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Sample records for tumor vessels b-flow

  1. Tumor Blood Vessel Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Lance

    2009-11-01

    ``Normalization'' of tumor blood vessels has shown promise to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. In theory, anti-angiogenic drugs targeting endothelial VEGF signaling can improve vessel network structure and function, enhancing the transport of subsequent cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. In practice, the effects are unpredictable, with varying levels of success. The predominant effects of anti-VEGF therapies are decreased vessel leakiness (hydraulic conductivity), decreased vessel diameters and pruning of the immature vessel network. It is thought that each of these can influence perfusion of the vessel network, inducing flow in regions that were previously sluggish or stagnant. Unfortunately, when anti-VEGF therapies affect vessel structure and function, the changes are dynamic and overlapping in time, and it has been difficult to identify a consistent and predictable normalization ``window'' during which perfusion and subsequent drug delivery is optimal. This is largely due to the non-linearity in the system, and the inability to distinguish the effects of decreased vessel leakiness from those due to network structural changes in clinical trials or animal studies. We have developed a mathematical model to calculate blood flow in complex tumor networks imaged by two-photon microscopy. The model incorporates the necessary and sufficient components for addressing the problem of normalization of tumor vasculature: i) lattice-Boltzmann calculations of the full flow field within the vasculature and within the tissue, ii) diffusion and convection of soluble species such as oxygen or drugs within vessels and the tissue domain, iii) distinct and spatially-resolved vessel hydraulic conductivities and permeabilities for each species, iv) erythrocyte particles advecting in the flow and delivering oxygen with real oxygen release kinetics, v) shear stress-mediated vascular remodeling. This model, guided by multi-parameter intravital imaging of tumor vessel structure

  2. Tumor vessel normalization by the PI3K inhibitor HS-173 enhances drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Kyung Hee; Son, Mi Kwon; Park, Jung Hee; Yan, Hong Hua; Fang, Zhenghuan; Kang, Yeo Wool; Han, Boreum; Lim, Joo Han; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2017-09-10

    Tumor vessels are leaky and immature, which causes poor oxygen and nutrient supply to tumor vessels and results in cancer cell metastasis to distant organs. This instability of tumor blood vessels also makes it difficult for anticancer drugs to penetrate and reach tumors. Numerous tumor vessel normalization approaches have been investigated for improving drug delivery into tumors. In this study, we investigated whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors are able to improve vascular structure and function over the prolonged period necessary to achieve effective vessel normalization. The PI3K inhibitors, HS-173 and BEZ235 potently suppressed tumor growth and hypoxia, and increased tumor apoptosis in animal models. PI3K inhibitors also induced a regular, flat monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) in vessels, improving stability of vessel structure, and normalized tumor vessels by increasing vascular maturity, pericyte coverage, basement membrane thickness, and tight-junctions. These effects resulted in a decrease in tumor vessel tortuosity and vessel thinning, and improved vessel function and blood flow. The tumor vessel stabilization effect of the PI3K inhibitor HS-173 also decreased the number of metastatic lung nodules in vivo metastasis model. Furthermore, HS-173 improved the delivery of doxorubicin into the tumor region, enhancing its anticancer effects. Mechanistic studies suggested that PI3K inhibitor HS-173-induced vessel normalization reflected changes in endothelial Notch signaling. Taken together, our findings indicate that vessel normalization by PI3K inhibitors restrained tumor growth and metastasis while improving chemotherapy by enhancing drug delivery into the tumor, suggesting that HS-173 may have a therapeutic value as an enhancer or an anticancer drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor vessel normalization after aerobic exercise enhances chemotherapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadler, Keri L; Thomas, Nicholas J; Galie, Peter A; Bhang, Dong Ha; Roby, Kerry C; Addai, Prince; Till, Jacob E; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Zaslavsky, Alexander; Chen, Christopher S; Ryeom, Sandra

    2016-10-04

    Targeted therapies aimed at tumor vasculature are utilized in combination with chemotherapy to improve drug delivery and efficacy after tumor vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are highly disorganized with disrupted blood flow impeding drug delivery to cancer cells. Although pharmacologic anti-angiogenic therapy can remodel and normalize tumor vessels, there is a limited window of efficacy and these drugs are associated with severe side effects necessitating alternatives for vascular normalization. Recently, moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to induce vascular normalization in mouse models. Here, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the tumor vascular normalization induced by exercise. Shear stress, the mechanical stimuli exerted on endothelial cells by blood flow, modulates vascular integrity. Increasing vascular shear stress through aerobic exercise can alter and remodel blood vessels in normal tissues. Our data in mouse models indicate that activation of calcineurin-NFAT-TSP1 signaling in endothelial cells plays a critical role in exercise-induced shear stress mediated tumor vessel remodeling. We show that moderate aerobic exercise with chemotherapy caused a significantly greater decrease in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone through improved chemotherapy delivery after tumor vascular normalization. Our work suggests that the vascular normalizing effects of aerobic exercise can be an effective chemotherapy adjuvant.

  4. Captopril improves tumor nanomedicine delivery by increasing tumor blood perfusion and enlarging endothelial gaps in tumor blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Ting; Tuo, Yanyan; Jin, Kai; Luo, Zimiao; Shi, Wei; Mei, Heng; Hu, Yu; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2017-12-01

    Poor tumor perfusion and unfavorable vessel permeability compromise nanomedicine drug delivery to tumors. Captopril dilates blood vessels, reducing blood pressure clinically and bradykinin, as the downstream signaling moiety of captopril, is capable of dilating blood vessels and effectively increasing vessel permeability. The hypothesis behind this study was that captopril can dilate tumor blood vessels, improving tumor perfusion and simultaneously enlarge the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels, therefore enhancing nanomedicine drug delivery for tumor therapy. Using the U87 tumor xenograft with abundant blood vessels as the tumor model, tumor perfusion experiments were carried out using laser Doppler imaging and lectin-labeling experiments. A single treatment of captopril at a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly increased the percentage of functional vessels in tumor tissues and improved tumor blood perfusion. Scanning electron microscopy of tumor vessels also indicated that the endothelial gaps of tumor vessels were enlarged after captopril treatment. Immunofluorescence-staining of tumor slices demonstrated that captopril significantly increased bradykinin expression, possibly explaining tumor perfusion improvements and endothelial gap enlargement. Additionally, imaging in vivo, imaging ex vivo and nanoparticle distribution in tumor slices indicated that after a single treatment with captopril, the accumulation of 115-nm nanoparticles in tumors had increased 2.81-fold with a more homogeneous distribution pattern in comparison to non-captopril treated controls. Finally, pharmacodynamics experiments demonstrated that captopril combined with paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles resulted in the greatest tumor shrinkage and the most extensive necrosis in tumor tissues among all treatment groups. Taken together, the data from the present study suggest a novel strategy for improving tumor perfusion and enlarging blood vessel permeability simultaneously in order to improve

  5. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 μm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes.

  6. Tumor Vessel Compression Hinders Perfusion of Ultrasonographic Contrast Agents1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiè, Mirco; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Calderan, Laura; Marzola, Pasquina; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia; Marchini, Cristina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an advanced approach to in vivo assessment of tumor vascularity and is being increasingly adopted in clinical oncology. It is based on 1- to 10 µm-sized gas microbubbles, which can cross the capillary beds of the lungs and are effective echo enhancers. It is known that high cell density, high transendothelial fluid exchange, and poorly functioning lymphatic circulation all provoke solid stress, which compresses vessels and drastically reduces tumor blood flow. Given their size, we supposed that the perfusion of microbubbles is affected by anatomic features of tumor vessels more than are contrast agents traditionally used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Here, we compared dynamic information obtained from CEUS and DCE-MRI on two experimental tumor models exhibiting notable differences in vessel anatomy. We found that tumors with small, flattened vessels show a much higher resistance to microbubble perfusion than to MRI contrast agents, and appear scarcely vascularized at CEUS examination, despite vessel volume adequate for normal function. Thus, whereas CEUS alone could induce incorrect diagnosis when tumors have small or collapsed vessels, integrated analysis using CEUS and DCE-MRI allows in vivo identification of tumors with a vascular profile frequently associated with malignant phenotypes. PMID:15967105

  7. The effect of transluminal stent-graft placement on blood flow of abdominal branch vessels in type B aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Lianjun; Yang Jian; Yu Feicheng; Sun Lizhong; Zhu Junming; Zhang Yan; Jiang Shiliang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of TSGP on blood flow of abdominal branch vessels of Type B dissection. Methods: Thirty-five patients with type B aortic dissection underwent TSGP. The blood flow of abdominal branch vessels was analyzed via EBCT, MRI, and DSA before and after procedure. Results: A total of 140 important vessels from abdominal aorta in 35 patients, including celiac artery, SMA, right and left renal arteries were analyzed via EBCT, MRI, and DSA. 58 branches were affected by dissection, of which 14 (10% ) were dynamic impairment; and 44 (31.4%) were static impairment. After TSGP, the blood flow of impaired branches all showed improvement at different degrees, no post-operative ischemic complications occurred. Conclusion: TSGP could improve the blood flow immediately not only the dynamic but also the static ischemia of abdominal aorta branch vessels caused by type B aortic dissection. Further study is still need to observe the mid-term and long-term effect of TSGP. (authors)

  8. Tumors induce coordinate growth of artery, vein, and lymphatic vessel triads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddell, Alanna; Croft, Alexandra; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Furuya, Momoko; Kemp, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Tumors drive blood vessel growth to obtain oxygen and nutrients to support tumor expansion, and they also can induce lymphatic vessel growth to facilitate fluid drainage and metastasis. These processes have generally been studied separately, so that it is not known how peritumoral blood and lymphatic vessels grow relative to each other. The murine B16-F10 melanoma and chemically-induced squamous cell carcinoma models were employed to analyze large red-colored vessels growing between flank tumors and draining lymph nodes. Immunostaining and microscopy in combination with dye injection studies were used to characterize these vessels. Each peritumoral red-colored vessel was found to consist of a triad of collecting lymphatic vessel, vein, and artery, that were all enlarged. Peritumoral veins and arteries were both functional, as detected by intravenous dye injection. The enlarged lymphatic vessels were functional in most mice by subcutaneous dye injection assay, however tumor growth sometimes blocked lymph drainage to regional lymph nodes. Large red-colored vessels also grew between benign papillomas or invasive squamous cell carcinomas and regional lymph nodes in chemical carcinogen-treated mice. Immunostaining of the red-colored vessels again identified the clustered growth of enlarged collecting lymphatics, veins, and arteries in the vicinity of these spontaneously arising tumors. Implanted and spontaneously arising tumors induce coordinate growth of blood and lymphatic vessel triads. Many of these vessel triads are enlarged over several cm distance between the tumor and regional lymph nodes. Lymphatic drainage was sometimes blocked in mice before lymph node metastasis was detected, suggesting that an unknown mechanism alters lymph drainage patterns before tumors reach draining lymph nodes

  9. Tumors induce coordinate growth of artery, vein, and lymphatic vessel triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Alanna; Croft, Alexandra; Kelly-Spratt, Karen; Furuya, Momoko; Kemp, Christopher J

    2014-05-21

    Tumors drive blood vessel growth to obtain oxygen and nutrients to support tumor expansion, and they also can induce lymphatic vessel growth to facilitate fluid drainage and metastasis. These processes have generally been studied separately, so that it is not known how peritumoral blood and lymphatic vessels grow relative to each other. The murine B16-F10 melanoma and chemically-induced squamous cell carcinoma models were employed to analyze large red-colored vessels growing between flank tumors and draining lymph nodes. Immunostaining and microscopy in combination with dye injection studies were used to characterize these vessels. Each peritumoral red-colored vessel was found to consist of a triad of collecting lymphatic vessel, vein, and artery, that were all enlarged. Peritumoral veins and arteries were both functional, as detected by intravenous dye injection. The enlarged lymphatic vessels were functional in most mice by subcutaneous dye injection assay, however tumor growth sometimes blocked lymph drainage to regional lymph nodes. Large red-colored vessels also grew between benign papillomas or invasive squamous cell carcinomas and regional lymph nodes in chemical carcinogen-treated mice. Immunostaining of the red-colored vessels again identified the clustered growth of enlarged collecting lymphatics, veins, and arteries in the vicinity of these spontaneously arising tumors. Implanted and spontaneously arising tumors induce coordinate growth of blood and lymphatic vessel triads. Many of these vessel triads are enlarged over several cm distance between the tumor and regional lymph nodes. Lymphatic drainage was sometimes blocked in mice before lymph node metastasis was detected, suggesting that an unknown mechanism alters lymph drainage patterns before tumors reach draining lymph nodes.

  10. Primo vessel inside a lymph vessel emerging from a cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungwoo; Ryu, Yeonhee; Cha, Jinmyung; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Kim, Sungchul; Lim, Jaekwan

    2012-10-01

    Primo vessels were observed inside the lymph vessels near the caudal vena cava of a rabbit and a rat and in the thoracic lymph duct of a mouse. In the current work we found a primo vessel inside the lymph vessel that came out from the tumor tissue of a mouse. A cancer model of a nude mouse was made with human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460. We injected fluorescent nanoparticles into the xenografted tumor tissue and studied their flow in blood, lymph, and primo vessels. Fluorescent nanoparticles flowed through the blood vessels quickly in few minutes, and but slowly in the lymph vessels. The bright fluorescent signals of nanoparticles disappeared within one hour in the blood vessels but remained much longer up to several hours in the case of lymph vessels. We found an exceptional case of lymph vessels that remained bright with fluorescence up to 24 hours. After detailed examination we found that the bright fluorescence was due to a putative primo vessel inside the lymph vessel. This rare observation is consistent with Bong-Han Kim's claim on the presence of a primo vascular system in lymph vessels. It provides a significant suggestion on the cancer metastasis through primo vessels and lymph vessels. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effect of fluid friction on interstitial fluid flow coupled with blood flow through solid tumor microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefidgar, Mostafa; Soltani, M; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Bazmara, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    A solid tumor is investigated as porous media for fluid flow simulation. Most of the studies use Darcy model for porous media. In Darcy model, the fluid friction is neglected and a few simplified assumptions are implemented. In this study, the effect of these assumptions is studied by considering Brinkman model. A multiscale mathematical method which calculates fluid flow to a solid tumor is used in this study to investigate how neglecting fluid friction affects the solid tumor simulation. The mathematical method involves processes such as blood flow through vessels and solute and fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. The sprouting angiogenesis model is used for generating capillary network and then fluid flow governing equations are implemented to calculate blood flow through the tumor-induced capillary network. Finally, the two models of porous media are used for modeling fluid flow in normal and tumor tissues in three different shapes of tumors. Simulations of interstitial fluid transport in a solid tumor demonstrate that the simplifications used in Darcy model affect the interstitial velocity and Brinkman model predicts a lower value for interstitial velocity than the values that Darcy model predicts.

  12. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Deng, Z. S.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  13. Theoretical evaluations of magnetic nanoparticle-enhanced heating on tumor embedded with large blood vessels during hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China); Deng, Z. S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry (China); Liu, J., E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine (China)

    2012-07-15

    The large blood vessels surrounding the tumor would significantly result in heat sink, and thus seriously limit the thermal ablative area during tumor hyperthermia. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) was recently identified as an important heating enhancer to improve the treatment efficiency. It will not only help to absorb more energy under the irradiation of external magnetic field, but also can block the blood flow and subsequently weaken the heat sink effect of large vessels. In this study, these two critical factors, reserved to be undisclosed before in theory, were comprehensively investigated through three-dimensional numerical simulation. The results suggested that concerning the contribution to temperature increase in the tissues surrounding large vessel, the factor of blood flow blocking is more effective than that of energy absorption. Therefore, selective loading of MNPs to the target sites is expected to serve as a promising method to perform successful hyperthermia treatment for tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of vessel morphology and function in tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiessling, Fabian; Jugold, Manfred; Woenne, Eva C.; Brix, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    The switch to an angiogenic phenotype is an important precondition for tumor growth, invasion and spread. Since newly formed vessels are characterized by structural, functional and molecular abnormalities, they offer promising targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy. Previous studies indicate that MRI is valuable to assess vessel morphology and function. It can be used to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions and to improve delineation of proliferating areas within heterogeneous tumors. In addition, tracer kinetic analysis of contrast-enhanced image series allows the estimation of well-defined physiological parameters such as blood volume, blood flow and vessel permeability. Frequently, changes of these parameters during cytostatic, anti-angiogenic and radiation therapy precede tumor volume reduction. Moreover, target-specific MRI techniques can be used to elucidate the expression of angiogenic markers at the molecular level. This review summarizes strategies for non-invasive characterization of tumor vascularization by functional and molecular MRI, hereby introducing representative preclinical and clinical applications. (orig.)

  15. Combination of Dll4/Notch and Ephrin-B2/EphB4 targeted therapy is highly effective in disrupting tumor angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokovic, Dusan; Gill, Parkash S; Duarte, Antonio; Trindade, Alexandre; Gigante, Joana; Badenes, Marina; Silva, Lilliana; Liu, Ren; Li, Xiuqing; Gong, Ming; Krasnoperov, Valery

    2010-01-01

    Dll4/Notch and Ephrin-B2/EphB4 pathways play critical roles in tumor vessel development and maturation. This study evaluates the efficacy of the inhibition of both signaling pathways, alone and in combination, in reducing the growth of an autochthonous mouse tumor and assesses potential adverse effects. We used the transgenic RIP1-Tag2 tumor model to study the effects of 1) inhibition of Dll4/Notch by either Dll4 allelic deletion or use of a soluble extracellular Dll4 (sDll4), 2) inhibition of Ephrin-B2/EphB4 signaling by a soluble extracellular EphB4 fused to albumin (sEphB4-Alb), and 3) inhibition of both pathways by sEphB4-Alb combined with either Dll4 allelic deletion or sDll4. To investigate adverse effects, we used inducible endothelial-specific Dll4 knock-out mice, treated with sEphB4-Alb, and carried out histopathological analysis. Dll4 allele deletion or soluble Dll4 treatment resulted in increased tumor vessel density, reduced mural cell recruitment and vessel perfusion which resulted in reduced tumor size. The soluble EphB4 instead reduced vessel density and vessel perfusion, leading to reduction of tumor size. Greater efficacy was observed when sEphB4-Alb was combined with either Dll4 allele deletion or sDll4 in regards to tumor size, vessel perfusion and mural cell recruitment. Induced endothelial specific Dll4 loss-of-function caused hepatic vascular alterations, which were prevented by concomitant sEphB4-Alb treatment. Combination targeting of Dll4/Notch and Ephrin-B2/EphB4 has potential for clinical investigation, providing cumulative efficacy and increased safety over Dll4/Notch inhibition alone

  16. Galectin-1 Inhibitor OTX008 Induces Tumor Vessel Normalization and Tumor Growth Inhibition in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Nathan A; Griffin, Robert J; Dings, Ruud P M

    2017-12-09

    Galectin-1 is a hypoxia-regulated protein and a prognostic marker in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Here we assessed the ability of non-peptidic galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 to improve tumor oxygenation levels via tumor vessel normalization as well as tumor growth inhibition in two human HNSCC tumor models, the human laryngeal squamous carcinoma SQ20B and the human epithelial type 2 HEp-2. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with OTX008, Anginex, or Avastin and oxygen levels were determined by fiber-optics and molecular marker pimonidazole binding. Immuno-fluorescence was used to determine vessel normalization status. Continued OTX008 treatment caused a transient reoxygenation in SQ20B tumors peaking on day 14, while a steady increase in tumor oxygenation was observed over 21 days in the HEp-2 model. A >50% decrease in immunohistochemical staining for tumor hypoxia verified the oxygenation data measured using a partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂) probe. Additionally, OTX008 induced tumor vessel normalization as tumor pericyte coverage increased by approximately 40% without inducing any toxicity. Moreover, OTX008 inhibited tumor growth as effectively as Anginex and Avastin, except in the HEp-2 model where Avastin was found to suspend tumor growth. Galectin-1 inhibitor OTX008 transiently increased overall tumor oxygenation via vessel normalization to various degrees in both HNSCC models. These findings suggest that targeting galectin-1-e.g., by OTX008-may be an effective approach to treat cancer patients as stand-alone therapy or in combination with other standards of care.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M; Chen, P

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries) are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Interstitial Fluid Flow Coupled with Blood Flow through a Remodeled Solid Tumor Microvascular Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soltani

    Full Text Available Modeling of interstitial fluid flow involves processes such as fluid diffusion, convective transport in extracellular matrix, and extravasation from blood vessels. To date, majority of microvascular flow modeling has been done at different levels and scales mostly on simple tumor shapes with their capillaries. However, with our proposed numerical model, more complex and realistic tumor shapes and capillary networks can be studied. Both blood flow through a capillary network, which is induced by a solid tumor, and fluid flow in tumor's surrounding tissue are formulated. First, governing equations of angiogenesis are implemented to specify the different domains for the network and interstitium. Then, governing equations for flow modeling are introduced for different domains. The conservation laws for mass and momentum (including continuity equation, Darcy's law for tissue, and simplified Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow through capillaries are used for simulating interstitial and intravascular flows and Starling's law is used for closing this system of equations and coupling the intravascular and extravascular flows. This is the first study of flow modeling in solid tumors to naturalistically couple intravascular and extravascular flow through a network. This network is generated by sprouting angiogenesis and consisting of one parent vessel connected to the network while taking into account the non-continuous behavior of blood, adaptability of capillary diameter to hemodynamics and metabolic stimuli, non-Newtonian blood flow, and phase separation of blood flow in capillary bifurcation. The incorporation of the outlined components beyond the previous models provides a more realistic prediction of interstitial fluid flow pattern in solid tumors and surrounding tissues. Results predict higher interstitial pressure, almost two times, for realistic model compared to the simplified model.

  19. A method for increasing the homogeneity of the temperature distribution during magnetic fluid hyperthermia with a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy in the presence of blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yundong [College of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116 (China); Flesch, Rodolfo C.C. [Departamento de Automação e Sistemas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Jin, Tao, E-mail: jintly@fzu.edu.cn [College of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350116 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The effects of blood vessels on temperature field distribution are investigated. • The critical thermal energy of hyperthermia is computed by the Finite Element Analysis. • A treatment method is proposed by using the MNPs with low Curie temperature. • The cooling effects due to the blood flow can be controlled. - Abstract: Magnetic hyperthermia ablates tumor cells by absorbing the thermal energy from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under an external alternating magnetic field. The blood vessels (BVs) within tumor region can generally reduce treatment effectiveness due to the cooling effect of blood flow. This paper aims to investigate the cooling effect of BVs on the temperature field of malignant tumor regions using a complex geometric model and numerical simulation. For deriving the model, the Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow is combined with Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for human tissue. The effects on treatment temperature caused by two different BV distributions inside a mammary tumor are analyzed through numerical simulation under different conditions of flow rate considering a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy, which has low Curie temperature ranging from 42 °C to 45 °C. Numerical results show that the multi-vessel system has more obvious cooling effects than the single vessel one on the temperature field distribution for hyperthermia. Besides, simulation results show that the temperature field within tumor area can also be influenced by the velocity and diameter of BVs. To minimize the cooling effect, this article proposes a treatment method based on the increase of the thermal energy provided to MNPs associated with the adoption of low Curie temperature particles recently reported in literature. Results demonstrate that this approach noticeably improves the uniformity of the temperature field, and shortens the treatment time in a Fe-Cr-Nb-B system, thus reducing the side effects to the patient.

  20. Disrupting established tumor blood vessels: an emerging therapeutic strategy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeage, Mark J; Baguley, Bruce C

    2010-04-15

    The unique characteristics of tumor vasculature represent an attractive target that may be exploited by vascular-targeting anticancer agents. A promising strategy involves the selective disruption of established tumor blood vessels by tumor-vascular disrupting agents (tumor-VDAs), which exhibit antivascular activity, resulting in inhibition of tumor blood flow and extensive necrosis within the tumor core. The tumor-VDA class can be subdivided into flavonoid compounds, which are related to flavone acetic acid, and tubulin-binding compounds. ASA404, of the flavonoid class, is the most advanced tumor-VDA in clinical development and has been evaluated preclinically and in several phase 1 and phase 2 studies. Preclinical studies have demonstrated the selective apoptosis of tumor endothelial cells and the inhibition of tumor blood flow. Synergistic activity was observed with ASA404 and with several chemotherapeutic agents, particularly taxanes. In clinical trials, compared with chemotherapy alone, ASA404 was tolerated well and produced improved activity in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer when combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin. Phase 3 clinical trials are ongoing. Selectively targeting established tumor vasculature with tumor-VDAs represents a promising and innovative approach to improving the efficacy of standard anticancer therapies. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  1. Molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Seitz, Michael; Singer, Bernhard B; Irmak, Ster; Stief, Christian G; Reich, Oliver; Ergün, Süleyman

    2009-05-01

    In the past three decades many efforts have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis. The introduction of anti-angiogenic drugs in tumor therapy during the last few years necessitates the establishment of new techniques enabling molecular imaging of tumor vascular remodelling. The determination of tumor size as commonly used is not appropriate since the extended necrosis under anti-angiogenic therapy does not necessarily result in the reduction of tumor diameter. The basis for the molecular imaging of tumor blood vessels is the remodelling of the tumor vessels under anti-angiogenic therapy which obviously occurs at an early stage and seems to be a convincing parameter. Beside the enormous progress in this field during the last few years the resolution is still not high enough to evaluate the remodelling of the micro tumor vessels. New imaging approaches combining specific molecular markers for tumor vessels with the different imaging techniques are needed to overcome this issue as exemplarily discussed for prostate cancer in this review. Molecular contrast agents targeting the vasculature will allow clinicians the visualization of vascular remodelling processes taking place under anti-angiogenic therapy and improve tumor diagnosis and follow-up.

  2. A method for increasing the homogeneity of the temperature distribution during magnetic fluid hyperthermia with a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy in the presence of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yundong; Flesch, Rodolfo C. C.; Jin, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia ablates tumor cells by absorbing the thermal energy from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under an external alternating magnetic field. The blood vessels (BVs) within tumor region can generally reduce treatment effectiveness due to the cooling effect of blood flow. This paper aims to investigate the cooling effect of BVs on the temperature field of malignant tumor regions using a complex geometric model and numerical simulation. For deriving the model, the Navier-Stokes equation for blood flow is combined with Pennes bio-heat transfer equation for human tissue. The effects on treatment temperature caused by two different BV distributions inside a mammary tumor are analyzed through numerical simulation under different conditions of flow rate considering a Fe-Cr-Nb-B alloy, which has low Curie temperature ranging from 42 °C to 45 °C. Numerical results show that the multi-vessel system has more obvious cooling effects than the single vessel one on the temperature field distribution for hyperthermia. Besides, simulation results show that the temperature field within tumor area can also be influenced by the velocity and diameter of BVs. To minimize the cooling effect, this article proposes a treatment method based on the increase of the thermal energy provided to MNPs associated with the adoption of low Curie temperature particles recently reported in literature. Results demonstrate that this approach noticeably improves the uniformity of the temperature field, and shortens the treatment time in a Fe-Cr-Nb-B system, thus reducing the side effects to the patient.

  3. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Li Jing; Wu Zhiqun; Zhou Changxi; Liu Xi; Wan Yi; Duan Yunyou

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 °C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 °C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

  4. Changes in Hepatic Blood Flow During Transcatheter Arterial Infusion with Heated Saline in Hepatic VX2 Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Wei, E-mail: cawe-001@163.com [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Li Jing, E-mail: lijing02@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery (China); Wu Zhiqun, E-mail: zhiqunwu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Zhou Changxi, E-mail: changxizhou@163.com [Chinese PLA General Hospital, Department of Respiratory Disease (China); Liu Xi, E-mail: xiliu@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China); Wan Yi, E-mail: yiwan@163.com [The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Health Statistics, Institute for Health Informatics (China); Duan Yunyou, E-mail: yunyouduan@fmmu.edu.cn [Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Ultrasound Diagnostics (China)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. This study evaluates the influence of transcatheter arterial infusion with heated saline on hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to tumor and normal hepatic tissues in a rabbit VX2 tumor model. Methods. All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Twenty rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into the following two groups: (a) the treated group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL transarterial injection of 60 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery; (b) the control group (n = 10), which received a 60 mL injection of 37 Degree-Sign C saline via the hepatic artery. Using ultrasonography, the blood flows in both the portal vein and hepatic artery were measured, and the changes in the hemodynamic indices were recorded before and immediately after the injection. The changes in the tumor and normal liver tissues of the two groups were histopathologically examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining after the injection. Results. After the transcatheter arterial heated infusion, there was a decrease in the hepatic arterial blood flow to the tumor tissue, a significant decrease in the hepatic artery mean velocity (P < 0.05), and a significant increase in the resistance index (P < 0.05). On hematoxylin and eosin staining, there were no obvious signs of tissue destruction in the normal liver tissue or the tumor tissue after heated perfusion, and coagulated blood plasma was observed in the cavities of intratumoral blood vessels in the treated group. Conclusions. The changes in tumor blood flow in the rabbit VX2 tumor model were presumably caused by microthrombi in the tumor vessels, and the portal vein likely mediated the heat loss in normal liver tissue during the transarterial heated infusion.

  5. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  6. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography depicts small tumor vessels for the evaluation of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yuko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takaki, Akinobu; Ishida, Etsuji; Ogawa, Tsuneyoshi; Kuwaki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors. Materials and methods: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist was performed on 62 consecutive patients (53 with pancreatic cancer, 4 with islet cell tumor, 3 with inflammatory pancreatic tumor, and 2 with metastatic tumor). The vascular and perfusion image phases of the tumors were evaluated and compared with the findings of contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Results: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed tumor vessels around and/or in the tumor at the vascular image phase in 79% of pancreatic cancer patients (42/53). At the perfusion image phase, 96% of pancreatic cancers (51/53) were classified as hypo-enhancement type. However, tiny spotty or irregular heterogeneous enhanced lesions were found in 84% of hypo-enhanced pancreatic cancer patients (43/51). The presence of small vessels at the vascular image phase was closely correlated with the presence of these intratumor regional enhanced lesions at the perfusion image phase (κ coefficient = 0.42). The sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (100%) for pancreatic cancer was superior to that of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (91%), but no significant difference was observed between the two (McNemar test: p = 0.063). Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with Levovist successfully visualizes fine vessels and enhancement in pancreatic tumors, and is useful for evaluating pancreatic tumors

  7. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Welter

    Full Text Available Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law and sources (vessels and sinks (lymphatics for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss

  8. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  9. The Effect of Pulsatile Flow on bMSC-Derived Endothelial-Like Cells in a Small-Sized Artificial Vessel Made by 3-Dimensional Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Woog Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of small-sized vessels is still challenging. This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of small-sized artificial vessels made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and the effect of pulsatile flow on bMSC-derived endothelial-like cells. Cells were harvested from rabbit bone marrow and primary cultured with or without growth factors. Endothelial differentiation was confirmed by the Matrigel tube formation assay, Western blot, and qRT-PCR. In addition, embedment of endothelial-like cells in an artificial vessel was made by 3-dimensional bioprinting, and the pulsatile flow was performed. For pumped and nonpumped groups, qRT-PCR was performed on CD31 and VE-cadherin gene expression. Endothelial-like cells showed increased gene expression of CD31 and VE-cadherin, and tube formation is observed at each week. Endothelial-like cells grow well in a small-sized artificial vessel made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and even express higher endothelial cell markers when they undergo pulsatile flow condition. Moreover, the pulsatile flow condition gives a positive effect for cell observation not only on the sodium alginate hydrogel layer but also on the luminal surface of the artificial vessel wall. We have developed an artificial vessel, which is a mixture of cells and carriers using a 3-dimensional bioprinting method, and applied pulsatile flow using a peristaltic pump, and we also demonstrated cell growth and differentiation into endothelial cells. This study suggests guidelines regarding a small-sized artificial vessel in the field of tissue engineering.

  10. Flow mode analysis by Imatron C100 of 44 focal liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon-Karneff, J.; Hernigou, A.; Grataloup, C.; Charpentier, A.; Bouillot, J.L.; Plainfosse, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    We studied 44 patients with focal benign (n = 13) or malignant (n = 31) liver tumors proved by histology or follow-up. The flow mode was acquired by electron beam CT (EBCT) after injection (35 cc at 6 ml/sec): 20 slices with a 400 ms exposure time. We looked for abnormal vessels and density curves inside the tumor, liver and aorta. We describe arterial vascularization in most cases (type 1) and particularly in all the hepatocarcinomas (n = 15) associated with abnormal vessels, and also in rare tumors (n = 4). For benign lesions like angiomas (n = 9) we showed surrounding the mass arterial vascularization in add to the typical aspect (type 3); for nodular hyperplasia (n = 3) arterial blush was associated with the last part of the tumoral curve at the same level as liver. Most often metastasis (n = 13) had no central vascularization and a slight peripheral density increased (type 2). Flow mode by EBCT allows a good density curves analysis particularly at arterial time. (authors). 20 refs., 12 figs

  11. Presence of intratumoral platelets is associated with tumor vessel structure and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Xiao; Ran, Bing; Wu, Jianbo; Ren, Meiping; Chen, Ni; Luo, Mao; Deng, Xin; Xia, Jiyi; Yu, Guang; Liu, Jinbo; He, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in maintaining hemostasis and have been shown to participate in hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. Abundant platelets were detected in the tumor microenvironment outside of the blood vessel, thus, platelet -tumor cell interaction outside of the bloodstream may play a role in regulating primary tumor growth and metastasis initiation. However, it is unclear that platelet depletion affects tumor vessel structure and dynamics. Using thrombocytopenia induction in two different tumor-bearing mouse models, tumor tissues were performed by Westernblotting and immunohistochemical staining. Vascular permeability was evaluated by determination of intratumoral Evans blue and Miles vascular permeability assay. Furthermore, microdialysis was used to examining the intratumoral extracellular angiogenic growth factors (VEGF, TGF-β) by ELISA. Platelet depletion showed no change in tumor growth and reduced lung metastasis. Platelet depletion led to reduced tumor hypoxia and Met receptor activation and was associated with a decreased release of MMP-2, 9, PAI-1, VEGF, and TGF-β. Tumor vessels in platelet-depleted mice showed impaired vessel density and maturation. Our findings demonstrate that platelets within the primary tumor microenvironment play a critical role in the induction of vascular permeability and initiation of tumor metastasis

  12. Gas-liquid flow filed in agitated vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormazi, F.; Alaie, M.; Dabir, B.; Ashjaie, M.

    2001-01-01

    Agitated vessels in form of sti reed tank reactors and mixed ferment ors are being used in large numbers of industry. It is more important to develop good, and theoretically sound models for scaling up and design of agitated vessels. In this article, two phase flow (gas-liquid) in a agitated vessel has been investigated numerically. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, is used to predict the gas-liquid flow. The effects of gas phase, varying gas flow rates and variation of bubbles shape on flow filed of liquid phase are investigated. The numerical results are verified against the experimental data

  13. Peptide-Mediated Liposomal Drug Delivery System Targeting Tumor Blood Vessels in Anticancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chung Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors are known to recruit new blood vessels to support their growth. Therefore, unique molecules expressed on tumor endothelial cells can function as targets for the antiangiogenic therapy of cancer. Current efforts are focusing on developing therapeutic agents capable of specifically targeting cancer cells and tumor-associated microenvironments including tumor blood vessels. These therapies hold the promise of high efficacy and low toxicity. One recognized strategy for improving the therapeutic effectiveness of conventional chemotherapeutics is to encapsulate anticancer drugs into targeting liposomes that bind to the cell surface receptors expressed on tumor-associated endothelial cells. These anti-angiogenic drug delivery systems could be used to target both tumor blood vessels as well as the tumor cells, themselves. This article reviews the mechanisms and advantages of various present and potential methods using peptide-conjugated liposomes to specifically destroy tumor blood vessels in anticancer therapy.

  14. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Pharmacological and physical vessel modulation strategies to improve EPR-mediated drug targeting to tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Tarun; Pathak, Vertika; Shi, Yang; Hennink, Wim E; Moonen, Chrit T W; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2017-09-15

    The performance of nanomedicine formulations depends on the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) effect. Prototypic nanomedicine-based drug delivery systems, such as liposomes, polymers and micelles, aim to exploit the EPR effect to accumulate at pathological sites, to thereby improve the balance between drug efficacy and toxicity. Thus far, however, tumor-targeted nanomedicines have not yet managed to achieve convincing therapeutic results, at least not in large cohorts of patients. This is likely mostly due to high inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in EPR. Besides developing (imaging) biomarkers to monitor and predict EPR, another strategy to address this heterogeneity is the establishment of vessel modulation strategies to homogenize and improve EPR. Over the years, several pharmacological and physical co-treatments have been evaluated to improve EPR-mediated tumor targeting. These include pharmacological strategies, such as vessel permeabilization, normalization, disruption and promotion, as well as physical EPR enhancement via hyperthermia, radiotherapy, sonoporation and phototherapy. In the present manuscript, we summarize exemplary studies showing that pharmacological and physical vessel modulation strategies can be used to improve tumor-targeted drug delivery, and we discuss how these advanced combination regimens can be optimally employed to enhance the (pre-) clinical performance of tumor-targeted nanomedicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vessel co-option in primary human tumors and metastases: an obstacle to effective anti-angiogenic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnem, Tom; Hu, Jiangting; Ferguson, Mary; Adighibe, Omanma; Snell, Cameron; Harris, Adrian L; Gatter, Kevin C; Pezzella, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Angiogenesis has been regarded as essential for tumor growth and progression. Studies of many human tumors, however, suggest that their microcirculation may be provided by nonsprouting vessels and that a variety of tumors can grow and metastasize without angiogenesis. Vessel co-option, where tumor cells migrate along the preexisting vessels of the host organ, is regarded as an alternative tumor blood supply. Vessel co-option may occur in many malignancies, but so far mostly reported in highly vascularized tissues such as brain, lung, and liver. In primary and metastatic lung cancer and liver metastasis from different primary origins, as much as 10-30% of the tumors are reported to use this alternative blood supply. In addition, vessel co-option is introduced as a potential explanation of antiangiogenic drug resistance, although the impact of vessel co-option in this clinical setting is still to be further explored. In this review we discuss tumor vessel co-option with specific examples of vessel co-option in primary and secondary tumors and a consideration of the clinical implications of this alternative tumor blood supply.

  17. Investigation of flow stabilization in a compact reactor vessel of a FBR. Flow visualization in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    In the feasibility studies of Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System, a compact reactor vessel is considered from economical improvement point of a sodium cooled loop type fast reactor. The flow field was visualized by water experiment for a reactor vessel with 'a column type UIS (Upper Internal Structure)', which has a slit for fuel handling mechanism and is useful for a compact fast reactor. In this research, the 1/20 scale test equipment using water was made to understand coolant flow through a slit of a column type UIS' and fundamental behavior of reactor upper plenum flow. In the flow visualization tests, tracer particles were added in the water, and illuminated by the slit-shaped pulse laser. The flow visualization image was taken with a CCD camera. We obtained fluid velocity vectors from the visualization image using the Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results are as follows. 1. Most of coolant flow through a slit of 'column type UIS' arrived the dip plate directly. In the opposite side of a slit, most of coolant flowed toward reactor vessel wall before it arrived the dip plate. 2. The PIV was useful to measure the flow field in the reactor vessel. The obtained velocity field was consistent with the flow visualization result. 3. The jet through the UIS slit was dependent on the UIS geometry. There is a possibility to control the jet by the UIS geometry. (author)

  18. A microfluidic device for study of the effect of tumor vascular structures on the flow field and HepG2 cellular flow behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ming; Cai, Shaoxi; Zou, Misha; Zhao, Yi; Li, Bo; Chen, Sijia; Chen, Longcong

    2018-01-29

    To build a microfluidic device with various morphological features of the tumor vasculature for study of the effects of tumor vascular structures on the flow field and tumor cellular flow behaviors. The designed microfluidic device was able to approximatively simulate the in vivo structures of tumor vessels and the flow within it. In this models, the influences of the angle of bifurcation, the number of branches, and the narrow channels on the flow field and the influence of vorticity on the retention of HepG2 cells were significant. Additionally, shear stress below physiological conditions of blood circulation has considerable effect on the formation of the lumen-like structures (LLSs) of HepG2 cells. These results can provide some data and reference in the understanding of the interaction between hemorheological properties and tumor vascular structures in solid tumors. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wang, Yanping; Jiang, Bo; Jin, Qiaofeng; Jiang, Chunxiang; Zheng, Hairong

    2010-10-21

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  20. Measurement of flow velocity fields in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals using micro ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (micro-EPIV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Ming; Niu Lili; Jiang Bo; Jin Qiaofeng; Jiang Chunxiang; Zheng Hairong; Wang Yanping

    2010-01-01

    Determining a multidimensional velocity field within microscale opaque fluid flows is needed in areas such as microfluidic devices, biofluid mechanics and hemodynamics research in animal studies. The ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV) technique is appropriate for measuring opaque flows by taking advantage of PIV and B-mode ultrasound contrast imaging. However, the use of clinical ultrasound systems for imaging flows in small structures or animals has limitations associated with spatial resolution. This paper reports on the development of a high-resolution EchoPIV technique (termed as micro-EPIV) and its application in measuring flows in small vessel-mimic phantoms and vessels of small animals. Phantom experiments demonstrate the validity of the technique, providing velocity estimates within 4.1% of the analytically derived values with regard to the flows in a small straight vessel-mimic phantom, and velocity estimates within 5.9% of the computationally simulated values with regard to the flows in a small stenotic vessel-mimic phantom. Animal studies concerning arterial and venous flows of living rats and rabbits show that the micro-EPIV-measured peak velocities within several cardiac cycles are about 25% below the values measured by the ultrasonic spectral Doppler technique. The micro-EPIV technique is able to effectively measure the flow fields within microscale opaque fluid flows.

  1. Vascular infarction by subcutaneous application of tissue factor targeted to tumor vessels with NGR-peptides: activity and toxicity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischalück, Johannes; Schwöppe, Christian; Spieker, Tilmann; Kessler, Torsten; Tiemann, Klaus; Liersch, Ruediger; Schliemann, Christoph; Kreuter, Michael; Kolkmeyer, Astrid; Hintelmann, Heike; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2010-12-01

    tTF-NGR consists of the extracellular domain of the (truncated) tissue factor (tTF), a central molecule for coagulation in vivo, and the peptide GNGRAHA (NGR), a ligand of the surface protein aminopeptidase N (CD13). After deamidation of the NGR-peptide moiety, the fusion protein is also a ligand for integrin αvβ3 (CD51/CD61). Both surface proteins are upregulated on endothelial cells of tumor vessels. tTF-NGR showed binding to specific binding sites on endothelial cells in vitro as shown by flow cytometry. Subcutaneous injection of tTF-NGR into athymic mice bearing human HT1080 fibrosarcoma tumors induced tumor growth retardation and delay. Contrast enhanced ultrasound detected a decrease in tumor blood flow in vivo after application of tTF-NGR. Histological analysis of the tumors revealed vascular disruption due to blood pooling and thrombotic occlusion of tumor vessels. Furthermore, a lack of resistance was shown by re-exposure of tumor-bearing mice to tTF-NGR after regrowth following a first cycle of treatment. However, after subcutaneous (s.c.) push injection with therapeutic doses (1-5 mg/kg bw) side effects have been observed, such as skin bleeding and reduced performance. Since lethality started within the therapeutic dose range (LD10 approximately 2 mg/kg bw) no safe therapeutic window could be found. Limiting toxicity was represented by thrombo-embolic events in major organ systems as demonstrated by histology. Thus, subcutaneous injection of tTF-NGR represents an active, but toxic application procedure and compares unfavourably to intravenous infusion.

  2. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2017-05-11

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.

  3. Recovery of testicular blood flow following ligation of testicular vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascual, J.A.; Villanueva-Meyer, J.; Salido, E.; Ehrlich, R.M.; Mena, I.; Rajfer, J.

    1989-01-01

    To determine whether initial ligation of the testicular vessels of the high undescended testis followed by a delayed secondary orchiopexy is a viable alternative to the classical Fowler-Stephens procedure, a series of preliminary experiments were conducted in the rat in which testicular blood flow was measured by the 133-xenon washout technique before, and 1 hour and 30 days after ligation of the vessels. In addition, testicular histology, and testis and sex-accessory tissue weights were measured in 6 control, 6 sham operated and 6 testicular vessel ligated rats 54 days after vessel ligation. The data demonstrate that ligation and division of the testicular blood vessels produce an 80 per cent decrease in testicular blood flow 1 hour after ligation of the vessels. However, 30 days later testis blood flow returns to the control and pre-treatment value. There were no significant changes in testis or sex-accessory tissue weights 54 days after vessel ligation. Histologically, 4 of the surgically operated testes demonstrated necrosis of less than 25 per cent of the seminiferous tubules while 1 testis demonstrated more than 75 per cent necrosis. The rest of the tubules in all 6 testes demonstrated normal spermatogenesis. From this study we conclude that initial testicular vessel ligation produces an immediate decrease in testicular blood flow but with time the collateral vessels are able to compensate and return the testis blood flow to its normal pre-treatment value. These preliminary observations lend support for the concept that initial ligation of the testicular vessels followed by a delayed secondary orchiopexy in patients with a high undescended testis may be a possible alternative to the classical Fowler-Stephens approach

  4. Hierarchical and coupling model of factors influencing vessel traffic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Liu, Jingxian; Li, Huanhuan; Li, Zongzhi; Tan, Zhirong; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of vessel traffic flow is crucial in maintaining navigation safety, efficiency, and overall waterway transportation management. Factors influencing vessel traffic flow possess diverse features such as hierarchy, uncertainty, nonlinearity, complexity, and interdependency. To reveal the impact mechanism of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow, a hierarchical model and a coupling model are proposed in this study based on the interpretative structural modeling method. The hierarchical model explains the hierarchies and relationships of the factors using a graph. The coupling model provides a quantitative method that explores interaction effects of factors using a coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is obtained by determining the quantitative indicators of the factors and their weights. Thereafter, the data obtained from Port of Tianjin is used to verify the proposed coupling model. The results show that the hierarchical model of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow can explain the level, structure, and interaction effect of the factors; the coupling model is efficient in analyzing factors influencing traffic volumes. The proposed method can be used for analyzing increases in vessel traffic flow in waterway transportation system.

  5. Ultrasonographic Examination of Some Vessels in Dogs and the Characteristics of Blood Flow in These Vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figurová M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The examination by Doppler ultrasonography provides haemodynamic information about blood flow velocity in a respective vessel. It specifies high- and lowresistance flow patterns. The aim of our study was to record the flow in a. carotis communis, a. femoralis and aa. renales in 16 adult clinically healthy dogs of small and medium size; characterize the types of vessels and also determine the pulsatility index (PI and the resistive index (RI of these vessels. The a. femoralis is a high-resistance vessel with a pronounced three-peak waveform. The aa. renales gives a typical picture of a low-resistance flow pattern. The characteristics of a. carotis communis involves different images of its branches a. carotis interna and a. carotis externa. In the investigated groups we observed a medium degree of pulsatility (atypical highresistance flow pattern with an absence of reverse flow. The mean measured values of indices for a. carotis communis were: left side PI 1.824 and RI 0.742; right side PI 1.891 and RI 0.746, and for aa. renales: PI 1.366 ± 0.04 and RI 0.684 ± 0.05.

  6. Hierarchical and coupling model of factors influencing vessel traffic flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available Understanding the characteristics of vessel traffic flow is crucial in maintaining navigation safety, efficiency, and overall waterway transportation management. Factors influencing vessel traffic flow possess diverse features such as hierarchy, uncertainty, nonlinearity, complexity, and interdependency. To reveal the impact mechanism of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow, a hierarchical model and a coupling model are proposed in this study based on the interpretative structural modeling method. The hierarchical model explains the hierarchies and relationships of the factors using a graph. The coupling model provides a quantitative method that explores interaction effects of factors using a coupling coefficient. The coupling coefficient is obtained by determining the quantitative indicators of the factors and their weights. Thereafter, the data obtained from Port of Tianjin is used to verify the proposed coupling model. The results show that the hierarchical model of the factors influencing vessel traffic flow can explain the level, structure, and interaction effect of the factors; the coupling model is efficient in analyzing factors influencing traffic volumes. The proposed method can be used for analyzing increases in vessel traffic flow in waterway transportation system.

  7. Podoplanin as Key Player of Tumor Progression and Lymph Vessel Proliferation in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobec, Ionut Marcel; Sas, Ioan; Pirtea, Laurențiu; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Moatar, Aurica Elisabeta; Ceaușu, Raluca Amalia; Raica, Marius

    2016-10-01

    Podoplanin plays a key role in tumor progression and metastasis. We evaluated lymphatics proliferation rate and podoplanin expression in tumor cells of ovarian carcinoma. Seventy-five paraffin-embedded specimens of ovarian cancer were immunohistochemically assessed in order to quantify peritumoral (LMVDP) and intratumoral (LMVDT) lymphatic microvessel density of proliferating lymphatics and for podoplanin variability in tumor cells. LMVDT correlated with proliferating tumor vessels located in the peritumoral area (p=0.024) and with the number of mature vessels located in the intratumoral area (p<0.0001), while LMVDP correlated with peritumoral mature vessels (p<0.000l). Proliferating tumor cells at the invasive front were highly positive for podoplanin. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first assessment of lymphatic endothelial cell proliferation correlated with podoplanin expression in tumor cells from ovarian cancer. Our data support podoplanin as a potential target that may help reduce ovarian cancer dissemination and lymphatic metastasis. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Vessel Sampling and Blood Flow Velocity Distribution With Vessel Diameter for Characterizing the Human Bulbar Conjunctival Microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Yuan, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Wentao; Cintrón-Colón, Hector R; Perez, Victor L; DeBuc, Delia C; Feuer, William J; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    This study determined (1) how many vessels (i.e., the vessel sampling) are needed to reliably characterize the bulbar conjunctival microvasculature and (2) if characteristic information can be obtained from the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter. Functional slitlamp biomicroscope was used to image hundreds of venules per subject. The bulbar conjunctiva in five healthy human subjects was imaged on six different locations in the temporal bulbar conjunctiva. The histograms of the diameter and velocity were plotted to examine whether the distribution was normal. Standard errors were calculated from the standard deviation and vessel sample size. The ratio of the standard error of the mean over the population mean was used to determine the sample size cutoff. The velocity was plotted as a function of the vessel diameter to display the distribution of the diameter and velocity. The results showed that the sampling size was approximately 15 vessels, which generated a standard error equivalent to 15% of the population mean from the total vessel population. The distributions of the diameter and velocity were not only unimodal, but also somewhat positively skewed and not normal. The blood flow velocity was related to the vessel diameter (r=0.23, Psampling size of the vessels and the distribution histogram of the blood flow velocity and vessel diameter, which may lead to a better understanding of the human microvascular system of the bulbar conjunctiva.

  9. Vascularization of liver tumors - preliminary results with Coded Harmonic Angio (CHA), phase inversion imaging, 3D power Doppler and contrast medium-enhanced B-flow with second generation contrast agent (Optison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, E M; Kubale, R; Jungius, K-P; Jung, W; Lenhart, M; Clevert, D-A

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the dynamic value of contrast medium-enhanced ultrasonography with Optison for appraisal of the vascularization of hepatic tumors using harmonic imaging, 3D-/power Doppler and B-flow. 60 patients with a mean age of 56 years (range 35-76 years) with 93 liver tumors, including histopathologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [15 cases with 20 lesions], liver metastases of colorectal tumors [17 cases with 33 lesions], metastases of breast cancer [10 cases with 21 lesions] and hemangiomas [10 cases with 19 lesions] were prospectively investigated by means of multislice CT as well as native and contrast medium-enhanced ultrasound using a multifrequency transducer (2.5-4 MHz, Logig 9, GE). B scan was performed with additional color and power Doppler, followed by a bolus injection of 0.5 ml Optison. Tumor vascularization was evaluated with coded harmonic angio (CHA), pulse inversion imaging with power Doppler, 3D power Doppler and in the late phase (>5 min) with B-flow. In 15 cases with HCC, i.a. DSA was performed in addition. The results were also correlated with MRT and histological findings. Compared to spiral-CT/MRT, only 72/93 (77%) of the lesions could be detected in the B scan, 75/93 (81%) with CHA and 93/93 (100%) in the pulse inversion mode. Tumor vascularization was detectable in 43/93 (46%) of lesions with native power Doppler, in 75/93 (81%) of lesions after administering contrast medium in the CHA mode, in 81/93 (87%) of lesions in the pulse inversion mode with power Doppler and in 77/93 (83%) of lesions with contrast-enhanced B-flow. Early arterial and capillary perfusion was best detected with CHA, particularly in 20/20 (100%) of the HCC lesions, allowing a 3D reconstruction. 3D power Doppler was especially useful in investigating the tumor margins. Up to 20 min after contrast medium injection, B-flow was capable of detecting increased metastatic tumor vascularization in 42/54 (78%) of cases and intratumoral perfusion in 17/20 (85

  10. Method for In-vivo Synthetic Aperture B-flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    . The signal received by the 64 elements closets to the en-fission are sampled at 40 MHz and 12 bits at a pulse repetition frequency of 3 kHz. A full second of data is acquired from a healthy 29 years old male volunteer from the carotid artery. The data is beamformed, combined, and echo canceled off-line. High-pass......B-flow techniques introduced in commercial scanners have been useful is visualizing places of flow. The method is relatively independent of flow angle and can give a good perception of vessel location and turbulence. This paper introduces a technique for making a synthetic aperture B-flow system...

  11. Tumor cell-derived PDGF-B potentiates mouse mesenchymal stem cells-pericytes transition and recruitment through an interaction with NRP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Inamul

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New blood vessel formation, or angiogenic switch, is an essential event in the development of solid tumors and their metastatic growth. Tumor blood vessel formation and remodeling is a complex and multi-step processes. The differentiation and recruitment of mural cells including vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes are essential steps in tumor angiogenesis. However, the role of tumor cells in differentiation and recruitment of mural cells has not yet been fully elucidated. This study focuses on the role of human tumor cells in governing the differentiation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to pericytes and their recruitment in the tumor angiogenesis process. Results We show that C3H/10T1/2 mouse embryonic mesenchymal stem cells, under the influence of different tumor cell-derived conditioned media, differentiate into mature pericytes. These differentiated pericytes, in turn, are recruited to bind with capillary-like networks formed by endothelial cells on the matrigel under in vitro conditions and recruited to bind with blood vessels on gel-foam under in vivo conditions. The degree of recruitment of pericytes into in vitro neo-angiogenesis is tumor cell phenotype specific. Interestingly, invasive cells recruit less pericytes as compared to non-invasive cells. We identified tumor cell-secreted platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B as a crucial factor controlling the differentiation and recruitment processes through an interaction with neuropilin-1 (NRP-1 in mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusion These new insights into the roles of tumor cell-secreted PDGF-B-NRP-1 signaling in MSCs-fate determination may help to develop new antiangiogenic strategies to prevent the tumor growth and metastasis and result in more effective cancer therapies.

  12. Antibody-linked drug destroys tumor cells and tumor blood vessels in many types of cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team led by Brad St. Croix, Ph.D., Senior Associate Scientist, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, has developed an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that destroys both tumor cells and the blood vessels that nourish them. The drug significantly shrank breast tumors, colon tumors and several other types of cancer and prolonged survival. Learn more...  

  13. Intravenous contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (IVCBCT of intrahepatic tumors and vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Eccles, BSc

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Intravenous-CBCT may enhance the visibility of hepatic vessels and tumor in CBCT scans obtained during breath hold. Optimization of IV contrast timing and reduction of artifacts to improve tumor visualization warrant further investigation.

  14. THE ALGORITHM OF DETERMINATION OF EYE FUNDUS VESSELS BLOOD FLOW CHARACTERISTICS ON VIDEOSEQUENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Nedzvedz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of determination of the dynamic characteristics like the vessel diameter change, the linear and volume blood velocities in the vessels of the eye fundus is considered. Such characteristics allow to determine blood flow changes in the microvasculature affecting the blood flow in the brain, kidneys and coronary vessels. Developed algorithm includes four stages: the video sequence stabilization, the vessels segmentation with the help of a neural network, the determination of the instantaneous velocity in the vessels based on the optical flow and the analysis of the results.

  15. Mechanism of endothelial progenitor cell recruitment into neo-vessels in adjacent non-tumor tissues in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, De-cai; Chen, Jun; Sun, Xi-tai; Zhuang, Lin-yuan; Jiang, Chun-ping; Ding, Yi-tao

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution and clinical significance of mobilized endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found that many more EPCs were recruited to nonmalignant liver tissue (especially into adjacent non-tumor tissues (AT)) than to tumor vessels. These results suggest that the mechanism underlying the recruitment of EPCs into microvessels in AT merits further investigation Angiogenic factors were detected in three tissue microarrays comprising normal liver, paired tumor tissue (TT) and AT from 105 patients (who had undergone hepatectomy for HCC) using immunohistochemistry. Also, the number of EPCs (positive for Sca-1, Flk-1 and c-Kit) in the blood and liver of cirrhotic mice were determined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. The distribution of these labeled EPCs in tumor and non-tumor tissues was then studied. The results from the tissue microarrays showed that the expression levels of VEGF-A, bFGF, TGF-β, MCP-1, TSP-1, MMP-9, TIMP-2, and endostatin were significantly higher in AT than in either normal liver or TT (p < 0.05), but no significant difference was found in the expression levels of COX-2 and NOS-2 between AT and TT. The expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, TGF-β, MCP-1, TSP-1, MMP-9, TIMP-2, endostatin, COX-2, and NOS-2 in normal liver tissue was weaker than that in AT or TT. In cirrhotic mice, the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells gradually increased, before decreasing again. In this mouse model, increased numbers of EPCs were recruited and homed specifically to the cirrhotic liver. Both liver cirrhosis and HCC led to increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors, which resulted in the recruitment of EPCs into AT. Also, EPCs were mobilized, recruited and homed to cirrhotic liver. The unique pathology of HCC coupled with liver cirrhosis may, therefore, be associated with the distribution and function of EPCs

  16. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izunaga, Hiroshi; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Fuwa, Isao; Kodama, Takafumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko

    1986-01-01

    The regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined on seventeen patients with brain tumors. Ring type single photon emission CT (SPECT) was used following intravenous injection of 133 Xe. Case materials included eleven meningiomas and six malignant gliomas. Evaluation was performed with emphasis on the following points; 1. Correlation of the flow data within tumors to the angiographic tumor stains, 2. Influence of tumors on the cerebral blood flow of the normal brain tissue, 3. Correlation between degree of peripheral edema and the flow data of the affected hemispheres. There was significant correlation between flow data within tumors and angiographic tumor stains in meningiomas. Influence of tumors on cerebral blood flow of the normal tissue was greater in meningiomas than in gliomas. There was negative correlation between the degree of peripheral edema and the flow data of the affected hemisphere. It has been concluded that the measurement of CBF in brain tumors is a valuable method in evaluation of brain tumors. (author)

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow measurement in brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izunaga, Hiroshi; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Fuwa, Isao; Kodama, Takafumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko

    1986-10-01

    The regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined on seventeen patients with brain tumors. Ring type single photon emission CT (SPECT) was used following intravenous injection of /sup 133/Xe. Case materials included eleven meningiomas and six malignant gliomas. Evaluation was performed with emphasis on the following points; 1. Correlation of the flow data within tumors to the angiographic tumor stains, 2. Influence of tumors on the cerebral blood flow of the normal brain tissue, 3. Correlation between degree of peripheral edema and the flow data of the affected hemispheres. There was significant correlation between flow data within tumors and angiographic tumor stains in meningiomas. Influence of tumors on cerebral blood flow of the normal tissue was greater in meningiomas than in gliomas. There was negative correlation between the degree of peripheral edema and the flow data of the affected hemisphere. It has been concluded that the measurement of CBF in brain tumors is a valuable method in evaluation of brain tumors.

  18. Laser Therapy Inhibits Tumor Growth in Mice by Promoting Immune Surveillance and Vessel Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ottaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser therapy, recently renamed as photobiomodulation, stands as a promising supportive treatment for oral mucositis induced by oncological therapies. However, its mechanisms of action and, more importantly, its safety in cancer patients, are still unclear. Here we explored the anti-cancer effect of 3 laser protocols, set at the most commonly used wavelengths, in B16F10 melanoma and oral carcinogenesis mouse models. While laser light increased cell metabolism in cultured cells, the in vivo outcome was reduced tumor progression. This striking, unexpected result, was paralleled by the recruitment of immune cells, in particular T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, which secreted type I interferons. Laser light also reduced the number of highly angiogenic macrophages within the tumor mass and promoted vessel normalization, an emerging strategy to control tumor progression. Collectively, these results set photobiomodulation as a safety procedure in oncological patients and open the way to its innovative use for cancer therapy.

  19. Effect of hepatic blood flow alteration on the therapeutic effect of cryoablation in VX2 hepatic tumor rabbit: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhi; Ni Hong; Li Baoguo; Hu Yonghua; Xing Wenge; Liu Fang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of alteration of blood flow in the hepatic artery on the therapeutic effect of cryoablation in VX2 hepatic tumor rabbit model. Methods: Thirty rabbits with VX2 hepatic tumor were divided into three groups according to hepatic artery blood flow: complete occlusion of the hepatic artery(group A), partial occlusion of the hepatic artery (group B), and no occlusion of the hepatic artery (group C). With conventional CT scan and perfusion scan, the values of blood flow (BF) and blood volume(BV) of VX 2 tumor were computed and the differences among the three groups were analyzed. After cryoablation, the animals were euthanized and the livers were removed. The hepatic tissue from the cryoablation area and surrounding area underwent both methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTY) diaphorase staining and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The gross pathology and histopathological changes were observed. Results: (1)The BF and BV in the three groups were: (7.23 + 2. 15 ) ml·100 g -1 ·min -1 and (1.63±0.52) ml/100 g in group A; (32.65±6.12) ml·100 g -1 ·min -1 and (9.32±2.63) ml/100 g in group B; (61.34±12.15) ml·100 g -1 ·min -1 and (17.51± 3.14) ml/100 g in group C, respectively. There were significant differences among the three groups in the BF and BV (F value was 452.16 and 421.33 in the BF and BV, respectively, P <0.01); (2) The maximum diameter of cryoablation-induced necrosis was (2.3±0.3)cm in group A, (1.5±0.2) cm in group B, and (0.8±0.1) cm in group C, respectively. The difference was significant among the groups (F value was 315.32,P <0.01). (3) There were well-defined frozen areas, bordering areas and normal surrounding areas in MTT staining. In group C, positive staining around some blood vessels could be seen. Conclusion: Alteration of the blood flow in the hepatic artery can affect the cryoablation efficacy. With the decrease of hepatic artery blood flow, the efficacy of cryoablation on liver tumor

  20. Regulation of tumor invasion by interstitial fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh, Adrian C; Swartz, Melody A

    2011-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression is undisputed, yet the significance of biophysical forces in the microenvironment remains poorly understood. Interstitial fluid flow is a nearly ubiquitous and physiologically relevant biophysical force that is elevated in tumors because of tumor-associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, as well as changes in the tumor stroma. Not only does it apply physical forces to cells directly, but interstitial flow also creates gradients of soluble signals in the tumor microenvironment, thus influencing cell behavior and modulating cell–cell interactions. In this paper, we highlight our current understanding of interstitial fluid flow in the context of the tumor, focusing on the physical changes that lead to elevated interstitial flow, how cells sense flow and how they respond to changes in interstitial flow. In particular, we emphasize that interstitial flow can directly promote tumor cell invasion through a mechanism known as autologous chemotaxis, and indirectly support tumor invasion via both biophysical and biochemical cues generated by stromal cells. Thus, interstitial fluid flow demonstrates how important biophysical factors are in cancer, both by modulating cell behavior and coupling biophysical and biochemical signals

  1. 1-D Two-phase Flow Investigation for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Cheol

    2007-02-01

    During a severe accident, when a molten corium is relocated in a reactor vessel lower head, the RCF(Reactor Cavity Flooding) system for ERVC (External Reactor Vessel Cooling) is actuated and coolants are supplied into a reactor cavity to remove a decay heat from the molten corium. This severe accident mitigation strategy for maintaining a integrity of reactor vessel was adopted in the nuclear power plants of APR1400, AP600, and AP1000. Under the ERVC condition, the upward two-phase flow is driven by the amount of the decay heat from the molten corium. To achieve the ERVC strategy, the two-phase natural circulation in the annular gap between the external reactor vessel and the insulation should be formed sufficiently by designing the coolant inlet/outlet area and gap size adequately on the insulation device. Also the natural circulation flow restriction has to be minimized. In this reason, it is needed to review the fundamental structure of insulation. In the existing power plants, the insulation design is aimed at minimizing heat losses under a normal operation. Under the ERVC condition, however, the ability to form the two-phase natural circulation is uncertain. Namely, some important factors, such as the coolant inlet/outlet areas, flow restriction, and steam vent etc. in the flow channel, should be considered for ERVC design. T-HEMES 1D study is launched to estimate the natural circulation flow under the ERVC condition of APR1400. The experimental facility is one-dimensional and scaled down as the half height and 1/238 channel area of the APR1400 reactor vessel. The air injection method was used to simulate the boiling at the external reactor vessel and generate the natural circulation two-phase flow. From the experimental results, the natural circulation flow rate highly depended on inlet/outlet areas and the circulation flow rate increased as the outlet height as well as the supplied water head increased. On the other hand, the simple analysis using the drift

  2. Hybrid Segmentation of Vessels and Automated Flow Measures in In-Vivo Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Martins, Bo; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2016-01-01

    Vector Flow Imaging (VFI) has received an increasing attention in the scientific field of ultrasound, as it enables angle independent visualization of blood flow. VFI can be used in volume flow estimation, but a vessel segmentation is needed to make it fully automatic. A novel vessel segmentation...

  3. Blood Vessel Normalization in the Hamster Oral Cancer Model for Experimental Cancer Therapy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ana J. Molinari; Romina F. Aromando; Maria E. Itoiz; Marcela A. Garabalino; Andrea Monti Hughes; Elisa M. Heber; Emiliano C. C. Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Veronica A. Trivillin; Amanda E. Schwint

    2012-07-01

    Normalization of tumor blood vessels improves drug and oxygen delivery to cancer cells. The aim of this study was to develop a technique to normalize blood vessels in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer. Materials and Methods: Tumor-bearing hamsters were treated with thalidomide and were compared with controls. Results: Twenty eight hours after treatment with thalidomide, the blood vessels of premalignant tissue observable in vivo became narrower and less tortuous than those of controls; Evans Blue Dye extravasation in tumor was significantly reduced (indicating a reduction in aberrant tumor vascular hyperpermeability that compromises blood flow), and tumor blood vessel morphology in histological sections, labeled for Factor VIII, revealed a significant reduction in compressive forces. These findings indicated blood vessel normalization with a window of 48 h. Conclusion: The technique developed herein has rendered the hamster oral cancer model amenable to research, with the potential benefit of vascular normalization in head and neck cancer therapy.

  4. Tumor blood vessel "normalization" improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Nigg

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  5. Tumor blood vessel 'normalization' improves the therapeutic efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in experimental oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigg, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the efficacy of BNCT mediated by boronophenylalanine (BPA) to treat tumors in a hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer with no normal tissue radiotoxicity and moderate, albeit reversible, mucositis in precancerous tissue around treated tumors. It is known that boron targeting of the largest possible proportion of tumor cells contributes to the success of BNCT and that tumor blood vessel normalization improves drug delivery to the tumor. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of blood vessel normalization on the therapeutic efficacy and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in the hamster cheek pouch model of oral cancer.

  6. Cone-Beam CT Angiography for Determination of Tumor-Feeding Vessels During Chemoembolization of Liver Tumors: Comparison of Conventional and Dedicated-Software Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronot, Maxime; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Hakimé, Antoine; Kuoch, Viseth; Roux, Marion; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Vilgrain, Valérie; de Baere, Thierry; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    To compare the ability of dedicated software and conventional cone-beam computed tomography (CT) analysis to identify tumor-feeding vessels in hypervascular liver tumors treated with chemoembolization. Between January 2012 and January 2013, 45 patients (32 men, mean age of 61 y; range, 27-85 y) were enrolled, and 66 tumors were treated (mean, 32 mm ± 18; range, 10-81 mm) with conventional chemoembolization with arterial cone-beam CT. Data were independently analyzed by six interventional radiologists with standard postprocessing software, a computer-aided analysis with FlightPlan for liver (FPFL; ie, "raw FPFL"), and a review of this computer-aided FPFL analysis ("reviewed FPFL"). Analyses were compared with a reference reading established by two study supervisors in consensus who had access to all imaging data. Sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), and false-positive (FP) ratios were compared by McNemar, χ(2), and Fisher exact tests. Analysis durations were compared by Mann-Whitney test, and interreader agreement was assessed. Reference reading identified 179 feeder vessels. The sensitivity of raw FPFL was significantly higher than those of reviewed FPFL and conventional analyses (90.9% vs 83.2% and 82.1%; P software enabled a fast, accurate, and sensitive detection of tumor feeder vessels. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantification of tumor vessels in glioblastoma patients using time-of-flight angiography at 7 Tesla: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Radbruch

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160 × 210 mm(2, voxel size: 0.31 × 0.31 × 0.40 mm(3 on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. RESULTS: Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3 ± 13.9 mm(2 vs. 29.0 ± 21.0 mm(2 (p<0.035 and number of branches (3.5 ± 1.8 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 (p<0.001 per cubic centimeter were significantly higher, while mean vessel branch length was significantly lower (3.8 ± 1.5 mm vs 7.2 ± 2.8 mm (p<0.001 in the tumor. DISCUSSION: ToF angiography at 7-Tesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies.

  8. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori

    1999-01-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  9. Lymphatic vessel density and function in experimental bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saban, Marcia R; Wu, Xue-Ru; Saban, Ricardo; Towner, Rheal; Smith, Nataliya; Abbott, Andrew; Neeman, Michal; Davis, Carole A; Simpson, Cindy; Maier, Julie; Mémet, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    The lymphatics form a second circulatory system that drains the extracellular fluid and proteins from the tumor microenvironment, and provides an exclusive environment in which immune cells interact and respond to foreign antigen. Both cancer and inflammation are known to induce lymphangiogenesis. However, little is known about bladder lymphatic vessels and their involvement in cancer formation and progression. A double transgenic mouse model was generated by crossing a bladder cancer-induced transgenic, in which SV40 large T antigen was under the control of uroplakin II promoter, with another transgenic mouse harboring a lacZ reporter gene under the control of an NF-κB-responsive promoter (κB-lacZ) exhibiting constitutive activity of β-galactosidase in lymphatic endothelial cells. In this new mouse model (SV40-lacZ), we examined the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and function (LVF) during bladder cancer progression. LVD was performed in bladder whole mounts and cross-sections by fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC) using LYVE-1 antibody. LVF was assessed by real-time in vivo imaging techniques using a contrast agent (biotin-BSA-Gd-DTPA-Cy5.5; Gd-Cy5.5) suitable for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near infrared fluorescence (NIRF). In addition, IHC of Cy5.5 was used for time-course analysis of co-localization of Gd-Cy5.5 with LYVE-1-positive lymphatics and CD31-positive blood vessels. SV40-lacZ mice develop bladder cancer and permitted visualization of lymphatics. A significant increase in LVD was found concomitantly with bladder cancer progression. Double labeling of the bladder cross-sections with LYVE-1 and Ki-67 antibodies indicated cancer-induced lymphangiogenesis. MRI detected mouse bladder cancer, as early as 4 months, and permitted to follow tumor sizes during cancer progression. Using Gd-Cy5.5 as a contrast agent for MRI-guided lymphangiography, we determined a possible reduction of lymphatic flow within the tumoral area. In addition, NIRF

  10. Quantitative ex-vivo micro-computed tomographic imaging of blood vessels and necrotic regions within tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Charlene M; Singla, Arvind K; Villemaire, Michelle L; Buie, Helen R; Boyd, Steven K; Jirik, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for visualizing and quantifying the microvasculature of tumors are essential not only for studying angiogenic processes but also for monitoring the effects of anti-angiogenic treatments. Given the relatively limited information that can be gleaned from conventional 2-D histological analyses, there has been considerable interest in methods that enable the 3-D assessment of the vasculature. To this end, we employed a polymerizing intravascular contrast medium (Microfil) and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) in combination with a maximal spheres direct 3-D analysis method to visualize and quantify ex-vivo vessel structural features, and to define regions of hypoperfusion within tumors that would be indicative of necrosis. Employing these techniques we quantified the effects of a vascular disrupting agent on the tumor vasculature. The methods described herein for quantifying whole tumor vascularity represent a significant advance in the 3-D study of tumor angiogenesis and evaluation of novel therapeutics, and will also find potential application in other fields where quantification of blood vessel structure and necrosis are important outcome parameters.

  11. Quantification of Tumor Vessels in Glioblastoma Patients Using Time-of-Flight Angiography at 7 Tesla: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, Alexander; Eidel, Oliver; Wiestler, Benedikt; Paech, Daniel; Burth, Sina; Kickingereder, Philipp; Nowosielski, Martha; Bäumer, Philipp; Wick, Wolfgang; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bendszus, Martin; Ladd, Mark; Nagel, Armin Michael; Heiland, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze if tumor vessels can be visualized, segmented and quantified in glioblastoma patients with time of flight (ToF) angiography at 7 Tesla and multiscale vessel enhancement filtering. Materials and Methods Twelve patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were examined with ToF angiography (TR = 15 ms, TE = 4.8 ms, flip angle = 15°, FOV = 160×210 mm2, voxel size: 0.31×0.31×0.40 mm3) on a whole-body 7 T MR system. A volume of interest (VOI) was placed within the border of the contrast enhancing part on T1-weighted images of the glioblastoma and a reference VOI was placed in the non-affected contralateral white matter. Automated segmentation and quantification of vessels within the two VOIs was achieved using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering in ImageJ. Results Tumor vessels were clearly visible in all patients. When comparing tumor and the reference VOI, total vessel surface (45.3±13.9 mm2 vs. 29.0±21.0 mm2 (pTesla MRI enables characterization and quantification of the internal vascular morphology of glioblastoma and may be used for the evaluation of therapy response within future studies. PMID:25415327

  12. Microparticle image velocimetry approach to flow measurements in isolated contracting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaris, Konstantinos N; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Zawieja, David C; Moore, James; Black, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of an optical flow visualization method for resolving the flow velocity vector field in lymphatic vessels in vitro. The aim is to develop an experimental protocol for accurately estimating flow parameters, such as flow rate and shear stresses, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Previous studies in situ have relied on lymphocytes as tracers, but their low density resulted in a reduced spatial resolution whereas the assumption that the flow was fully developed in order to determine the flow parameters of interest may not be valid, especially in the vicinity of the valves, where the flow is undoubtedly more complex. To overcome these issues, we have applied the time-resolved microparticle image velocimetry (μ -PIV) technique, a well-established method that can provide increased spatial and temporal resolution that this transient flow demands. To that end, we have developed a custom light source, utilizing high-power light-emitting diodes, and associated control and image processing software. This paper reports the performance of the system and the results of a series of preliminary experiments performed on vessels isolated from rat mesenteries, demonstrating, for the first time, the successful application of the μ -PIV technique in these vessels.

  13. Development of cold moderator vessel for the spallation neutron source. Flow field measurements and thermal hydraulic analyses in cold moderator vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Tomokazu; Kaminaga, Masanori; Terada, Atsuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is developing a several MW-scale spallation target system under the High-Intensity Accelerator Project. A cold moderator using supercritical hydrogen is one of the key components in the target system, which directly affects the neutronic performance both in intensity and resolution. Since a hydrogen temperature rise in the moderator vessel affects the neutronic performance, it is necessary to suppress the recirculation and stagnant flows which cause hot spots. In order to develop the conceptual design of the moderator structure in progress, the flow field was measured using a PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) system under water flow conditions using a flat model that simulated a moderator vessel. From these results, the flow field such as recirculation flows, stagnant flows etc. was clarified. The hydraulic analytical results using the standard k-ε model agreed well with experimental results. Thermal-hydraulic analyses in the moderator vessel were carried out under liquid hydrogen conditions. Based on these results, we clarified the possibility of suppressing the local temperature rise within 3 K under 2 MW operating condition. (author)

  14. Effects of Flowing RBCs on Adhesion of a Circulating Tumor Cell in Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, L.L.; Liu, Y.; Chen, S.; Fu, B.M.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to the microvessel wall largely depends on the blood hydrodynamic conditions, one of which is the blood viscosity. Since blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, whose viscosity increases with hematocrit, in the microvessels at low shear rate. In this study, the effects of hematocrit, vessel size, flow rate and red blood cells (RBCs) aggregation on adhesion of a CTC in the microvessels were numerically investigated using dissipative particle dynamics. The membrane of cells was represented by a spring-based network connected by elastic springs to characterize its deformation. RBCs aggregation was modelled by a Morse potential function based on depletion-mediated assumption and the adhesion of the CTC to the vessel wall was achieved by the interactions between receptors and ligands at the CTC and those at the endothelial cells forming the vessel wall. The results demonstrated that in the microvessel of 15μm diameter, the CTC has an increasing probability of adhesion with the hematocrit due to a growing wall-directed force, resulting in a larger number of receptor-ligand bonds formed on the cell surface. However, with the increase in microvessel size, an enhanced lift force at higher hematocrit detaches the initial adherent CTC quickly. If the microvessel is comparable to the CTC in diameter, CTC adhesion is independent of Hct. In addition, the velocity of CTC is larger than the average blood flow velocity in smaller microvessels and the relative velocity of CTC decreases with the increase in microvessel size. An increased blood flow resistance in the presence of CTC was also found. Moreover, it was found that the large deformation induced by high flow rate and the presence of aggregation promote the adhesion of CTC. PMID:27738841

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow in the patient with brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Shohei

    1993-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured with xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT) in 21 cases of intracranial tumors (13 meningiomas, 5 gliomas, 3 metastatic brain tumors). Peritumoral edema was graded as mild, moderate or severe based on the extent of edema on CT and MRI. According to intratumoral blood flow distribution patterns, three patterns were classified as central type with relatively high blood flow at the center of the tumor, homogeneous type with an almost homogeneous blood flow distribution, and marginal type with relatively high blood flow at the periphery of the tumor. High grade astrocytoma and metastatic brain tumor showed marginal type blood flow and moderate or severe edema except in one case. Five meningiomas with severe peritumoral edema revealed marginal type blood flow and four with mild peritumoral edema showed central type blood flow, except for one case. No correlation was found between the extent of peritumoral edema and histological subtype, tumor size, location, duration of clinical history, vascularization on angiogram, and mean blood flow in the tumor. These results suggest that blood flow distribution patterns within the tumor may affect the extension of peritumoral edema. Pre- and postoperative rCBFs were evaluated with Xe-CT and IMP-SPECT in 7 cases, mean rCBF of peritumoral edema was 6.2 ml/100 g/min preoperatively, and discrepancy between rCBF on Xe-CT and that on IMP-SPECT was shown in the remote cortical region ipsilateral to the tumor. Postoperative rCBF revealed an improved blood flow in both adjacent and remote areas, suggesting that the decreased blood flow associated with brain tumors might be relieved after surgery. (author) 53 refs

  16. Cryospectrophotometric determination of tumor intravascular oxyhemoglobin saturations: dependence on vascular geometry and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B M; Rofstad, E K; Degner, F L; Sutherland, R M

    1988-12-21

    To delineate the complex relationships between overall tumor oxygenation and vascular configuration, intravascular oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation distributions were measured with cryospectrophotometric techniques. Four factors related to vascular morphometry and tumor growth were evaluated: a) vessel diameter, b) distance of vessel from the tumor surface, c) tumor volume, and d) vascular density. To measure intertumor heterogeneity, two murine sarcomas (RIF-1 and KHT) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenografts (OWI and MLS) were utilized. In contrast to skeletal muscle, a preponderance of very low HbO2 saturations was observed for both large and small tumors of all lines. Saturations up to about 90% were also generally present, however, even in very large tumors. Variations in vascular configuration were predominantly tumor-line dependent rather than due to inherent characteristics of the host vasculature, and widely disparate HbO2 distributions were found for alternate lines implanted in identical host mice. Although peripheral saturations remained fairly constant with tumor growth, HbO2 values were markedly lower for vessels nearer the tumor center and further decreased with increasing tumor volume. HbO2 saturations did not change substantially with increasing vascular density (except for KHT tumors), although density did decrease with increasing distance from tumor surface. Combined effects of vessel diameter, tumor volume, and vessel location on HbO2 saturations were complex and varied markedly with both tumor line and vessel class. For specific classes, HbO2 distributions correlated closely with radiobiological hypoxic fractions, i.e., for tumor lines in which hypoxic fraction increased substantially with tumor volume, corresponding HbO2 values decreased, while for lines in which hypoxic fraction remained constant, HbO2 values also were unchanged. Although these trends may also be a function of differing oxygen consumption rates between tumor lines

  17. Tracer responses and control of vessels with variable flow and volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Continuous flow vessels which are subject to variation of flow and volume are characterized by time-variable parameters. It is shown that their residence time distributions and weighting functions obtained by tracer testing are made invariant with regard to the integrated flow variables which are introduced. Under variable flow but constant volume, one such integrated variable is sufficient. Under variable volume, two different variables are suggested for the residence time distribution and weighting function, while the appropriate variable of the perfect mixer differs distinctly from that of vessels with a distinct velocity profile. It is shown through a number of example cases, that an agreement with their mathematical models is reached. The approach is extended to include also arbitrary, non-analytic response functions obtained by tracer measurements. Applications of the derived models and their incorporation in automatic control algorithms is discussed. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  19. Non-gated vessel wall imaging of the internal carotid artery using radial scanning and fast spin echo sequence. Evaluation of vessel signal intensity by flow rate at 3.0 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Manami; Makabe, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Masaki; Hatakeyama, Ryohei; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Sakata, Motomichi

    2013-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging using radial scanning does not use a blood flow suppression pulse with gated acquisition. It has been proposed that there may not be a flow void effect if the flow rate is slow; however, this has yet to be empirically tested. To clarify the relationship between the signal intensity of the vessel lumen and the blood flow rate in a flow phantom, we investigated the usefulness of vessel wall imaging at 3.0 tesla (T). We measured the signal intensity while changing the flow rate in the flow phantom. Radial scanning at 1.5 T showed sufficient flow voids at above medium flow rates. There was no significant difference in lumen signal intensity at the carotid artery flow rate. The signal intensity of the vessel lumen decreased sufficiently using the radial scan method at 3.0 T. We thus obtained sufficient flow void effects at the carotid artery flow rate. We conclude this technique to be useful for evaluating plaque if high contrast can be maintained for fixed tissue (such as plaque) and the vessel lumen. (author)

  20. Quantitative phase imaging characterization of tumor-associated blood vessel formation on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Huang, Jing; Moses, Marsha A.

    2018-02-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing ones, is a biological process that has an essential role in solid tumor growth, development, and progression. Recent advances in Lab-on-a-Chip technology has created an opportunity for scientists to observe endothelial cell (EC) behaviors during the dynamic process of angiogenesis using a simple and economical in vitro platform that recapitulates in vivo blood vessel formation. Here, we use quantitative phase imaging (QPI) microscopy to continuously and non-invasively characterize the dynamic process of tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprout formation on a microfluidic chip. The live tumor cell-induced angiogenic sprouts are generated by multicellular endothelial sprouting into 3 dimensional (3D) Matrigel using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By using QPI, we quantitatively measure a panel of cellular morphological and behavioral parameters of each individual EC participating in this sprouting. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that QPI is a powerful tool that can provide real-time quantitative analysis of biological processes in in vitro 3D biomimetic devices, which, in turn, can improve our understanding of the biology underlying functional tissue engineering.

  1. H.B. Robinson-2 pressure vessel benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, I.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The H. B. Robinson Unit 2 Pressure Vessel Benchmark (HBR-2 benchmark) is described and analyzed in this report. Analysis of the HBR-2 benchmark can be used as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the qualification of the methodology for calculating neutron fluence in pressure vessels, as required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide DG-1053, Calculational and Dosimetry Methods for Determining Pressure Vessel Neutron Fluence. Section 1 of this report describes the HBR-2 benchmark and provides all the dimensions, material compositions, and neutron source data necessary for the analysis. The measured quantities, to be compared with the calculated values, are the specific activities at the end of fuel cycle 9. The characteristic feature of the HBR-2 benchmark is that it provides measurements on both sides of the pressure vessel: in the surveillance capsule attached to the thermal shield and in the reactor cavity. In section 2, the analysis of the HBR-2 benchmark is described. Calculations with the computer code DORT, based on the discrete-ordinates method, were performed with three multigroup libraries based on ENDF/B-VI: BUGLE-93, SAILOR-95 and BUGLE-96. The average ratio of the calculated-to-measured specific activities (C/M) for the six dosimeters in the surveillance capsule was 0.90 {+-} 0.04 for all three libraries. The average C/Ms for the cavity dosimeters (without neptunium dosimeter) were 0.89 {+-} 0.10, 0.91 {+-} 0.10, and 0.90 {+-} 0.09 for the BUGLE-93, SAILOR-95 and BUGLE-96 libraries, respectively. It is expected that the agreement of the calculations with the measurements, similar to the agreement obtained in this research, should typically be observed when the discrete-ordinates method and ENDF/B-VI libraries are used for the HBR-2 benchmark analysis.

  2. Ultrasound sonication with microbubbles disrupts blood vessels and enhances tumor treatments of anticancer nanodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CY

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chung-Yin Lin1*, Hsiao-Ching Tseng1*, Heng-Ruei Shiu1, Ming-Fang Wu2, Cheng-Ying Chou3, Win-Li Lin1,41Institute of Biomedical Engineering, 2Laboratory Animal Center, 3Department of Bio-Industrial Mechatronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Ultrasound (US sonication with microbubbles (MBs has the potential to disrupt blood vessels and enhance the delivery of drugs into the sonicated tissues. In this study, mouse ear tumors were employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of US, MBs, and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD on tumors. Tumors started to receive treatments when they grew up to about 15 mm3 (early stage with injection of PLD 10 mg/kg, or up to 50 mm3 (medium stage with PLD 6 (or 4 mg/kg. Experiments included the control, PLD alone, PLD + MBs + US, US alone, and MBs + US groups. The procedure for the PLD + MBs + US group was that PLD was injected first, MB (SonoVue injection followed, and then US was immediately sonicated on the tumor. The results showed that: (1 US sonication with MBs was always able to produce a further hindrance to tumor growth for both early and medium-stage tumors; (2 for the medium-stage tumors, 6 mg/kg PLD alone was able to inhibit their growth, while it did not work for 4 mg/kg PLD alone; (3 with the application of MBs + US, 4 mg/kg PLD was able to inhibit the growth of medium-stage tumors; (4 for early stage tumors after the first treatment with a high dose of PLD alone (10 mg/kg, the tumor size still increased for several days and then decreased (a biphasic pattern; (5 MBs + US alone was able to hinder the growth of early stage tumors, but unable to hinder that of medium stage tumors. The results of histological examinations and blood perfusion measurements indicated that the application of MBs + US disrupts the tumor blood

  3. Analytical evaluation of two-phase natural circulation flow characteristics under external reactor vessel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes an analytical method of evaluating the effects of design and operating parameters on the low-pressure two-phase natural circulation flow through the annular shaped gap at the reactor vessel exterior surface heated by corium (molten core) relocated to the reactor vessel lower plenum after loss of coolant accidents. A natural circulation flow velocity equation derived from steady-state mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for homogeneous two-phase flow is numerically solved for the core melting conditions of the APR1400 reactor. The solution is compared with existing experiments which measured natural circulation flow through the annular gap slice model. Two kinds of parameters are considered for this analytical method. One is the thermal-hydraulic conditions such as thermal power of corium, pressure and inlet subcooling. The others are those for the thermal insulation system design for the purpose of providing natural circulation flow path outside the reactor vessel: inlet flow area, annular gap clearance and system resistance. A computer program NCIRC is developed for the numerical solution of the implicit flow velocity equation.

  4. Effect of variable heat transfer coefficient on tissue temperature next to a large vessel during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Cleber

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the current shortcomings of radiofrequency (RF tumor ablation is its limited performance in regions close to large blood vessels, resulting in high recurrence rates at these locations. Computer models have been used to determine tissue temperatures during tumor ablation procedures. To simulate large vessels, either constant wall temperature or constant convective heat transfer coefficient (h have been assumed at the vessel surface to simulate convection. However, the actual distribution of the temperature on the vessel wall is non-uniform and time-varying, and this feature makes the convective coefficient variable. Methods This paper presents a realistic time-varying model in which h is a function of the temperature distribution at the vessel wall. The finite-element method (FEM was employed in order to model RF hepatic ablation. Two geometrical configurations were investigated. The RF electrode was placed at distances of 1 and 5 mm from a large vessel (10 mm diameter. Results When the ablation procedure takes longer than 1–2 min, the attained coagulation zone obtained with both time-varying h and constant h does not differ significantly. However, for short duration ablation (5–10 s and when the electrode is 1 mm away from the vessel, the use of constant h can lead to errors as high as 20% in the estimation of the coagulation zone. Conclusion For tumor ablation procedures typically lasting at least 5 min, this study shows that modeling the heat sink effect of large vessels by applying constant h as a boundary condition will yield precise results while reducing computational complexity. However, for other thermal therapies with shorter treatment using a time-varying h may be necessary.

  5. The tumor vasculature is a target for genetic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauceri, Helena J.; Heimann, Ruth; Seetharam, Saraswathy; Beckett, Michael A.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor progression and metastasis require the growth of new capillaries from existing blood vessels. Tumor cells produce both activators and inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Changes in the balance between these regulators appear to govern an angiogenic switch which is activated during tumor development. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has a biphasic role in angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that relatively low concentrations of TNF induce angiogenesis while high doses inhibit growth of blood vessels. In our previous studies, using the SQ-20B xenograft model system, we demonstrated increased tumor control when a virus containing the radiation-inducible promoter Egr-1 ligated to a cDNa for TNF-α was combined with radiation. The dominant histopathological feature of tumors receiving combined treatment with Ad.Egr-TNF and radiation was intratumoral vascular thrombosis. The present studies examine the role of TNF in tumor progression by investigating the effects of TNF on VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) production in vitro and on tumor vessel count in vivo. Methods: SQ-20B tumor cells in serum-free medium were exposed to hrTNF (10 ng/ml) 4 hours prior to a single dose of x-irradiation (10 Gy). 24 hrs. after treatment, the conditioned medium was harvested, centrifuged, diluted 1:10, and assayed for VEGF using a Quantikine TNF ELISA kit. For studies in vivo, female nude mice were injected sc in the right thigh with 10 6 SQ-20B cells. Xenografts were irradiated with four 5 Gy fractions (20 Gy) and injected twice with either Ad.Egr-TNF or Ad.null. Control tumors were injected with buffer. To highlight vessels, sections from paraffin embedded tissue were stained with anti-CD31 antibody using standard immunohistochemical techniques. Areas of high vascular density were identified and five high power fields (400X) were counted. Data are shown as the mean ± S.E.M. for each treatment group. Significance was evaluated using one

  6. Targeting Therapy Resistant Tumor Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Morris LS. Hysterectomy vs. resectoscopic endometrial ablation for the control of abnormal uterine bleeding . A cost-comparative study. J Reprod Med 1994;39...after the antibody treatment contain a pericyte coat, vessel architecture is normal, the diameter of the vessels is smaller (dilated, abnormal vessels...involvement of proteases from inflammatory mast cells and functionally abnormal (Carmeliet and Jain, 2000; Pasqualini (Coussens et al., 1999) and other bone

  7. Tumor vascularity under hypertension induced by intravenous infusion of angiotensin II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1986-01-01

    We studied whether or not the blood flow of tumors was increased by AT-II-induced hypertension in patients. Angiograms of 51 patients before and after intravenous infusion of AT-II were compared carefully from 5 points of view which suggested increased tumor blood flow. These were, 1) Contraction of small arteries feeding normal tissue, 2) Enhanced visualization of tumor vessels, 3) Enhanced visualization of tumor stain, 4) Increase of venous return from tumor-bearing region, and 5) Enhanced visualization of metastatic lymph nodes. The results were as follows. Contractions of small arteries feeding normal tissue [Finding 1)] were observed in 34 cases (66.6 %) and enhanced visualization of tumor vessels, tumor stain and so on [Finding 2)-5] were observed in 18 cases (35.3 %). Concequently, an increase of tumor blood flow was suggested in 40 cases (78.4 %). Blood flow of human tumors and normal tissue during the full course of induced hypertension with AT-II were measures by means of radionuclide angiography ( 99m Tc-RBC) and laser Doppler velocimetry. Activities of the tumor-bearing region and the mid-portion of the thigh (selected as normal tissue) were measured continuously by collimated scintillation detectors. In 26 measurements out of 31 (83.8 %), the activity in the thigh decreased promptly and returned to the baseline synchronously with the rise and fall of blood pressure. In contrast, in 11 measurements (34.4 %) the activity of the tumor-bearing region increased and returned to the baseline accompanying the change of blood pressure. Preliminary observations using laser Doppler velocimetry revealed an increase of blood flow in 5 tumors. In conclusion, the blood flow of human tumors was increased by AT-II, in agreement with the findings in animal tumors. (J.P.N.)

  8. Coupled finite difference and boundary element methods for fluid flow through a vessel with multibranches in tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Wu, Guo Xiong

    2013-03-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution procedure are developed to simulate flow field through a 3D permeable vessel with multibranches embedded in a solid tumour. The model is based on Poisseuille's law for the description of the flow through the vessels, Darcy's law for the fluid field inside the tumour interstitium, and Starling's law for the flux transmitted across the vascular walls. The solution procedure is based on a coupled method, in which the finite difference method is used for the flow in the vessels and the boundary element method is used for the flow in the tumour. When vessels meet each other at a junction, the pressure continuity and mass conservation are imposed at the junction. Three typical representative structures within the tumour vasculature, symmetrical dichotomous branching, asymmetrical bifurcation with uneven radius of daughter vessels and trifurcation, are investigated in detail as case studies. These results have demonstrated the features of tumour flow environment by the pressure distributions and flow velocity field. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  10. Tumor blood flow and pH changes after glucose administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Tupchong, L.; Leeper, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used a laser doppler technique to correlate blood flow changes with pH changes in human tumors after glucose ingestion. Three PTs with large superficial tumors ingested 100 gm glucose. A 21g needle pH electrode (Micro-electrodes, Inc.) and a 21g ''Laserflo'' fiberoptic laser doppler blood flow probe (TSI, Minneapolis, MN) were used at the same location. Blood glucose was measured by finger stick every 7.5 min. One PT with a squamous cell CA with extensive necrosis had only a small increase in blood glucose and an increase in tumor pH. Blood flow readings were within 6.4-18.4ml/100g/min. Another PT with a squamous CA had a drop in tumor pH (7.46 to 7.05) as blood glucose increased from 85 to 137 mg/dl by 55 min. Blood flow remained in a range of 7.7-13.8 ml/100g/min with a mean of 11.4. The third PT with a sarcoma had tumor pH and blood glucose measurements on two occasions, with similar results. Blood glucose rose from approx. 100 to 150 mg/dl by 52.5 min with a drop in tumor pH from approx. 7.4 to 7.25. On the second trial, tumor blood flow was measured and, while erratic (6.4-24.9ml/100g/min), decreased by approx. 50%. These preliminary data show that the laser doppler blood flow technique is quite sensitive to movement artifact and interference by free hemoglobin. Currently, it is inconclusive whether blood flow is altered with blood glucose and tumor pH changes. Further studies may prove this to be a valuable tool in predicting tumor response to hyperthermia

  11. A patient with Moyamoya-like vessels after radiation therapy for a tumor in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Koichi; Tomura, Noriaki; Kato, Koki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Watarai, Jiro; Sasajima, Toshio; Mizoi, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    A patient with Moyamoya-like vessels after radiation therapy for treatment of a tumor in the basal ganglia is reported. He was diagnosed as Down syndrome at birth. He had a tumor in the left basal ganglionic region at 12 years of the age. The tumor increased in size at age 14. He underwent cerebral angiography, which did not show a stenosis nor occlusion of the internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery, nor the middle cerebral artery. He received radiation therapy with a total dose of 56 Gy. He presented a dressing apraxia at age 19. MRI showed cerebral infarction in the left temporo-occipital region. Right internal carotid angiography revealed a severe stenosis of the internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery as well as a severe stenosis of the middle cerebral artery on the right side. Moyamoya-like vessels were seen in the basal ganglionic region. Left internal carotid angiography also showed a stenosis of the internal carotid artery and anterior cerebral artery as well as a severe stenosis of the middle cerebral artery on the left side. Moyamoya-like vessels were seen in the basal ganglionic region. Leptomeningeal anastomose and transdural anastomose were bilaterally seen. These arterial occlusion and stenotic phenomenon corresponded to a previous radiation field. These Moyamoya-like vessels with arterial stenosis and occlusion were thought to be due to radiation-induced vasculopathy, because a previous cerebral angiography showed a normal caliber of cerebral arteries. This patient showed that patients with radiation therapy in their early childhood should be carefully observed considering the possibility of the phenomenon. (author)

  12. Tie2-Expressing Monocytes Are Associated with Identification and Prognoses of Hepatitis B Virus Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Resection

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yi-Feng; Wang, Chao-Qun; Yu, Yao; Qian, Jing; Song, Kang; Sun, Qi-Man; Zhou, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Tie2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) are found in various tumors, involved in forming tumor blood vessels and expressing several important proangiogenic factors. The goals of this study were to evaluate the value of TEMs in diagnosing and predicting the prognosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Flow cytometry was performed to identify and count TEMs in peripheral blood monocytes from HCC patients (n = 84) receiving hepatectomy, HBV cirrhotic p...

  13. Turbulent flow in a vessel agitated by side entering inclined blade turbine with different diameter using CFD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathonah, N. N.; Nurtono, T.; Kusdianto; Winardi, S.

    2018-03-01

    Single phase turbulent flow in a vessel agitated by side entering inclined blade turbine has simulated using CFD. The aim of this work is to identify the hydrodynamic characteristics of a model vessel, which geometrical configuration is adopted at industrial scale. The laboratory scale model vessel is a flat bottomed cylindrical tank agitated by side entering 4-blade inclined blade turbine with impeller rotational speed N=100-400 rpm. The effect of the impeller diameter on fluid flow pattern has been investigated. The fluid flow patterns in a vessel is essentially characterized by the phenomena of macro-instabilities, i.e. the flow patterns change with large scale in space and low frequency. The intensity of fluid flow in the tank increase with the increase of impeller rotational speed from 100, 200, 300, and 400 rpm. It was accompanied by shifting the position of the core of circulation flow away from impeller discharge stream and approached the front of the tank wall. The intensity of fluid flow in the vessel increase with the increase of the impeller diameter from d=3 cm to d=4 cm.

  14. Assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall using four-dimensional flow MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Magnus; Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Dyverfeldt, Petter

    2017-06-01

    To explore the use of MR-estimated turbulence quantities for the assessment of turbulent flow effects on the vessel wall. Numerical velocity data for two patient-derived models was obtained using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for two physiological flow rates. The four-dimensional (4D) Flow MRI measurements were simulated at three different spatial resolutions and used to investigate the estimation of turbulent wall shear stress (tWSS) using the intravoxel standard deviation (IVSD) of velocity and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) estimated near the vessel wall. Accurate estimation of tWSS using the IVSD is limited by the spatial resolution achievable with 4D Flow MRI. TKE, estimated near the wall, has a strong linear relationship to the tWSS (mean R 2  = 0.84). Near-wall TKE estimates from MR simulations have good agreement to CFD-derived ground truth (mean R 2  = 0.90). Maps of near-wall TKE have strong visual correspondence to tWSS. Near-wall estimation of TKE permits assessment of relative maps of tWSS, but direct estimation of tWSS is challenging due to limitations in spatial resolution. Assessment of tWSS and near-wall TKE may open new avenues for analysis of different pathologies. Magn Reson Med 77:2310-2319, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Estimation of the flow resistances exerted in coronary arteries using a vessel length-based method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Ji, Yoon Cheol; Shin, Eun-Seok; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Sung Joon; Shim, Eun Bo

    2016-08-01

    Flow resistances exerted in the coronary arteries are the key parameters for the image-based computer simulation of coronary hemodynamics. The resistances depend on the anatomical characteristics of the coronary system. A simple and reliable estimation of the resistances is a compulsory procedure to compute the fractional flow reserve (FFR) of stenosed coronary arteries, an important clinical index of coronary artery disease. The cardiac muscle volume reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images has been used to assess the resistance of the feeding coronary artery (muscle volume-based method). In this study, we estimate the flow resistances exerted in coronary arteries by using a novel method. Based on a physiological observation that longer coronary arteries have more daughter branches feeding a larger mass of cardiac muscle, the method measures the vessel lengths from coronary angiogram or CT images (vessel length-based method) and predicts the coronary flow resistances. The underlying equations are derived from the physiological relation among flow rate, resistance, and vessel length. To validate the present estimation method, we calculate the coronary flow division over coronary major arteries for 50 patients using the vessel length-based method as well as the muscle volume-based one. These results are compared with the direct measurements in a clinical study. Further proving the usefulness of the present method, we compute the coronary FFR from the images of optical coherence tomography.

  16. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy: An emerging technique for intravital imaging of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates-only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment.

  17. Mechanism of occurrence of self-exciting sloshing in rectangular vessel by plane jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Masashi; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    1996-01-01

    FBRs have free liquid surfaces in reactor vessels and others, and it is expected that the flow velocity of liquid sodium coolant heightens accompanying the reduction of the reactor size. In the field where free liquid surface and high velocity flow exist, there is the possibility that various unstable phenomena occur on the liquid surface by the interference of the free liquid surface and flow. One example is the self-exciting sloshing by flow. In order to elucidate the mechanism of occurrence of the phenomena in a simple system, the experimental and analytical examinations were carried out on the self-exciting sloshing of free liquid surface in a rectangular vessel by plane jet flow. The basic oscillation characteristics of self-exciting sloshing were examined, and the physical quantities that control the occurrence of self-exciting sloshing were investigated by examining the effect in the case of changing the shapes of vessels. The experiments on the self-exciting sloshing in the case of vertical, horizontal and oblique plane jet flows are reported. The model for the occurrence of oscillation, in which the interaction of sloshing and jet variation was simplified, is proposed, and the verification of the model is reported. (K.I.)

  18. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Flow patterns on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography reveal flow directions at retinal vessel bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Anne; Li, Xiao Q; Munch, Inger C

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study intravascular characteristics of flowing blood in retinal vessels using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). METHODS: Examination of selected arterial bifurcations and venous sites of confluence in 25 healthy 11-year-old children recruited as an ad hoc subsample...

  20. The impact of including spatially longitudinal heterogeneities of vessel oxygen content and vascular fraction in 3D tumor oxygenation models on predicted radiation sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen distribution models have been used to analyze the influences of oxygen tensions on tissue response after radiotherapy. These distributions are often generated assuming constant oxygen tension in the blood vessels. However, as red blood cells progress through the vessels, oxygen is continuously released into the plasma and the surrounding tissue, resulting in longitudinally varying oxygen levels in the blood vessels. In the present study, the authors investigated whether a tumor oxygenation model that incorporated longitudinally varying oxygen levels would provide different predictions of necrotic fractions and radiosensitivity compared to commonly used models with a constant oxygen pressure. Our models simulated oxygen diffusion based on a Green's function approach and oxygen consumption according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The authors constructed tumor models with different vascular fractions (VFs), from which they generated depth oxygenation curves and a look-up table of oxygen pressure gradients. The authors evaluated models of spherical tumors of various sizes, from 1 to 10(4) mg. The authors compared the results from a model with constant vessel oxygen (CVO) pressure to those from models with longitudinal variations in oxygen saturation and either a constant VF (CVF) or variable VF (VVF) within the tumor tissue. The authors monitored the necrotic fractions, defined as tumor regions with an oxygen pressure below 1 mmHg. Tumor radiation sensitivity was expressed as D99, the homogeneous radiation dose required for a tumor control probability of 0.99. In the CVO saturation model, no necrosis was observed, and decreasing the VF could only decrease the D99 by up to 10%. Furthermore, the D99 vs VF dependence was similar for different tumor masses. Compared to the CVO model, the extended CVF and VVF models provided clearly different results, including pronounced effects of VF and tumor size on the necrotic fraction and D99, necrotic fractions ranging

  1. Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow in VX2 tumor transplanted in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, Takeshi

    1994-01-01

    Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow was evaluated using VX 2 rabbit carcinoma in both legs. Microwave energy at 2450 MHz was used to heat tumors for 40 minutes. An outer canula of 18 G Erasta was implanted in the depth of 2 cm in tumor to measure the temperature and to maintain at 43.0degC-44.0degC. The blood flow in tumors was evaluated by color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI. Disturbance of blood flow in the depth of surface 0 cm to 2 cm in tumors was showed at 10 minutes starting 43.0degC heating and at almost all sites disappearance of blood flow was showed at 40 minutes using color doppler flow imaging. But the blood flow beyond the depth of 2 cm was not so disturbed at 40 minutes, relatively. After hyperthermia T1WI and T2WI in heated tumor were no difference comparing with those in control tumor, but heated tumor showed no enhancement using dynamic MRI with TURBO-FLASH technique and post-enhanced T1WI. Histologically, there was extensive tumor necrosis and thrombus formation in heated tumor after 3 days and 1 week. Therefore color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI were considered to be useful for evaluation of blood flow in tumor after and during hyperthermia. (author)

  2. The usefulness of US with contrast agent on breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hye An; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hak Hee; Son, Sang Bum; Byun, Jae Young; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Sung Tae; Kim, Choon Yul

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of US with contrast agent breast tumors. Fifteen breast tumors in fourteen patients underwent color Doppler US before and after intravenous injection of a microbubble contrast agent (Levovist, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany). Benign lesions were 8 and malignant lesions were 7 among these. Real-time power Doppler ultrasonographic images were recorded on a videotape and representative images were color-printed. Tumor vascularity was analyzed on real-time images in regard to its presence or absence, and changes in diameter and number of vessels, presence or absence of blush around the vessels. Two observers reached a consensus. Results of malignant tumors were compared with those of benign tumors. Color Doppler signal intensity increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Number of vessel increased in 9 of 15 cases (60%) and diameter of vessel increased in 12 of 15 cases (80%). Vascular blush around the enhanced vessel was present in 5 of 15 patients (53%). Color Doppler signal increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Number of vessel increased in 4 of 8 benign lesion (50%) and 5 of 7 malignant lesions (71%). Diameter of vessel increased in 5 of 8 benign lesions (63%) and 7 of 7 malignant lesions (100%). Blush around the enhanced vessel was present in one of 8 benign lesions (13%) and 4 of 7 malignant lesions (57%). The time to peak enhancement was shorter in malignant cases (mean=45 sec) than benign cases (mean=82 sec). US with contrast agent on breast tumors is effective to detect blood flow within the mass and may be helpful to differentiate malignant from benign lesions.

  3. Induction of selective blood-tumor barrier permeability and macromolecular transport by a biostable kinin B1 receptor agonist in a glioma rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Jérôme; Bovenzi, Veronica; Savard, Martin; Dubuc, Céléna; Fortier, Audrey; Neugebauer, Witold; Tremblay, Luc; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Tsanaclis, Ana-Maria; Lepage, Martin; Fortin, David; Gobeil, Fernand

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB). B1 receptors (B1R), inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg(9)BK (LDBK) and SarLys[dPhe(8)]desArg(9)BK (NG29), in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer) at tumoral sites (T(1)-weighted imaging). These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry). We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peri)tumoral sites.

  4. Characterizing the flow of stirred vessels with anchor type impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.C. Peixoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in chemical industries, there are few works which studies anchor type impellers and only a fraction of the works investigate these systems under a computational approach. The great majority refers to turbine impellers, specially Rushton turbines, under turbulent flow. Anchor impellers are used specially for highly viscous flow, typical of polymer reactions. The viscosity is normally in the range 1000-10000 cp. Since this range of viscosity describe highly viscous flows, the reactions for anchor agitated systems are normally carried out under laminar flow. This work presents a detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach to study the behaviour of stirred vessels using anchor impellers. The axial plane of the tank, which is being modelled, is divided into small control volumes, which collectively is referred to as the mesh, or grid. In each of these cells the momentum balance, energy and mass conservation, which describes the model, are rewritten algebraically using the finite volumes method to relate such variables as velocity, pressure and temperature to values in neighbouring cells. The equations are then solved numerically, and the results yield the flow corresponding to the model. Since the geometry of a vessel with anchor impellers strictly calls for a three dimensional method, an approximation is made to account for the effect of the blades (Kuncewics, 1992. The main objective of this work is to give a detailed description of the flow generated by this axial impeller with a view to indicate ways in which the design and operation of these systems can be improved.

  5. Tumor blood flow modifying effects of electrochemotherapy. A potential vascular targeted mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sersa, G.; Cemazar, M.; Miklavcic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine the tumor blood flow modifying, and potential vascular targeted effect of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin or cisplatin. Materials and methods. Electrochemotherapy was performed by application of short intense electric pulses to the tumors after systemic administration of bleomycin or cisplatin. Evaluated were antitumor effectiveness of electrochemotherapy by tumor measurement, tumor blood flow modifying effect by Patent blue staining technique, and sensitivity of endothelial and tumor cells to the drugs and electrochemotherapy by clonogenicity assay. Results. Electrochemotherapy was effective in treatment of SA-1 tumors in A/J mice resulting in substantial tumor growth delay and also tumor cures. Tumor blood flow reduction following electrochemotherapy correlated well with its antitumor effectiveness. Virtually complete shut down of the tumor blood flow was observed already at 24 h after electrochemotherapy with bleomycin whereas only 50% reduction was observed after electrochemotherapy with cisplatin. Sensitivity of human endothelial HMEC-1 cells to electrochemotherapy suggests a vascular targeted effect for electrochemotherapy in vivo with bleomycin as well as with cisplatin. Conclusion. These results show that, in addition to direct electroporation of tumor cells, other vascular targeted mechanisms are involved in electrochemotherapy with bleomycin or cisplatin, potentially mediated by tumor blood flow reduction, and enhanced tumor cell death as a result of endothelial damage by electrochemotherapy. (author)

  6. Wide-field absolute transverse blood flow velocity mapping in vessel centerline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nanshou; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Bifeng; Guan, Caizhong; Wang, Mingyi; Han, Dingan; Tan, Haishu; Zeng, Yaguang

    2018-02-01

    We propose a wide-field absolute transverse blood flow velocity measurement method in vessel centerline based on absorption intensity fluctuation modulation effect. The difference between the light absorption capacities of red blood cells and background tissue under low-coherence illumination is utilized to realize the instantaneous and average wide-field optical angiography images. The absolute fuzzy connection algorithm is used for vessel centerline extraction from the average wide-field optical angiography. The absolute transverse velocity in the vessel centerline is then measured by a cross-correlation analysis according to instantaneous modulation depth signal. The proposed method promises to contribute to the treatment of diseases, such as those related to anemia or thrombosis.

  7. Anti-tumor angiogenesis effect of aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin against B16-BL6 melanoma cells orthotopically implanted into syngeneic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aozuka, Yasushi; Koizumi, Keiichi; Saitoh, Yurika; Ueda, Yasuji; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saiki, Ikuo

    2004-12-08

    We investigated the effect of bestatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 and aminopeptidase B, on the angiogenesis induced by B16-BL6 melanoma cells. Oral administration of bestatin (100-200 mg/kg/day) was found to significantly inhibit the melanoma cell-induced angiogenesis in a mouse dorsal air sac assay. Additionally, anti-APN/CD13 mAb (WM15), which neutralizes the aminopeptidase activity in tumor cells, as well as bestatin inhibited the tube-like formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Furthermore, the intraperitoneal administration of bestatin (50-100 mg/kg/day) after the orthotopic implantation of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into mice reduced the number of vessels oriented towards the established primary tumor mass on the dorsal side of mice. These findings suggest that bestatin is an active anti-angiogenic agent that may inhibit tumor angiogenesis in vivo and tube-like formation of endothelial cells in vitro through its inhibition of APN/CD13 activity.

  8. Optically measured microvascular blood flow contrast of malignant breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regine Choe

    Full Text Available Microvascular blood flow contrast is an important hemodynamic and metabolic parameter with potential to enhance in vivo breast cancer detection and therapy monitoring. Here we report on non-invasive line-scan measurements of malignant breast tumors with a hand-held optical probe in the remission geometry. The probe employs diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS, a near-infrared optical method that quantifies deep tissue microvascular blood flow. Tumor-to-normal perfusion ratios are derived from thirty-two human subjects. Mean (95% confidence interval tumor-to-normal ratio using surrounding normal tissue was 2.25 (1.92-2.63; tumor-to-normal ratio using normal tissues at the corresponding tumor location in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.94-2.66, and using normal tissue in the contralateral breast was 2.27 (1.90-2.70. Thus, the mean tumor-to-normal ratios were significantly different from unity irrespective of the normal tissue chosen, implying that tumors have significantly higher blood flow than normal tissues. Therefore, the study demonstrates existence of breast cancer contrast in blood flow measured by DCS. The new, optically accessible cancer contrast holds potential for cancer detection and therapy monitoring applications, and it is likely to be especially useful when combined with diffuse optical spectroscopy/tomography.

  9. An Approach for Selection of Flow Regime and Models for Conservative Evaluation of a Vessel Integrity Monitoring System for Water-Cooled Vacuum Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pointer, W. David; Ruggles, Arthur E.

    2003-01-01

    Thin-walled vacuum containment vessels cooled by circulating water jackets are often utilized in research and industrial applications where isolation of equipment or experiments from the influences of the surrounding environment is desirable. The development of leaks in these vessels can result in costly downtime for the facility. A Vessel Integrity Monitoring System (VIMS) is developed to detect leak formation and estimate the size of the leak to allow evaluation of the risk associated with continued operation. A wide range of leak configurations and fluid flow phenomena are considered in the evaluation of the rate at which a tracer gas dissolved in the cooling jacket water is transported into the vacuum vessel. A methodology is presented that uses basic fluid flow models and careful evaluation of their ranges of applicability to provide a conservative estimate of the transport rates for the tracer gas and hence the time required for the VIMS to detect a leak of a given size

  10. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisel, M.A.; Laug, W.E.; Stowe, S.M.; Jones, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow in various types of brain tumor. Effect of the space-occupying lesion on blood flow in brain tissue close to and remote from tumor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, K; Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 23 patients with brain tumors using the 133Xe intra-carotid injection method and a 254 channel gamma camera. The glioblastomas (4) and astrocytomas (4) all showed hyperemia in the tumor and tumor-near region. This was also seen in several...... meningiomas (4 of 7 cases) in which most of the tumor itself did not receive any isotope. Brain metastases (6) usually had a low flow in the tumor and tumor-near region. The glioblastomas tended to show markedly bending 133Xe wash-out curves pointing to pronounced heterogeneity of blood flow. Most of the flow...... maps, regardless of the tumor types, showed widespread abnormalities of rCBF not only in the tumor region but also in the region remote from the tumor. It is concluded that measurement of rCBF cannot yield accurate differential diagnostic information, but that the widespread derangement of the brain...

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Bingham Plastic Model of Blood Flow Through Stenotic Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Verma

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the axially symmetric, laminar, steady, one-dimensional flow of blood through narrow stenotic vessel. Blood is considered as Bingham plastic fluid. The analytical results such as pressure drop, resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been obtained. Effect of yield stress and shape of stenosis on resistance to flow and wall shear stress have been discussed through tables and graphically. It has been shown that resistance to flow and th...

  13. Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging of meningioma and other intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Hunt, Christopher H; Nathan, Mark A; Parisi, Joseph E; Boeve, Bradley F; Murray, Melissa E; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Lowe, Val J; Johnson, Geoffrey B

    2018-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumors. Diagnosis by MRI is generally straightforward, but lack of imaging specificity can present a diagnostic dilemma, particularly in patients with cancer. We report our experience with meningioma identification on Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET/CT. Patients who underwent PiB PET/CT from 2006 to 2015 were reviewed to identify those with intracranial tumors. Tumor types were classified by MR appearance, or by pathology when available. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) measurements of tumor PiB activity were compared across tumor types. 2472 patients underwent PiB PET/CT in the period of interest; 45 patients (1.8%) had probable or definite intracranial tumor. Tumor types were meningioma (29/45, 64%), vestibular schwannoma (7/45, 16%), pituitary macroadenoma (4/45, 9%), metastatic disease (2/45, 4%), and others (3/45, 7%). In patients with meningioma, the mean lesion SUVmax was 2.05 (SD 1.37), versus 1.00 (SD 0.42) in patients with non-meningioma tumors (p < 0.01). A receiver operating curve was created for lesion:cerebellum SUVmax ratio, with an area under the curve of 0.91 for a value of 1.68. At or above this ratio, specificity for meningioma was 100% (95% CI 79-100%) and sensitivity was 76% (95% CI 57-90%). PiB PET activity within an intracranial tumor is a highly specific and reasonably sensitive marker of meningioma. Further prospective evaluation is warranted to validate this result as well as to assess the performance of commercially available beta-amyloid radiotracers in meningioma identification.

  14. Study of B7.1 costimulatory molecule neoexpression induced by γ irradiation of different dose in various human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianghua; Su Liaoyuan; Tong Jian; Zhu Minqing; Xue Lian

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between irradiation and B7.1 co-stimulative molecule expression of human tumor cells was studied to explore the reason of enhanced tumor cells immunity. The effect of γ ray irradiation on B7.1 molecule expression in various human tumor cells which were irradiated with 30 Gy, 40 Gy, 50 Gy, 60 Gy γ ray was investigated. At 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h after irradiation the changes of B7.1 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique. The activation of lymphocyte toxin upon tumor target cell after exposure was determined by using radiation release method. The results showed that a few of tumor cells after γ-ray irradiation express B7.1 co-stimulative molecule. Furthermore, B7.1 molecule membrane expression after γ ray irradiation is shown to enhance the activation of lymphocyte toxin. The data could explain the enhanced immunogenicity of tumor cells after irradiation, and could lead to new immunotherapy protocols. The experiments suggested that γ ray irradiation could induce human tumor cells to express B7.1 co-stimulative molecules and enhance tumor cell immunity

  15. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. - Highlights: • Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells. • Oroxin B significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice.

  16. Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrently inhibits tumor-adaptive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells for effective anti-lymphoma therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping; Fu, Shilong; Cao, Zhifei; Liao, Huaidong; Huo, Zihe; Pan, Yanyan; Zhang, Gaochuan; Gao, Aidi; Zhou, Quansheng, E-mail: zhouqs@suda.edu.cn

    2015-10-15

    Cancer cells have both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress machineries that determine cell fate. In malignant tumors including lymphoma, constant activation of tumor-adaptive ER stress and concurrent reduction of tumor-suppressive ER stress favors cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. Current ER stress-based anti-tumor drugs typically activate both tumor-adaptive and -suppressive ER stresses, resulting in low anti-cancer efficacy; hence, selective induction of tumor-suppressive ER stress and inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress are new strategies for novel anti-cancer drug discovery. Thus far, specific tumor-suppressive ER stress therapeutics have remained absent in clinical settings. In this study, we explored unique tumor-suppressive ER stress agents from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Oroxylum indicum, and found that a small molecule oroxin B selectively induced tumor-suppressive ER stress in malignant lymphoma cells, but not in normal cells, effectively inhibited lymphoma growth in vivo, and significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice without obvious toxicity. Mechanistic studies have revealed that the expression of key tumor-adaptive ER-stress gene GRP78 was notably suppressed by oroxin B via down-regulation of up-stream key signaling protein ATF6, while tumor-suppressive ER stress master gene DDIT3 was strikingly activated through activating the MKK3-p38 signaling pathway, correcting the imbalance between tumor-suppressive DDIT3 and tumor-adaptive GRP78 in lymphoma. Together, selective induction of unique tumor-suppressive ER stress and concurrent inhibition of tumor-adaptive ER stress in malignant lymphoma are new and feasible approaches for novel anti-lymphoma drug discovery and anti-lymphoma therapy. - Highlights: • Oroxin B selectively induces tumor-suppressive ER stress in B-lymphoma cells. • Oroxin B significantly prolonged overall survival of lymphoma-xenografted mice.

  17. Neutrophils responsive to endogenous IFN-beta regulate tumor angiogenesis and growth in a mouse tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jadwiga; Leschner, Sara; Westphal, Kathrin; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried

    2010-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of malignant neoplasias, as the formation of new blood vessels is required for tumors to acquire oxygen and nutrients essential for their continued growth and metastasis. However, the signaling pathways leading to tumor vascularization are not fully understood. Here, using a transplantable mouse tumor model, we have demonstrated that endogenous IFN-beta inhibits tumor angiogenesis through repression of genes encoding proangiogenic and homing factors in tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. We determined that IFN-beta-deficient mice injected with B16F10 melanoma or MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells developed faster-growing tumors with better-developed blood vessels than did syngeneic control mice. These tumors displayed enhanced infiltration by CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils expressing elevated levels of the genes encoding the proangiogenic factors VEGF and MMP9 and the homing receptor CXCR4. They also expressed higher levels of the transcription factors c-myc and STAT3, known regulators of VEGF, MMP9, and CXCR4. In vitro, treatment of these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils with low levels of IFN-beta restored expression of proangiogenic factors to control levels. Moreover, depletion of these neutrophils inhibited tumor growth in both control and IFN-beta-deficient mice. We therefore suggest that constitutively produced endogenous IFN-beta is an important mediator of innate tumor surveillance. Further, we believe our data help to explain the therapeutic effect of IFN treatment during the early stages of cancer development.

  18. Visualization of flow patterns in shaking vessels with various geometry; Shushu no kika keijo wo motsu yodo kakuhan sonai no ryudo jotai no kashika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Y; Hiraoka, S; Tada, Y; Ue, T [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Koh, S [Toyo Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Lee, Y [Keimyung University, (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-10

    The flow patterns in shaking vessels with various geometries were visualized with a tracer method using aluminum powder. The spherical and conical vessels were effective for the shake mixing in the same manner as the cylindrical vessel, because these vessels have circular cross sections that develop the rotational flow. Neither a rectangular vessel nor a cylindrical vessel with baffles should be used for shake mixing, because rotational flows are not developed in these vessels. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  19. An investigation of the flow dependence of temperature gradients near large vessels during steady state and transient tissue heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolios, M.C.; Worthington, A.E.; Hunt, J.W.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Sherar, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    Temperature distributions measured during thermal therapy are a major prognostic factor of the efficacy and success of the procedure. Thermal models are used to predict the temperature elevation of tissues during heating. Theoretical work has shown that blood flow through large blood vessels plays an important role in determining temperature profiles of heated tissues. In this paper, an experimental investigation of the effects of large vessels on the temperature distribution of heated tissue is performed. The blood flow dependence of steady state and transient temperature profiles created by a cylindrical conductive heat source and an ultrasound transducer were examined using a fixed porcine kidney as a flow model. In the transient experiments, a 20 s pulse of hot water, 30 deg. C above ambient, heated the tissues. Temperatures were measured at selected locations in steps of 0.1 mm. It was observed that vessels could either heat or cool tissues depending on the orientation of the vascular geometry with respect to the heat source and that these effects are a function of flow rate through the vessels. Temperature gradients of 6 deg. C mm -1 close to large vessels were routinely measured. Furthermore, it was observed that the temperature gradients caused by large vessels depended on whether the heating source was highly localized (i.e. a hot needle) or more distributed (i.e. external ultrasound). The gradients measured near large vessels during localized heating were between two and three times greater than the gradients measured during ultrasound heating at the same location, for comparable flows. Moreover, these gradients were more sensitive to flow variations for the localized needle heating. X-ray computed tomography data of the kidney vasculature were in good spatial agreement with the locations of all of the temperature variations measured. The three-dimensional vessel path observed could account for the complex features of the temperature profiles. The flow

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of absolute blood flow velocity and blood vessel position under low blood flow velocity based on Doppler signal information included in scattered light from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Tajiri, Tomoki; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2017-11-01

    The development of a system for in vivo visualization of occluded distal blood vessels for diabetic patients is the main target of our research. We herein describe two-beam multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (MLDV), which measures the instantaneous multipoint flow velocity and can be used to observe the blood flow velocity in peripheral blood vessels. By including a motorized stage to shift the measurement points horizontally and in the depth direction while measuring the velocity, the path of the blood vessel in the skin could be observed using blood flow velocity in three-dimensional space. The relationship of the signal power density between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissues was shown and helped us identify the position of the blood vessel. Two-beam MLDV can be used to simultaneously determine the absolute blood flow velocity distribution and identify the blood vessel position in skin.

  1. Study of blood flow inside the stenosis vessel under the effect of solenoid magnetic field using ferrohydrodynamics principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badfar, Homayoun; Motlagh, Saber Yekani; Sharifi, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, biomagnetic blood flow in the stenosis vessel under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field is studied using the ferrohydrodynamics (FHD) model. The parabolic profile is considered at an inlet of the axisymmetric stenosis vessel. Blood is modeled as electrically non-conducting, Newtonian and homogeneous fluid. Finite volume and the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure Linked Equations) algorithm are utilized to discretize governing equations. The investigation is studied at different magnetic numbers ( MnF=164, 328, 1640 and 3280) and the number of the coil loops (three, five and nine loops). Results indicate an increase in heat transfer, wall shear stress and energy loss (pressure drop) with an increment in the magnetic number (ratio of Kelvin force to dynamic pressure force), arising from the FHD, and the number of solenoid loops. Furthermore, the flow pattern is affected by the magnetic field, and the temperature of blood can be decreased up to 1.48 {}°C under the effect of the solenoid magnetic field with nine loops and reference magnetic field ( B0) of 2 tesla.

  2. Induction of selective blood-tumor barrier permeability and macromolecular transport by a biostable kinin B1 receptor agonist in a glioma rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Côté

    Full Text Available Treatment of malignant glioma with chemotherapy is limited mostly because of delivery impediment related to the blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB. B1 receptors (B1R, inducible prototypical G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR can regulate permeability of vessels including possibly that of brain tumors. Here, we determine the extent of BTB permeability induced by the natural and synthetic peptide B1R agonists, LysdesArg(9BK (LDBK and SarLys[dPhe(8]desArg(9BK (NG29, in syngeneic F98 glioma-implanted Fischer rats. Ten days after tumor inoculation, we detected the presence of B1R on tumor cells and associated vasculature. NG29 infusion increased brain distribution volume and uptake profiles of paramagnetic probes (Magnevist and Gadomer at tumoral sites (T(1-weighted imaging. These effects were blocked by B1R antagonist and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but not by B2R antagonist and non-selective nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. Consistent with MRI data, systemic co-administration of NG29 improved brain tumor delivery of Carboplatin chemotherapy (ICP-Mass spectrometry. We also detected elevated B1R expression in clinical samples of high-grade glioma. Our results documented a novel GPCR-signaling mechanism for promoting transient BTB disruption, involving activation of B1R and ensuing production of COX metabolites. They also underlined the potential value of synthetic biostable B1R agonists as selective BTB modulators for local delivery of different sized-therapeutics at (peritumoral sites.

  3. Role of blood flow and blood flow modifiers in clinical hyperthermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the effect of localized magnetic-loop hyperthermia on blood flow was performed on 12 patients (19 tumor studies) using the Xenon-133 clearance method. After it was discovered that blood flow in most of the tumors increased in response to needle injection, a physiologically based, one compartment model was developed that included both a hyperemic (transient) and a steady state component. In the tumors of six patients, increases in blood flow induced by heat were also observed. The same model was used to describe the measured clearance data for both types of hyperemic response. The ability of tumor vessels to respond dynamically to stress and the degree of response may be predictive of tumor heating efficiency and subsequent therapeutic response. Many tumors treated by hyperthermia, therefore, do not reach therapeutic temperatures (42 0 C). One explanation for this may be that some tumors react to thermal stress in a manner similar to normal tissues; i.e., they increase blood flow during hyperthermia in order to dissipate heat. Higher temperatures might be achieved in these heat-resistant tumors by administering vasoconstrictive agents in an effort to reduce blood flow. In the second part of this research study, the extent to which pharmacologic inhibition of local blood flow might allow higher temperatures to develop in normal muscles exposed to localized radiofrequency hyperthermia was determined. It was found that the local muscle temperature rise could be increased by at least 90% in dogs and rabbits with the use of a local vasoconstrictive drug

  4. La citometría de flujo en el estudio de tumores mediastinales ricos en elementos linfoides Flow cytometry for the study of mediastinal tumors with abundant lymphoid elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Vides Almonacid

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available El mediastino anterior es un sitio frecuente de localización de tumores ricos en elementos linfoides. La identificación correcta de cada entidad es de importancia en el tratamiento de los pacientes. En ocasiones puede plantearse el diagnóstico diferencial entre timoma y linfoma linfoblástico con fenotipo de precursor T (LLB-T. La Citometría de Flujo (CF es una técnica complementaria útil para estos tumores de la cual se obtiene información cualitativa y cuantitativa. Revisamos 38 tumores mediastinales que tenían estudio de CF. Además comparamos los resultados de CF de timomas y tejido tímico normal con 42 casos de LLB-T de otras localizaciones anatómicas. De los 38 tumores mediastinales 6 eran lesiones benignas, 9 linfomas difusos de células grandes con fenotipo B (LDCG-B, 10 linfomas de Hodgkin (LH, 11 timomas y 2 LLB-T. En 24 casos la CF aportó información positiva, definiendo el inmunofenotipo de las células linfoides neoplásicas, o los linfocitos característicos que acompañan a los timomas. La CF en los 10 casos de LH y en 4 lesiones benignas permitió descartar otros tipos de linfoma (LDCG-B, LLB-T, etc.. Las marcaciones para CD3, CD4 y CD8 fueron las más útiles para el diagnóstico diferencial entre timomas y LLB-T. En conclusión, la CF es una técnica complementaria de utilidad que aporta información en lesiones mediastinales de manera rápida, requiriendo cantidades pequeñas de material, tanto para el diagnóstico inicial como para el monitoreo de estas enfermedades.The anterior mediastinum is a common site of tumors with abundant lymphoid elements. Flow cytometry is a useful complementary technique to analyze this type of tumors, which provides qualitative and quantitative information. A differential diagnosis can be sometimes made between thymoma and precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL. Correct identification is of utmost importance for patient treatment. A total of 38 mediastinal tumors were analyzed, and

  5. Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical structures were investigated in an elastic 180° curved pipe with and without torsion under steady and pulsatile flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The elastic thin-walled curved pipes were constructed using Sylgard 184, and inserted into a bath of refractive index matched fluid to perform PIV. A vortex identification method was employed to identify various vortical structures in the flow. The secondary flow structures in the planar compliant model with dilatation of 0.61%-3.23% under pulsatile flow rate were compared with the rigid vessel model results, and it was found that local vessel compliance has a negligible effect on secondary flow morphology. The secondary flow structures were found to be more sensitive to out of plane curvature (torsion) than to vessel compliance. Torsion distorts the symmetry of secondary flow and results in more complex vortical structures in both steady and pulsatile flows. In high Re number steady flow with torsion, a single dominant vortical structure can be detected at the middle of the 90° cross section. In pulsatile flow with torsion, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together. supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  6. Vessel abnormalization: another hallmark of cancer? Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, Katrien; Cauwenberghs, Sandra; Carmeliet, Peter

    2011-02-01

    As a result of excessive production of angiogenic molecules, tumor vessels become abnormal in structure and function. By impairing oxygen delivery, abnormal vessels fuel a vicious cycle of non-productive angiogenesis, which creates a hostile microenvironment from where tumor cells escape through leaky vessels and which renders tumors less responsive to chemoradiation. While anti-angiogenic strategies focused on inhibiting new vessel growth and destroying pre-existing vessels, clinical studies showed modest anti-tumor effects. For many solid tumors, anti-VEGF treatment offers greater clinical benefit when combined with chemotherapy. This is partly due to a normalization of the tumor vasculature, which improves cytotoxic drug delivery and efficacy and offers unprecedented opportunities for anti-cancer treatment. Here, we overview key novel molecular players that induce vessel normalization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Through Capacity Model for One-way Channel Based on Characteristics of the Vessel Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Nie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vessel traffic flow is a key parameter for channel-through capacity and is of great significance to vessel traffic management, channel and port design and navigational risk evaluation. Based on the study of parameters of characteristics of vessel traffic flow related to channel-through capacity, this paper puts forward a brand-new mathematical model for one-way channel-through capacity in which parameters of channel length, vessel arrival rate and velocity difference in different vessels are involved and a theoretical calculating mechanism for the channel-through capacity is provided. In order to verify availability and reliability of the model, extensive simulation studies have been carried out and based on the historical AIS data, an analytical case study on the Xiazhimen Channel validating the proposed model is presented. Both simulation studies and the case study show that the proposed model is valid and all relative parameters can be readjusted and optimized to further improve the channel-through capacity. Thus, all studies demonstrate that the model is valuable for channel design and vessel management.

  8. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or

  9. Transient mild hyperthermia induces E-selectin mediated localization of mesoporous silicon vectors in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson K Kirui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperthermia treatment has been explored as a strategy to overcome biological barriers that hinder effective drug delivery in solid tumors. Most studies have used mild hyperthermia treatment (MHT to target the delivery of thermo-sensitive liposomes carriers. Others have studied its application to permeabilize tumor vessels and improve tumor interstitial transport. However, the role of MHT in altering tumor vessel interfacial and adhesion properties and its relationship to improved delivery has not been established. In the present study, we evaluated effects of MHT treatment on tumor vessel flow dynamics and expression of adhesion molecules and assessed enhancement in particle localization using mesoporous silicon vectors (MSVs. We also determined the optimal time window at which maximal accumulation occur. RESULTS: In this study, using intravital microscopy analyses, we showed that temporal mild hyperthermia (∼1 W/cm(2 amplified delivery and accumulation of MSVs in orthotopic breast cancer tumors. The number of discoidal MSVs (1000×400 nm adhering to tumor vasculature increased 6-fold for SUM159 tumors and 3-fold for MCF-7 breast cancer tumors. By flow chamber experiments and Western blotting, we established that a temporal increase in E-selectin expression correlated with enhanced particle accumulation. Furthermore, MHT treatment was shown to increase tumor perfusion in a time-dependent fashion. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that well-timed mild hyperthermia treatment can transiently elevate tumor transport and alter vascular adhesion properties and thereby provides a means to enhance tumor localization of non-thermally sensitive particles such as MSVs. Such enhancement in accumulation could be leveraged to increase therapeutic efficacy and reduce drug dosing in cancer therapy.

  10. Robo4 maintains vessel integrity and inhibits angiogenesis by interacting with UNC5B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Alexander W; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Tong, Raymond K; Kowalski, Joe; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Bouvrée, Karine; Stawicki, Scott; Nicholes, Katrina; Rathore, Nisha; Scales, Suzie J; Luis, Elizabeth; del Toro, Raquel; Freitas, Catarina; Bréant, Christiane; Michaud, Annie; Corvol, Pierre; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Wu, Yan; Peale, Franklin; Watts, Ryan J; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Bagri, Anil; Eichmann, Anne

    2011-01-18

    Robo4 is an endothelial cell-specific member of the Roundabout axon guidance receptor family. To identify Robo4 binding partners, we performed a protein-protein interaction screen with the Robo4 extracellular domain. We find that Robo4 specifically binds to UNC5B, a vascular Netrin receptor, revealing unexpected interactions between two endothelial guidance receptors. We show that Robo4 maintains vessel integrity by activating UNC5B, which inhibits signaling downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Function-blocking monoclonal antibodies against Robo4 and UNC5B increase angiogenesis and disrupt vessel integrity. Soluble Robo4 protein inhibits VEGF-induced vessel permeability and rescues barrier defects in Robo4(-/-) mice, but not in mice treated with anti-UNC5B. Thus, Robo4-UNC5B signaling maintains vascular integrity by counteracting VEGF signaling in endothelial cells, identifying a novel function of guidance receptor interactions in the vasculature. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. B7-H3 in tumors: friend or foe for tumor immunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; Quan, Yanchun; Che, Fengyuan; Wang, Lijuan

    2018-02-01

    B7-H3 is a type I transmembrane co-stimulatory molecule of the B7 family. B7-H3 mRNA is widely distributed in most tissues; however, B7-H3 protein is not constitutively expressed. Few molecules have been shown to mediate the regulation of B7-H3 expression, and their regulatory mechanisms remain unexplored. Recently, TREM-like transcript 2 (TLT-2) has been identified as a potential receptor of B7-H3. However, TLT-2 may not be the only receptor of B7-H3, as B7-H3 has many contradictory roles. As a co-stimulatory molecule, B7-H3 increases the proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and enhances cytotoxic T-cell activity. However, greatly increased T-cell proliferation and IL-2 levels have been observed in the absence of B7-H3. Thus far, it has been shown that various tumors test positive for B7-H3 expression and that B7-H3 levels correlate with tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, malignant stage, and recurrence rate. Furthermore, transfection of cells with a B7-H3 plasmid and treatment with monoclonal antibodies to block B7-H3 are the main immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. Several groups have generated anti-B7-H3 antibodies and observed tumor growth suppression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it is likely that B7-H3 plays an important role in cancer diagnosis and treatment, aside from its role as a co-stimulatory molecule.

  12. Validated automated ultrasonic inspections of the Sizewell 'B' reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikstra, B.J.; Farley, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Automated ultrasonic inspection was applied extensively during manufacture of the RPV for Sizewell 'B'. This was an important element of the safety case presented at the Sizewell 'B' public enquiry. This requirement reflected concern in the United Kingdom as to the effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic inspections. By applying automated inspections in addition to the manual ultrasonic inspection carried out by the vessel manufacturer, the overall reliability of the inspection of the vessel would be considerably enhanced. The automated inspections carried out in the manufacturer's workshops were termed 'automated shop inspections' (ASIs). The ASIs were carried out in two contracts: the first to inspect the component forgings of the RPV, the second to inspect the pressure retaining welds. (author)

  13. Hybrid PIV-PTV technique for measuring blood flow in rat mesenteric vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-11-01

    The micro-particle tracking velocimetry (μ-PTV) technique is used to obtain the velocity fields of blood flow in the microvasculature under in vivo conditions because it can provide the blood velocity distribution in microvessels with high spatial resolution. The in vivo μ-PTV technique usually requires a few to tens of seconds to obtain a whole velocity profile across the vessel diameter because of the limited number density of tracer particles under in vivo conditions. Thus, the μ-PTV technique alone is limited in measuring unsteady blood flows that fluctuate irregularly due to the heart beating and muscle movement in surrounding tissues. In this study, a new hybrid PIV-PTV technique was established by combining PTV and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques to resolve the drawbacks of the μ-PTV method in measuring blood flow in microvessels under in vivo conditions. Images of red blood cells (RBCs) and fluorescent particles in rat mesenteric vessels were obtained simultaneously. Temporal variations of the centerline blood velocity were monitored using a fast Fourier transform-based cross-correlation PIV method. The fluorescence particle images were analyzed using the μ-PTV technique to extract the spatial distribution of the velocity vectors. Data from the μ-PTV and PIV methods were combined to obtain a better estimate of the velocity profile in actual blood flow. This technique will be useful in investigating hemodynamics in microcirculation by measuring unsteady irregular blood flows more accurately. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Vascular thermal adaptation in tumors and normal tissue in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nah, Byung Sik; Choi, Ihl-Bohng; Oh, Won Young; Osborn, James L.; Song, Chang W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The vascular thermal adaptation in the R3230 adenocarcinoma, skin and muscle in the legs of Fischer rats was studied. Methods and Materials: The legs of Fischer rats bearing the R3230 AC adenocarcinoma (subcutaneously) were heated once or twice with a water bath, and the blood flow in the tumor, skin and muscle of the legs was measured with the radioactive microsphere method. Results: The blood flow in control R3230 AC tumors was 23.9 ml/100 g/min. The tumor blood flow increased about 1.5 times in 30 min and then markedly decreased upon heating at 44.5 deg. C for 90 min. In the tumors preheated 16 h earlier at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min, reheating at 44.5 deg. C increased the tumor blood flow by 2.5-fold in 30 min. Contrary to the decline in blood flow following an initial increase during the 44.5 deg. C heating without preheating, the tumor blood flow remained elevated throughout the 90 min reheating at 44.5 deg. C. These results indicated that thermal adaptation or thermotolerance developed in the tumor vasculatures after the preheating at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min. The magnitude of vascular thermal adaptation in the tumors 24 h and 48 h after the preheating, as judged from the changes in blood flow, were smaller than that 16 h after the preheating. Heating at 42.5 deg. C for 60 min induced vascular thermal adaptation also in the skin and muscle, which peaked in 48 h and 24 h, respectively, after the heating. Conclusion: Heating at 42.5 deg. C for 1 h induced vascular thermal adaptation in the R3230 AC tumor, skin, and muscle of rats that peaked 16-48 h after the heating. When the tumor blood vessels were thermally adapted, the tumor blood flow increased upon heating at temperatures that would otherwise reduce the tumor blood flow. Such an increase in tumor blood flow may hinder raising the tumor temperature while it may increase tumor oxygenation.

  15. CD13-positive bone marrow-derived myeloid cells promote angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Barbu, Elena M; Hosoya, Hitomi; St John, Lisa S; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2013-12-17

    Angiogenesis is fundamental to tumorigenesis and an attractive target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. We have recently demonstrated that CD13 (aminopeptidase N) expressed by nonmalignant host cells of unspecified types regulate tumor blood vessel development. Here, we compare CD13 wild-type and null bone marrow-transplanted tumor-bearing mice to show that host CD13(+) bone marrow-derived cells promote cancer progression via their effect on angiogenesis. Furthermore, we have identified CD11b(+)CD13(+) myeloid cells as the immune subpopulation directly regulating tumor blood vessel development. Finally, we show that these cells are specifically localized within the tumor microenvironment and produce proangiogenic soluble factors. Thus, CD11b(+)CD13(+) myeloid cells constitute a population of bone marrow-derived cells that promote tumor progression and metastasis and are potential candidates for the development of targeted antiangiogenic drugs.

  16. NOVEL PRERETINAL HAIR PIN-LIKE VESSEL IN RETINAL ASTROCYTIC HAMARTOMA WITH VITREOUS HEMORRHAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeta, Megumi; Arai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Hidenori; Fujino, Yujiro; Tanabe, Tatsuro; Inoue, Yuji; Kawashima, Hidetoshi

    2018-01-01

    To report a case of retinal astrocytic hamartoma with vitreous hemorrhage and a hair pin-like vessel adhering to a posterior vitreous membrane. A 33-year-old man with a retinal astrocytic hamartoma presented with vitreous hemorrhage 5 times. Multimodal imaging, including fundus photography, fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and B-mode ultrasonography. Multimodal imaging demonstrated a novel hair pin-like vessel that adhered to the posterior vitreous membrane. Some cases of retinal astrocytic hamartoma with vitreous hemorrhage may be related to structure abnormalities of tumor vessels.

  17. Estimation of vessel diameter and blood flow dynamics from laser speckle images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle imaging is a rapidly developing method to study changes of blood velocity in the vascular networks. However, to assess blood flow and vascular responses it is crucial to measure vessel diameter in addition to blood velocity dynamics. We suggest an algorithm that allows for dynamical...

  18. Effects of the tumor-vasculature-disrupting agent verubulin and two heteroaryl analogues on cancer cells, endothelial cells, and blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahal, Katharina; Resch, Marcus; Ficner, Ralf; Schobert, Rainer; Biersack, Bernhard; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Two analogues of the discontinued tumor vascular-disrupting agent verubulin (Azixa®, MPC-6827, 1) featuring benzo-1,4-dioxan-6-yl (compound 5 a) and N-methylindol-5-yl (compound 10) residues instead of the para-anisyl group on the 4-(methylamino)-2-methylquinazoline pharmacophore, were prepared and found to exceed the antitumor efficacy of the lead compound. They were antiproliferative with single-digit nanomolar IC50 values against a panel of nine tumor cell lines, while not affecting nonmalignant fibroblasts. Indole 10 surpassed verubulin in seven tumor cell lines including colon, breast, ovarian, and germ cell cancer cell lines. In line with docking studies indicating that compound 10 may bind the colchicine binding site of tubulin more tightly (Ebind =-9.8 kcal mol(-1) ) than verubulin (Ebind =-8.3 kcal mol(-1) ), 10 suppressed the formation of vessel-like tubes in endothelial cells and destroyed the blood vessels in the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilized chicken eggs at nanomolar concentrations. When applied to nude mice bearing a highly vascularized 1411HP germ cell xenograft tumor, compound 10 displayed pronounced vascular-disrupting effects that led to hemorrhages and extensive central necrosis in the tumor. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Development of TPNCIRC code for Evaluation of Two-Phase Natural Circulation Flow Performance under External Reactor Vessel Cooling Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, A-Reum; Song, Hyuk-Jin; Park, Jong-Woon

    2015-01-01

    During a severe accident, corium is relocated to the lower head of the nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Design concept of retaining the corium inside a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) through external cooling under hypothetical core melting accidents is called external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC). In this respect, validated two-phase natural circulation flow (TPNC) model is necessary to determine the adequacy of the ERVC design and operating conditions such as inlet area, form losses, gap distance, riser length and coolant conditions. The most important model generally characterizing the TPNC are void fraction and two-phase friction factors. Typical experimental and analytical studies to be referred to on two-phase circulation flow characteristics are those by Reyes, Gartia et al. based on Vijayan et al., Nayak et al. and Dubey et al. In the present paper, two-phase natural circulation (TPNC) flow characteristics under external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) conditions are studied using two existing TPNC flow models of Reyes and Gartia et al. incorporating more improved void fraction and two-phase friction models. These models and correlations are integrated into a computer program, TPNCIRC, which can handle candidate ERVC design parameters, such as inlet, riser and downcomer flow lengths and areas, gap size between reactor vessel and surrounding insulations, minor loss factors and operating parameters of decay power, pressure and subcooling. Accuracy of the TPNCIRC program is investigated with respect to the flow rate and void fractions for existing measured data from a general experiment and ULPU specifically designed for the AP1000 in-vessel retention. Also, the effect of some important design parameters are examined for the experimental and plant conditions. Using the flow models and correlations are integrated into a computer program, TPNCIRC, a number of correlations have been examined. This seems coming from the differences of void fractions

  20. Blood flow in transplantable bladder tumors treated with hematoporphyrin derivative and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selman, S.H.; Kreimer-Birnbaum, M.; Klaunig, J.E.; Goldblatt, P.J.; Keck, R.W.; Britton, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Following hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) photochemotherapy, blood flow to transplantable N-[4-(5-nitro-2-furyl)-2-thia-zolyl] formamide-induced urothelial tumors was determined by a radioactive microsphere technique using either 103 Ru or 141 Ce. Two tumors were implanted s.c. on the abdominal wall of Fischer 344 weanling rats. HPD (10 mg/kg body weight) was administered 24 hr prior to phototherapy (red light, greater than 590 nm; 360 J/sq cm). One of the two tumors was shielded from light exposure and served as an internal control. Blood flows were determined in control animals that received no treatment (Group 1), HPD only (Group 2), or light only (Group 3). In Groups 4 and 5, animals received the combination of HPD and light but differed in the time interval between treatment and blood flow determinations (10 min and 24 hr, respectively). Only blood flow to tumors treated with HPD and light showed a significant decrease (p less than 0.05) when compared with their internal controls both at 10 min (Group 4) and 24 hr (Group 5) after completion of phototherapy. These studies suggest that disruption of tumor blood flow may be an important mechanism of action of this method of cancer therapy

  1. Changes in regional blood flow of normal and tumor tissues following hyperthermia and combined X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia and X-ray irradiation were given to Ehrlich tumors, which were induced in the ventrum of the right hind foot of ICR mice, and to the normal tissues. Their effects on regional blood flow were examined using Xe-133 local clearance method. Blood flow of the normal tissues remained unchanged by heating at 41 deg C for 30 minutes, and increased by heating at 43 deg C and 45 deg C for 30 minutes. On the contrary, blood flow of the tumors decreased with an increase in temperature. When hypertermia (43 deg C for 30 minutes) was combined with irradiation of 30 Gy, decrease in blood flow of the tumors was greater than the normal tissues at 24 hours. Blood flow of the tumors depended on tumor size. The decreased amount of blood flow by hyperthermia was more for tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . Blood flow ratios of tumor to normal tissues were also smaller in tumors > 250 mm 3 than tumors 3 . In the case of tumors 3 , blood flow tended to return to normal at 3 hr after heating at 43 deg C for 30 min. However, this was not seen in tumors > 250 mm 3 . (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Diltiazem enhances tumor blood flow: MRI study in a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, M.; Kasiviswanathan, A.; Jagannathan, N.R.; Raghunathan, P.; Jain, P.C.; Jain, V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Diltiazem, a calcium-channel blocker, is known to differentially influence the radiation responses of normal and murine tumor tissues. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, the effects of diltiazem on the radiation response of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in mice have been investigated, and the hemodynamic changes induced by diltiazem in tumor and normal muscle have been studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Methods and Materials: Ehrlich ascites tumors were grown subcutaneously in Swiss albino strain A mice. Dynamic gadodiamide and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast enhanced 1 H MR imaging studies of EAT and normal muscle were performed after administration of diltiazem in mice using a 4.7 Tesla MR scanner. Tumor radiotherapy experiments (total dose = 10 Gy, 0.4-0.5 Gy/min, single fraction) were carried out with 30 min preadministration of diltiazem (27.5 or 55 mg/kg i.p.) to EAT-bearing mice using a teletherapy machine. Results: The diltiazem+ radiation treated group showed significant tumor regression (in congruent with 65% of the animals) and enhanced animal survival. MR-gadodiamide contrast kinetics revealed a higher magnitude of signal enhancement in diltiazem treated groups as compared to the controls. The observed changes in the magnitude of kinetic parameters were the same for both tumor and normal muscle. BOLD-MR images at 30 min after diltiazem administration showed a 25% and 8% (average) intensity enhancement from their basal values in tumor and normal muscle regions, respectively. The control group showed no significant changes. Conclusion: The present studies demonstrate the radiosensitization potential of diltiazem in the mice EAT model. The enhanced radiation response observed with diltiazem correlates with the diltiazem-induced increase in tumor blood flow (TBF) and tumor oxygenation. The present results also demonstrate the applications of BOLD-MR measurements in investigating the alterations in tumor

  3. A theoretical model for the effects of reduced hemoglobin-oxygen affinity on tumor oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Secomb, Timothy W.; Hsu, Richard; Lin, P.-S.; Venitz, Jurgen; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a theoretical model for oxygen delivery to tumors, and to use the model to simulate the effects of changing the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen on tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Hemoglobin affinity is expressed in terms of P 50 , the partial pressure of oxygen (Po 2 ) at half saturation. Effects of changing P 50 on arterial Po 2 are predicted using an effective vessel approach to describe diffusive oxygen transport in the lungs, assuming fixed systemic oxygen demand and fixed blood flow rate. The decline in oxygen content of blood as it flows through normal tissue before entering the tumor region is assumed fixed. The hypoxic fraction of the tumor region is predicted using a three-dimensional simulation of diffusion from a network of vessels whose geometry is derived from observations of tumor microvasculature in the rat. Results: In air-breathing rats, predicted hypoxic fraction decreases with moderate increases in P 50 , but increases with further increases of P 50 , in agreement with previous experimental results. In rats breathing hyperoxic gases, and in humans breathing either normoxic or hyperoxic gases, increased P 50 is predicted to improve tumor oxygenation. Conclusions: The results support the administration of synthetic agents to increase P 50 during radiation treatment of tumors

  4. Two-Phase Flow Effect on the Ex-Vessel Corium Debris Bed Formation in Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunho; Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Moo Hwan; Park, Hyun Sun; Ma, Weimin; Bechta, Sevostian V.

    2014-01-01

    In Korean IVR-ERVC(In-Vessel Retention of molten corium through External Reactor Vessel Cooling) strategy, if the situation degenerates into insufficient external vessel cooling, the molten core mixture can directly erupt into the flooded cavity pool from the weakest point of the vessel. Then, FCI (molten Fuel Coolant Interaction) will fragment the corium jet into small particulates settling down to make porous debris bed on the cavity basemat. To secure the containment integrity against the MCCI (Molten Core - Concrete Interaction), cooling of the heat generating porous corium debris bed is essential and it depends on the characteristics of the bed itself. For the characteristics of corium debris bed, many previous experimental studies with simulant melts reported the heap-like shape mostly. There were also following experiments to develop the correlation for the heap-like shaped debris bed. However, recent studies started to consider the effect of the decay heat and reported some noticeable results with the two-phase flow effect on the debris bed formation. The Kyushu University and JAEA group reported the experimental studies on the 'self-leveling' effect which is the flattening effect of the particulate bed by the inside gas generation. The DECOSIM simulation study of RIT (Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) with Russian researchers showed the 'large cavity pool convection' effect, which is driven by the up-rising gas bubble flow from the pre-settled debris bed, on the particle settling trajectories and ultimately final bed shape. The objective of this study is verification of the two-phase flow effect on the ex-vessel corium debris bed formation in the severe accident. From the analysis on the test movie and resultant particle beds, the two-phase flow effect on the debris bed formation, which has been reported in the previous studies, was verified and the additional findings were also suggested. For the first, in quiescent pool the

  5. Secondary flow vortical structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2018-01-01

    Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ curved pipe model of an artery are studied using particle image velocimetry. Both steady and pulsatile inflow conditions are investigated. In planar curved pipes with steady flow, multiple (two, four, six) vortices are detected. For pulsatile flow, various pairs of vortices, i.e., Dean, deformed-Dean, Lyne-type, and split-Dean, are present in the cross section of the pipe at 90∘ into the bend. The effects of nonplanar curvature (torsion) and vessel dilatation on these vortical structures are studied. Torsion distorts the symmetric secondary flows (which exist in planar curvatures) and can result in formation of more complex vortical structures. For example, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together in pulsatile flow. The vortical structures in elastic vessels with dilatation (0.61%-3.23%) are also investigated and the results are compared with rigid model results. It was found that the secondary flow structures in rigid and elastic models are similar, and hence the local compliance of the vessel does not affect the morphology of secondary flow structures.

  6. Doppler color flow mapping of peripheral vessels: Comparison of angiodynography with conventional duplex US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, C.R.B.; Bluth, E.I.; Sullivan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    A new Doppler color flow imager was compared to duplex US in the evaluation of carotid and peripheral vessels in 50 patients. A 7.5-MHz transducer permitted simultaneous high-resolution real-time imaging of Doppler flow and tissue. The system was found to have excellent image quality and Doppler sensitivity. Flow characteristics and velocity measurements obtained with this system correlated well with those obtained using the duplex scanner and were obtained more quickly than with the conventional system, allowing more complete assessment of flow characteristics. Color Doppler flow imaging appears to be an extremely promising method for the rapid and effective evaluation of peripheral vascular flow

  7. Variable impact of CSF flow suppression on quantitative 3.0T intracranial vessel wall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Petrice M; Siero, Jeroen C W; Lants, Sarah K; Waddle, Spencer; Davis, L Taylor; Gilbert, Guillaume; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2018-03-31

    Flow suppression techniques have been developed for intracranial (IC) vessel wall imaging (VWI) and optimized using simulations; however, simulation results may not translate in vivo. To evaluate experimentally how IC vessel wall and lumen measurements change in identical subjects when evaluated using the most commonly available blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow suppression modules and VWI sequences. Prospective. Healthy adults (n = 13; age = 37 ± 15 years) were enrolled. A 3.0T 3D T 1 /proton density (PD)-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisition with post-readout anti-driven equilibrium module, with and without Delay-Alternating-with-Nutation-for-Tailored-Excitation (DANTE) was applied. DANTE flip angle (8-12°) and TSE refocusing angle (sweep = 40-120° or 50-120°) were varied. Basilar artery and internal carotid artery (ICA) wall thicknesses, CSF signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio (SR) were assessed. Measurements were made by two readers (radiology resident and board-certified neuroradiologist). A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied with corrected two-sided P CSF suppression. Addition of the DANTE preparation reduced CSF SNR from 17.4 to 6.7, thereby providing significant (P CSF suppression. The DANTE preparation also resulted in a significant (P CSF CNR improvement (P = 0.87). There was a trend for a difference in blood SNR with vs. without DANTE (P = 0.05). The outer vessel wall diameter and wall thickness values were lower (P CSF suppression and CNR of the approaches evaluated. However, improvements are heterogeneous, likely owing to intersubject vessel pulsatility and CSF flow variations, which can lead to variable flow suppression efficacy in these velocity-dependent modules. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Wallace

    Full Text Available Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.

  9. Reactor vessel and core two-phase flow ultrasonic densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia. Separate effects tests and two-phase flow tests have been conducted to characterize the detector. Tests show the detector can perform in a 343 0 C pressurized water reactor environment and measure the average density of the media surrounding the sensor

  10. Erratum to: Ungersma SE, Pacheco G, Ho C, Yee SF, Ross J, van Bruggen N, Peale FV Jr, Ross S, Carano RA. Vessel imaging with viable tumor analysis for quantification of tumor angiogenesis. Magn Reson Med 2010;63:1637–1647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungersma, Sharon E; Pacheco, Glenn; Ho, Calvin; Yee, Sharon Fong; Ross, Jed; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Peale, Franklin V; Ross, Sarajane; Carano, Richard A D

    2011-03-01

    Imaging of tumor microvasculature has become an important tool for studying angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic therapies. Ultrasmall paramagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for indirect imaging of vasculature offer a method for quantitative measurements of vascular biomarkers such as vessel size index, blood volume, and vessel density (Q). Here, this technique is validated with direct comparisons to ex vivo micro-computed tomography angiography and histologic vessel measurements, showing significant correlations between in vivo vascular MRI measurements and ex vivo structural vessel measurements. The sensitivity of the MRI vascular parameters is also demonstrated, in combination with a multispectral analysis technique for segmenting tumor tissue to restrict the analysis to viable tumor tissue and exclude regions of necrosis. It is shown that this viable tumor segmentation increases sensitivity for detection of significant effects on blood volume and Q by two antiangiogenic therapeutics [anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and anti-neuropilin-1] on an HM7 colorectal tumor model. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor reduced blood volume by 36±3% (p<0.0001) and Q by 52±3% (p<0.0001) at 48 h post-treatment; the effects of anti-neuropilin-1 were roughly half as strong with a reduction in blood volume of 18±6% (p<0.05) and a reduction in Q of 33±5% (p<0.05) at 48 h post-treatment.

  11. Interaction of Liquid Film Flow of Direct Vessel Injection Under the Cross Directional Gas Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han-sol; Lee, Jae-young [Handong Global University, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Euh, Dong-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to obtain a proper scaling law of the flow, local information of the flow was investigated experimentally and also numerically. A series of experiments were conducted in the 1/20 modified linear scaled plate type test rig to analyze a liquid film from ECC water injection through the DVI nozzle to the downcomer wall. The present study investigates liquid film flow generated in a downcomer of direct vessel injection (DVI) system which is employed as an emergency core cooling (ECC) system during a loss of coolant accident in the Korea nuclear power plant APR1400. During the late reflooding, complicated multi-phase flow phenomena including the wavy film flow, film breakup, entrainment, liquid film shift due to interfacial drag and gas jet impingement occur. A confocal chromatic sensor was used to measure the local instantaneous liquid film thickness and a hydraulic jump in the film flow and boundaries of the film flow. It was found that CFD analysis results without surface tension model showed some difference with the data in surface tension dominated flow region. For the interaction between a liquid film and gas shear flow, CFD results make a good agreement with the real liquid film dynamics in the case of low film Reynolds number or low Weber number flow. In the 1/20 scaled plate type experiment and simulation, the deformed spreading profile results seem to accord with each other at the relatively low We and Re regime.

  12. Study of coolant flow distribution within the PWR type reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, L.M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The thermohydraulic design of a pressurized water reactor requires the determination of the coolant flow distributions within the reactor vessel, particulary at the core inlet. In this work it is proposed the study of this flow, using potencial flow theory governed by Laplace's equation, nabla 2 φ = O. The solution of the potential field is obtained by the finite element method, which simplifies considerably the treatment of complex geometrical configurations. The equation is solved by the finite element computer code ANSYS, developed and licensed for structural and thermal analysis by using the analogy between steady state heat transfer equation without heat generation, nabla 2 T=O, and Laplace's equation of the velocity potential. The proposed method has been applied to a commercial reactor, and the results are consistent with the available experimental data. (author) [pt

  13. Selective drug-induced reduction of blood flow in tumor transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, W.H.; Debatin, J.; Layer, K.; Helus, F.; Altmann, A.; Sinn, H.J.; Ostertag, H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of a calcium antagonist and a physiological amine on tumor and muscle perfusion was investigated with the aim of improving the preconditions for external hyperthermia treatment of cancer. Nisoldipine and 5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) were administered ip in Sprague-Dawley rats bearing Walker 256 carcinoma, Yoshida sarcoma, or a homologous tumor transplant derived from a spontaneous leiomyosarcoma of the uterus. At the maximum dosage used, nisoldipine injection caused a decrease of the regional washout rate of Xenon-133 in the Walker carcinoma and an increase in the muscle of the hind leg. 5-HT caused a drop in the Walker carcinoma and only a slight fall of the washout rate in muscle. Tumor-to-muscle uptake ratios of 11 C-butanol fell. Both drugs representing two different rationales of vasomotor action were able to reduce blood flow specifically in transplanted tumors; nisoldipine increased muscle blood flow and decreased arterial blood pressure, whereas 5-HT acted without substantial systemic effects

  14. Reduced blood flow increases the in vivo ammonium ion concentration in the RIF-1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinidis, Ioannis; Gamcsik, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies from our laboratory have suggested that pooling of ammonium in tumor tissues may be caused by its inefficient removal due to the poor vasculature commonly found in tumors. The purpose of these experiments was to validate the relationship between tumor ammonium ion concentration and tumor blood flow, and to determine whether large concentrations of ammonium ion detected by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are either produced within the tumor or simply imported into the tumor through the blood stream. Methods and Materials: To test this hypothesis, we reduced blood flow in subcutaneously grown Radiation Induced Fibrosarcoma-1 (RIF-1) tumors, either by creating partial ischemia with a bolus injection of hydralazine or by occlusion with surgical sutures. 14 N and 31 P NMR spectroscopy were used to detect the presence of ammonium, and to assess the bioenergetic status of the tumors, respectively. Results: A correlation between ammonium ion concentration and (PCr(P i )) ratio was established for untreated tumors. An increase in the in vivo tumor ammonium ion concentration was observed for every tumor that experienced a reduction in blood flow caused by either hydralazine injection or suture ligation. Changes in ammonium ion concentration paralleled changes in the bioenergetics of hydralazine-treated tumors. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis that a reduction in tumor blood flow is responsible for the accumulation of ammonium in tumors, and that detected ammonium originated from within the tumor

  15. Gamma-secretase inhibitor treatment promotes VEGF-A-driven blood vessel growth and vascular leakage but disrupts neovascular perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Kalén

    Full Text Available The Notch signaling pathway is essential for normal development due to its role in control of cell differentiation, proliferation and survival. It is also critically involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. A key enzyme in the activation of Notch signaling is the gamma-secretase protein complex and therefore, gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs--originally developed for Alzheimer's disease--are now being evaluated in clinical trials for human malignancies. It is also clear that Notch plays an important role in angiogenesis driven by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A--a process instrumental for tumor growth and metastasis. The effect of GSIs on tumor vasculature has not been conclusively determined. Here we report that Compound X (CX, a GSI previously reported to potently inhibit Notch signaling in vitro and in vivo, promotes angiogenic sprouting in vitro and during developmental angiogenesis in mice. Furthermore, CX treatment suppresses tumor growth in a mouse model of renal carcinoma, leads to the formation of abnormal vessels and an increased tumor vascular density. Using a rabbit model of VEGF-A-driven angiogenesis in skeletal muscle, we demonstrate that CX treatment promotes abnormal blood vessel growth characterized by vessel occlusion, disrupted blood flow, and increased vascular leakage. Based on these findings, we propose a model for how GSIs and other Notch inhibitors disrupt tumor blood vessel perfusion, which might be useful for understanding this new class of anti-cancer agents.

  16. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Numerical simulation of the accurate RCP start-up flow rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.; Stelletta, S.

    1997-06-01

    This report explains the last results about the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. The accurate fluid flow transient, induced by the RCP starting-up, is represented. In a first time, we present the Thermalhydraulic Finite Element Code N3S used for the 3D numerical computations. After that, results obtained for one reactor operation case are given. This case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. A comparison made between two injection modes; a steady state fluid flow conditions or the accurate RCP transient fluid flow conditions. The results giving the local minimum of concentration and the time response of the mean concentration at the core inlet are compared. The results show the real importance of the unsteadiness characteristics of the fluid flow transport of the clear water plug. (author)

  17. An experimental study on feasibility of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Park, Rae-Jun; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments for assessing the efficacy of ex-vessel cooling through the external guide vessel during a severe accident. Four tests were performed in the LAVA test facility at KAERI, varying the boundary conditions at the outer surface of the vessel. The first test was a dry condition test conducted without cooling the outside of the vessel. On the other hand, in the second test, the cooling of the vessel surface was produced by gravity-driven forced injection of water along the annular gap of 25 mm between the vessel and the external guide vessel. Water flow rate was about 0.85 kg/s and total mass of available water was 300 kg. For the evaluation of the water flow rate effect, the third test was performed with a pool type cooling in the annulus without any circulation of water. These two external cooling tests were performed under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa. Finally, the fourth test was conducted under atmospheric pressure to evaluate the effect of system pressure on boiling heat transfer characteristics. In the dry test and the pool type ex-vessel cooling test performed under atmospheric pressure, the vessel was failed by a melt penetration at about 40 degree upper position from the vessel bottom, which is coincident with the boundary of the Al 2 O 3 /Fe melt separated layers. On the other hand, in both of the ex-vessel cooling tests conducted under elevated pressure of about 1.6 MPa, the vessel didn't fail. Compared with the pool boiling test, the vessel experienced effective cooling due to the inlet flow in the forced flow test. Synthesized the results of the tests, it was shown that the heat removal with ex-vessel cooling through the guide vessel is feasible, but the additional evaluations should be performed to guarantee enough thermal margin. (author)

  18. 33 CFR Appendix B to Part 155 - Determining and Evaluating Required Response Resources for Vessel Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Pt. 155, App. B Appendix B to Part 155—Determining and... environment. For example, vessels moving from the ocean to a river port must identify appropriate equipment...

  19. Solid KHT tumor dispersal for flow cytometric cell kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Folstad, L.J.; Dunbar, C.

    1981-01-01

    A bacterial neutral protease was used to disperse KHT solid tumors into single cell suspensions suitable for routine cell kinetic analysis by flow cytometry and for clonogenic cell survival. Neutral protease disaggregation under conditions which would be suitable for routine tumor dispersal was compared with a trypsin/DNase procedure. Cell yield, clonogenic cell survival, DNA distributions of untreated and drug-perturbed tumors, rates of radioactive precursor incorporation during the cell cycle, and preferential cell cycle phase-specific cell loss were investigated. Tumors dispersed with neutral protease yielded approximately four times more cells than those dispersed with trypsin/DNase and approximately a 1.5-fold higher plating efficiency in a semisolid agar system. Quantitative analysis of DNA distributions obtained from untreated and cytosine-arabinoside-perturbed tumors produced similar results with both dispersal procedures. The rates of incorporation of tritiated thymidine during the cell cycle were also similar with neutral protease and trypsin/DNase dispersal. Preferential phase-specific cell loss was not obseved with either technique. We find that neutral protease provides good single cell suspensions of the KHT tumor for cell survival measurements and for cell kinetic analysis of drug-induced perturbations by flow cytometry. In addition, the high cell yields facilitate electronic cell sorting where large numbers of cells are often required

  20. Tumor blood flow, pO2, and radioresponse are improved by mild temperature hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, Abdus; Griffin, Robert J.; Song, Chang W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the changes in tumor blood flow, tumor pO 2 and the radiation response of the tumors caused by mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Materials And Methods: Experiments were carried out using the R3230 Adenocarcinoma (R3230 AC tumor), grown subcutaneously in the right hind limbs of male Fischer rats. Tumors were heated once at 40.5 deg.to 43.5 deg.C for 30 or 60 min, or twice at a 24 hr interval. Tumor blood flow and tumor pO 2 were measured immediately after the hyperthermic treatments or after 24 hr using a radioactive microsphere method and by an Eppendorf pO 2 Histograph, respectively. The influence of MTH on the effect of X-irradiation (250 kVp) on this tumor was investigated with tumor growth delay and the in vivo/in vitro excision assay for surviving tumor cell fraction. Results: Tumor blood flow and pO 2 increased upon heating for 30 min at 40.5 deg.C to 43.5 deg.C, but following 60 min heating, the pO 2 was similar to that in control tumors. The tumor blood flow increased about 1.4-fold and the tumor pO 2 increased more than 3 times after 30 min heating at 42.5 deg.C. Therefore, the in vivo/in vitro assay and the growth delay were carried out following treatment with 42.5 deg.C for 30 min. As shown in Table 1, the reduction in surviving fraction by MTH before radiation was markedly greater than that by MTH after radiation. Table 1 also shows that MTH alone caused no growth delay compared to control and while heat after radiation increased the growth delay by 2 days, MTH before radiation increased the growth delay by 5 days compared to radiation alone. Conclusion: The results indicate that MTH is effective in increasing tumor blood flow and oxygenation and that MTH for 30 min at 42.5 deg.C, applied before radiation, significantly improves the radiation response of R3230 AC tumors

  1. Lung tumor tracking in fluoroscopic video based on optical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qianyi; Hamilton, Russell J.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory gating and tumor tracking for dynamic multileaf collimator delivery require accurate and real-time localization of the lung tumor position during treatment. Deriving tumor position from external surrogates such as abdominal surface motion may have large uncertainties due to the intra- and interfraction variations of the correlation between the external surrogates and internal tumor motion. Implanted fiducial markers can be used to track tumors fluoroscopically in real time with sufficient accuracy. However, it may not be a practical procedure when implanting fiducials bronchoscopically. In this work, a method is presented to track the lung tumor mass or relevant anatomic features projected in fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers based on an optical flow algorithm. The algorithm generates the centroid position of the tracked target and ignores shape changes of the tumor mass shadow. The tracking starts with a segmented tumor projection in an initial image frame. Then, the optical flow between this and all incoming frames acquired during treatment delivery is computed as initial estimations of tumor centroid displacements. The tumor contour in the initial frame is transferred to the incoming frames based on the average of the motion vectors, and its positions in the incoming frames are determined by fine-tuning the contour positions using a template matching algorithm with a small search range. The tracking results were validated by comparing with clinician determined contours on each frame. The position difference in 95% of the frames was found to be less than 1.4 pixels (∼0.7 mm) in the best case and 2.8 pixels (∼1.4 mm) in the worst case for the five patients studied.

  2. Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonists enhance transvascular drug delivery into malignant brain tumors by increasing drug half-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intravenous co-infusion of labradimil, a metabolically stable bradykinin B2 receptor agonist, has been shown to temporarily enhance the transvascular delivery of small chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin, across the blood-brain tumor barrier. It has been thought that the primary mechanism by which labradimil does so is by acting selectively on tumor microvasculature to increase the local transvascular flow rate across the blood-brain tumor barrier. This mechanism of action does not explain why, in the clinical setting, carboplatin dosing based on patient renal function over-estimates the carboplatin dose required for target carboplatin exposure. In this study we investigated the systemic actions of labradimil, as well as other bradykinin B2 receptor agonists with a range of metabolic stabilities, in context of the local actions of the respective B2 receptor agonists on the blood-brain tumor barrier of rodent malignant gliomas. Methods Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA, a small MRI contrast agent, were imaged in rodents bearing orthotopic RG-2 malignant gliomas. Baseline blood and brain tumor tissue pharmacokinetics were imaged with the 1st bolus of Gd-DTPA over the first hour, and then re-imaged with a 2nd bolus of Gd-DTPA over the second hour, during which normal saline or a bradykinin B2 receptor agonist was infused intravenously for 15 minutes. Changes in mean arterial blood pressure were recorded. Imaging data was analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Results The decrease in systemic blood pressure correlated with the known metabolic stability of the bradykinin B2 receptor agonist infused. Metabolically stable bradykinin B2 agonists, methionine-lysine-bradykinin and labradimil, had differential effects on the transvascular flow rate of Gd-DTPA across the blood-brain tumor barrier. Both methionine

  3. Radionuclide investigation of the blood flow in tumor and normal rat tissues in induced hyperglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Istomin, Yu.P.; Shitikov, B.D.; Markova, L.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography was performed in rats with transplantable tumors. Induced hyperglycemia was shown to result in blood flow inhibition in tumor and normal tissues of tumor-bearing rats. Some differences were revealed in a degree of reversibility of blood flow disorders in tissues of the above strains. The results obtained confirmed the advisability of radiation therapy at the height of a decrease in tumor blood

  4. 3 D flow computations under a reactor vessel closure head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, O.; Bonnin, O.; Hofmann, F.; Hecker, M.

    1995-12-01

    The flow under a vessel cover of a pressurised water reactor is investigated by using several computations and a physical model. The case presented here is turbulent, isothermal and incompressible. Computations are made with N3S code using a k-epsilon model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are on the whole satisfying. Some local improvements are expected either with more sophisticated turbulence models or with mesh refinements automatically computed by using the adaptive meshing technique which has been just implemented in N3S for 3D cases. (authors). 6 refs., 7 figs

  5. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoo, Kanako; Inagaki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kento; Sasawatari, Shigemi; Kamigaki, Takashi; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP) and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6-12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  6. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Inoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6–12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  7. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor attenuates melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dillenburg-Pilla

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  8. Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Characteristics of Iris Melanocytic Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalet, Alison H.; Li, Yan; Lu, Chen D.; Jia, Yali; Lee, ByungKun; Husvogt, Lennart; Maier, Andreas; Fujimoto, James G.; Thomas, Charles R.; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate tumor vasculature with optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography (OCTA) in malignant iris melanomas and benign iris lesions. Design Cross-sectional observational clinical study. Participants Patients with iris lesions and healthy volunteers. Methods Eyes were imaged using OCTA systems operating at 1050 and 840 nm wavelengths. Three-dimensional OCTA scans were acquired. Iris melanomas patients treated with radiation therapy were imaged again after I-125 plaque brachytherapy at 6 and 18 months. Main Outcome Measures OCT and OCTA images, qualitative evaluation of iris and tumor vasculature and quantitative vessel density. Results One eye each of eight normal volunteers and nine patients with iris melanomas or benign iris lesions including freckles, nevi, and an iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cyst were imaged. The normal iris has radially-oriented vessels within the stroma on OCTA. Penetration of flow signal in normal iris depended on iris color, with best penetration seen in light to moderately pigmented irides. Iris melanomas demonstrated tortuous and disorganized intratumoral vasculature. In two eyes with nevi there was no increased vascularity; in another, fine vascular loops were noted near an area of ectropion uveae. Iris freckles and the IPE cyst did not have intrinsic vascularity. The vessel density was significantly higher within iris melanomas (34.5%±9.8%, piris nevi (8.0%±1.4%) or normal irides (8.0%±1.2%). Tumor regression after radiation therapy for melanomas was associated with decreased vessel density. OCTA at 1050 nm provided better visualization of tumor vasculature and penetration through thicker tumors than at 840 nm. But in very thick tumors and highly pigmented lesions even 1050 nm OCTA could not visualize their full thickness. Interpretable OCTA images were obtained in 82% participants in whom imaging was attempted. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of OCTA in iris tumors. OCTA may provide a dye-free, no

  9. Rapid analysis of vessel elements (RAVE: a tool for studying physiologic, pathologic and tumor angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc E Seaman

    Full Text Available Quantification of microvascular network structure is important in a myriad of emerging research fields including microvessel remodeling in response to ischemia and drug therapy, tumor angiogenesis, and retinopathy. To mitigate analyst-specific variation in measurements and to ensure that measurements represent actual changes in vessel network structure and morphology, a reliable and automatic tool for quantifying microvascular network architecture is needed. Moreover, an analysis tool capable of acquiring and processing large data sets will facilitate advanced computational analysis and simulation of microvascular growth and remodeling processes and enable more high throughput discovery. To this end, we have produced an automatic and rapid vessel detection and quantification system using a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI that vastly reduces time spent on analysis and greatly increases repeatability. Analysis yields numerical measures of vessel volume fraction, vessel length density, fractal dimension (a measure of tortuosity, and radii of murine vascular networks. Because our GUI is open sourced to all, it can be easily modified to measure parameters such as percent coverage of non-endothelial cells, number of loops in a vascular bed, amount of perfusion and two-dimensional branch angle. Importantly, the GUI is compatible with standard fluorescent staining and imaging protocols, but also has utility analyzing brightfield vascular images, obtained, for example, in dorsal skinfold chambers. A manually measured image can be typically completed in 20 minutes to 1 hour. In stark comparison, using our GUI, image analysis time is reduced to around 1 minute. This drastic reduction in analysis time coupled with increased repeatability makes this tool valuable for all vessel research especially those requiring rapid and reproducible results, such as anti-angiogenic drug screening.

  10. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study

  11. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study.

  12. S100A4-neutralizing antibody suppresses spontaneous tumor progression, pre-metastatic niche formation and alters T-cell polarization balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grum-Schwensen, Birgitte; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Beck, Mette

    2015-01-01

    , decreased vessel density and inhibition of metastases. CONCLUSION: The S100A4 blocking antibody (6B12) reduces tumor growth and metastasis in a model of spontaneous breast cancer. The 6B12 antibody treatment inhibits T cell accumulation at the primary and pre-metastatic tumor sites. The 6B12 antibody acts...

  13. The relationship between elevated interstitial fluid pressure and blood flow in tumors: a bioengineering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, Michael F.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Hill, Richard P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the hypothesis that elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is a cause of reduced blood flow in tumors. Materials and Methods: A physiologic model of tumor blood flow was developed based on a semipermeable, compliant capillary in the center of a spherical tumor. The model incorporates the interaction between the tumor vasculature and the interstitium, as mediated by IFP. It also incorporates the dynamic behavior of the capillary wall in response to changes in transmural pressure, and the effect of viscosity on blood flow. Results: The model predicted elevated tumor IFP in the range of 0 to 56 mmHg. The capillary diameter in the setting of elevated IFP was greatest at the arterial end, and constricted to between 3.2 and 4.4 μm at the venous end. This corresponded to a 2.4- to 3.5-fold reduction in diameter along the length of the capillary. The IFP exceeded the intravascular pressure distally in the capillary, but vascular collapse did not occur. Capillary diameter constriction resulted in a 2.3- to 9.1-fold steady-state reduction in tumor blood flow relative to a state of near-zero IFP. Conclusion: The results suggest that steady-state vascular constriction occurs in the setting of elevated IFP, and leads to reduced tumor blood flow. This may in turn contribute to the development of hypoxia, which is an important cause of radiation treatment failure in many tumors

  14. X-ray PIV measurement of blood flow in deep vessels of a rat: An in vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-18

    X-ray PIV measurement is a noninvasive approach to measure opaque blood flows. However, it is not easy to measure real pulsatile blood flows in the blood vessels located at deep position of the body, because the surrounding tissues significantly attenuate the contrast of X-ray images. This study investigated the effect of surrounding tissues on X-ray beam attenuation by measuring the velocity fields of blood flows in deep vessels of a live rat. The decrease in image contrast was minimized by employing biocompatible CO2 microbubbles as tracer particles. The maximum measurable velocity of blood flows in the abdominal aorta of a rat model was found through comparative examination between the PIV measurement accuracy and the level of image contrast according to the input flow rate. Furthermore, the feasibility of using X-ray PIV to accurately measure in vivo blood flows was demonstrated by determining the velocity field of blood flows in the inferior vena cava of a rat. This study may serve as a reference in conducting in vivo X-ray PIV measurements of pulsatile blood flows in animal disease models and investigating hemodynamic characteristics and circulatory vascular diseases.

  15. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi; Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru.

    1997-01-01

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and γ rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  16. Vacuum vessel for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Kurita, Gen-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Onozuka, Masaki; Suzuki, Masaru

    1997-07-31

    Heat of inner walls of a vacuum vessel that receive radiation heat from plasmas by way of first walls is removed by a cooling medium flowing in channels for cooling the inner walls. Nuclear heat generation of constitutional materials of the vacuum vessel caused by fast neutrons and {gamma} rays is removed by a cooling medium flowing in cooling channels disposed in the vacuum vessel. Since the heat from plasmas and the nuclear heat generation are removed separately, the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling inner walls is increased for cooling a great amount of heat from plasmas while the amount of the cooling medium flowing in the channels for cooling the inside of the vacuum vessel is reduced for cooling the small amount of nuclear heat generation. Since the amount of the cooling medium can thus be optimized, the capacity of the facilities for circulating the cooling medium can be reduced. In addition, since the channels for cooling the inner walls and the channels of cooling medium formed in the vacuum vessel are disposed to the inner walls of the vacuum vessel on the side opposite to plasmas, integrity of the channels relative to leakage of the cooling medium can be ensured. (N.H.)

  17. 3D reconstruction of microvascular flow phantoms with hybrid imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingying; Hsiung, Kevin; Ritenour, Russell; Golzarian, Jafar

    2011-03-01

    Microvascular flow phantoms were built to aid the development of a hemodynamic simulation model for treating hepatocelluar carcinoma. The goal is to predict the blood flow routing for embolotherapy planning. Embolization is to deliver agents (e.g. microspheres) to the vicinity of the tumor to obstruct blood supply and nutrients to the tumor, targeting into 30 - 40 μm arterioles. Due to the size of the catheter, it has to release microspheres at an upper stream location, which may not localize the blocking effect. Accurate anatomical descriptions of microvasculature will help to conduct a reliable simulation and prepare a successful embolization strategy. Modern imaging devices can generate 3D reconstructions with ease. However, with a fixed detector size, larger field of view yields lower resolution. Clinical CT images can't be used to measure micro vessel dimensions, while micro-CT requires more acquisitions to reconstruct larger vessels. A multi-tiered, montage 3D reconstruction method with hybrid-modality imagery is devised to minimize the reconstruction effort. Regular CT is used for larger vessels and micro-CT is used for micro vessels. The montage approach aims to stitch up images with different resolutions and orientations. A resolution-adaptable 3D image registration is developed to assemble the images. We have created vessel phantoms that consist of several tiers of bifurcating polymer tubes in reducing diameters, down to 25 μm. No previous work of physical flow phantom has ventured into this small scale. Overlapping phantom images acquired from clinical CT and micro-CT are used to verify the image registration fidelity.

  18. Dynamic stroma reorganization drives blood vessel dysmorphia during glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathivet, Thomas; Bouleti, Claire; Van Woensel, Matthias; Stanchi, Fabio; Verschuere, Tina; Phng, Li-Kun; Dejaegher, Joost; Balcer, Marly; Matsumoto, Ken; Georgieva, Petya B; Belmans, Jochen; Sciot, Raf; Stockmann, Christian; Mazzone, Massimiliano; De Vleeschouwer, Steven; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-12-01

    Glioma growth and progression are characterized by abundant development of blood vessels that are highly aberrant and poorly functional, with detrimental consequences for drug delivery efficacy. The mechanisms driving this vessel dysmorphia during tumor progression are poorly understood. Using longitudinal intravital imaging in a mouse glioma model, we identify that dynamic sprouting and functional morphogenesis of a highly branched vessel network characterize the initial tumor growth, dramatically changing to vessel expansion, leakage, and loss of branching complexity in the later stages. This vascular phenotype transition was accompanied by recruitment of predominantly pro-inflammatory M1-like macrophages in the early stages, followed by in situ repolarization to M2-like macrophages, which produced VEGF-A and relocate to perivascular areas. A similar enrichment and perivascular accumulation of M2 versus M1 macrophages correlated with vessel dilation and malignancy in human glioma samples of different WHO malignancy grade. Targeting macrophages using anti-CSF1 treatment restored normal blood vessel patterning and function. Combination treatment with chemotherapy showed survival benefit, suggesting that targeting macrophages as the key driver of blood vessel dysmorphia in glioma progression presents opportunities to improve efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. We propose that vessel dysfunction is not simply a general feature of tumor vessel formation, but rather an emergent property resulting from a dynamic and functional reorganization of the tumor stroma and its angiogenic influences. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Development of a method for detecting nuclear fuel debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It is the important issue to fill up each nuclear reactor/containment vessel with water and to take out debris of damaged fuel from them for decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. It is necessary to detect the debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel for the purpose. However, the method is not completely developed in the present stage. Accordingly, we have developed a method for detecting debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization. Experiments of the flow visualization were conducted using two types of water tanks. An optical fiber and a collimator lens were employed for modifying a straight laser beam into a sheet projection. Some visualized images were obtained through the experiments. Particle Image Velocimetry, i.e. PIV, analysis was applied to the images for quantitative flow rate analysis. Consequently, it is considered that the flow visualization method has a possibility for the practical use. (author)

  20. A numerical analysis on the curved bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) : leaflet motion and blood flow in an elastic blood vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Jin Seok; Kim, Chang Nyung; Choi, Choeng Ryul

    2005-01-01

    In blood flow passing through the Mechanical Heart Valve (MHV) and elastic blood vessel, hemolysis and platelet activation causing thrombus formation can be seen owing to the shear stress in the blood. Also, fracture and deformation of leaflets can be observed depending on the shape and material properties of the leaflets which is opened and closed in a cycle. Hence, comprehensive study is needed on the hemodynamics which is associated with the motion of leaflet and elastic blood vessel in terms of fluid-structure interaction. In this paper, a numerical analysis has been performed for a three-dimensional pulsatile blood flow associated with the elastic blood vessel and curved bileaflet for multiple cycles in light of fluid-structure interaction. From this analysis fluttering phenomenon and rebound of the leaflet have been observed and recirculation and regurgitation have been found in the flow fields of the blood. Also, the pressure distribution and the radial displacement of the elastic blood vessel have been obtained. The motion of the leaflet and flow fields of the blood have shown similar tendency compared with the previous experiments carried out in other studies. The present study can contribute to the design methodology for the curved bileaflet mechanical heart valve. Furthermore, the proposed fluid-structure interaction method will be effectively used in various fields where the interaction between fluid flow and structure are involved

  1. Flow cytometric applications of tumor biology: prospects and pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.; Johnson, T.S.; Tokita, N.; Gillette, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review of cytometry instrumentation and its potential applications in tumor biology is presented using our recent data. Age-distribution measurements of cells from spontaneous dog tumors and cultured cells after exposure to x rays, alpha particles, or adriamycin are shown. The data show that DNA fluorescence measurements have application in the study of cell kinetics after either radiation or drug treatment. Extensive and careful experimentation is needed to utilize the sophisticated developments in flow cytometry instrumentation

  2. Modeling and simulation of the bubble-induced flow in wine fermentation vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Detailed flow pattern analyses regarding wine fermentations conducted without mechanical agitation are limited to lab-scale investigations, as industrial size measurements are expensive and difficult to realize. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD methods can offer an alternative and more flexible approach to gain insight into such bubble induced fluid flows. Therefore, the aim of this study was to transfer the findings of existing research onto a CFD model capable of capturing the three- dimensional flow pattern in industrial scale wine fermentation vessels. First results were obtained by using an extended version of the OpenFOAM® (v.2.2.x solver multiphaseEulerFoam for modeling the gas-liquid two phase system. With parameters from the most vigorous phase of wine fermentation a fully developed, unsteady flow regime could be established after approx. 120 s of real time. Thereby the groundwork for further evaluations of e.g. mixing efficiency or cooling equipment optimizations with CFD methods is laid.

  3. Effect of heat transfer on unsteady MHD flow of blood in a permeable vessel in the presence of non-uniform heat source

    OpenAIRE

    A. Sinha; J.C. Misra; G.C. Shit

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of blood flow and heat transfer in a permeable vessel in the presence of an external magnetic field. The unsteadiness in the coupled flow and temperature fields is considered to be caused due to the time-dependent stretching velocity and the surface temperature of the vessel. The non-uniform heat source/sink effect on blood flow and heat transfer is taken into account. This study is of potential value in the clinical treatment of cardiovascular disor...

  4. Variability in blood flow and pO2 in tumors in response to carbogen breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzen, Jennifer L.; Braun, Rod D.; Ong, Aqui L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: There is speculation that the CO 2 in carbogen (95% O 2 , 5% CO 2 ) can block the vasoconstrictive effects of oxygen. However, it has recently been shown that blood flow in human tumors is variable while patients breathe carbogen. Furthermore, we have shown a consistent decrease in tumor blood flow (TBF) with carbogen breathing in the rat window chamber model. Also, we have previously shown that there is no significant difference in tumor growth time after radiation with air vs. carbogen breathing. This study was designed to investigate the effects of carbogen breathing on blood flow and oxygen levels in a solid tumor. Methods: Measurements were made in Fischer-344 rats with 8-10 mm diameter R3230Ac tumors transplanted either within the quadriceps muscle (n = 16) or subcutis (n = 14). Nontumor-bearing quadriceps muscle was studied in six other rats. After a 20-minute air-breathing baseline, rats breathed carbogen for an additional 40 minutes. Partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) was continuously monitored at one position for 60 minutes using 9-12 μm diameter oxygen microelectrodes. Blood flow was simultaneously monitored in all animals using laser Doppler flowmetry (1-2 probes/tumor). Results: Blood flow changes during carbogen breathing were variable in all tissues and intratumoral heterogeneity was observed. Despite variability in blood flow, pO 2 consistently increased in normal muscle but varied in both tumor sites. During carbogen breathing, the percent pO 2 measurements greater than the baseline average were 99.5% ± 0.4% (mean ± SEM), 42.7% ± 13.8%, and 79.8% ± 11.0% in normal muscle, subcutaneous tumor, and muscle tumor, respectively. To show the magnitude of change, average pO 2 values during air and carbogen breathing were calculated for each site. Normal muscle increased from 14.9 ± 2.3 to 39.0 ± 6.4 mm Hg (paired t-test; p = 0.009). Muscle tumors showed a rise from 14.6 ± 3.2 to 34.5 ± 8.2 mm Hg (p = 0.019). However, pO 2 in subcutaneous

  5. Tumor blood flow and systemic shunting in patients receiving intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, R.H.; Ziessman, H.A.; Medvec, B.R.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Keyes, J.W.; Pitt, S.R.; Baker, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radionuclide techniques have been used to estimate the systemic shunt and to quantitate blood flow to the tumor and a reference normal tissue in nine patients undergoing intraarterial chemotherapy for head and neck cancer. The systemic shunt was calculated as the percentage of pulmonary trapping of intraarterially injected /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean systemic shunt in the 12 separate arteries studied was 23 +/- 13% (SE) (range 8-43%). Quantitative blood flow was determined from the slope of the washout curve of intraarterially injected 133 Xe. The mean tumor blood flow was 13.6 +/- 6.7 ml/100 g/min, while the mean blood flow to the scalp was 4.2 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min providing a mean tumor/normal tissue ratio of 3.9 +/- 2.7. An estimate of blood flow distribution was obtained by calculating the ratio of counts/pixel in the tumor mass versus the remainder of the head as determined by single photon emission computed tomography following an intraarterial injection of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin. The mean ratio of tumor to normal tissue perfusion by this technique was 5.6 +/- 3.7. These techniques have allowed noninvasive determination of the blood flow parameters associated with intraarterial chemotherapy. At least part of the therapeutic advantage of regional chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer is due to a tumor/normal tissue blood flow ratio that favors drug delivery to the tumor contained within the infused volume

  6. Toward a full understanding of the EPR effect in primary and metastatic tumors as well as issues related to its heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-30

    The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect of solid tumors as seen with nanomedicines and macromolecular drugs is well known. However, many researchers appear to lack a full understanding of this effect. The effect varies depending on a patient's pathological and physiological characteristics and clinical condition. When a patient's systolic blood pressure is low side of about 90mmHg instead of 120-130mmHg, the hydrodynamic force pushing blood from the luminal side of a vessel into tumor tissue becomes significantly low, which results in a low EPR. Also, a vascular embolism in a tumor may impede blood flow and the EPR. Here, I describe the background of the EPR effect, heterogeneity of this effect, physiological and pathological factors affecting the effect, the EPR effect in metastatic tumors, artifacts of the EPR effect with micellar and liposomal drugs, problems of macromolecular drug stability and drug release, and access to target sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical simulation of moderator flow and temperature distributions in a CANDU reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.

    1982-10-01

    This paper describes numerical predictions of the two-dimensional flow and temperature fields of an internally-heated liquid in a typical CANDU reactor vessel. Turbulence momentum and energy transport are simulated using the k-epsilon model. Both steady-state and transient results are discussed. The finite control volume analogues of the conservation equations are solved using a modified version of the TEACH code

  8. CT perfusion for determination of pharmacologically mediated blood flow changes in an animal tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimé, Antoine; Peddi, Himaja; Hines-Peralta, Andrew U; Wilcox, Carol J; Kruskal, Jonathan; Lin, Shezhang; de Baere, Thierry; Raptopoulos, Vassilios D; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2007-06-01

    To prospectively compare single- and multisection computed tomographic (CT) perfusion for tumor blood flow determination in an animal model. All animal protocols and experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee before the study was initiated. R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma was implanted in 11 rats. Tumors (18-20 mm) were scanned with dynamic 16-section CT at baseline and after administration of arsenic trioxide, which is known to cause acute reduction in blood flow. The concentration of arsenic was titrated (0-6 mg of arsenic per kilogram of body weight) to achieve a defined blood flow reduction (0%-75%) from baseline levels at 60 minutes, as determined with correlative laser Doppler flowmetry. The mean blood flow was calculated for each of four 5-mm sections that covered the entire tumor, as well as for the entire tumor after multiple sections were processed. Measurements obtained with both methods were correlated with laser Doppler flowmetry measurements. Interobserver agreement was determined for two blinded radiologists, who calculated the percentage of blood flow reduction for the "most representative" single sections at baseline and after arsenic administration. These results were compared with the interobserver variability of the same radiologists obtained by summing blood flow changes for the entire tumor volume. Overall correlations for acute blood flow reduction were demonstrated between laser Doppler flowmetry and the two CT perfusion approaches (single-section CT, r=0.85 and r(2)=0.73; multisection CT, r=0.93 and r(2)=0.87; pooled data, P=.01). CT perfusion disclosed marked heterogeneity of blood flow, with variations of 36% +/- 13 between adjacent 5-mm sections. Given these marked differences, interobserver agreement was much lower for single-section CT (standard deviation, 0.22) than for multisection CT (standard deviation, 0.10; P=.01). Multisection CT perfusion techniques may provide an accurate and more reproducible

  9. Chimeric antigen receptors with human scFvs preferentially induce T cell anti-tumor activity against tumors with high B7H6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacerez, Albert T; Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E; Sentman, Charles L

    2018-05-01

    B7H6 is emerging as a promising tumor antigen that is known to be expressed on a wide array of tumors and is reported to stimulate anti-tumor responses from the immune system. As such, B7H6 presents a good target for tumor-specific immunotherapies. B7H6-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) based on a murine antibody showed successful targeting and elimination of tumors expressing B7H6. However, mouse single chain variable fragments (scFvs) have the potential to induce host anti-CAR responses that may limit efficacy, so human scFvs specific for B7H6 were selected by yeast surface display. In this study, we validate the functionality of these human scFvs when formatted into chimeric antigen receptors. The data indicate that T cells expressing these B7H6-specific human scFvs as CARs induced potent anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo against tumors expressing high amounts of B7H6. Importantly, these human scFv-based CARs are sensitive to changes in B7H6 expression which may potentially spare non-tumor cells that express B7H6 and provides the foundation for future clinical development.

  10. An integrated 3-D image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suetens, P.; Baert, A.L.; Gybels, J.; Haegemans, S.; Jansen, P.; Oosterlinck, A.; Wilms, G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors developed a method that yields an integrated three-dimensional image of cerebral blood vessels and CT view of tumor. This method allows the neurosurgeon to choose any electrode trajectory that looks convenient to him, without imminent danger of causing a hemorrhage. Besides offering more safety to stereotactic interventions, this integrated 3-D image also has other applications. First, it gives a better characterization of most focal mass lesions seen by CT. Second, it allows high dose focal irradiation to be effected in such a way as to avoid arteries and veins. Third, it provides useful information for planning the strategy of open surgery

  11. POST: a postprocessor computer code for producing three-dimensional movies of two-phase flow in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, K.A.; Liles, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    The development of the TRAC computer code for analysis of LOCAs in light-water reactors involves the use of a three-dimensional (r-theta-z), two-fluid hydrodynamics model to describe the two-phase flow of steam and water through the reactor vessel. One of the major problems involved in interpreting results from this code is the presentation of three-dimensional flow patterns. The purpose of the report is to present a partial solution to this data display problem. A first version of a code which produces three-dimensional movies of flow in the reactor vessel has been written and debugged. This code (POST) is used as a postprocessor in conjunction with a stand alone three-dimensional two-phase hydrodynamics code (CYLTF) which is a test bed for the three-dimensional algorithms to be used in TRAC

  12. The distribution of the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and trastuzumab within solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Carol M; Tannock, Ian F

    2010-01-01

    Poor distribution of some anticancer drugs in solid tumors may limit their anti-tumor activity. Here we used immunohistochemistry to quantify the distribution of the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies cetuximab and trastuzumab in relation to blood vessels and to regions of hypoxia in human tumor xenografts. The antibodies were injected into mice implanted with human epidermoid carcinoma A431 or human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 transfected with ERBB2 (231-H2N) that express high levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 respectively, or wild-type MDA-MB-231, which expresses intermediate levels of ErbB1 and low levels of ErbB2. The distribution of cetuximab in A431 xenografts and trastuzumab in 231-H2N xenografts was time and dose dependent. At early intervals after injection of 1 mg cetuximab into A431 xenografts, the concentration of cetuximab decreased with increasing distance from blood vessels, but became more uniformly distributed at later times; there remained however limited distribution and binding in hypoxic regions of tumors. Injection of lower doses of cetuximab led to heterogeneous distributions. Similar results were observed with trastuzumab in 231-H2N xenografts. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, which express lower levels of ErbB1, homogeneity of distribution of cetuximab was achieved more rapidly. Cetuximab and trastuzumab distribute slowly, but at higher doses achieve a relatively uniform distribution after about 24 hours, most likely due to their long half-lives in the circulation. There remains poor distribution within hypoxic regions of tumors

  13. Role of Erbin in ErbB2-dependent breast tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yanmei; Shen, Chengyong; Luo, Shiwen; Traoré, Wilfried; Marchetto, Sylvie; Santoni, Marie-Josée; Xu, Linlin; Wu, Biao; Shi, Chao; Mei, Jinghong; Bates, Ryan; Liu, Xihui; Zhao, Kai; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Borg, Jean-Paul; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    ErbB2 (v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2), a receptor tyrosine kinase of the ErbB family, is overexpressed in around 25% of breast cancers. In addition to forming a heterodimer with other ErbB receptors in response to ligand stimulation, ErbB2 can be activated in a ligand-independent manner. We report here that Erbin, an ErbB2-interacting protein that was thought to act as an antitumor factor, is specifically expressed in mammary luminal epithelial cells and facilitates ErbB2-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells and tumorigenesis in MMTV-neu transgenic mice. Disruption of their interaction decreases ErbB2-dependent proliferation, and deletion of the PDZ domain in Erbin hinders ErbB2-dependent tumor development in MMTV-neu mice. Mechanistically, Erbin forms a complex with ErbB2, promotes its interaction with the chaperon protein HSP90, and thus prevents its degradation. Finally, ErbB2 and Erbin expression correlates in human breast tumor tissues. Together, these observations establish Erbin as an ErbB2 regulator for breast tumor formation and progression. PMID:25288731

  14. Increased projection of MHC and tumor antigens in murine B16-BL6 melanoma induced by hydrostatic pressure and chemical crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, V; Eisenthal, A; Skornick, Y; Shinitzky, M

    1993-05-01

    The B16-BL6 melanoma, like most spontaneously arising tumors, is poorly immunogenic and expresses low levels of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. Treatment of cells of this tumor in vitro by hydrostatic pressure in the presence of adenosine 2',3'-dialdehyde (oxAdo), a membrane-impermeant crosslinker, caused elevated projection of MHC and a specific tumor antigen as demonstrated by flow-cytometric analysis. Maximum projection of both the MHC and the tumor antigens could be reached by application of 1200 atm for 15 min in the presence of 20 mM oxAdo. It is not yet clear whether this passive increase in availability of antigens on the cell surface originated from a dormant pool of antigens in the plasma membrane or from pressure-induced fusion of antigen-rich intracellular organelles (e.g. the endoplasmic reticulum). The immunogenic properties of the antigen-enriched B16-BL6 cells are described in the following paper.

  15. Monstrous venous haemangioma tumor of the retroperitonial space - Diagnosis and diagnostic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinung, S.; Wuerl, P.; Frey, A.; Schoenfelder, M.; Lotz, I.; Lochhaas, L.

    2000-01-01

    The preoperative diagnosis and its inherent problems are illustrated using a coincidentally diagnosed monstrous haemangioma tumor of the retroperitonial space in a twenty year old patient. With respect to our patient, X-ray, computer tomography and angiography all failed as diagnostic tools. Only the use of Doppler sonographic flow signals suggested the presence of a haemangioma. The morphology, prognosis and clinical significance of blood vessel tumors are multifaceted. The most important differential diagnoses to the venous haemangioma are the cavernous and the cappilliary haemangioma. The venous haemangioma distinguishes itself through the presence of blood vessel walls. Haemangiomas are common benign tumors. In the presence of highly developed muscular components, there exists a transition to angiomyomas and to leiomyomas. Venal haemangiomas are extremely rare in the demonstrated localisation of the retroperitoneal space. Here they can grow to monstrous preportions whilst remaining undetected. Thus the patient is under the potential danger of bleeding to death through trivial injuries. The therapy of choice reamins total surgical excision. (orig.) [de

  16. Experimental and theoretical studies of transient boiling and two-phase flow during the depressurisation of a simple glass vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardron, K.H.; Furness, R.A.; Hall, P.C.

    1976-11-01

    Blowdown experiments using a glass pressure vessel containing saturated water at 4 bars have been performed to assist interpretation of the results of large scale experiments and aid understanding of the physical processes involved. Results have shown the strong dependence of depressurisation time, phase distribution and mass flow rate on the length to diameter ratio of the exit pipe. Preliminary observations of the flow regime in the discharge pipe are consistent with predictions of the flow regime map of Mandhane, Gregory and Aziz 1974. Different flow regimes have been observed at different axial positions along the pipe. Bubble growth rates during the non-equilibrium phase of blowdown are shown to be in reasonable agreement with a simple convective heat flux analysis previously used in blowdown calculations. The transient pressure and liquid distribution in the vessel have been compared with calculations using the blowdown code RELAP-UK. (U.K.)

  17. Structural design considerations in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vepa, K.; Sterbentz, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    In view of favorable results from the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) also at LLNL, the MFTF project is now being rescoped into a large tandem mirror configuration (MFTF-B), which is the mainline approach to a mirror fusion reactor. This paper concerns itself with the structural aspects of the design of the vessel. The vessel and its intended functions are described. The major structural design issues, especially those influenced by the analysis, are described. The objectives of the finite element analysis and their realization are discussed at length

  18. Longitudinal Studies of Angiogenesis in Hormone-Dependent Shionogi Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor P. Wade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Vessel size imaging was used to assess changes in the average vessel size of Shionogi tumors throughout the tumor growth cycle. Changes in R2 and R2* relaxivities caused by the injection of a superparamagnetic contrast agent (ferumoxtran-10 were measured using a 2.35-T animal magnetic resonance imaging system, and average vessel size index (VSI was calculated for each stage of tumor progression: growth, regression, and relapse. Statistical analysis using Spearman rank correlation test showed no dependence between vessel size and tumor volume at any stage of the tumor growth cycle. Paired Student's t test was used to assess the statistical significance of the differences in average vessel size for the three stages of the tumor growth cycle. The average VSI for regressing tumors (15.1 ± 6.6 wm was significantly lower than that for growing tumors (35.2 ± 25.5 μm; P < .01. Relapsing tumors also had an average VSI (45.4 ± 41.8 μm higher than that of regressing tumors, although the difference was not statistically significant (P = .067. This study shows that VSI imaging is a viable method for the noninvasive monitoring of angiogenesis during the progression of a Shionogi tumor from androgen dependence to androgen independence.

  19. A wave propagation model of blood flow in large vessels using an approximate velocity profile function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessems, D.; Rutten, M.C.M.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2007-01-01

    Lumped-parameter models (zero-dimensional) and wave-propagation models (one-dimensional) for pressure and flow in large vessels, as well as fully three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction models for pressure and velocity, can contribute valuably to answering physiological and patho-physiological

  20. DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF/VEGFR2-activated angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeong Sim; Lee, Kangwook; Kim, Min Kyoung; Lee, Kang Min; Shin, Yong Cheol; Cho, Sung-Gook; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-04-19

    Tumor growth requires a process called angiogenesis, a new blood vessel formation from pre-existing vessels, as newly formed vessels provide tumor cells with oxygen and nutrition. Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-Tang (DSGOST), one of traditional Chinese medicines, has been widely used in treatment of vessel diseases including Raynaud's syndrome in Northeast Asian countries including China, Japan and Korea. Therefore, we hypothesized that DSGOST might inhibit tumor growth by targeting newly formed vessels on the basis of its historical prescription. Here, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits tumor growth by inhibiting VEGF-induced angiogenesis. DSGOST inhibited VEGF-induced angiogenic abilities of endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, which resulted from its inhibition of VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction. Furthermore, DSGOST attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in vivo by reducing angiogenic vessel numbers, while not affecting pancreatic tumor cell viability. Thus, our data conclude that DSGOST inhibits VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis, suggesting a new indication for DSGOST in treatment of cancer.

  1. 33 CFR 90.3 - Pushing vessel and vessel being pushed: Composite unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pushing vessel and vessel being... HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES INLAND RULES: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 90.3 Pushing vessel and vessel being pushed: Composite unit. Rule 24(b) of the Inland Rules states that when a pushing vessel and...

  2. 33 CFR 82.3 - Pushing vessel and vessel being pushed: Composite unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pushing vessel and vessel being... HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES 72 COLREGS: INTERPRETATIVE RULES § 82.3 Pushing vessel and vessel being pushed: Composite unit. Rule 24(b) of the 72 COLREGS states that when a pushing vessel and a...

  3. Numerical Simulation to Phenomenon of Main Vessel Free Surface Flow Impact Coping for Fast Reactor by Moving Particle Semi-implicit Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yuanyuan; Lu Daogang

    2009-01-01

    There is the free surface in the main vessel of fast reactor, when long period earthquakes happen, the fluid will impact the coping of vessel and make the reactor dangerous. The flow of the fluid was simulated by moving particle semi-implicit method. The phenomenon on sloshing response of the free surface in the main vessel of fast reactor excited by 3 sine waves was simulated. The impact pressure from the research can provide important loadings for the integrality analysis of the main vessel. (authors)

  4. B16 melanoma tumor growth is delayed in mice in an age-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Pettan-Brewer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A major risk factor for cancer is increasing age, which suggests that syngeneic tumor implants in old mice would grow more rapidly. However, various reports have suggested that old mice are not as permissive to implanted tumor cells as young mice. In order to determine and characterize the age-related response to B16 melanoma, we implanted 5×105 tumor cells into 8, 16, 24, and 32-month-old male C57BL/6 (B6 and C57BL/6×BALB/c F1 (CB6 F1 mice subcutaneously in the inguinal and axillary spaces, or intradermally in the lateral flank. Results showed decreased tumor volume with increasing age, which varied according to mouse genetic background and the implanted site. The B6 strain showed robust tumor growth at 8 months of age at the inguinal implantation site, with an average tumor volume of 1341.25 mm3. The 16, 24, and 32-month age groups showed a decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 563.69, 481.02, and 264.55 mm3, respectively (p≤0.001. The axillary implantation site was less permissive in 8-month-old B6 mice with an average tumor volume of 761.52 mm3. The 24- and 32-month age groups showed a similar decrease in tumor growth with tumor volumes of 440 and 178.19 mm3, respectively (p≤0.01. The CB6F1 strain was not as tumor permissive at 8 months of age as B6 mice with average tumor volumes of 446.96 and 426.91 mm3 for the inguinal and axillary sites, respectively. There was a decrease in tumor growth at 24 months of age at both inguinal and axillary sites with an average tumor volume of 271.02 and 249.12 mm3, respectively (p≤0.05. The strain dependence was not apparent in 8-month-old mice injected intradermally with B16 melanoma cells, with average tumor volumes of 736.82 and 842.85 mm3 for B6 and CB6 F1, respectively. However, a strain difference was seen in 32-month-old B6 mice with an average decrease in tumor volume of 250.83 mm3 (p≤0.01. In contrast, tumor growth significantly decreased earlier in CB6 F1 mice with average

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, carrying the activating mutation D849N, accelerates the establishment of B16 melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shioto; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Heuchel, Rainer Lothar

    2007-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β are mainly expressed in the developing vasculature, where PDGF-BB is produced by endothelial cells and PDGFR-β is expressed by mural cells, including pericytes. PDGF-BB is produced by most types of solid tumors, and PDGF receptor signaling participates in various processes, including autocrine stimulation of tumor cell growth, recruitment of tumor stroma fibroblasts, and stimulation of tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-producing tumors are characterized by increased pericyte abundance and accelerated tumor growth. Thus, there is a growing interest in the development of tumor treatment strategies by blocking PDGF/PDGFR function. We have recently generated a mouse model carrying an activated PDGFR-β by replacing the highly conserved aspartic acid residue (D) 849 in the activating loop with asparagine (N). This allowed us to investigate, in an orthotopic tumor model, the role of increased stromal PDGFR-β signaling in tumor-stroma interactions. B16 melanoma cells lacking PDGFR-β expression and either mock-transfected or engineered to express PDGF-BB, were injected alone or in combination with matrigel into mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) and into wild type mice. The tumor growth rate was followed and the vessel status of tumors, i.e. total vessel area/tumor, average vessel surface and pericyte density of vessels, was analyzed after resection. Tumors grown in mice carrying an activated PDGFR-β were established earlier than those in wild-type mice. In this early phase, the total vessel area and the average vessel surface were higher in tumors grown in mice carrying the activated PDGFR-β (D849N) compared to wild-type mice, whereas we did not find a significant difference in the number of tumor vessels and the pericyte abundance around tumor vessels between wild type and mutant mice. At later phases of tumor progression, no significant difference in tumor growth rate was

  6. X-ray phase contrast with injected gas for tumor microangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundström, U; Larsson, D H; Burvall, A; Hertz, H M; Westermark, U K; Henriksson, M Arsenian

    2014-01-01

    We show that the microvasculature of mouse tumors can be visualized using propagation-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging with gas as the contrast agent. The large density difference over the gas–tissue interface provides high contrast, allowing the imaging of small-diameter blood vessels with relatively short exposure times and low dose using a compact liquid-metal-jet x-ray source. The method investigated is applied to tumors (E1A/Ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts) grown in mouse ears, demonstrating sub-15-µm-diameter imaging of their blood vessels. The exposure time for a 2D projection image is a few seconds and a full tomographic 3D map takes some minutes. The method relies on the strength of the vasculature to withstand the gas pressure. Given that tumor vessels are known to be more fragile than normal vessels, we investigate the tolerance of the vasculature of 12 tumors to gas injection and find that a majority withstand 200 mbar pressures, enough to fill 12-µm-diameter vessels with gas. A comparison of the elasticity of tumorous and non-tumorous vessels supports the assumption of tumor vessels being more fragile. Finally, we conclude that the method has the potential to be extended to the imaging of 15 µm vessels in thick tissue, including mouse imaging, making it of interest for, e.g., angiogenesis research. (paper)

  7. The correlation between the rise of the tumor temperature during the hyperthermia treatment and the tumor blood flow measured by dynamic CT and 15O gas-positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hideyuki

    1993-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the correlation between the rise of tumor temperature during hyperthermia treatment and the blood flow of the tumors measured by dynamic CT (DCT) and 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. In this report, we observed 20 patients with malignant tumors which underwent hyperthermia treatment. In each case, the temperature of the tumor was monitored with a photofiber sensor. DCT's and 15 O gas-positron emission tomographies were applied before the hyperthermia treatment. During the DCT, the tumor blood flow of each tumor was estimated by analyzing the time-dependent activity curve after a bolus injection. During the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography, the tumor blood flow was estimated by the C 15 O 2 -steady-state method. The value of the tumor blood flow estimated by DCT were proportional to those calculated by the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography. These values were inversely proportional to the rise of the temperature of the tumors during hyperthermia treatment. Our results imply that DCT as well as the 15 O gas-positron emission tomography can be used for the prediction of the tumor temperature rise during the hyperthermia treatment. (author)

  8. Expansion of myeloid immune suppressor Gr+CD11b+ cells in tumor-bearing host directly promotes tumor angiogenesis | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    We demonstrate a novel tumor-promoting role of myeloid immune suppressor Gr+CD11b+ cells, which are evident in cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals. These cells constitute approximately 5% of total cells in tumors. Tumors coinjected with Gr+CD11b+ cells exhibited increased vascular density, vascular maturation, and decreased necrosis. These immune cells produce high

  9. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation

  10. On a computational study for investigating acoustic streaming and heating during focused ultrasound ablation of liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovchuk, Maxim A.; Sheu, Tony W.H.; Thiriet, Marc; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    The influences of blood vessels and focused location on temperature distribution during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of liver tumors are studied numerically. A three-dimensional acoustics-thermal-fluid coupling model is employed to compute the temperature field in the hepatic cancerous region. The model construction is based on the linear Westervelt and bioheat equations as well as the nonlinear Navier–Stokes equations for the liver parenchyma and blood vessels. The effect of acoustic streaming is also taken into account in the present HIFU simulation study. Different blood vessel diameters and focal point locations were investigated. We found from this three-dimensional numerical study that in large blood vessels both the convective cooling and acoustic streaming can considerably change the temperature field and the thermal lesion near blood vessels. If the blood vessel is located within the beam width, both acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects should be addressed. The temperature rise on the blood vessel wall generated by a 1.0 MHz focused ultrasound transducer with the focal intensity 327 W/cm 2 was 54% lower when acoustic streaming effect was taken into account. Subject to the applied acoustic power the streaming velocity in a 3 mm blood vessel is 12 cm/s. Thirty percent of the necrosed volume can be reduced, when taking into account the acoustic streaming effect. -- Highlights: • 3D three-field coupling physical model for focused ultrasound tumor ablation is presented. • Acoustic streaming and blood flow cooling effects on ultrasound heating are investigated. • Acoustic streaming can considerably affect the temperature distribution. • The lesion can be reduced by 30% due to the acoustic streaming effect. • Temperature on the blood vessel wall is reduced by 54% due to the acoustic streaming effect

  11. Penetration of the consolidant Paraloid® B-72 in Macuxi indigenous ceramic vessels investigated by neutron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojev Pereira, Marco A.; Pugliesi, Reynaldo

    2018-05-01

    The neutron tomography technique was applied in studying the penetration of the consolidant Paraloid® B-72 in contemporary indigenous ceramic vessels. The study was carried out for two distinct and controlled air humidity conditions, 40% and 90%, in which the vessels were exposed, before the consolidant application. The obtained images have proved that the penetration of Paraloid® B-72 in the ceramic does not depend on the humidity condition in which it was applied, moreover allowed a macro-visualization of the consolidant penetration in the ceramic vessel. As the vessels used in the present work were manufactured by an indigenous artisan, Macuxi, according to the same procedures and raw materials used by the ancient artisans, the results obtained can be used as a guide to assist experts, both in the study of archeological objects of Macuxi origin, as well as other objects that had been made by other tribes that lived in the same Amazon region, in Brazil.

  12. In vivo MR monitoring of pH and blood flow during hyperglycemia in a brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.L.; Ross, B.D.; Merkle, H.; Garwood, M.

    1988-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that tumors exhibit an acidotic pH shift following hyperglycemia, which may aid in hyperthermic treatments. P-31 and H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to monitor hyperglycemia-induced pH and blood flow changes, respectively, in subcutaneous and intracerebral C6 gliomas in rats. Subcutaneous tumors had a 78.2% +- 8.03% (standard error of the mean) decrease in blood flow and a concomitant pH decrease of 0.76 units +- 0.08. However, intracerebral tumors displayed an average blood flow reduction of only 20.9% +- 6.1%, with no significant pH change following hyperglycemia. These results indicate that the tissue harboring the tumor may have an important role in the overall tumor response to hyperglycemia

  13. Noninvasive diffuse optical monitoring of head and neck tumor blood flow and oxygenation during radiation delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study explored using a novel diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter to noninvasively monitor blood flow and oxygenation changes in head and neck tumors during radiation delivery. A fiber-optic probe connected to the DCS flow-oximeter was placed on the surface of the radiologically/clinically involved cervical lymph node. The DCS flow-oximeter in the treatment room was remotely operated by a computer in the control room. From the early measurements, abnormal signals were observed when the optical device was placed in close proximity to the radiation beams. Through phantom tests, the artifacts were shown to be caused by scattered x rays and consequentially avoided by moving the optical device away from the x-ray beams. Eleven patients with head and neck tumors were continually measured once a week over a treatment period of seven weeks, although there were some missing data due to the patient related events. Large inter-patient variations in tumor hemodynamic responses were observed during radiation delivery. A significant increase in tumor blood flow was observed at the first week of treatment, which may be a physiologic response to hypoxia created by radiation oxygen consumption. Only small and insignificant changes were found in tumor blood oxygenation, suggesting that oxygen utilizations in tumors during the short period of fractional radiation deliveries were either minimal or balanced by other effects such as blood flow regulation. Further investigations in a large patient population are needed to correlate the individual hemodynamic responses with the clinical outcomes for determining the prognostic value of optical measurements. PMID:22312579

  14. Longitudinal optical monitoring of blood flow in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. M.; Chung, S. H.; Leproux, A.; Baker, W. B.; Busch, D. R.; DeMichele, A. M.; Tchou, J.; Tromberg, B. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    We measure tissue blood flow markers in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and investigate their correlation to pathologic complete response in a pilot longitudinal patient study (n  =  4). Tumor blood flow is quantified optically by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and tissue optical properties, blood oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration are derived from concurrent diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). The study represents the first longitudinal DCS measurement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in humans over the entire course of treatment; it therefore offers a first correlation between DCS flow indices and pathologic complete response. The use of absolute optical properties measured by DOSI facilitates significant improvement of DCS blood flow calculation, which typically assumes optical properties based on literature values. Additionally, the combination of the DCS blood flow index and the tissue oxygen saturation from DOSI permits investigation of tissue oxygen metabolism. Pilot results from four patients suggest that lower blood flow in the lesion-bearing breast is correlated with pathologic complete response. Both absolute lesion blood flow and lesion flow relative to the contralateral breast exhibit potential for characterization of pathological response. This initial demonstration of the combined optical approach for chemotherapy monitoring provides incentive for more comprehensive studies in the future and can help power those investigations.

  15. Comprehending the structure of a vacuum vessel and in-vessel components of fusion machines. 1. Comprehending the vacuum vessel structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Masanori; Nakahira, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    The functions, conditions and structure of vacuum vessel using tokamak fusion machines are explained. The structural standard and code of vacuum vessel, process of vacuum vessel design, and design of ITER vacuum vessel are described. Production and maintenance of ultra high vacuum, confinement of radioactive materials, support of machines in vessel and electromagnetic force, radiation shield, plasma vertical stability, one-turn electric resistance, high temperature baking heat and remove of nuclear heat, reduce of troidal ripple, structural standard, features of safety of nuclear fusion machines, subjects of structural standard of fusion vacuum vessel, design flow of vacuum vessel, establishment of radial build, selections of materials, baking and cooling method, basic structure, structure of special parts, shield structure, and of support structure, and example of design of structure, ITER, are stated. (S.Y.)

  16. In Vivo Tumor Targeting by the B-Subunit of Shiga Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Viel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of drugs to the appropriate target cells would improve efficacy and reduce potential side effects. The nontoxic B-subunit of the intestinal pathogen-produced Shiga toxin (STxB binds specifically to the glycosphingolipid Gb3, overex-pressed in membranes of certain tumor cells, and enters these cells through the retrograde pathway. Therefore, STxB binding to Gb3 receptors may be useful for cell-specific vectorization or imaging purposes. Here we labeled STxB with a fluorophore to evaluate its potential as an in vivo cell-specific targeting reagent in two different models of human colorectal carcinoma. Fluorescent STxB was administered systemically to xenografted nude mice, and its biodistribution was studied by optical imaging. The use of fluorescent STxB allowed the combination of the macroscopic observations with analyses at the cellular level using confocal microscopy. After administration, the fluorescent STxB was slowly eliminated by renal excretion. However, it accumulated in the tumor area. Furthermore, STxB was demonstrated to enter the Gb3-expressing tumoral cells, as well as the epithelial cells of the neovascularization and the monocytes and macrophages surrounding the xenografts.

  17. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie

    2017-01-01

    with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. RESULTS: Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow...... using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.......BACKGROUND: Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being...

  18. Careful treatment planning enables safe ablation of liver tumors adjacent to major blood vessels by percutaneous irreversible electroporation (IRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Bor; Voigt, Peter; Miklavcic, Damijan; Moche, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a tissue ablation method, which relies on the phenomenon of electroporation. When cells are exposed to a sufficiently electric field, the plasma membrane is disrupted and cells undergo an apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Although heating effects are known IRE is considered as non-thermal ablation technique and is currently applied to treat tumors in locations where thermal ablation techniques are contraindicated. The manufacturer of the only commercially available pulse generator for IRE recommends a voltage-to-distance ratio of 1500 to 1700 V/cm for treating tumors in the liver. However, major blood vessels can influence the electric field distribution. We present a method for treatment planning of IRE which takes the influence of blood vessels on the electric field into account; this is illustrated on a treatment of 48-year-old patient with a metastasis near the remaining hepatic vein after a right side hemi-hepatectomy. Output of the numerical treatment planning method shows that a 19.9 cm3 irreversible electroporation lesion was generated and the whole tumor was covered with at least 900 V/cm. This compares well with the volume of the hypodense lesion seen in contrast enhanced CT images taken after the IRE treatment. A significant temperature raise occurs near the electrodes. However, the hepatic vein remains open after the treatment without evidence of tumor recurrence after 6 months. Treatment planning using accurate computer models was recognized as important for electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. An important finding of this study was, that the surface of the electrodes heat up significantly. Therefore the clinical user should generally avoid placing the electrodes less than 4 mm away from risk structures when following recommendations of the manufacturer.

  19. Coupling of glucose deprivation with impaired histone H2B monoubiquitination in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Urasaki

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is associated with tumorigenesis. However, glucose metabolism in tumors is poorly understood. Here, we report that glucose levels are significantly lower in bulk tumor specimens than those in normal tissues of the same tissue origins. We show that mono-ubiquitinated histone H2B (uH2B is a semi-quantitative histone marker for glucose. We further show that loss of uH2B occurs specifically in cancer cells from a wide array of tumor specimens of breast, colon, lung and additional 23 anatomic sites. In contrast, uH2B levels remain high in stromal tissues or non-cancerous cells in the tumor specimens. Taken together, our data suggest that glucose deficiency and loss of uH2B are novel properties of cancer cells in vivo, which may represent important regulatory mechanisms of tumorigenesis.

  20. A theoretical model describing arterial flow in the DIEP flap related to number and size of perforator vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sameer A; Keller, Alex

    2008-11-01

    The deep inferior epigastric perforator flap is rapidly becoming a more widely employed method of autologous breast reconstruction. The technical considerations involved in the execution of the flap are many and include the selection of perforators to be incorporated in the flap. We attempt to give a mathematical explanation, based on the physics of flow through vessels and the properties of circuits with multiple resistances in parallel, for the clinical observations which have been arrived at through clinical experience. We compare the system of perforators to a circuit with multiple resistances in parallel. Each of these resistances represents a perforator vessel. In the event that there is only one perforator vessel, this simplifies to a single resistance in series with the capillary bed perfusing the flap. The flow through the flap is optimized by incorporation of the largest diameter perforator. Inclusion of other smaller perforators in addition to the largest diameter perforator will reduce the overall resistance, but this reduction in resistance is dependent on the diameter of the additional perforator and may not be worth the additional trauma of dissection and increased operative time. Incorporating several smaller perforators at the expense of excluding the largest diameter perforator appears to increase the overall resistance, unless the smaller perforators are only slightly smaller. We conclude that the best perfused flap involves use of the largest diameter vessel, that although adding additional perforators will decrease the resistance and increase flow, the magnitude of the benefit depends largely on the calibre of the additional perforator, and that this benefit needs to be weighed against the downside of increased muscle and facial trauma.

  1. 2D time-of-flight MR angiography using concatenated saturation bands for determining direction of flow in the intracranial vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbit, G.M.; DeMarco, J.K.

    1997-01-01

    We prospectively studied 15 patients to assess 2D time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with concatenated saturation bands for determining the direction of intracranial blood flow. This MRA sequence was compared to T2-weighted spin-echo MRI, 3D-TOF MRA, and intra-arterial angiography (IAA) as regards demonstration of vessels and determination of the direction of flow in the circle of Willis and its branches. The 2D-TOF MRA sequence demonstrated flow in 98.5 % vessel segments identified on IAA, 3D-TOF demonstrating 92 % and spin-echo images 77 %. The direction of flow shown on the 2D-TOF sequence was correct in 94 % when compared to conventional angiography, the remaining six segments not demonstrating flow. In ten patients, the flow abnormalities demonstrated by this MRA technique provided clinical information similar to that of conventional angiography in nine, but it was incomplete in three, and misleading in one. Slow retrograde flow in ophthalmic artery collaterals and differentiation of arteries and veins presented some problems. 2D-TOF MRA with concatenated saturation bands provides flow direction information using widely available, easily applicable TOF techniques, and can be a useful adjunct to MRI and MRA if information on flow direction is needed. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Aminopeptidase A is a functional target in angiogenic blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiò, Serena; Lahdenranta, Johanna; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Valdembri, Donatella; Wesseling, Pieter; Arap, Marco A; Hajitou, Amin; Ozawa, Michael G; Trepel, Martin; Giordano, Ricardo J; Nanus, David M; Dijkman, Henri B P M; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Sidman, Richard L; Cooper, Max D; Bussolino, Federico; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2004-02-01

    We show that a membrane-associated protease, aminopeptidase A (APA), is upregulated and enzymatically active in blood vessels of human tumors. To gain mechanistic insight, we evaluated angiogenesis in APA null mice. We found that, although these mice develop normally, they fail to mount the expected angiogenic response to hypoxia or growth factors. We then isolated peptide inhibitors of APA from a peptide library and show that they specifically bind to and inhibit APA, suppress migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, inhibit angiogenesis, and home to tumor blood vessels. Finally, we successfully treated tumor-bearing mice with APA binding peptides or anti-APA blocking monoclonal antibodies. These data show that APA is a regulator of blood vessel formation, and can serve as a functional vascular target.

  3. Static and dynamic analyses on the MFTF [Mirror Fusion Test Facility]-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel System: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-09-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large-scale, tandem-mirror-fusion experiment. MFTF-B comprises many highly interconnected systems, including a magnet array and a vacuum vessel. The vessel, which houses the magnet array, is supported by reinforced concrete piers and steel frames resting on an array of foundations and surrounded by a 7-ft-thick concrete shielding vault. The Pittsburgh-Des Moines (PDM) Corporation, which was awarded the contract to design and construct the vessel, carried out fixed-base static and dynamic analyses of a finite-element model of the axicell vessel and magnet systems, including the simulation of various loading conditions and three postulated earthquake excitations. Meanwhile, LLNL monitored PDM's analyses with modeling studies of its own, and independently evaluated the structural responses of the vessel in order to define design criteria for the interface members and other project equipment. The assumptions underlying the finite-element model and the behavior of the axicell vessel are described in detail in this report, with particular emphasis placed on comparing the LLNL and PDM studies and on analyzing the fixed-base behavior with the soil-structure interaction, which occurs between the vessel and the massive concrete vault wall during a postulated seismic event. The structural members that proved sensitive to the soil effect are also reevaluated

  4. Reactor pressure vessel steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelli, R.; Kemppainen, M.; Toerroenen, K.

    1979-11-01

    This report presents the tensile test results of steels ASTM A533B and A508 Cl.2 obtained in connection with a programme initiated to gather and create information needed for the assessment of the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessels. The tensile properties were studied between -196 and 300 degC varying austenitizing and tempering temperatures and having two different carbon contents for the heats of A533B. (author)

  5. Functional response of tumor vasculature in rats' glioma to hypercarbia evaluated by MR perfusion weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingbo; Feng Xiaoyuan; Liang Zonghui; Chen Shuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of MR PWI in judging maturity and variability of tumor vasculature in gliomas in rats. Methods: Twenty male SD rats were randomly assigned to tumor group and control group. Four weeks after implantation of C6 glioma cells in the brains of tumor group and injection of saline in the brains of control group, all rats were examined using MR PWI before and after inhalation of a mixture of 10% CO2 and 90% air. PaCO 2 and blood pH values of rats were monitored. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) values of tumors and normal brain tissue were measured. Brain sample were examined histologically using HE and immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin(SMA). The histological features of gliomas were observed and SMA positively stained vessels of each tumor were counted manually using a light microscope. Perfusion data and pathological findings were analyzed statistically with SPSS for Windows. Results: PaCO 2 increased significantly [from(4.69±0.62)kPa to (7.62±0.81) kPa in tumor group and from (4.67±0.51) kPa to (7.63±0.78) kPa in control group, P 0.05), while changing rate of rCBV, rCBF in normal brain tissue correlated well with number of positive SMA labeled vessels (r=0.721 and 0.525, P 2 increase in the normal brain and in the tumor. It may be a useful technique to measure maturity of tumor vessels. (authors)

  6. Ultrasonic density detector for vessel and reactor core two-phase flow measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arave, A.E.

    1979-01-01

    A local ultrasonic density (LUD) detector has been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor vessel and core two-phase flow density measurements. The principle of operating the sensor is the change in propagation time of a torsional ultrasonic wave in a metal transmission line as a function of the density of the surrounding media. A theoretical physics model is presented which represents the total propagation time as a function of the sensor modulus of elasticity and polar moment of inertia

  7. Molecular nuclear imaging of tumoral angio genesis using a rgd-containing tracer, Raft-RGD, targeted at the neo vessel-specific integrin αvβ3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancey, L.

    2006-06-01

    Tumoral neo-angio genesis targeting is currently a major field of research for the diagnostic and treatment of solid tumors. Endothelial cells from neo vessels over express several specific markers such as the α v β 3 integrin, which binds RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-)- containing peptides. We evaluated the potential of a novel radiotracer - RAFT-RGD - for the molecular nuclear imaging of neo vessels. In vitro, the coupling of 4 c(RGDfK) to the RAFT platform resulted in an increased cellular uptake of the tracer by α v β 3 positive cells when compared to c(RGDfK). Furthermore, RAFTRGD has a higher affinity than c(RGDfK) and similar properties for angio genesis inhibition. In vivo, both α v β 3 positive and negative tumors were visible by non invasive whole body planar and tomographic imaging from 30 min to 24 h post-injection, using a gamma camera dedicated to small animal imaging. Despite a lack of significant contrast improvement compare with c(RGDfK), RAFT-RGD could represent a promising tracer for tumoral angio genesis since it could provide invaluable information about tumor development and treatment efficacy in Nuclear Medicine departments. Furthermore, thanks to its chemical structure, RAFT-RGD can be labelled with a variety of radioisotopes including γ and β - emitters, allowing interesting therapeutical applications such as internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood vascular tumors form from cells that make blood vessels or lymph vessels. They can be benign (not cancer) or malignant (cancer). Get information about the symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, and treatment of the most common type of vascular tumor, infantile hemangioma, and other vascular tumors in this expert-reviewed summary.

  9. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  10. Regional glucose utilization and blood flow in experimental brain tumors studied by double tracer autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, A.; Sako, K.; Diksic, M.; Yamamoto, Y.L.; Feindel, W.

    1985-01-01

    Coupling of regional glucose utilization (GLU) and blood flow (CBF) was examined in rats with implanted brain tumors (AA ascites tumor) by quantitative double tracer autoradiography using YF-2-fluorodeoxyglucose and 14C-iodoantipyrine. Four to 13 days after implantation, the animals were injected with the two tracers to obtain autoradiograms from the same brain section before and after the decay of YF. The autoradiograms were then analyzed by an image processor to obtain a metabolic coupling index (MCI = GLU/CBF). In the tumor, high GLU and low CBF were uncoupled to give a high MCI which implied anerobic glycolysis. In large tumors, the CBF was even lower. In the peri-tumoral region, GLU was reduced and reduction was lowest around the larger tumors. CBF in the peri-tumoral region was also reduced, but this reduction became less as the distance from the tumor margin increased. The GLU and CBF of white matter was little influenced by the presence of tumors except for some reduction in these values in relation to the larger tumors. The MCI in the tumor was higher than in the cortex of the same as well as the opposite hemisphere. These findings indicate that the metabolism and blood flow of the tumor and surrounding brain are variable and directly related to tumor size.

  11. Blood flow responses to mild-intensity exercise in ectopic vs. orthotopic prostate tumors; dependence upon host tissue hemodynamics and vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Emmanuel; Becker, Veronika G C; McCullough, Danielle J; Stabley, John N; Gittemeier, Elizabeth M; Opoku-Acheampong, Alexander B; Sieman, Dietmar W; Behnke, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Given the critical role of tumor O2 delivery in patient prognosis and the rise in preclinical exercise oncology studies, we investigated tumor and host tissue blood flow at rest and during exercise as well as vascular reactivity using a rat prostate cancer model grown in two transplantation sites. In male COP/CrCrl rats, blood flow (via radiolabeled microspheres) to prostate tumors [R3327-MatLyLu cells injected in the left flank (ectopic) or ventral prostate (orthotopic)] and host tissue was measured at rest and during a bout of mild-intensity exercise. α-Adrenergic vasoconstriction to norepinephrine (NE: 10(-9) to 10(-4) M) was determined in arterioles perforating the tumors and host tissue. To determine host tissue exercise hyperemia in healthy tissue, a sham-operated group was included. Blood flow was lower at rest and during exercise in ectopic tumors and host tissue (subcutaneous adipose) vs. the orthotopic tumor and host tissue (prostate). During exercise, blood flow to the ectopic tumor significantly decreased by 25 ± 5% (SE), whereas flow to the orthotopic tumor increased by 181 ± 30%. Maximal vasoconstriction to NE was not different between arterioles from either tumor location. However, there was a significantly higher peak vasoconstriction to NE in subcutaneous adipose arterioles (92 ± 7%) vs. prostate arterioles (55 ± 7%). Establishment of the tumor did not alter host tissue blood flow from either location at rest or during exercise. These data demonstrate that blood flow in tumors is dependent on host tissue hemodynamics and that the location of the tumor may critically affect how exercise impacts the tumor microenvironment and treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Arterial displacement by the tumor demonstrated by magnetic resonance CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro.

    1985-01-01

    MR-CT permits visualization of blood vessels non-invasively. Major blood vessels in scan slices are demonstrated as structures with low or no signal intensity. In this report, two cases with brain tumor and spinal tumor are presented in which arterial displacement by the tumor was visualized by MR-CT. MR-CT is considered to be an effective method in detecting blood vessel abnormalities. (author)

  13. EFFECT OF ION ∇ B DRIFT DIRECTION ON TURBULENCE FLOW AND FLOW SHEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FENZI, C; McKEE, G.R; BURRELL, K.H; CARLSTROM, T.N; FONCK, R.J; GROEBNER, R.J

    2003-01-01

    The divertor magnetic geometry has a significant effect on the poloidal flow and resulting flow shear of turbulence in the outer region of L-mode tokamak plasmas, as determined via two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations with Beam Emission Spectroscopy on DIII-D. Plasmas with similar parameters, except that in one case the ion (del)B drift points towards the divertor X-point (lower single-null, LSN), and in the other case, the ion (del)B drift points away from the divertor X-point (upper single-null, USN), are compared. Inside of r/a=0.9, the turbulence characteristics (amplitude, flow direction, correlation lengths) are similar in both cases, while near r/a=0.92, a dramatic reversal of the poloidal flow of turbulence relative to the core flow direction is observed in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. No such flow reversal is observed in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing away from the divertor X-point. This poloidal flow reversal results in a significantly larger local shear in the poloidal turbulence flow velocity in plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing towards the divertor X-point. Additionally, these plasmas locally exhibit significant dispersion, with two distinct and counter-propagating turbulence modes. Likewise, the radial correlation length of the turbulence is reduced in these plasmas, consistent with biorthogonal decomposition measurements of dominant turbulence structures. The naturally occurring turbulence flow shear in these LSN plasmas may facilitate the LH transition that occurs at an input power of roughly one-half to one-third that of corresponding plasmas with the ion (del)B drift pointing away from the X-point

  14. CFD analysis of moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansal, Anuj Kumar; Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B.; Maheshwari, Naresh Kumar; Vijayan, Pallippattu Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D CFD of vertical calandria vessel. • Spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. • Effect of Archimedes number. • Non-dimensional analysis. - Abstract: Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed for the moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor under normal operating condition using OpenFOAM CFD code. OpenFOAM is validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data available in literature. CFD model includes the calandria vessel, calandria tubes, inlet header and outlet header. Analysis has been performed for the cases of uniform and spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. Studies show that the maximum temperature in moderator is lower in the case of spatial distribution of heat generation as compared to that in the uniform heat generation in calandria. In addition, the effect of Archimedes number on maximum and average moderator temperature was investigated

  15. CFD analysis of moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansal, Anuj Kumar, E-mail: akansal@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Maheshwari, Naresh Kumar, E-mail: nmahesh@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu Krishnan, E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • 3D CFD of vertical calandria vessel. • Spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. • Effect of Archimedes number. • Non-dimensional analysis. - Abstract: Three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed for the moderator flow and temperature fields inside a vertical calandria vessel of nuclear reactor under normal operating condition using OpenFOAM CFD code. OpenFOAM is validated by comparing the predicted results with the experimental data available in literature. CFD model includes the calandria vessel, calandria tubes, inlet header and outlet header. Analysis has been performed for the cases of uniform and spatial distribution of volumetric heat generation. Studies show that the maximum temperature in moderator is lower in the case of spatial distribution of heat generation as compared to that in the uniform heat generation in calandria. In addition, the effect of Archimedes number on maximum and average moderator temperature was investigated.

  16. Quantitative image analysis of intra-tumoral bFGF level as a molecular marker of paclitaxel resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wientjes M Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in chemoresistance is controversial; some studies showed a relationship between higher bFGF level and chemoresistance while other studies showed the opposite finding. The goal of the present study was to quantify bFGF levels in archived tumor tissues, and to determine its relationship with chemosensitivity. Methods We established an image analysis-based method to quantify and convert the immunostaining intensity of intra-tumor bFGF to concentrations; this was accomplished by generating standard curves using human xenograft tumors as the renewable tissue source for simultaneous image analysis and ELISA. The relationships between bFGF concentrations and tumor chemosensitivity of patient tumors (n = 87 to paclitaxel were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Results The image analysis results were compared to our previous results obtained using a conventional, semi-quantitative visual scoring method. While both analyses indicated an inverse relationship between bFGF level and tumor sensitivity to paclitaxel, the image analysis method, by providing bFGF levels in individual tumors and therefore more data points (87 numerical values as opposed to four groups of staining intensities, further enabled the quantitative analysis of the relationship in subgroups of tumors with different pathobiological properties. The results show significant correlation between bFGF level and tumor sensitivity to the antiproliferation effect, but not the apoptotic effect, of paclitaxel. We further found stronger correlations of bFGF level and paclitaxel sensitivity in four tumor subgroups (high stage, positive p53 staining, negative aFGF staining, containing higher-than-median bFGF level, compared to all other groups. These findings suggest that the relationship between intra-tumoral bFGF level and paclitaxel sensitivity was context-dependent, which may explain the previous contradictory findings

  17. Axial vessel widening in arborescent monocots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Giai; DeClerck, Fabrice A J; Carrer, Marco; Anfodillo, Tommaso

    2014-02-01

    Dicotyledons have evolved a strategy to compensate for the increase in hydraulic resistance to water transport with height growth by widening xylem conduits downwards. In monocots, the accumulation of hydraulic resistance with height should be similar, but the absence of secondary growth represents a strong limitation for the maintenance of xylem hydraulic efficiency during ontogeny. The hydraulic architecture of monocots has been studied but it is unclear how monocots arrange their axial vascular structure during ontogeny to compensate for increases in height. We measured the vessel lumina and estimated the hydraulic diameter (Dh) at different heights along the stem of two arborescent monocots, Bactris gasipaes (Kunth) and Guadua angustifolia (Kunth). For the former, we also estimated the variation in Dh along the leaf rachis. Hydraulic diameter increased basally from the stem apex to the base with a scaling exponent (b) in the range of those reported for dicot trees (b = 0.22 in B. gasipaes; b = 0.31 and 0.23 in G. angustifolia). In B. gasipaes, vessels decrease in Dh from the stem's centre towards the periphery, an opposite pattern compared with dicot trees. Along the leaf rachis, a pattern of increasing Dh basally was also found (b = 0.13). The hydraulic design of the monocots studied revealed an axial pattern of xylem conduits similar to those evolved by dicots to compensate and minimize the negative effect of root-to-leaf length on hydrodynamic resistance to water flow.

  18. Measurement of turbulent flow fields in a agitated vessel with four baffles by laser-doppler velocimetry. Mean velocity fields and flow pattern; Buffle tsuki heiento kakuhan sonai nagare no LDV ni yoru keisoku. Heikin sokudoba to flow pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzukawa, K [Ube Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); hashimoto, T [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan); Osaka, H [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan). Faclty of Engineering

    1997-12-25

    The three dimensional complex turbulent flow fields induced by a four flat blade paddle impeller in agitated vessel were measured by laser Doppler velocimetry. Mixing vessel used was a closed cylindrical tank of 490 mm diameter with a flat bottom and four vertical buffles, giving water volumes of about 1001. The impellers were at the midnight of the water level in the tank. A height of liquid (water) was equal to the vessel diameter. Three components of mean velocity were measured at three vertical sections {theta}=7.5deg, 45deg and 85deg, in several horizontal planes. Mixing Reynolds number NRe was 1.2 times 10{sup 5}. It can be found from the results that circumferential mean velocity profiles show the symmetrical shape in the upper and lower sides of impeller. Secondary velocity components, such as axial and radial velocities, however, were not in symmetry. For this reason, the ratio of circulation flow volume which enter in upper and lower sides of impeller was roughly 7/3. In both the middle and buffle regions, mean flow velocities (flow patterns) were different, dependent of three vertical planes with different circumferential angle measured from buffle. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Limiting Factors for External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.

    2005-01-01

    The method of external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) that involves flooding of the reactor cavity during a severe accident has been considered a viable means for in-vessel retention (IVR). For high-power reactors, however, there are some limiting factors that might adversely affect the feasibility of using ERVC as a means for IVR. In this paper, the key limiting factors for ERVC have been identified and critically discussed. These factors include the choking limit for steam venting (CLSV) through the bottleneck of the vessel/insulation structure, the critical heat flux (CHF) for downward-facing boiling on the vessel outer surface, and the two-phase flow instabilities in the natural circulation loop within the flooded cavity. To enhance ERVC, it is necessary to eliminate or relax these limiting factors. Accordingly, methods to enhance ERVC and thus improve margins for IVR have been proposed and demonstrated, using the APR1400 as an example. The strategy is based on using two distinctly different methods to enhance ERVC. One involves the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design to facilitate steam venting through the bottleneck of the annular channel. The other involves the use of an appropriate vessel coating to promote downward-facing boiling. It is found that the use of an enhanced vessel/insulation design with bottleneck enlargement could greatly facilitate the process of steam venting through the bottleneck region as well as streamline the resulting two-phase motions in the annular channel. By selecting a suitable enhanced vessel/insulation design, not only the CLSV but also the CHF limits could be significantly increased. In addition, the problem associated with two-phase flow instabilities and flow-induced mechanical vibration could be minimized. It is also found that the use of vessel coatings made of microporous metallic layers could greatly facilitate downward-facing boiling on the vessel outer surface. With vessel coatings, the local CHF limits at

  20. An experimental study on the two-phase natural circulation flow through the gap between reactor vessel and insulation under ERVC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kwang-Soon; Park, Rae-Joon; Cho, Young-Ro; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Kim, Hee-dong

    2005-04-01

    As part of a study on a two-phase natural circulation flow between the outer reactor vessel and the insulation material in the reactor cavity under an external reactor vessel cooling of APR1400, T-HERMES-SMALL and HERMES-HALF experiments have been performed. For the T-HERMES-SMALL experiments, an 1/21.6 scaled experimental facility was prepared utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and insulation system. The liquid mass flow rates driven by natural circulation loop were measured by varying the wall heat flux, upper outlet area and configuration, and water head condition. The experimental data were also compared with numerical ones given by simple loop analysis. And non-heating small-scaled experiments have also been performed to certify the hydraulic similarity of the heating experiments by injecting air equivalent to the steam generated in the heating experimental condition. The HERMES-HALF experiment is a half-scaled / non-heating experimental study on the two-phase natural circulation through the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation. The behaviors of the two-phase natural circulation flow in the insulation gap were observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by natural circulation loop were measured by varying the air injection rate, the coolant inlet area and configuration, and the outlet area and also the water head condition of coolant reservoir. From the experimental flow observation, the recirculation flows in the near region of the shear key were identified. At a higher air injection rate condition, higher recirculation flows and choking phenomenon in the near region of the shear key were observed. As the water inlet areas increased, the natural circulation mass flow rates asymptotically increased, that is, they converged at a specific value. And the experimental correlations for the natural circulation mass flow rates along with a variation of the inlet / outlet area and wall heat flux were

  1. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  2. Measurement and flow visualization research of thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR reactor Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, J. E.; Kim, S. O.; Choi, H. L.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, the thermal hydraulic and flow visualization experiment was described for the KALIMER-600 water-scaled model. In order to investigate a thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR KALIMER-600, which has been conceptually designed in the KAERI, a water-scaled 1/10 reactor vessel model was designed and prepared through the scaling analysis during three-years research. In this research, SFR Photos system, which has inherently very complicated the internal structures, was fabricated with a transparent vessel. It was shown that a serious of thermal hydraulic test was conducted within a short period if modeled with water than sodium. Natural circulation test was successfully performed with the modeled heater assembly and heat exchanger system coupled with cooling system. The water-scaled RSV experimental facility made in this research could be used to study the USA development for the future SFR system and utilized to analyze the flow characteristics before changing a main internal part of Photos system. It could also be used to test a pool-inspection study and a sensor selection study before large scale sodium experiment. The PCV system prepared in this research could be utilized to test other TSH experiment and temperature field measurement

  3. CXCL17 expression by tumor cells recruits CD11b+Gr1 high F4/80- cells and promotes tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Matsui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemokines are involved in multiple aspects of pathogenesis and cellular trafficking in tumorigenesis. In this study, we report that the latest member of the C-X-C-type chemokines, CXCL17 (DMC/VCC-1, recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and enhances early tumor progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CXCL17 was preferentially expressed in some aggressive types of gastrointestinal, breast, and lung cancer cells. CXCL17 expression did not impart NIH3T3 cells with oncogenic potential in vitro, but CXCL17-expressing NIH3T3 cells could form vasculature-rich tumors in immunodeficient mice. Our data showed that CXCL17-expressing tumor cells increased immature CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid-derived cells at tumor sites in mice and promoted CD31(+ tumor angiogenesis. Extensive chemotactic assays proved that CXCL17-responding cells were CD11b(+Gr1(highF4/80(- cells (≈ 90% with a neutrophil-like morphology in vitro. Although CXCL17 expression could not increase the number of CD11b(+Gr1(+ cells in tumor-burdened SCID mice or promote metastases of low metastatic colon cancer cells, the existence of CXCL17-responding myeloid-derived cells caused a striking enhancement of xenograft tumor formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that aberrant expression of CXCL17 in tumor cells recruits immature myeloid-derived cells and promotes tumor progression through angiogenesis.

  4. Cystatin E/M Suppresses Tumor Cell Growth through Cytoplasmic Retention of NF-κB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Hendrick; Venkatesan, Natarajan; Veena, Mysore S.; Ravichandran, Sandhiya; Zinabadi, Alborz; Basak, Saroj K.; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Srivastava, Meera; Liang, Li-Jung; Gjertson, David W.; Torres, Jorge Z.; Moatamed, Neda A.

    2016-01-01

    We and others have shown that the cystatin E/M gene is inactivated in primary human tumors, pointing to its role as a tumor suppressor gene. However, the molecular mechanism of tumor suppression is not yet understood. Using plasmid-directed cystatin E/M gene overexpression, a lentivirus-mediated tetracycline-inducible vector system, and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) E6 and E7 gene-immortalized normal human epidermal keratinocytes, we demonstrated intracellular and non-cell-autonomous apoptotic growth inhibition of tumor cell lines and that growth inhibition is associated with cytoplasmic retention of NF-κB. We further demonstrated decreased phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKKβ) and IκBα in the presence of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), confirming the role of cystatin E/M in the regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Growth suppression of nude mouse xenograft tumors carrying a tetracycline-inducible vector system was observed with the addition of doxycycline in drinking water, confirming that the cystatin E/M gene is a tumor suppressor gene. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses of cervical carcinoma in situ and primary tumors have shown a statistically significant inverse relationship between the expression of cystatin E/M and cathepsin L and a direct relationship between the loss of cystatin E/M expression and nuclear expression of NF-κB. We therefore propose that the cystatin E/M suppressor gene plays an important role in the regulation of NF-κB. PMID:27090639

  5. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organ...

  6. Can visual assessment of blood flow patterns by dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harders, Stefan Walbom; Madsen, Hans Henrik; Nellemann, Hanne Marie; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Thygesen, Jesper; Hager, Henrik; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Rasmussen, Finn

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is a tool, which, in theory, can quantify the blood flow and blood volume of tissues. In structured qualitative analysis, parametric color maps yield a visual impression of the blood flow and blood volume within the tissue being studied, allowing for quick identification of the areas with the highest or lowest blood flow and blood volume. To examine whether DCE-CT could be used to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors in patients with suspected lung cancer. Fifty-nine patients with suspected lung cancer and a lung tumor on their chest radiograph were included for DCE-CT. The tumors were categorized using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns. Histopathology was used as reference standard. Using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns, it was possible to distinguish between malignant and benign lung tumors (Fisher-Freeman-Halton exact test, P  = 0.022). The inter-reader agreement of this method of analysis was slight to moderate (kappa = 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.13-0.46). DCE-CT in suspected lung cancer using structured qualitative analysis of tumor blood flow patterns is accurate as well as somewhat reproducible. However, there are significant limitations to DCE-CT.

  7. miR-133b down-regulates ABCC1 and enhances the sensitivity of CRC to anti-tumor drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Li, Daojiang; Gong, Ni; Wu, Hao; Su, Chen; Xie, Canbin; Xiang, Hong; Lin, Changwei; Li, Xiaorong

    2017-08-08

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main cause of failed chemotherapy treatments. Therefore, preventing MDR is pivotal in treating colorectal cancer (CRC). In a previous study miR-133b was shown to be a tumor suppressor. Additionally, in CRC cells transfected with miR-133b, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily C member 1(ABCC1) was shown to be significantly down regulated. Whether miR-133b also enhances the chemosensitivity of drugs used to treat CRC by targeting ABCC1 is still unclear. Here, we utilized flow cytometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis to identify the ability of miR-133b to reserve MDR in CRC. We then used a dual-luciferase reporter assay to validate that miR-133b targets ABCC1. Further in vivo experiments were designed to validate the method in which miR-133b reversed MDR in CRC cells. The results demonstrated that the level of miR-133b was down-regulated and the expression of ABCC1 was up-regulated in drug-resistant CRC cells compared to non-drug-resistant CRC cells. The restoration of miR-133b expression in CRC drug-resistant cells in vitro resulted in reduced IC50s to chemotherapeutic drugs, significantly induced G1 accumulation, inhibited growth and promoted necrosis in combination with either 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or vincristine (VCR), and decreased the expression of ABCC1. The dual-luciferase assay demonstrated that miR-133b directly targets ABCC1. The combination of agomiRNA-133b with chemotherapeutic drugs in vivo inhibited tumor growth induced by CRC drug-resistant cells. A xenograft from the in vivo model resulted in up-regulated levels of miR-133b and down-regulated levels of ABCC1. Therefore, miR-133b enhances the chemosensitivity of CRC cells to anti-tumor drugs by directly down-regulating ABCC1. This discovery provides a therapeutic strategy in which miR-133b is used as a potential sensitizer for drug-resistant CRC.

  8. Enhancing Tumor Drug Delivery by Laser-Activated Vascular Barrier Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    diabetic retinopathy . Therefore, se- lectively targeting existing blood vessels (vascular- disrupting therapy) and/or inhibiting the forma- tion of new...adhesion led to the formation of thrombi that can occlude blood vessels, causing vascular shutdown. However, viable tumor cells were often detected at...tumor sections (Fig. 4). However, viable tumor cells were commonly detected at tumor periphery. Because of the existence of viable peripheral tumor cells

  9. Cysteine cathepsins B and X promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Ana; Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2017-09-01

    Cathepsins B and X are lysosomal cysteine carboxypeptidases suggested as having a redundant role in cancer. They are involved in a number of processes leading to tumor progression but their role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. We have investigated the contribution of both cathepsins B and X in EMT using tumor cell lines differing in their expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers and cell morphology. Higher levels of both cathepsins are shown to promote EMT and are associated with the mesenchymal-like cell phenotype. Moreover, simultaneous knockdown of the two peptidases triggers a reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Of the two cathepsins, cathepsin B appears to be the stronger promotor of EMT. Furthermore, we evaluated the involvement of cathepsin B and X in the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling pathway, one of the key signaling mechanisms triggering EMT in cancer. In MCF-7 cells the expression of cathepsin B was shown to depend on their activation with TGF-β1 while, for cathepsin X, a TGF-β1 independent mechanism of induction during EMT is indicated. EMT is thus shown to be another mechanism linking cathepsins B and X with tumor progression. With silencing of their expression or inhibition of enzymatic activity, the tumor cells could be reverted to less aggressive epithelial-like phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Contrast-enhanced color Doppler ultrasound characteristics in hypervascular breast tumors: comparison with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, L.; Fischer, U.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced color Doppler ultrasound (CE-US) in comparison with contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) in the discrimination of hypervascularized breast tumors. An additional CE-US of the breast was preoperatively performed in 40 patients with a hypervascular breast lesion detected on CE-MRI. The presence of blood flow signals and the morphological characteristics of the vessels in the breast lesions were evaluated pre- and post-contrast administration, as well as the dynamic aspects of the Doppler signal, including time interval to maximum signal enhancement and persistence of the signal enhancement. Twenty-three carcinomas and 17 fibroadenomas were explored. Considering initial signal enhancement > 100 % after the administration of contrast material as a criterion suggesting malignancy, CE-MRI showed a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 76.5 % in the detection of malignant breast tumors. Color Doppler signals were consistently demonstrated in all carcinomas and in 68.7 % of fibroadenomas after the administration of Levovist, with CE-US showing a sensitivity of 95.6 % and a specificity of 5.9 %. Neither the mean number of vessels per tumor, nor the location of vessels, the time to maximum increase of the Doppler signal or the persistence of signal enhancement showed significant differences between benign and malignant lesions. Additional CE-US does not increase the low specificity of MRI in patients with hypervascularized breast tumors. (orig.)

  11. Lymphatic vessel density in vocal cord carcinomas assessed with LYVE-1 receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, Walter J.; Bono, Petri; Leivo, Ilmo; Vaheri, Antti; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Joensuu, Heikki

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Early stage vocal cord carcinomas are usually cured by radiation therapy despite the use of portals that exclude the cervical lymph nodes. We investigated whether the lymphatic vessel density (LVD) of vocal cord carcinomas differs from that of other head and neck carcinomas. Patients and methods: Deparaffinized tissue from tumors of 60 patients diagnosed with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were immunostained for LYVE-1, a novel lymphatic vessel marker. Twenty-two had vocal cord carcinoma. Tumor blood vessel density (BVD) was assessed using immunostaining for CD31. Results: Tumor overall LVD, including both intra- and peritumoral lymph vessels, was 10-fold lower than the BVD (5 counts/mm 2 vs. 52 mm -2 , respectively). A high LVD was associated with a high BVD (P=.002), but neither was associated with the tumor size. Both tumor LVD and BVD were lower in vocal cord carcinomas than in HNSCCs arising at other sites (median, 0 vs. 7 mm -2 , P=.016; and median, 36 vs. 52 mm -2 , P=.006, respectively). Only one vocal cord carcinoma was associated with a regional metastasis at the time of the diagnosis. Among the rest of the cases tumor size was a better predictor for the presence of regional metastases than tumor BVD or LVD in a logistic regression model (odds ratio 2.2, 95% CI 1.1-4.5). Conclusion: Vocal cord carcinomas have a low lymph vessel density as compared with HNSCCs arising at other sites

  12. Evidence of Flicker-Induced Functional Hyperaemia in the Smallest Vessels of the Human Retinal Blood Supply.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Duan

    Full Text Available Regional changes in blood flow are initiated within neural tissue to help fuel local differences in neural activity. Classically, this response was thought to arise only in larger arterioles and venules. However, recently, it has been proposed that a the smallest vessels of the circulation make a comparable contribution, and b the response should be localised intermittently along such vessels, due to the known distribution of contractile mural cells. To assess these hypotheses in human neural tissue in vivo, we imaged the retinal microvasculature (diameters 3-28 μm non-invasively, using adaptive optics, before and after delivery of focal (360 μm patches of flickering visible light. Our results demonstrated a definite average response in 35% of all vessel segments analysed. In these responding vessels, the magnitude of proportional dilation (mean ± SEM for pre-capillary arterioles 13 ± 5%, capillaries 31 ± 8%, and post-capillary venules 10 ± 3% is generally far greater than the magnitudes we and others have measured in the larger retinal vessels, supporting proposition a above. The dilations observed in venules were unexpected based on previous animal work, and may be attributed either to differences in stimulus or species. Response heterogeneity across the network was high; responses were also heterogeneous along individual vessels (45% of vessel segments showed demonstrable locality in their response. These observations support proposition b above. We also observed a definite average constriction across 7% of vessel segments (mean ± SEM constriction for capillaries -16 ± 3.2%, and post-capillary venules -18 ± 12%, which paints a picture of dynamic redistribution of flow throughout the smallest vessel networks in the retina in response to local, stimulus-driven metabolic demand.

  13. Tumor-induced loss of mural Connexin 43 gap junction activity promotes endothelial proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Mayur; Naczki, Christine; Chen, Wenhong; Barlow, Keith D.; Case, L. Douglas; Metheny-Barlow, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Proper functional association between mural cells and endothelial cells (EC) causes EC of blood vessels to become quiescent. Mural cells on tumor vessels exhibit decreased attachment to EC, which allows vessels to be unstable and proliferative. The mechanisms by which tumors prevent proper association between mural cells and EC are not well understood. Since gap junctions (GJ) play an important role in cell-cell contact and communication, we investigated whether loss of GJ plays a role in tumor-induced mural cell dissociation. Mural cell regulation of endothelial proliferation was assessed by direct co-culture assays of fluorescently labeled cells quantified by flow cytometry or plate reader. Gap junction function was assessed by parachute assay. Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein in mural cells exposed to conditioned media from cancer cells was assessed by Western and confocal microscopy; mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. Expression vectors or siRNA were utilized to overexpress or knock down Cx43. Tumor growth and angiogenesis was assessed in mouse hosts deficient for Cx43. Using parachute dye transfer assay, we demonstrate that media conditioned by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells diminishes GJ communication between mural cells (vascular smooth muscle cells, vSMC) and EC. Both protein and mRNA of the GJ component Connexin 43 (Cx43) are downregulated in mural cells by tumor-conditioned media; media from non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells had no effect. Loss of GJ communication by Cx43 siRNA knockdown, treatment with blocking peptide, or exposure to tumor-conditioned media diminishes the ability of mural cells to inhibit EC proliferation in co-culture assays, while overexpression of Cx43 in vSMC restores GJ and endothelial inhibition. Breast tumor cells implanted into mice heterozygous for Cx43 show no changes in tumor growth, but exhibit significantly increased tumor vascularization determined by CD31 staining, along with decreased mural cell support

  14. Investigation of the Impact of ENDF/B-VI Cross Sections on the H.B. Robinson-2 Pressure-Vessel Flux Prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I

    1999-01-01

    This report discusses the impact of the change from the SAILOR cross-section library, based on the ENDF/B-IV data, to the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, based on the ENDF/B-VI data, on the neutron flux prediction in the H. B. Robinson-2 pressure vessel, in the surveillance capsule, and in the cavity. The fast flux (E > 1 MeV) from the transport calculations with the BUGLE-96 library is approximately6% higher in the surveillance capsule and at the PV inner wall, and approximately25% higher in the reactor cavity than the flux from the transport calculations with the SAILOR library. These changes result from the combined effect of the changes in the cross sections, which cause significant increases in the calculated fluxes, and much smaller decreases in the fast fluxes due to the changes in the fission spectra. The increase in the calculated fast flux due to the changes in the cross sections only is approximately9% in the capsule and at the pressure vessel (PV) wall, and approximately30% in the cavity. The changes in the fission spectra lead to decreases in the order of approximately3-4% in calculated fast fluxes

  15. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief. (author)

  16. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.

  17. PIV study of flow field in Rushton turbine stirred vessel influenced by spatial resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotek, M.; Jašíková, D.; Kysela, Bohuš; Šulc, R.; Kopecký, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2017 (2017), s. 79-84 ISSN 2367-8992 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-20175S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1201 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : mixing process * PIV measurement * spatial resolution Subject RIV: JP - Industrial Processing OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.iaras.org/iaras/home/caijtam/piv-study-of-flow-field-in-rushton-turbine-stirred-vessel-influenced-by-spatial-resolution

  18. Maximum discharge rate of liquid-vapor mixtures from vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, F.J.

    1975-09-01

    A discrepancy exists in theoretical predictions of the two-phase equilibrium discharge rate from pipes attached to vessels. Theory which predicts critical flow data in terms of pipe exit pressure and quality severely overpredicts flow rates in terms of vessel fluid properties. This study shows that the discrepancy is explained by the flow pattern. Due to decompression and flashing as fluid accelerates into the pipe entrance, the maximum discharge rate from a vessel is limited by choking of a homogeneous bubbly mixture. The mixture tends toward a slip flow pattern as it travels through the pipe, finally reaching a different choked condition at the pipe exit

  19. NF-κB RelA renders tumor-associated macrophages resistant to and capable of directly suppressing CD8+ T cells for tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liwen; Han, Lei; Sun, Fan; Zhou, Jingjiao; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Tang, Xudong; Zang, Xingxing; Steinbrecher, Kris A; Qu, Zhaoxia; Xiao, Gutian

    2018-01-01

    Activation of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is assumed to contribute to tumor promotion. However, whether and how NF-κB drives the antitumor macrophages to become pro-tumorigenic have not been determined in any cancer type yet. Similarly, how TAMs repress CD8 + cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) remains largely unknown, although their importance in regulatory T (Treg) cell regulation and tumor promotion has been well appreciated. Here, using an endogenous lung cancer model we uncover a direct crosstalk between TAMs and CTLs. TAMs suppress CTLs through the T-cell inhibitory molecule B7x (B7-H4/B7S1) in a cell-cell contact manner, whereas CTLs kill TAMs in a tumor antigen-specific manner. Remarkably, TAMs secrete the known T-cell suppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) to activate, but not to repress, CTLs. Notably, one major role of cell-intrinsic NF-κB RelA is to drive TAMs to suppress CTLs for tumor promotion. It induces B7x expression in TAMs directly, and restricts IL-10 expression indirectly by repressing expression of the NF-κB cofactor Bcl3 and subsequent Bcl3/NF-κB1-mediated transcription of IL-10. It also renders TAMs resistant to CTLs by up-regulating anti-apoptotic genes. These studies help understand how immunity is shaped in lung tumorigenesis, and suggest a RelA-targeted immunotherapy for this deadliest cancer.

  20. FAM49B, a novel regulator of mitochondrial function and integrity that suppresses tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaragada, M S; Riganti, C; Sassoe, M; Principe, M; Santamorena, M M; Roux, C; Curcio, C; Evangelista, A; Allavena, P; Salvia, R; Rusev, B; Scarpa, A; Cappello, P; Novelli, F

    2018-02-08

    Mitochondrial dysregulation plays a central role in cancers and drives reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tumor progression. We investigated the pro-tumoral roles of mitochondrial dynamics and altered intracellular ROS levels in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We identified 'family with sequence similarity 49 member B' (FAM49B) as a mitochondria-localized protein that regulates mitochondrial fission and cancer progression. Silencing FAM49B in PDAC cells resulted in increased fission and mitochondrial ROS generation, which enhanced PDAC cell proliferation and invasion. Notably, FAM49B expression levels in PDAC cells were downregulated by the tumor microenvironment. Overall, the results of this study show that FAM49B acts as a suppressor of cancer cell proliferation and invasion in PDAC by regulating tumor mitochondrial redox reactions and metabolism.

  1. Experimental assessment of the role of the blood flow inhibition in hyperglycemia-enhanced radiation injury to tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozin, S.V.; Sevast'yanov, A.I.; Yarmonenko, S.P.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental assessment of the role of the blood flow inhibition in enhancement of radiation injury to tumors using short-term hyperglycemia was provided. Experiments on mice with Ehrlich solid carcinoma showed the dependence of a rise of the antitumor effect of preceding radiation induced by glucose and glucose combined with mexamin on a degree of the blood flow inhibition under the influence of these modifying agents. It was established that a considerable enhancement of radiation injury occured but in such tumors where short-term hyperglycemia and mexamin decreased the blood flow level not less than 5-10 fold as estimated by 133 Xe clearance. The results of the above experiments showed that the noticeable inhibition of the blood flow in tumors was a necessary tough, probably, not the only condition for a high efficacy of short-term hyperglycemia used an ajuvant to radiotherapy

  2. Reducing the data: Analysis of the role of vascular geometry on blood flow patterns in curved vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alastruey, Jordi; Siggers, Jennifer H.; Peiffer, Véronique; Doorly, Denis J.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2012-03-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of blood flow usually produce such large quantities of data that they are unlikely to be of clinical use unless methods are available to simplify our understanding of the flow dynamics. We present a new method to investigate the mechanisms by which vascular curvature and torsion affect blood flow, and we apply it to the steady-state flow in single bends, helices, double bends, and a rabbit thoracic aorta based on image data. By calculating forces and accelerations in an orthogonal coordinate system following the centreline of each vessel, we obtain the inertial forces (centrifugal, Coriolis, and torsional) explicitly, which directly depend on vascular curvature and torsion. We then analyse the individual roles of the inertial, pressure gradient, and viscous forces on the patterns of primary and secondary velocities, vortical structures, and wall stresses in each cross section. We also consider cross-sectional averages of the in-plane components of these forces, which can be thought of as reducing the dynamics of secondary flows onto the vessel centreline. At Reynolds numbers between 50 and 500, secondary motions in the directions of the local normals and binormals behave as two underdamped oscillators. These oscillate around the fully developed state and are coupled by torsional forces that break the symmetry of the flow. Secondary flows are driven by the centrifugal and torsional forces, and these are counterbalanced by the in-plane pressure gradients generated by the wall reaction. The viscous force primarily opposes the pressure gradient, rather than the inertial forces. In the axial direction, and depending on the secondary motion, the curvature-dependent Coriolis force can either enhance or oppose the bulk of the axial flow, and this shapes the velocity profile. For bends with little or no torsion, the Coriolis force tends to restore flow axisymmetry. The maximum circumferential and axial wall shear stresses along the centreline

  3. {sup 10}B-augmented fast neutron radiosurgery for brain tumor treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.; Chen, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Halpern, D.; Moore, C. [Isotron Inc., Alpharetta, GA (United States)

    2000-10-01

    We have investigated a new {sup 10}B-enhanced fast neutron treatment modality based on a concept similar to the x-ray radiosurgery or gamma knife. The results from our proof-of-principle Monte Carlo calculations clearly indicate that the dose-volume-histogram (DVH) of a 5-cm-deep tumor treated with multiple converging neutron beams is superior to that treated with a single broad neutron beam. To find out if the idea of neutron radiosurgery is practical, we have designed a small neutron beam based on 1-mA of 7-MeV deuterons bombarding a thick beryllium target, i.e. via Be(d,n) reactions. Such a deuteron beam is already achievable based on the existing accelerator technology, and it is also inexpensive. The Monte Carlo results show that the Be(d,n)-based facility produces an average dose rate of 1.9 Gy min{sup -1} in the tumor volume. For a typical tumor dose of 20 Gy, the treatment time would be 10.5 minutes. The results also show that the preferential loading of 100 ppm of {sup 10}B will produce in average an additional 8% of dose to tumor cells via {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reactions. (author)

  4. Cell Transformation by PTP1B Truncated Mutants Found in Human Colon and Thyroid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Wenhan; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Expression of wild-type protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B may act either as a tumor suppressor by dysregulation of protein tyrosine kinases or a tumor promoter through Src dephosphorylation at Y527 in human breast cancer cells. To explore whether mutated PTP1B is involved in human carcinogenesis, we have sequenced PTP1B cDNAs from human tumors and found splice mutations in ~20% of colon and thyroid tumors. The PTP1BΔE6 mutant expressed in these two tumor types and another PTP1BΔE5 mutant expressed in colon tumor were studied in more detail. Although PTP1BΔE6 revealed no phosphatase activity compared with wild-type PTP1B and the PTP1BΔE5 mutant, its expression induced oncogenic transformation of rat fibroblasts without Src activation, indicating that it involved signaling pathways independent of Src. The transformed cells were tumourigenic in nude mice, suggesting that the PTP1BΔE6 affected other molecule(s) in the human tumors. These observations may provide a novel therapeutic target for colon and thyroid cancer.

  5. The evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in patients with intracranial tumors by stable xenon CT; The effect of glycerol administration on regional cerebral blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoda, Masami; Kawamata, Fumio; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Hidaka, Mitsuru; Oda, Shinri; Shibuya, Naoki; Yamamoto, Isao; Sato, Osamu (Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-04-01

    In evaluating cerebral regional blood flow (rCBF), stable xenon-enhanced tomography (XeCT) study associated with simultaneous blood sampling was applied in 15 cases of intracranial neoplasms. The effect of intravenous glycerol infusion on rCBF was also investigated. The results indicated that intratumoral rCBF values were not only variable and unrelated to their histological types and grades, but also were not correlated with the vascularity of the lesion as demonstrated by angiography. When a tumor mass was enhanced after the injection of iodinated contrast media, it proved to be useful in distinguishing tumor mass and its associated edema that the rCBF of the peritumoral edematous region was predominantly low (10{plus minus}5 ml/100 g/min). The regional cerebral blood flow in remote areas, both ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion, was low in value, and there was no statistical significance between affected and sound sides. Following glycerol administration, rCBF was increased in the whole intracranial region, but not inside of the neoplasm, particularly when the intracranial pressure (ICP) was increased. It was assumed that the elevated rCBF after glycerol administration was due to the increase in the cerebral perfusion pressure resulting from the ICP reduction, the hemodilution effect, cerebral vessel dilatation after metabolic acidosis, and/or mechanically rectified microcirculation after edema reduction. (author).

  6. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  7. Application of a drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles for anti-angiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Sachiko; Kodama, Tetsuya; Sato, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles is a molecular delivery approach using the mechanism of sonoporation. With sonoporation, an endothelium-derived negative-feedback regulator of angiogenesis, Vasohibin-1 (VASH1), was introduced specifically into tumor vessels. We found VASH1 in tumor vessels induce normalization of tumor vessels and inhibited tumor growth. A recent topic regarding tumor angiogenesis is vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are abnormal or immature that cause hyperpermeability and impaired blood flow. Tumor vascular normalization improves blood flow and tissue hypoxia, which increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy and reduce tumor cell malignancy. In this review, application of drug delivery system using ultrasound for an anti-angiogenic therapy, a tumor vessel normalization therapy to treat cancer, is summarized. (author)

  8. Observation of flow dissipation in 3He-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenstein, J.P.; Packard, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous dissipation is observed in 3 He-B flowing in a U-tube device. The dissipation is of unknown origin and persists to the lowest measured velocity. The position of this result in the framework of other 3 He-B flow experiments is discussed

  9. Bovine Lactoferrin and Lactoferricin, a Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferrin, Inhibit Tumor Metastasis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shikiko; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Hata, Katsusuke; Shimazaki, Kei–ichi; Azuma, Ichiro

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the effect of a bovine milk protein, lactoferrin (LF–B), and a pepsin–generated peptide of LF–B, lactoferricin (Lfcin–B), on inhibition of tumor metastasis produced by highly metastatic murine tumor cells, B16–BL6 melanoma and L5178Y–ML25 lymphoma cells, using experimental and spontaneous metastasis models in syngeneic mice. The subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of bovine apo–lactoferrin (apo–LF–B, 1 mg/mouse) and Lfcin–B (0.5 mg/monse) 1 day after tumor inoculation significantly inhibited liver and lung metastasis of L5178Y–ML25 cells. However, human apo–lactoferrin (apo–LF–H) and bovine holo–lactoferrin (holo–LF–B) at the dose of 1 mg/mouse failed to inhibit tumor metastasis of L5178Y–ML25 cells. Similarly, the s.c. administration of apo–LF–B as well as Lfcin–B, but not apo–LF–H and holo–LF–B, 1 day after tumor inoculation resulted in significant inhibition of lung metastasis of B16–BL6 cells in an experimental metastasis model. Furthermore, in in vivo analysis for tumor–induced angiogenesis, both apo–LF–B and Lfcin–B inhibited the number of tumor–induced blood vessels and suppressed tumor growth on day 8 after tumor inoculation. However, in a long–term analysis of tumor growth for up to 21 days after tumor inoculation, single administration of apo–LF–B significantly suppressed the growth of B16–BL6 cells throughout the examination period, whereas Lfcin–B showed inhibitory activity only during the early period (8 days). In spontaneous metastasis of B16–BL6 melanoma cells, multiple administration of both apo–LF–B and Lfcin–B into tumor–bearing mice significantly inhibited lung metastasis produced by B16–BL6 cells, though only apo–LF–B exhibited an inhibitory effect on tumor growth at the time of primary tumor amputation (on day 21) after tumor inoculation. These results suggest that apo–LF–B and Lfcin–B inhibit tumor metastasis through different

  10. Tumor Therapeutics Work as Stress Inducers to Enhance Tumor Sensitivity to Natural Killer (NK) Cell Cytolysis by Up-regulating NKp30 Ligand B7-H6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guoshuai; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-12-11

    Immune cells are believed to participate in initiating anti-tumor effects during regular tumor therapy such as chemotherapy, radiation, hyperthermia, and cytokine injection. One of the mechanisms underlying this process is the expression of so-called stress-inducible immunostimulating ligands. Although the activating receptor NKG2D has been proven to play roles in tumor therapy through targeting its ligands, the role of NKp30, another key activating receptor, is seldom addressed. In this study, we found that the NKp30 ligand B7-H6 was widely expressed in tumor cells and closely correlated to their susceptibility to NK cell lysis. Further studies showed that treatment of tumor cells with almost all standard tumor therapeutics, including chemotherapy (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil), radiation therapy, non-lethal heat shock, and cytokine therapy (TNF-α), could up-regulate the expression of B7-H6 in tumor cells and enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis. B7-H6 shRNA treatment effectively dampened sensitization of tumor cells to NK-mediated lysis. Our study not only reveals the possibility that tumor therapeutics work as stress inducers to enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis but also suggests that B7-H6 could be a potential target for tumor therapy in the future. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. TLR4 activates NF-κB in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Dori C.; White, Yvonne A.R.; Dau, Caroline; Johnson, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. → Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NFκB signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. → NFκB activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to IκB degradation and activation of NF-κB. NF-κB activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNFα plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-κB signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-κB does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  12. TLR4 activates NF-{kappa}B in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Dori C., E-mail: dwoods2@partners.org [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); White, Yvonne A.R. [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Vincent Obstetrics and Gynecology Service, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Dau, Caroline [University of California, San Francisco, School of Dentistry, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Johnson, A.L. [Center for Reproductive Biology and Health, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} TLR4 is expressed in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} Acting through TLR4, LPS and HSP60 induce a NF{kappa}B signaling cascade in human ovarian granulosa tumor cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation or inhibition did not alter chemosensitivity to TRAIL or cisplatin. -- Abstract: Previous studies have demonstrated expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the surface epithelium of normal ovaries (OSE) and in epithelial ovarian tumors. Most notably, OSE-derived cancers express TLR4, which activates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling cascade as a mediator of inflammatory response. Currently, there is considerable interest in elucidating the role of TLR-mediated signaling in cancers. Nevertheless, the expression of TLRs in granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary, and the extent to which GCT expression of TLRs may influence cell-signaling pathways and/or modulate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, has yet to be determined. In the present study, human GCT lines (COV434 and KGN) were utilized to evaluate expression of functional TLR4. TLR4 is expressed in GCT cell lines and ligation of TLR4 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to I{kappa}B degradation and activation of NF-{kappa}B. NF-{kappa}B activation was confirmed by nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65 following treatment with LPS and the naturally occurring ligand, HSP60. Notably, immunoneutralization of TLR4 blocked nuclear localization, and inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling attenuated LPS-induced TNF{alpha} plus increased doubling time in both cell lines. Contradictory to reports using human OSE cell lines, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling failed to sensitize GCT lines to TRAIL or cisplatin. In summary, findings herein are the first to demonstrate a functional TLR-signaling pathway specifically in GCTs, and indicate that in contrast to OSE-derived cancers, inhibition of NF-{kappa}B does not sensitize GCTs to TRAIL or cisplatin.

  13. C5b-9 Staining Correlates With Clinical and Tumor Stage in Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Yang, Wei-Jun; Sun, Hai-Jian; Yang, Xia; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-08-01

    The complement system is a critical part of the immune response, acting in defense against viral infections, clearance of immune complexes, and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Upregulated expression of the terminal complement complex, C5b-9, has been observed on various tumor cells, such as stomach carcinoma cells, and on cells in the necrotic regions of these tumors as well; however, whether and how C5b-9 is related to gastric cancer progression and severity remains unknown. In this study, human gastric adenocarcinoma (HGAC) tissues (n=47 cases) and patient-matched adjacent nontumoral parenchyma (n=20 cases) were evaluated by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. The HGAC tissues showed upregulated C5b-9 expression. Multinomial logistic regression and likelihood ratio testing showed that overexpression of C5b-9 in HGAC tissue was significantly correlated with clinical stage (P=0.007) and tumor stage (P=0.005), but not with tumor distant organ metastasis, lymphoid nodal status, sex, or age. Patients with late-stage gastric adenocarcinoma had a higher amount of tumor cells showing positive staining for C5b-9 than patients with early-stage disease. These results may help in diagnosis and assessment of disease severity of human gastric carcinoma.

  14. Influence of vascular normalization on interstitial flow and delivery of liposomes in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Deniz; Yonucu, Sirin; Yilmaz, Defne; Unlu, Mehmet Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure is one of the barriers of drug delivery in solid tumors. Recent studies have shown that normalization of tumor vasculature by anti-angiogenic factors may improve the delivery of conventional cytotoxic drugs, possibly by increasing blood flow, decreasing interstitial fluid pressure, and enhancing the convective transvascular transport of drug molecules. Delivery of large therapeutic agents such as nanoparticles and liposomes might also benefit from normalization therapy since their transport depends primarily on convection. In this study, a mathematical model is presented to provide supporting evidence that normalization therapy may improve the delivery of 100 nm liposomes into solid tumors, by both increasing the total drug extravasation and providing a more homogeneous drug distribution within the tumor. However these beneficial effects largely depend on tumor size and are stronger for tumors within a certain size range. It is shown that this size effect may persist under different microenvironmental conditions and for tumors with irregular margins or heterogeneous blood supply. (paper)

  15. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  16. Regorafenib inhibits tumor progression through suppression of ERK/NF-κB activation in hepatocellular carcinoma bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mao-Chi; Wang, Mei-Hui; Tsai, Jai-Jen; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Chang; Hsu, Fei-Ting; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2018-03-13

    Regorafenib has been demonstrated in our previous study to trigger apoptosis through suppression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) SK-Hep1 cells in vitro However, the effect of regorafenib on NF-κB-modulated tumor progression in HCC in vivo is ambiguous. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of regorafenib on NF-κB-modulated tumor progression in HCC bearing mouse model. pGL4.50 luciferase reporter vector transfected SK-Hep1 (SK-Hep1/ luc2 ) and Hep3B 2.1-7 tumor bearing mice were established and used for this study. Mice were treated with vehicle or regorafenib (20 mg/kg/day by gavage) for 14 days. Effects of regorafenib on tumor growth and protein expression together with toxicity of regorafenib were evaluated with digital caliper and bioluminescence imaging (BLI), ex vivo Western blotting immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining, and measurement of body weight and pathological examination of liver tissue, respectively, in SK-Hep1/ luc2 and Hep3B 2.1-7 tumor bearing mice. The results indicated regorafenib significantly reduced tumor growth and expression of phosphorylated ERK, NF-κB p65 (Ser536), phosphorylated AKT and tumor progression-associated proteins. In addition, we found regorafenib induced both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Body weight and liver morphology were not affected by regorafenib treatment. Our findings present the mechanism of tumor progression inhibition by regorafenib is linked to suppression of ERK/NF-κB signaling in SK-Hep1/ luc2 and Hep3B 2.1-7 tumor-bearing mice. ©2018 The Author(s).

  17. The correlation of vascularization index and flow index of thyroid cancer ultrasound with tumor malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Liao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of ultrasound vascularization index and flow index of thyroid cancer with tumor malignancy. Methods: A total of 140 patients with thyroid nodule who accepted surgical resection in our hospital between May 2013 and June 2016 were selected as the research subjects, the patients with malignant thyroid nodule were included in the malignant group of the research and patients with benign thyroid nodule were included in the benign group of research. Three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasonography was conducted before operation to determine vascularization index (VI, flow index (FI and vascularization flow index (VFI; tumor tissues were collected after operation to detect the expression of angiogenesis as well as cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion-related molecules. Results: VI, FI and VFI levels of tumor tissue of malignant group were significantly higher than those of benign group; VEGF, MK, Ang-2, IGF-II, Bcl-2, Livin, Wip1, S100A4, TCF, β-catenin and SATB1 protein expression in tumor tissue of malignant group were significantly higher than those of benign group and positively correlated with VI, FI and VFI levels while CCNG2 and p27 protein expression were significantly lower than those of benign group and negatively correlated with VI, FI and VFI levels. Conclusion: Ultrasound vascularization index and flow index of thyroid cancer increase significantly and are closely related to the angiogenesis as well as cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion.

  18. Effect of sodium nitroprusside-induced hypotension on the blood flow in subcutaneous and intramuscular BT4An tumors and normal tissues in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Tyssebotn, Ingvald

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of infusion of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the blood flow in normal tissues and BT 4 An tumors growing subcutaneously or intramusculary in BD IX rats. Methods and Materials: Sodium nitroprusside was given as a continuous intravenous infusion to keep the mean arterial pressure stable at 60 mmHg. The cardiac output, organ blood flow, and perfusion of the BT 4 An tumors were measured by injection of radiolabelled microspheres at control conditions and after 20 min SNP infusion in each animal. Two series of experiments were performed with two anesthetics with different mechanisms of action, Inactin and the midazolam-fentanyl-fluanisone combination (MFF), to secure reliable conclusions. Results: Cardiac output, heart rate, and blood flow to the skeletal muscles, heart, and liver increased during SNP infusion in either anesthetic group. In the kidneys and particularly in the skin, decreased blood flow by SNP was observed. When located subcutaneously on the foot, the blood flow in the tumor fell to 23.4% and 21.4% of the control values in the MFF- and Inactin-anesthetized animals, respectively. This was accompanied by a similar fall in the blood flow in the foot (tumor bed) itself. In the intramuscular tumor the blood flow fell to 24.8% of the control value in the MFF group, whereas the corresponding figure was 36.2% in the Inactin group. In the surrounding muscle (tumor bed) the blood flow increased significantly, most pronounced in the MFF experiment, where it was tripled. Conclusion: The fall in the tumor perfusion by SNP may be exploited therapeutically to increase the tumor temperature during hyperthermia. Predominant heating of the tumor compared to the tumor bed can be expected if the tumor is growing in or near skeletal muscles

  19. Heating and cooling system for an on-board gas adsorbent storage vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburello, David A.; Anton, Donald L.; Hardy, Bruce J.; Corgnale, Claudio

    2017-06-20

    In one aspect, a system for controlling the temperature within a gas adsorbent storage vessel of a vehicle may include an air conditioning system forming a continuous flow loop of heat exchange fluid that is cycled between a heated flow and a cooled flow. The system may also include at least one fluid by-pass line extending at least partially within the gas adsorbent storage vessel. The fluid by-pass line(s) may be configured to receive a by-pass flow including at least a portion of the heated flow or the cooled flow of the heat exchange fluid at one or more input locations and expel the by-pass flow back into the continuous flow loop at one or more output locations, wherein the by-pass flow is directed through the gas adsorbent storage vessel via the by-pass line(s) so as to adjust an internal temperature within the gas adsorbent storage vessel.

  20. Affinity Purification of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expressed in Raji Cells by Produced scFv Antibody Coupled CNBr-Activated Sepharose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Majidi Zolbanin, Jafar; Nouri, Mohammad; Baradaran, Behzad; Movassaghpour, AliAkbar; Farajnia, Safar; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been utilized as an antineoplastic agent for the treatment of patients with melanoma and sarcoma. It targets tumor cell antigens by impressing tumor-associated vessels. Protein purification with affinity chromatography has been widely used in the downstream processing of pharmaceutical-grade proteins. Methods:In this study, we examined the potential of our produced anti-TNF-α scFv fragments for purification of TNF-α produced by Raji cells. The Raji cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to express TNF-α. Western blotting and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) flow cytometry analyses were used to evaluate the TNF-α expression. The anti-TNF-α scFv selected from antibody phage display library was coupled to CNBr-activated sepharose 4B beads used for affinity purification of expressed TNF-α and the purity of the protein was assessed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Western blot and FACS flow cytometry analyses showed the successful expression of TNF-α with Raji cells. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the performance of scFv for purification of TNF-α protein with purity over 95%. Conclusion: These findings confirm not only the potential of the produced scFv antibody fragments but also this highly pure recombinant TNF-α protein can be applied for various in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24312807

  1. Affinity Purification of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Expressed in Raji Cells by Produced scFv Antibody Coupled CNBr-Activated Sepharose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safar Farajnia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α has been utilized as an antineoplastic agent for the treatment of patients with melanoma and sarcoma. It targets tumor cell antigens by impressing tumor-associated vessels. Protein purification with affinity chromatography has been widely used in the downstream processing of pharmaceutical-grade proteins. Methods: In this study, we examined the potential of our produced anti-TNF-scFv fragments for purification of TNF-α produced by Raji cells. he Raji cells were induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS to express TNF-α. Western blotting and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS flow cytometry analyses were used to evaluate the TNF-α expression. The anti-TNF-α scFv selected from antibody phage display library was coupled to CNBr-activated sepharose 4B beads used for affinity purification of expressed TNF-α and the purity of the protein was assessed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Western blot and FACS flow cytometry analyses showed the successful expression of TNF-α with Raji cells. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the performance of scFv for purification of TNF-α protein with purity over 95%. Conclusion: These findings confirm not only the potential of the produced scFv antibody fragments but also this highly pure recombinant TNF-α protein can be applied for various in vitro and in vivo applications.

  2. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Sengupta, Shramik; Viator, John A.

    2011-03-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are inadequately sensitive. Patients must wait until secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and flow through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring cancer. Our group utilizes the photoacoustic effect to detect metastatic melanoma cells, which contain the pigmented granule melanin. As a rapid laser pulse irradiates melanoma, the melanin undergoes thermo-elastic expansion and ultimately creates a photoacoustic wave. Thus, melanoma patient's blood samples can be enriched, leaving the melanoma in a white blood cell (WBC) suspension. Irradiated melanoma cells produce photoacoustic waves, which are detected with a piezoelectric transducer, while the optically transparent WBCs create no signals. Here we report an isolation scheme utilizing two-phase flow to separate detected melanoma from the suspension. By introducing two immiscible fluids through a t-junction into one flow path, the analytes are compartmentalized. Therefore, the slug in which the melanoma cell is located can be identified and extracted from the system. Two-phase immiscible flow is a label free technique, and could be used for other types of pathological analytes.

  3. Canonical and Non-Canonical NF-κB Signaling Promotes Breast Cancer Tumor-Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendellen, Megan F.; Bradford, Jennifer W.; Lawrence, Cortney L.; Clark, Kelly S.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are a sub-population of cells that exhibit a robust ability to self-renew and contribute to the formation of primary tumors, the relapse of previously treated tumors, and the development of metastases. TICs have been identified in various tumors, including those of the breast, and are particularly enriched in the basal-like and claudin-low subtypes of breast cancer. The signaling pathways that contribute to the function and maintenance of TICs are under intense study. We explored the potential involvement of the NF-κB family of transcription factors in TICs in cell lines that are representative of basal-like and claudin-low breast cancer. NF-κB was found to be activated in breast cancer cells that form tumorspheres efficiently. Moreover, both canonical and non-canonical NF-κB signaling is required for these cells to self-renew in vitro and to form xenograft tumors efficiently in vivo using limiting dilutions of cells. Consistent with this, canonical and non-canonical NF-κB signaling is activated in TICs isolated from breast cancer cell lines. Experimental results indicate that NF-κB promotes the function of TICs by stimulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and by upregulating the expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-6. The results suggest the use of NF-κB inhibitors for clinical therapy of certain breast cancers. PMID:23474754

  4. Phospho-specific flow cytometry identifies aberrant signaling in indolent B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blix Egil S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge about signaling pathways in malignant cells may provide prognostic and diagnostic information in addition to identify potential molecular targets for therapy. B-cell receptor (BCR and co-receptor CD40 signaling is essential for normal B cells, and there is increasing evidence that signaling via BCR and CD40 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate basal and induced signaling in lymphoma B cells and infiltrating T cells in single-cell suspensions of biopsies from small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL patients. Methods Samples from untreated SLL/CLL and MZL patients were examined for basal and activation induced signaling by phospho-specific flow cytometry. A panel of 9 stimulation conditions targeting B and T cells, including crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR, CD40 ligand and interleukins in combination with 12 matching phospho-protein readouts was used to study signaling. Results Malignant B cells from SLL/CLL patients had higher basal levels of phosphorylated (p-SFKs, p-PLCγ, p-ERK, p-p38, p-p65 (NF-κB, p-STAT5 and p-STAT6, compared to healthy donor B cells. In contrast, anti-BCR induced signaling was highly impaired in SLL/CLL and MZL B cells as determined by low p-SFK, p-SYK and p-PLCγ levels. Impaired anti-BCR-induced p-PLCγ was associated with reduced surface expression of IgM and CD79b. Similarly, CD40L-induced p-ERK and p-p38 were also significantly reduced in lymphoma B cells, whereas p-p65 (NF-κB was equal to that of normal B cells. In contrast, IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15 induced p-STAT5 in tumor-infiltrating T cells were not different from normal T cells. Conclusions BCR signaling and CD40L-induced p-p38 was suppressed in malignant B cells from SLL/CLL and MZL patients. Single-cell phospho-specific flow cytometry for detection of basal as well as activation

  5. Diagnostic of flow rate of the tumors of the boobs at increment of the blood pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlodek, K.; Sohn, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    54 patients with ultrasonography evident tumors of the mammary glands were examined by angiography on flow rate of the blood in the tumor (14 patients with benign tumor and 40 patients with carcinoma at increment of the blood pressure. At evaluating of the findings 4 characteristic curves were obtained: first type was typical for malignant tumors; second type was characteristic for benign findings and third and fourth types were non-specific. (authors)

  6. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A.; van Beek, Adriaan A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  7. Effect of heat transfer on unsteady MHD flow of blood in a permeable vessel in the presence of non-uniform heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sinha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis of blood flow and heat transfer in a permeable vessel in the presence of an external magnetic field. The unsteadiness in the coupled flow and temperature fields is considered to be caused due to the time-dependent stretching velocity and the surface temperature of the vessel. The non-uniform heat source/sink effect on blood flow and heat transfer is taken into account. This study is of potential value in the clinical treatment of cardiovascular disorders accompanied by accelerated circulation. The problem is treated mathematically by reducing it to a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations, which have been solved by using similarity transformation and boundary layer approximation. The resulting nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations are solved numerically by using an implicit finite difference scheme. Computational results are obtained for the velocity, temperature, the skin-friction coefficient and the rate of heat transfer in the vessel. The estimated results are compared with another analytical study reported earlier in scientific literatures. The present study reveals that the heat transfer rate is enhanced as the value of the unsteadiness parameter increases, but it reduces as the space-dependence parameter for heat source/sink increases.

  8. Phase contrast MR imaging measurements of blood flow in healthy human cerebral vessel segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Matthew Ethan; Frayne, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging was used to obtain velocity measurements in 30 healthy subjects to provide an assessment of hemodynamic parameters in cerebral vessels. We expect a lower coefficient-of-variation (COV) of the volume flow rate (VFR) compared to peak velocity (v_p_e_a_k) measurements and the COV to increase in smaller caliber arteries compared to large arteries.PC velocity maps were processed to calculate v_p_e_a_k and VFR in 26 vessel segments. The mean, standard deviation and COV, of v_p_e_a_k and VFR in each segment were calculated. A bootstrap-style analysis was used to determine the minimum number of subjects required to accurately represent the population. Significance of v_p_e_a_k and VFR asymmetry was assessed in 10 vessel pairs.The bootstrap analysis suggested that averaging more than 20 subjects would give consistent results. When averaged over the subjects, v_p_e_a_k and VFR ranged from 5.2 ± 7.1 cm s"−"1, 0.41 ± 0.58 ml s"−"1 (in the anterior communicating artery; mean ± standard deviation) to 73 ± 23 cm s"−"1, 7.6 ± 1.7 ml s"−"1 (in the left internal carotid artery), respectively. A tendency for VFR to be higher in the left hemisphere was observed in 88.8% of artery pairs, while the VFR in the right transverse sinus was larger. The VFR COV was larger than v_p_e_a_k COV in 57.7% of segments, while smaller vessels had higher COV.Significance and potential impact: VFR COV was not generally higher than v_p_e_a_k COV. COV was higher in smaller vessels as expected. These summarized values provide a base against which v_p_e_a_k and VFR in various disease states can be compared. (paper)

  9. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor by the vascular endothelium in tumor metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraj, Ahsan; Gonin, Julie; Radu, Aurelian; Ghinea, Nicolae; Desestret, Virginie; Antoine, Martine; Fromont, Gaëlle; Huerre, Michel; Sanson, Marc; Camparo, Philippe; Pichon, Christophe; Planeix, François

    2013-01-01

    The Follicle Stimulating Hormone receptor (FSHR) is expressed by the vascular endothelium in a wide range of human tumors. It was not determined however if FSHR is present in metastases which are responsible for the terminal illness. We used immunohistochemistry based on a highly FSHR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect FSHR in cancer metastases from 6 major tumor types (lung, breast, prostate, colon, kidney, and leiomyosarcoma) to 6 frequent locations (bone, liver, lymph node, brain, lung, and pleura) of 209 patients. In 166 patients examined (79%), FSHR was expressed by blood vessels associated with metastatic tissue. FSHR-positive vessels were present in the interior of the tumors and some few millimeters outside, in the normally appearing tissue. In the interior of the metastases, the density of the FSHR-positive vessels was constant up to 7 mm, the maximum depth available in the analyzed sections. No significant differences were noticed between the density of FSHR-positive vessels inside vs. outside tumors for metastases from lung, breast, colon, and kidney cancers. In contrast, for prostate cancer metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was about 3-fold higher at the exterior of the tumor compared to the interior. Among brain metastases, the density of FSHR-positive vessels was highest in lung and kidney cancer, and lowest in prostate and colon cancer. In metastases of breast cancer to the lung pleura, the percentage of blood vessels expressing FSHR was positively correlated with the progesterone receptor level, but not with either HER-2 or estrogen receptors. In normal tissues corresponding to the host organs for the analyzed metastases, obtained from patients not known to have cancer, FSHR staining was absent, with the exception of approx. 1% of the vessels in non tumoral temporal lobe epilepsy samples. FSHR is expressed by the endothelium of blood vessels in the majority of metastatic tumors

  10. In-vivo imaging of blood flow in human retinal vessels using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    1999-04-01

    Quantification of retinal blood flow may lead to a better understanding of the progression and treatment of several ocular disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, age- related macular degeneration, and glaucoma. Current techniques, such as fluorescein angiography and laser Doppler velocimetry are limited, failing to provide sufficient information to the clinician. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography (CDOCT) is a novel technique using coherent heterodyne detection for simultaneous cross- sectional imaging of tissue microstructure and blood flow. This technique is capable of high spatial and velocity resolution imaging in highly scattering media. We implemented CDOCT for retinal blood flow mapping in human subjects. No dilation of the pupil was necessary. CDOCT is demonstrated for determining bidirectional flow in sub- 100micrometers diameter vessels in the retina. Additionally, we calculated Doppler broadening using the variance of depth- resolved spectra to identify regions with large velocity gradients within the Xenopus heart. This technique may be useful in quantifying local tissue perfusion in highly vascular retinal tissue.

  11. Spatial variation of vessel grouping in the xylem of Betula platyphylla Roth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Vessel grouping in angiosperms may improve hydraulic integration and increase the spread of cavitations through redundancy pathways. Although disputed, it is increasingly attracting research interest as a potentially significant hydraulic trait. However, the variation of vessel grouping in a tree is poorly understood. I measured the number of solitary and grouped vessels in the xylem of Betula platyphylla Roth. from the pith to the bark along the water flow path. The vessel grouping parameters included the mean number of vessels per vessel group (VG), percentage of solitary vessels (SVP), percentage of radial multiple vessels (MVP), and percentage of cluster vessels (CVP). The effects of cambial age (CA) and flow path-length (PL) on the vessel grouping were analyzed using a linear mixed model.VG and CVP increased nonlinearly, SVP decreased nonlinearly with PL. In trunks and branches, VG and CVP decreased nonlinearly, and SVP increased nonlinearly with CA. In roots, the parameters had no change with CA. MVP was almost constant with PL or CA. The results suggest that vessel grouping has a nonrandom variation pattern, which is affected deeply by cambial age and water flow path.

  12. Estimation on the Flow Phenomena and the Pressure Loss for the Inlet Part of a Research Reactor Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kyoung Woo; Oh, Jae Min; Seo, Jae Kwang; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Doo Jeong

    2009-01-01

    For a research reactor, a conceptual primary cooling system (PCS) was designed for an adequate cooling to the reactor core. The developed primary cooling circuit consisted of decay tanks, pumps, heat exchangers, vacuum breakers, some isolation and check valves, connection piping, and instruments. The main function of the primary cooling pumps (PCPs) of the PCS was to circulate the reactor coolant through the fuel core and the heat exchangers during a normal operation. The head according to the design flow rate which was determined by the thermal hydraulic design analysis for the core should be estimated to design the PCPs in the fluid system. The pressure loss in the PCS can be calculated by the dimensional analysis of the pipe flow and the head loss coefficient of the components. However, it is insufficient to estimate the pressure loss for 3-dimensional flow phenomena such as the flow path in the reactor with the theoretical dimensional analysis based on experimental data. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the pressure loss of the part of a research reactor vessel. For evaluating the pressure loss, the commercially available CFD computer model, FLUENT, was employed. First, for validating the application of FLUENT to the pressure loss, a simple case was calculated and compared with the Idelchik empirical correlation. Secondly, several cases for the inlet part of a research reactor vessel were estimated by a FLUENT 3- dimensional calculation

  13. NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert radiation-mediated tumor suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Priscilla S.; Bardhan, Kankana; Chen, May R.; Paschall, Amy V.; Lu, Chunwan; Bollag, Roni J.; Kong, Feng-Chong; Jin, JianYue; Kong, Feng-Ming; Waller, Jennifer L.; Pollock, Raphael E.; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation modulates both tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment to exert its anti-tumor activity; however, the molecular connection between tumor cells and immune cells that mediates radiation-exerted tumor suppression activity in the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. We report here that radiation induces rapid activation of the p65/p50 and p50/p50 NF-κB complexes in human soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Radiation-activated p65/p50 and p50/p50 bind to the TNFα promoter to activate its transcription in STS cells. Radiation-induced TNFα induces tumor cell death in an autocrine manner. A sublethal dose of Smac mimetic BV6 induces cIAP1 and cIAP2 degradation to increase tumor cell sensitivity to radiation-induced cell death in vitro and to enhance radiation-mediated suppression of STS xenografts in vivo. Inhibition of caspases, RIP1, or RIP3 blocks radiation/TNFα-induced cell death, whereas inhibition of RIP1 blocks TNFα-induced caspase activation, suggesting that caspases and RIP1 act sequentially to mediate the non-compensatory cell death pathways. Furthermore, we determined in a syngeneic sarcoma mouse model that radiation up-regulates IRF3, IFNβ, and the T cell chemokines CCL2 and CCL5 in the tumor microenvironment, which are associated with activation and increased infiltration of Th1/Tc1 T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, tumor-infiltrating T cells are in their active form since both the perforin and FasL pathways are activated in irradiated tumor tissues. Consequently, combined BV6 and radiation completely suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, radiation-induced NF-κB functions as a molecular link between tumor cells and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment for radiation-mediated tumor suppression. PMID:27014915

  14. LECOTELO - conceptual design, testings and realisation of the main vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioan, M.; Hororoi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lead Corrosion Testing Loop (LECOTELO) facility was conceived to assure all conditions requested by corrosion/erosion tests in pure hot lead for different materials. The main vessel will receive at least 36 different material samples; each of them must be swept on both sides by a lead flow at a very well known speed. Taking into account that the inner system of this vessel is rather complex, it is very important to know the behavior of the vessel at different speeds of the lead flow around the samples. After many simulations of different configurations of the inner components, it was obtained the best inner geometry of the flow which provides the minimum pressure loss between inlet and outlet vessel. Consequently, the design of vessel components was changed in accordance with these new results of simulations and in this moment they are in the manufacturing process. (authors)

  15. Four-dimensional (4D) flow of the whole heart and great vessels using real-time respiratory self-gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uribe, Sergio; Beerbaum, Philipp; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) flow imaging has been used to study flow patterns and pathophysiology, usually focused on specific thoracic vessels and cardiac chambers. Whole-heart 4D flow at high measurement accuracy covering the entire thoracic cardiovascular system would be desirable to simplify...... and improve hemodynamic assessment. This has been a challenge because compensation of respiratory motion is difficult to achieve, but it is paramount to limit artifacts and improve accuracy. In this work we propose a self-gating technique for respiratory motion-compensation integrated into a whole-heart 4D...... flow acquisition that overcomes these challenges. Flow components are measured in all three directions for each pixel over the complete cardiac cycle, and 1D volume projections are obtained at certain time intervals for respiratory gating in real time during the acquisition. The technique was tested...

  16. Synergistic actions of blocking angiopoietin-2 and tumor necrosis factor-α in suppressing remodeling of blood vessels and lymphatics in airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Catherine T K; Laidlaw, Grace; Morehouse, Christopher A; Naiman, Brian; Brohawn, Philip; Mustelin, Tomas; Connor, Jane R; McDonald, Donald M

    2015-11-01

    Remodeling of blood vessels and lymphatics are prominent features of sustained inflammation. Angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)/Tie2 receptor signaling and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)/TNF receptor signaling are known to contribute to these changes in airway inflammation after Mycoplasma pulmonis infection in mice. We determined whether Ang2 and TNF are both essential for the remodeling on blood vessels and lymphatics, and thereby influence the actions of one another. Their respective contributions to the initial stage of vascular remodeling and sprouting lymphangiogenesis were examined by comparing the effects of function-blocking antibodies to Ang2 or TNF, given individually or together during the first week after infection. As indices of efficacy, vascular enlargement, endothelial leakiness, venular marker expression, pericyte changes, and lymphatic vessel sprouting were assessed. Inhibition of Ang2 or TNF alone reduced the remodeling of blood vessels and lymphatics, but inhibition of both together completely prevented these changes. Genome-wide analysis of changes in gene expression revealed synergistic actions of the antibody combination over a broad range of genes and signaling pathways involved in inflammatory responses. These findings demonstrate that Ang2 and TNF are essential and synergistic drivers of remodeling of blood vessels and lymphatics during the initial stage of inflammation after infection. Inhibition of Ang2 and TNF together results in widespread suppression of the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison between model-predicted tumor oxygenation dynamics and vascular-/flow-related Doppler indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Vidal Urbinati, Ailyn M; Ciardo, Delia; Franchi, Dorella; Cattani, Federica; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    Mathematical modeling is a powerful and flexible method to investigate complex phenomena. It discloses the possibility of reproducing expensive as well as invasive experiments in a safe environment with limited costs. This makes it suitable to mimic tumor evolution and response to radiotherapy although the reliability of the results remains an issue. Complexity reduction is therefore a critical aspect in order to be able to compare model outcomes to clinical data. Among the factors affecting treatment efficacy, tumor oxygenation is known to play a key role in radiotherapy response. In this work, we aim at relating the oxygenation dynamics, predicted by a macroscale model trained on tumor volumetric data of uterine cervical cancer patients, to vascularization and blood flux indices assessed on Ultrasound Doppler images. We propose a macroscale model of tumor evolution based on three dynamics, namely active portion, necrotic portion, and oxygenation. The model parameters were assessed on the volume size of seven cervical cancer patients administered with 28 fractions of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) (1.8 Gy/fraction). For each patient, five Doppler ultrasound tests were acquired before, during, and after the treatment. The lesion was manually contoured by an expert physician using 4D View ® (General Electric Company - Fairfield, Connecticut, United States), which automatically provided the overall tumor volume size along with three vascularization and/or blood flow indices. Volume data only were fed to the model for training purpose, while the predicted oxygenation was compared a posteriori to the measured Doppler indices. The model was able to fit the tumor volume evolution within 8% error (range: 3-8%). A strong correlation between the intrapatient longitudinal indices from Doppler measurements and oxygen predicted by the model (about 90% or above) was found in three cases. Two patients showed an average correlation value (50-70%) and the remaining

  18. Evaluation of anastomosis between intrahepatic or extrahepatic vessels by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography using carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Nobuaki; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nishida, Hirotoshi; Kanetsuki, Ichirou; Miyake, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki

    1995-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) intra-arterial subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed in 31 patients with various hepatobiliary disease. The injection sites of CO 2 were proper hepatic artery (10/31; group A), segmental hepatic artery (18/31; group B), and peripheral inferior phrenic artery (3/31; group C), respectively. In group A, only the third order branches of the portal venous system were visualized anterogradely in 8 of 10 patients. In group B, the microcatheter was placed coaxially through a 5 French guiding catheter at the main arterial supply of the tumor in 7 patients and at the peripheral segmental branch of the hepatic artery in 11 patients. The portal venous system was visualized retrogradely in all of the patients regardless of the injection site. The injected CO 2 may flow back into the portal vein through the anastmosis known as the peribiliary or periportal plexus. In group C, not only the portal vein but also the pulmonary artery or pericardial vein were visualized by this method. CO 2 -IADSA was useful to image the minute communications between the various vessels, which have been not hitherto visualized by iodinated contrast medium. (author)

  19. Evaluation of anastomosis between intrahepatic or extrahepatic vessels by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography using carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazono, Nobuaki; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nishida, Hirotoshi; Kanetsuki, Ichirou; Miyake, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) intra-arterial subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed in 31 patients with various hepatobiliary disease. The injection sites of CO{sub 2} were proper hepatic artery (10/31; group A), segmental hepatic artery (18/31; group B), and peripheral inferior phrenic artery (3/31; group C), respectively. In group A, only the third order branches of the portal venous system were visualized anterogradely in 8 of 10 patients. In group B, the microcatheter was placed coaxially through a 5 French guiding catheter at the main arterial supply of the tumor in 7 patients and at the peripheral segmental branch of the hepatic artery in 11 patients. The portal venous system was visualized retrogradely in all of the patients regardless of the injection site. The injected CO{sub 2} may flow back into the portal vein through the anastmosis known as the peribiliary or periportal plexus. In group C, not only the portal vein but also the pulmonary artery or pericardial vein were visualized by this method. CO{sub 2}-IADSA was useful to image the minute communications between the various vessels, which have been not hitherto visualized by iodinated contrast medium. (author).

  20. [HPV DNA vaccines expressing recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 fusion protein inhibit tumor growth and angiogenic activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Ke-Jia; Zhu, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Xing

    2007-11-01

    This paper was to study the angiogenic inhibitory effect and the potential antitumor effect of the constructed recombinant DNA vaccine CRT/HPV6bE7 in vivo. The C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated respectively with recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 DNA plamids. The inhibitory effects on angiogenesis of generated vaccines in vivo were evaluated by a bFGF-induced angiogenesis assay using the Matrigel kit. To investigate the potential antitumor effect, the mean tumor weights, sizes and tumor appearing times were measured in C57BL/6 mice treated with HPV6bE7-expressing B16 cells. The results indicated that the recombinants CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 showed strong anti-angiogenic effects in bFGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 DNA vaccines could significantly inhibit the tumor growth in tumor challenge experiment, and CRT180/HPV6bE7 was superior to other vaccines in delaying tumor formation time, limiting tumor size and weight in tumor protection experiment. In conclusion, recombinant CRT180/HPV6bE7 DNA could elicit a most efficient anti-angiogenic effect and inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with DNA vaccines. The antiangiogenic activity of CRT were suggested residing in a domain between CRT 120-180 aa.

  1. Human endothelial precursor cells express tumor endothelial marker 1/endosialin/CD248.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Rebecca G; Rouleau, Cecile; St Martin, Thia; Boutin, Paula; Weber, William; Ruzek, Melanie; Honma, Nakayuki; Nacht, Mariana; Shankara, Srinivas; Kataoka, Shiro; Ishida, Isao; Roberts, Bruce L; Teicher, Beverly A

    2008-08-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during normal physiologic processes as well as under pathologic conditions such as tumor growth. Serial analysis of gene expression profiling revealed genes [tumor endothelial markers (TEM)] that are overexpressed in tumor endothelial cells compared with normal adult endothelial cells. Because blood vessel development of malignant tumors under certain conditions may include endothelial precursor cells (EPC) recruited from bone marrow, we investigated TEM expression in EPC. The expression of TEM1 or endosialin (CD248) and other TEM has been discovered in a population of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2+/CD31+/CD45-/VE-cadherin+ EPC derived from human CD133+/CD34+ cells. EPC share some properties with fully differentiated endothelial cells from normal tissue, yet reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry reveal that EPC express higher levels of endosialin at the molecular and protein levels. The elevated expression of endosialin in EPC versus mature endothelial cells suggests that endosialin is involved in the earlier stages of tumor angiogenesis. Anti-endosialin antibodies inhibited EPC migration and tube formation in vitro. In vivo, immunohistochemistry indicated that human EPC continued to express endosialin protein in a Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay established in nude mice. Anti-endosialin antibodies delivered systemically at 25 mg/kg were also able to inhibit circulating murine EPC in nude mice bearing s.c. SKNAS tumors. EPC and bone marrow-derived cells have been shown previously to incorporate into malignant blood vessels in some instances, yet they remain controversial in the field. The data presented here on endothelial genes that are up-regulated in tumor vasculature and in EPC support the hypothesis that the angiogenesis process in cancer can involve EPC.

  2. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevey, J.; Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J.; Dobos, J.; Vago, A.; Kasler, M.; Doeme, B.; Tovari, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPOα on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPOα at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPOα on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1α expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPOα and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPOα treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPOα administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1α expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPOα treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 ± 4.7 mg and 34.9 ± 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPOα treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1α expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  3. Low Reynolds number steady state flow through a branching network of rigid vessels: II. A finite element mixture model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huyghe, J.M.R.J.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Campen, van D.H.; Heethaar, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    This research aims at formulating and verifying a finite element mixture formulation for blood perfusion. The equations derived in a companion paper [3] are discretized according to the Galerkin method. A flow experiment in a rigid model of a vascular tree of about 500 vessels is performed in order

  4. A quantitative theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate and vascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B Herman

    Full Text Available The relationships between cellular, structural and dynamical properties of tumors have traditionally been studied separately. Here, we construct a quantitative, predictive theory of solid tumor growth, metabolic rate, vascularization and necrosis that integrates the relationships between these properties. To accomplish this, we develop a comprehensive theory that describes the interface and integration of the tumor vascular network and resource supply with the cardiovascular system of the host. Our theory enables a quantitative understanding of how cells, tissues, and vascular networks act together across multiple scales by building on recent theoretical advances in modeling both healthy vasculature and the detailed processes of angiogenesis and tumor growth. The theory explicitly relates tumor vascularization and growth to metabolic rate, and yields extensive predictions for tumor properties, including growth rates, metabolic rates, degree of necrosis, blood flow rates and vessel sizes. Besides these quantitative predictions, we explain how growth rates depend on capillary density and metabolic rate, and why similar tumors grow slower and occur less frequently in larger animals, shedding light on Peto's paradox. Various implications for potential therapeutic strategies and further research are discussed.

  5. Inflammatory angiomyolipoma of the liver: a rare hepatic tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Angiomyolipoma (AML is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm of the tumor, composed of a varying heterogeneous mixture of three tissue components: blood vessels, smooth muscle and adipose cells. Hepatic AML may demonstrate a marked histological diversity. We herein present one case of hepatic AML exhibiting prominent inflammatory cells in the background, which happened in a 61-year-old Chinese female patient, without signs of tuberous sclerosis. Histologically, the striking feature was the infiltration of numerous inflammatory cells in the background, including small lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosnophils. The tumor cells were spindled and histiocytoid in shape, with slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm, and arranged along the vessels or scattered among the inflammatory background. Sinusoid structure was obviously seen in the tumor. Mature adipocytes and thick-walled blood vessels were focally observed at the boundaries between the tumor and surrounding liver tissues. The tumor cells were positive immunostaining for HMB-45, Melan-A, and smooth muscle actin. The inflammatory AML should be distinguished from other tumors with inflammatory background such as inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and follicular dendritic cell tumor and deserves wider recognition for its occurrence as a primary hepatic tumor. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1828633072762370

  6. Liver tumors, correlation of computed tomography (CT) and pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Niibe, Hideo; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    1984-09-01

    Computed tomographic and pathologic correlation was studied in 12 autopsied cases with 11 cases of metastatic liver tumors and 1 case of hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite of proliferative patterns of the tumors, nodular low attenuations on CT showed scattered nodular lesions and geographic low attenuations on CT showed groups of multiple small nodular lesions, macroscopically. Abnormal areas of low attenuation were generally diminished by drip infusion contrast enhancement, which was more significant on tumors of infiltrative proliferation. Tumors of infiltrative proliferation revealed little degeneration of surrounding liver cells and abnormal areas of low attenuation were more distinct before contrast enhancement. Tumors of expansive proliferation revealed obvious degeneration of surrounding liver cells and a case having about 200 layers of degenerated liver cells revealed more distinct after contrast enhancement. The central lower density areas in abnormal areas of low attenuation on CT coincided with liquefactive necroses with scanty capillary. vessels and fibrotic changes, histopathologically. But coagulative necroses without decrease of surrouding blood flows were not visualized on CT. CT could not demonstrate the liquefactive necroses in more small nodules than 2 cm in diameter. (J.P.N.).

  7. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  8. The Pleiotropic Role of L1CAM in Tumor Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Angiolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is a key step in the development, invasion, and dissemination of solid tumors and, therefore, represents a viable target in the context of antitumor therapy. Indeed, antiangiogenic approaches have given promising results in preclinical models and entered the clinical practice. However, in patients, the results obtained so far with antiangiogenic drugs have not completely fulfilled expectations, especially because their effect has been transient with tumors developing resistance and evasion mechanisms. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie tumor vascularization and the functional regulation of cancer vessels is a prerequisite for the development of novel and alternative antiangiogenic treatments. The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM, a cell surface glycoprotein previously implicated in the development and plasticity of the nervous system, is aberrantly expressed in the vasculature of various cancer types. L1CAM plays multiple pro-angiogenic roles in the endothelial cells of tumor-associated vessels, thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target. In addition, L1CAM prevents the maturation of cancer vasculature and its inhibition promotes vessel normalization, a process that is thought to improve the therapeutic response of tumors to cytotoxic drugs. We here provide an overview on tumor angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies and summarize the current knowledge on the biological role of L1CAM in cancer vasculature. Finally, we highlight the clinical implications of targeting L1CAM as a novel antiangiogenic and vessel-normalizing approach.

  9. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2007-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  10. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pasquale, Elena B

    2006-01-01

    Mutations have been recently identified in the EphB2 receptor gene in prostate cancer suggesting that EphB2, a member of the large Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family, is a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer...

  11. Loss of Serglycin Promotes Primary Tumor Growth and Vessel Functionality in the RIP1-Tag2 Mouse Model for Spontaneous Insulinoma Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Hamilton

    Full Text Available The serglycin proteoglycan is mainly expressed by hematopoietic cells where the major function is to retain the content of storage granules and vesicles. In recent years, expression of serglycin has also been found in different forms of human malignancies and a high serglycin expression level has been correlated with a more migratory and invasive phenotype in the case of breast cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Serglycin has also been implicated in the development of the tumor vasculature in multiple myeloma and hepatocellular carcinoma where reduced expression of serglycin was correlated with a less extensive vasculature. To further investigate the contribution of serglycin to tumor development, we have used the immunocompetent RIP1-Tag2 mouse model of spontaneous insulinoma formation crossed into serglycin deficient mice. For the first time we show that serglycin-deficiency affects orthotopic primary tumor growth and tumor vascular functionality of late stage carcinomas. RIP1-Tag2 mice that lack serglycin develop larger tumors with a higher proliferative activity but unaltered apoptosis compared to normal RIP1-Tag2 mice. The absence of serglycin also enhances the tumor vessel functionality, which is better perfused than in tumors from serglycin wild type mice. The presence of the pro-angiogenic modulators vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were decreased in the serglycin deficient mice which suggests a less pro-angiogenic environment in the tumors of these animals. Taken together, we conclude that serglycin affects multiple aspects of spontaneous tumor formation, which strengthens the theory that serglycin acts as an important mediator in the formation and progression of tumors.

  12. Detailed evaluation of two phase natural circulation flow in the cooling channel of the ex-vessel core catcher for EU-APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon, E-mail: rjpark@kaeri.re.kr; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Rhee, Bo-Wook; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Ex-vessel core catcher of PECS is installed in EU-APR1400. • CE-PECS has been conducted to test a cooling capability of the PECS. • Two phase flow in CE-PECS and PECS was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. • RELAP5 results are very similar to the CE-PECS data. • The super-step design is suitable for steam injection into the downcomer in PECS. - Abstract: The ex-vessel core catcher of the PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System) is installed to retain and cool down the corium in the reactor cavity of the EU (European Union)-APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400. A verification experiment on the cooling capability of the PECS has been conducted in the CE (Cooling Experiment)-PECS. Simulations of a two-phase natural circulation flow using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code in the CE-PECS and PECS have been conducted to predict the two-phase flow characteristics, to determine the natural circulation mass flow rate in the cooling channel, and to evaluate the scaling in the experimental design of the CE-PECS. Particularly from a comparative study of the prototype PECS and the scaled test facility of the CE-PECS, the orifice loss coefficient in the CE-PECS was found to be 6 to maintain the coolant circulation mass flux, which is approximately 273.1 kg/m{sup 2} s. The RELAP5 results on the coolant circulation mass flow rate are very similar to the CE-PECS experimental results. An increase in the coolant injection temperature and the heat flux lead to an increase in the coolant circulation mass flow rate. In the base case simulation, a lot of vapor was injected into the downcomer, which leads to an instability of the two-phase natural circulation flow. A super-step design at a downcomer inlet is suitable to prevent vapor injection into the downcomer piping.

  13. Detailed evaluation of two phase natural circulation flow in the cooling channel of the ex-vessel core catcher for EU-APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Rhee, Bo-Wook; Kim, Hwan Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ex-vessel core catcher of PECS is installed in EU-APR1400. • CE-PECS has been conducted to test a cooling capability of the PECS. • Two phase flow in CE-PECS and PECS was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. • RELAP5 results are very similar to the CE-PECS data. • The super-step design is suitable for steam injection into the downcomer in PECS. - Abstract: The ex-vessel core catcher of the PECS (Passive Ex-vessel corium retaining and Cooling System) is installed to retain and cool down the corium in the reactor cavity of the EU (European Union)-APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400. A verification experiment on the cooling capability of the PECS has been conducted in the CE (Cooling Experiment)-PECS. Simulations of a two-phase natural circulation flow using the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code in the CE-PECS and PECS have been conducted to predict the two-phase flow characteristics, to determine the natural circulation mass flow rate in the cooling channel, and to evaluate the scaling in the experimental design of the CE-PECS. Particularly from a comparative study of the prototype PECS and the scaled test facility of the CE-PECS, the orifice loss coefficient in the CE-PECS was found to be 6 to maintain the coolant circulation mass flux, which is approximately 273.1 kg/m"2 s. The RELAP5 results on the coolant circulation mass flow rate are very similar to the CE-PECS experimental results. An increase in the coolant injection temperature and the heat flux lead to an increase in the coolant circulation mass flow rate. In the base case simulation, a lot of vapor was injected into the downcomer, which leads to an instability of the two-phase natural circulation flow. A super-step design at a downcomer inlet is suitable to prevent vapor injection into the downcomer piping.

  14. Expression of the tumor suppressor genes NF2, 4.1B, and TSLC1 in canine meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, P J; Surace, E I; Cambell, M; Higgins, R J; Leutenegger, C M; Bollen, A W; LeCouteur, R A; Gutmann, D H

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are common primary brain tumors in dogs; however, little is known about the molecular genetic mechanisms involved in their tumorigenesis. Several tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in meningioma pathogenesis in humans, including the neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), protein 4.1B (4.1 B), and tumor suppressor in lung cancer-1 (TSLC1) genes. We investigated the expression of these tumor suppressor genes in a series of spontaneous canine meningiomas using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) (NF2; n = 25) and western blotting (NF2/merlin, 4.1B, TSLC1; n = 30). Decreased expression of 4.1B and TSLC1 expression on western blotting was seen in 6/30 (20%) and in 15/30 (50%) tumors, respectively, with 18/30 (60%) of meningiomas having decreased or absent expression of one or both proteins. NF2 gene expression assessed by western blotting and RT-PCR varied considerably between individual tumors. Complete loss of NF2 protein on western blotting was not seen, unlike 4.1B and TSLC1. Incidence of TSLC1 abnormalities was similar to that seen in human meningiomas, while perturbation of NF2 and 4.1B appeared to be less common than reported for human tumors. No association was observed between tumor grade, subtype, or location and tumor suppressor gene expression based on western blot or RT-PCR. These results suggest that loss of these tumor suppressor genes is a frequent occurrence in canine meningiomas and may be an early event in tumorigenesis in some cases. In addition, it is likely that other, as yet unidentified, genes play an important role in canine meningioma formation and growth.

  15. Immersive volume rendering of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gregory; Kim, Han Suk; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method of visualizing flow in blood vessels. Our approach reads unstructured tetrahedral data, resamples it, and uses slice based 3D texture volume rendering. Due to the sparse structure of blood vessels, we utilize an octree to efficiently store the resampled data by discarding empty regions of the volume. We use animation to convey time series data, wireframe surface to give structure, and utilize the StarCAVE, a 3D virtual reality environment, to add a fully immersive element to the visualization. Our tool has great value in interdisciplinary work, helping scientists collaborate with clinicians, by improving the understanding of blood flow simulations. Full immersion in the flow field allows for a more intuitive understanding of the flow phenomena, and can be a great help to medical experts for treatment planning.

  16. Tumor cell proliferation kinetics and tumor growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M

    1989-01-01

    The present knowledge on the growth rate and the proliferation kinetics of human tumor is based on the measurement of the tumor doubling times (DT) in several hundred patients and on the determination of the proportion of proliferating cells with radioactive thymidine or by flow cytometry in large numbers of patients. The results show that the DT of human tumor varies widely, from less than one week to over one year with a median value of approximately 2 months. The DTs are significantly correlated with the histological type. They depend upon (1) the duration of the cell cycle whose mean duration is 2 days with small variations from tumor to tumor, (2) the proportion of proliferating cells and consequently the cell birth rate which varies widely among tumors and which is significantly correlated to the DT, (3) the cell loss factors which also vary widely and which are the greatest when proliferation is most intensive. These studies have several clinical implications: (a) they have further increased our understanding of the natural history of human tumor, (b) they have therapeutic implications since tumor responsiveness and curability by radiation and drugs are strongly influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the tumor, (c) the proportion of proliferating cells is of great prognostic value in several types of human cancers. The investigation of the molecular defects, which are correlated with the perturbation of control of cell proliferation, should lead to significant fundamental and therapeutic advances. (orig.).

  17. Mechanism of brain tumor headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynne P

    2014-04-01

    Headaches occur commonly in all patients, including those who have brain tumors. Using the search terms "headache and brain tumors," "intracranial neoplasms and headache," "facial pain and brain tumors," "brain neoplasms/pathology," and "headache/etiology," we reviewed the literature from the past 78 years on the proposed mechanisms of brain tumor headache, beginning with the work of Penfield. Most of what we know about the mechanisms of brain tumor associated headache come from neurosurgical observations from intra-operative dural and blood vessel stimulation as well as intra-operative observations and anecdotal information about resolution of headache symptoms with various tumor-directed therapies. There is an increasing overlap between the primary and secondary headaches and they may actually share a similar biological mechanism. While there can be some criticism that the experimental work with dural and arterial stimulation produced head pain and not actual headache, when considered with the clinical observations about headache type, coupled with improvement after treatment of the primary tumor, we believe that traction on these structures, coupled with increased intracranial pressure, is clearly part of the genesis of brain tumor headache and may also involve peripheral sensitization with neurogenic inflammation as well as a component of central sensitization through trigeminovascular afferents on the meninges and cranial vessels. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  18. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  19. Full vessel CFD analysis on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of CPR1000 PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Yanmeng; Yang Lixin; Zhang Mingqian

    2014-01-01

    To obtain flow distributions and thermal-hydraulic properties in a full vessel PWR under limited computation ability and time, a full vessel simulation model of CPR1000 was built based on two simplification methods. One simplified the inner geometry of the control rod guide tubes using equivalent flow area. Another substituted the core by a porous domain to maintain the pressure drop and temperature rise. After the computation, global and localized flow distributions, hydraulic loads of some main assemblies were obtained, as well as other thermal-hydraulic properties. The results indicate the flow distribution in the full vessel is asymmetrical. Therefore it is essential to use the full vessel model to simulate. The calculated thermal-hydraulic characteristics agree well with the operation statistics, providing the reference data for the reactor safety operation. (authors)

  20. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  1. Leukemic Cells "Gas Up" Leaky Bone Marrow Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkin, Tomer; Rafii, Shahin

    2017-09-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Passaro et al. demonstrate how leukemia through aberrant induction of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production trigger marrow vessel leakiness, instigating pro-leukemic function. Disrupted tumor blood vessels promote exhaustion of non-malignant stem and progenitor cells and may facilitate leukemia relapse following chemotherapeutic treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Affinity for 57Co-Vitamin B12 by a wide histologic variety of tumor types in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, M. H.; Park, S. A.; Kim, S. H.; Jeong, K. H.; Lim, C. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The search for tumor-avid agents for use in nuclear medicine imaging is an ongoing field of importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the affinity for radiolabeled vitamin B 12 by a wide histologic variety of tumor types in mice. Seventeen different types of tumor were grown subcutaneously in female Balb/C or Balb nu/nu(nude) mice. When the tumors reached about 1 cm in diameter, mice were injected intraperitoneally with 57 Co-vitamin B 12 . Twenty-four hours later, the mice were sacrificed. Organs and tissues were removed, weighed, and activity per mg determined by gamma counter. Values represented cpm/mg tissue that was normalized to 20 grams body weight for each mouse. A wide variety of tumor types showed significant uptake and concentration of 57 Co-vitamin B 12 , as evidenced by tumor:tissue activity ratios. For many tissues of great importance in terms of background (bone, muscle, blood), the tumor:tissue activity ratios of uptake were high. These data strongly suggest that further efforts to evaluate the utility of radiolabeled adducts of vitamin B 12 for clinical use in oncologic imaging are warranted

  3. Cinnamon extract induces tumor cell death through inhibition of NFκB and AP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Park, Zee Yong; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Hwang, Ji-Sun; So, Jae-Seon; Lee, Choong-Gu; Sahoo, Anupama; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Jeon, Won Kyung; Ko, Byoung Seob; Im, Chang-Rok

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark is the outer skin of an evergreen tall tree belonging to the family Lauraceae containing several active components such as essential oils (cinnamic aldehyde and cinnamyl aldehyde), tannin, mucus and carbohydrate. They have various biological functions including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammation, anti-diabetic and anti-tumor activity. Previously, we have reported that anti-cancer effect of cinnamon extracts is associated with modulation of angiogenesis and effector function of CD8 + T cells. In this study, we further identified that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is also link with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity by inhibiting the activities NFκB and AP1 in mouse melanoma model. Water soluble cinnamon extract was obtained and quality of cinnamon extract was evaluated by HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) analysis. In this study, we tested anti-tumor activity and elucidated action mechanism of cinnamon extract using various types of tumor cell lines including lymphoma, melanoma, cervix cancer and colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Cinnamon extract strongly inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induced active cell death of tumor cells by up-regulating pro-apoptotic molecules while inhibiting NFκB and AP1 activity and their target genes such as Bcl-2, BcL-xL and survivin. Oral administration of cinnamon extract in melanoma transplantation model significantly inhibited tumor growth with the same mechanism of action observed in vitro. Our study suggests that anti-tumor effect of cinnamon extracts is directly linked with enhanced pro-apoptotic activity and inhibition of NFκB and AP1 activities and their target genes in vitro and in vivo mouse melanoma model. Hence, further elucidation of active components of cinnamon extract could lead to development of potent anti-tumor agent or complementary and alternative medicine for the treatment of diverse cancers

  4. Fast magnetic reconstruction of the portal vein with allogeneic blood vessels in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan-Pei; Yan, Xiao-Peng; Xue, Fei; Dong, Ding-Hui; Zhang, Xu-Feng; Ma, Feng; Wang, Hao-Hua; Lv, Yi

    2015-06-01

    The resection and reconstruction of large vessels, including the portal vein, are frequently needed in tumor resection. Warm ischemia before reconstruction might have deleterious effects on the function of some vital organs and therefore, how to reconstruct the vessels quickly after resection is extremely important. The present study was to introduce a new type of magnetic compression anastomosis (MCA) device to establish a quick non-suture anastomosis of the portal vein after resection in canines. The new MCA device consists of a pair of titanium alloy and neodymium-ferrum-boron magnet (Ti-NdFeB) composite rings. The NdFeB magnetic ring as a core of the device was hermetically sealed inside the biomedical titanium alloy case. Twelve canines were divided into two groups: a MCA group in which the end-to-end anastomoses was made with a new device after resection in the portal vein and a traditional manual suture (TMS) group consisted of 6 canines. The anastomosis time, anastomotic patency and quality were investigated at week 24 postoperatively. The portal vein was reconstructed successfully in all of the animals and they all survived. The duration of portal vein anastomosis was significantly shorter in the MCA group than in the TMS group (8.16+/-1.25 vs 36.24+/-2.17 min, PNdFeB composite MCA device was applicable in reconstruction of large vessels after resection. This device was easy to use and the anastomosis was functionally better than the traditional sutured anastomosis.

  5. VEGF-B is dispensable for blood vessel growth but critical for their survival, and VEGF-B targeting inhibits pathological angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Tang, Zhongshu; Hou, Xu; Lennartsson, Johan; Li, Yang; Koch, Alexander W.; Scotney, Pierre; Lee, Chunsik; Arjunan, Pachiappan; Dong, Lijin; Kumar, Anil; Rissanen, Tuomas T.; Wang, Bin; Nagai, Nobuo; Fons, Pierre; Fariss, Robert; Zhang, Yongqing; Wawrousek, Eric; Tansey, Ginger; Raber, James; Fong, Guo-Hua; Ding, Hao; Greenberg, David A.; Becker, Kevin G.; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Nash, Andrew; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Cao, Yihai; Watts, Ryan J.; Li, Xuri

    2009-01-01

    VEGF-B, a homolog of VEGF discovered a long time ago, has not been considered an important target in antiangiogenic therapy. Instead, it has received little attention from the field. In this study, using different animal models and multiple types of vascular cells, we revealed that although VEGF-B is dispensable for blood vessel growth, it is critical for their survival. Importantly, the survival effect of VEGF-B is not only on vascular endothelial cells, but also on pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and vascular stem/progenitor cells. In vivo, VEGF-B targeting inhibited both choroidal and retinal neovascularization. Mechanistically, we found that the vascular survival effect of VEGF-B is achieved by regulating the expression of many vascular prosurvival genes via both NP-1 and VEGFR-1. Our work thus indicates that the function of VEGF-B in the vascular system is to act as a “survival,” rather than an “angiogenic” factor and that VEGF-B inhibition may offer new therapeutic opportunities to treat neovascular diseases. PMID:19369214

  6. Additional value of B-flow imaging in arterial wall calcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abate, Fabrizio; de Bruin, Jorg L

    2018-02-01

    The accuracy of color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) is hampered by the presence of arterial wall calcifications. B-flow imaging may overcome these limitations. We present a case of a severely calcified stenosis of the right common femoral artery (CFA) diagnosed with the aid of B-flow imaging. Both the CT angiography scan and CDU were limited by the presence of diffuse dense arterial calcifications. B-flow imaging showed a >75% stenosis of the CFA. B-flow imaging appears to improve the accuracy of CDU in the presence of calcified stenosis of the CFA. It is of clinical relevance to improve the duplex sonographic accuracy, ideally reducing the need for other imaging modalities prior to surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 46:136-139, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Segmentation of vessels cluttered with cells using a physics based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, Stephen J; Keller, Steve; Nguyen, Nhat; Souvenir, Richard; Huynh, Toan; Clemens, Mark; Shin, Min C

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation of vessels in biomedical images is important as it can provide insight into analysis of vascular morphology, topology and is required for kinetic analysis of flow velocity and vessel permeability. Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool as it enables in vivo imaging of both vasculature and circulating cells. However, the analysis of vasculature in those images is difficult due to the presence of cells and their image gradient. In this paper, we provide a novel method of segmenting vessels with a high level of cell related clutter. A set of virtual point pairs ("vessel probes") are moved reacting to forces including Vessel Vector Flow (VVF) and Vessel Boundary Vector Flow (VBVF) forces. Incorporating the cell detection, the VVF force attracts the probes toward the vessel, while the VBVF force attracts the virtual points of the probes to localize the vessel boundary without being distracted by the image features of the cells. The vessel probes are moved according to Newtonian Physics reacting to the net of forces applied on them. We demonstrate the results on a set of five real in vivo images of liver vasculature cluttered by white blood cells. When compared against the ground truth prepared by the technician, the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) of segmentation with VVF and VBVF was 55% lower than the method without VVF and VBVF.

  8. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy

  10. A versatile mathematical work-flow to explore how Cancer Stem Cell fate influences tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Chiara; Balbo, Gianfranco; Halawani, Sami M; Ba-Rukab, Omar; Ahmad, Ab Rahman; Calogero, Raffaele A; Cordero, Francesca; Beccuti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays multidisciplinary approaches combining mathematical models with experimental assays are becoming relevant for the study of biological systems. Indeed, in cancer research multidisciplinary approaches are successfully used to understand the crucial aspects implicated in tumor growth. In particular, the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) biology represents an area particularly suited to be studied through multidisciplinary approaches, and modeling has significantly contributed to pinpoint the crucial aspects implicated in this theory. More generally, to acquire new insights on a biological system it is necessary to have an accurate description of the phenomenon, such that making accurate predictions on its future behaviors becomes more likely. In this context, the identification of the parameters influencing model dynamics can be advantageous to increase model accuracy and to provide hints in designing wet experiments. Different techniques, ranging from statistical methods to analytical studies, have been developed. Their applications depend on case-specific aspects, such as the availability and quality of experimental data, and the dimension of the parameter space. The study of a new model on the CSC-based tumor progression has been the motivation to design a new work-flow that helps to characterize possible system dynamics and to identify those parameters influencing such behaviors. In detail, we extended our recent model on CSC-dynamics creating a new system capable of describing tumor growth during the different stages of cancer progression. Indeed, tumor cells appear to progress through lineage stages like those of normal tissues, being their division auto-regulated by internal feedback mechanisms. These new features have introduced some non-linearities in the model, making it more difficult to be studied by solely analytical techniques. Our new work-flow, based on statistical methods, was used to identify the parameters which influence the tumor growth. The

  11. Three dimensional calculations of the primary coolant flow in a 900 MW PWR vessel. Steady state and transients computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Alvarez, D.; Cases, F.

    1996-03-01

    The paper explains the chronological account and the first results obtained in the R and D program on the mixing in the 900 MW PWR vessels. After the presentation of the plant type simulated, we define the numerical tool, the (Finite Element Modelling) FEM N3S code. Two results are presented with a comparison with the experiment results issued of the BORA BORA mock up. The first case is dealing with the isothermal steady state mixing in the vessel with the three loops mass flow rate balanced. This case identified as a validation of our numerical tool shows a good agreement. The second case is dealing with the transient mixing of a clear plug in the vessel when one primary pump starts-up. We compare the numerical and experiment results giving the mean boron concentration at the core inlet for several clear water plugs. The results show again a good agreement. (authors). 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  12. Clinical Significances of Serum Vitamin B12, Folate and Ferritin Levels in Patients with Malignant Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monn, Youn Sung; Soung, In Whan; Kim, Sam Yong; Ro, Heung Kyu; Lee, Bok Hee

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical significances of the serum vitamin B 12 , folate and ferritin levels in patients with malignant tumors, the levels were measured in 10 normal control subjects, 70 patients with malignant tumors, 7 patients with liver cirrhosis and 25 patients with other benign diseases. The results are as follows: 1) In normal control subjects, mean serum values for vitamin B 12 , folate and ferritin level were 588.80±131.58 pg/ml, 5.59±1.52 ng/ml and 89.22±42.78 ng/ml retrospectively. 2) There was no significant difference in serum levels between patients with benign diseases and normal control subjects. 3) The serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin levels in patients with liver cirrhosis were significantly higher than in normal control, and the serum folate levels in these patients were lower than in normal control subjects. 4) The serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin levels in patients with malignant tumors were significantly higher than in normal control subjects, and the serum folate levels in these patients were significantly lower than in normal control subjects. The above results suggest that the serum vitamin B 12 and ferritin may be useful as tumor markers in patients with malignant tumors.

  13. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagan, Jonathan, E-mail: jdpagan@uams.edu; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gupta, Kalpna [Vascular Biology Center and Division of Hematology-Oncology Transplantation, Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, MN 72223 (United States); Griffin, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-02-18

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm{sup 3}) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  14. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  15. Perfusion MRI derived indices of microvascular shunting and flow control correlate with tumor grade and outcome in patients with cerebral glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Mouridsen, Kim; Lassen-Ramshad, Yasmin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Deficient microvascular blood flow control is thought to cause tumor hypoxia and increase resistance to therapy. In glioma patients, we tested whether perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) based indices of microvascular flow control provide more information on tumor grade and patient outcome...... than does the established PWI angiogenesis marker, cerebral blood volume (CBV). Material and Methods: Seventy-two glioma patients (sixty high-grade, twelve low-grade gliomas) were included. Capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) and COV, its ratio to blood mean transit time, provide indices...... of microvascular flow control and the extent to which oxygen can be extracted by tumor tissue. The ability of these parameters and CBV to differentiate tumor grade were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curves and logistic regression. Their ability to predict time to progression and overall survival...

  16. Nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel and applies in particular when this is a fast reactor, the core or active part of the reactor being inside the vessel and immersed under a suitable volume of flowing liquid metal to cool it by extracting the calories released by the nuclear fission in the fuel assemblies forming this core [fr

  17. Evaluations of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the reactor vessel annular gap under ERVC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Kwang Soon, E-mail: tomo@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Cheung, Fan-Bill [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two-phase natural circulation flow induced in insulation gap was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Half-scaled non-heating experiments were performed to evaluate flow behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loop-integrated momentum equation was formulated and solved asymptotically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First-order approximate solution was obtained and agreed with experimental data. - Abstract: The process of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation under external reactor vessel cooling conditions was investigated experimentally and analytically in this study. HERMES-HALF experiments were performed to observe and quantify the induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap. A half-scaled non-heating experimental facility was designed by utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and its insulation system. The behavior of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap was observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and the void fraction distribution were measured. Direct flow visualization revealed that choking would occur under certain flow conditions in the minimum gap region near the shear keys. Specifically, large recirculation flows were observed in the minimum gap region for large air injection rates and small outlet areas. Under such conditions, the injected air could not pass through the minimum gap region, resulting in the occurrence of choking near the minimum gap with a periodical air back flow being generated. Therefore, a design modification of the minimum gap region needs to be done to facilitate steam venting and to prevent choking from occurring. To complement the HERMES-HALF experimental effort, an analytical study of the dependence of the induced natural circulation mass flow rate on the inlet area and the

  18. Tumor Cells Express FcγRl Which Contributes to Tumor Cell Growth and a Metastatic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bud Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of circulating immune complexes containing tumor-associated antigens are associated with a poor prognosis for individuals with cancer. The ability of B cells, previously exposed to tumor-associated antigens, to promote both in vitro and in vivo tumor growth formed the rationale to evaluate the mechanism by which immune complexes may promote tumor growth. In elucidating this mechanism, FcγRl expression by tumor cells was characterized by flow cytometry, polymerase chain reaction, and sequence analysis. Immune complexes containing shed tumor antigen and anti-shed tumor antigen Ab cross-linked FcγRl-expressing tumor cells, which resulted in an induction of tumor cell proliferation and of shed tumor antigen production. Use of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors demonstrated that tumor cell proliferation induced by immune complex cross-linking of FcγRl is dependent on the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway. A selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase also inhibited this induction of tumor cell proliferation. These findings support a role for immune complexes and FcγRl expression by tumor cells in augmentation of tumor growth and a metastatic phenotype.

  19. Effect of x irradiation on the vascularization of experimental animal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Y; Ogawa, F; Nishiguchi, H; Tanaka, N; Murakami, K [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1975-03-01

    The authors studied the effect of ionizing radiation on blood vessels and tumor growth in two animal tumor systems: a third generation isoplants of a mammary cancer and a spontaneously arising squamous cell carcinoma. Single cell suspensions were transplanted into a C3H and a C3Hf mouse respectively. They were irradiated once with 2000 rad when the tumors reached about 8 mm in diameter. Microangiography was performed at a constant temperature and pressure, and a contrast medium containing lead-oxide and gelatin was flushed the vena cava for 10 min. at 120 mmHg. Tumor shrinkage was followed by continuous regrowth. The basic vasculature of the mammary carcinoma consisted of abundant large and fine blood vessels corkscrewed or stretched from the periphery of the tumor to its center in complex reticular networks. One day after irradiation there were small scattered avascular areas which, by the third day formed a large central necrosis. Supervascularization was also observed, indicating that some hypoxic tumor cells could be reoxygenized. In 5 days vascularization was similar to that of a nonirradiated tumor. Conversely, The squamous cell carcinoma showed peripheral and central vascularization with abundant vascular and avascular areas and extravasion in the large avascular area. Two days after irradiation the vessels were dilated. At 3 days peripheral fine vessels were damaged but the central vasculature remained intact. Unlike the mammary carcinoma, supervascularization was not the typical finding. At 5 days, vascularization was similar to that of a nonirradiated tumor.

  20. ErbB2 Pathway Activation upon Smad4 Loss Promotes Lung Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death. Genome sequencing of lung tumors from patients with squamous cell carcinoma has identified SMAD4 to be frequently mutated. Here, we use a mouse model to determine the molecular mechanisms by which Smad4 loss leads to lung cancer progression. Mice with ablation of Pten and Smad4 in airway epithelium develop metastatic adenosquamous tumors. Comparative transcriptomic and in vivo cistromic analyses determine that loss of PTEN and SMAD4 results in ELF3 and ErbB2 pathway activation due to decreased expression of ERRFI1, a negative regulator of ERBB2 in mouse and human cells. The combinatorial inhibition of ErbB2 and Akt signaling attenuate tumor progression and cell invasion, respectively. Expression profile analysis of human lung tumors substantiated the importance of the ErbB2/Akt/ELF3 signaling pathway as both a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic drug target for treating lung cancer.

  1. An efficient semi-implicit method for three-dimensional non-hydrostatic flows in compliant arterial vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fambri, Francesco; Dumbser, Michael; Casulli, Vincenzo

    2014-11-01

    Blood flow in arterial systems can be described by the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations within a time-dependent spatial domain that accounts for the elasticity of the arterial walls. In this article, blood is treated as an incompressible Newtonian fluid that flows through compliant vessels of general cross section. A three-dimensional semi-implicit finite difference and finite volume model is derived so that numerical stability is obtained at a low computational cost on a staggered grid. The key idea of the method consists in a splitting of the pressure into a hydrostatic and a non-hydrostatic part, where first a small quasi-one-dimensional nonlinear system is solved for the hydrostatic pressure and only in a second step the fully three-dimensional non-hydrostatic pressure is computed from a three-dimensional nonlinear system as a correction to the hydrostatic one. The resulting algorithm is robust, efficient, locally and globally mass conservative, and applies to hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic flows in one, two and three space dimensions. These features are illustrated on nontrivial test cases for flows in tubes with circular or elliptical cross section where the exact analytical solution is known. Test cases of steady and pulsatile flows in uniformly curved rigid and elastic tubes are presented. Wherever possible, axial velocity development and secondary flows are shown and compared with previously published results. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  3. Microfluidic flow fractionation device for label-free isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Kyung-A; Kwon, Kiho; Han, Hyunju; Kim, Seung-Il; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2013-02-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are dissociated from primary tumor and circulate in peripheral blood. They are regarded as the genesis of metastasis. Isolation and enumeration of CTCs serve as valuable tools for cancer prognosis and diagnosis. However, the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in blood makes it difficult to separate intact CTCs without loss. In this paper, we introduce a parallel multi-orifice flow fractionation (p-MOFF) device in which a series of contraction/expansion microchannels are placed parallel on a chip forming four identical channels. CTCs were continuously isolated from the whole blood of breast cancer patients by hydrodynamic forces and cell size differences. Blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients were analyzed (half were from metastatic breast cancer patients and the rest were from adjuvant breast cancer patients). The number of isolated CTCs varied from 0 to 21 in 7.5 ml of blood. Because our devices do not require any labeling processes (e.g., EpCAM antibody), heterogeneous CTCs can be isolated regardless of EpCAM expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The vessel fluence; Fluence cuve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the technical meeting on the reactors vessels fluence. They are grouped in eight sessions: the industrial context and the stakes of the vessels control; the organization and the methodology for the fluence computation; the concerned physical properties; the reference computation methods; the fluence monitoring in an industrial context; vessels monitoring under irradiation; others methods in the world; the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  5. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  6. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  7. Advanced ultrasound applications in the assessment of renal transplants: contrast-enhanced ultrasound, elastography, and B-flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Tara A; Jha, Priyanka; Poder, Liina; Weinstein, Stefanie

    2018-04-09

    Ultrasound is routinely used as the first imaging exam for evaluation of renal transplants and can identify most major surgical complications and evaluate vascularity with color Doppler. Ultrasound is limited, however, in the detection of parenchymal disease processes and Doppler evaluation is also prone to technical errors. Multiple new ultrasound applications have been developed and are under ongoing investigation which could add additional diagnostic capability to the routine ultrasound exam with minimal additional time, cost, and patient risk. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can be used off-label in the transplant kidney, and can assist in detection of infection, trauma, and vascular complications. CEUS also can demonstrate perfusion of the transplant assessed quantitatively with generation of time-intensity curves. Future directions of CEUS include monitoring treatment response and microbubble targeted medication delivery. Elastography is an ultrasound application that can detect changes in tissue elasticity, which is useful to diagnose diffuse parenchymal disease, such as fibrosis, otherwise unrecognizable with ultrasound. Elastography has been successfully applied in other organs including the liver, thyroid, and breast; however, it is still under development for use in the transplant kidney. Unique properties of the transplant kidney including its heterogeneity, anatomic location, and other technical factors present challenges in the development of reference standard measurements. Lastly, B-flow imaging is a flow application derived from B-mode. This application can show the true lumen size of a vessel which is useful to depict vascular anatomy and bypasses some of the pitfalls of color Doppler such as demonstration of slow flow.

  8. Thymic epithelial tumors: Comparison of CT and MR imaging findings of low-risk thymomas, high-risk thymomas, and thymic carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadohara, Junko; Fujimoto, Kiminori; Mueller, Nestor L.; Kato, Seiya; Takamori, Shinzo; Ohkuma, Kazuaki; Terasaki, Hiroshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of thymic epithelial tumors classified according to the current World Health Organization (WHO) histologic classification and to determine useful findings in differentiating the main subtypes. Materials and methods: Sixty patients with thymic epithelial tumor who underwent both CT and MR imaging were reviewed retrospectively. All cases were classified according to the 2004 WHO classification. The following findings were assessed in each case on both CT and MRI: size of tumor, contour, perimeter of capsule; homogeneity, presence of septum, hemorrhage, necrotic or cystic component within tumor; presence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleural effusion, and great vessel invasion. These imaging characteristics of 30 low-risk thymomas (4 type A, 12 type AB, and 14 type B1), 18 high-risk thymomas (11 type B2 and seven type B3), and 12 thymic carcinomas on CT and MR imaging were compared using the chi-square test. Comparison between CT and MR findings was performed by using McNemar test. Results: On both CT and MR imaging, thymic carcinomas were more likely to have irregular contours (P < .001), necrotic or cystic component (P < .05), heterogeneous contrast-enhancement (P < .05), lymphadenopathy (P < .0001), and great vessel invasion (P < .001) than low-risk and high-risk thymomas. On MR imaging, the findings of almost complete capsule, septum, and homogenous enhancement were more commonly seen in low-risk thymomas than high-risk thymomas and thymic carcinomas (P < .05). MR imaging was superior to CT in the depiction of capsule, septum, or hemorrhage within tumor (all comparison, P < .05). Conclusion: The presence of irregular contour, necrotic or cystic component, heterogeneous enhancement, lymphadenopathy, and great vessel invasion on CT or MR imaging are strongly suggestive of thymic carcinomas. On MR imaging, the findings of contour, capsule, septum, and homogenous enhancement are helpful in

  9. Reciprocal influence of B cells and tumor macro and microenvironments in the ApcMin/+ model of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, Francesca; Vetrano, Stefania; Tonon, Silvia; Valeri, Viviana; Piontini, Andrea; Burocchi, Alessia; Petti, Luciana; Frossi, Barbara; Gulino, Alessandro; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2017-01-01

    One of the most fascinating aspects of the immune system is its dynamism, meant as the ability to change and readapt according to the organism needs. Following an insult, we assist to the spontaneous organization of different immune cells which cooperate, locally and at distance, to build up an appropriate response. Throughout tumor progression, adaptations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion and metastasis to distal organs, but also to dramatic changes in the activity and composition of the immune system. In this work, we show the changes of the B-cell arm of the immune system following tumor progression in the Apc Min/+ model of colorectal cancer. Tumor macroenvironment leads to an increased proportion of total and IL-10-competent B cells in draining LNs while activates a differentiation route that leads to the expansion of IgA + lymphocytes in the spleen and peritoneum. Importantly, serum IgA levels were significantly higher in Apc Min/+ than Wt mice. The peculiar involvement of IgA response in the adenomatous transformation had correlates in the gut-mucosal compartment where IgA-positive elements increased from normal mucosa to areas of low grade dysplasia while decreasing upon overt carcinomatous transformation. Altogether, our findings provide a snapshot of the tumor education of B lymphocytes in the Apc Min/+ model of colorectal cancer. Understanding how tumor macroenvironment affects the differentiation, function and distribution of B lymphocytes is pivotal to the generation of specific therapies, targeted to switching B cells to an anti-, rather than pro-, tumoral phenotype.

  10. Using Flow Characteristics in Three-Dimensional Power Doppler Ultrasound Imaging to Predict Complete Responses in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shia, Wei-Chung; Huang, Yu-Len; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2017-05-01

    Strategies are needed for the identification of a poor response to treatment and determination of appropriate chemotherapy strategies for patients in the early stages of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. We hypothesize that power Doppler ultrasound imaging can provide useful information on predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The solid directional flow of vessels in breast tumors was used as a marker of pathologic complete responses (pCR) in patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Thirty-one breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and had tumors of 2 to 5 cm were recruited. Three-dimensional power Doppler ultrasound with high-definition flow imaging technology was used to acquire the indices of tumor blood flow/volume, and the chemotherapy response prediction was established, followed by support vector machine classification. The accuracy of pCR prediction before the first chemotherapy treatment was 83.87% (area under the ROC curve [AUC] = 0.6957). After the second chemotherapy treatment, the accuracy of was 87.9% (AUC = 0.756). Trend analysis showed that good and poor responders exhibited different trends in vascular flow during chemotherapy. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of using the vascular flow in breast tumors to predict chemotherapeutic efficacy. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. BETHSY 9.1b Test Calculation with TRACE Using 3D Vessel Component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berar, O.; Prosek, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, several advanced multidimensional computational tools for simulating reactor system behaviour during real and hypothetical transient scenarios were developed. One of such advanced, best-estimate reactor systems codes is TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE), developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The advanced TRACE comes with a graphical user interface called SNAP (Symbolic Nuclear Analysis Package). It is intended for pre- and post-processing, running codes, RELAP5 to TRACE input deck conversion, input deck database generation etc. The TRACE code is still not fully development and it will have all the capabilities of RELAP5. The purpose of the present study was therefore to assess the 3D capability of the TRACE on BETHSY 9.1b test. The TRACE input deck was semi-converted (using SNAP and manual corrections) from the RELAP5 input deck. The 3D fluid dynamics within reactor vessel was modelled and compared to 1D fluid dynamics. The 3D calculation was compared both to TRACE 1D calculation and RELAP5 calculation. Namely, the geometry used in TRACE is basically the same, what gives very good basis for the comparison of the codes. The only exception is 3D reactor vessel model in case of TRACE 3D calculation. The TRACE V5.0 Patch 1 and RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch 4 were used for calculations. The BETHSY 9.1b test (International Standard Problem no. 27 or ISP-27) was 5.08 cm equivalent diameter cold leg break without high pressure safety injection and with delayed ultimate procedure. BETHSY facility was a 3-loop replica of a 900 MWe FRAMATOME pressurized water reactor. For better presentation of the calculated physical phenomena and processes, an animation model using SNAP was developed. In general, the TRACE 3D code calculation is in good agreement with the BETHSY 9.1b test. The TRACE 3D calculation results are as good as or better than the RELAP5 calculated results. Also, the TRACE 3D calculation is not significantly different from TRACE 1D

  12. Tumor angiogenesis in advanced stage ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, H C; Kohn, E C; Steinberg, S M; Rothenberg, M L; Merino, M J

    1995-07-01

    Tumor angiogenesis has been found to have prognostic significance in many tumor types for predicting an increased risk of metastasis. We assessed tumor vascularity in 43 cases of advanced stage (International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stages III and IV) ovarian cancer by using the highly specific endothelial cell marker CD34. Microvessel counts and stage were associated with disease-free survival and with overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The plots show that higher stage, higher average vessel count at 200x (200x avg) and 400x (400x avg) magnification and highest vessel count at 400x (400x high) magnification confer a worse prognosis for disease-free survival. Average vessel count of less than 16 (400x avg, P2 = 0.01) and less than 45 (200x avg, P2 = 0.026) suggested a better survival. Similarly, a high vessel count of less than 20 (400x high, P2 = 0.019) conferred a better survival as well. The plots suggest that higher stage, higher average vessel count at 200x and 400x, and highest vessel count at 200x and 400x show a trend to worse overall survival as well. With the Cox proportional hazards model, stage was the best predictor of overall survival, however, the average microvessel count at 400x was found to be the best predictor of disease-free survival. These results suggest that analysis of neovascularization in advanced stage ovarian cancer may be a useful prognostic factor.

  13. Dioscin inhibits colon tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis through regulating VEGFR2 and AKT/MAPK signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Qingyi [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Qing, Yong, E-mail: qingyongxy@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Hu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Lei [Department of Pharmacology, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wu, Xiaohua, E-mail: wuxh@scu.edu.cn [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Dioscin has shown cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but its in vivo effects and the mechanisms have not elucidated yet. The purpose of the current study was to assess the antitumor effects and the molecular mechanisms of dioscin. We showed that dioscin could inhibit tumor growth in vivo and has no toxicity at the test condition. The growth suppression was accompanied by obvious blood vessel decrease within solid tumors. We also found dioscin treatment inhibited the proliferation of cancer and endothelial cell lines, and most sensitive to primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). What's more, analysis of HUVECs migration, invasion, and tube formation exhibited that dioscin has significantly inhibitive effects to these actions. Further analysis of blood vessel formation in the matrigel plugs indicated that dioscin could inhibit VEGF-induced blood vessel formation in vivo. We also identified that dioscin could suppress the downstream protein kinases of VEGFR2, including Src, FAK, AKT and Erk1/2, accompanied by the increase of phosphorylated P38MAPK. The results potently suggest that dioscin may be a potential anticancer drug, which efficiently inhibits angiogenesis induced by VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathways. - Highlights: • Dioscin inhibits tumor growth in vivo and does not exhibit any toxicity. • Dioscin inhibits angiogenesis within solid tumors. • Dioscin inhibits the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs. • Dioscin inhibits VEGF–induced blood vessel formation in vivo. • Dioscin inhibits VEGFR2 signaling pathway as well as AKT/MAPK pathway.

  14. Radiation and concurrent chemotherapy for the treatment of Lewis lung tumor and B16 melanoma tumor in C57/BL mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, J.E.; Barron, G.

    1984-01-01

    C57/BL mice bearing either Lewis lung tumor or B16 melanoma tumor were treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. The treatment results were determined in vivo by tumor regrowth delay assay. When continuous infusion of either Cyclophosphamide (CYCLO) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or Adriamycin (ADRIA) or Mitomycin-C (MITO-C) was used in combination with continuous radiation at 1 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. When multiple drug chemotherapy, FAM (5-FU, ADRIA, MITO-C) was administered in combination with radiation at 80 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. In these two murine tumor models, when clinically relevant concentrations of commonly used chemotherapy agents were combined with radiation, no therapeutic advantage was observed

  15. Determining tumor blood flow parameters from dynamic image measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libertini, Jessica M.

    2008-11-01

    Many recent cancer treatments focus on preventing angiogenesis, the process by which a tumor promotes the growth of large and efficient capillary beds for the increased nourishment required to support the tumor's rapid growth[l]. To measure the efficacy of these treatments in a timely fashion, there is an interest in using data from dynamic sequences of contrast-enhanced medical imaging, such as MRI and CT, to measure blood flow parameters such as perfusion, permeability-surface-area product, and the relative volumes of the plasma and extracellular-extravascular space. Starting with a two compartment model presented by the radiology community[2], this work challenges the application of a simplification to this problem, which was originally developed to model capillary reuptake[3]. While the primary result of this work is the demonstration of the inaccuracy of this simplification, the remainder of the paper is dedicated to presenting alternative methods for calculating the perfusion and plasma volume coefficients. These methods are applied to model data sets based on real patient data, and preliminary results are presented.

  16. Complete resection of locally advanced ovarian carcinoma fixed to the pelvic sidewall and involving external and internal iliac vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikimi, Kyoko; Tate, Shinichi; Matsuoka, Ayumu; Shozu, Makio

    2017-08-01

    Locally advanced ovarian carcinomas may be fixed to the pelvic sidewall, and although these often involve the internal iliac vessels, they rarely involve the external iliac vessels. Such tumors are mostly considered inoperable. We present a surgical technique for complete resection of locally advanced ovarian carcinoma fixed to the pelvic sidewall and involving external and internal iliac vessels. A 69-year-old woman presented with ovarian carcinoma fixed to the right pelvic sidewall, which involved the right external and internal iliac arteries and veins and the right lower ureter, rectum, and vagina. We cut the external iliac artery and vein at the bifurcation and at the inguinal ligament to resect the external artery and vein. Then, we reconstructed the arterial and venous supplies of the right external artery and vein with grafts. After creating a wide space immediately inside of the sacral plexus to allow the tumor fixed to pelvic sidewall with the internal iliac vessels to move medially, we performed total internal iliac vessel resection. We achieved complete en bloc tumor resection with the right external and internal artery and vein, right ureter, vagina, and rectum adhering to the tumor. There were no intra- or postoperative complications, such as bleeding, graft occlusion, infection, or limb edema. Exfoliation from the sacral plexus and total resection with external and internal iliac vessels enables complete resection of the tumor fixed to the pelvic sidewall. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intraoperative evaluation of renal blood flow during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy with a novel Doppler system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mues, Adam C; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Badani, Ketan; Gupta, Mantu; Landman, Jaime

    2010-12-01

    Hemostasis remains a major challenge associated with laparoscopic renal surgery. We evaluated a cost-effective novel Doppler probe (DP) for assessment of vascular control during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN). We prospectively collected data during LPN procedures. We documented tumor location and size as well as subjective quality of the hilar dissection. The DP was compared with our standard intraoperative ultrasound system (SUS) for the ability to detect blood flow during hilar dissection and to determine parenchymal ischemia around the tumor after clamping of the renal vessels. Twenty patients underwent LPN by a single surgeon. The mean tumor size was 3.0 cm (range: 1.2-6.3 cm). The times to assess the kidney using the SUS and DP were 68.6 seconds (range: 20-155) and 44.5 seconds (range: 15-180), respectively. Evaluation prior to renal hilar clamping demonstrated the presence of blood flow in all 20 patients (100%) using the SUS and in 17 of 20 (85%) using the DP. Similarly, cessation of blood flow with clamping was documented in 100% of cases with SUS and 85% with DP. Persistent flow was detected by both SUS and DP in two patients requiring further dissection and reclamping. Then, both systems detected the absence of flow before tumor resection. With blood flow interruption confirmation, no patient had significant bleeding at the time of renal parenchymal transection. Intraoperative Doppler ultrasound technologies minimize the risk of significant bleeding during LPN. The DP is a small, simple, effective probe that can be used to assess blood flow interruption to the kidney during laparoscopic renal surgery.

  18. Induction of oncogene addiction shift to NF-κB by camptothecin in solid tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togano, Tomiteru; Sasaki, Masataka; Watanabe, Mariko; Nakashima, Makoto; Tsuruo, Takashi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Watanabe, Toshiki; Horie, Ryouichi

    2009-01-01

    The biological basis of the resistance of solid tumor cells to chemotherapy is not well understood. While addressing this problem, we found that gastric cancer cell line St-4/CPT, lung cancer cell line A549/CPT, and colon cancer cell line HT-29/CPT, all of which are resistant to camptothecin (CPT), showed strong and constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity driven by IκB kinase compared with their parental cell lines St-4, A549, and HT-29. A new NF-κB inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), reduced viability and induced apoptosis in St-4/CPT, A549/CPT, and HT-29/CPT cell lines, while their parental cell lines were resistant to DHMEQ. The results in this study present an example of the shift in signals that support the survival of solid tumor cells to NF-κB during the acquisition of resistance to CPT. The results also indicate that solid tumor cells that become resistant to chemotherapy may be more easily treated by NF-κB inhibitors.

  19. Induction of oncogene addiction shift to NF-{kappa}B by camptothecin in solid tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togano, Tomiteru; Sasaki, Masataka; Watanabe, Mariko; Nakashima, Makoto [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Tsuruo, Takashi [Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-10-6 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Umezawa, Kazuo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-0061 (Japan); Higashihara, Masaaki [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Watanabe, Toshiki [Laboratory of Tumor Cell Biology, Department of Medical Genome Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Horie, Ryouichi, E-mail: rhorie@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan)

    2009-12-04

    The biological basis of the resistance of solid tumor cells to chemotherapy is not well understood. While addressing this problem, we found that gastric cancer cell line St-4/CPT, lung cancer cell line A549/CPT, and colon cancer cell line HT-29/CPT, all of which are resistant to camptothecin (CPT), showed strong and constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activity driven by I{kappa}B kinase compared with their parental cell lines St-4, A549, and HT-29. A new NF-{kappa}B inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), reduced viability and induced apoptosis in St-4/CPT, A549/CPT, and HT-29/CPT cell lines, while their parental cell lines were resistant to DHMEQ. The results in this study present an example of the shift in signals that support the survival of solid tumor cells to NF-{kappa}B during the acquisition of resistance to CPT. The results also indicate that solid tumor cells that become resistant to chemotherapy may be more easily treated by NF-{kappa}B inhibitors.

  20. A reason for intermittent fasting to suppress the awakening of dormant breast tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankelma, J.; Kooi, B.W.; Krab, K.; Dorsman, J.C.; Joenje, H.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2015-01-01

    For their growth, dormant tumors, which lack angiogenesis may critically depend on gradients of nutrients and oxygen from the nearest blood vessel. Because for oxygen depletion the distance from the nearest blood vessel to depletion will generally be shorter than for glucose depletion, such tumors

  1. A reason for intermittent fasting to suppress the awakening of dormant breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankelma, J.; Kooi, B.; Krab, K.; Dorsman, J.C.; Joenje, H.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2015-01-01

    For their growth, dormant tumors, which lack angiogenesis may critically depend on gradients of nutrients and oxygen from the nearest blood vessel. Because for oxygen depletion the distance from the nearest blood vessel to depletion will generally be shorter than for glucose depletion, such tumors

  2. The effects of Anadara granosa shell-Stichopus hermanni on bFGF expressions and blood vessel counts in the bone defect healing process of Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Parwati Sari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone damage can be caused by various factors with treatment usually involving graft materials being applied to the defective area. Moreover, in the bone defect healing process, blood vessels are also considered to be an important energy source for cell proliferation. One of the angiogenic factors playing an important role in blood vessel formation is basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. Furthermore, synthesized hydroxyapatite derived from Anadara granosa (AG shells constitutes one of the potential materials for use in bone graft. The gold sea cucumber genus Stichopus hermanni (SH possesses the ability to stimulate endothelial progenitor cells inducing bFGF. Purpose: This study aims to investigate the effects of AG shells and SH on bFGF expressions and blood vessel counts within the bone healing process. Methods: Twenty four male Wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: a control group (C, a treatment group was administered with blood cockle shell (AG, and a treatment group with blood cockle shell and golden sea cucumber (AG+SH. Defects were made on their femurs measuring half the diameter of a circular, no. 018. bur These rats were subsequently sacrificed on day 7 after surgery. The expressions of bFGF were measured by means of IHC technique, while the number of blood vessels was quantified using HE technique. The resulting data was subjected to statistical analysis using an Anova test followed by an LSD test (p < 0.05. Results: The one-way Anova test results combined with those of an LSD test showed there to be significant differences in bFGF expressions and blood vessel counts between the control group (K and the treatment group (AG as well as between the treatment group (AG and the treatment group (AG+SH. Conclusions: A combination of Anadara granosa shell and Stichopus hermanni can increase the expression of bFGF and the number of blood vessels on day 7 during the bone healing process in Wistar rats.

  3. The relationship of flow velocities to vessel diameters differs between extracranial carotid and vertebral arteries of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa O; Agunloye, Atinuke M; Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2014-01-01

    Chronic changes in flow rate through arteries produce adjustment of arterial diameters. We compared the relationship between flow velocity and diameter in the carotid and in the vertebral arteries of stroke patients. Using triplex ultrasonography, the internal diameter and flow velocities of the common carotid, internal carotid, and vertebral arteries of 176 consecutive stroke patients were measured. Correlations were examined with Pearson's statistics at an alpha level of 0.05. Mean age of the patients was 59.3 ± 12 years, and 66% had cerebral infarcts. Diameter and blood flow velocities showed significant negative correlations (-0.115 ≥ r ≥ -0.382) in the carotid arteries on both sides, but positive correlations (0.211 ≤ r ≤ 0.320) in the vertebral arteries, even after controlling for age, gender, and blood pressure. Our study demonstrated different diameter/flow relationships in the carotid and the vertebral arteries of stroke patients, which may suggest pathologic changes in the adaptive processes governing vessel diameter and growth, especially in the carotid arteries. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  5. A reason for intermittent fasting to suppress the awakening of dormant breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankelma, Jan; Kooi, Bob; Krab, Klaas; Dorsman, Josephine C; Joenje, Hans; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2015-01-01

    For their growth, dormant tumors, which lack angiogenesis may critically depend on gradients of nutrients and oxygen from the nearest blood vessel. Because for oxygen depletion the distance from the nearest blood vessel to depletion will generally be shorter than for glucose depletion, such tumors will contain anoxic living tumor cells. These cells are dangerous, because they are capable of inducing angiogenesis, which will "wake up" the tumor. Anoxic cells are dependent on anaerobic glucose breakdown for ATP generation. The local extracellular glucose concentration gradient is determined by the blood glucose concentration and by consumption by cells closer to the nearest blood vessel. The blood glucose concentration can be lowered by 20-40% during fasting. We calculated that glucose supply to the potentially hazardous anoxic cells can thereby be reduced significantly, resulting in cell death specifically of the anoxic tumor cells. We hypothesize that intermittent fasting will help to reduce the incidence of tumor relapse via reducing the number of anoxic tumor cells and tumor awakening. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molten material-containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The molten material-containing vessel of the present invention comprises a vessel main body having an entrance opened at the upper end, a lid for closing the entrance, an outer tube having an upper end disposed at the lower surface of the lid, extended downwardly and having an closed lower end and an inner tube disposed coaxially with the outer tube. When a molten material is charged from the entrance to the inside of the vessel main body of the molten material-containing vessel and the entrance is closed by the lid, the outer tube and the inner tube are buried in the molten material in the vessel main body, accordingly, a fluid having its temperature elevated by absorption of the heat of the molten material rises along the inner circumferential surface of the outer tube, abuts against the lower surface of the lid and cooled by exchanging heat with the lid and forms a circulating flow. Since the heat in the molten material is continuously absorbed by the fluid, transferred to the lid and released from the lid to the atmospheric air, heat releasing efficiency can be improved compared with conventional cases. (N.H.)

  7. Blood flow determinations utilizing digital densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lois, F.; Mankovich, N.J.; Gomes, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of obtaining relative and absolute blood flow measurements from digital densitometry was evaluated with a simulated vessel phantom and a hydrodynamic model. A digital vascular imaging system capable of acquisition in 512 2 and 1024 2 mode was used. Relative and absolute blood flow were measured using parameters derived from the densitometric curve. Since application of densitometric data to absolute flow measurements requires the vessel diameter, an algorithm for vessel size determination was created. Gray scale changes were demonstrated to be linearly related to contrast concentration. The variance of vessel size determination was significantly different in all combinations of 1024 2 and 512 2 imaging with 15 cm or 35 cm field size. The error in vessel size determination was significantly less using the larger 1024 2 matrix and the smaller 15 cm image intensifier field size, as shown by the smaller variance. In relative flow determinations, there was good correlation between the flow and four parameters of the densitometric curve with no significant differences between 512 2 and 1024 2 imaging. Absolute flow determinations had slightly lower correlation to actual flow but were not significantly different from relative flow determinations. Relative and absolute blood flow determinations can be performed adequately with either 512 2 or 1024 2 imaging. The increased accuracy in vessel size determination with 1024 2 imaging makes this high resolution system potentially perferable to determine absolute blood flow. (orig.)

  8. CFD and system analysis code investigations of the multidimensional flow mixing phenomena in the reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceuca, S.C.; Herb, J.; Schoeffel, P.J.; Hollands, T.; Austregesilo, H.; Hristov, H.V.

    2017-01-01

    The realistic numerical prediction of transient fluid-dynamic scenarios including the complex, three-dimensional flow mixing phenomena occurring in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) both in normal or abnormal operation are an important issue in today's reactor safety assessment studies. Both Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools as well as fluid-dynamic system analysis codes, each with its advantages and drawbacks, are commonly used to model such transients. Simulation results obtained with the open-source CFD tool-box OpenFOAM and the German thermal-hydraulic system code ATHLET (Analysis of THermal-hydraulics of LEaks and Transients), the later developed by Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) for the analysis of the whole spectrum of operational transients, design-basis accidents and beyond design basis accidents anticipated for nuclear energy facilities, are compared against experimental data from the ROssendorf Coolant Mixing (ROCOM) test facility. In the case of the OpenFOAM CFD simulations the influence of various turbulence models and numerical schemes has been assessed while in the case of the system analysis code ATHLET a multidimensional nodalization recommended for real power plant applications has been employed. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that both OpenFOAM and ATHLET can capture the key flow features of the mixing processes in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). (author)

  9. ErbB2 Pathway Activation upon Smad4 Loss Promotes Lung Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Cho, Sung-Nam; Akkanti, Bindu; Jin, Nili; Mao, Jianqiang; Long, Weiwen; Chen, Tenghui; Zhang, Yiqun; Tang, Ximing; Wistub, Ignacio I; Creighton, Chad J; Kheradmand, Farrah; DeMayo, Francesco J

    2015-03-03

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death. Genome sequencing of lung tumors from patients with squamous cell carcinoma has identified SMAD4 to be frequently mutated. Here, we use a mouse model to determine the molecular mechanisms by which Smad4 loss leads to lung cancer progression. Mice with ablation of Pten and Smad4 in airway epithelium develop metastatic adenosquamous tumors. Comparative transcriptomic and in vivo cistromic analyses determine that loss of PTEN and SMAD4 results in ELF3 and ErbB2 pathway activation due to decreased expression of ERRFI1, a negative regulator of ERBB2 in mouse and human cells. The combinatorial inhibition of ErbB2 and Akt signaling attenuate tumor progression and cell invasion, respectively. Expression profile analysis of human lung tumors substantiated the importance of the ErbB2/Akt/ELF3 signaling pathway as both a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic drug target for treating lung cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Electrical discharge machining for vessel sample removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litka, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Due to aging-related problems or essential metallurgy information (plant-life extension or decommissioning) of nuclear plants, sample removal from vessels may be required as part of an examination. Vessel or cladding samples with cracks may be removed to determine the cause of cracking. Vessel weld samples may be removed to determine the weld metallurgy. In all cases, an engineering analysis must be done prior to sample removal to determine the vessel's integrity upon sample removal. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is being used for in-vessel nuclear power plant vessel sampling. Machining operations in reactor coolant system (RCS) components must be accomplished while collecting machining chips that could cause damage if they become part of the flow stream. The debris from EDM is a fine talclike particulate (no chips), which can be collected by flushing and filtration

  11. Convection in complex shaped vessel; Convection dans des enceintes de forme complexe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The 8 november 2000, the SFT (Societe Francaise de Thermique) organized a technical day on the convection in complex shaped vessels. Nine papers have been presented in the domains of the heat transfers, the natural convection, the fluid distribution, the thermosyphon effect, the steam flow in a sterilization cycle and the transformers cooling. Eight papers are analyzed in ETDE and one paper dealing with the natural convection in spent fuels depository is analyzed in INIS. (A.L.B.)

  12. CNR considerations for rapid real-time MRI tumor tracking in radiotherapy hybrid devices: Effects of B0 field strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachowicz, K.; De Zanche, N.; Yip, E.; Volotovskyy, V.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work examines the subject of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), specifically between tumor and tissue background, and its dependence on the MRI field strength, B 0 . This examination is motivated by the recent interest and developments in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids where real-time imaging can be used to guide treatment beams. The ability to distinguish a tumor from background tissue is of primary importance in this field, and this work seeks to elucidate the complex relationship between the CNR and B 0 that is too often assumed to be purely linear. Methods: Experimentally based models of B 0 -dependant relaxation for various tumor and normal tissues from the literature were used in conjunction with signal equations for MR sequences suitable for rapid real-time imaging to develop field-dependent predictions for CNR. These CNR models were developed for liver, lung, breast, glioma, and kidney tumors for spoiled gradient-echo, balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP), and single-shot half-Fourier fast spin echo sequences. Results: Due to the pattern in which the relaxation properties of tissues are found to vary over B 0 field (specifically the T 1 time), there was always an improved CNR at lower fields compared to linear dependency. Further, in some tumor sites, the CNR at lower fields was found to be comparable to, or sometimes higher than those at higher fields (i.e., bSSFP CNR for glioma, kidney, and liver tumors). Conclusions: In terms of CNR, lower B 0 fields have been shown to perform as well or better than higher fields for some tumor sites due to superior T 1 contrast. In other sites this effect was less pronounced, reversing the CNR advantage. This complex relationship between CNR and B 0 reveals both low and high magnetic fields as viable options for tumor tracking in MRI/radiotherapy hybrids.

  13. Cell Autonomous and Non-Autonomous Functions of IKKβ and NF-κB during the Pathogenesis of Gastrointestinal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Greten, Florian R.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies describing a link between cancer and inflammation have increased recently. Activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its effector pathways has been proposed to be the missing link between these two processes. NF-κB is persistently activated in several types of tumors. However, NF-κB has a distinct role in cancer cells and in inflammatory cells. While in tumor cells NF-κB controls cell survival, in inflammatory cells NF-κB activates genes that encode pro-inflammatory cytokines which further act in a paracrine manner within the tumor microenvironment to contribute to tumorigenesis. Inactivation of NF-κB can also reduce chemoresistance and radioresistance of cancer cells. Therefore, specific NF-κB inhibition in combination with cytotoxic drugs and/or irradiation represents a very promising strategy for cancer therapy

  14. Stress analysis of mixing of non-newtonian flows in cylindrical vessel induced by co-rotating stirrers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, R.A.; Solangi, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of rotational velocity and inertia on velocity gradients and stresses are addressed under present study. The non-Newtonian behaviour of inelastic rotating flows is predicted by employing Power law model. A numerical model has been developed for mixing flow within a cylindrical vessel along a couple of stirrers. A time marching FEM (Finite Element Method) is employed to predict the required solution. Predicted solutions are presented for minimum to maximum values in terms of contour plots of velocity gradients and shear stresses, over the range. The long term application of this research will be used to improve the design of mixers and processing products. The predicted results are used to generate the capability and are in good agreement with numerical results to the mixer design that will ultimately effect the processing of dough products. (author)

  15. Combination of Vessel-Targeting Agents and Fractionated Radiation Therapy: The Role of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Fu, Sheng-Yung; Yang, Ying-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate vascular responses during fractionated radiation therapy (F-RT) and the effects of targeting pericytes or bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) on the efficacy of F-RT. Methods and Materials: Murine prostate TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in control mice or mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM), and irradiated with 60 Gy in 15 fractions. Mice were also treated with gefitinib (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or AMD3100 (a CXCR4 antagonist) to examine the effects of combination treatment. The responses of tumor vasculatures to these treatments and changes of tumor microenvironment were assessed. Results: After F-RT, the tumor microvascular density (MVD) was reduced; however, the surviving vessels were dilated, incorporated with GFP-positive cells, tightly adhered to pericytes, and well perfused with Hoechst 33342, suggesting a more mature structure formed primarily via vasculogenesis. Although the gefitinib+F-RT combination affected the vascular structure by dissociating pericytes from the vascular wall, it did not further delay tumor growth. These tumors had higher MVD and better vascular perfusion function, leading to less hypoxia and tumor necrosis. By contrast, the AMD3100+F-RT combination significantly enhanced tumor growth delay more than F-RT alone, and these tumors had lower MVD and poorer vascular perfusion function, resulting in increased hypoxia. These tumor vessels were rarely covered by pericytes and free of GFP-positive cells. Conclusions: Vasculogenesis is a major mechanism for tumor vessel survival during F-RT. Complex interactions occur between vessel-targeting agents and F-RT, and a synergistic effect may not always exist. To enhance F-RT, using CXCR4 inhibitor to block BM cell influx and the vasculogenesis process is a better strategy than targeting pericytes by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor

  16. The effect of interstitial pressure on tumor growth: coupling with the blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; McDougall, Steven R.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2013-01-01

    The flow of interstitial fluid and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in solid tumors and surrounding host tissues have been identified as critical elements in cancer growth and vascularization. Both experimental and theoretical studies have shown that tumors may present elevated IFP, which can be a formidable physical barrier for delivery of cell nutrients and small molecules into the tumor. Elevated IFP may also exacerbate gradients of biochemical signals such as angiogenic factors released by tumors into the surrounding tissues. These studies have helped to understand both biochemical signaling and treatment prognosis. Building upon previous work, here we develop a vascular tumor growth model by coupling a continuous growth model with a discrete angiogenesis model. We include fluid/oxygen extravasation as well as a continuous lymphatic field, and study the micro-environmental fluid dynamics and their effect on tumor growth by accounting for blood flow, transcapillary fluid flux, interstitial fluid flow, and lymphatic drainage. We thus elucidate further the non-trivial relationship between the key elements contributing to the effects of interstitial pressure in solid tumors. In particular, we study the effect of IFP on oxygen extravasation and show that small blood/lymphatic vessel resistance and collapse may contribute to lower transcapillary fluid/oxygen flux, thus decreasing the rate of tumor growth. We also investigate the effect of tumor vascular pathologies, including elevated vascular and interstitial hydraulic conductivities inside the tumor as well as diminished osmotic pressure differences, on the fluid flow across the tumor capillary bed, the lymphatic drainage, and the IFP. Our results reveal that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity together with poor lymphatic function is the root cause of the development of plateau profiles of the IFP in the tumor, which have been observed in experiments, and contributes to a more uniform

  17. An Automatic Occlusion Device for Remote Control of Tumor Tissue Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dahdah, Hamid; Wang, Bei; He, Guanglong; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-01-01

    We developed an automatic occlusion device for remote control of tumor tissue ischemia. The device consists of a flexible cannula encasing a shape memory alloy wire with its distal end connected to surgical suture. Regional tissue occlusion was tested on both the benchtop and the animal models. In the benchtop test, the occlusion device introduced quantitative and reproducible changes of blood flow in a tissue simulating phantom embedding a vessel simulator. In the animal test, the device generated a cyclic pattern of reversible ischemia in the right hinder leg tissue of a black male C57BL/6 mouse. We also developed a multimodal detector that integrates near infrared spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy for continuous monitoring of tumor tissue oxygenation, blood content, and oxygen tension changes. The multimodal detector was tested on a cancer xenograft nude mouse undergoing reversible tumor ischemia. The automatic occlusion device and the multi-modal detector can be potentially integrated for closed-loop feedback control of tumor tissue ischemia. Such an integrated occlusion device may be used in multiple clinical applications such as regional hypoperfusion control in tumor resection surgeries and thermal ablation processes. In addition, the proposed occlusion device can also be used as a research tool to understand tumor oxygen transport and hemodynamic characteristics. PMID:20082532

  18. Analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer inside calandria vessel of CANDU-6 reactor using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seon Oh; Kim, Man Woong; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-01-01

    In a CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor, fuel channel integrity depends on the coolability of the moderator as an ultimate heat sink under transient conditions such as a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with coincident Loss Of Emergency Core Cooling (LOECC). as well as normal operating conditions. This study presents assessments of moderator thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the normal operating conditions and one transient condition for CANDU-6 reactors, using a general purpose three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code. First, an optimized calculation scheme is obtained by many-sided comparisons of the predicted results with the related experimental data, and by evaluating the fluid flow and temperature distributions. Then, using the optimized scheme, analyses of real CANDU-6 in normal operating conditions and the transition condition have been performed. The present model successfully predicted the experimental results and also reasonably assessed the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a real CANDU-6 with 380 fuel channels. A flow regime map with major parameters representing the flow pattern inside a calandria vessel has also proposed to be used as operational and/or regulatory guidelines

  19. 33 CFR 88.11 - Law enforcement vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX V: PILOT RULES § 88.11 Law enforcement vessels. (a) Law enforcement vessels may display a flashing blue light when engaged in direct law enforcement or public safety activities. This... lights. (b) The blue light described in this section may be displayed by law enforcement vessels of the...

  20. Graywater Discharges from Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    metals (e.g., cadmium, chromium, lead, copper , zinc, silver, nickel, and mercury), solids, and nutrients (USEPA, 2008b; USEPA 2010). Wastewater from... flotation ), and disinfection (using ultraviolet light) as compared to traditional Type II MSDs that use either simple maceration and chlorination, or...Coliform Naval Vessels Oceanographic Vessels Small Cruise Ships 25a Vendor 2 Hamann AG Biological Treatment with Dissolved Air Flotation and

  1. Expression of immunosuppresive B7-H3 ligand by hormone-treated prostate cancer tumors and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavin, Grant; Sheinin, Yuri; Crispen, Paul L; Boorjian, Stephen A; Roth, Timothy J; Rangel, Laureano; Blute, Michael L; Sebo, Thomas J; Tindall, Don J; Kwon, Eugene D; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2009-03-15

    Prostate cancer cells uniformly express the immune cell inhibitory B7-H3 ligand. Enhanced B7-H3 expression correlates with increased disease progression and cancer-specific death after radical prostatectomy (RP). To further assess whether B7-H3 expression is hormone regulated and persists as a viable target during (or after) androgen-ablative therapy, we examined B7-H3 ligand expression within primary and metastatic cancer lesions in response to neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) or palliative hormone deprivation. Tumor B7-H3 in RP specimens from men treated with >/=3 months of NHT was compared with B7-H3 in tumors from matched patients who received no therapy before RP. Hormone-treated and untreated metastatic lesions involving bone were also compared for levels of B7-H3 expression. Of 165 consecutive RP specimens in each cohort studied, sufficient tissues were available for 148 patients (89.7%) treated with NHT versus 127 patients (77.0%) treated with surgery alone. B7-H3 was expressed in 142 (95.9%) tumors from NHT patients compared with 122 (96.0%) tumors from patients treated with surgery alone (P = 0.91). B7-H3 expression intensity in RP specimens was not affected by NHT (P = 0.12). Bone metastases from 11 (32.4%) untreated and 23 (67.6%) androgen-ablated patients revealed that B7-H3 expression increased in response to hormone therapy (P = 0.04) relative to untreated lesions. Taken together, B7-H3 expression seems to remain stable (or may even increase) in response to hormone therapy. As such, B7-H3 may represent an attractive target to improve treatment of men with high-risk hormone-treated or refractory prostate cancer.

  2. The anti-tumor effect of the quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod: blockade of recruitment of CD11b+ Ly6Chi cells to tumor tissue reduces tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deronic, Adnan; Leanderson, Tomas; Ivars, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of the small molecule quinoline-3-carboxamide tasquinimod in pre-clinical cancer models. To better understand the anti-tumor effects of tasquinimod in transplantable tumor models, we have evaluated the impact of the compound both on recruitment of myeloid cells to tumor tissue and on tumor-induced myeloid cell expansion as these cells are known to promote tumor development. Mice bearing subcutaneous 4 T1 mammary carcinoma tumors were treated with tasquinimod in the drinking water. A BrdU-based flow cytometry assay was utilized to assess the impact of short-term tasquinimod treatment on myeloid cell recruitment to tumors. Additionally, long-term treatment was performed to study the anti-tumor effect of tasquinimod as well as its effects on splenic myeloid cells and their progenitors. Myeloid cell populations were also immune-depleted by in vivo antibody treatment. Short-term tasquinimod treatment did not influence the proliferation of splenic Ly6C hi and Ly6G hi cells, but instead reduced the influx of Ly6C hi cells to the tumor. Treatment with tasquinimod for various periods of time after tumor inoculation revealed that the anti-tumor effect of this compound mainly operated during the first few days of tumor growth. Similar to tasquinimod treatment, antibody-mediated depletion of Ly6C hi cells within that same time frame, caused reduced tumor growth, thereby confirming a significant role for these cells in tumor development. Additionally, long-term tasquinimod treatment reduced the splenomegaly and expansion of splenic myeloid cells during a later phase of tumor development. In this phase, tasquinimod normalized the tumor-induced alterations in myeloerythroid progenitor cells in the spleen but had only limited impact on the same populations in the bone marrow. Our results indicate that tasquinimod treatment reduces tumor growth by operating early after tumor

  3. Generation of erythroid cells from polyploid giant cancer cells: re-thinking about tumor blood supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhigang; Yao, Hong; Fei, Fei; Li, Yuwei; Qu, Jie; Li, Chunyuan; Zhang, Shiwu

    2018-04-01

    During development and tumor progression, cells need a sufficient blood supply to maintain development and rapid growth. It is reported that there are three patterns of blood supply for tumor growth: endothelium-dependent vessels, mosaic vessels, and vasculogenic mimicry (VM). VM was first reported in highly aggressive uveal melanomas, with tumor cells mimicking the presence and function of endothelial cells forming the walls of VM vessels. The walls of mosaic vessels are randomly lined with both endothelial cells and tumor cells. We previously proposed a three-stage process, beginning with VM, progressing to mosaic vessels, and eventually leading to endothelium-dependent vessels. However, many phenomena unique to VM channel formation remain to be elucidated, such as the origin of erythrocytes before VM vessels connect with endothelium-dependent vessels. In adults, erythroid cells are generally believed to be generated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. In contrast, embryonic tissue obtains oxygen through formation of blood islands, which are largely composed of embryonic hemoglobin with a higher affinity with oxygen, in the absence of mature erythrocytes. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that embryonic blood-forming mechanisms also exist in cancer tissue, particularly when these tissues are under environmental stress such as hypoxia. We review the evidence from induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro and in vivo to support this previously underappreciated cell functionality in normal and cancer cells, including the ability to generate erythroid cells. We will also summarize the current understanding of tumor angiogenesis, VM, and our recent work on polyploid giant cancer cells, with emphasis on their ability to generate erythroid cells and their association with tumor growth under hypoxia. An alternative embryonic pathway to obtain oxygen in cancer cells exists, particularly when they are under hypoxic conditions.

  4. Affinity for {sup 57}Co-Vitamin B{sub 12} by a wide histologic variety of tumor types in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, M. H.; Park, S. A.; Kim, S. H.; Jeong, K. H.; Lim, C. Y. [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    The search for tumor-avid agents for use in nuclear medicine imaging is an ongoing field of importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the affinity for radiolabeled vitamin B{sub 12} by a wide histologic variety of tumor types in mice. Seventeen different types of tumor were grown subcutaneously in female Balb/C or Balb nu/nu(nude) mice. When the tumors reached about 1 cm in diameter, mice were injected intraperitoneally with {sup 57}Co-vitamin B{sub 12}. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were sacrificed. Organs and tissues were removed, weighed, and activity per mg determined by gamma counter. Values represented cpm/mg tissue that was normalized to 20 grams body weight for each mouse. A wide variety of tumor types showed significant uptake and concentration of {sup 57}Co-vitamin B{sub 12}, as evidenced by tumor:tissue activity ratios. For many tissues of great importance in terms of background (bone, muscle, blood), the tumor:tissue activity ratios of uptake were high. These data strongly suggest that further efforts to evaluate the utility of radiolabeled adducts of vitamin B{sub 12} for clinical use in oncologic imaging are warranted.

  5. Thermofluid experiments for Fusion Reactor Safety. Visualization of exchange flows through breaches of a vacuum vessel in a fusion reactor under the LOVA condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Sadao; Shibazaki, Hiroaki; Takase, Kazuyuki; Kunugi, Tomoaki.

    1997-01-01

    Exchange flow rates through breaches of a vacuum vessel in a fusion reactor under the LOVA (Loss of VAcuum event) conditions were measured quantitatively by using a preliminary LOVA apparatus and exchange flow patterns over the breach were visualized qualitatively by smoke. Velocity distributions in the exchange flows were predicted from the observed flow patterns by using the correlation method in the flow visualization procedures. Mean velocities calculated from the predicted velocity distributions at the outside of the breach were in good agreement with the LOVA experimental results when the exchange flow velocities were low. It was found that the present flow visualization and the image processing system might be an useful procedure to evaluate the exchange flow rates. (author)

  6. Evaluation of In-Vessel Corium Retention under a Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae-Joon; Kang, Kyung-Ho; Ha, Kwang-Soon; Kim, Jong-Tae; Koo, Kil-Mo; Cho, Young-Ro; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Sang-Baik; Kim, Hee-Dong

    2008-02-15

    The current study on In-Vessel corium Retention and its application activities to the actual nuclear power plant have been reviewed and discussed in this study. Severe accident sequence which determines an initial condition of the IVR has been evaluated and late phase melt progression, heat transfer on the outer reactor vessel, and in-vessel corium cooling mechanism have been estimated in detail. During the high pressure sequence of the reactor coolant system, a natural circulation flow of the hot steam leads to a failure of the pressurizer surge line before the reactor vessel failure, which leads to a rapid decrease of the reactor coolant system pressure. The results of RASPLAV/MASCA study by OECD/NEA have shown that a melt stratification has occurred in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel. In particular, laver inversion has occurred, which is that a high density of the metal melt moves to the lower part of the oxidic melt layer. A method of heat transfer enhancement on the outer reactor vessel is an optimal design of the reactor vessel insulation for an increase of the natural circulation flow between the outer reactor vessel and the its insulation, and an increase of the critical Heat flux on the outer reactor vessel by using various method, such as Nono fluid, coated reactor vessel, and so on. An increase method of the in-vessel melt cooling is a development of the In-vessel core catcher and a decrease of focusing effect in the metal layer.

  7. Distribution of Vascular Patterns in Different Subtypes of Renal Cell Carcinoma. A Morphometric Study in Two Distinct Types of Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; García-Bustos, V; Granero, E; Cuesta, S; Sales, M A; Marcos, V; Llombart-Bosch, A

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the presence of mature and immature vessels as a prognostic factor in patients with renal cell carcinoma and propose a classification of renal cancer tumor blood vessels according to morphometric parameters. Tissue samples were obtained from 121 renal cell carcinoma patients who underwent radical nephrectomy. Staining with CD31 and CD34 was used to differentiate between immature (CD31+) and mature (CD34+) blood vessels. We quantified the microvascular density, microvascular area and different morphometric parameters: maximum diameter, minimum diameter, major axis, minor axis, perimeter, radius ratio and roundness. We found that the microvascular density was higher in CD31+ than CD34+ vessels, but CD34+ vessels were larger than CD31+ vessels, as well as being strongly correlated with the ISUP tumor grade. We also identified four vascular patterns: pseudoacinar, fascicular, reticular and diffuse. Pseudoacinar and fascicular patterns were more frequent in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (37.62 and 35.64% respectively), followed by reticular pattern (21.78%), while in chromophobe tumors the reticular pattern predominated (90%). The isolated pattern was present in all papillary tumors (100%). In healthy renal tissue, the pseudoacinar and isolated patterns were differentially found in the renal cortex and medulla respectively. We defined four distinct vascular patterns significantly related with the ISUP tumor grade in renal cell carcinomas. Further studies in larger series are needed in order to validate these results. Analysis of both mature and immature vessels (CD34+ and CD31+) provides additional information when evaluating microvascular density.

  8. Flow characteristics of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in a vessel stirred by a 60° pitched blade impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid M. Nouri

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Mean and rms velocity characteristics of two Newtonian flows at Reynolds numbers of 12,800 (glycerin solution and 48,000 (water and of a non-Newtonian flow (0.2% CMC solution, at a power number similar to the Newtonian glycerin flow in a mixing vessel stirred by a 60° pitched blade impeller have been measured by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV. The velocity measurements, resolved over 360° and 1.08° of impeller rotation, showed that the mean flow of the two power number matched glycerin and CMC flows were similar to within 3% of the impeller tip velocity and the turbulence intensities generally lower in the CMC flow by up to 5% of the tip velocity. The calculated mean flow quantities showed similar discharge coefficient and pumping efficiency in all three flows and similar strain rate between the two power number matched glycerin and CMC flows; the strain rate of the higher Reynolds number Newtonian flow was found to be slightly higher. The energy balance around the impeller indicated that the CMC flow dissipated up to 9% more of the total input power and converted 7% less into the turbulence compared to the glycerin flow with the same power input which could lead to less effective mixing processes where the micro-mixing is important.

  9. Thermal Behavior of the Reactor Vessel Penetration Under External Vessel Cooling During a Severe Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Rae-Joon; Kim, Jong-Tae; Min, Byung-Tae; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Sang-Baik

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies on the thermal behavior of reactor vessel penetration have been performed under external vessel cooling during a severe accident in the Korean next-generation reactor APR1400. Two types of tests, SUS-EXT and SUS-DRY with and without external vessel cooling, respectively, have been performed using sustained heating by an induction heater. Three tests have been carried out varying the cooling conditions at the vessel outer surface in the SUS-EXT tests. The experimental results have been thermally estimated using the LILAC computer code. The experimental results indicate that the inner surface of the vessel was ablated by the 45-mm thickness in the SUS-DRY test. Despite the total ablation of the welding material, the penetration was not ejected outside the vessel, which could be attributed to the thermal expansion of the penetration. Unlike the SUS-DRY test, the thickness of the ablation was ∼15 to 20 mm at most, so the welding was preserved in the SUS-EXT tests. It is concluded from the experimental results that the external vessel cooling highly affected the ablation configuration and the thermal behaviors of the vessel and the penetration. An increase in coolant mass flow rate from 0.047 to 0.152 kg/s had effects on the thermal behavior of the lower head vessel and penetration in the SUS-EXT tests. The LILAC analytical results on temperature distribution and ablation depth in the lower head vessel and penetration were very similar to the experimental results

  10. Reactors with pressure vessel in pre-stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Christian; Lafore, Pierre

    1964-12-01

    After having proposed a general description of the evolution of the general design of reactors with a vessel in pre-stressed concrete, this report outlines the interest of this technical solution of a vessel in pre-stressed concrete with integrated exchangers, which is to replace steel vessel. This solution is presented as much safer. The authors discuss the various issues related to protection: inner and outer biological protection of the vessel, material protection (against heating, steel irradiation, Wigner effect, and moderator radiolytic corrosion). They report the application of calculation methods: calculation of vessel concrete heating, study of the intermediate zone in integrated reactors, neutron spectrum and flows in the core of a graphite pile

  11. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balduino Keli N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Results Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. Conclusions This study indicates that

  12. Anti-tumor therapy with macroencapsulated endostatin producer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Danielle B; Chammas, Roger; Malavasi, Natália V; da Costa, Patrícia L N; Chura-Chambi, Rosa M; Balduino, Keli N; Morganti, Ligia

    2010-03-02

    Theracyte is a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane macroencapsulation system designed to induce neovascularization at the tissue interface, protecting the cells from host's immune rejection, thereby circumventing the problem of limited half-life and variation in circulating levels. Endostatin is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Continuous delivery of endostatin improves the efficacy and potency of the antitumoral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recombinant fibroblasts expressing endostatin encapsulated in Theracyte immunoisolation devices can be used for delivery of this therapeutic protein for treatment of mice bearing B16F10 melanoma and Ehrlich tumors. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with melanoma (B16F10 cells) or Ehrlich tumor cells at the foot pads. Treatment began when tumor thickness had reached 0.5 mm, by subcutaneous implantation of 107 recombinant encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin producer cells. Similar melanoma growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated or non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells. The treatment of mice bearing melanoma tumor with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells was decreased by 50.0%, whereas a decrease of 56.7% in tumor thickness was obtained for mice treated with non-encapsulated cells. Treatment of Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice with non-encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells reduced tumor thickness by 52.4%, whereas lower tumor growth inhibition was obtained for mice treated with encapsulated endostatin-expressing cells: 24.2%. Encapsulated endostatin-secreting fibroblasts failed to survive until the end of the treatment. However, endostatin release from the devices to the surrounding tissues was confirmed by immunostaining. Decrease in vascular structures, functional vessels and extension of the vascular area were observed in melanoma microenvironments. This study indicates that immunoisolation devices containing endostatin

  13. Tumoral Environment Triggers Transcript Anomalies in Established Tumors: Induction of Altered Gene Expression and of Aberrant, Truncated and B2 Repeat-Containing Gene Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Rottiers

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to eugenetic changes, cancerous cells exhibit extensive modifications in the expression levels of a variety of genes. The phenotypic switch observed after inoculation of T lymphoma cells into syngenic mice illustrates the active participation of tumoral environment in the induction of an aberrant gene expression pattern. To further substantiate this contribution, we performed polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based subtraction suppression hybridization (SSH to identify genes that are differentially expressed in tumor-derived EL4/13.3 cells compared to the same cells isolated from cultures. Besides a number of unknown genes, the subtracted library contained several known genes that have been reported to be expressed at increased levels in tumors and/or to contribute to carcinogenesis. Apart from clones representing translated transcripts, the subtracted library also contained a high number of clones representing B2 repeat elements, viz. short interspersed repetitive elements that are transcribed by RNA polymerase III. Northern blotting confirmed the induction of B2 transcripts in tumor tissue and also revealed induction of chimeric, B2 repeat-containing mRNA. The appearance of chimeric transcripts was accompanied by aberrant, shorter-than-full-length transcripts, specifically from upregulated genes. Accordingly, in addition to altered gene expression, tumoral environmental triggers constitute a potent mechanism to create an epigenetic diversity in cancers by inducing extensive transcript anomalies.

  14. Time-resolved assessment of collateral flow using 4D CT angiography in large-vessel occlusion stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, Andreas M.J.; Wolff, Sarah Lena; Psychogios, Marios N.; Schramm, Ramona; Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Peter; Klotz, Ernst; Wasser, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    In acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, collateral blood flow affects tissue fate and patient outcome. The visibility of collaterals on computed tomography angiography (CTA) strongly depends on the acquisition phase, but the optimal time point for collateral imaging is unknown. We analysed collaterals in a time-resolved fashion using four-dimensional (4D) CTA in 82 endovascularly treated stroke patients, aiming to determine which acquisition phase best depicts collaterals and predicts outcome. Early, peak and late phases as well as temporally fused maximum intensity projections (tMIP) were graded using a semiquantitative regional leptomeningeal collateral score, compared with conventional single-phase CTA and correlated with functional outcome. The total extent of collateral flow was best visualised on tMIP. Collateral scores were significantly lower on early and peak phase as well as on single-phase CTA. Collateral grade was associated with favourable functional outcome and the strength of this relationship increased from earlier to later phases, with collaterals on tMIP showing the strongest correlation with outcome. Temporally fused tMIP images provide the best depiction of collateral flow. Our findings suggest that the total extent of collateral flow, rather than the velocity of collateral filling, best predicts clinical outcome. (orig.)

  15. [Hemodynamic phenomena in retrobulhar and eyeball vessels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzejewska, Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to evaluate factors connected with blood flow and indices regulating vascular diameter and some parameters influencing retrobulbar circulation such as type of vascular resistance, anatomical structure of vascular wall and vessel lumen. Neurogenic and angiogenic factors, rheological blood composition, presence of anatomical and pathological obstructions on blood flow pathway as well as degree of development of collateral circulation pathways--have influence on the volume and blood flow velocity in eyeball. There were discussed bulbar circulation hemodynamics, emphasizing the importance of perfusion pressure. The role of risk factors was underlined for pathological lesions in vessels supplying blood to eyeball and in ophthalmic artery (OA) and its collaterals, in central retinal artery (CRA) as well as posterior ciliary arteries (PCAs), and in venous system carrying away blood from eye. IN CONCLUSION--the results of many studies of retrobulbar blood flow in different types of ophthalmic diseases of the vascular etiopathogenesis indicate that registry of the mean values of blood flow parameters and vascular resistance indices parallel to measurement of blood flow spectrum in OA, CRA, PCAs arteries, might contribute much information to explain or to evaluate nature of pathological changes in retinal and choroidal circulation.

  16. The retrograde transverse cervical artery as a recipient vessel for free tissue transfer in complex head and neck reconstruction with a vessel-depleted neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, Pedro; Agko, Mouchammed; Manrique, Oscar J; Date, Shivprasad; Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Chang, Wei Ling; Nicoli, Fabio; Lo Torto, Federico; Maruccia, Michele; Orfaniotis, Georgios; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2017-11-01

    Reconstruction in a vessel-depleted neck is challenging. The success rates can be markedly decreased because of unavailability of suitable recipient vessels. In order to obtain a reliable flow, recipient vessels away from the zone of fibrosis, radiation, or infection need to be explored. The aim of this report is to present our experience and clinical outcomes using the retrograde flow coming from the distal transverse cervical artery (TCA) as a source for arterial inflow for complex head and neck reconstruction in patients with a vessel-depleted neck. Between July 2010 and June 2016, nine patients with a vessel-depleted neck underwent secondary head and neck reconstruction using the retrograde TCA as recipient vessel for microanastomosis. The mean age was 49.6 years (range, 36 to 68 years). All patients had previous bilateral neck dissections and all, except one, had also received radiotherapy. Indications included neck contracture release (n = 3), oral (n = 1), mandibular (n = 3) and pharyngoesophageal (n = 2) reconstruction necessitating free anterolateral thigh (n = 3) and medial sural artery (n = 1) perforator flaps, fibula (n = 3) and ileocolon (n = 2) flaps respectively. There was 100% flap survival rate with no re-exploration or any partial flap loss. One case of intra-operative arterial vasospasm at the anastomotic suture line was managed intra-operatively with vein graft interposition. There were no other complications or donor site morbidity during the follow-up period. In a vessel-depleted neck, the reverse flow of the TCA may be a reliable option for complex secondary head and neck reconstruction in selected patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. EDF studies on PWR vessel internal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellet, S.; Vallat, S.

    1998-01-01

    EDF has undertaken some mechanics and thermal-hydraulics studies with the objective of mastering plant phenomena today and in order to numerically predict the behaviour of vessel internals on units planned for the future. From some justifications already underway after in operation incidents (wear and drop time of RCCA rods, fuel deflection, adapter cracks, baffle bolt cracks) we intend to control reactor vessel flows and mechanical behaviour of internal structures. During normal operation, thermal-hydraulic is the main load of vessel internals. The current approach consists of acquiring the capacity to link different calculations, taking care that codes are qualified for physical phenomena and complex 3D geometries. For baffle assembly, a more simple model of this structure has been used to treat the physical phenomena linked to the LOCA transient. Results are encouraging mainly due to code capacity progression (resolution and models), which allows more and more complex physical phenomena to be treated, like turbulence flow and LOCA. (author)

  18. Vessel dilatation in coronary angiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterauer, L.; Goebel, N.

    1983-01-01

    Amongst 166 patients with aneurysms, ectasia or megaloarteries shown on coronary angiograms, 86.1% had dilated vessels as part of generalised coronary sclerosis (usually in patients with three-vessel disease). In 9%, dilatation was of iatrogenic origin and in 4.8% it was idiopathic. One patient had Marfan's syndrome. Amongst 9 000 patients, there were eight with megalo-arteries without stenosis; six of these had atypical angina and three suffered an infarct. Patients with definite dilatation of the coronary artery and stagnation of contrast flow required treatment. (orig.) [de

  19. Vessel dilatation in coronary angiograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterauer, L.; Goebel, N.

    1983-11-01

    Amongst 166 patients with aneurysms, ectasia or megaloarteries shown on coronary angiograms, 86.1% had dilated vessels as part of generalised coronary sclerosis (usually in patients with three-vessel disease). In 9%, dilatation was of iatrogenic origin and in 4.8% it was idiopathic. One patient had Marfan's syndrome. Amongst 9 000 patients, there were eight with megalo-arteries without stenosis; six of these had atypical angina and three suffered an infarct. Patients with definite dilatation of the coronary artery and stagnation of contrast flow required treatment.

  20. Expression and significance of TRAIL and NF-kB in osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Xiumin; You Murong; Qi Falian; Hu Chengjin

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between expressions of TRAIL, NF-kB and cell proliferation in human osteosarcomas, the expressions of TRAIL and NF-kB in 16 cases of osteosarcoma, 5 cases of giant cell tumor of bone and 6 cases of chondrosarcoma were studied by flow cytometry. The expressions of TRAIL and NF-kB in osteosarcomas of different differentiation states were higher than those in other two kinds of tumors significantly in our study(P 0.05). The expressions of TRAIL and NF-kB in chondrosarcoma and giant cell tumor of bone were not different significantly(P>0.05). The higher expression of TRAIL in osteosarcoma with different differentiation states could not induce apoptosis because of the higher expression of NF-kB. NF-kB may restrain the apoptosis of tumor cells by regulating the NF-kB- induced apoptosis path way in osteosarcoma. (authors)

  1. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4 + CD49b + LAG-3 + T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25 + Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10 + Foxp3 - CD4 + T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  2. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mirzaei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma, 5637 (bladder tumor and U-87MG (brain tumor cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion.

  3. CD4+ and Perivascular Foxp3+ T Cells in Glioma Correlate with Angiogenesis and Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Mu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAngiogenesis and immune cell infiltration are key features of gliomas and their manipulation of the microenvironment, but their prognostic significance remains indeterminate. We evaluate the interconnection between tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL and tumor blood-vasculatures in the context of glioma progression.MethodsPaired tumor tissues of 44 patients from three tumor-recurrent groups: diffuse astrocytomas (DA recurred as DA, DA recurred as glioblastomas (GBM, and GBM recurred as GBM were evaluated by genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry for tumor blood vessel density, TIL subsets, and clinical outcomes. These cells were geographically divided into perivascular and intratumoral TILs. Associations were examined between these TILs, CD34+ tumor blood vessels, and clinical outcomes. To determine key changes in TIL subsets, microarray data of 15-paired tumors from patients who failed antiangiogenic therapy- bevacizumab, and 16-paired tumors from chemo-naïve recurrent GBM were also evaluated and compared.ResultsUpon recurrence in primary gliomas, similar kinetic changes were found between tumor blood vessels and each TIL subset in all groups, but only CD4+ including Foxp3+ TILs, positively correlated with the density of tumor blood vessels. CD4 was the predominant T cell population based on the expression of gene-transcripts in primary GBMs, and increased activated CD4+ T cells were revealed in Bevacizumab-resistant recurrent tumors (not in chemo-naïve recurrent tumors. Among these TILs, 2/3 of them were found in the perivascular niche; Foxp3+ T cells in these niches not only correlated with the tumor vessels but were also an independent predictor of shortened recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR = 4.199, 95% CI 1.522–11.584, p = 0.006.ConclusionThe minimal intratumoral T cell infiltration and low detection of CD8 transcripts expression in primary GBMs can potentially limit antitumor response. CD4+ and perivascular Foxp3

  4. Flow model study of 'Monju' reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaguchi, Kimihide

    1980-01-01

    In the case of designing the structures in nuclear reactors, various problems to be considered regarding thermo-hydrodynamics exist, such as the distribution of flow quantity and the pressure loss in reactors and the thermal shock to inlet and outlet nozzles. In order to grasp the flow characteristics of coolant in reactors, the 1/2 scale model of the reactor structure of ''Monju'' was attached to the water flow testing facility in the Oarai Engineering Center, and the simulation experiment has been carried out. The flow characteristics in reactors clarified by experiment and analysis so far are the distribution of flow quantity between high and low pressure regions in reactors, the distribution of flow quantity among flow zones in respective regions of high and low pressure, the pressure loss in respective parts in reactors, the flow pattern and the mixing effect of coolant in upper and lower plenums, the effect of the twisting angle of inlet nozzles on the flow characteristics in lower plenums, the effect of internal cylinders on the flow characteristics in upper plenums and so on. On the basis of these test results, the improvement of the design of structures in reactors was made, and the confirmation test on the improved structures was carried out. The testing method, the calculation method, the test results and the reflection to the design of actual machines are described. (Kako, I.)

  5. HIFU procedures at moderate intensities-effect of large blood vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, P; Myers, M R; Banerjee, R K

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational model is presented for studying the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedures targeted near large blood vessels. The analysis applies to procedures performed at intensities below the threshold for cavitation, boiling and highly nonlinear propagation, but high enough to increase tissue temperature a few degrees per second. The model is based upon the linearized KZK equation and the bioheat equation in tissue. In the blood vessel the momentum and energy equations are satisfied. The model is first validated in a tissue phantom, to verify the absence of bubble formation and nonlinear effects. Temperature rise and lesion-volume calculations are then shown for different beam locations and orientations relative to a large vessel. Both single and multiple ablations are considered. Results show that when the vessel is located within about a beam width (few mm) of the ultrasound beam, significant reduction in lesion volume is observed due to blood flow. However, for gaps larger than a beam width, blood flow has no major effect on the lesion formation. Under the clinically representative conditions considered, the lesion volume is reduced about 40% (relative to the no-flow case) when the beam is parallel to the blood vessel, compared to about 20% for a perpendicular orientation. Procedures involving multiple ablation sites are affected less by blood flow than single ablations. The model also suggests that optimally focused transducers can generate lesions that are significantly larger (>2 times) than the ones produced by highly focused beams

  6. HIFU procedures at moderate intensities-effect of large blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariharan, P [Mechanical, Industrial, and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Myers, M R [Division of Solid and Fluid Mechanics, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Building 62, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002 (United States); Banerjee, R K [Mechanical, Industrial, and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-07-21

    A three-dimensional computational model is presented for studying the efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) procedures targeted near large blood vessels. The analysis applies to procedures performed at intensities below the threshold for cavitation, boiling and highly nonlinear propagation, but high enough to increase tissue temperature a few degrees per second. The model is based upon the linearized KZK equation and the bioheat equation in tissue. In the blood vessel the momentum and energy equations are satisfied. The model is first validated in a tissue phantom, to verify the absence of bubble formation and nonlinear effects. Temperature rise and lesion-volume calculations are then shown for different beam locations and orientations relative to a large vessel. Both single and multiple ablations are considered. Results show that when the vessel is located within about a beam width (few mm) of the ultrasound beam, significant reduction in lesion volume is observed due to blood flow. However, for gaps larger than a beam width, blood flow has no major effect on the lesion formation. Under the clinically representative conditions considered, the lesion volume is reduced about 40% (relative to the no-flow case) when the beam is parallel to the blood vessel, compared to about 20% for a perpendicular orientation. Procedures involving multiple ablation sites are affected less by blood flow than single ablations. The model also suggests that optimally focused transducers can generate lesions that are significantly larger (>2 times) than the ones produced by highly focused beams.

  7. Enrichment of tumor cells for cell kinetic analysis in human tumor biopsies using cytokeratin gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, K.; Hofland, I.; Ramaekers, M.; Ivanyi, D.; Balm, A.J.M.; Geboes, K.; Lerut, T.; Schueren, E. van der; Begg, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using cytokeratin antibodies to distinguish normal and malignant cells in human tumors using flow cytometry. The goal was ultimately to increase the accuracy of cell kinetic measurements on human tumor biopsies. Material and methods: A panel of four antibodies was screened on a series of 48 tumors from two centres; 22 head and neck tumors (Amsterdam) and 26 esophagus carcinomas (Leuven). First, screening was carried out by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections to test intensity of staining and the fraction of cytokeratin-positive tumor cells. The antibody showing the most positive staining was then used for flow cytometry on the same tumor. Results: The two broadest spectrum antibodies (AE1/AE3, E3/C4) showed overall the best results with immunohistochemical staining, being positive in over 95% of tumors. Good cell suspensions for DNA flow cytometry could be made from frozen material by a mechanical method, whereas enzymatic methods with trypsin or collagenase were judged failures in almost all cases. >From fresh material, both collagenase and trypsin produced good suspensions for flow cytometry, although the fraction of tumor cells, judged by proportion aneuploid cells, was markedly higher for trypsin. Using the best cytokeratin antibody for each tumor, two parameter flow cytometry was done (cytokeratin versus DNA content). Enrichment of tumor cells was then tested by measuring the fraction of aneuploid cells (the presumed malignant population) of cytokeratin-positive cells versus all cells. An enrichment factor ranging between 0 (no enrichment) and 1 (perfect enrichment, tumor cells only) was then calculated. The average enrichment was 0.60 for head and neck tumors and 0.59 for esophagus tumors. Conclusions: We conclude that this method can substantially enrich the proportion of tumor cells in biopsies from carcinomas. Application of this method could significantly enhance accuracy of tumor cell kinetic measurements

  8. The influence of P-glycoprotein expression and its inhibitors on the distribution of doxorubicin in breast tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Krupa J; Tannock, Ian F

    2009-01-01

    Anti-cancer drugs access solid tumors via blood vessels, and must penetrate tumor tissue to reach all cancer cells. Previous studies have demonstrated steep gradients of decreasing doxorubicin fluorescence with increasing distance from blood vessels, such that many tumor cells are not exposed to drug. Studies using multilayered cell cultures show that increased P-glycoprotein (PgP) is associated with better penetration of doxorubicin, while PgP inhibitors decrease drug penetration in tumor tissue. Here we evaluate the effect of PgP expression on doxorubicin distribution in vivo. Mice bearing tumor sublines with either high or low expression of PgP were treated with doxorubicin, with or without pre-treatment with the PgP inhibitors verapamil or PSC 833. The distribution of doxorubicin in relation to tumor blood vessels was quantified using immunofluorescence. Our results indicate greater uptake of doxorubicin by cells near blood vessels in wild type as compared to PgP-overexpressing tumors, and pre-treatment with verapamil or PSC 833 increased uptake in PgP-overexpressing tumors. However, there were steeper gradients of decreasing doxorubicin fluorescence in wild-type tumors compared to PgP overexpressing tumors, and treatment of PgP overexpressing tumors with PgP inhibitors led to steeper gradients and greater heterogeneity in the distribution of doxorubicin. PgP inhibitors increase uptake of doxorubicin in cells close to blood vessels, have little effect on drug uptake into cells at intermediate distances, and might have a paradoxical effect to decrease doxorubicin uptake into distal cells. This effect probably contributes to the limited success of PgP inhibitors in clinical trials

  9. Tumor Imaging in Patients with Advanced Tumors Using a New 99mTc-Radiolabeled Vitamin B12 Derivative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sah, Bert-Ram; Schibli, Roger; Waibel, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Targeting cancer cells with vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is hampered by unwanted physiologic tissue uptake mediated by transcobalamin. Adhering to good manufacturing practice, we have developed a new (99m)Tc-cobalamin derivative ((99m)Tc(CO)3-[(4-amido-butyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyl-amino-acetato] cobalamin......, (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin). The derivative shows no binding to transcobalamin but is recognized by haptocorrin, a protein present in the circulation and notably expressed in many tumor cells. In this prospective study, we investigated cancer-specific uptake of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin in 10 patients...... with various metastatic tumors. METHODS: Ten patients with biopsy-proven metastatic cancer were included. Dynamic imaging was started immediately after injection of 300-500 MBq of (99m)Tc-PAMA-cobalamin, and whole-body scintigrams were obtained at 10, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min and after 24 h. The relative tumor...

  10. Test of 6-in.-thick pressure vessels. Series 3: intermediate test vessel V-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Holz, P.P.; Smith, J.E.; Bryan, R.H.

    1976-08-01

    The test of intermediate test vessel V-7 was a crack-initiation fracture test of a 152-mm-thick (6-in.), 990-mm-OD (39-in.) vessel of ASTM A533, grade B, class 1 steel plate with a sharp outside surface flaw 457 mm (18 in.) long and about 135 mm (5.3 in.) deep. The vessel was heated to 91 0 C (196 0 F) and pressurized hydraulically until leakage through the flaw terminated the test at a peak pressure of 147 MPa (21,350 psi). Fracture toughness data obtained by testing precracked Charpy-V and compact-tension specimens machined from a prolongation of the cylindrical test shell were used in pretest analyses of the flawed vessel. The vessel, as expected, did not burst. Upon depressurization, the ruptured ligament closed so as to maintain static pressure without leakage at about 129 MPa

  11. Safety and efficacy of Y-90 microsphere treatment in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer: The tumor selectivity of the treatment as a function of tumor to liver flow ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezarn William A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment records and follow-up data on 40 patients with primary and metastatic liver malignancies who underwent a single whole-liver treatment with Y-90 resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres® Sirtex Medical, Lake Forest, IL were retrospectively reviewed. The objective of the study was to evaluate the anatomic and physiologic determinants of radiation dose distribution, and the dose response of tumor and liver toxicity in patients with liver malignancies who underwent hepatic arterial Y-90 resin microsphere treatment. Methods Liver and tumor volume calculations were performed on pre-treatment CT scans. Fractional tumor and liver flow characteristics and lung shunt fractions were determined using hepatic arterial Tc-99m MAA imaging. Absorbed dose calculations were performed using the MIRD equations. Liver toxicity was assessed clinically and by liver function tests. Tumor response to therapy was assessed by CT and/or tumor markers. Results Of the 40 patients, 5 had hepatocellular cancer (HCC, and 35 had metastatic liver tumors (15 colorectal cancer, 10 neuroendocrine tumors, 4 breast cancer, 2 lung cancer, 1 ovarian cancer, 1 endometrial cancer, and 2 unknown primary adenocarcinoma. All patients were treated in a salvage setting with a 3 to 80 week follow-up (mean: 19 weeks. Tumor volumes ranged from 15.0 to 984.2 cc (mean: 294.9 cc and tumor to normal liver uptake ratios ranged from 2.8 to 15.4 (mean: 5.4. Average administered activity was 1.2 GBq (0.4 to 2.4 GBq. Liver absorbed doses ranged from 0.7 to 99.5 Gy (mean: 17.2 Gy. Tumor absorbed doses ranged from 40.1 to 494.8 Gy (mean: 121.5 Gy. None of the patients had clinical venoocclusive disease or therapy-induced liver failure. Seven patients (17.5 % had transient and 7 patients (17.5 % had persistent LFT abnormalities. There were 27 (67.5% responders (complete response, partial response, and stable disease. Tumor response correlated with higher tumor flow ratio as measured by

  12. Functional and morphological effects of diazepam and midazolam on tumor vasculature in the 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nuo Yan,1 Yuzhen Zheng,2 Cheng Yang1 1Second Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital to Logistics University of PAP, Tianjin, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin, China Abstract: Antiangiogenic therapy attenuates tumor growth by reducing vascularization. Diazepam (DZP and midazolam (MZL have antiangiogenic properties in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Thus, we investigated the antiangiogenic activity of DZP and MZL in the rat 9L gliosarcoma brain tumor model. The effect on tumor vasculature was evaluated using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging with gradient-echo (GE and spin-echo (SE to assess perfusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV, cerebral blood flow (CBF, mean transit time (MTT, and mean vessel diameter. The GE-normalized CBF (nCBF in the tumors of untreated controls was significantly lower than that in normal brain tissue, whereas the CBV and MTT were higher. DZP- and MZL-treated rats had higher CBF and lower CBV and MTT values than did untreated controls. The tumor size decreased significantly to 33.5% in DZP-treated rats (P<0.001 and 22.5% in MZL-treated rats (P<0.01 relative to controls. The SE-normalized CBV was lower in DZP-treated (32.9% and MZL-treated (10.6% rats compared with controls. The mean vessel diameter decreased significantly by 32.5% in DPZ-treated and by 24.9% in MZL-treated rats compared with controls (P<0.01. The GE and SE nCBF values were higher in DZP-treated (49.9% and 40.1%, respectively and MZL-treated (41.2% and 32.1%, respectively rats than in controls. The GE- and SE-normalized MTTs were lower in DZP-treated (48.2% and 59.8%, respectively and MZL-treated (40.5% and 51.2%, respectively rats than in controls. Both DZP and MZL had antiangiogenic effects on tumor perfusion and vasculature; however, the antiangiogenic activity of DZP is more promising than that of MZL. Keywords: diazepam, midazolam, 9L gliosarcoma

  13. Device for accurately measuring mass flow of gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, James O.; Remenyik, Carl J.

    1994-01-01

    A device for measuring mass flow of gases which utilizes a substantially buoyant pressure vessel suspended within a fluid/liquid in an enclosure. The pressure vessel is connected to a weighing device for continuously determining weight change of the vessel as a function of the amount of gas within the pressure vessel. In the preferred embodiment, this pressure vessel is formed from inner and outer right circular cylindrical hulls, with a volume between the hulls being vented to the atmosphere external the enclosure. The fluid/liquid, normally in the form of water typically with an added detergent, is contained within an enclosure with the fluid/liquid being at a level such that the pressure vessel is suspended beneath this level but above a bottom of the enclosure. The buoyant pressure vessel can be interconnected with selected valves to an auxiliary pressure vessel so that initial flow can be established to or from the auxiliary pressure vessel prior to flow to or from the buoyant pressure vessel.

  14. Cold source vessel development for the advanced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), will be a user-oriented neutron research facility that will produce the most intense flux of neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the productions of cold neutrons is a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410 mm diameter sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design are being performed with multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This paper presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that will be used to verify the final design.

  15. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B) expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xiulong; Rao, Geetha S; Groh, Veronika; Spies, Thomas; Gattuso, Paolo; Kaufman, Howard L; Plate, Janet; Prinz, Richard A

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B) are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51 Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and ELISA, respectively. Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production

  16. Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A/B (MICA/B expression in tumor tissue and serum of pancreatic cancer: Role of uric acid accumulation in gemcitabine-induced MICA/B expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufman Howard L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A and B (MICA/B are two stress-inducible ligands that bind the immunoreceptor NKG2D and play an important role in mediating the cyotoxicity of NK and T cells. In this study, we sought to study MICA/B expression in pancreatic cancer and to determine whether and how genotoxic drugs such as gemcitabine can affect MICA/B expression and natural killer cytotoxity. Methods Seven pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for MICA/B expression by flow cytometry and for their sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing by a 51Cr release assay. MICA/B expression in tumor tissues and sera of pancreatic cancer was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining (IHC and ELISA, respectively. Results Two MICA/B-positive cell lines were sensitive to the cytotoxic activity of NK-92 cells. Other two MICA/B-positive cell lines and three MICA/B-negative cell lines were resistant to NK-92 cell killing. MICA/B expression was positive in 17 of 25 (68% pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas but not in normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Serum MICA/B levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinomas but did not correlate with the stage of pancreatic cancer and patient survival. Gemcitabine therapy led to increased serum MICA levels in 6 of 10 patients with detectable serum MICA. Allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidoreductase that converts xanthine to uric acid, blocked uric acid production, MICA/B expression, and sensitivity to NK-92 cell killing toward a PANC-1 cancer cell line exposed to radiation and two genotoxic drugs, gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Conclusions The levels of MICA/B expression in serum and tissue of pancreatic cancer are elevated. DNA damage-induced MICA/B expression is mediated through increased uric acid production.

  17. Cell-cycle-dependent drug-resistant quiescent cancer cells induce tumor angiogenesis after chemotherapy as visualized by real-time FUCCI imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously demonstrated that quiescent cancer cells in a tumor are resistant to conventional chemotherapy as visualized with a fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI). We also showed that proliferating cancer cells exist in a tumor only near nascent vessels or on the tumor surface as visualized with FUCCI and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumor vessels. In the present study, we show the relationship between cell-cycle phase and chemotherapy-induced tumor angiogenesis using in vivo FUCCI real-time imaging of the cell cycle and nestin-driven GFP to detect nascent blood vessels. We observed that chemotherapy-treated tumors, consisting of mostly of quiescent cancer cells after treatment, had much more and deeper tumor vessels than untreated tumors. These newly-vascularized cancer cells regrew rapidly after chemotherapy. In contrast, formerly quiescent cancer cells decoyed to S/G2 phase by a telomerase-dependent adenovirus did not induce tumor angiogenesis. The present results further demonstrate the importance of the cancer-cell position in the cell cycle in order that chemotherapy be effective and not have the opposite effect of stimulating tumor angiogenesis and progression. PMID:27715464

  18. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, Yvette; Klier, Ulrike; Linnebacher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4 + , activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI + carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  19. Design and performance tests of gas circulation heating of JT-60U vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yotsuga, M.; Masuzaki, T.; Sago, H.; Nishikane, M.; Uchikawa, T.; Iritani, Y.; Murakami, T.; Horiike, H.; Neyatani, Y.; Ninomiya, H.; Matsukawa, M.; Ando, T.; Miyachi, I.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that in the final stage of construction of the upgraded JT-60 device (JT-60U), baking tests of the vacuum vessel was performed. The vessel torus was heated-up to 300 degrees C by means of the nitrogen gas circulation system and electric heaters mounted on the outboard solid wall of the vessel. The design of the gas flow channels inside the double-wall structure of the vessel was done based on flow model tests, fluid analysis, and flow network analysis. The results of the baking tests were satisfactory. In maintaining 300 degrees C bake-out temperature, required heating power of the gas circulation system and outboard heaters was 520kW and 50kW, respectively. The temperature distribution over the vessel wall was within 300 ± 30 degrees C. It was also shown or suggested that heat-up and cool-down time is about 30 hours. The baking tests data have been reflected on operations for plasma experiments

  20. WE-E-17A-01: Characterization of An Imaging-Based Model of Tumor Angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikarla, V; Jeraj, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the transient dynamics of tumor oxygenation is important when evaluating tumor-vasculature response to anti-angiogenic therapies. An imaging-based tumor-vasculature model was used to elucidate factors that affect these dynamics. Methods: Tumor growth depends on its doubling time (Td). Hypoxia increases pro-angiogenic factor (VEGF) concentration which is modeled to reduce vessel perfusion, attributing to its effect of increasing vascular permeability. Perfused vessel recruitment depends on the existing perfused vasculature, VEGF concentration and maximum VEGF concentration (VEGFmax) for vessel dysfunction. A convolution-based algorithm couples the tumor to the normal tissue vessel density (VD-nt). The parameters are benchmarked to published pre-clinical data and a sensitivity study evaluating the changes in the peak and time to peak tumor oxygenation characterizes them. The model is used to simulate changes in hypoxia and proliferation PET imaging data obtained using [Cu- 61]Cu-ATSM and [F-18]FLT respectively. Results: Td and VD-nt were found to be the most influential on peak tumor pO2 while VEGFmax was marginally influential. A +20 % change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax resulted in +50%, +25% and +5% increase in peak pO2. In contrast, Td was the most influential on the time to peak oxygenation with VD-nt and VEGFmax playing marginal roles. A +20% change in Td, VD-nt and VEGFmax increased the time to peak pO2 by +50%, +5% and +0%. A −20% change in the above parameters resulted in comparable decreases in the peak and time to peak pO2. Model application to the PET data was able to demonstrate the voxel-specific changes in hypoxia of the imaged tumor. Conclusion: Tumor-specific doubling time and vessel density are important parameters to be considered when evaluating hypoxia transients. While the current model simulates the oxygen dynamics of an untreated tumor, incorporation of therapeutic effects can make the model a potent tool for analyzing

  1. Numerical modelling of the influence of stromal cells on tumor growth and angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiyama, Nobuyuki; Nagayama, Katsuya

    2018-01-01

    According to the statistics provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare the death of one in 3.5 Japanese people is attributed to tumor highlighting the need for active research on malignant tumors. Early detection can be cited as a countermeasure against malignant tumors, but it is often difficult to observe the growth process, and thorough understanding of the phenomena will aid in more efficient detection of such tumors. A malnourished benign tumor may create new blood vessels from existing ones and proliferate abnormally by absorbing nutrients from these newly created blood vessels to become malignant. Different factors influence the shape of tumors and shape is an important factor in evaluating their malignancy. Because interstitial cells greatly influence tumor growth, investigating the influence of stromal cells on tumor growth will help in developing a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  2. Effect of Irradiation on Tumor Microenvironment and Bone Marrow Cell Migration in a Preclinical Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, Jonathan L. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Hanna, Alaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Raffel, Thomas R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Wilson, George D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian, E-mail: Brian.Marples@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To characterize the tumor microenvironment after standard radiation therapy (SRT) and pulsed radiation therapy (PRT) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) allografts. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous LLC tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice. Standard RT or PRT was given at 2 Gy/d for a total dose of 20 Gy using a 5 days on, 2 days off schedule to mimic clinical delivery. Radiation-induced tumor microenvironment changes were examined after treatment using flow cytometry and antibody-specific histopathology. Normal tissue effects were measured using noninvasive {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography after naïve animals were given whole-lung irradiation to 40 Gy in 4 weeks using the same 2-Gy/d regimens. Results: Over the 2 weeks of therapy, PRT was more effective than SRT at reducing tumor growth rate (0.31 ± 0.02 mm{sup 3}/d and 0.55 ± 0.04 mm{sup 3}/d, respectively; P<.007). Histopathology showed a significant comparative reduction in the levels of Ki-67 (14.5% ± 3%), hypoxia (10% ± 3.5%), vascular endothelial growth factor (2.3% ± 1%), and stromal-derived factor-1α (2.5% ± 1.4%), as well as a concomitant decrease in CD45{sup +} bone marrow–derived cell (BMDC) migration (7.8% ± 2.2%) after PRT. The addition of AMD3100 also decreased CD45{sup +} BMDC migration in treated tumors (0.6% ± 0.1%). Higher vessel density was observed in treated tumors. No differences were observed in normal lung tissue after PRT or SRT. Conclusions: Pulsed RT–treated tumors exhibited slower growth and reduced hypoxia. Pulsed RT eliminated initiation of supportive mechanisms utilized by tumors in low oxygen microenvironments, including angiogenesis and recruitment of BMDCs.

  3. Acrylic vessel cleaning tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, D.; Hahn, R.L.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The acrylic vessel as constructed is dirty. The dirt includes blue tape, Al tape, grease pencil, gemak, the glue or residue form these tapes, finger prints and dust of an unknown composition but probably mostly acrylic dust. This dirt has to be removed and once removed, the vessel has to be kept clean or at least to be easily cleanable at some future stage when access becomes much more difficult. The authors report on the results of a series of tests designed: (a) to prepare typical dirty samples of acrylic; (b) to remove dirt stuck to the acrylic surface; and (c) to measure the optical quality and Th concentration after cleaning. Specifications of the vessel call for very low levels of Th which could come from tape residues, the grease pencil, or other sources of dirt. This report does not address the concerns of how to keep the vessel clean after an initial cleaning and during the removal of the scaffolding. Alconox is recommended as the cleaner of choice. This acrylic vessel will be used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  4. Increased tumor uptake of 67Ga citrate following a course of picibanil (NSC-B116209)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Shinichi; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Mishina, Hitoshi.

    1979-01-01

    Exposure to exponential dose schedules of OK-432, penicillin-inactivated preparation of streptococcus hemolyticus (NSC-B116209), resulted in an increased retention of 67 Ga citrate. Its uptake in footpad tumors of AH 109A was also increased. The results may suggest that pretreatment with OK-432 would increase tumor uptake of 67 Ga citrate and help scintigraphic delineation of malignancies in man. It may probably augment tumor concentration of anticancer chemotherapeutics, too. Thus, the tumor affinitive property of OK-432 can be taken advantage of in anticancer strategy as well as cancer detection by 67 Ga scanning. (author)

  5. Aptamer-Mediated Codelivery of Doxorubicin and NF-κB Decoy Enhances Chemosensitivity of Pancreatic Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Porciani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers able to bind efficiently cell-surface receptors differentially expressed in tumor and in healthy cells are emerging as powerful tools to perform targeted anticancer therapy. Here, we present a novel oligonucleotide chimera, composed by an RNA aptamer and a DNA decoy. Our assembly is able to (i target tumor cells via an antitransferrin receptor RNA aptamer and (ii perform selective codelivery of a chemotherapeutic drug (Doxorubicin and of an inhibitor of a cell-survival factor, the nuclear factor κB decoy oligonucleotide. Both payloads are released under conditions found in endolysosomal compartments (low pH and reductive environment. Targeting and cytotoxicity of the oligonucleotidic chimera were assessed by confocal microscopy, cell viability, and Western blot analysis. These data indicated that the nuclear factor κB decoy does inhibit nuclear factor κB activity and ultimately leads to an increased therapeutic efficacy of Doxorubicin selectively in tumor cells.

  6. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 2 Characterizes TLR9-Driven Formation of Interleukin-10-Producing B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ticha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available B cell-derived interleukin-10 (IL-10 production has been described as a hallmark for regulatory function in B lymphocytes. However, there is an ongoing debate on the origin of IL-10-secreting B cells and lack of specific surface markers has turned into an important obstacle for studying human B regulatory cells. In this study, we propose that tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2 expression can be used for enrichment of IL-10-secreting B cells. Our data confirm that IL-10 production can be induced by TLR9 stimulation with CpG ODN and that IL-10 secretion accompanies differentiation of peripheral blood B cells into plasma blasts. We further show that CpG ODN stimulation induces TNFR2 expression, which correlates with IL-10 secretion and terminal differentiation. Indeed, flow cytometric sorting of TNFR2+ B cells revealed that TNFR2+ and TNFR2− fractions correspond to IL-10+ and IL-10− fractions, respectively. Furthermore, CpG-induced TNFR2+ B cells were predominantly found in the IgM+ CD27+ B cell subset and spontaneously released immunoglobulin. Finally, our data corroborate the functional impact of TNFR2 by demonstrating that stimulation with a TNFR2 agonist significantly augments IL-10 and IL-6 production in B cells. Altogether, our data highlight a new role for TNFR2 in IL-10-secreting human B lymphocytes along with the potential to exploit this finding for sorting and isolation of this currently ill-defined B cell subset.