite spermatogenesis. This function of gld-1 is inferred from a haplo-insufficient phenotype and from the properties of gain-of-function gld-1 mutations that cause alterations in the sexual identity of germ cells. 69 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Mice lacking pituitary tumor transforming gene show elevated exposure of DGalNAc carbohydrate determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsyk A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the influence of pituitary tumor transforming gene (pttg-1 knockout on glycome of parenchimal organs by means of lectin histochemistry. Methods. DGalNAc, DGlcNAc, NeuNAc carbohydrate determinants were labelled with soybean agglutinin (SBA and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, conjugated to peroxidase, with subsequent visualization of the lectin-binding sites with diaminobenzidine. The testes and kidneys of murine strain BL6/C57 with the pttg-1 gene knockout (PTTG-KO were compared to the wild type (PTTG-WT animals, both groups 1 month of age. Results. Knockout of the pttg-1 gene was accompanied by enhanced exposure of the DGalNAc sugar residues within the Golgi complex of secondary spermatocytes, in a brush border of renal tubules and on the lumenal surface of collecting ducts. Conclusions. This study suggests that knockout of the pttg-1 gene may lead to the changes in carbohydrate processing in mammalian organism.

  1. Mechanisms of epigenetic silencing of the c21 gene in Y1 adrenocortical tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyf, M; Slack, A D

    2000-11-01

    We utilized Y1 adrenocortical carcinoma cell line as a model system to dissect the events regulating epigenomic gene silencing in tumor cells. We show here that the chromatin structure of c21 gene is inactive in Y1 cells and that it could be reconfigured to an active form by either expressing antisense mRNA to DNA methyltransferase 1 (dnmt1) or an attenuator of Ras protooncogenic signaling hGAP. Surprisingly however, the known inducer of active chromatin structure the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A TSA fails to induce expression of c21. These results suggest that the primary cause of c21 gene silencing is independent of histone deacetylation. We present a model to explain the possible roles of the different components of the epigenome and the DNA methylation and demethylation machineries in silencing c21 gene expression.

  2. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  3. Histamine suppresses gene expression and synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha via histamine H2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Histamine and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) can each contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic reactions and chronic inflammatory diseases. We now report the effect of histamine on gene expression and total cellular synthesis of TNF-alpha. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced synthesis of TNF-alpha in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 18 healthy donors was suppressed by histamine concentrations from 10(-6) to 10(-4) M, levels comparable with those measured in tissues after...

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  5. Generation of two modified mouse alleles of the Hic1 tumor suppressor gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíchalová, Vendula; Turečková, Jolana; Fafílek, Bohumil; Vojtěchová, Martina; Krausová, Michaela; Lukáš, Jan; Šloncová, Eva; Takacova, S.; Divoký, V.; Leprince, D.; Plachý, Jiří; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2011), s. 142-151 ISSN 1526-954X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Hypermethylated In Cancer 1 * Hic1 tumor suppressor * gene targeting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.527, year: 2011

  6. Tumor grade-related NDRG2 gene expression in primary and recurrent intracranial meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiriute, Daina; Tamasauskas, Sarunas; Asmoniene, Virginija; Saferis, Viktoras; Skauminas, Kestutis; Deltuva, Vytenis; Tamasauskas, Arimantas

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 30% of all primary CNS tumors are meningiomas. Depending on histological type, meningiomas can recur as follows: benign--with five-year recurrence of 5%, atypical--recurrence approximately 40%, and anaplastic with recurrence of 50-80%. In an attempt to understand the molecular mechanism of meningioma recurrence we investigated the N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), which has recently been described as important in suppressing cellular carcinogenesis in different types of cancer. The objective of the study was to investigate NDRG2 gene expression at the mRNA level in primary and recurrent meningiomas as a potential marker of tumor aggressiveness, malignancy, and recurrence. Primary and recurrent meningiomas of WHO grades I, II, and III from 35 patients operated on between 2005 and 2008 year at the Department of Neurosurgery of Kaunas Medical University Hospital (Lithuania) were studied. Using the qRT-PCR method we measured NDRG2 gene expression at the mRNA level in primary (n = 24) and recurrent (n = 11) meningiomas. Statistically significant differences in NDRG2 gene expression level were observed between primary and recurrent meningioma groups (P grade I) and atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas (P 0.05) among histological subtypes of benign (WHO grade I) meningiomas: fibrous, meningothelial, and transitional. In accordance with our results, reduction of NDRG2 gene expression at the mRNA level could help to explain malignant progression and predisposition to recurrence in meningiomas.

  7. Distinct and competitive regulatory patterns of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available So far, investigators have found numerous tumor suppressor genes (TSGs and oncogenes (OCGs that control cell proliferation and apoptosis during cancer development. Furthermore, TSGs and OCGs may act as modulators of transcription factors (TFs to influence gene regulation. A comprehensive investigation of TSGs, OCGs, TFs, and their joint target genes at the network level may provide a deeper understanding of the post-translational modulation of TSGs and OCGs to TF gene regulation.In this study, we developed a novel computational framework for identifying target genes of TSGs and OCGs using TFs as bridges through the integration of protein-protein interactions and gene expression data. We applied this pipeline to ovarian cancer and constructed a three-layer regulatory network. In the network, the top layer was comprised of modulators (TSGs and OCGs, the middle layer included TFs, and the bottom layer contained target genes. Based on regulatory relationships in the network, we compiled TSG and OCG profiles and performed clustering analyses. Interestingly, we found TSGs and OCGs formed two distinct branches. The genes in the TSG branch were significantly enriched in DNA damage and repair, regulating macromolecule metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis, while the genes in the OCG branch were significantly enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway. Remarkably, their specific targets showed a reversed functional enrichment in terms of apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway: the target genes regulated by OCGs only were enriched in anti-apoptosis and the target genes regulated by TSGs only were enriched in the ErbB signaling pathway.This study provides the first comprehensive investigation of the interplay of TSGs and OCGs in a regulatory network modulated by TFs. Our application in ovarian cancer revealed distinct regulatory patterns of TSGs and OCGs, suggesting a competitive regulatory mechanism acting upon apoptosis and the ErbB signaling pathway through

  8. Bilateral renal tumors in an adult man with Smith-Magenis syndrome: The role of the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Verleyen, Pieter; Lesage, Karl; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-10-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a contiguous-gene disorder most commonly caused by a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. We report a 57 year-old man with SMS who presents bilateral renal tumors. This is most likely related to haploinsufficiency of FLCN gene, located in the deleted region, and a known tumor suppressor gene. Haploinsufficiency of FLCN causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), characterized by pulmonary cysts, renal and skin tumors. The present observation suggests that the follow-up of patients with SMS should also focus on possible manifestations of BHDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Combined anti-tumor therapeutic effect of targeted gene, hyperthermia, radionuclide brachytherapy in breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daozhen; Tang Qiusha; Xiang Jingying; Xu Fei; Zhang Li; Wang Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antitumor therapeutic effect of combined therapy of magnetic induction heating by nano-magnetic particles, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk suicide gene) and internal radiation in mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma. Methods: The transfection reagents, plasmids heat shock protein-HSV-tk (pHSP-HSV-tk), ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow and 188 Re-ganciclovir-bovine serum albumin-nanopaticles (GCV-BSA-NP) were prepared. The heating experiments in vivo were carried out using ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow. Sixty mice tumor models bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma were established and randomly divided into six groups. Group A was the control group, B was gene transfection therapy group, C was hyperthermia group, D was gene transfection therapy combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group, E was gene therapy combined with hyperthermia group, and F was gene therapy, hyperthermia combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group. The tumor growth, tumor mass and histopathological changes were evaluated. The expression of HSV-tk in the groups of B, D, E and F was detected by RT-PCR. Poisson distribution and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis by SPSS 10.0 software. Results: In the animal heating experiments, the temperature of tumor increased up to 39.6 degree C, 43.2 degree C, and 48.1 degree C quickly with different injected doses (2, 4 and 6 mg respectively) of nano-magnetic particles and maintained for 40 min. The temperature of tumor tissue reduced to 36.8 degree C, 37.5 degree C and 37.8 degree C in 10 min when alternating magnetic field (AMF) stopped. The tumor mass in Groups C ((452.50±30.29) mg), D ((240.98±35.32)mg), E((231.87±27.41) mg) and F ((141.55±23.78) mg) were much lower than that in Group A ((719.12±22.65) mg) (F=800.07, P<0.01), with the most significant treatment effect in Group F.The tumor mass in Group B((684.05±24.02) mg) was higher than

  10. A molecular analysis by gene expression profiling reveals Bik/NBK overexpression in sporadic breast tumor samples of Mexican females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, Normand; Salamanca, Fabio; Astudillo-de la Vega, Horacio; Curiel-Quesada, Everardo; Alvarado, Isabel; Peñaloza, Rosenda; Arenas, Diego

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent causes of death in Mexican women over 35 years of age. At molecular level, changes in many genetic networks have been reported as associated with this neoplasia. To analyze these changes, we determined gene expression profiles of tumors from Mexican women with breast cancer at different stages and compared these with those of normal breast tissue samples. 32 P-radiolabeled cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription of mRNA from fresh sporadic breast tumor biopsies, as well as normal breast tissue. cDNA probes were hybridized to microarrays and expression levels registered using a phosphorimager. Expression levels of some genes were validated by real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical assays. We identified two subgroups of tumors according to their expression profiles, probably related with cancer progression. Ten genes, unexpressed in normal tissue, were turned on in some tumors. We found consistent high expression of Bik gene in 14/15 tumors with predominant cytoplasmic distribution. Recently, the product of the Bik gene has been associated with tumoral reversion in different neoplasic cell lines, and was proposed as therapy to induce apoptosis in cancers, including breast tumors. Even though a relationship among genes, for example those from a particular pathway, can be observed through microarrays, this relationship might not be sufficient to assign a definitive role to Bik in development and progression of the neoplasia. The findings herein reported deserve further investigation

  11. Quantitative gene-expression of the tumor angiogenesis markers vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin alphaV and integrin beta3 in human neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxboel, Jytte; Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Anti-angiogenesis treatment is a promising new therapy for cancer that recently has also been suggested for patients with neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the level of tumor angiogenesis, and thereby the molecular basis for anti-angiogenesis treatment......, in neuroendocrine tumors. We used quantitative real-time PCR for measuring mRNA gene-expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), integrin alphaV, and integrin beta3, and CD34 for a group of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (n=13). Tissue from patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases (n=14......) and normal liver tissues (n=16) was used as control. We found a lower mRNA level of VEGF in neuroendocrine tumors compared to both colorectal liver metastases (ptumors...

  12. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Robert W. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ghert, Michelle [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Surgery, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit, E-mail: gurmit.singh@jcc.hhsc.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession St., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  13. Classification between normal and tumor tissues based on the pair-wise gene expression ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, YeeLeng; Zhang, XueWu; Ling, MT; Wang, XiangHong; Wong, YC; Danchin, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Precise classification of cancer types is critically important for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. Numerous efforts have been made to use gene expression profiles to improve precision of tumor classification. However, reliable cancer-related signals are generally lacking. Using recent datasets on colon and prostate cancer, a data transformation procedure from single gene expression to pair-wise gene expression ratio is proposed. Making use of the internal consistency of each expression profiling dataset this transformation improves the signal to noise ratio of the dataset and uncovers new relevant cancer-related signals (features). The efficiency in using the transformed dataset to perform normal/tumor classification was investigated using feature partitioning with informative features (gene annotation) as discriminating axes (single gene expression or pair-wise gene expression ratio). Classification results were compared to the original datasets for up to 10-feature model classifiers. 82 and 262 genes that have high correlation to tissue phenotype were selected from the colon and prostate datasets respectively. Remarkably, data transformation of the highly noisy expression data successfully led to lower the coefficient of variation (CV) for the within-class samples as well as improved the correlation with tissue phenotypes. The transformed dataset exhibited lower CV when compared to that of single gene expression. In the colon cancer set, the minimum CV decreased from 45.3% to 16.5%. In prostate cancer, comparable CV was achieved with and without transformation. This improvement in CV, coupled with the improved correlation between the pair-wise gene expression ratio and tissue phenotypes, yielded higher classification efficiency, especially with the colon dataset – from 87.1% to 93.5%. Over 90% of the top ten discriminating axes in both datasets showed significant improvement after data transformation. The high classification efficiency achieved suggested

  14. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chosdol, Kunzang; Misra, Anjan; Puri, Sachin; Srivastava, Tapasya; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sarkar, Chitra; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sinha, Subrata

    2009-01-01

    We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors

  15. A Children's Oncology Group and TARGET initiative exploring the genetic landscape of Wilms tumor

    KAUST Repository

    Gadd, Samantha

    2017-08-21

    We performed genome-wide sequencing and analyzed mRNA and miRNA expression, DNA copy number, and DNA methylation in 117 Wilms tumors, followed by targeted sequencing of 651 Wilms tumors. In addition to genes previously implicated in Wilms tumors (WT1, CTNNB1, AMER1, DROSHA, DGCR8, XPO5, DICER1, SIX1, SIX2, MLLT1, MYCN, and TP53), we identified mutations in genes not previously recognized as recurrently involved in Wilms tumors, the most frequent being BCOR, BCORL1, NONO, MAX, COL6A3, ASXL1, MAP3K4, and ARID1A. DNA copy number changes resulted in recurrent 1q gain, MYCN amplification, LIN28B gain, and MIRLET7A loss. Unexpected germline variants involved PALB2 and CHEK2. Integrated analyses support two major classes of genetic changes that preserve the progenitor state and/or interrupt normal development.

  16. Glucose Metabolism Gene Expression Patterns and Tumor Uptake of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose After Radiation Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, George D.; Thibodeau, Bryan J.; Fortier, Laura E.; Pruetz, Barbara L.; Galoforo, Sandra; Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Chunta, John; Oliver Wong, Ching Yee; Yan, Di; Marples, Brian; Huang, Jiayi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether radiation treatment influences the expression of glucose metabolism genes and compromises the potential use of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) as a tool to monitor the early response of head and neck cancer xenografts to radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Low passage head and neck squamous cancer cells (UT14) were injected to the flanks of female nu/nu mice to generate xenografts. After tumors reached a size of 500 mm 3 they were treated with either sham RT or 15 Gy in 1 fraction. At different time points, days 3, 9, and 16 for controls and days 4, 7, 12, 21, 30, and 40 after irradiation, 2 to 3 mice were assessed with dynamic FDG-PET acquisition over 2 hours. Immediately after the FDG-PET the tumors were harvested for global gene expression analysis and immunohistochemical evaluation of GLUT1 and HK2. Different analytic parameters were used to process the dynamic PET data. Results: Radiation had no effect on key genes involved in FDG uptake and metabolism but did alter other genes in the HIF1α and glucose transport–related pathways. In contrast to the lack of effect on gene expression, changes in the protein expression patterns of the key genes GLUT1/SLC2A1 and HK2 were observed after radiation treatment. The changes in GLUT1 protein expression showed some correlation with dynamic FDG-PET parameters, such as the kinetic index. Conclusion: 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography changes after RT would seem to represent an altered metabolic state and not a direct effect on the key genes regulating FDG uptake and metabolism

  17. Ancestry as a potential modifier of gene expression in breast tumors from Colombian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia J Serrano-Gómez

    Full Text Available Hispanic/Latino populations are a genetically admixed and heterogeneous group, with variable fractions of European, Indigenous American and African ancestries. The molecular profile of breast cancer has been widely described in non-Hispanic Whites but equivalent knowledge is lacking in Hispanic/Latinas. We have previously reported that the most prevalent breast cancer intrinsic subtype in Colombian women was Luminal B as defined by St. Gallen 2013 criteria. In this study we explored ancestry-associated differences in molecular profiles of Luminal B tumors among these highly admixed women.We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-seq analysis in 42 Luminal tumors (21 Luminal A and 21 Luminal B from Colombian women. Genetic ancestry was estimated from a panel of 80 ancestry-informative markers (AIM. We categorized patients according to Luminal subtype and to the proportion of European and Indigenous American ancestry and performed differential expression analysis comparing Luminal B against Luminal A tumors according to the assigned ancestry groups.We found 5 genes potentially modulated by genetic ancestry: ERBB2 (log2FC = 2.367, padj<0.01, GRB7 (log2FC = 2.327, padj<0.01, GSDMB (log2FC = 1.723, padj<0.01, MIEN1 (log2FC = 2.195, padj<0.01 and ONECUT2 (log2FC = 2.204, padj<0.01. In the replication set we found a statistical significant association between ERBB2 expression with Indigenous American ancestry (p = 0.02, B = 3.11. This association was not biased by the distribution of HER2+ tumors among the groups analyzed.Our results suggest that genetic ancestry in Hispanic/Latina women might modify ERBB2 gene expression in Luminal tumors. Further analyses are needed to confirm these findings and explore their prognostic value.

  18. Gene delivery in conjunction with gold nanoparticle and tumor treating electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Soo Lee, Yeon

    2013-08-01

    The advances in electrotherapy to treat the diseased biological cell instigate its extension in gene therapy through the delivery of gene into the nucleus. The objective of this study is to investigate the application of moderate intensity alternating electric field, also known as tumor treating electric field on a carrier system consisting of a charged gene complex conjugated to the surface of a gold nanoparticle. The gene delivery mechanism relies on the magnitude and direction of the induced electric field inside the cytoplasm in presence of carrier system. The induced electric field strength is significant in breaking the gene complex-gold nanoparticle bonding, and exerting an electric force pushing the charged gene into the nucleus. The electric force orientation is dependent on the aspect ratio (AR) of the gold nanoparticle and a relationship between them is studied via Maxwell two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation analyzer. The development of charge density on the surface of carrier system and the required electric field strength to break the bonding are investigated utilizing the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame-Stern (GCGS) theoretical model. A carrier system having the aspect ratio of the gold nanoparticle in the range 1 < AR ≤ 5 and AR = 1 are substantial delivering cationic and anionic genes into the nucleus, respectively.

  19. Gene alterations in radiation-induced F344 rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.; Hahn, F.F.

    1994-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is frequently altered in all major histopathologic types of human lung tumors. Reported p53 mutations include base substitutions, allelic loss, rearrangements, and deletions. Point mutations resulting in base substitutions are clustered within a highly conserved region of the gene encoding exons 508, and mutations in this region substantially extend the half-life of the p53 protein. In addition to its prominent importance in lung carcinogenesis, the p53 gene plays a critical role in the cellular response to genetic damage caused by radiation. Specifically, the protein product of p53 induces a pause or block at the G 1 to S boundary of the cell cycle following radiation-caused DNA damage. This G 1 block may allow the cell time to repair the damaged DNA prior to replication. Cells lacking a functional p53 protein fail to pause for repair and consequently accumulate mutations in the genome at an accelerated rate. p53 has also been implicated as a controlling factor in apoptosis or in programmed cell death induced by DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation. The p53 gene is mutated in approximately 50% of squamous cell carcinomas from uranium miners who inhaled high doses of radon daughters. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a similar percentage of squamous cell carcinomas with p53 mutations developed in the lungs of rats exposed to aerosols of 239 PuO 2

  20. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

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    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  1. Remodeling epigenetic modifications at tumor suppressor gene promoters with bovine oocyte extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenfei; Yue, Yongli; Han, Pengyong; Sa, Rula; Ren, Xiaolv; Wang, Jie; Bai, Haidong; Yu, Haiquan

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes by aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications at their promoter regions plays an important role in the initiation and progression of cancer. The therapeutic effect of the widely used epigenetic drugs, including DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors, remains unsatisfactory. One important underlying factor in the ineffectiveness of these drugs is that their actions lack specificity. To investigate whether oocyte extract can be used for epigenetic re-programming of cancer cells, H460 human lung cancer cells were reversibly permeabilized and incubated with bovine oocyte extract. Bisulfite sequencing showed that bovine oocyte extract induced significant demethylation at hypermethylated promoter CpG islands of the tumor suppressor genes RUNX3 and CDH1; however, the DNA methylation levels of repetitive sequences were not affected. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that bovine oocyte extract significantly reduced transcriptionally repressive histone modifications and increased transcriptionally activating histone modifications at the promoter regions of RUNX3 and CDH1. Bovine oocyte extract reactivated the expression of RUNX3 and CDH1 at both the messenger RNA and the protein levels without up-regulating the transcription of pluripotency-associated genes. At the functional level, anchorage-independent proliferation, migration and invasion of H460 cells was strongly inhibited. These results demonstrate that bovine oocyte extract reactivates epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes by remodeling the epigenetic modifications at their promoter regions. Bovine oocyte extract may provide a useful tool for investigating epigenetic mechanisms in cancer and a valuable source for developing novel safe therapeutic approaches that target epigenetic alterations. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic interactions between the Drosophila tumor suppressor gene ept and the stat92E transcription factor.

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    M Melissa Gilbert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101 promotes the endocytic degradation of transmembrane proteins and is implicated as a mutational target in cancer, yet the effect of TSG101 loss on cell proliferation in vertebrates is uncertain. By contrast, Drosophila epithelial tissues lacking the TSG101 ortholog erupted (ept develop as enlarged undifferentiated tumors, indicating that the gene can have anti-growth properties in a simple metazoan. A full understanding of pathways deregulated by loss of Drosophila ept will aid in understanding potential links between mammalian TSG101 and growth control.We have taken a genetic approach to the identification of pathways required for excess growth of Drosophila eye-antennal imaginal discs lacking ept. We find that this phenotype is very sensitive to the genetic dose of stat92E, the transcriptional effector of the Jak-Stat signaling pathway, and that this pathway undergoes strong activation in ept mutant cells. Genetic evidence indicates that stat92E contributes to cell cycle deregulation and excess cell size phenotypes that are observed among ept mutant cells. In addition, autonomous Stat92E hyper-activation is associated with altered tissue architecture in ept tumors and an effect on expression of the apical polarity determinant crumbs.These findings identify ept as a cell-autonomous inhibitor of the Jak-Stat pathway and suggest that excess Jak-Stat signaling makes a significant contribution to proliferative and tissue architectural phenotypes that occur in ept mutant tissues.

  3. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

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    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  4. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  5. Methylation and expression profiles of MGMT gene in thymic epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Mohamed; Kondo, Kazuya; Namura, Toshiaki; Ali, Abdellah H K; Fujita, Yui; Takai, Chikako; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Toba, Hiroaki; Kajiura, Koichiro; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kawakami, Gyokei; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira

    2014-02-01

    A key challenge in diagnosis and treatment of thymic epithelial tumors (TET) is in improving our understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes of these relatively rare tumors. Methylation specific PCR (MSP) and immunohistochemistry were applied to 66 TET to profile the methylation status of DNA repair gene O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and its protein expression in TET to clarify the association between MGMT status and clinicopathological features, response to chemotherapy and overall survival. MGMT methylation was significantly more frequent in thymic carcinoma than in thymoma (17/23, 74% versus 13/44, 29%; PMGMT protein was significantly more frequent in thymic carcinoma than in thymoma (20/23, 87% versus 10/44, 23%; PMGMT methylation and loss of its protein expression (PMGMT methylation and loss of expression were significantly more frequent in advanced thymic epithelial tumors (III/IV) than in early tumors (I/II). MGMT methylation plays a soul role in development of TET, especially in thymic carcinoma. Therefore, translation of our results from basic molecular research to clinical practice may have important implication for considering MGMT methylation as a marker and a target of future therapies in TET. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Search for the sex-determining switch in monotremes: mapping WT1, SF1, LHX1, LHX2, FGF9, WNT4, RSPO1 and GATA4 in platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafodatskaya, Daria; Rens, Willem; Wallis, Mary C; Trifonov, Vladimir; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Clarke, Oliver; Graves, Jennifer A M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2007-01-01

    The duck-billed platypus has five pairs of sex chromosomes, but there is no information about the primary sex-determining switch in this species. As there is no apparent SRY orthologue in platypus, another gene must acquire the function of a key regulator of the gonadal male or female fate. SOX9 was ruled out from being this key regulator as it maps to an autosome in platypus. To check whether other genes in mammalian gonadogenesis could be the primary switch in monotremes, we have mapped a number of candidates in platypus. We report here the autosomal location of WT1, SF1, LHX1, LHX9, FGF9, WNT4 and RSPO1 in platypus, thus excluding these from being key regulators of sex determination in this species. We found that GATA4 maps to sex chromosomes Y1 and X2; however, it lies in the pairing region shown by chromosome painting to be homologous, so is unlikely to be either male-specific or differentially dosed in male and female.

  7. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

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    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  8. Nonviral gene therapy in vivo with PAM-RG4/apoptin as a potential brain tumor therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Songhie; Nam, Kihoon; Choi, Sunghyun; Bai, Cheng Z; Lee, Yan; Park, Jong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Glioma is still one of the most complicated forms of brain tumor to remove completely due to its location and the lack of an efficient means to specifically eliminate tumor cells. For these reasons, this study has examined the effectiveness of a nonviral gene therapy approach utilizing a tumor-selective killer gene on a brain tumor xenograft model. The therapeutic apoptin gene was recombined into the JDK plasmid and delivered into human brain tumor cells (U87MG) by using a polyamidoamine dendrimer with an arginine surface (PAM-RG4). Studies in vitro showed that the PAM-RG4/apoptin plasmid polyplex exhibited a particularly high transfection activity of .40%. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) TUNEL assay, DAPI staining, and caspase-3 activity assay verified that the tumor cells had undergone apoptosis induced by apoptin. For in vivo studies, the polyplex was injected into tumors, which were induced by injecting U87MG cells intradermally into nude mice. Based on hematoxylin and eosin staining, epidermal growth factor receptor immunohistochemistry results and tumor volume measurement results, tumor growth was effectively inhibited and no specific edema, irritation, or other harm to the skin was observed after polyplex injection. The in vivo expression of apoptin and the induction of apoptosis were verified by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, TUNEL assay, and DAPI staining. The PAM-RG4/apoptin gene polyplex is a strong candidate for brain tumor therapeutics because of the synergistic effect of the carrier's high transfection efficiency (35%-40%) in glioma cells and the selective apoptosis-inducing activity of apoptin in tumor cells.

  9. A study on tumor suppressor genes mutations associated with different pathological colorectal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar, S.N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the Western world. In Egypt; there is an increasing incidence of the disease, especially among patients ≤40 years age. While CRC have been reported in low incidence rate in developing countries, it is the third most common tumor in male and the fifth common tumor in females in Egypt. Early diagnosis and surgical interference guarantee long survival of most CRC patients. Early diagnosis is impeded by the disease onset at young age and imprecise symptoms at the initial stages of the disease. As in most solid tumors, the malignant transformation of colonic epithelial cells is to arise through a multistep process during which they acquire genetic changes involving the activation of proto-oncogenes and the loss of tumor suppressor genes. Recently, a candidate tumor suppressor gene, KLF6, which is mapped to chromosome 10p, was found to be frequently mutated in a number of cancers. There are some evidences suggesting that the disruption of the functional activity of KLF6 gene products may be one of the early events in tumor genesis of the colon. The main objective of the present study was to detect mutational changes of KLF6 tumor suppressor gene and to study the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) markers at chromosome 10p15 (KLF6 locus) in colorectal lesions and colorectal cancer in Egyptian patients. The patients included in this study were 83 presented with different indications for colonoscopic examination. Selecting patients with colorectal pre-cancerous lesions or colorectal cancer was done according to the results of tissue biopsy from lesion and adjacent normal. The patients were classified into three main groups; (G I) Cancerous group, (G II) polyps group including patients with adenomatous polyps (AP), familial adenomatous polyps (FAP) and hyperplastic polyps (HP) and (G III) Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) including patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD

  10. Centrosome clustering and cyclin D1 gene amplification in double minutes are common events in chromosomal unstable bladder tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Javier del; Prat, Esther; Ponsa, Immaculada; Lloreta, Josep; Gelabert, Antoni; Algaba, Ferran; Camps, Jordi; Miró, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Aneuploidy, centrosome abnormalities and gene amplification are hallmarks of chromosome instability (CIN) in cancer. Yet there are no studies of the in vivo behavior of these phenomena within the same bladder tumor. Twenty-one paraffin-embedded bladder tumors were analyzed by conventional comparative genome hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cyclin D1 gene (CCND1)/centromere 11 dual-color probe. Immunofluorescent staining of α, β and γ tubulin was also performed. Based on the CIN index, defined as the percentage of cells not displaying the modal number for chromosome 11, tumors were classified as CIN-negative and CIN-positive. Fourteen out of 21 tumors were considered CIN-positive. All T1G3 tumors were included in the CIN-positive group whereas the majority of Ta samples were classified as CIN-negative tumors. Centrosome clustering was observed in six out of 12 CIN-positive tumors analyzed. CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions was present in six out of 14 CIN-positive tumors; three of them also showed amplification of this gene in double minutes. Complex in vivo behavior of CCND1 amplicon in bladder tumor cells has been demonstrated by accurate FISH analysis on paraffin-embedded tumors. Positive correlation between high heterogeneity, centrosome abnormalities and CCND1 amplification was found in T1G3 bladder carcinomas. This is the first study to provide insights into the coexistence of CCND1 amplification in homogeneously staining regions and double minutes in primary bladder tumors. It is noteworthy that those patients whose tumors showed double minutes had a significantly shorter overall survival rate (p < 0.001)

  11. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

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    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  12. Cytokines and tumor metastasis gene variants in oral cancer and precancer in Puerto Rico.

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    Esther Erdei

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR.Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia, or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption.Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α -238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03-0.70. The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 -509 C/T polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09-0.79. The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1 variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05-6.53 compared to people with ancestral alleles.Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR.

  13. Cytokines and tumor metastasis gene variants in oral cancer and precancer in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Esther; Luo, Li; Sheng, Huiping; Maestas, Erika; White, Kirsten A M; Mackey, Amanda; Dong, Yan; Berwick, Marianne; Morse, Douglas E

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR). Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia), or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption. Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) -238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03-0.70). The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 -509 C/T) polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09-0.79). The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1) variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05-6.53) compared to people with ancestral alleles. Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR.

  14. Gene expression profiles of progestin-induced canine mammary hyperplasia and spontaneous mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N A S; van Wolferen, M E; Gracanin, A; Bhatti, S F M; Krol, M; Holstege, F C; Mol, J A

    2009-05-01

    Spontaneous mammary tumors are the most prevalent type of neoplasms in women as well as in female dogs. Although ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone are known to play a key role in mammary tumorigenesis, conflicting reports have been obtained from in vivo and in vitro studies concerning the role of especially progesterone in mammary tumorigenesis. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of progesterone during the unusually long luteal phase of the estrous cycle is suspected to be the key event in canine mammary tumorigenesis. Accordingly, previous studies have shown the development of mammary hyperplasia in dogs upon prolonged progestin administration. In this study, a dog-specific cDNA microarray was used to identify oncogenic determinants in progestin-induced canine hyperplasia (CMH) and spontaneous mammary tumors (CMC) by comparing expression profiles to those obtained from mammary glands of healthy dogs. The CMH profile showed elevated expression of genes involved in cell proliferation such as PCNA, NPY, RAN and also alterations in expression of transcription factors and cell adhesion molecules. Whereas in CMC, major alterations to the expression of genes involved in cell motility, cytoskeletal organization and extra cellular matrix production was evident besides differential expression of cell proliferation inducing genes. The overall gene expression profile of CMH was related to cell proliferation where as that of CMC was associated with both cell proliferation as well as neoplastic transformation. In conclusion, our findings support a strong cell proliferation inducing potential of progestins in the canine mammary gland. Moreover, deregulated genes identified in CMC are potentially involved in their malignant and may serve as prospective therapeutic targets.

  15. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  16. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela; Sarasin, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis

  17. The role of UV induced lesions in skin carcinogenesis: an overview of oncogene and tumor suppressor gene modifications in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daya-Grosjean, Leela [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: daya@igr.fr; Sarasin, Alain [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Cancer, UPR2169 CNRS, IFR 54, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2005-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), a rare hereditary syndrome, is characterized by a hypersensitivity to solar irradiation due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair resulting in a predisposition to squamous and basal cell carcinomas as well as malignant melanomas appearing at a very early age. The mutator phenotype of XP cells is evident by the higher levels of UV specific modifications found in key regulatory genes in XP skin tumors compared to those in the same tumor types from the normal population. Thus, XP provides a unique model for the study of unrepaired DNA lesions, mutations and skin carcinogenesis. The high level of ras oncogene activation, Ink4a-Arf and p53 tumor suppressor gene modifications as well as alterations of the different partners of the mitogenic sonic hedgehog signaling pathway (patched, smoothened and sonic hedgehog), characterized in XP skin tumors have clearly demonstrated the major role of the UV component of sunlight in the development of skin tumors. The majority of the mutations are C to T or tandem CC to TT UV signature transitions, occurring at bipyrimidine sequences, the specific targets of UV induced lesions. These characteristics are also found in the same genes modified in sporadic skin cancers but with lower frequencies confirming the validity of studying the XP model. The knowledge gained by studying XP tumors has given us a greater perception of the contribution of genetic predisposition to cancer as well as the consequences of the many alterations which modulate the activities of different genes affecting crucial pathways vital for maintaining cell homeostasis.

  18. Mosaic zebrafish transgenesis for functional genomic analysis of candidate cooperative genes in tumor pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Choong Yong; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Zhihui; Zhu, Shizhen

    2015-03-31

    Comprehensive genomic analysis has uncovered surprisingly large numbers of genetic alterations in various types of cancers. To robustly and efficiently identify oncogenic "drivers" among these tumors and define their complex relationships with concurrent genetic alterations during tumor pathogenesis remains a daunting task. Recently, zebrafish have emerged as an important animal model for studying human diseases, largely because of their ease of maintenance, high fecundity, obvious advantages for in vivo imaging, high conservation of oncogenes and their molecular pathways, susceptibility to tumorigenesis and, most importantly, the availability of transgenic techniques suitable for use in the fish. Transgenic zebrafish models of cancer have been widely used to dissect oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor types. However, developing a stable transgenic fish model is both tedious and time-consuming, and it is even more difficult and more time-consuming to dissect the cooperation of multiple genes in disease pathogenesis using this approach, which requires the generation of multiple transgenic lines with overexpression of the individual genes of interest followed by complicated breeding of these stable transgenic lines. Hence, use of a mosaic transient transgenic approach in zebrafish offers unique advantages for functional genomic analysis in vivo. Briefly, candidate transgenes can be coinjected into one-cell-stage wild-type or transgenic zebrafish embryos and allowed to integrate together into each somatic cell in a mosaic pattern that leads to mixed genotypes in the same primarily injected animal. This permits one to investigate in a faster and less expensive manner whether and how the candidate genes can collaborate with each other to drive tumorigenesis. By transient overexpression of activated ALK in the transgenic fish overexpressing MYCN, we demonstrate here the cooperation of these two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of a pediatric cancer, neuroblastoma that has

  19. Radiosensitivity and gene expression of human lung cancer cells dividing in nude tumor before (anoxic) and after vascular induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Ishii, Sachiko; Koto, Masashi; Imai, Reiko; Saegusa, Kimiko; Michikawa, Yuichi; Imai, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    We cloned H2 cell line from IA cell line (human large cell lung cancer) in anoxic cell culture. AH2 nude tumor develops a poor vascular system with rich fibrous component and shows low radiosensitivity compared with IA tumor. In relation to radiosensitivity, we studied the gene expression of the both cell lines grown in culture under an oxic or anoxic condition, and in a nude tumor with a microarray method using 22K custom oligoallele. As a result, we found that the both cells depressed CXCL1 and CXCL gene in anoxic culture condition and depressed or expressed IF127, EBI3, and cytokine like protein C17 gene in a nude tumor. (author)

  20. Radiosensitivity and gene expression of human lung cancer cells dividing in nude tumor before (anoxic) and after vascular induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Ishii, Sachiko; Baba, Masayuki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Furuno, Aki; Saegusa, Kimiko; Michikawa, Y.; Imai, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We cloned H2 cell line from IA cell line (human large cell lung cancer) in anoxic cell culture. AH2 nude tumor develops a poor vascular system with rich fibrous component and shows low radiosensitivity compared with IA tumor. In relation to radiosensitivity, we studied the gene expression of the both cell lines grown in culture under an oxic or anoxic condition, and in a nude tumor with a microarray method using 22K custom oligoallele. As a result, we found that the both cells depressed CXCL1 and CXCL gene in anoxic culture condition and depressed or expressed IFI27, EBI3, and cytokine like protein C17 gene in a nude tumor. (author)

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host. PMID:22530882

  2. Multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised graph-based tumor classification using gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jie; Wang, Shu-Lin; Lei, Ying-Ke

    2010-11-01

    Both supervised methods and unsupervised methods have been widely used to solve the tumor classification problem based on gene expression profiles. This paper introduces a semi-supervised graph-based method for tumor classification. Feature extraction plays a key role in tumor classification based on gene expression profiles, and can greatly improve the performance of a classifier. In this paper we propose a novel multi-step dimensionality reduction method for extracting tumor-related features. First the Wilcoxon rank-sum test is used for gene selection. Then gene ranking and discrete cosine transform are combined with principal component analysis for feature extraction. Finally, the performance is evaluated by semi-supervised learning algorithms. To show the validity of the proposed method, we apply it to classify four tumor datasets involving various human normal and tumor tissue samples. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and feasible. Compared with other methods, our method can achieve relatively higher prediction accuracy. Particularly, it is found that semi-supervised method is superior to support vector machines in classification performance. The proposed approach can effectively improve the performance of tumor classification based on gene expression profiles. This work is a meaningful attempt to explore and apply multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised learning methods in the field of tumor classification. Considering the high classification accuracy, there should be much room for the application of multi-step dimensionality reduction and semi-supervised learning methods to perform tumor classification. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced gene expression in tumors after intravenous administration of arginine-, lysine- and leucine-bearing polyethylenimine polyplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawsari, Hibah; Raj, Behin Sundara; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Blatchford, David R; Tate, Rothwelle J; Tetley, Laurence; Dufès, Christine

    2011-10-01

    The potential of gene therapy to treat cancer is currently limited by the low expression of therapeutic genes in the tumors. Because amino acids are known to have excellent properties in cell penetration and gene expression regulation, we investigated if the conjugation of arginine (Arg), lysine (Lys) and leucine (Leu) onto the surface of the gene delivery system polyethylenimine (PEI) could lead to an improved gene expression in tumors. The intravenous administration of Arg-, Lys- and Leu-bearing PEI polyplexes led to a significant increase of gene expression in the tumor, with a β-galactosidase expression amount at least threefold higher than that obtained after treatment with unmodified PEI polyplex. The three amino acid-bearing PEI polyplexes led to similar levels of gene expression in the tumor. The treatments were well tolerated by the mice. Arg-, Lys- and Leu-bearing PEI polyplexes are therefore highly promising gene delivery systems for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Overexpression of the p53 tumor suppressor gene product in primary lung adenocarcinomas is associated with cigarette smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, W. H.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Goodman, S. N.; Slebos, R. J.; Polak, M.; Baas, I. O.; Rodenhuis, S.; Hruban, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are frequently observed in primary lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting that these mutations are critical events in the malignant transformation of airway cells. These mutations are often associated with stabilization of the p53 gene product, resulting in the

  5. Ki-ras gene mutations are invariably present in low-grade mucinous tumors of the vermiform appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Peter; Berman, Errol; Marotta, Stephen; Sabbath-Solitare, Marlene; Bishop, Timothy

    2011-07-01

    Low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix appear to have a simple histological structure. Paradoxically, reports have suggested a greater frequency of Ki-ras gene mutation in these lesions than in more complex lesions such as benign colonic adenomas and carcinomas. We assessed several molecular genetic changes, including Ki-ras gene mutations, in a large series of low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix. We retrospectively ascertained low-grade mucinous tumors of the appendix from computerized pathology records. Extracted DNA was analyzed for APC and DCC gene loss of heterozygosity, microsatellite instability and for the presence of Ki-ras gene mutation using standard molecular techniques. Controls consisted of normal appendices, other appendiceal neoplasms, and ovarian mucinous cystadenomas. A total of 31 low-grade appendiceal mucinous tumors were identified. All were microsatellite stable and none demonstrated loss of heterozygosity for the APC or DCC genes. By contrast, all 31 lesions contained a Ki-ras gene mutation. The presence of a Ki-ras gene mutation in all lesions, with no other molecular changes identified, strongly suggests a possible etiological role of the Ki-ras mutation in the development of this particular lesion of the appendix. Based on other work regarding intestinal bacteria, we hypothesize a relationship between chronic inflammation of the appendix from bacterial overgrowth and Ki-ras gene mutation.

  6. Splice Expression Variation Analysis (SEVA) for Inter-tumor Heterogeneity of Gene Isoform Usage in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Bahman; Guo, Theresa; Considine, Michael; Florea, Liliana; Kagohara, Luciane T; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve L; Kelley, Dylan; Flam, Emily; Zambo, Kristina D; Ha, Patrick K; Geman, Donald; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Gaykalova, Daria A; Favorov, Alexander V; Fertig, Elana J

    2018-01-12

    Current bioinformatics methods to detect changes in gene isoform usage in distinct phenotypes compare the relative expected isoform usage in phenotypes. These statistics model differences in isoform usage in normal tissues, which have stable regulation of gene splicing. Pathological conditions, such as cancer, can have broken regulation of splicing that increases the heterogeneity of the expression of splice variants. Inferring events with such differential heterogeneity in gene isoform usage requires new statistical approaches. We introduce Splice Expression Variability Analysis (SEVA) to model increased heterogeneity of splice variant usage between conditions (e.g., tumor and normal samples). SEVA uses a rank-based multivariate statistic that compares the variability of junction expression profiles within one condition to the variability within another. Simulated data show that SEVA is unique in modeling heterogeneity of gene isoform usage, and benchmark SEVA's performance against EBSeq, DiffSplice, and rMATS that model differential isoform usage instead of heterogeneity. We confirm the accuracy of SEVA in identifying known splice variants in head and neck cancer and perform cross-study validation of novel splice variants. A novel comparison of splice variant heterogeneity between subtypes of head and neck cancer demonstrated unanticipated similarity between the heterogeneity of gene isoform usage in HPV-positive and HPV-negative subtypes and anticipated increased heterogeneity among HPV-negative samples with mutations in genes that regulate the splice variant machinery. These results show that SEVA accurately models differential heterogeneity of gene isoform usage from RNA-seq data. SEVA is implemented in the R/Bioconductor package GSReg. bahman@jhu.edu, ejfertig@jhmi.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    ) and irradiated normal tissue cells (MRC5). Using gammaH2AX foci at 24 hours after IR, we identified several genes, such as BRCA2, Lig IV, and XRCC5, whose knockdown is known to cause increased cell radiosensitivity, thereby validating the primary screening end point. In addition, we identified POLQ (DNA...... radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B...

  8. Kras gene mutation and RASSF1A, FHIT and MGMT gene promoter hypermethylation: indicators of tumor staging and metastasis in adenocarcinomatous sporadic colorectal cancer in Indian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal Sinha

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC development involves underlying modifications at genetic/epigenetic level. This study evaluated the role of Kras gene mutation and RASSF1A, FHIT and MGMT gene promoter hypermethylation together/independently in sporadic CRC in Indian population and correlation with clinicopathological variables of the disease.One hundred and twenty four consecutive surgically resected tissues (62 tumor and equal number of normal adjacent controls of primary sporadic CRC were included and patient details including demographic characteristics, lifestyle/food or drinking habits, clinical and histopathological profiles were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction - Restriction fragment length polymorphism and direct sequencing for Kras gene mutation and Methylation Specific-PCR for RASSF1A, FHIT and MGMT genes was performed.Kras gene mutation at codon 12 & 13 and methylated RASSF1A, FHIT and MGMT gene was observed in 47%, 19%, 47%, 37% and 47% cases, respectively. Alcohol intake and smoking were significantly associated with presence of Kras mutation (codon 12 and MGMT methylation (p-value <0.049. Tumor stage and metastasis correlated with presence of mutant Kras codon 12 (p-values 0.018, 0.044 and methylated RASSF1A (p-values 0.034, 0.044, FHIT (p-values 0.001, 0.047 and MGMT (p-values 0.018, 0.044 genes. Combinatorial effect of gene mutation/methylation was also observed (p-value <0.025. Overall, tumor stage 3, moderately differentiated tumors, presence of lymphatic invasion and absence of metastasis was more frequently observed in tumors with mutated Kras and/or methylated RASSF1A, FHIT and MGMT genes.Synergistic interrelationship between these genes in sporadic CRC may be used as diagnostic/prognostic markers in assessing the overall pathological status of CRC.

  9. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Ludes-Meyers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  10. Neuroendocrine Tumors in the Stomach, Duodenum, and Pancreas Accompanied by Novel MEN1 Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min A; Lee, Woong Ki; Shin, Hong Shik; Park, Sung Hyun; Kim, Byung Sun; Kim, Ji Woong; Cho, Jin Woong; Yun, So Hee

    2017-03-25

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) syndrome is a relatively rare disease, characterized by the occurrence of multiple endocrine tumors in the parathyroid and pituitary glands as well as the pancreas. Here, we report a case of MEN1 with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in the stomach, duodenum, and pancreas. A 53-year-old man visited our hospital to manage gastric NET. Five years prior to his visit, he had undergone surgery for incidental meningioma. His brother had pancreatic nodules and a history of surgery for adrenal adenoma. His brother's daughter also had pancreatic nodules, but had not undergone surgery. The lesion was treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection and diagnosed as a grade 1 NET. Another small NET was detected in the second duodenal portion, resected by endoscopic submucosal dissection, which was also diagnosed as a grade 1 NET. During evaluation, three nodules were detected in the pancreas, and no evidence of pituitary, parathyroid tumors, or metastasis was observed. After surgery, the pancreatic lesions were diagnosed as NETs, with the same immunohistochemical patterns as those of the stomach and duodenum. Genetic testing was performed, and a heterozygous mutation was detected in the MEN1 gene, which is located on 11q13.

  11. Screening and identification of significant genes related to tumor metastasis and PSMA in prostate cancer using microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Wang, Zhu; Li, Xiao-Fei; He, Xia; Guan, Lin-Lin; Tuo, Jiu-Ling; Wang, Yang; Luo, Yanfen; Zhong, Hui-Ling; Qiu, Shao-Peng; Cao, Kai-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the causes for the high mortality rate of prostate cancer (PCa) patients, yet the molecular mechanisms of PCa metastasis are not fully understood. In our previous studies, we found that PSMA suppresses the metastasis of PCa, yet the underlying mechanism remains unknown. To identify the genes related to tumor metastasis possibly regulated by PSMA, we performed tumor metastasis PCR array assay to analyze the differentially expressed tumor metastasis-related genes. Eighty-four tumor metastasis related genes were screened in si-PSMA LNCap cells (PSMA silenced by siRNA)/LNCap cells and in PC-3/LNcap cells, respectively. Expression levels of possible related genes were verified by real-time PCR in 4 prostate cancer cell lines (LNCap, 22RV1, PC-3 and DU145) and in 85 clinical samples (12 normal, 26 benign prostatic hypertrophy and 47 prostate cancer tissues). The results showed that 10 genes (including CDH6 and CXCL12) were upregulated and 4 genes (CCL7, ITGB3, MDM2 and MMP2) were downregulated in the si-PSMA LNCap cells. There were 41 genes significantly upregulated and 15 genes downregulated in PC-3 cells when compared with LNCap cells. Eight common genes were found in both the si-PSMA and PSMA(-) groups. CDH6, MMP3, MTSS1 were further identified as PSMA-related genes in the prostate cancer cell lines and clinical samples, and their expression showed a negative correlation with the stage of prostate cancer (P<0.0001) and PSMA level (P<0.05) in clinical samples, indicating their possible involvement in PSMA-related PCa metastasis regulation. These findings may provide insights into the mechanism involved in the suppression of PCa metastasis by PSMA and its possible interacting proteins, and may provide clues for further exploration of the molecular mechanism of PCa metastasis.

  12. Frequent long-range epigenetic silencing of protocadherin gene clusters on chromosome 5q31 in Wilms' tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Dallosso

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Wilms' tumour (WT is a pediatric tumor of the kidney that arises via failure of the fetal developmental program. The absence of identifiable mutations in the majority of WTs suggests the frequent involvement of epigenetic aberrations in WT. We therefore conducted a genome-wide analysis of promoter hypermethylation in WTs and identified hypermethylation at chromosome 5q31 spanning 800 kilobases (kb and more than 50 genes. The methylated genes all belong to alpha-, beta-, and gamma-protocadherin (PCDH gene clusters (Human Genome Organization nomenclature PCDHA@, PCDHB@, and PCDHG@, respectively. This demonstrates that long-range epigenetic silencing (LRES occurs in developmental tumors as well as in adult tumors. Bisulfite polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that PCDH hypermethylation is a frequent event found in all Wilms' tumor subtypes. Hypermethylation is concordant with reduced PCDH expression in tumors. WT precursor lesions showed no PCDH hypermethylation, suggesting that de novo PCDH hypermethylation occurs during malignant progression. Discrete boundaries of the PCDH domain are delimited by abrupt changes in histone modifications; unmethylated genes flanking the LRES are associated with permissive marks which are absent from methylated genes within the domain. Silenced genes are marked with non-permissive histone 3 lysine 9 dimethylation. Expression analysis of embryonic murine kidney and differentiating rat metanephric mesenchymal cells demonstrates that Pcdh expression is developmentally regulated and that Pcdhg@ genes are expressed in blastemal cells. Importantly, we show that PCDHs negatively regulate canonical Wnt signalling, as short-interfering RNA-induced reduction of PCDHG@ encoded proteins leads to elevated beta-catenin protein, increased beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF reporter activity, and induction of Wnt target genes. Conversely, over-expression of PCDHs suppresses beta-catenin/TCF-reporter activity and also inhibits

  13. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-03-27

    Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C > G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C > G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. In this study, the DNA sequences of four genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2, in the DNA mismatch repair system were determined via direct sequencing to elucidate the exact mechanism for the development of this granulosa cell tumor. The results showed that two missense germline mutations, T485K and N775L, inactivate the PMS2 gene. The results of this case study indicated that although FOXL2 402C > G mutation determines the development of granulosa cell tumor, PMS2 mutation may be the initial driver of carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry-based tumor testing for mismatch repair gene expression may be necessary for granulosa cell tumors to determine their malignant potential or if they are part of Lynch syndrome.

  14. Dual responsive promoters to target therapeutic gene expression to radiation-resistant hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, Naomi; Cowen, Rachel L.; Sheppard, Freda C.D.; Robinson, Suzanne; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon D.; Stratford, Ian J.; Patterson, Adam V.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is unequivocally linked to poor radiotherapy outcome. This study aimed to identify enhancer sequences that respond maximally to a combination of radiation and hypoxia for use in genetic radiotherapy approaches. Methods and materials: The influence of radiation (5 Gy) and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) on reporter-gene expression driven by hypoxia (HRE) and radiation (Egr-1) responsive elements was evaluated in tumor cells grown as monolayers or multicellular spheroids. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α protein expression was monitored in parallel. Results: Of the sequences tested, an HRE from the phosphoglycerate kinase-1 gene (PGK-18[5+]) was maximally induced in response to hypoxia plus radiation in all 5 cell lines tested. The additional radiation treatment afforded a significant increase in the induction of PGK-18[5+] compared with hypoxia alone in 3 cell lines. HIF-1α/2α were induced by radiation but combined hypoxia/radiation treatment did not yield a further increase. The dual responsive nature of HREs was maintained when spheroids were irradiated after delivery of HRE constructs in a replication-deficient adenovirus. Conclusions: Hypoxia-responsive enhancer element sequences are dually responsive to combined radiation and hypoxic treatment. Their use in genetic radiotherapy in vivo could maximize expression in the most radio-resistant population at the time of radiation and also exploit microenvironmental changes after radiotherapy to yield additional switch-on

  15. The PTEN tumor suppressor gene and its role in lymphoma pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Huiqiang; Young, Ken H.

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog gene PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer. Loss of PTEN function occurs in a variety of human cancers via its mutation, deletion, transcriptional silencing, or protein instability. PTEN deficiency in cancer has been associated with advanced disease, chemotherapy resistance, and poor survival. Impaired PTEN function, which antagonizes phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, causes the accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate and thereby the suppression of downstream components of the PI3K pathway, including the protein kinase B and mammalian target of rapamycin kinases. In addition to having lipid phosphorylation activity, PTEN has critical roles in the regulation of genomic instability, DNA repair, stem cell self-renewal, cellular senescence, and cell migration. Although PTEN deficiency in solid tumors has been studied extensively, rare studies have investigated PTEN alteration in lymphoid malignancies. However, genomic or epigenomic aberrations of PTEN and dysregulated signaling are likely critical in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. This review provides updated summary on the role of PTEN deficiency in human cancers, specifically in lymphoid malignancies; the molecular mechanisms of PTEN regulation; and the distinct functions of nuclear PTEN. Therapeutic strategies for rescuing PTEN deficiency in human cancers are proposed. PMID:26655726

  16. Beta4 integrin subunit gene expression correlates with tumor size and nuclear grade in early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Leslie K; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Zhou, Xiao; Welch, Kristin L; Smith, Terry L; Yang, Ying; Sneige, Nour; Sahin, Aysegul A; Gilcrease, Michael Z

    2005-09-01

    In vitro data support a role for the alpha6beta4 integrin in tumor cell migration and invasion, particularly in breast carcinoma cells, but clinical data on this potentially important integrin are limited. The beta4 integrin subunit has been shown to cluster with genes characteristic of basal/myoepithelial cells in cDNA microarray analyses of breast cancer, and the subset of breast cancers with increased expression of genes characteristic of basal/myoepithelial cells appears to be particularly aggressive. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alpha6beta4 integrin expression correlates with aggressive clinicopathologic features of breast cancer and whether expression of this integrin has prognostic significance in early breast cancer. We evaluated tumor expression of the beta4 integrin subunit gene in a cohort of patients with early invasive breast carcinoma by in situ hybridization and correlated expression levels with multiple clinicopathologic characteristics. We also evaluated expression of laminin-5 protein, the principal ligand of alpha6beta4, in this patient cohort. Although we observed a slight trend towards decreased disease-free survival for patients whose tumors had high beta4 gene expression and coexpression of laminin-5, this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.11). However, we did observe a correlation between beta4 mRNA expression and both tumor size (P=0.01) and tumor nuclear grade (Plaminin-5 protein expression in early breast cancer, but increased beta4 gene expression in larger tumors and in higher grade tumors does support a potential role for the alpha6beta4 integrin in tumor progression.

  17. Analysis of Relationship between Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Gene (G308A Polymorphism) with Preterm Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Lobat; Danesh, Azar; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Heybati, Fateme; Hashemzadeh, Morteza

    2013-08-01

    Increased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in blood and amniotic fluid are observed in women with preterm delivery (PTD) and TNF-α mutations at -308 position are associated with higher expression of this gene. Therefore, we compared the frequency of G308A transition in the promoter region of TNF-α gene of women and neonates delivered preterm with the normal subjects. This cross-sectional study was performed on 135 mothers who were referred for delivery. According to the gestational age, mothers and their neonates were allocated to the case (preterm, 64 subjects) and control (term, 71 subjects) groups. Using the polymerase chain reaction, restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), genotyping was performed on both maternal peripheral blood and cord blood samples to determine single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of TNF-α gene at -308. Two mothers in the case group, one mother in the control group and one neonate in the case group had genotyping assays (GA) mutation. All other subjects had normal GG genotype. Frequency of GA mutation was not significantly different between two groups (P = 0.47). There is no significant association between PTD and either maternal or fetal TNF-α -308 polymorphism and frequency ofGAmutation is not significantly increased in mothers and neonates delivered preterm. It means that the presence of this mutation by itself does not modify the overall risk of PTD. Investigations on the combination of various polymorphisms indifferent genes are recommended to achieve more accurate results.

  18. Altered regulation of Prox1-gene-expression in liver tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füzesi Laszlo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 transcription factor was described as a tumor-suppressor gene in liver tumors. In contrast, Prox1 knock out in murine embryos drastically reduces proliferation of hepatoblasts. Methods We have studied the expression of Prox1 in normal liver, liver cirrhosis and peritumoral liver samples in comparison to hepatocellular (HCC and cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC at mRNA, protein and functional levels. Results Prox1 was found in hepatocytes of normal liver, while normal bile duct epithelial cells were negative. However, Prox1+ cells, which co-expressed biliary epithelial makers and showed ductular morphology, could be detected within fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers, and in both HCC and CCC. Two Prox1 mRNA isoforms (2.9 kb and 7.9 kb were identified with a prevalence of the longer isoform in several HCC samples and the shorter in most CCC samples. Evidence was provided that Myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ might significantly contribute to the gene expression of Prox1 in HCC, while neo-expression of Prox1 in CCC remains to be resolved. A point mutation in the prospero domain of Prox1 was found in one HCC sample. Conclusion Our study shows dysregulation of Prox1 in liver cirrhosis, HCC and CCC, such as neo-expression in cells with biliary epithelial phenotype in liver cirrhosis, and in CCC. Altered Prox1 mRNA expression is partly regulated by MAZ, and mutation of the prospero domain in HCC indicates an involvement for Prox1 during tumor progression.

  19. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p < 0.0001), Spitzoid (75%) vs. nonSpitzoid melanomas (1%; p = 0.0001), acinar (67%) vs. nonacinar pancreatic cancers (<1%; p < 0.0001) and papillary (3%) vs. nonpapillary thyroid cancers (0%; p < 0.03). Clinical responses to trametinib and sorafenib are presented. In conclusion, BRAF fusions are rare driver alterations in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms, but enriched in Spitzoid melanoma, pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  20. The Anti-Tumor Effects of Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transduced with HSV-Tk Gene on U-87-Driven Brain Tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Maymone de Melo

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is an infiltrative tumor that is difficult to eradicate. Treating GBM with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that have been modified with the HSV-Tk suicide gene has brought significant advances mainly because MSCs are chemoattracted to GBM and kill tumor cells via a bystander effect. To use this strategy, abundantly present adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs were evaluated for the treatment of GBM in mice. AT-MSCs were prepared using a mechanical protocol to avoid contamination with animal protein and transduced with HSV-Tk via a lentiviral vector. The U-87 glioblastoma cells cultured with AT-MSC-HSV-Tk died in the presence of 25 or 50 μM ganciclovir (GCV. U-87 glioblastoma cells injected into the brains of nude mice generated tumors larger than 3.5 mm2 after 4 weeks, but the injection of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells one week after the U-87 injection, combined with GCV treatment, drastically reduced tumors to smaller than 0.5 mm2. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumors showed the presence of AT-MSC-HSV-Tk cells only within the tumor and its vicinity, but not in other areas of the brain, showing chemoattraction between them. The abundance of AT-MSCs and the easier to obtain them mechanically are strong advantages when compared to using MSCs from other tissues.

  1. Tumor-specific expression of shVEGF and suicide gene as a novel strategy for esophageal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Wu, Hai-Jun; Liang, Yu; Liang, Xu-Jun; Huang, Hui-Chao; Zhao, Yan-Zhong; Liao, Qing-Chuan; Chen, Ya-Qi; Leng, Ai-Min; Yuan, Wei-Jian; Zhang, Gui-Ying; Peng, Jie; Chen, Yong-Heng

    2016-06-21

    To develop a potent and safe gene therapy for esophageal cancer. An expression vector carrying fusion suicide gene (yCDglyTK) and shRNA against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was constructed and delivered into EC9706 esophageal cancer cells by calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CPNP). To achieve tumor selectivity, expression of the fusion suicide gene was driven by a tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. The biologic properties and therapeutic efficiency of the vector, in the presence of prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Both in vitro and in vivo testing showed that the expression vector was efficiently introduced by CPNP into tumor cells, leading to cellular expression of yCDglyTK and decreased VEGF level. With exposure to 5-FC, it exhibited strong anti-tumor effects against esophageal cancer. Combination of VEGF shRNA with the fusion suicide gene demonstrated strong anti-tumor activity. The shVEGF-hTERT-yCDglyTK/5-FC system provided a novel approach for esophageal cancer-targeted gene therapy.

  2. Effect of p27 gene combined with Pientzehuang ([characters: see text]) on tumor growth in osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shou-song; Yuan, Fang; Liu, Ying-hong; Zhou, Le-tian; Li, Jun

    2015-11-01

    To observe the effect of p27 gene recombinant adenovirus combined with Chinese medicine Pientzehuang ([characters: see text]) on the growth of xenografted human osteosarcoma in nude mice. Tissue transplantation was used to construct the orthotopic model of human osteosarcoma Saos-2 cell in nude mice. Thirty tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into 5 groups with 6 mice in each group: blank control group (model of osteosarcoma), empty vector group (recombinant adeno-associated virus-multiple cloning site), Pientzehuang group, p27 gene group and combined treatment group (p27 gene combined with Pientzehuang). The effect of combined treatment on human osteosarcoma was analyzed through the tumor formation, tumor volume and inhibition rate of tumor growth. The expression of p27 was measured by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. The orthotopic model of osteosarcoma in nude mice was successfully constructed. The general appearance of tumor-bearing nude mice in Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups was markedly improved compared with the blank control group; and in the combined treatment group it was significantly improved compared with the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups. The tumor growth in the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups was significantly inhibited compared with the blank control group P<0.05); while in the combined treatment group it was markedly inhibited compared with the Pientzehuang and p27 gene groups (P<0.05). The rates of tumor growth inhibition were 34.1%, 56.5% and 63.8% in the Pientzehuang, p27 gene and combined treatment groups, respectively. Meanwhile, the protein expression of p27 gene in the p27 gene group was significantly increased compared with the blank control group (P<0.05); and it was significantly increased in the combined treatment group compared with the p27 gene and Pientzehuang groups (P<0.05). p27 gene introduced by adenovirus combined with Pientzehuang can inhibit the growth of human osteosarcoma cell Saos-2 in nude mice.

  3. Integrated bioinformatic analysis unveils significant genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Guang-Yu Wang,1,* Ling Li,2,* Bo Liu,1 Xiao Han,1 Chun-Hua Wang,1 Ji-Wen Wang3 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Children’s Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Pudong New District, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: This study aimed to explore significant genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET. Materials and methods: Gene expression profile of GSE14295 was downloaded from publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened out in primary sPNET samples compared with normal fetal and adult brain reference samples (sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Pathway enrichment analysis of these DEGs was conducted, followed by protein–protein interaction (PPI network construction and significant module selection. Additionally, transcription factors (TFs regulating the common DEGs in the two comparison groups were identified, and the regulatory network was constructed. Results: In total, 526 DEGs (99 up- and 427 downregulated in sPNET vs fetal brain and 815 DEGs (200 up- and 615 downregulated in sPNET vs adult brain were identified. DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain were associated with calcium signaling pathway, cell cycle, and p53 signaling pathway. CDK1, CDC20, BUB1B, and BUB1 were hub nodes in the PPI networks of DEGs in sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. Significant modules were extracted from the PPI networks. In addition, 64 upregulated and 200 downregulated overlapping DEGs were identified in both sPNET vs fetal brain and sPNET vs adult brain. The genes involved in the regulatory network upon overlapping DEGs and the TFs were correlated with calcium signaling pathway

  4. Rare frequency of gene variation and survival analysis in thymic epithelial tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Z

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhengbo Song,1,2,* Xinmin Yu,1,2,* Yiping Zhang1,2 1Department of Medical Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 2Key Laboratory Diagnosis and Treatment Technology on Thoracic Oncology, Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Thymic epithelial tumor (TET is a rare mediastinal neoplasm and little is known about its genetic variability and prognostic factors. This study investigated the genetic variability and prognostic factors of TET. Patients and methods: We sequenced 22 cancer-related hotspot genes in TET tissues and matched normal tissues using Ampliseq Ion Torrent next-generation technology. Overall survival was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier methods and compared with log-rank tests. Results: A histological analysis of 52 patients with a median age of 52 years showed 15 patients (28.8% with thymic carcinoma, five with type A thymoma (9.6%, eight with type AB (15.4%, six with type B1 (11.5%, nine with type B2 (17.3%, and nine with type B3 thymoma (17.3%. Three gene mutations were identified, including two with PIK3CA mutation and one with EGFR mutation. The three patients with mutant genes included two cases of thymoma (one with EGFR and the other with PIK3CA mutation in addition to a case of thymic carcinoma (PIK3CA mutation. The 5-year survival rates were 77.7% in all patients. The 5-year survival rates were 93.3%, 90.0%, 76.9%, and 22.9% corresponding to Masaoka stages I, II, III, and IV (P<0.001. The 5-year survival rates were 100%, 100%, 83.3%, 88.9%, 65.6%, and 60.9% in the histological subtypes of A, AB, B1, B2, and B3 thymomas, and thymic carcinoma, respectively (P=0.012. Conclusion: Hotspot gene mutations are rare in TET. PIK3CA and EGFR mutations represent candidate driver genes and treatment targets in TET. Masaoka stage and histological subtypes predict the survival of TET. Keywords: thymic epithelial tumors, gene mutation, prognosis

  5. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Tumors With 2 or More Somatic Mutations in Mismatch Repair Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stacey A; Turner, Emily H; Beightol, Mallory B; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A; Salipante, Stephen J; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F; Grady, William M; Lin, Edward H; Cohn, David E; Goodfellow, Paul J; Arnold, Mark W; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C

    2016-09-01

    Some colorectal and endometrial tumors with microsatellite instability not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutations contain 2 or more somatic mutations in genes encoding mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. From 2 prospective studies of the efficacy of screening for Lynch syndrome, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors who had 2 or more somatic (but not germline) mutations in genes encoding MMR proteins (double somatic). We determined the frequencies of tumor mutations in PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them with those from patients with Lynch syndrome, MLH1-hypermethylated, or microsatellite-stable tumors. We validated our findings using independent data sets from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14 of 21 (67%) patients with double somatic tumors also had PIK3CA mutations, compared with 4 of 18 (22%) tumors from patients with Lynch syndrome, 2 of 10 (20%) tumors with MLH1 hypermethylation, and 12 of 78 (15%) tumors with microsatellite stability (P < .0001 for patients with double somatic tumors vs other subgroups). Mutations in PIK3CA were detected in all 13 patients with double somatic endometrial cancers (P = .04 compared with other subgroups). We did not detect BRAF mutations in patients with double somatic colorectal tumors or Lynch syndrome. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas (113 patients with colorectal tumors, 178 endometrial tumors); 100% of double somatic cases had a somatic mutation in PIK3CA (P < .0001 compared with other subgroups). Most patients with colorectal or endometrial tumors with 2 or more somatic (but not germline) mutations in MMR proteins also have mutations in PIK3CA; mutations in PIK3CA are detected at substantially higher frequencies in these

  6. Targeted gene delivery in tumor xenografts by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction and polyethylenimine to inhibit survivin gene expression and induce apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Ri-Xiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noninvasive and tissue-specific technologies of gene transfection would be valuable in clinical gene therapy. This present study was designed to determine whether it could enhance gene transfection in vivo by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD with polyethylenimine (PEI in tumor xenografts, and illuminate the effects of gene silencing and apoptosis induction with short hairpin RNA (shRNA interference therapy targeting human survivin by this novel technique. Methods Two different expression vectors (pCMV-LUC and pSIREN were incubated with PEI to prepare cationic complexes (PEI/DNA and confirmed by the gel retardation assay. Human cervical carcinoma (Hela tumors were planted subcutaneously in both flanks of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were administered by tail vein with PBS, plasmid, plasmid and SonoVue microbubble, PEI/DNA and SonoVue microbubble. One tumor was exposed to ultrasound irradiation, while the other served as control. The feasibility of targeted delivery and tissue specificity facilitated by UTMD and PEI were investigated. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analyses about gene silencing and apoptosis induction were detected. Results Electrophoresis experiment revealed that PEI could condense DNA efficiently. The application of UTMD significantly increases the tissue transfection. Both expression vectors showed that gene expressions were present in all sections of tumors that received ultrasound exposure but not in control tumors. More importantly, the increases in transgene expression were related to UTMD with the presence of PEI significantly. Silencing of the survivin gene could induce apoptosis effectively by downregulating survivin and bcl-2 expression, also cause up-regulation of bax and caspase-3 expression. Conclusions This noninvasive, novel combination of UTMD with PEI could enhance targeted gene delivery and gene expression in tumor xenografts at intravenous administration

  7. Detection of transformed cells in crown gall tumors using the GUS reporter gene and correlation of GUS stained cells with T-DNA gene activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, R.C.; Labriola, J.; Binns, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Crown gall tumors are a mixture of transformed hormone producing cells and normal cells. Until now it has not been possible to directly visualize these cell types in situ. We have constructed strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens that carry the 35S-β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in either wild type or mutant Ti plasmids. Using histochemical staining for GUS activity, blue (GUS positive) sectors are observed in tumor sections. In order to demonstrate that the blue sectors actually represent cells expressing other T-DNA genes, we have looked for T-DNA gene encoded enzyme activity in the stained and unstained sectors. The blue sectors accumulate octopine (a product of the octopine synthase gene on the T-DNA) while the white (GUS negative) sectors do not. We conclude that the use of the GUS reporter gene provides a sensitive and reliable method for visualizing transformation events in plant tissues. A comparison of the proportion of transformed and nontransformed cells in wild type tumors vs. tumors deficient in auxin or cytokinin encoding genes will be discussed

  8. Tissue-wide expression profiling using cDNA subtraction and microarrays to identify tumor-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amatschek, Stefan; Koenig, Ulrich; Auer, Herbert; Steinlein, Peter; Pacher, Margit; Gruenfelder, Agnes; Dekan, Gerhard; Vogl, Sonja; Kubista, Ernst; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Stratowa, Christian; Schreiber, Martin; Sommergruber, Wolfgang

    2004-02-01

    With the objective of discovering novel putative intervention sites for anticancer therapy, we compared transcriptional profiles of breast cancer, lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC), lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and renal cell cancer (RCC). Each of these tumor types still needs improvement in medical treatment. Our intention was to search for genes not only highly expressed in the majority of patient samples but which also exhibit very low or even absence of expression in a comprehensive panel of 16 critical (vital) normal tissues. To achieve this goal, we combined two powerful technologies, PCR-based cDNA subtraction and cDNA microarrays. Seven subtractive libraries consisting of approximately 9250 clones were established and enriched for tumor-specific transcripts. These clones, together with approximately 1750 additional tumor-relevant genes, were used for cDNA microarray preparation. Hybridizations were performed using a pool of 16 critical normal tissues as a reference in all experiments. In total, we analyzed 20 samples of breast cancer, 11 of LSCC, 11 of LAC, and 8 of RCC. To select for genes with low or even no expression in normal tissues, expression profiles of 22 different normal tissues were additionally analyzed. Importantly, this tissue-wide expression profiling allowed us to eliminate genes, which exhibit also high expression in normal tissues. Similarly, expression signatures of genes, which are derived from infiltrating cells of the immune system, were eliminated as well. Cluster analysis resulted in the identification of 527 expressed sequence tags specifically up-regulated in these tumors. Gene-wise hierarchical clustering of these clones clearly separated the different tumor types with RCC exhibiting the most homogeneous and LAC the most diverse expression profile. In addition to already known tumor-associated genes, the majority of identified genes have not yet been brought into context with tumorigenesis such as genes involved in bone matrix

  9. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  10. Gene expression profiles of cell adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and their tissue inhibitors in canine oral tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisamai, Sirinun; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Kalpravidh, Chanin; Suriyaphol, Gunnaporn

    2017-08-01

    Perturbation of cell adhesion can be essential for tumor cell invasion and metastasis, but the current knowledge on the gene expression of molecules that mediate cell adhesion in canine oral tumors is limited. The present study aimed to investigate changes in the gene expression of cell adhesion molecules (E-cadherin or CDH1, syndecan 1 or SDC1, NECTIN2 and NECTIN4), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs), in canine oral tumors, including benign tumors, oral melanoma (OM) and non-tonsillar oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR. When compared with the normal gingival controls, decreased CDH1, SDC1 and NECTIN4 expression levels were observed in OSCC and OM, reflecting a possible role as cell adhesion molecules and tumor suppressors in canine oral cancers in contrast to the upregulation of MMP2 expression. Downregulated MMP7 was specifically revealed in the OM group. In the late-stage OM, the positive correlation of MMP7 and CDH1 expression was noticed as well as that of SDC1 and NECTIN4. Enhanced TIMP1 expression was shown in all tumor groups with prominent expression in the benign tumors and the early-stage OM. MMP14 expression was notable in the early-stage OM. Higher MMP9 and TIMP1 expression was observed in the acanthomatous ameloblastoma. In conclusion, this study revealed that the altered expression of cell adhesion molecules, MMP7 and MMP2 was correlated with clinicopathologic features in canine oral cancers whereas TIMP1 and MMP14 expression was probably associated with early-stage tumors; therefore, these genes might serve as molecular markers for canine oral tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiosensitivity and gene expression of human lung cancer cells dividing in nude tumor before (anoxic) and after vascular induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Baba, Masayuki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki; Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Saegusa, Kumiko; Furuno, Aki; Michikawa, Yuichi; Imai, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Using cultured and nude mouse tumor cell (IA) derived frome a human lung cancer, we studied their radiosensitivity by focusing attention on the dynamics of tumor clonogens. The movement of clonogens in the regrowing IA tumor after X rays irradiation can be divided into three phases: first,: the early and rapid survival recovery (PLD repair) phase, second, the delay phase involving a certain lag in survival change, and third, the repopulation phase consisting of two stagea. Now we compare with the dynamics of tumor clonogens before or after exposure to X rays and carbon-ion beams. PLD repair was not observed in a carbon-ion beam. In relation to radiosensitivity and repair mechanism, we studied the gene expression of the cultured cell and nude tumor with a microarray method using 22K custom oligoallele. (author)

  12. Systematic Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data on Tumor Cell-Selective Apoptotic Responses to HDAC Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or vorinostat is the first nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. SAHA affects histone acetylation in chromatin and a variety of nonhistone substrates, thus influencing many cellular processes. In particularly, SAHA induces selective apoptosis of tumor cells, although the mechanism is not well understood. A series of microarray experiments was recently conducted to investigate tumor cell-selective proapoptotic transcriptional responses induced by SAHA. Based on that gene expression time series, we propose a novel framework for detailed analysis of the mechanism of tumor cell apoptosis selectively induced by SAHA. Our analyses indicated that SAHA selectively disrupted the DNA damage response, cell cycle, p53 expression, and mitochondrial integrity of tumor samples to induce selective tumor cell apoptosis. Our results suggest a possible regulation network. Our research extends the existing research.

  13. Tumor suppressor gene P53 in fish species as a target for genotoxic effects monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusser, W.C.; Brand, D.; Glickman, B.W. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Cretney, W.

    1995-12-31

    Analysis of environmentally induced molecular changes in DNA from fish was initiated with a study of tumor suppressor gene p53. This gene was chosen because of the high number of documented mutations in p53 from humans and their relevance in tumorigenesis. Bottom-feeding flatfish (e.g. English sole, Pleuronectes vetulus) and members of the salmonid family (e.g. rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon, O. tschaaytsha) were chosen, because they are widespread and of commercial and recreational importance. The studies include the use of histopathological, biochemical, and molecular genetic tools in aquatic systems. The authors are currently examining the deposition of DNA damage and mutation in the p53 gene in fish. Parallel histopathology of liver showed idiopathic liver lesions that were strongly dependent on location of capture (0.01 < p(X{sup 2} 0.05, 2 > 6.89) < 0.025) with a prevalence of 30% for fish collected from the vicinity of pulp mills. To assess DNA damage and mutation analysis, DNA was extracted from fish liver. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing of the p53 gene was performed for rainbow trout, chinook and sockeye salmon, O. nerka. Southern blotting with a labeled p53 probe from rainbow trout was performed using genomic DNA from various teleost fish species. The presence of p53 could be shown in all fish species examined, including salmonids and sentinel species for environmental monitoring like English sole and white sucker (Catostomus commersom). To correlate histopathology with molecular analysis the authors initiated the determination of DNA damage, DNA adducts and mutations in the p53 gene (conserved exons 5 to 9).

  14. Gene expression in skin tumors induced in hairless mice by chronic exposure to ultraviolet B irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiromi; Tanaka, Misao; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Suzuki, Junko S.; Ogiso, Manabu; Tohyama, Chiharu

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the expressions of c-Ha-ras, c-jun, c-fos, c-myc genes and p53 protein in the development of skin tumours induced by chronic exposure to UVB without a photosensitizer using hairless mice. When mice were exposed to UVB at a dose of 2 kJ/m 2 three times a week, increased c-Ha-ras and c-myc transcripts were detected after only 5 weeks of exposure, while no tumour appeared on the exposed skin. The increase in gene expression continued until 25 weeks, when tumours, identified pathologically as mainly squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), developed in the dorsal skin. In these SCC, overexpression of c-fos mRNA was also observed along with the increases in c-Ha-ras and c-myc. A single dose of UVB (2 kJ/m 2 ) applied to the backs of hairless mice transiently induced overexpression of the early event genes c-fos, c-jun and c-myc, but not c-Ha-ras, in the exposed area of skin. Accumulation of p53 protein was determined by Western blotting analysis of immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies PAb 240 or 246, which recognize mutant or wide type, respectively. In the SCC, a mutant p53 protein accumulated in the cytoplasm and nucleus. After single-dose irradiation, the increased wild-type p53 protein was observed in the nuclei of epidermal cells. The present results suggest that overexpression of the c-fos, c-myc and c-Ha-ras genes, and the mutational changes in p53 protein might be associated with skin photocarcinogenesis. Moreover, overexpression of the c-Ha-ras and c-myc genes might be an early event in the development of UVB-induced skin tumors in mice. (author)

  15. Tumor growth reduction is regulated at the gene level in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats supplemented with fish oil rich in EPA and DHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.; Yamazaki, R.K.; Coelho, I.; Pequito, D.C.T.; Schiessel, D.L.; Kryczyk, M.; Mamus, R.; Naliwaiko, K.; Fernandes, L.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Setor de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-08-23

    We investigated the effect of fish oil (FO) supplementation on tumor growth, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and RelA gene and protein expression in Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats. Male Wistar rats (70 days old) were fed with regular chow (group W) or chow supplemented with 1 g/kg body weight FO daily (group WFO) until they reached 100 days of age. Both groups were then inoculated with a suspension of Walker 256 ascitic tumor cells (3×10{sup 7} cells/mL). After 14 days the rats were killed, total RNA was isolated from the tumor tissue, and relative mRNA expression was measured using the 2{sup -ΔΔCT} method. FO significantly decreased tumor growth (W=13.18±1.58 vs WFO=5.40±0.88 g, P<0.05). FO supplementation also resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 (W=100.1±1.62 vs WFO=59.39±5.53, P<0.001) and PPARγ (W=100.4±1.04 vs WFO=88.22±1.46, P<0.05) protein expression. Relative mRNA expression was W=1.06±0.022 vs WFO=0.31±0.04 (P<0.001) for COX-2, W=1.08±0.02 vs WFO=0.52±0.08 (P<0.001) for PPARγ, and W=1.04±0.02 vs WFO=0.82±0.04 (P<0.05) for RelA. FO reduced tumor growth by attenuating inflammatory gene expression associated with carcinogenesis.

  16. Gene expression, single nucleotide variant and fusion transcript discovery in archival material from breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Norton

    Full Text Available Advantages of RNA-Seq over array based platforms are quantitative gene expression and discovery of expressed single nucleotide variants (eSNVs and fusion transcripts from a single platform, but the sensitivity for each of these characteristics is unknown. We measured gene expression in a set of manually degraded RNAs, nine pairs of matched fresh-frozen, and FFPE RNA isolated from breast tumor with the hybridization based, NanoString nCounter (226 gene panel and with whole transcriptome RNA-Seq using RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq V2 library preparation kits. We performed correlation analyses of gene expression between samples and across platforms. We then specifically assessed whole transcriptome expression of lincRNA and discovery of eSNVs and fusion transcripts in the FFPE RNA-Seq data. For gene expression in the manually degraded samples, we observed Pearson correlations of >0.94 and >0.80 with NanoString and ScriptSeq protocols, respectively. Gene expression data for matched fresh-frozen and FFPE samples yielded mean Pearson correlations of 0.874 and 0.783 for NanoString (226 genes and ScriptSeq whole transcriptome protocols respectively, p<2x10(-16. Specifically for lincRNAs, we observed superb Pearson correlation (0.988 between matched fresh-frozen and FFPE pairs. FFPE samples across NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms gave a mean Pearson correlation of 0.838. In FFPE libraries, we detected 53.4% of high confidence SNVs and 24% of high confidence fusion transcripts. Sensitivity of fusion transcript detection was not overcome by an increase in depth of sequencing up to 3-fold (increase from ~56 to ~159 million reads. Both NanoString and ScriptSeq RNA-Seq technologies yield reliable gene expression data for degraded and FFPE material. The high degree of correlation between NanoString and RNA-Seq platforms suggests discovery based whole transcriptome studies from FFPE material will produce reliable expression data. The RiboZeroGold ScriptSeq protocol

  17. [Testing of mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in tumor tissues - possibilities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vošmiková, Hana; Ryška, Aleš; Sieglová, Kateřina; Laco, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Development of targeted cancer therapy is accompanied by a search for markers allowing prediction of response to the particular treatment. Recently, the interest is focused, among other neoplasms, also on the therapy of ovarian cancer using new inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins, nuclear enzymes involved in the repair of single-stranded DNA breaks. The greatest benefit from the administration of PARP inhibitors have patients with a deleterious or potentially deleterious germ-line or somatic mutation of BRCA1 or BRCA2, two genes responsible for repair of double stranded DNA breaks. There has been described a wide spectrum of mutations of BRCA 1/2, from point substitutions to large deletions, including sometimes even several exons of the gene.Unlike the testing of germ-line mutations provided for many years by the medical geneticists, somatic mutations in the tumor tissue have not been routinely tested so far. Detection of BRCA1/2 mutations in the tumor is significantly different from testing of germ-line mutations. In comparison with the analysis of DNA isolated from blood samples, testing of DNA isolated from the FFPE tissue encounters challenges based on heterogeneous representation of tumor cells in the tissue samples, on the presence of multiple neoplastic clones and on the infiltration of tissue by the non-neoplastic elements, as well as difficulties caused by variable proportion of apoptotic and necrotic cells deteriorating the overall quality of isolated DNA.Regarding the testing methods, NGS appears to be the optimal choice because of its complexity, speed of implementation into routine diagnostics as well as sensitivity for detection of a BRCA 1/2 mutations. When introduced into everyday laboratory practice, the functioning quality control system is of utmost importance. Provided there is a high probability of detection of the so far unreported variations in BRCA 1/2 genes, an introduction of a shared database of somatic variants

  18. Functional heterogeneity of cancer-associated fibroblasts from human colon tumors shows specific prognostic gene expression signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mercedes; Islam, Abul B M M K; Herrera, Alberto; Martín, Paloma; García, Vanesa; Silva, Javier; Garcia, Jose M; Salas, Clara; Casal, Ignacio; de Herreros, Antonio García; Bonilla, Félix; Peña, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) actively participate in reciprocal communication with tumor cells and with other cell types in the microenvironment, contributing to a tumor-permissive neighborhood and promoting tumor progression. The aim of this study is the characterization of how CAFs from primary human colon tumors promote migration of colon cancer cells. Primary CAF cultures from 15 primary human colon tumors were established. Their enrichment in CAFs was evaluated by the expression of various epithelial and myofibroblast specific markers. Coculture assays of primary CAFs with different colon tumor cells were performed to evaluate promigratory CAF-derived effects on cancer cells. Gene expression profiles were developed to further investigate CAF characteristics. Coculture assays showed significant differences in fibroblast-derived paracrine promigratory effects on cancer cells. Moreover, the association between CAFs' promigratory effects on cancer cells and classic fibroblast activation or stemness markers was observed. CAF gene expression profiles were analyzed by microarray to identify deregulated genes in different promigratory CAFs. The gene expression signature, derived from the most protumorogenic CAFs, was identified. Interestingly, this "CAF signature" showed a remarkable prognostic value for the clinical outcome of patients with colon cancer. Moreover, this prognostic value was validated in an independent series of 142 patients with colon cancer, by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), with a set of four genes included in the "CAF signature." In summary, these studies show for the first time the heterogeneity of primary CAFs' effect on colon cancer cell migration. A CAF gene expression signature able to classify patients with colon cancer into high- and low-risk groups was identified.

  19. Molecular analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by next generation sequencing and ultrastructural aspects of breast tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, Corina Elena; Moroşanu, Ana Maria; Murăraşu, Daniela; Puiu, Liliana; Cinca, Sabin Aurel; Voinea, Silviu Cristian; Mirancea, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we focus our interest on the dynamics alterations of the tumor-stroma interface at the ultrastructural level and to detect BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using next generation sequencing (NGS) of breast tumor tissue. Electron microscopic investigation revealed some peculiar infrastructural alterations of the tumor cells per se as well as of the tumor-stroma interface: invadopodia, shedding microvesicles, altered morphology and reduced number of telocytes, different abnormalities of the microvasculature. Tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the genes with most hereditary predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer. An early identification of mutation within these genes is essential for determining classification and therapeutic approach to patients. Genetic tests used to determine mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are laborious analysis methods which include, among others, NGS. We analyzed a total of eight samples, in which genomic DNA was amplified using Ion AmpliSeq panel BRCA1 and BRCA2. DNA libraries were created, amplified and sequenced with Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. The bio-information data obtained allow us to detect all known pathogenic mutation and uncertain polymorphisms.

  20. Anti-tumor effects of Egr-IFN γ gene therapy combined with 125I-UdR radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingguo; Ni Yanjun; Song Xiangfu; Li Yanyi; Yang Wei; Sun Ting; Ma Qingjie; Gao Fengtong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anti-tumor effects of Egr-IFNγ gene therapy combined with 125 I-UdR radionuclide therapy in mice bearing H22 hepatocarcinoma and its mechanism. Methods: The recombinant plasmid pcDNAEgr-IFNγ mixed with liposome was injected into tumor. 48 h later, 370 kBq 125 I-UdR was injected into tumor. The tumor growth rates at different times were observed. After 3 d gene-radionuclide therapy, the concentration of IFNγ in cytoplasm of H22 cells and cytotoxic activities of splenic CTL of the mice in different groups were examined. Results: The tumor growth rates of pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group were obviously lower than those of control group, 125 I-UdR group and pcDNAEgr-1 + 125 I-UdR group 6-15 d after gene-radionuclide therapy. IFNγ protein was found in cytoplasm of H22 cells in pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group after 3 d gene-radionuclide therapy. Cytotoxic activity of splenic CTL in pcDNAEgr-IFNγ + 125 I-UdR group was significantly higher than that in the other groups (P 125 I-UdR radionuclide therapy are better than those of 125 I-UdR therapy. (authors)

  1. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy targeting Wilms' tumor 1 in patients with recurrent malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Maejima, Shinya; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Sano, Kenji; Higuchi, Yumiko; Koya, Terutsugu; Ochiai, Takanaga; Koide, Masanori; Uehara, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Midori; Sugiyama, Haruo; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Masato; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination is considered a potentially effective therapy against advanced cancer. The authors conducted a Phase I study to investigate the safety and immunomonitoring of Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1)-pulsed DC vaccination therapy for patients with relapsed malignant glioma. WT1-pulsed and/or autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination therapy was performed in patients with relapsed malignant gliomas. Approximately 1 × 10(7) to 2 × 10(7) pulsed DCs loaded with WT1 peptide antigen and/or tumor lysate were intradermally injected into the axillary areas with OK-432, a streptococcal preparation, at 2-week intervals for at least 5-7 sessions (1 course) during an individual chemotherapy regimen. Ten patients (3 men, 7 women; age range 24-64 years [median 39 years]) with the following tumors were enrolled: glioblastoma (6), anaplastic astrocytoma (2), anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (1), and anaplastic oligodendroglioma (1). Modified WT1 peptide-pulsed DC vaccine was administered to 7 patients, tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccine to 2 patients, and both tumor lysate-pulsed and WT1-pulsed DC vaccine to 1 patient. The clinical response was stable disease in 5 patients with WT1-pulsed DC vaccination. In 2 of 5 patients with stable disease, neurological findings improved, and MR images showed tumor shrinkage. No serious adverse events occurred except Grade 1-2 erythema at the injection sites. WT1 tetramer analysis detected WT1-reactive cytotoxic T cells after vaccination in patients treated with WT1-pulsed therapy. Positivity for skin reaction at the injection sites was 80% (8 of 10 patients) after the first session, and positivity remained for these 8 patients after the final session. This study of WT1-pulsed DC vaccination therapy demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and feasibility in the management of relapsed malignant gliomas.

  2. Identification of genes highly downregulated in pancreatic cancer through a meta-analysis of microarray datasets: implications for discovery of novel tumor-suppressor genes and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonesekere, Nalin C W; Andersen, Wyatt; Smith, Alex; Wang, Xiaosheng

    2018-02-01

    The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC), which has a 5-year survival rate of about 7%. Recent failures of targeted therapies inhibiting kinase activity in clinical trials have highlighted the need for new approaches towards combating this deadly disease. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly downregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We have used qRT-PCR to confirm the downregulation of selected genes in a panel of PC cell lines. This study has yielded several novel candidate tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) including GNMT, CEL, PLA2G1B and SERPINI2. We highlight the role of GNMT, a methyl transferase associated with the methylation potential of the cell, and CEL, a lipase, as potential therapeutic targets. We have uncovered genetic links to risk factors associated with PC such as smoking and obesity. Genes important for patient survival and prognosis are also discussed, and we confirm the dysregulation of metabolic pathways previously observed in PC. While many of the genes downregulated in our dataset are associated with protein products normally produced by the pancreas for excretion, we have uncovered some genes whose downregulation appear to play a more causal role in PC. These genes will assist in providing a better understanding of the disease etiology of PC, and in the search for new therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  3. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gil, Elad B.; Malone Link, Elizabeth; Liu, Leo X.; Johnson, Carl D.; Lees, Jacqueline A.

    1999-01-01

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3′K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or...

  4. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-mediated genes predicts recurrence-free survival in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis on high-throughput gene expression data to identify TNF-α-mediated genes implicated in lung cancer. We first investigated the gene expression profiles of two independent TNF-α/TNFR KO murine models. The EGF receptor signaling pathway was the top pathway associated with genes mediated by TNF-α. After matching the TNF-α-mediated mouse genes to their human orthologs, we compared the expression patterns of the TNF-α-mediated genes in normal and tumor lung tissues obtained from humans. Based on the TNF-α-mediated genes that were dysregulated in lung tumors, we developed a prognostic gene signature that effectively predicted recurrence-free survival in lung cancer in two validation cohorts. Resampling tests suggested that the prognostic power of the gene signature was not by chance, and multivariate analysis suggested that this gene signature was independent of the traditional clinical factors and enhanced the identification of lung cancer patients at greater risk for recurrence.

  5. Replicative Stress and the FHIT Gene: Roles in Tumor Suppression, Genome Stability and Prevention of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karras, Jenna R.; Paisie, Carolyn A.; Huebner, Kay, E-mail: kay.huebner@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-06-04

    The fragile FHIT gene, encompassing the chromosomal fragile site FRA3B, is an early target of DNA damage in precancerous cells. While vulnerable to DNA damage itself, FHIT protein expression is essential to protect from DNA damage-induced cancer initiation and progression by modulating genome stability, oxidative stress and levels of accumulating DNA damage. Thus, FHIT, whose expression is lost or reduced in many human cancers, is a tumor suppressor and genome caretaker whose loss initiates genome instability in preneoplastic lesions. Ongoing studies are seeking more detailed understanding of the role of FHIT in the cellular response to oxidative damage. This review discusses the relationship between FHIT, reactive oxygen species production, and DNA damage in the context of cancer initiation and progression.

  6. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Luković Ljiljana; Popović Branka; Atanacković Jasmina; Novaković Ivana; Perović Milica; Petrović Bojana; Petković Spasoje

    2006-01-01

    Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 ...

  7. Dendrimer-Stabilized Gold Nanostars as a Multifunctional Theranostic Nanoplatform for CT Imaging, Photothermal Therapy, and Gene Silencing of Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ping; Chen, Jingwen; Hu, Yong; Li, Xin; Wang, Han; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Development of versatile nanomaterials combining diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities within one single nanoplatform is extremely important for tumor theranostics. In this work, the authors report the synthesis of a gold nanostar (Au NS)-based theranostic platform stabilized with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified amine-terminated generation 3 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. The formed RGD-modified dendrimer-stabilized Au NSs (RGD-Au DSNSs) are used as a gene delivery vector to complex small interfering RNA (siRNA) for computed tomography (CT) imaging, thermal imaging, photothermal therapy (PTT), and gene therapy of tumors. The results show that the RGD-Au DSNSs are able to compact vascular endothelial growth factor siRNA and specifically deliver siRNA to cancer cells overexpressing α v β 3 integrin. Under near-infrared laser irradiation, the viability of cancer cells is only 20.2% after incubation with the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes, which is much lower than that of cells after single PTT or gene therapy treatment. Furthermore, in vivo results show that the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes enable tumor CT imaging, thermal imaging, PTT, and gene therapy after intratumoral injection. These results indicate that the developed multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising platform for tumor imaging and combinational PTT and gene therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T A; Brown, Keith W

    2017-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome-wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down-regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest-expressing tumors had reduced relapse-free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock-down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R.; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J.; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C.; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome‐wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome‐wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down‐regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest‐expressing tumors had reduced relapse‐free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock‐down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27862318

  10. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  11. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  12. Genome-wide gene copy number and expression analysis of primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junnila, Siina; Kokkola, Arto; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Monni, Outi

    2010-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Gene copy number alterations play an important role in the development of gastric cancer and a change in gene copy number is one of the main mechanisms for a cancer cell to control the expression of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. To highlight genes of potential biological and clinical relevance in gastric cancer, we carried out a systematic array-based survey of gene expression and copy number levels in primary gastric tumors and gastric cancer cell lines and validated the results using an affinity capture based transcript analysis (TRAC assay) and real-time qRT-PCR. Integrated microarray analysis revealed altogether 256 genes that were located in recurrent regions of gains or losses and had at least a 2-fold copy number- associated change in their gene expression. The expression levels of 13 of these genes, ALPK2, ASAP1, CEACAM5, CYP3A4, ENAH, ERBB2, HHIPL2, LTB4R, MMP9, PERLD1, PNMT, PTPRA, and OSMR, were validated in a total of 118 gastric samples using either the qRT-PCR or TRAC assay. All of these 13 genes were differentially expressed between cancerous samples and nonmalignant tissues (p < 0.05) and the association between copy number and gene expression changes was validated for nine (69.2%) of these genes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, integrated gene expression and copy number microarray analysis highlighted genes that may be critically important for gastric carcinogenesis. TRAC and qRT-PCR analyses validated the microarray results and therefore the role of these genes as potential biomarkers for gastric cancer

  13. Identifying the role of Wilms tumor 1 associated protein in cancer prediction using integrative genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Sheng; Qian, Jia-Yi; Wang, Minghai; Yang, Haiwei

    2016-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor, WT1 was first identified due to its essential role in the normal development of the human genitourinary system. Wilms tumor 1 associated protein (WTAP) was subsequently revealed to interact with WT1 using yeast two-hybrid screening. The present study identified 44 complete WTAP genes in the genomes of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. The vertebrate WTAP proteins clustered into the primate, rodent and teleost lineages using phylogenetic tree analysis. From 1,347 available SNPs in the human WTAP gene, 19 were identified to cause missense mutations. WTAP was expressed in bladder, blood, brain, breast, colorectal, esophagus, eye, head and neck, lung, ovarian, prostate, skin and soft tissue cancers. A total of 17 out of 328 microarrays demonstrated an association between WTAP gene expression and cancer prognosis. However, the association between WTAP gene expression and prognosis varied in distinct types of cancer, and even in identical types of cancer from separate microarray databases. By searching the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database, 65 somatic mutations were identified in the human WTAP gene from the cancer tissue samples. These results suggest that the function of WTAP in tumor formation may be multidimensional. Furthermore, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, forkhead box protein O1, interferon regulatory factor 1, glucocorticoid receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ transcription factor binding sites were identified in the upstream (promoter) region of the human WTAP gene, suggesting that these transcription factors may be involved in WTAP functions in tumor formation.

  14. Coamplification in tumors of KRAS2, type 2 inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate receptor gene, and a novel human gene, KRAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heighway, J.; Betticher, D.C.; Altermatt, H.J. [Univ. Hospital of Berne (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Analysis of a region of DNA, coamplified in tumors with KRAS2, resulted in the identification of the human homologue of the mouse KRAG gene. The gene was widely expressed in range of cell lines, tumors, and normal tissue and demonstrated a high degree of alternate splicing. A human KRAG cDNA sequence, with a structure similar to that encoded by the amplified gene in mouse Y1 adrenal carcinoma cells, was isolated by RT-PCR. The predicted amino acid similarity between the two sequences was 91%, and hydrophobicity plots suggested a structure closely resembling that of transmembrane 4 superfamily members. Identification of a PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism allele-specific splicing differences in tumors. Northern analysis of mRNA derived from a range of tissues suggested high level expression in muscle and confirmed alternate splicing. To facilitate the analysis of exon junctions, a YAC clone encoding the genomic sequence was identified. This allowed the localization of KRAG to human chromosome 12p11.2. Isolation of one end of this nonchimeric clone demonstrated a perfect match with a 247-bp sequence within the 3{prime} untranslated region of the type 2 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate receptor gene. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes. Multiplex PCR confirmed the inclusion of both genes in the KRAS2 amplicon in human malignancy, suggesting that either may contribute to the malignant phenotypes. 35 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. A Biphasic Pleural Tumor with Features of an Epithelioid and Small Cell Mesothelioma: Morphologic and Molecular Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Hackman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant mesotheliomas are generally classified into epithelioid, sarcomatoid, desmoplastic, and biphasic types with rare reports of a small cell form. These small cell variants display some morphologic overlap with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs which generally occur within the abdominal cavity of young males and are defined by a characteristic t(11;22(p13;q12 translocation. However, there are rare reports of DSRCTs lacking this translocation. We present a 78-year-old man with a pleura-based biphasic neoplasm with features of both epithelioid mesothelioma and a small cell blastema-like neoplasm. The epithelioid portion showed IHC reactivity for pan cytokeratin, CK5/6, D2-40, and calretinin and the small cell portion marked with CD99, pan cytokeratin, WT1, FLI1, S100, CD200, MyoD1, and CD15. Fluorescence in situ hybridization testing for the t(11;22(p13;q12 translocation disclosed loss of the EWSR1 gene in 94% of tumor cell nuclei, but there was no evidence of the classic translocation. Array based-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH confirmed the tumor had numerous chromosome copy number losses, including 11p15.5-p11.12 and 22q12.1-q13.33, with loss of the EWSR1 and WT1 gene regions. Herein, we report novel complex CGH findings in a biphasic tumor and review the molecular genetic alterations in both mesothelioma and DSRCTs.

  16. Quantitative gene expression of somatostatin receptors and noradrenaline transporter underlying scintigraphic results in patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Mellon Mogensen, Anne

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To measure, by a quantitative approach, the gene expression underlying the results of somatostatin receptor (sst) scintigraphy ((111)In-DTPA-octreotide) and noradrenaline transporter (NAT) scintigraphy ((123)I-MIBG) in patients with neuroendocrine (NE) tumors. METHODS: The gene expression of...... to achieve a better understanding of the link between them, which in turn could aid in planning and development of noninvasive molecular imaging of key molecular processes....

  17. [Construction of Escherichia coli-Bifidobacterium longum shuttle vector and expression of tumor suppressor gene PTEN in B. longum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xin; Liu, Jun-E

    2006-06-01

    It was reported that Bifidobacterium longum accumulated specifically in hypoxic solid tumors, therefore could be used as a delivery system for cancer-specific gene therapy. Furthermore, construction of E.coli-B. longum shuttle vectors was proved by other research to be an efficient way for stable gene expression in B. longum. To obtain a shuttle vector and analyze the inhibition on mice solid tumors by genetically engineered B. longum, 48 primers with mutual overlaps were designed, assisted by software package Oligo 6.0. By PCR with the above primers, a linear plasmid was synthesized, which consists of pMB1 and HU gene promoter, both from B. longum. pMB-HU was constructed by cloning the synthesized linear plasmid into E.coli vector pMD 18-T, and was proved to be stably replicated in both E.coli DH5alpha and B. longum L17. By inserting PTEN cDNA into pMB-HU, expression vector pMB-HU-PTEN was obtained, in which PTEN gene was reported as a major tumor suppressor gene encoding a dual-specificity phosphatase. pMB-HU-PTEN was then transferred into B. longum L17 by electroporation. After transformation, an effective expression of PTEN in B. longum L17 was confirmed by Western blot, and significant inhibition on growth of mice solid tumors was also observed with the above genetically engineered B. longum. Those obtained results have laid foundation for tumor-targeting gene therapy with B. longum.

  18. Gene expression analysis supports tumor threshold over 2.0 cm for T-category breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvang, Hiroko K; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Kaveh, Fateme; Riis, Margit L H; Lüders, Torben; Bukholm, Ida R K; Kristensen, Vessela N; Andreassen, Bettina K

    2016-12-01

    Tumor size, as indicated by the T-category, is known as a strong prognostic indicator for breast cancer. It is common practice to distinguish the T1 and T2 groups at a tumor size of 2.0 cm. We investigated the 2.0-cm rule from a new point of view. Here, we try to find the optimal threshold based on the differences between the gene expression profiles of the T1 and T2 groups (as defined by the threshold). We developed a numerical algorithm to measure the overall differential gene expression between patients with smaller tumors and those with larger tumors among multiple expression datasets from different studies. We confirmed the performance of the proposed algorithm by a simulation study and then applied it to three different studies conducted at two Norwegian hospitals. We found that the maximum difference in gene expression is obtained at a threshold of 2.2-2.4 cm, and we confirmed that the optimum threshold was over 2.0 cm, as indicated by a validation study using five publicly available expression datasets. Furthermore, we observed a significant differentiation between the two threshold groups in terms of time to local recurrence for the Norwegian datasets. In addition, we performed an associated network and canonical pathway analyses for the genes differentially expressed between tumors below and above the given thresholds, 2.0 and 2.4 cm, using the Norwegian datasets. The associated network function illustrated a cellular assembly of the genes for the 2.0-cm threshold: an energy production for the 2.4-cm threshold and an enrichment in lipid metabolism based on the genes in the intersection for the 2.0- and 2.4-cm thresholds.

  19. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 suppresses gene expression of cyclin D1 in tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmin, Tania; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Mori, Jun; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Masato; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    To determine the mechanism by which differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen of Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits tumor cell proliferation, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on the gene expression of cyclin D1. DIF-1 strongly reduced the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and correspondingly decreased the amount of β-catenin in HeLa cells and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DIF-1 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated the DIF-1-induced β-catenin degradation, indicating the involvement of GSK-3β in this effect. Moreover, DIF-1 reduced the activities of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) reporter plasmid and a reporter gene driven by the human cyclin D1 promoter. Eliminating the TCF/LEF consensus site from the cyclin D1 promoter diminished the effect of DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in the suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity

  20. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  1. DLC1 tumor suppressor gene inhibits migration and invasion of multiple myeloma cells through RhoA GTPase pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ullmannová-Benson, Veronika; Guan, M.; Zhou, X. G.; Tripathi, V.; Yang, V.; Zimonjic, D. B.; Popescu, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2009), s. 383-390 ISSN 0887-6924 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : multiple myeloma * tumor suppressor gene * promoter methylation Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 8.296, year: 2009

  2. Chemotherapy modulates intestinal immune gene expression including surfactant Protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Thomassen, Mads; Shen, René L.

    2016-01-01

    the BUCY and DOX piglets. Selected genes of potential biological significance with a similar change in expression across the treatments were controlled by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Key innate defense molecules, including surfactant protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1, were among...

  3. Tumor classification and marker gene prediction by feature selection and fuzzy c-means clustering using microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonassen Inge

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using DNA microarrays, we have developed two novel models for tumor classification and target gene prediction. First, gene expression profiles are summarized by optimally selected Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs, followed by tumor sample classification by Fuzzy C-means clustering. Then, the prediction of marker genes is accomplished by either manual feature selection (visualizing the weighted/mean SOM component plane or automatic feature selection (by pair-wise Fisher's linear discriminant. Results The proposed models were tested on four published datasets: (1 Leukemia (2 Colon cancer (3 Brain tumors and (4 NCI cancer cell lines. The models gave class prediction with markedly reduced error rates compared to other class prediction approaches, and the importance of feature selection on microarray data analysis was also emphasized. Conclusions Our models identify marker genes with predictive potential, often better than other available methods in the literature. The models are potentially useful for medical diagnostics and may reveal some insights into cancer classification. Additionally, we illustrated two limitations in tumor classification from microarray data related to the biology underlying the data, in terms of (1 the class size of data, and (2 the internal structure of classes. These limitations are not specific for the classification models used.

  4. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  5. Sepsis syndrome and death in trauma patients are associated with variation in the gene encoding tumor necrosis factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menges, T.; Konig, I.R.; Hossain, H.; Little, S.; Tchatalbachev, S.; Thierer, F.; Hackstein, H.; Franjkovic, I.; Colaris, T.; Martens, F.; Weismuller, K.; Langefeld, T.; Stricker, J.; Hempelmann, G.; Vos, P.E.; Ziegler, A.; Jacobs, B.; Chakraborty, T.; Bein, G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients encountering severe trauma are at risk of developing sepsis syndrome and subsequent multiple organ failure. This is often associated with fatal outcome despite survival of the initial injury. We postulate that variation of the gene coding for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is

  6. Selector genes display tumor cooperation and inhibition in Drosophila epithelium in a developmental context-dependent manner

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    Ram Prakash Gupta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During animal development, selector genes determine identities of body segments and those of individual organs. Selector genes are also misexpressed in cancers, although their contributions to tumor progression per se remain poorly understood. Using a model of cooperative tumorigenesis, we show that gain of selector genes results in tumor cooperation, but in only select developmental domains of the wing, haltere and eye-antennal imaginal discs of Drosophila larva. Thus, the field selector, Eyeless (Ey, and the segment selector, Ultrabithorax (Ubx, readily cooperate to bring about neoplastic transformation of cells displaying somatic loss of the tumor suppressor, Lgl, but in only those developmental domains that express the homeo-box protein, Homothorax (Hth, and/or the Zinc-finger protein, Teashirt (Tsh. In non-Hth/Tsh-expressing domains of these imaginal discs, however, gain of Ey in lgl− somatic clones induces neoplastic transformation in the distal wing disc and haltere, but not in the eye imaginal disc. Likewise, gain of Ubx in lgl− somatic clones induces transformation in the eye imaginal disc but not in its endogenous domain, namely, the haltere imaginal disc. Our results reveal that selector genes could behave as tumor drivers or inhibitors depending on the tissue contexts of their gains.

  7. Mutational profile of KIT and PDGFRA genes in gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Peruvian samples

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    José Buleje

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are mesenchymal neoplasms usually caused by somatic mutations in the genes KIT (c-KIT or PDGFRA. Mutation characterization has become an important exam for GIST patients because it is useful in predicting the response to the inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in 25 GIST samples collected over two years at two national reference hospitals in Peru. There were 21 samples collected from the Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN, national cancer center and 4 samples collected from Hospital A. Loayza. Methods and materials: In this retrospective study, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequencing of KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes in 20 FFPE (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and 5 frozen GIST samples. Results: We report 21 mutations, including deletions, duplications, and missense, no mutations in 2 samples, and 2 samples with no useful DNA for further analysis. Eighty-six percent of these mutations were located in exon 11 of KIT, and 14 % were located in exon 18 of PDGFRA. Conclusions: Our study identified mutations in 21 out of 25 GIST samples from 2 referential national hospitals in Peru, and the mutation proportion follows a global tendency observed from previous studies (i.e., the majority of samples presented KIT mutations followed by a minor percentage of PDGFRA mutations. This study presents the first mutation data of the KIT and PDGFRA genes from Peruvian individuals with GIST.

  8. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

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    Ewa Sawosz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg or proline (rGO + Pro. The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy.

  9. Graphene Functionalized with Arginine Decreases the Development of Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor in a Gene-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Vadalasetty, Krishna Prasad; Grodzik, Marta; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Kurantowicz, Natalia; Strojny, Barbara; Hotowy, Anna; Lipińska, Ludwika; Jagiełło, Joanna; Chwalibog, André

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that graphene had anticancer properties in experiments in vitro with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells and in tumors cultured in vivo. We hypothesized that the addition of arginine or proline to graphene solutions might counteract graphene agglomeration and increase the activity of graphene. Experiments were performed in vitro with GBM U87 cells and in vivo with GBM tumors cultured on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes. The measurements included cell morphology, mortality, viability, tumor morphology, histology, and gene expression. The cells and tumors were treated with reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and rGO functionalized with arginine (rGO + Arg) or proline (rGO + Pro). The results confirmed the anticancer effect of graphene on GBM cells and tumor tissue. After functionalization with amino acids, nanoparticles were distributed more specifically, and the flakes of graphene were less agglomerated. The molecule of rGO + Arg did not increase the expression of TP53 in comparison to rGO, but did not increase the expression of MDM2 or the MDM2/TP53 ratio in the tumor, suggesting that arginine may block MDM2 expression. The expression of NQO1, known to be a strong protector of p53 protein in tumor tissue, was greatly increased. The results indicate that the complex of rGO + Arg has potential in GBM therapy. PMID:26512645

  10. A jackknife-like method for classification and uncertainty assessment of multi-category tumor samples using gene expression information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Keith

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene expression profiling for the classification of human cancer tumors has been widely investigated. Previous studies were successful in distinguishing several tumor types in binary problems. As there are over a hundred types of cancers, and potentially even more subtypes, it is essential to develop multi-category methodologies for molecular classification for any meaningful practical application. Results A jackknife-based supervised learning method called paired-samples test algorithm (PST, coupled with a binary classification model based on linear regression, was proposed and applied to two well known and challenging datasets consisting of 14 (GCM dataset and 9 (NC160 dataset tumor types. The results showed that the proposed method improved the prediction accuracy of the test samples for the GCM dataset, especially when t-statistic was used in the primary feature selection. For the NCI60 dataset, the application of PST improved prediction accuracy when the numbers of used genes were relatively small (100 or 200. These improvements made the binary classification method more robust to the gene selection mechanism and the size of genes to be used. The overall prediction accuracies were competitive in comparison to the most accurate results obtained by several previous studies on the same datasets and with other methods. Furthermore, the relative confidence R(T provided a unique insight into the sources of the uncertainty shown in the statistical classification and the potential variants within the same tumor type. Conclusion We proposed a novel bagging method for the classification and uncertainty assessment of multi-category tumor samples using gene expression information. The strengths were demonstrated in the application to two bench datasets.

  11. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luković Ljiljana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/aim: Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. Methods. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Results. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65% cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7% tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5% tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IIIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.7%, with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. Conclusion. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the

  12. [Analysis of loss of heterozygosity of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarial carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Bojana; Perović, Milica; Novaković, Ivana; Atanacković, Jasmina; Popović, Branka; Luković, Ljiljana; Petković, Spasoje

    2006-09-01

    Among the genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, there has been increased interest in tumor-suppressor genes p53 and BRCA1. Both of the genes make control of cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. The p53 is a "genome guardian" inactivated in more than 50% of human cancers, while BRCA1 mutations are found mostly in breast and ovarian cancer. The aim of this investigation was to establish the frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the regions of the genes p53 and BRCA1 in ovarian carcinomas, and to analyze the association of LOH with the disease stage and prognosis. We analyzed 20 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of epithelilal ovarian carcinoma. DNA for molecular-genetic analysis was extracted from the tumor tissue and blood as normal tissue of each person. Microsatellite markers of the regions of genes p53 and BRCA1 were amplified by PCR method. The determination of allelic status of microsatellites and detection of LOH was performed after PAA gel electroforesis. Both of the analyzed microsatellite markers were informative in 13/20 (65%) cases. In the region of gene p53, LOH was established in 4/13 (30.7%) tumors. One of them had histological gradus G1, one had gradus G2, and two of them had gradus G3, while all were with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) IIIc stage. In the region of gene BRCA1, LOH was detected in 5/13 (38.5%) tumors. Four of them had histological gradus G2, and one had gradus G3, while by the (FIGO) classification one was with stage Ib, one was with stage IIIb, while the three were with stage IlIc. LOH in both of the analyzed regions was detected in one tumor (7.70), with histological gradus G3 and the FIGO IIIc stage. The frequency of LOH in epthelial ovarian carcinomas was 30.7% and 38.5% for p53 and BRCA1 gene regions, respectively. Most of tumors with LOH had histological gradus G2 or G3, and the clinical FIGO stage IIIc, suggesting the association of this occurrence with a later phase of the disease.

  13. AC133+ progenitor cells as gene delivery vehicle and cellular probe in subcutaneous tumor models: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Robert A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite enormous progress in gene therapy for breast cancer, an optimal systemic vehicle for delivering gene products to the target tissue is still lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether AC133+ progenitor cells (APC can be used as both gene delivery vehicles and cellular probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In this study, we used superparamagentic iron oxide (SPIO-labeled APCs to carry the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS gene to the sites of implanted breast cancer in mouse model. In vivo real time tracking of these cells was performed by MRI and expression of hNIS was determined by Tc-99m pertechnetate (Tc-99m scan. Results Three million human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 cells were subcutaneously implanted in the right flank of nude mice. APCs, isolated from fresh human cord blood, were genetically transformed to carry the hNIS gene using adenoviral vectors and magnetically labeled with ferumoxides-protamine sulfate (FePro complexes. Magnetically labeled genetically transformed cells were administered intravenously in tumor bearing mice when tumors reached 0.5 cm in the largest dimension. MRI and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT images were acquired 3 and 7 days after cell injection, with a 7 Tesla animal MRI system and a custom built micro-SPECT using Tc-99m, respectively. Expression of hNIS in accumulated cells was determined by staining with anti-hNIS antibody. APCs were efficiently labeled with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate (FePro complexes and transduced with hNIS gene. Our study showed not only the accumulation of intravenously administered genetically transformed, magnetically labeled APCs in the implanted breast cancer, but also the expression of hNIS gene at the tumor site. Tc-99m activity ratio (tumor/non-tumor was significantly different between animals that received non-transduced and transduced cells (P Conclusion This study indicates that genetically transformed

  14. A simple protocol for preparation of a liposomal vesicle with encapsulated plasmid DNA that mediate high accumulation and reporter gene activity in tumor tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjetting, Torben; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Christensen, Camilla Laulund

    2011-01-01

    a simple protocol for the research-scale preparation of SPLPs from commercially available reagents with high amounts of encapsulated plasmid DNA. The SPLPs show properties of promising accumulation in tumor tissue in comparison to other organs when intravenously injected into xenograft tumor-bearing nude...... mice. Although transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy was not achieved, the SPLPs were capable of mediating reporter gene transfection in subcutaneous flank tumors originating from human small cell lung cancer....

  15. A simple protocol for preparation of a liposomal vesicle with encapsulated plasmid DNA that mediate high accumulation and reporter gene activity in tumor tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjetting, Torben; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Christensen, Camilla Laulund

    2011-01-01

    a simple protocol for the research-scale preparation of SPLPs from commercially available reagents with high amounts of encapsulated plasmid DNA. The SPLPs show properties of promising accumulation in tumor tissue in comparison to other organs when intravenously injected into xenograft tumor-bearing nude...... mice. Although transcriptionally targeted suicide gene therapy was not achieved, the SPLPs were capable of mediating reporter gene transfection in subcutaneous ¿ank tumors originating from human small cell lung cancer....

  16. Combined comparative genomic hybridization and transcriptomic analyses of ovarian granulosa cell tumors point to novel candidate driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caburet, Sandrine; Anttonen, Mikko; Todeschini, Anne-Laure; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Mestivier, Denis; Butzow, Ralf; Veitia, Reiner A

    2015-04-10

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are the most frequent sex cord-stromal tumors. Several studies have shown that a somatic mutation leading to a C134W substitution in the transcription factor FOXL2 appears in more than 95% of adult-type GCTs. Its pervasive presence suggests that FOXL2 is the main cancer driver gene. However, other mutations and genomic changes might also contribute to tumor formation and/or progression. We have performed a combined comparative genomic hybridization and transcriptomic analyses of 10 adult-type GCTs to obtain a picture of the genomic landscape of this cancer type and to identify new candidate co-driver genes. Our results, along with a review of previous molecular studies, show the existence of highly recurrent chromosomal imbalances (especially, trisomy 14 and monosomy 22) and preferential co-occurrences (i.e. trisomy 14/monosomy 22 and trisomy 7/monosomy 16q). In-depth analyses showed the presence of recurrently broken, amplified/duplicated or deleted genes. Many of these genes, such as AKT1, RUNX1 and LIMA1, are known to be involved in cancer and related processes. Further genomic explorations suggest that they are functionally related. Our combined analysis identifies potential candidate genes, whose alterations might contribute to adult-type GCT formation/progression together with the recurrent FOXL2 somatic mutation.

  17. Effects of 5-aza-2′deoxycytidine on RECK gene expression and tumor invasion in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.Q. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, The First People' s Hospital of Jining, Shandong (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Huang, S.Y. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhang, D.S. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhang, S.Z.; Li, W.G.; Chen, Z.W.; Wu, H.W. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2014-12-12

    Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK), a novel tumor suppressor gene that negatively regulates matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), is expressed in various normal human tissues but downregulated in several types of human tumors. The molecular mechanism for this downregulation and its biological significance in salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) are unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-aza-2′deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), on the methylation status of the RECK gene and tumor invasion in SACC cell lines. Methylation-specific PCR (MSP), Western blot analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR were used to investigate the methylation status of the RECK gene and expression of RECK mRNA and protein in SACC cell lines. The invasive ability of SACC cells was examined by the Transwell migration assay. Promoter methylation was only found in the ACC-M cell line. Treatment of ACC-M cells with 5-aza-dC partially reversed the hypermethylation status of the RECK gene and significantly enhanced the expression of mRNA and protein, and 5-aza-dC significantly suppressed ACC-M cell invasive ability. Our findings showed that 5-aza-dC inhibited cancer cell invasion through the reversal of RECK gene hypermethylation, which might be a promising chemotherapy approach in SACC treatment.

  18. NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene analysis in two cases of meningeal solitary fibrous tumor/hemangiopericytoma with late distant metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Satoko; Minato, Hiroshi; Takegami, Tsutomu; Kurose, Nozomu; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Masako; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Akai, Takuya; Kato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Norio; Nojima, Takayuki

    2015-10-01

    We present two cases of meningeal solitary fibrous tumor (SFT)/hemangiopericytoma (HPC) with immunohistochemistry of STAT6 and analysis of NAB2-STAT6 fusion genes. Case 1 was a 37-year-old male with a left middle fossa tumor; case 2 was a 68-year-old female with a cerebellar tumor. They showed late metastasis to the lung or bone 8 or 13 years, respectively, after the first surgery. Histology of both primary and metastatic tumors showed a cellular hemangiopericytomatous pattern with nuclear atypia. The primary tumors showed nuclear staining of STAT6, but both metastatic tumors showed nuclear and cytoplasmic STAT6. DNA sequencing revealed two kinds of NAB2-STAT6 fusion genes. One consisted of exon 6 of NAB2, intron 6 of NAB2, and the middle of exon 17 of STAT6 (observed in the primary and metastatic tumors of case 1); the other consisted of exon 6 of NAB2 and the beginning of exon 17 of STAT6 (observed in the metastatic tumor of case 2). The primary tumor of case 2 had both fusion genes. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to report NAB2-STAT6 fusion gene analysis in primary and metastatic meningeal SFT/HPCs and a case showed different fusion gene status in the metastatic tumor.

  19. Association between TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism and Wilms’ tumor risk in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu W

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wen Fu,1,2,* Zhen-Jian Zhuo,3,* Wei Jia,1,2 Jinhong Zhu,4 Shi-Bo Zhu,1,2 Ze-Feng Lin,1,2 Feng-Hua Wang,1,2 Huimin Xia,1,2 Jing He,1,2 Guo-Chang Liu1,2 1Department of Pediatric Urology, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 2Department of Pediatric Surgery, Guangzhou Institute of Pediatrics, Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 3Faculty of Medicine, School of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 4Molecular Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Wilms’ tumor is one of the most prevalent pediatric malignancies, ranking fourth in childhood cancer worldwide. TP53 is a critical tumor suppressor gene, which encodes a 53 kDa protein, p53. The p53 functions to protect against cancer by regulating cell cycle and apoptosis and maintaining DNA integrity. TP53 gene is highly polymorphic. Several TP53 gene polymorphisms have been considered to be associated with cancer risk. Of them, a nonsynonymous polymorphism, Arg72Pro (rs1042522 C>G, has been most extensively studied for the association with cancer risk; however, few studies have investigated its effect on Wilms’ tumor. Because of the central role of p53 in cell cycle control, the TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism is also a good potential candidate predisposition locus for this pediatric cancer. We genotyped this polymorphism in 145 patients and 531 cancer-free controls recruited from Chinese children by Taqman methodology. Overall, our result suggested a lack of association between the TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism and Wilms’ tumor. In the stratified analysis, we found that carriers of CG/GG genotypes had a significantly increased Wilms’ tumor risk in children not older

  20. MTHFR variants reduce the risk of G:C->A:T transition mutations within the p53 tumor suppressor gene in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C M; Curtin, K; Samowitz, W; Bigler, J; Potter, J D; Caan, B; Slattery, M L

    2005-10-01

    5,10-Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism. Reduced MTHFR activity has been associated with genomic DNA hypomethylation. Methylated cytosines at CpG sites are easily mutated and have been implicated in G:C-->A:T transitions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We investigated 2 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene (C677T and A1298C) and their associations with colon tumor characteristics, including acquired mutations in Ki-ras and p53 genes and microsatellite instability (MSI). The study population comprised 1248 colon cancer cases and 1972 controls, who participated in a population-based case-control study and had been analyzed previously for MSI, acquired mutations in Ki-ras, p53, and germline MTHFR polymorphisms. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios are presented. Overall, MTHFR genotypes were not associated with MSI status or the presence of any p53 or Ki-ras mutation. Individuals with homozygous variant MTHFR genotypes had a significantly reduced risk of G:C-->A:T transition mutations within the p53 gene, yet, as hypothesized, only at CpG-associated sites [677TT vs. 677CC (referent group) OR = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) for CpG-associated sites; OR = 1.5 (0.7-3.6) for non-CpG associated sites]. Genotypes conferring reduced MTHFR activity were associated with a decreased risk of acquired G:C-->A:T mutations within the p53 gene occurring at CpG sites. Consistent with evidence on the phenotypic effect of the MTHFR C677T variant, we hypothesize that this relation may be explained by modestly reduced genomic DNA methylation, resulting in a lower probability of spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine to thymidine. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which MTHFR polymorphisms can affect the risk of colon cancer.

  1. Assessing tumor progression factors by somatic gene transfer into a mouse model: Bcl-xL promotes islet tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Nancy Du

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumors develop through multiple stages, implicating multiple effectors, but the tools to assess how candidate genes contribute to stepwise tumor progression have been limited. We have developed a novel system in which progression of phenotypes in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cell tumorigenesis can be used to measure the effects of genes introduced by cell-type-specific infection with retroviral vectors. In this system, bitransgenic mice, in which the rat insulin promoter (RIP drives expression of both the SV40 T antigen (RIP-Tag and the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis virus (RIP-tva, are infected with avian viral vectors carrying cDNAs encoding candidate progression factors. Like RIP-Tag mice, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva bitransgenic mice develop isolated carcinomas by approximately 14 wk of age, after progression through well-defined stages that are similar to aspects of human tumor progression, including hyperplasia, angiogenesis, adenoma, and invasive carcinoma. When avian retroviral vectors carrying a green fluorescent protein marker were introduced into RIP-Tag; RIP-tva mice by intra-cardiac injection at the hyperplastic or early dysplastic stage of tumorigenesis, approximately 20% of the TVA-positive cells were infected and expressed green fluorescent proteins as measured by flow cytometry. Similar infection with vectors carrying cDNA encoding either of two progression factors, a dominant-negative version of cadherin 1 (dnE-cad or Bcl-xL, accelerated the formation of islet tumors with invasive properties and pancreatic lymph node metastasis. To begin studying the mechanism by which Bcl-xL, an anti-apoptotic protein, promotes invasion and metastasis, RIP-Tag; RIP-tva pancreatic islet tumor cells were infected in vitro with RCASBP-Bcl-xL. Although no changes were observed in rates of proliferation or apoptosis, Bcl-xL altered cell morphology, remodeled the actin cytoskeleton, and down-regulated cadherin 1; it also induced cell migration and

  2. Activating mutations in c-KIT and PDGFRalpha are exclusively found in gastrointestinal stromal tumors and not in other tumors overexpressing these imatinib mesylate target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Herman; den Bakker, Michael A; Kros, Johan M; van Tol, Hans; de Bruin, Alex M; Oosterhuis, Wolter; van den Ingh, Harry F G M; van der Harst, Erwin; de Schipper, Hans P; Wiemer, Erik A C; Nooter, Kees

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of c-KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFR), is highly effective in c-KIT/CD117-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), especially in those having activating mutations in c-kit exon 11. In addition, gain-of-function mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (exon 12) and the kinase activation loop (exon 18) of PDGFRalpha were found in GISTs. Importantly, the presence and type of these mutually exclusive c-KIT or PDGFRalpha mutations were found to be associated with the response to imatinib. Here, we examined the prevalence of c-kit exon 11 and PDGFRalpha exons 12 and 18 mutations in other tumor types known to express these tyrosine kinase receptors in order to explore which other cancer types may potentially benefit from imatinib treatment. We determined the mutational status of these commonly mutated exons by direct sequencing in 11 different tumor types (in total: 215 unrelated cases), including GIST, chordoma, and various distinct tumors of lung, brain and its coverings, and skin cancer. Of the 579 exons examined (211 c-kit exon 11, 192 PDGFRalpha exon 12, 142 PDGFRalpha exon18, 17 PDGFRbeta exon 12 and 17 PDGFRbeta exon 18), only 12 (all GIST) harbored mutations (10 c-kit exon 11 and 2 PDGFRalpha exon18). From these data we conclude that activating c-KIT and PDGFR mutations are sporadic in human cancers known to overexpress these tyrosine kinase receptor genes and suggest that, except in GIST, this overexpression is not correlated with activating mutations. The latter may imply that these wild-type c-KIT and PDGFR tumor types will probably not benefit from imatinib treatment.

  3. Role of tumor suppressor genes in the cancer-associated reprogramming of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Chu; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Hashimoto, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yukio; Lin, Chang-Shin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Saito, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    Because of their pluripotent characteristics, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) possess great potential for therapeutic application and for the study of degenerative disorders. These cells are generated from normal somatic cells, multipotent stem cells, or cancer cells. They express embryonic stem cell markers, such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, and REX1, and can differentiate into all adult tissue types, both in vitro and in vivo. However, some of the pluripotency-promoting factors have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Here, we describe the merits of tumor suppresser genes as reprogramming factors for the generation of iPSCs without tumorigenic activity. The initial step of reprogramming is induction of the exogenous pluripotent factors to generate the oxidative stress that leads to senescence by DNA damage and metabolic stresses, thus inducing the expression of tumor suppressor genes such as p21CIP1 and p16INK4a through the activation of p53 to be the pre-induced pluripotent stem cells (pre-iPSCs). The later stage includes overcoming the barrier of reprogramming-induced senescence or cell-cycle arrest by shutting off the function of these tumor suppressor genes, followed by the induction of endogenous stemness genes for the full commitment of iPSCs (full-iPSCs). Thus, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by oxidative stress might be critical for the induction of endogenous reprogramming-factor genes via epigenetic changes or antioxidant reactions. We also discuss the critical role of tumor suppressor genes in the evaluation of the tumorigenicity of human cancer cell-derived pluripotent stem cells, and describe how to overcome their tumorigenic properties for application in stem cell therapy in the field of regenerative medicine.

  4. Physical mapping of a commonly deleted region, the site of a candidate tumor suppressor gene, at 12q22 in human male germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murty, V.V.V.S.; Bosl, G.J.; Chaganti, R.S.K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) site at 12q22 characterized by a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously (LOH) and a homozygous deletion has previously been reported in human male germ cell tumors (GCTs). In a detailed deletion mapping analysis of 67 normal-tumor DNAs utilizing 20 polymorphic markers mapped to 12q22-q24, we identified the limits of the minimal region of deletion at 12q22 between D12S377 (priximal) and D12S296 (distal). We have constructed a YAC contig map of a 3-cM region of this band between the proximal marker D12S101 and the distal marker D12S346, which contained the minimal region of deletion in GCTs. The map is composed of 53 overlapping YACs and 3 cosmids onto which 25 polymorphic and nonpolymorphic sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were placed in a unique order. The size of the minimal region of deletion was approximately 2 Mb from overlapping, nonchimeric YACs that spanned the region. We also developed a radiation hybrid (RH) map of the region between D12S101 and D12S346 containing 17 loci. The consensus order developed by RH mapping is in good agreement with the YAC STS-content map order. The RH map estimated the distance between D12S101 and D12S346 to be 246 cR{sub 8000} and the minimal region of deletion to be 141 cR{sub 8000}. In addition, four genes that were previously mapped to 12q22 have been excluded as candidate genes. The leads gained from the deletion mapping and physical maps should expedite the isolation and characterization of the TSG at 12q22. 35 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Multi-gene epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in T-cell lymphoma cells; delayed expression of the p16 protein upon reversal of the silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagasawa, T; Zhang, Q; Raghunath, P N

    2006-01-01

    )-expressing T-cell lymphomas. p16 gene was epigenetically silenced in all but one of the 10 malignant T-cell lines examined, p15 gene silenced in roughly half of the lines, and p14 was the least frequently affected. Extensive methylation of the p16 promoter was seen in six out of 10 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma...... promoter demethylation and required up to 3 weeks to occur, seemingly reflecting late activation of the p16 gene. These findings indicate that epigenetic silencing affects in T-cell malignancies, often simultaneously, several tumor suppressor genes that impact on key cell functions. The observed...... differential silencing of p16 and p14, and to a lesser degree p15 gene, indicates that the silencing is governed by precise, promoter region-specific mechanisms. The study provides also further rationale for treatment of at least some types of T-cell lymphomas with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to target...

  6. Hypermethylation of the 16q23.1 Tumor Suppressor Gene ADAMTS18 in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify tumor suppressor genes (TSGs silenced by hypermethylation and discover new epigenetic biomarkers for early cancer detection. ADAMTS18, located at 16q23.1, has been reported to be a critical TSG in multiple primary tumors; however, this has not yet been verified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC. We explored epigenetic alterations in this gene in ccRCC and analyzed possible clinicopathological associations. We examined ADAMTS18 gene expression and methylation by semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP in 5 ccRCC-derived cell lines before and after treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AzaC. MSP was further performed for 101 ccRCC primary tumors and 20 adjacent normal tissues. Some cell lines and specimens were examined by subsequent bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS and real-time PCR. Further, we analyzed the relationship between the ADAMTS18 gene methylation and clinicopathological features, including short-term disease-free survival (DFS, in patients with ccRCC. ADAMTS18 down-regulation and hypermethylation were detected in the ccRCC-derived cell lines using RT-PCR and MSP. Treatment with 5-AzaC reversed the hypermethylation of the ADAMTS18 gene and restored its expression. Hypermethylation was further detected in 44 of 101 (43.6% primary tumors and 3 of 20 (15.0% adjacent normal tissues. However, a significant difference between both groups was observed (p = 0.02. BGS analysis and real-time PCR were subsequently performed to confirm the results of RT-PCR and MSP. Furthermore, the methylation status of ADAMTS18 was not significantly associated with gender, age, location, tumor diameter, pathological stage, nuclear grade or short-term DFS in patients with ccRCC (p > 0.05. The ADAMTS18 gene is often down-regulated by hypermethylation in ccRCC-derived cell lines and primary tumors, indicating its critical role as a TSG in ccRCC. We conclude that ADAMTS18

  7. Analysis of Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex Gene Transcription in Human Tumors Caused by Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Steven F; Zhang, Ali; Ghasemi, Farhad; Barrett, John W; Nichols, Anthony C; Mymryk, Joe S

    2017-09-10

    Oncoproteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) downregulate the transcription of the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I) antigen presentation apparatus in tissue culture model systems. This could allow infected or transformed cells to evade the adaptive immune response. Using data from over 800 human cervical and head & neck tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we determined the impact of HPV status on the mRNA expression of all six MHC-I heavy chain genes, and the β2 microglobulin light chain. Unexpectedly, these genes were all expressed at high levels in HPV positive (HPV+) cancers compared with normal control tissues. Indeed, many of these genes were expressed at significantly enhanced levels in HPV+ tumors. Similarly, the transcript levels of several other components of the MHC-I peptide-loading complex were also high in HPV+ cancers. The coordinated expression of high mRNA levels of the MHC-I antigen presentation apparatus could be a consequence of the higher intratumoral levels of interferon γ in HPV+ carcinomas, which correlate with signatures of increased infiltration by T- and NK-cells. These data, which were obtained from both cervical and oral tumors in large human cohorts, indicates that HPV oncoproteins do not efficiently suppress the transcription of the antigen presentation apparatus in human tumors.

  8. Normalization of gene expression measurement of tissue samples obtained by transurethral resection of bladder tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop LA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Laura A Pop,1,* Valentina Pileczki,1,2,* Roxana M Cojocneanu-Petric,1 Bogdan Petrut,3,4 Cornelia Braicu,1 Ancuta M Jurj,1 Rares Buiga,5 Patriciu Achimas-Cadariu,6,7 Ioana Berindan-Neagoe1,8 1The Research Center for Functional Genomics, Biomedicine and Translational Medicine, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 2Department of Analytical Chemistry, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 3Department of Surgery II – Urology, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 4Department of Urology, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 5Department of Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof. Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 6Department of Surgery, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania; 7Department of Surgical Oncology and Gynecological Oncology, Iuliu Haţieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 8Department of Functional Genomics and Experimental Pathology, The Oncology Institute “Prof Dr Ion Chiricuţă”, Cluj-Napoca, Cluj, Romania *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Sample processing is a crucial step for all types of genomic studies. A major challenge for researchers is to understand and predict how RNA quality affects the identification of transcriptional differences (by introducing either false-positive or false-negative errors. Nanotechnologies help improve the quality and quantity control for gene expression studies. Patients and methods: The study was performed on 14 tumor and matched normal pairs of tissue from patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas. We assessed the RNA quantity by using the NanoDrop spectrophotometer and the quality by nano-microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology provided by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. We evaluated the amplification status of three

  9. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton; Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron; Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri

    2004-01-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the 124 I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 124 I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped 124 I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of 124 I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that 124 I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of 124 I-FIAU and 18 F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between 124 I-FIAU and 18 F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia. (orig.)

  10. Are there tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 4p in sporadic colorectal carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Li-Xin; Lv, Zhong-Chuan; Li, Da-Peng; Zhou, Chong-Zhi; Gao, Jian-Jun; He, Lin; Peng, Zhi-Hai

    2008-01-07

    To study the candidate tumor suppressor genes (TSG) on chromosome 4p by detecting the high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in sporadic colorectal carcinoma in Chinese patients. Seven fluorescent labeled polymorphic microsatellite markers were analyzed in 83 cases of colorectal carcinoma and matched normal tissue DNA by PCR. PCR products were electrophoresed on an ABI 377 DNA sequencer. Genescan 3.7 and Genotype 3.7 software were used for LOH scanning and analysis. The same procedure was performed by the other six microsatellite markers spanning D4S3013 locus to make further detailed deletion mapping. Comparison between LOH frequency and clinicopathological factors was performed by c2 test. Data were collected from all informative loci. The average LOH frequency on 4p was 24.25%, and 42.3% and 35.62% on D4S405 and D4S3013 locus, respectively. Adjacent markers of D4S3013 displayed a low LOH frequency (4p15.2) and D4S405 (4p14) locus are detected. Candidate TSG, which is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of sporadic colorectal carcinoma on chromosome 4p, may be located between D4S3017 and D4S2933 (about 1.7 cm).

  11. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and cancer therapy: An evolutionary game theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem, Heydar; Kebriaei, Hamed; Veisi, Zahra

    2017-06-01

    Inactivation of alleles in tumor suppressor genes (TSG) is one of the important issues resulting in evolution of cancerous cells. In this paper, the evolution of healthy, one and two missed allele cells is modeled using the concept of evolutionary game theory and replicator dynamics. The proposed model also takes into account the interaction rates of the cells as designing parameters of the system. Different combinations of the equilibrium points of the parameterized nonlinear system is studied and categorized into some cases. In each case, the interaction rates' values are suggested in a way that the equilibrium points of the replicator dynamics are located on an appropriate region of the state space. Based on the suggested interaction rates, it is proved that the system doesn't have any undesirable interior equilibrium point as well. Therefore, the system will converge to the desirable region, where there is a scanty level of cancerous cells. In addition, the proposed conditions for interaction rates guarantee that, when a trajectory of the system reaches the boundaries, then it will stay there forever which is a desirable property since the equilibrium points have been already located on the boundaries, appropriately. The simulation results show the effectiveness of the suggestions in the elimination of the cancerous cells in different scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of angiogenesis-related genes in canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, M M J; Galac, S; Kooistra, H S; Mol, J A

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of angiogenesis-related genes in canine cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors (ATs). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNA encoding for vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2, angiopoietin 1 and 2 (ANGPT1 and ANGPT2), the splice variant ANGPT2443, the ANGPT-receptor Tie2, and basic fibroblast growth factor in 38 canine cortisol-secreting ATs (26 carcinomas and 12 adenomas) and 15 normal adrenals. The relative expression of both ANGPT2 and ANGPT2443 was higher in adenomas (P = 0.020 for ANGPT2 and P = 0.002 for ANGPT2443) and carcinomas (P = 0.003 for ANGPT2 and P cortisol-producing adrenocortical carcinoma cell line, we were able to demonstrate that the ANGPT2 expression was stimulated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate and progesterone but not by cortisol. In conclusion, canine cortisol-secreting ATs have enhanced ANGPT2 expression with a concomitant shift toward a proangiogenic state. On the basis of this information, treatment modalities may be developed that interfere with ANGPT2 expression, including inhibition of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway, or of the effect of ANGPT2, by using specific ANGPT2 inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural Stability of the Coiled-Coil Domain of Tumor Susceptibility Gene (TSG)-101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jordan T; Toptygin, Dmitri; Cohen, Randy; Murphy, Natalie; Hilser, Vincent J

    2017-09-05

    The tumor susceptibility gene-101 coiled coil domain (TSG101cc) is an integral component of the endosomal maturation machinery and cytokinesis, and also interacts with several transcription factors. The TSG101cc has been crystallized as a homotetramer but is known to interact with two of its binding partners as a heterotrimer. To investigate this apparent discrepancy, we examined the solution thermodynamics of the TSG101cc. Here, we use circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, analytical ultracentrifugation, fluorescence, and structural thermodynamic analysis to investigate the structural stability and the unfolding of the TSG101cc. We demonstrate that TSG101cc exists in solution primarily as a tetramer, which unfolds in a two-state manner. Surprisingly, no homodimeric or homotrimeric species were detected. Structural thermodynamic analysis of the homotetrameric structure and comparison with known oligomeric coiled-coils suggests that the TSG101cc homotetramer is comparatively unstable on a per residue basis. Furthermore, the homotrimeric coiled-coil is predicted to be much less stable than the functional heterotrimeric coiled-coil in the endosomal sorting complex required for transport 1 (ESCRT1). These results support a model whereby the tetramer-monomer equilibrium of TSG101 serves as the cellular reservoir of TSG101, which is effectively outcompeted when its binding partners are present and the heteroternary complex can form.

  14. Partial loss of heterozygosity events at the mutated gene in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 large genomic rearrangement carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavodna, Katarina; Krivulcik, Tomas; Bujalkova, Maria Gerykova; Slamka, Tomas; Martinicky, David; Ilencikova, Denisa; Bartosova, Zdena

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the population studied, large genomic rearrangements (LGRs) of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes constitute various proportions of the germline mutations that predispose to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). It has been reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the LGR region occurs through a gene conversion mechanism in tumors from MLH1/MSH2 deletion carriers; however, the converted tracts were delineated only by extragenic microsatellite markers. We sought to determine the frequency of LGRs in Slovak HNPCC patients and to study LOH in tumors from LGR carriers at the LGR region, as well as at other heterozygous markers within the gene to more precisely define conversion tracts. The main MMR genes responsible for HNPCC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, were analyzed by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) in a total of 37 unrelated HNPCC-suspected patients whose MLH1/MSH2 genes gave negative results in previous sequencing experiments. An LOH study was performed on six tumors from LGR carriers by combining MLPA to assess LOH at LGR regions and sequencing to examine LOH at 28 SNP markers from the MLH1 and MSH2 genes. We found six rearrangements in the MSH2 gene (five deletions and dup5-6), and one aberration in the MLH1 gene (del5-6). The MSH2 deletions were of three types (del1, del1-3, del1-7). We detected LOH at the LGR region in the single MLH1 case, which was determined in a previous study to be LOH-negative in the intragenic D3S1611 marker. Three tumors displayed LOH of at least one SNP marker, including two cases that were LOH-negative at the LGR region. LGRs accounted for 25% of germline MMR mutations identified in 28 Slovakian HNPCC families. A high frequency of LGRs among the MSH2 mutations provides a rationale for a MLPA screening of the Slovakian HNPCC families prior scanning by DNA sequencing. LOH at part of the informative loci confined to the MLH1 or MSH2 gene (heterozygous LGR region, SNP, or

  15. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells

  16. Imaging targeted at tumor with 188Re-labeled VEGF189 exon 6-encoded peptide and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhexue; Li Qianwei; Liu Guangyuan; Luo Chaoxue; Xie Ganfeng; Zheng Lei; Huang Dingde

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Planar imaging of 188 Re-labeled vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 189 exon 6-encoded peptide (QKRKRKKSRYKS) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in tumor-bearing nude mice and effects of the transfecting truncated KDR gene on its imaging were investigated, so as to provide a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor-targeted radionuclide treatment. Methods: QKRKRKKSRYKS, coupling with mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG 3 ) chelator was labeled with 188 Re; then in vivo distribution, planar imaging with SPECT and blocking experiment in tumor-bearing nude mice were analyzed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors carrying the truncated KDR gene were constructed to transfect tumor tissues to evaluate the effects of truncated KDR on the in vivo distribution and tumor planar imaging of 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS in tumor-bearing nude mice. Results: The labeled peptide exhibited a sound receptor binding activity. Planar imaging with SPECT demonstrated significant radioactivity accumulation in tumor 1 h after injection of the labeled peptide and disappearance of radioactivity 3 h later. Significant radioactivity accumulation was also observed in the liver, intestines and kidneys but was not obvious in other tissues. An hour after injection of the labeled peptide, the percentage of the injected radioactive dose per gram (%ID/g) of tumor and tumor/contralateral muscle tissues ratio were 1.98±0.38 and 2.53±0.33, respectively, and increased to 3.08±0.84 and 3.61±0.59 in the group transfected with the truncated KDR gene, respectively, and radioactivity accumulation in tumor with planar imaging also increased significantly in the transfection group. Conclusion: 188 Re-MAG 3 -QKRKRKKSRYKS can accumulate in tumor tissues, which could be increased by the transfection of truncated KDR gene. This study provides a basis for further applying the peptide to tumor targeted radionuclide imaging and treatment.

  17. CT perfusion as an imaging biomarker in monitoring response to neoadjuvant bevacizumab and radiation in soft-tissue sarcomas: comparison with tumor morphology, circulating and tumor biomarkers, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambadakone, Avinash; Yoon, Sam S; Kim, Tae-Min; Karl, Daniel L; Duda, Dan G; DeLaney, Thomas F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of CT perfusion in monitoring response to neoadjuvant antiangiogenic and radiation therapy in resectable soft-tissue sarcomas and correlate the findings with tumor size, circulating and tumor biomarkers, and gene expression. This phase II clinical trial included 20 patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age, 55 years) with soft-tissue sarcomas who were undergoing treatment with the antiangiogenic drug bevacizumab followed by bevacizumab, radiation, and surgical resection. The patients underwent CT perfusion and diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT at baseline, at 2 weeks after bevacizumab therapy, and after completion of bevacizumab and radiation therapy. Multiple CT perfusion parameters (blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and permeability) were correlated with tumor size, circulating and tumor biomarkers, and gene expression. Two weeks after bevacizumab therapy, there was substantial fall in blood volume (31.9% reduction, p = 0.01) with more pronounced reduction in blood flow, blood volume, and permeability after treatment completion (53-64% reduction in blood flow, blood volume, and permeability; p = 0.001), whereas tumor size showed no significant change (p = 0.34). Tumors with higher baseline blood volume and lower baseline tumor size showed superior response to bevacizumab and radiation (p = 0.05). There was also an increase in median plasma vascular endothelial growth factor and placental-derived growth factor concentration after bevacizumab therapy paralleled by a decrease in tumor perfusion depicted by CT perfusion, although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.4). The baseline tumor microvessel density (MVD) correlated with blood flow (p = 0.04). At least 20 different genes were differentially expressed in tumors with higher and lower baseline perfusion. CT perfusion is more sensitive than tumor size for monitoring early and late response to bevacizumab and radiation therapy. CT perfusion

  18. Effect of restoration of retinoblastoma gene function on the radiosensitivity of cells of human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, N.M.; Little, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the role of expression of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene on the sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, we transfected a normal RB gene into cells of RB + and RB - osteosarcoma cell lines and an RB - prostate carcinoma line and studied the radiosensitivity of the cells before and after transfection. Four transfected clones were isolated from the two RB - tumor cell lines that expressed the product of the transfected normal RB gene and contained no mutations in the pocket and C-terminal regions by sequencing. A small increase in radiosensitivity was observed in cell lines transfected with the pDOL plasmid vector alone, containing the neo gene and a long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. However, no significant change in radiosensitivity occurred in transfected cells expressing the normal RB gene compared to controls transfected with an RB - plasmid. Based on this and other information, we conclude that RB gene function is not involved in the response of these human tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  19. The Tumor Suppressor Gene, RASSF1A, Is Essential for Protection against Inflammation -Induced Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiteih, Yahya; Law, Jennifer; Volodko, Natalia; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O. S.; Liu, Lei; Odenbach, Jeff; Thiesen, Aducio; Onyskiw, Christina; Ghazaleh, Haya Abu; Park, Jikyoung; Lee, Sean Bong; Yu, Victor C.; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Alexander, R. Todd; Wine, Eytan; Baksh, Shairaz

    2013-01-01

    Ras association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced in cancer. Here we report that RASSF1A is a novel regulator of intestinal inflammation as Rassf1a+/−, Rassf1a−/− and an intestinal epithelial cell specific knockout mouse (Rassf1a IEC-KO) rapidly became sick following dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) administration, a chemical inducer of colitis. Rassf1a knockout mice displayed clinical symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease including: increased intestinal permeability, enhanced cytokine/chemokine production, elevated nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB) activity, elevated colonic cell death and epithelial cell injury. Furthermore, epithelial restitution/repair was inhibited in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice with reduction of several makers of proliferation including Yes associated protein (YAP)-driven proliferation. Surprisingly, tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP was detected which coincided with increased nuclear p73 association, Bax-driven epithelial cell death and p53 accumulation resulting in enhanced apoptosis and poor survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice. We can inhibit these events and promote the survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice with intraperitoneal injection of the c-Abl and c-Abl related protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib/gleevec. However, p53 accumulation was not inhibited by imatinib/gleevec in the Rassf1a−/− background which revealed the importance of p53-dependent cell death during intestinal inflammation. These observations suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP (to drive p73 association and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax) and accumulation of p53 are consequences of inflammation-induced injury in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice. Mechanistically, we can detect robust associations of RASSF1A with membrane proximal Toll-like receptor (TLR) components to suggest that RASSF1A may function to interfere and restrict TLR

  20. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  1. Subclassification and Detection of New Markers for the Discrimination of Primary Liver Tumors by Gene Expression Analysis Using Oligonucleotide Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Holger G; Vogel, Ulrich; Scheurlen, Michael; Jobst, Jürgen

    2017-12-26

    The failure to correctly differentiate between intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma [CC] and hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] is a significant clinical problem, particularly in terms of the different treatment goals for both cancers. In this study a specific gene expression profile to discriminate these two subgroups of liver cancer was established and potential diagnostic markers for clinical use were analyzed. To evaluate the gene expression profiles of HCC and intrahepatic CC, Oligonucleotide arrays ( Affymetrix U133A) were used. Overexpressed genes were checked for their potential use as new markers for discrimination and their expression values were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry analyses. 695 genes/expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in HCC (245 up-/450 down-regulated) and 552 genes/ESTs in CC (221 up-/331 down-regulated) were significantly dysregulated (p〈0.05, fold change >2, ≥70%). Using a supervised learning method, and one-way analysis of variance a specific 270-gene expression profile that enabled rapid, reproducible differentiation between both tumors and non-malignant liver tissues was established. A panel of 12 genes (e.g. HSP90β, ERG1, GPC3, TKT, ACLY, and NME1 for HCC; SPT2, T4S3, CNX43, TTD1, HBD01 for CC) were detected and partly described for the first time as potential discrimination markers. A specific gene expression profile for discrimination of primary liver cancer was identified and potential marker genes with feasible clinical impact were described.

  2. A Meta-Analysis of Retinoblastoma Copy Numbers Refines the List of Possible Driver Genes Involved in Tumor Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Irsan E.; Mol, Berber M.; Massink, Maarten P. G.; de Jong, Marcus C.; de Graaf, Pim; van der Valk, Paul; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Moll, Annette C.; te Riele, Hein; Cloos, Jacqueline; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2016-01-01

    Background While RB1 loss initiates retinoblastoma development, additional somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) can drive tumor progression. Although SCNAs have been identified with good concordance between studies at a cytoband resolution, accurate identification of single genes for all recurrent SCNAs is still challenging. This study presents a comprehensive meta-analysis of genome-wide SCNAs integrated with gene expression profiling data, narrowing down the list of plausible retinoblastoma driver genes. Methods We performed SCNA profiling of 45 primary retinoblastoma samples and eight retinoblastoma cell lines by high-resolution microarrays. We combined our data with genomic, clinical and histopathological data of ten published genome-wide SCNA studies, which strongly enhanced the power of our analyses (N = 310). Results Comprehensive recurrence analysis of SCNAs in all studies integrated with gene expression data allowed us to reduce candidate gene lists for 1q, 2p, 6p, 7q and 13q to a limited gene set. Besides the well-established driver genes RB1 (13q-loss) and MYCN (2p-gain) we identified CRB1 and NEK7 (1q-gain), SOX4 (6p-gain) and NUP205 (7q-gain) as novel retinoblastoma driver candidates. Depending on the sample subset and algorithms used, alternative candidates were identified including MIR181 (1q-gain) and DEK (6p gain). Remarkably, our study showed that copy number gains rarely exceeded change of one copy, even in pure tumor samples with 100% homozygosity at the RB1 locus (N = 34), which is indicative for intra-tumor heterogeneity. In addition, profound between-tumor variability was observed that was associated with age at diagnosis and differentiation grades. Interpretation Since focal alterations at commonly altered chromosome regions were rare except for 2p24.3 (MYCN), further functional validation of the oncogenic potential of the described candidate genes is now required. For further investigations, our study provides a refined and revised set

  3. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Talbot, Neil C; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-02-21

    To identify the genes induced and regulated by the MYC protein in generating tumors from liver stem cells. In this study, we have used an immortal porcine liver stem cell line, PICM-19, to study the role of c-MYC in hepatocarcinogenesis. PICM-19 cells were converted into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs) by overexpressing human MYC. To identify MYC-driven differential gene expression, transcriptome sequencing was carried out by RNA sequencing, and genes identified by this method were validated using real-time PCR. In vivo tumorigenicity studies were then conducted by injecting PICM-19-CSCs into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Our results showed that MYC-overexpressing PICM-19 stem cells formed tumors in immunodeficient mice demonstrating that a single oncogene was sufficient to convert them into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs). By using comparative bioinformatics analyses, we have determined that > 1000 genes were differentially expressed between PICM-19 and PICM-19-CSCs. Gene ontology analysis further showed that the MYC-induced, altered gene expression was primarily associated with various cellular processes, such as metabolism, cell adhesion, growth and proliferation, cell cycle, inflammation and tumorigenesis. Interestingly, six genes expressed by PICM-19 cells (CDO1, C22orf39, DKK2, ENPEP, GPX6, SRPX2) were completely silenced after MYC-induction in PICM-19-CSCs, suggesting that the absence of these genes may be critical for inducing tumorigenesis. MYC-driven genes may serve as promising candidates for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma therapeutics that would not have deleterious effects on other cell types in the liver.

  4. An Inducible Lentiviral Guide RNA Platform Enables the Identification of Tumor-Essential Genes and Tumor-Promoting Mutations In Vivo

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    Brandon J. Aubrey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables the introduction of genomic alterations into almost any organism; however, systems for efficient and inducible gene modification have been lacking, especially for deletion of essential genes. Here, we describe a drug-inducible small guide RNA (sgRNA vector system allowing for ubiquitous and efficient gene deletion in murine and human cells. This system mediates the efficient, temporally controlled deletion of MCL-1, both in vitro and in vivo, in human Burkitt lymphoma cell lines that require this anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for sustained survival and growth. Unexpectedly, repeated induction of the same sgRNA generated similar inactivating mutations in the human Mcl-1 gene due to low mutation variability exerted by the accompanying non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ process. Finally, we were able to generate hematopoietic cell compartment-restricted Trp53-knockout mice, leading to the identification of cancer-promoting mutants of this critical tumor suppressor.

  5. Association of tumor necrosis factor-α and -β gene polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Meghaiseeb ES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebtissam Saleh Al-Meghaiseeb,1 Abdulrahman A Al-Robayan,1 Mulfi Mubarak Al-Otaibi,1 Misbahul Arfin,2 Abdulrahman K Al-Asmari2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Research Centre, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a complex, multifactorial, chronic inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract in which immune dysregulation caused by genetic and/or environmental factors plays an important role. The aim of this case–­control study was to evaluate the association of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α (308 and -β (+252 polymorphisms with susceptibility of IBD. A total of 379 Saudi subjects including 179 IBD patients (ulcerative colitis (UC =84 and Crohn’s disease (CD =95 and 200 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. TNF-a and TNF-b genes were amplified using an amplification refractory mutation systems polymerase chain reaction methodology to detect TNF-α (–308 and -β (+252 polymorphisms. The frequency of the GA genotype of TNF-α (–308G/A was higher, and the frequencies of the GG and AA genotypes were significantly lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating that genotype GA-positive individuals are susceptible to IBD and that the GG and AA genotypes exert a protective effect. The frequency of allele A of TNF-α (–308G/A was significantly higher and that of allele G was lower in IBD patients compared with those in controls, indicating an association of allele A with IBD risk in Saudi patients. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, an almost similar pattern was noticed in both the groups. The results of TNF-β (+252A/G polymorphisms showed a significant increase in the frequency of the GG genotype in IBD patients, suggesting a positive association of GG genotype with IBD risk. On stratification of IBD patients into UC and CD, the genotype GG of TNF-β was associated with susceptibility risk to UC but not CD. The

  6. Caracterização patológica e gênica (gene P53) dos tumores mamários em cadelas.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Maria Bastos de Souza

    2006-01-01

    Os tumores mamários em cadelas tem alta incidência e malignidade sendo provocados por vários fatores de risco incluindo idade, atividade hormonal, nutrição, vírus, pseudogestação e administração de progestágenos exógenos. O gene p53, conhecido como um gene supressor de tumor, tem apresentado mutações relacionadas com neoplasias. Neste trabalho, o objetivo foi caracterizar os tumores mamários em cadelas, avaliar o comprometimento da mama lateral ao tumor e o envolvimento de fatores de risco...

  7. Internal radiotherapy of liver cancer with rat hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas gene as a liver tumor-specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Hop Paul Brousse, INSERM, Hepatobiliary Ctr, U785, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Herve, J.; Cunha, A. Sa; Liu, B.; Valogne, Y.; Longuet, M.; Bregerie, O.; Guettier, C.; Samuel, D.; Brechot, C.; Faivre, J. [Univ Paris Sud, Fac Med, F-94800 Villejuif (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [INSERM, U803, F-91400 Orsay (France); Boisgard, R.; Tavitian, B. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, Lab Imagerie Mol Expt, F-91400 Orsay (France); Roux, J.; Cales, P. [Univ Angers, UPRES EA 3859, Lab Hemodynam Interact Fibrose et Invas Tumorale H, Angers (France); Clerc, J. [Hop Cochin, AP HP, Dept Nucl Med, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    The hepato-carcinoma-intestine-pancreas (HIP) gene, also called pancreatitis-associated protein-1 (PAP1) or Reg III {alpha}, is activated in most human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) but not in normal liver, which suggests that HIP regulatory sequence could be used as efficient liver tumor-specific promoters to express a therapeutic polynucleotide in liver cancer. The sodium iodide sym-porter (NIS), which has recognized therapeutic and reporter gene properties, is appropriate to evaluate the transcriptional strength and specificity of the HIP promoter in HCC. For this purpose, we constructed a recombinant rat HIP-NIS adeno-viral vector (AdrHIP-NIS), and evaluated its performance as a mediator of selective radio-iodide uptake in tumor hepatocytes. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and iodide uptake assays were performed in AdrHIP-NIS-infected primary hepatocytes and transformed hepatic and non-hepatic cells. Nuclear imaging, tissue counting and immuno-histo-chemistry were performed in normal and HCC-bearing Wistar rats infected with AdrHIP-NIS intra-tumorally or via the hepatic artery. In AdrHIP-NIS-infected transformed hepatic cells, functional NIS was strongly expressed, as in cells infected with a cytomegalovirus-NIS vector. No NIS expression was found in AdrHIP-NIS-infected normal hepatocytes or transformed non-hepatic cells. In rats bearing multi-nodular HCC, AdrHIP-NIS triggered functional NIS expression that was preferential in tumor hepatocytes. Administration of 18 mCi of {sup 131}I resulted in the destruction of AdrHIP-NIS-injected nodules. This study has identified the rHIP regulatory sequence as a potent liver tumor-specific promoter for the transfer of therapeutic genes, and AdrHIP-NIS-mediated. {sup 131}I therapy as a valuable option for the treatment of multi-nodular HCC. (authors)

  8. Functional interactions between the erupted/tsg101 growth suppressor gene and the DaPKC and rbf1 genes in Drosophila imaginal disc tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Melissa Gilbert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila gene erupted (ept encodes the fly homolog of human Tumor Susceptibility Gene-101 (TSG101, which functions as part of the conserved ESCRT-1 complex to facilitate the movement of cargoes through the endolysosomal pathway. Loss of ept or other genes that encode components of the endocytic machinery (e.g. synatxin7/avalanche, rab5, and vps25 produces disorganized overgrowth of imaginal disc tissue. Excess cell division is postulated to be a primary cause of these 'neoplastic' phenotypes, but the autonomous effect of these mutations on cell cycle control has not been examined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that disc cells lacking ept function display an altered cell cycle profile indicative of deregulated progression through the G1-to-S phase transition and express reduced levels of the tumor suppressor ortholog and G1/S inhibitor Rbf1. Genetic reductions of the Drosophila aPKC kinase (DaPKC, which has been shown to promote tumor growth in other fly tumor models, prevent both the ept neoplastic phenotype and the reduction in Rbf1 levels that otherwise occurs in clones of ept mutant cells; this effect is coincident with changes in localization of Notch and Crumbs, two proteins whose sorting is altered in ept mutant cells. The effect on Rbf1 can also be blocked by removal of the gamma-secretase component presenilin, suggesting that cleavage of a gamma-secretase target influences Rbf1 levels in ept mutant cells. Expression of exogenous rbf1 completely ablates ept mutant eye tissues but only mildly affects the development of discs composed of cells with wild type ept. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data show that loss of ept alters nuclear cell cycle control in developing imaginal discs and identify the DaPKC, presenilin, and rbf1 genes as modifiers of molecular and cellular phenotypes that result from loss of ept.

  9. Synergistic tumor-cidal effect of combination of hMUC1 vaccination and hNIS radioiodine gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Yun; Kim, Chul Woo; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key

    2007-01-01

    We developed the combination therapy of hMUC1 vaccination and hNlS radioiodine gene therapy in tumor bearing mice and visualized the anti-tumor effect using molecular imaging. A stable colon cancer cell line (CT26/hMUC1-hNlS-Fluc: CMNF) expressing the hMUC1, hNlS, and Flue genes was established. The in vitro survival rates of CMNF were determined using clonogenic assay after I-131 treatment. Five groups of 28 Balb/c (7mice/group) mice were made after subcutaneously injection of CMNF cells according to treatments (pcDNA3.1+PBS, phMUC1+PBS, pcDNA3.1+I-131, and phMUC1+I-131 groups). After development of xenografted tumor, PBS, MUC1 vaccine, I-131, and MUC1 vaccine + I-131 were administered to the mice. Tumor progression was monitored by using a bioluminescent image and caliper. Thirty-two days after tumor transplantation, we re-challenged CMNF to pcDNA3.1+I-131, and phMUC1 +I-131 groups. We investigated the number of hMUC1-associated CD8+IFN-+ T cells and of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) activity using splenocytes in treated mice. The in vitro survival rate of CMNF was significantly reduced to 15.31.1 % after I-131 treatment compared with the survival rates of parental cells (p<0.001). Complete tumor growth inhibition was shown in phMUC1+ I-131 group at 48 days post challenge, but not in any monotherapy group (p<0.05). In cases of tumor rechallenging, complete rejection of the tumor occurred in phMUC1 + I-131 group, but not in pcDNA3.1 + I-131 group. The number of hMUC1-associated CD8+ IFN-+ T cells was significantly more increased in phMUC1 +I-131 group compared mono-therapy group (P<0.001). The activity of hMUC1-associated CTLs in was higher than those of monotherapy groups (P<0.005). We found that this combination therapy induced the complete remission, and rejected rechallenged tumor cells in murine colon cancer model. This novel combination therapy strategy has a possibility to be applied in clinical oncology

  10. A nanocomplex that is both tumor cell-selective and cancer gene-specific for anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu Youli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many in vitro studies have demonstrated that silencing of cancerous genes by siRNAs is a potential therapeutic approach for blocking tumor growth. However, siRNAs are not cell type-selective, cannot specifically target tumor cells, and therefore have limited in vivo application for siRNA-mediated gene therapy. Results In this study, we tested a functional RNA nanocomplex which exclusively targets and affects human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL by taking advantage of the abnormal expression of CD30, a unique surface biomarker, and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene in lymphoma cells. The nanocomplexes were formulated by incorporating both ALK siRNA and a RNA-based CD30 aptamer probe onto nano-sized polyethyleneimine-citrate carriers. To minimize potential cytotoxicity, the individual components of the nanocomplexes were used at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Dynamic light scattering showed that formed nanocomplexes were ~140 nm in diameter and remained stable for more than 24 hours in culture medium. Cell binding assays revealed that CD30 aptamer probes selectively targeted nanocomplexes to ALCL cells, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed intracellular delivery of the nanocomplex. Cell transfection analysis showed that nanocomplexes silenced genes in an ALCL cell type-selective fashion. Moreover, exposure of ALCL cells to nanocomplexes carrying both ALK siRNAs and CD30 RNA aptamers specifically silenced ALK gene expression, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that this functional RNA nanocomplex is both tumor cell type-selective and cancer gene-specific for ALCL cells.

  11. Human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells suppress the growth of breast cancer by expression of tumor suppressor genes.

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    Naomi Ohta

    Full Text Available Human and rat umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSC possess the ability to control the growth of breast carcinoma cells. Comparative analyses of two types of UCMSC suggest that rat UCMSC-dependent growth regulation is significantly stronger than that of human UCMSC. Their different tumoricidal abilities were clarified by analyzing gene expression profiles in the two types of UCMSC. Microarray analysis revealed differential gene expression between untreated naïve UCMSC and those co-cultured with species-matched breast carcinoma cells. The analyses screened 17 differentially expressed genes that are commonly detected in both human and rat UCMSC. The comparison between the two sets of gene expression profiles identified two tumor suppressor genes, adipose-differentiation related protein (ADRP and follistatin (FST, that were specifically up-regulated in rat UCMSC, but down-regulated in human UCMSC when they were co-cultured with the corresponding species' breast carcinoma cells. Over-expression of FST, but not ADRP, in human UCMSC enhanced their ability to suppress the growth of MDA-231 cells. The growth of MDA-231 cells was also significantly lower when they were cultured in medium conditioned with FST, but not ADRP over-expressing human UCMSC. In the breast carcinoma lung metastasis model generated with MDA-231 cells, systemic treatment with FST-over-expressing human UCMSC significantly attenuated the tumor burden. These results suggest that FST may play an important role in exhibiting stronger tumoricidal ability in rat UCMSC than human UCMSC and also implies that human UCMSC can be transformed into stronger tumoricidal cells by enhancing tumor suppressor gene expression.

  12. Gene Expression Ratios Lead to Accurate and Translatable Predictors of DR5 Agonism across Multiple Tumor Lineages.

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    Anupama Reddy

    Full Text Available Death Receptor 5 (DR5 agonists demonstrate anti-tumor activity in preclinical models but have yet to demonstrate robust clinical responses. A key limitation may be the lack of patient selection strategies to identify those most likely to respond to treatment. To overcome this limitation, we screened a DR5 agonist Nanobody across >600 cell lines representing 21 tumor lineages and assessed molecular features associated with response. High expression of DR5 and Casp8 were significantly associated with sensitivity, but their expression thresholds were difficult to translate due to low dynamic ranges. To address the translational challenge of establishing thresholds of gene expression, we developed a classifier based on ratios of genes that predicted response across lineages. The ratio classifier outperformed the DR5+Casp8 classifier, as well as standard approaches for feature selection and classification using genes, instead of ratios. This classifier was independently validated using 11 primary patient-derived pancreatic xenograft models showing perfect predictions as well as a striking linearity between prediction probability and anti-tumor response. A network analysis of the genes in the ratio classifier captured important biological relationships mediating drug response, specifically identifying key positive and negative regulators of DR5 mediated apoptosis, including DR5, CASP8, BID, cFLIP, XIAP and PEA15. Importantly, the ratio classifier shows translatability across gene expression platforms (from Affymetrix microarrays to RNA-seq and across model systems (in vitro to in vivo. Our approach of using gene expression ratios presents a robust and novel method for constructing translatable biomarkers of compound response, which can also probe the underlying biology of treatment response.

  13. Radiation-associated breast tumors display a distinct gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common...... separate from the control tumors (p centroid classifier of 198 probes was identified. The BfHL tumors were often of the intrinsic basal breast tumor subtype, and they showed a chromosomal instability profile and a higher expression...

  14. Gene Expression of Glucose Transporter 1 (GLUT1), Hexokinase 1 and Hexokinase 2 in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Tina; Knigge, Ulrich; Federspiel, Birgitte Hartnack

    2013-01-01

    Neoplastic tissue exhibits high glucose utilization and over-expression of glucose transporters (GLUTs) and hexokinases (HKs), which can be imaged by (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of glycolysis......-associated genes and to compare this with FDG-PET imaging as well as with the cellular proliferation index in two cancer entities with different malignant potential. Using real-time PCR, gene expression of GLUT1, HK1 and HK2 were studied in 34 neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in comparison with 14 colorectal...... adenocarcinomas (CRAs). The Ki67 proliferation index and, when available, FDG-PET imaging was compared with gene expression. Overexpression of GLUT1 gene expression was less frequent in NETs (38%) compared to CRAs (86%), P = 0.004. HK1 was overexpressed in 41% and 71% of NETs and CRAs, respectively (P = 0...

  15. ALK Gene Translocation in Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor of the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiaki Takagi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old woman with gross hematuria was seen in a previous hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a tumor at the dome of the urinary bladder with invasion outside of the bladder wall. The patient underwent transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TUR-BT. From the result of the pathological examination, the tumor was suggested to be carcinosarcoma of the bladder. The patient was then referred to our hospital for treatment. We performed radical cystectomy and ileal conduit diversion. Pathological examination of the excised specimen revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor as the basis for immunostaining of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK.

  16. Lack of mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene exons 5 to 8 in Fanconi's anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonveaux, P; Le Coniat, M; Grausz, D; Berger, R

    1991-01-01

    The TP53 gene is considered to be a negative regulator of cell growth whose inactivation is an important step in the development or progression of malignancies. Recently, germ line TP53 mutations have been detected in a familial cancer syndrome, the dominantly inherited Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Using single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of PCR products, we looked for TP53 mutations in DNA of patients with Fanconi anemia, an autosomal recessive disease characterized by increased predisposition to neoplasia. We did not find any TP53 mutation in 13 patients, suggesting that this tumor suppressor gene is not directly involved in the cancer susceptibility observed in Fanconi's anemia.

  17. Enhanced gene expression in tumors after intravenous administration of arginine-, lysine- and leucine-bearing polypropylenimine polyplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldawsari, Hibah; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; Blatchford, David R; Tate, Rothwelle J; Tetley, Laurence; Dufès, Christine

    2011-09-01

    The possibility of using non-viral gene delivery systems for the treatment of cancer is currently limited by their lower transfection efficacy compared to viral systems. On the basis that amino acids such as arginine, lysine and leucine were involved in enhancing DNA transportation into cells, we hypothesized that the grafting of these amino acids to the highly promising generation 3 diaminobutyric polypropylenimine (DAB) dendrimer would improve its transfection efficacy in cancer cells. In this work we demonstrated that the conjugation of arginine, lysine and leucine to the dendrimer led to an enhanced anti-proliferative activity of the polyplexes, by up to 47-fold for DAB-Lys in T98G cancer cells compared to the unmodified polyplex in vitro. In vivo, the intravenous administration of amino acid-bearing DAB polyplexes resulted in a significantly improved tumor gene expression, with the highest gene expression level observed after treatment with DAB-Lys polyplex. Arginine, lysine and leucine-bearing generation 3 polypropylenimine polymers are therefore highly promising gene delivery systems for gene transfection in tumors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  19. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  20. Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells Modified with Tumor-Associated Antigen Gene Demonstrates Enhanced Antitumor Effect Against Lung Cancer

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    Tao Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immunotherapy using dendritic cell (DC vaccine has the potential to overcome the bottleneck of cancer therapy. METHODS: We engineered Lewis lung cancer cells (LLCs and bone marrow–derived DCs to express tumor-associated antigen (TAA ovalbumin (OVA via lentiviral vector plasmid encoding OVA gene. We then tested the antitumor effect of modified DCs both in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that in vitro modified DCs could dramatically enhance T-cell proliferation (P < .01 and killing of LLCs than control groups (P < .05. Moreover, modified DCs could reduce tumor size and prolong the survival of LLC tumor-bearing mice than control groups (P < .01 and P < .01, respectively. Mechanistically, modified DCs demonstrated enhanced homing to T-cell–rich compartments and triggered more naive T cells to become cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which exhibited significant infiltration into the tumors. Interestingly, modified DCs also markedly reduced tumor cells harboring stem cell markers in mice (P < .05, suggesting the potential role on cancer stem-like cells. CONCLUSION: These findings suggested that DCs bioengineered with TAA could enhance antitumor effect and therefore represent a novel anticancer strategy that is worth further exploration.

  1. Atheroprotective Effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor–Stimulated Gene-6

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    Rena Watanabe, MS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6, an anti-inflammatory protein, was shown to be localized in the neointima of injury-induced rat arteries. However, the modulatory effect of TSG-6 on atherogenesis has not yet been reported. We aimed to evaluate the atheroprotective effects of TSG-6 on human endothelial cells (HECs, human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs, human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs in vitro, and aortic lesions in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice, along with expression levels of TSG-6 in coronary lesions and plasma from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. TSG-6 was abundantly expressed in HECs, HMDMs, and HASMCs in vitro. TSG-6 significantly suppressed cell proliferation and lipopolysaccharide-induced up-regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and vascular adhesion molecule-1 in HECs. TSG-6 significantly suppressed inflammatory M1 phenotype and suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein–induced foam cell formation associated with down-regulation of CD36 and acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in HMDMs. In HASMCs, TSG-6 significantly suppressed migration and proliferation, but increased collagen-1 and -3 expressions. Four-week infusion of TSG-6 into apolipoprotein E–deficient mice significantly retarded the development of aortic atherosclerotic lesions with decreased vascular inflammation, monocyte/macrophage, and SMC contents and increased collagen fibers. In addition, it decreased peritoneal M1 macrophages with down-regulation of inflammatory molecules and lowered plasma total cholesterol levels. In patients with CAD, plasma TSG-6 levels were significantly increased, and TSG-6 was highly expressed in the fibrous cap within coronary atherosclerotic plaques. These results suggest that TSG-6 contributes to the prevention and stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Thus, TSG-6 may serve as a novel therapeutic target for CAD.

  2. Improving the prediction of chemotherapeutic sensitivity of tumors in breast cancer via optimizing the selection of candidate genes.

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    Jiang, Lina; Huang, Liqiu; Kuang, Qifan; Zhang, Juan; Li, Menglong; Wen, Zhining; He, Li

    2014-04-01

    Estrogen receptor status and the pathologic response to preoperative chemotherapy are two important indicators of chemotherapeutic sensitivity of tumors in breast cancer, which are used to guide the selection of specific regimens for patients. Microarray-based gene expression profiling, which is successfully applied to the discovery of tumor biomarkers and the prediction of drug response, was suggested to predict the cancer outcomes using the gene signatures differentially expressed between two clinical states. However, many false positive genes unrelated to the phenotypic differences will be involved in the lists of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) when only using the statistical methods for gene selection, e.g. Student's t test, and subsequently affect the performance of the predictive models. For the purpose of improving the prediction of clinical outcomes, we optimized the selection of DEGs by using a combined strategy, for which the DEGs were firstly identified by the statistical methods, and then filtered by a similarity profiling approach that used for candidate gene prioritization. In our study, we firstly verified the molecular functions of the DEGs identified by the combined strategy with the gene expression data generated in the microarray experiments of Si-Wu-Tang, which is a popular formula in traditional Chinese medicine. The results showed that, for Si-Wu-Tang experimental data set, the cancer-related signaling pathways were significantly enriched by gene set enrichment analysis when using the DEG lists generated by the combined strategy, confirming the potentially cancer-preventive effect of Si-Wu-Tang. To verify the performance of the predictive models in clinical application, we used the combined strategy to select the DEGs as features from the gene expression data of the clinical samples, which were collected from the breast cancer patients, and constructed models to predict the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of tumors in breast cancer. After

  3. Building a Robust Tumor Profiling Program: Synergy between Next-Generation Sequencing and Targeted Single-Gene Testing.

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    Matthew C Hiemenz

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS is a powerful platform for identifying cancer mutations. Routine clinical adoption of NGS requires optimized quality control metrics to ensure accurate results. To assess the robustness of our clinical NGS pipeline, we analyzed the results of 304 solid tumor and hematologic malignancy specimens tested simultaneously by NGS and one or more targeted single-gene tests (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, NPM1, FLT3, and JAK2. For samples that passed our validated tumor percentage and DNA quality and quantity thresholds, there was perfect concordance between NGS and targeted single-gene tests with the exception of two FLT3 internal tandem duplications that fell below the stringent pre-established reporting threshold but were readily detected by manual inspection. In addition, NGS identified clinically significant mutations not covered by single-gene tests. These findings confirm NGS as a reliable platform for routine clinical use when appropriate quality control metrics, such as tumor percentage and DNA quality cutoffs, are in place. Based on our findings, we suggest a simple workflow that should facilitate adoption of clinical oncologic NGS services at other institutions.

  4. Building a Robust Tumor Profiling Program: Synergy between Next-Generation Sequencing and Targeted Single-Gene Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemenz, Matthew C; Kadauke, Stephan; Lieberman, David B; Roth, David B; Zhao, Jianhua; Watt, Christopher D; Daber, Robert D; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful platform for identifying cancer mutations. Routine clinical adoption of NGS requires optimized quality control metrics to ensure accurate results. To assess the robustness of our clinical NGS pipeline, we analyzed the results of 304 solid tumor and hematologic malignancy specimens tested simultaneously by NGS and one or more targeted single-gene tests (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, NPM1, FLT3, and JAK2). For samples that passed our validated tumor percentage and DNA quality and quantity thresholds, there was perfect concordance between NGS and targeted single-gene tests with the exception of two FLT3 internal tandem duplications that fell below the stringent pre-established reporting threshold but were readily detected by manual inspection. In addition, NGS identified clinically significant mutations not covered by single-gene tests. These findings confirm NGS as a reliable platform for routine clinical use when appropriate quality control metrics, such as tumor percentage and DNA quality cutoffs, are in place. Based on our findings, we suggest a simple workflow that should facilitate adoption of clinical oncologic NGS services at other institutions.

  5. The Role of HLA-G Molecule and HLA-G Gene Polymorphisms in Tumors, Viral Hepatitis, and Parasitic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fabrício C; Castelli, Erick C; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Considering that the non-classical HLA-G molecule has well-recognized tolerogenic properties, HLA-G expression is expected to be deleterious when present in tumor cells and in cells chronically infected by viruses, whereas HLA-G expression is expected to be advantageous in autoimmune disorders. The expression of HLA-G on tissue or peripheral blood cells, the levels of soluble HLA-G and polymorphic sites along the gene have been studied in several disorders. In this study, we revised the role of the molecule and polymorphic sites along the HLA-G gene in tumors, viral hepatitis, and parasitic disorders. Overall, several lines of evidence clearly show that the induction of HLA-G expression in tumors has been associated with worse disease outcome and disease spread. In addition, the few studies conducted on hepatitis and parasitic disorders indicate that HLA-G may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Few isolated polymorphic sites, primarily located at the coding or 3' untranslated HLA-G region, have been evaluated in these disorders, and a complete HLA-G typing together with the study of gene regulatory elements may further help on the understanding of the influence of the genetic background on disease susceptibility.

  6. Uniparental disomy occurs infrequently in Wilms tumor patients

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    Grundy, P.; Wilson, B.; Telzerow, P.; Zhou, W.; Paterson, M.C. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1994-02-01

    Wilms tumors commonly exhibit loss of heterozygosity for polymorphic DNA markers located on the short arm of chromosome 11 at band p15. In some instances, the deleted region does not include 11p13, the location of the WT1 gene, suggesting the existence of a second Wilms tumor gene on 11p. Both the exclusive loss of the maternally derived allele in Wilms tumors and the recent description of constitutional paternal isodisomy for this region in patients with either the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or isolated hemihypertrophy have suggested that this second locus is subject to sex-specific genomic imprinting. Given that one of these isodisomic patients had minimal congenital anomalies (hemihypertrophy), the authors hypothesized that a proportion of Wilms tumors which had not lost heterozygosity for 11p markers (about 60% of all cases) might have arisen consequent to 11p paternal heterodisomy and that patients constitutionally homozygous at 11p15 might harbor paternal isodisomy. They have analyzed 40 Wilms tumor cases to determine the parental origin of the child's 11p15 alleles. Paternal heterodisomy could be excluded in all 28 unilateral and 8/9 bilateral potential candidates. It is intriguing that somatic mosaicism for 11p paternal isodisomy was detected in one child with bilateral Wilms tumor and macroglossia. Isodisomy could only be excluded in one of the three possible cases. Thus, 11p paternal hetero- and isodisomy appear to be uncommon causes of non-anomaly-associated Wilms tumors but may be more frequent in Wilms tumor patients with BWS-associated anomalies. 44 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Association between mutations of critical pathway genes and survival outcomes according to the tumor location in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Won; Han, Sae-Won; Cha, Yongjun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Lyu, Jaemyun; Han, Hyojun; Kim, Hyoki; Jang, Hoon; Bang, Duhee; Huh, Iksoo; Park, Taesung; Won, Jae-Kyung; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Kim, Tae-You

    2017-09-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through the alteration of several critical pathways. This study was aimed at evaluating the influence of critical pathways on survival outcomes for patients with CRC. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 40 genes included in the 5 critical pathways of CRC (WNT, P53, RTK-RAS, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase [PI3K], and transforming growth factor β [TGF-β]) was performed for 516 patients with stage III or high-risk stage II CRC treated with surgery followed by adjuvant fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy. The associations between critical pathway mutations and relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival were analyzed. The associations were further analyzed according to the tumor location. The mutation rates for the WNT, P53, RTK-RAS, PI3K, and TGF-β pathways were 84.5%, 69.0%, 60.7%, 30.0%, and 28.9%, respectively. A mutation in the PI3K pathway was associated with longer RFS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36-0.99), whereas a mutation in the RTK-RAS pathway was associated with shorter RFS (adjusted HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.01-2.52). Proximal tumors showed a higher mutation rate than distal tumors, and the mutation profile was different according to the tumor location. The mutation rates of Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit α (PIK3CA), and B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) were higher in proximal tumors, and the mutation rates of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), tumor protein 53 (TP53), and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) were higher in distal tumors. The better RFS with the PI3K pathway mutation was significant only for proximal tumors, and the worse RFS with the RTK-RAS pathway mutation was significant only for distal tumors. A PI3K pathway mutation was associated with better RFS for CRC patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and an RTK

  8. Intraperitoneal administration of a tumor-associated antigen SART3, CD40L, and GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle elicits a vaccine effect in mouse tumor models.

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    Kouichi Furugaki

    Full Text Available Polyplex micelles have demonstrated biocompatibility and achieve efficient gene transfection in vivo. Here, we investigated a polyplex micelle encapsulating genes encoding the tumor-associated antigen squamous cell carcinoma antigen recognized by T cells-3 (SART3, adjuvant CD40L, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as a DNA vaccine platform in mouse tumor models with different types of major histocompatibility antigen complex (MHC. Intraperitoneally administrated polyplex micelles were predominantly found in the lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Compared with mock controls, the triple gene vaccine significantly prolonged the survival of mice harboring peritoneal dissemination of CT26 colorectal cancer cells, of which long-term surviving mice showed complete rejection when re-challenged with CT26 tumors. Moreover, the DNA vaccine inhibited the growth and metastasis of subcutaneous CT26 and Lewis lung tumors in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, respectively, which represent different MHC haplotypes. The DNA vaccine highly stimulated both cytotoxic T lymphocyte and natural killer cell activities, and increased the infiltration of CD11c+ DCs and CD4+/CD8a+ T cells into tumors. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8a+ T cells by neutralizing antibodies deteriorated the anti-tumor efficacy of the DNA vaccine. In conclusion, a SART3/CD40L+GM-CSF gene-loaded polyplex micelle can be applied as a novel vaccine platform to elicit tumor rejection immunity regardless of the recipient MHC haplotype.

  9. [Oncopathological aspects of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes inactivation in tumors of ovary, fallopian tube and pelvic peritoneum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škapa, Petr; Dundr, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma represents a heterogeneous group of malignant epithelial tumors which could be divided into two fundamental groups: Type I (endometrioid carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, low grade serous carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma and more rare seromucinous carcinoma and malignant Brenner tumor) and type II (high grade serous carcinoma - HGSC). HGSC is the most frequent ovarian carcinoma which may be etiologically linked to inactivation of tumor suppressor genes BRCA1/2 and TP53 and differs from type I carcinomas by higher aggressiveness, tendency to peritoneal spread and worse prognosis. A precursor lesion of HGSC was described as a serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) which is usually localized in fimbria of the fallopian tube from where tumor cells are capable to implant on ovary and pelvic peritoneum. Therefore, HGSC may present itself not only as a tuboovarian tumor but also as a primary peritoneal carcinoma. HGSC constitutes a dominant group within hereditary ovarian carcinomas as a manifestation of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer or site-specific ovarian cancer syndromes which are associated with germinal mutations of BRCA1/2 genes. BRCA1 deficient HGSC show characteristic histological appearance which encompasses SET features (Solid-pseudoEndometrioid-Transitional), significant nuclear atypia and mitotic activity, geographic necrosis, marked lymphocytic infiltration and abnormalities in TP53 expression. Use of immunohistochemistry as a screening method for BRCA1/2 inactivation is questionable at this time. Bilateral adnexectomy is considered to be a standard prophylactic treatment of women affected by germinal BRCA1/2 mutation. In that case, fallopian tubes should be submitted completely for the histological evaluation according to the SEE-FIM protocol (Sectioning and Extensively Examining the FIMbria) due to the risk of STIC or occult HGSC. Tumors with BRCA1/2 inactivation show a better therapeutic response to platinum

  10. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I.M.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control

  11. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.; Mann, R.; Kok, T.; Obdeijn, I. M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Blickman, J. G.; Boetes, C.

    The appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type matched control

  12. Breast tumor characteristics of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers on MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Veltman; R. Mann; T. Kok (Theo); A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); J.G. Blickman; C. Boetes (Carla)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe appearance of malignant lesions in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-MCs) on mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Thus, 29 BRCA-MCs with breast cancer were retrospectively evaluated and the results compared with an age, tumor size and tumor type

  13. Genomic Imbalances in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines Affect Expression of Genes Frequently Altered in Primary Tumors: An Approach to Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Tumor Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Missiaglia, Edoardo; Selfe, Joanna; Hamdi, Mohamed; Williamson, Daniel; Schaaf, Gerben; Fang, Cheng; Koster, Jan; Summersgill, Brenda; Messahel, Boo; Versteeg, Rogier; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Kool, Marcel; Shipley, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) are the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcomas. They resemble developing skeletal muscle and are histologically divided into two main subtypes; alveolar and embryonal RMS. Characteristic genomic aberrations, including the PAX3- and PAX7-FOXO1 fusion genes in alveolar

  14. Glucose Metabolism Gene Expression Patterns and Tumor Uptake of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose After Radiation Treatment

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    Wilson, George D., E-mail: george.wilson@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Thibodeau, Bryan J.; Fortier, Laura E.; Pruetz, Barbara L. [Beaumont BioBank, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Galoforo, Sandra; Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Chunta, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Oliver Wong, Ching Yee [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Molecular Imaging Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Yan, Di; Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Huang, Jiayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether radiation treatment influences the expression of glucose metabolism genes and compromises the potential use of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) as a tool to monitor the early response of head and neck cancer xenografts to radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Low passage head and neck squamous cancer cells (UT14) were injected to the flanks of female nu/nu mice to generate xenografts. After tumors reached a size of 500 mm{sup 3} they were treated with either sham RT or 15 Gy in 1 fraction. At different time points, days 3, 9, and 16 for controls and days 4, 7, 12, 21, 30, and 40 after irradiation, 2 to 3 mice were assessed with dynamic FDG-PET acquisition over 2 hours. Immediately after the FDG-PET the tumors were harvested for global gene expression analysis and immunohistochemical evaluation of GLUT1 and HK2. Different analytic parameters were used to process the dynamic PET data. Results: Radiation had no effect on key genes involved in FDG uptake and metabolism but did alter other genes in the HIF1α and glucose transport–related pathways. In contrast to the lack of effect on gene expression, changes in the protein expression patterns of the key genes GLUT1/SLC2A1 and HK2 were observed after radiation treatment. The changes in GLUT1 protein expression showed some correlation with dynamic FDG-PET parameters, such as the kinetic index. Conclusion: {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography changes after RT would seem to represent an altered metabolic state and not a direct effect on the key genes regulating FDG uptake and metabolism.

  15. Pigment epithelial-derived factor gene loaded novel COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH nanoparticles promoted tumor suppression by systemic administration

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    Yu T

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ting Yu,1,* Bei Xu,1,* Lili He,2 Shan Xia,3 Yan Chen,1 Jun Zeng,1 Yongmei Liu,1 Shuangzhi Li,1 Xiaoyue Tan,4 Ke Ren,1 Shaohua Yao,1 Xiangrong Song1 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, 2College of Chemistry and Environment Protection Engineering, Southwest University for Nationalities, 3Central Laboratory, Science Education Department, Chengdu Normal University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 4Department of Pathology/Collaborative Innovation Center of Biotherapy, Medical School of Nankai University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Anti-angiogenesis has been proposed as an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF is one of the most powerful endogenous anti-angiogenic reagents discovered to date and PEDF gene therapy has been recognized as a promising treatment option for various tumors. There is an urgent need to develop a safe and valid vector for its systemic delivery. Herein, a novel gene delivery system based on the newly synthesized copolymer COOH-PEG-PLGA-COOH (CPPC was developed in this study, which was probably capable of overcoming the disadvantages of viral vectors and cationic lipids/polymers-based nonviral carriers. PEDF gene loaded CPPC nanoparticles (D-NPs were fabricated by a modified double-emulsion water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W solvent evaporation method. D-NPs with uniform spherical shape had relatively high drug loading (~1.6%, probably because the introduced carboxyl group in poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide terminal enhanced the interaction of copolymer with the PEDF gene complexes. An excellent in vitro antitumor effect was found in both C26 and A549 cells treated by D-NPs, in which PEDF levels were dramatically elevated due to the successful transfection of PEDF gene. D-NPs also showed a strong inhibitory effect on

  16. A expressão de genes reparadores do DNA nos tumores sincrônicos de câncer colorretal esporádico DNA repair gene expression in synchronic tumors of sporadic colorectal cancer

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    Igor Proscurshim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Um dos mecanismos genéticos presentes em aproximadamente 80% dos pacientes com síndrome hereditária não-polipóide do câncer colorretal (HNPCC são os defeitos nos genes reparadores de DNA, como o MSH2, MSH6 e MLH1, onde os tumores sincrônicos são relativamente freqüentes. Já no câncer colorretal esporádico as lesões sincrônicas são raras. OBJETIVO: Verificar se o mesmo mecanismo genético presente no HNPCC está presente no câncer colorretal esporádico que apresentam com lesões sincrônicas. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no estudo todos os pacientes com câncer colorretal sincrônico não HNPCC. Imunoistoquímica com anticorpos para MSH2,MSH6, e MLH1 foi realizada para cada tumor. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes apresentaram expressão normal de MSH2 e MLH1. O único gene com imunoexpressão alterada foi o MSH6. CONCLUSÃO: Possivelmente outro mecanismo genético seja responsável pelo surgimento de dois tumores sincrônicos no câncer colorretal esporádico.BACKGROUND: Mismatch repair genes (such as MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6 mutations are present in over 80% of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC tumors, which frequently exhibit synchronous lesions. Sporadic colorectal cancer is rarely associated with synchronous lesions. AIM: To investigate the role of mismatch repair gene mutation in synchronous sporadic colorectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with sporadic synchronous colorectal adenocarcinomas were included in the study. Immunohistochemistry was performed using MSH2, MLH1 and MSH6 antibodies. RESULTS: All patients had two synchoronous lesions. None of them had altered MSH2 or MLH1 expression. One patient had altered MSH6 expression in both tumors. CONCLUSION: Possibly, other molecular mechanisms are involved in carcinogenesis of sporadic synchronous colorectal cancer.

  17. Transcriptomic and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies reveal FOXA2 as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorvis, Christina; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Koutsioumpa, Marina; Williams, Jennifer; Donahue, Timothy R; Poultsides, George A; Eibl, Guido; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with low survival rates and limited therapeutic options. Thus elucidation of signaling pathways involved in PDAC pathogenesis is essential for identifying novel potential therapeutic gene targets. Here, we used a systems approach to elucidate those pathways by integrating gene and microRNA profiling analyses together with CRISPR/Cas9 technology to identify novel transcription factors involved in PDAC pathogenesis. FOXA2 transcription factor was found to be significantly downregulated in PDAC relative to control pancreatic tissues. Functional experiments revealed that FOXA2 has a tumor suppressor function through inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth, migration, invasion, and colony formation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed miR-199a to be significantly upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Bioinformatics and luciferase analyses showed that miR-199a negatively but directly regulates FOXA2 expression through binding in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Evaluation of the functional importance of miR-199a on pancreatic cancer revealed that miR-199a acts as an inhibitor of FOXA2 expression, inducing an increase in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Additionally, gene ontology and network analyses in PANC-1 cells treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against FOXA2 revealed an enrichment for cell invasion mechanisms through PLAUR and ERK activation. FOXA2 deletion (FOXA2Δ) by using two CRISPR/Cas9 vectors in PANC-1 cells induced tumor growth in vivo resulting in upregulation of PLAUR and ERK pathways in FOXA2Δ xenograft tumors. We have identified FOXA2 as a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and it is regulated directly by miR-199a, thereby enhancing our understanding of how microRNAs interplay with the transcription factors to affect pancreatic oncogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Clinical Utility of promoter methylation of the tumor suppressor genes DKK3, and RASSF1A in breast cancer patients

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    Marwa H. Saied

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: DNA methylation is the commonest known epigenetic change that results in silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes has the potential for early detection of breast cancer. Aim: Aim is to examine the potential usefulness of blood based methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP of methylated DKK3 and RASSF1A genes in early detection of breast cancer. Method: Methylation status of DKK3 and RASSF1 was investigated in forty breast cancer patients, twenty fibroadenoma patients and twenty healthy ladies as control group using MSP. Results: Methylation of DKK3 promoter was found in 22.5% of breast cancer patients, while DKK3 methylation was absent in both fibroadenoma patients and control group. Similarly, methylation of RASSF1 promoter was found in 17.5% of breast cancer patients and in none of fibroadenoma and control group. Conclusion: Promoter methylation of DKK3 and RASSF1 was found in breast cancer patients while absent in control group suggesting that tumorspecific methylation of the two genes (DKK3 and RASSF1A might be a valuable biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. Keywords: DNA methylation, Breast cancer, DKK3, RASSF1

  19. Pst I restriction fragment length polymorphism of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene in normal placentae and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsavaler, L.; Penhallow, R.C.; Kam, W.; Sussman, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the human placental alkaline phosphatase gene from normal term placentae was studied by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe to the gene for the placental enzyme. The DNA digests fall into three distinct patterns based on the presence and intensity of an extra 1.1-kilobase Pst I Band. The extra 1.1-kilobase band is present in 9 of 27 placenta samples, and in 1 of these samples the extra band is present at double intensity. No polymorphism was revealed by digestion with restriction enzymes EcoRI, Sma I, BamHI, or Sac I. The extra Pst I-digestion site may lie in a noncoding region of the gene because no correlation was observed between the restriction fragment length polymorphism and the common placental alkaline phosphatase alleles identified by starch gel electrophoresis. In addition, because placental alkaline phosphatase is frequently re-expressed in neoplasms, the authors examined tissue from ovarian, testicular, and endometrial tumors and from BeWo choriocarcinoma cells in culture. The Pst I-DNA digestion patterns from these cells and tissues were identical to those seen in the normal ovary and term placentae. The consistent reproducible digestion patterns seen in DNA from normal and tumor tissue indicate that a major gene rearrangement is not the basis for the ectopic expression of placental alkaline phosphatase in neoplasia

  20. Deletion and down-regulation of HRH4 gene in gastric carcinomas: a potential correlation with tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histamine is an established growth factor for gastrointestinal malignancies. The effect of histamine is largely determined locally by the histamine receptor expression pattern. Histamine receptor H4 (HRH4, the newest member of the histamine receptor family, is positively expressed on the epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract, and its function remains to be elucidated. Previously, we reported the decreased expression of HRH4 in colorectal cancers and revealed its correlation with tumor proliferation. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the abnormalities of HRH4 gene in gastric carcinomas (GCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed H4R expression in collected GC samples by quantitative PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunostaining. Our results showed that the protein and mRNA levels of HRH4 were reduced in some GC samples, especially in advanced GC samples. Copy number decrease of HRH4 gene was observed (17.6%, 23 out of 131, which was closely correlated with the attenuated expression of H4R. In vitro studies, using gastric cancer cell lines, showed that the alteration of HRH4 expression on gastric cancer cells influences tumor growth upon exposure to histamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that deletion of HRH4 gene is present in GC cases and is closely correlated with attenuated gene expression. Down-regulation of HRH4 in gastric carcinomas plays a role in histamine-mediated growth control of GC cells.

  1. Regulation of the insulin-like developmental pathway of Caenorhabditis elegans by a homolog of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, E B; Malone Link, E; Liu, L X; Johnson, C D; Lees, J A

    1999-03-16

    The human PTEN tumor suppressor gene is mutated in a wide variety of sporadic tumors. To determine the function of PTEN in vivo we have studied a PTEN homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans. We have generated a strong loss-of-function allele of the PTEN homolog and shown that the deficient strain is unable to enter dauer diapause. An insulin-like phosphatidylinositol 3-OH kinase (PI3'K) signaling pathway regulates dauer-stage entry. Mutations in either the daf-2 insulin receptor-like (IRL) gene or the age-1 encoded PI3'K catalytic subunit homolog cause constitutive dauer formation and also affect the life span, brood size, and metabolism of nondauer animals. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations in the age-1 PI3'K and daf-2 IRL genes are suppressed by loss-of-function mutations in the PTEN homolog. We establish that the PTEN homolog is encoded by daf-18, a previously uncloned gene that has been shown to interact genetically with the DAF-2 IRL AGE-1 PI3'K signaling pathway. This interaction provides clear genetic evidence that PTEN acts to antagonize PI3'K function in vivo. Given the conservation of the PI3'K signaling pathway between C. elegans and mammals, the analysis of daf-18 PTEN mutant nematodes should shed light on the role of human PTEN in the etiology of metabolic disease, aging, and cancer.

  2. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  3. Gene expression disorders of innate antibacterial signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer patients: implications for leukocyte dysfunction and tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Aleksandra; Lech, Gustaw; Słodkowski, Maciej; Słotwińska, Sylwia M.

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate changes in gene expression of innate antibacterial signaling pathways in patients with pancreatic cancer. Expression of the following genes was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 55 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR): TLR4, NOD1, MyD88, TRAF6 and HMGB1. The levels of expression of TLR4, NOD1 and TRAF6 genes were significantly elevated (p = 0.007; p = 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively), while MyD88 expression was markedly reduced (p = 0.0002), as compared to controls. Expression of TLR4 and NOD1 exceeded the normal level more than 3.5-fold and there was a significant correlation found between the expression of these genes (r = 0.558, p < 0.001). TLR4, NOD1 and MyD88 genes were expressed at a similar level both before and after surgery. No significant changes in the expression of HMGB1 gene were observed. The results of the study clearly indicate abnormal expression of genes belonging to innate antibacterial signaling pathways in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with pancreatic cancer, which may lead to leukocyte dysfunction. Overexpression of TLR4, NOD1 and TRAF6 genes, and decreased MyD88 gene expression may contribute to chronic inflammation and tumor progression by up-regulation of the innate antibacterial response. The parameters tested are useful for monitoring innate immunity gene disorders and pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26155170

  4. The anti-tumor drug bleomycin preferentially cleaves at the transcription start sites of actively transcribed genes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Galea, Anne M

    2014-04-01

    The genome-wide pattern of DNA cleavage at transcription start sites (TSSs) for the anti-tumor drug bleomycin was examined in human HeLa cells using next-generation DNA sequencing. It was found that actively transcribed genes were preferentially cleaved compared with non-transcribed genes. The 143,600 identified human TSSs were split into non-transcribed genes (82,596) and transcribed genes (61,004) for HeLa cells. These transcribed genes were further split into quintiles of 12,201 genes comprising the top 20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, and 80-100 % of expressed genes. The bleomycin cleavage pattern at highly transcribed gene TSSs was greatly enhanced compared with purified DNA and non-transcribed gene TSSs. The top 20 and 20-40 % quintiles had a very similar enhanced cleavage pattern, the 40-60 % quintile was intermediate, while the 60-80 and 80-100 % quintiles were close to the non-transcribed and purified DNA profiles. The pattern of bleomycin enhanced cleavage had peaks that were approximately 200 bp apart, and this indicated that bleomycin was identifying the presence of phased nucleosomes at TSSs. Hence bleomycin can be utilized to detect chromatin structures that are present at actively transcribed genes. In this study, for the first time, the pattern of DNA damage by a clinically utilized cancer chemotherapeutic agent was performed on a human genome-wide scale at the nucleotide level.

  5. Wilms' Tumor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Article: Extrarenal teratoma with nephroblastoma in the retroperitoneum: Case report and... Article: Wilms' tumour 1 (WT1) in development, homeostasis and disease. Article: Results of the First Prospective Multi-institutional Treatment Study in Children... Wilms Tumor -- see more articles Reference ...

  6. Tumor promoting effect of phenolphthalein on development of lung tumors induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in transgenic mice carrying human prototype c-Ha-ras gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Masako; Kashida, Yoko; Watanabe, Takao; Ueda, Makoto; Onodera, Hiroshi; Hirose, Masao; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2002-06-01

    In order to examine tumor modifying effects of phenolphthalein (PhP), female transgenic mice carrying human prototype c-Ha-ras gene (rasH2 mice) were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg body weight of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), followed by the diet containing 12,000 ppm PhP for 26-week. Histopathologically, alveolar hyperplasias, adenomas and adenocarcinomas were observed in the ENU + PhP group, but only hyperplasias and adenomas were observed in the ENU alone group. The incidence and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas in the ENU + PhP group was significantly increased as compared to that in the ENU alone group. The combined multiplicity of adenomas and adenocarcinomas in this group was also significantly higher than that of the ENU alone group. In addition, the ratio of area of adenomas in the ENU + PhP group was significantly higher than that in the ENU alone group. The result of our study suggests that PhP has a clear tumor promoting effect in the lung of rasH2 mice.

  7. Efficiency of high- and low-voltage pulse combinations for gene electrotransfer in muscle, liver, tumor, and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    André, F M; Gehl, J; Sersa, G

    2008-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is gaining momentum as an efficient methodology for nonviral gene transfer. In skeletal muscle, data suggest that electric pulses play two roles: structurally permeabilizing the muscle fibers and electrophoretically supporting the migration of DNA toward or across......, but not to liver; and (4) efficient gene electrotransfer was achieved with HV field strengths below the detectability thresholds for permeabilization; and (5) the lag time interval between the HV and LV pulses decreased sensitivity to the HV pulses, enabling a wider HV amplitude range. In conclusion, HV plus LV...... the permeabilized membrane. To investigate this further, combinations of permeabilizing short high-voltage pulses (HV; hundreds of V/cm) and mainly electrophoretic long low-voltage pulses (LV; tens of V/cm) were investigated in muscle, liver, tumor, and skin in rodent models. The following observations were made...

  8. The Cloning of the Human Tumor Supressor Gene INGI: DNA Cloning into Plasmid Vector and DNA Analysis by Restriction Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elza Ibrahim Auerkari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA cloning is one of the most important techniques In the field of molecular biology, with a critical role in analyzing the structure and function of genes and their adjacent regulatory regions. DNA cloning is helpful in learning fundamental molecular biological techniques, since DNA cloning involves a series of them, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA ligation, bacterial transformation, bacterial culture, plasmid DNA extraction, DNA digestion with restriction enzymes and agarose gel electrophoresis. In this paper the cloning of the human tumor suppressor gene INGI has been used to illustrate the methodology. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned into a TA-cloning vectore, and restriction enzyme mapping was used to distinguish the sense INGI construct from the antisense INGI construct.

  9. Rare germline alterations in cancer-related genes associated with the risk of multiple primary tumor development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villacis, Rolando A. R.; Basso, Tatiane R; Canto, Luisa M

    2017-01-01

    Multiple primary tumors (MPT) have been described in carriers of inherited cancer predisposition genes. However, the genetic etiology of a large proportion of MPT cases remains unclear. We reviewed 267 patients with hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes (HCPS) that underwent genetic counseling...... and selected 22 patients with MPT to perform genomic analysis (CytoScan HD Array, Affymetrix) aiming to identify new alterations related to a high risk of developing MPT. Twenty patients had a positive family history of cancer and 11 met phenotypic criteria for HCPS. Genetic testing for each of the genes...... and proliferation. Overall, we identified 14 cases with rare CNVs and/or cnLOH that may contribute to the risk of MPT development. KEY MESSAGE: CNVs may explain the risk of hereditary cancer syndromes in MPT patients. CNVs affecting genes related to cancer are candidates to be involved in MPT risk. EPCAM/MSH2...

  10. Direct visualization of electroporation-assisted in vivo gene delivery to tumors using intravital microscopy – spatial and time dependent distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dachs Gabi U

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electroporation is currently receiving much attention as a way to increase drug and DNA delivery. Recent studies demonstrated the feasibility of electrogene therapy using a range of therapeutic genes for the treatment of experimental tumors. However, the transfection efficiency of electroporation-assisted DNA delivery is still low compared to viral methods and there is a clear need to optimize this approach. In order to optimize treatment, knowledge about spatial and time dependency of gene expression following delivery is of utmost importance in order to improve gene delivery. Intravital microscopy of tumors growing in dorsal skin fold window chambers is a useful method for monitoring gene transfection, since it allows non-invasive dynamic monitoring of gene expression in tumors in a live animal. Methods Intravital microscopy was used to monitor real time spatial distribution of the green fluorescent protein (GFP and time dependence of transfection efficiency in syngeneic P22 rat tumor model. DNA alone, liposome-DNA complexes and electroporation-assisted DNA delivery using two different sets of electric pulse parameters were compared. Results Electroporation-assisted DNA delivery using 8 pulses, 600 V/cm, 5 ms, 1 Hz was superior to other methods and resulted in 22% increase in fluorescence intensity in the tumors up to 6 days post-transfection, compared to the non-transfected area in granulation tissue. Functional GFP was detected within 5 h after transfection. Cells expressing GFP were detected throughout the tumor, but not in the surrounding tissue that was not exposed to electric pulses. Conclusions Intravital microscopy was demonstrated to be a suitable method for monitoring time and spatial distribution of gene expression in experimental tumors and provided evidence that electroporation-assisted gene delivery using 8 pulses, 600 V/cm, 5 ms, 1 Hz is an effective method, r