WorldWideScience

Sample records for tumor response moderne

  1. Christian Responses to Modern Slavery

    OpenAIRE

    Reaves, Jayme

    2007-01-01

    Exhibited at the second Glucksman Memorial Symposium on June 13th 2007 This research project explores the theological and ethical issues around modern slavery and movements to abolish it. Topics include: human trafficking; human rights; racism; theological language and doctrines; Christian ethics, values and social practice.

  2. Modern concepts for basic radiobiological factors characterizing tumor tissue radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocheva, L.; Sergieva, K.

    2002-01-01

    Traditionally radiotherapy is prescribed at doses consistent with the expected therapeutic response and tolerance of tumor and normal tissues without consideration to individual differences in radiosensitivity. However, the basic radiobiological knowledge and clinical experience along this line point to significant variations in the observed therapeutic results. It has been established that cells and tissues under experimental and clinical conditions manifest a wide spectrum of individual radiosensitivity. The aim of this survey is to outline the current concepts for the basic radiobiological factors influencing tumor radiosensitivity. A thorough discussion is done of the essence, mechanisms of action, methods of determination and measurement, and effect on the prognosis in patients with malignant diseases of a number of radiobiological factors, such as: tumor-cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor hypoxia and neovascularization. Although the knowledge of the mechanisms of radiosensitivity is constantly expanding, its clinical implementation is still rather limited. The true role of radiosensitivity in predicting the therapeutic response should be more accurately defined. (authors)

  3. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  4. Ecological Modernization and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Tomiello

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the role of social and environmental enterprises revealed in the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and analyzed in the light of Ecological Modernization Theory (TME.The overall objective of this study is to understand CSR from the perspectiveof TME through more detailed research of a CSR program called  Clube dos Produtores [Producers Club].This program aims to influence the supply chain to adopt responsible and sustainable practices, and seeks to strengthen the small and medium producers through structured actions, such as training, qualification, and inspection, stimulating quality, innovation and productivity growth. It is conducted in parallel, in Portugal, by the Rede Sonae de Distribuição and, in Brazil, by Walmart Company. The data collection included both Countries. In Portugal, the Clube dos Produtores has emerged to combine the synergy between distribution and production and promote the development of domestic production. It takes the environment as the genesis for its creation, maintains a nationalist approach by encouraging the consumption of domestic products, and recognizes consumer pressure as the force for continuous innovation of products and services. In addition, it reconciles tradition and modernity through products supported by different generations. In Brazil, the Club is founded on the sustainability discourse; the customer awareness about environmental issues was not captured in the research; the producers innovations result from their own initiatives to participate in fairs or from direct contact with consumers; the dialogue between tradition and modernity occurs primarily through the entrepreneurial capacity of the producers and less direct intervention by Walmart.

  5. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  6. Social responsibility as modern conception of business

    OpenAIRE

    Vorona, E.

    2010-01-01

    Research of social responsibility is conducted in the context of theory of socialization of the economic systems. Approaches are considered to essence of concept «Social responsibility». The positive consequences of realization of social responsibility and its connection are certain with a competitiveness and efficiency

  7. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  8. Radiological evaluation of tumor response in oncological studies (tumor response evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, B.; Riess, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiological-morphological response evaluation plays a major role in oncological therapy and studies for approval. Specific criteria have been developed for some tumor entities and chemotherapeutics. Application, limitations and definitions of the most frequently used criteria for tumor response evaluation will be presented. Materials and Methods: Review based on a selective literature research. Results: In clinical oncological therapy studies, WHO and RECIST are the most frequently used criteria to evaluate morphological therapy response. RECIST criteria have been modified recently, especially with respect to the evaluation of lymph nodes, and were published as RECIST 1.1 in 2009. All criteria were originally developed and defined to review clinical multicenter trials for approval. Using these criteria in a clinical situation, certain limitations have to be considered. To evaluate response, a baseline scan before therapy start is mandatory. Special tumor response criteria have been defined for some certain tumor entities. Oncologists and radiologists should define in advance which criteria are used before starting therapy. Conclusion: The use of defined criteria is very important in oncology response evaluation. In-depth knowledge of the criteria and their limits is required for correct usage. (orig.)

  9. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: tumor response to sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacchiotti Silvia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMCS is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of uncertain differentiation, characterized in most cases by a translocation that results in the fusion protein EWSR1-CHN (the latter even called NR4A3 or TEC. EMCS is marked by >40% incidence of metastases in spite of its indolent behaviour. It is generally resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and, to the best of our knowledge, no data have been reported to date about the activity of tirosin-kinase inhibitor (TKI in this tumor. We report on two consecutive patients carrying an advanced EMCS treated with sunitinib. Methods Since July 2011, 2 patients with progressive pretreated metastatic EMCS (Patient1: woman, 58 years, PS1; Patient2: man, 63 years, PS1 have been treated with continuous SM 37.5 mg/day, on an individual use basis. Both patients are evaluable for response. In both cases diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of the typical EWSR1-CHN translocation. Results Both patients are still on treatment (11 and 8 months. Patient 1 got a RECIST response after 4 months from starting sunitinib, together with a complete response by PET. An interval progression was observed after stopping sunitinib for toxicity (abscess around previous femoral fixation, but response was restored after restarting sunitinib. Patient 2 had an initial tumor disease stabilization detected by CT scan at 3 months. Sunitinib was increased to 50 mg/day, with evidence of a dimensional response 3 months later. Conclusions Sunitinib showed antitumor activity in 2 patients with advanced EMCS. Further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

  10. Multimodal OCT for complex assessment of tumors response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Matveev, Lev A.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Vitkin, Alex; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2017-07-01

    Multimodal OCT is a promising tool for monitoring of individual tumor response to antitumor therapies. The changes of tumor cells, connective tissue, microcirculation and stiffness can be estimated simultaneously in real time with high resolution.

  11. Periostin Limits Tumor Response to VEGFA Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklikoglou, Ioanna; Kadioglu, Ece; Bissinger, Stefan; Langlois, Benoît; Bellotti, Axel; Orend, Gertraud; Ries, Carola H; De Palma, Michele

    2018-03-06

    Resistance to antiangiogenic drugs limits their applicability in cancer therapy. Here, we show that revascularization and progression of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) under extended vascular-endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) blockade are dependent on periostin (POSTN), a matricellular protein expressed by stromal cells. Genetic deletion of Postn in RIP1-Tag2 mice blunted tumor rebounds of M2-like macrophages and αSMA + stromal cells in response to prolonged VEGFA inhibition and suppressed PNET revascularization and progression on therapy. POSTN deficiency also impeded the upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an adaptive mechanism previously implicated in PNET evasion from antiangiogenic therapy. Higher POSTN expression correlated with markers of M2-like macrophages in human PNETs, and depleting macrophages with a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) antibody inhibited PNET revascularization and progression under VEGFA blockade despite continued POSTN production. These findings suggest a role for POSTN in orchestrating resistance to anti-VEGFA therapy in PNETs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periostin Limits Tumor Response to VEGFA Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Keklikoglou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antiangiogenic drugs limits their applicability in cancer therapy. Here, we show that revascularization and progression of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs under extended vascular-endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA blockade are dependent on periostin (POSTN, a matricellular protein expressed by stromal cells. Genetic deletion of Postn in RIP1-Tag2 mice blunted tumor rebounds of M2-like macrophages and αSMA+ stromal cells in response to prolonged VEGFA inhibition and suppressed PNET revascularization and progression on therapy. POSTN deficiency also impeded the upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2, an adaptive mechanism previously implicated in PNET evasion from antiangiogenic therapy. Higher POSTN expression correlated with markers of M2-like macrophages in human PNETs, and depleting macrophages with a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R antibody inhibited PNET revascularization and progression under VEGFA blockade despite continued POSTN production. These findings suggest a role for POSTN in orchestrating resistance to anti-VEGFA therapy in PNETs.

  13. Radiation effects on tumor-specific DTH response, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobusawa, Hiroshi; Hachisu, Reiko.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor-specific immunity was induced in C3H mice by immunizing with syngeneic MH134 hepatoma cells. Radiation sensitivity of anti-tumor activity of immunized spleen cells were examined and compared with the radiation sensitivity of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-response. The spleen cells were irradiated in vitro, then mixed with the tumor cells. DTH-response intensity was determined from the footpad increment twenty-four hours after inoculation of tumor cells with immunized spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of the spleen cells, based on growth inhibition of tumor cells, was measured by a cytostatic test in vivo with diffusion chambers. Tumor-specific DTH response was suppressed dose-dependently in the range of 12-24 Gy irradiation. No suppression was observed below 12 Gy. Without irradiation, growth of tumor cells was inhibited by immunized spleen cells more effectively than by normal spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of immunized and normal spleen cells was diminished by irradiation doses of 20 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively. Comparing our report with others that analyzed the type of anti-tumor effector cells induced in this experimental system, we concluded that tumor-specific anti-tumor activity (tumor growth inhibition in vivo) that was radiosensitive at 10-20 Gy depended on a DTH-response. (author)

  14. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in human tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, A.; Peters, H.; Croix, B. St.; Haroon, Z.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Strausberg, R.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Riggins, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is associated with a more malignant tumor phenotype and worse prognosis. To obtain a blood supply and protect against cellular damage and death, oxygen-deprived cells in tumors alter gene expression, resulting in resistance to therapy.

  15. Modern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Bagrov

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of the most important problems of modern meteoric astronomy and briefly describes ways and methods of their solutions. Particular attention is paid to the construction and arrangement of meteoric video cameras intended for registration of the meteoric phenomena as the main method of obtaining reliable and objective observational data on the basis of which the solution of the described tasks is possible.

  16. A deterministic and stochastic model for the system dynamics of tumor-immune responses to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Qingze; Pan, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Modern medical studies show that chemotherapy can help most cancer patients, especially for those diagnosed early, to stabilize their disease conditions from months to years, which means the population of tumor cells remained nearly unchanged in quite a long time after fighting against immune system and drugs. In order to better understand the dynamics of tumor-immune responses under chemotherapy, deterministic and stochastic differential equation models are constructed to characterize the dynamical change of tumor cells and immune cells in this paper. The basic dynamical properties, such as boundedness, existence and stability of equilibrium points, are investigated in the deterministic model. Extended stochastic models include stochastic differential equations (SDEs) model and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model, which accounts for the variability in cellular reproduction, growth and death, interspecific competitions, and immune response to chemotherapy. The CTMC model is harnessed to estimate the extinction probability of tumor cells. Numerical simulations are performed, which confirms the obtained theoretical results.

  17. Tumor Response to Radiotherapy Regulated by Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Barros, Monica; Paris, Francois; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lyden, David; Rafii, Shahin; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2003-05-01

    About 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy. Here we investigated the hypothesis that tumor response to radiation is determined not only by tumor cell phenotype but also by microvascular sensitivity. MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16F1 melanomas grown in apoptosis-resistant acid sphingomyelinase (asmase)-deficient or Bax-deficient mice displayed markedly reduced baseline microvascular endothelial apoptosis and grew 200 to 400% faster than tumors on wild-type microvasculature. Thus, endothelial apoptosis is a homeostatic factor regulating angiogenesis-dependent tumor growth. Moreover, these tumors exhibited reduced endothelial apoptosis upon irradiation and, unlike tumors in wild-type mice, they were resistant to single-dose radiation up to 20 grays (Gy). These studies indicate that microvascular damage regulates tumor cell response to radiation at the clinically relevant dose range.

  18. Clinical implications of heterogeneity of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.; Skates, S.; Taghian, A.; Okunieff, P.; Efird, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneity of response of tumor tissue to radiation clearly exists. Major parameters include histopathologic type, size (number of tumor rescue units (TRUs)), hemoglobin concentration, cell proliferation kinetics and immune rejection reaction by host. Further, normal and presumably tumor tissue response is altered in certain genetic diseases, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. Any assessment of response of tumor tissue to a new treatment method or the testing of a new clinical response predictor is optimally based upon a narrow strata, viz., uniform with respect to known parameters of response, e.g. size, histological type. Even among tumors of such a clinical defined narrow strata, there will be residual heterogeneity with respect to inherent cellular radiation sensitivity, distributions of pO 2 , (SH), cell proliferation, etc. (author). 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Immunological considerations of modern animal models of malignant primary brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C David

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent advances in animal models of glioma have facilitated a better understanding of biological mechanisms underlying gliomagenesis and glioma progression. The limitations of existing therapy, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, have prompted numerous investigators to search for new therapeutic approaches to improve quantity and quality of survival from these aggressive lesions. One of these approaches involves triggering a tumor specific immune response. However, a difficulty in this approach is the the scarcity of animal models of primary CNS neoplasms which faithfully recapitulate these tumors and their interaction with the host's immune system. In this article, we review the existing methods utilized to date for modeling gliomas in rodents, with a focus on the known as well as potential immunological aspects of these models. As this review demonstrates, many of these models have inherent immune system limitations, and the impact of these limitations on studies on the influence of pre-clinical therapeutics testing warrants further attention.

  20. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, Vincent A.; Zhao Dawen; Gilio, Joseph; Chang, C.-H.; Jiang Lan; Hahn, Eric W.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm 3 ) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) than their smaller counterparts ( 3 ). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO 2 , and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO 2 > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy

  1. Part of tumor markers in the evaluation of tumor response to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, C.; Desmedt, M.

    1994-01-01

    When present, the tumor markers reflect the clinical evolution of the malignant lesions. We present here their variations in relation to the antitumor treatment and demonstrate that the marker reflects quite well the tumor response and constitutes an additional monitoring for the clinician. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  2. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy

  4. Indian, Japanese, And U.S. Responses To Chinese Submarine Modernization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited INDIAN, JAPANESE ...DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INDIAN, JAPANESE , AND U.S. RESPONSES TO CHINESE SUBMARINE MODERNIZATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...is unlimited INDIAN, JAPANESE , AND U.S. RESPONSES TO CHINESE SUBMARINE MODERNIZATION David E. Kiser Lieutenant Commander, United States

  5. Peripheral tumors alter neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyter, Leah M; El Mouatassim Bih, Sarah; Sattar, Husain; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-03-13

    Cancer is associated with an increased prevalence of depression. Peripheral tumors induce inflammatory cytokine production in the brain and depressive-like behaviors. Mounting evidence indicates that cytokines are part of a pathway by which peripheral inflammation causes depression. Neuroinflammatory responses to immune challenges can be exacerbated (primed) by prior immunological activation associated with aging, early-life infection, and drug exposure. This experiment tested the hypothesis that peripheral tumors likewise induce neuroinflammatory sensitization or priming. Female rats with chemically-induced mammary carcinomas were injected with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250μg/kg; i.p.), and expression of mRNAs involved in the pathway linking inflammation and depression (interleukin-1beta [Il-1β], CD11b, IκBα, indolamine 2,3-deoxygenase [Ido]) was quantified by qPCR in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and frontal cortex, 4 or 24h post-treatment. In the absence of LPS, hippocampal Il-1β and CD11b mRNA expression were elevated in tumor-bearing rats, whereas Ido expression was reduced. Moreover, in saline-treated rats basal hypothalamic Il-1β and CD11b expression were positively correlated with tumor weight; heavier tumors, in turn, were characterized by more inflammatory, necrotic, and granulation tissue. Tumors exacerbated CNS proinflammatory gene expression in response to LPS: CD11b was greater in hippocampus and frontal cortex of tumor-bearing relative to tumor-free rats, IκBα was greater in hippocampus, and Ido was greater in hypothalamus. Greater neuroinflammatory responses in tumor-bearing rats were accompanied by attenuated body weight gain post-LPS. The data indicate that neuroinflammatory pathways are potentiated, or primed, in tumor-bearing rats, which may exacerbate future negative behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eDemaria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T-cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy that are being tested in the clinic.

  7. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaria, Sandra [Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: sandra.demaria@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has been demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy which are being tested in the clinic.

  8. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has been demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy which are being tested in the clinic.

  9. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Vincent A [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Dawen, Zhao [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gilio, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chang, C -H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lan, Jiang [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hahn, Eric W [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mason, Ralph P [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm{sup 3}) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) than their smaller counterparts (<1.5 cm{sup 3}). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO{sub 2}, and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO{sub 2} > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy.

  10. Tumor PDT-associated immune response: relevance of sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Separovic, Duska M.

    2010-02-01

    Sphingolipids have become recognized as essential effector molecules in signal transduction with involvement in various aspects of cell function and death, immune response and cancer treatment response. Major representatives of sphingolipids family, ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), have attracted interest in their relevance to tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) because of their roles as enhancers of apoptosis, mediators of cell growth and vasculogenesis, and regulators of immune response. Our recent in vivo studies with mouse tumor models have confirmed that PDT treatment has a pronounced impact on sphingolipid profile in the targeted tumor and that significant advances in therapeutic gain with PDT can be attained by combining this modality with adjuvant treatment with ceramide analog LCL29.

  11. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifies. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement required from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  12. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifiers. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  13. Fatty acid synthase - Modern tumor cell biology insights into a classical oncology target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Douglas; Duke, Gregory; Heuer, Timothy S; O'Farrell, Marie; Wagman, Allan S; McCulloch, William; Kemble, George

    2017-09-01

    Decades of preclinical and natural history studies have highlighted the potential of fatty acid synthase (FASN) as a bona fide drug target for oncology. This review will highlight the foundational concepts upon which this perspective is built. Published studies have shown that high levels of FASN in patient tumor tissues are present at later stages of disease and this overexpression predicts poor prognosis. Preclinical studies have shown that experimental overexpression of FASN in previously normal cells leads to changes that are critical for establishing a tumor phenotype. Once the tumor phenotype is established, FASN elicits several changes to the tumor cell and becomes intertwined with its survival. The product of FASN, palmitate, changes the biophysical nature of the tumor cell membrane; membrane microdomains enable the efficient assembly of signaling complexes required for continued tumor cell proliferation and survival. Membranes densely packed with phospholipids containing saturated fatty acids become resistant to the action of other chemotherapeutic agents. Inhibiting FASN leads to tumor cell death while sparing normal cells, which do not have the dependence of this enzyme for normal functions, and restores membrane architecture to more normal properties thereby resensitizing tumors to killing by chemotherapies. One compound has recently reached clinical studies in solid tumor patients and highlights the need for continued evaluation of the role of FASN in tumor cell biology. Significant advances have been made and much remains to be done to optimally apply this class of pharmacological agents for the treatment of specific cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Emerging Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in Tumor Immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Hélène; Vetters, Jessica; Moudombi, Lyvia; Caux, Christophe; Janssens, Sophie; Michallet, Marie-Cécile

    2017-07-01

    Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis results in ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This response alleviates cell stress, and is activated in both tumor cells and tumor infiltrating immune cells. The UPR plays a dual function in cancer biology, acting as a barrier to tumorigenesis at the premalignant stage, while fostering cancer maintenance in established tumors. In infiltrating immune cells, the UPR has been involved in both immunosurveillance and immunosuppressive functions. This review aims to decipher the role of the UPR at different stages of tumorigenesis and how the UPR shapes the balance between immunosurveillance and immune escape. This knowledge may improve existing UPR-targeted therapies and the design of novel strategies for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated genomics of ovarian xenograft tumor progression and chemotherapy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Brodsky, Alexander S; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H; Hillenmeyer, Sara; Kim, Kyu K; Ritz, Anna; Singh, Rakesh K; Raphael, Benjamin J; Brard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer with a very poor prognosis. Xenograft mouse models have proven to be one very useful tool in testing candidate therapeutic agents and gene function in vivo. In this study we identify genes and gene networks important for the efficacy of a pre-clinical anti-tumor therapeutic, MT19c. In order to understand how ovarian xenograft tumors may be growing and responding to anti-tumor therapeutics, we used genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA copy number measurements to identify key genes and pathways that may be critical for SKOV-3 xenograft tumor progression. We compared SKOV-3 xenografts treated with the ergocalciferol derived, MT19c, to untreated tumors collected at multiple time points. Cell viability assays were used to test the function of the PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone, on SKOV-3 cell growth. These data indicate that a number of known survival and growth pathways including Notch signaling and general apoptosis factors are differentially expressed in treated vs. untreated xenografts. As tumors grow, cell cycle and DNA replication genes show increased expression, consistent with faster growth. The steroid nuclear receptor, PPARγ, was significantly up-regulated in MT19c treated xenografts. Surprisingly, stimulation of PPARγ with Rosiglitazone reduced the efficacy of MT19c and cisplatin suggesting that PPARγ is regulating a survival pathway in SKOV-3 cells. To identify which genes may be important for tumor growth and treatment response, we observed that MT19c down-regulates some high copy number genes and stimulates expression of some low copy number genes suggesting that these genes are particularly important for SKOV-3 xenograft growth and survival. We have characterized the time dependent responses of ovarian xenograft tumors to the vitamin D analog, MT19c. Our results suggest that PPARγ promotes survival for some ovarian tumor cells. We propose that a combination of regulated expression and copy number

  16. Response to commentaries: modernity and narcissistic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Joel

    2014-04-01

    Replies to comments by Twenge, Miller, and Campbell (see record 2014-16207-001), Trull (see record 2014-16207-002), and Wright (see record 2014-16207-003) on the original article by Paris (see record 2012-18549-001) on the topic of narcissism and modernity. The current author would like to thank all three commentators for focusing on points in the original article that need clarification. Wright (2014) underlines the problem of precisely defining narcissism, arguing that research cannot progress until we agree on the meaning of the construct. Trull (2014) makes the useful point that cohort changes in narcissism do not translate into changes in the prevalence of NPD. Finally, Twenge, Miller, and Campbell (2014) are leaders in the empirical study of narcissism and NPD. The current author is pleased that they agree with some of his conclusions. However, they should not consider the case for dramatic increases in trait narcissism to be settled.

  17. Fibrinolytic response to tumor necrosis factor in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Büller, H. R.; van Deventer, S. J.; de Boer, J. P.; Hack, C. E.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be involved in the disturbance of the procoagulant-fibrinolytic balance in septicemia, leading to microvascular thrombosis. To assess the dynamics of the fibrinolytic response to TNF in humans, we performed a crossover saline-controlled study in six healthy men,

  18. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator

  19. Canine tumor and normal tissue response to heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; McChesney, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas of dogs were treated with either irradiation alone or combined with hyperthermia. Tumor control was assessed as no evidence of disease one year following treatment. Dogs were randomized to variable radiation doses which were given in ten fractions three times a week for three weeks. Heat was given three hours after the first and third radiation dose each week for seven treatments. The attempt was made to achieve a minimum tumor temperature of 42 0 C for thirty minutes with a maximum normal tissue temperature of 40 0 C. It was usually possible to selectively heat tumors. The TCD 50 for irradiation alone was about 400 rads greater than for heat plus irradiation. The dose response curve for heat plus radiation was much steeper than for radiation alone indicating less heterogeneity of tumor response. That also implies a much greater effectiveness of radiation combined with heat at higher tumor control probabilities. Early necrosis caused by heating healed with conservative management. No increase in late radiation necrosis was observed

  20. Response to noise from modern wind farms in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedersen, Eja; van den Berg, Frits; Bakker, Roel; Bouma, J.

    The increasing number and size of wind farms call for more data on human response to wind turbine noise, so that a generalized dose-response relationship can be modeled and possible adverse health effects avoided. This paper reports the results of a 2007 field study in The Netherlands with 725

  1. Riparian Meadow Response to Modern Conservation Grazing Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oles, Kristin M.; Weixelman, Dave A.; Lile, David F.; Tate, Kenneth W.; Snell, Laura K.; Roche, Leslie M.

    2017-09-01

    Riparian meadows occupy a small proportion of the public lands in the western United States but they provide numerous ecosystem services, including the production of high-quality forage for livestock grazing. Modern conservation management strategies (e.g., reductions in livestock stocking rates and adoption of new riparian grazing standards) have been implemented to better balance riparian conservation and livestock production objectives on publicly managed lands. We examined potential relationships between long-term changes in plant community, livestock grazing pressure and environmental conditions at two spatial scales in meadows grazed under conservation management strategies. Changes in plant community were not associated with either livestock stocking rate or precipitation at the grazing allotment (i.e., administrative) scale. Alternatively, both grazing pressure and precipitation had significant, albeit modest, associations with changes in plant community at the meadow (i.e., ecological site) scale. These results suggest that reductions in stocking rate have improved the balance between riparian conservation and livestock production goals. However, associations between elevation, site wetness, precipitation, and changes in plant community suggest that changing climate conditions (e.g., reduced snowpack and changes in timing of snowmelt) could trigger shifts in plant communities, potentially impacting both conservation and agricultural services (e.g., livestock and forage production). Therefore, adaptive, site-specific management strategies are required to meet grazing pressure limits and safeguard ecosystem services within individual meadows, especially under more variable climate conditions.

  2. Evolution of modern nuclear medicine tumor-imaging diagnostics in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piperkova, E.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of current nuclear medicine diagnostic is closely related to the technical progress in imaging equipment development, and application of radiopharmaceuticals (Rphs) with a different tumor-uptake mechanism. It is the aim of the study to present groups of tumor-imaging Rphs differing by tumor uptake mechanisms, used in clinical oncology. The obtained results are described, and compared with the ones reported by other researchers. Sensitivity and specificity of Rphs for cardio-scintigraphy with 99m Tc - MIBI and 201 Tl are relatively high, amounting to 93.7% and 60% respectively, in the various tumors. These indicators depend on the stage, location, histopathology, level of malignancy and biological activity of the neoplasm. 99m Tc - MIBI scintigraphy is endowed with considerable diagnostic potential for assaying multiple drug resistance (MDR), and is also a good criterion for its elimination following anti-MDR therapy. The obtained results show that radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using different radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) have high sensitivity and specificity respectively: 86% and 80% in ovarian carcinoma with B72.3 antiTAG; 68.6% and 92.5% in colorectal carcinoma with B73.2 antiTAG, antiCEA, antiCA 19-9; 92% and 83% in breast cancer with antiCEA, 86.8% and 67-69% in malignant melanoma with 225.28s. Receptor scintigraphy may reach up to 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity in tumors saturated with somatostatin receptors. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-FDG enhances the metabolic activity of tumor cells, and attains tumor-detecting rate amounting to 97%. Tumor imaging evolution characterized by the introduction and practical implementation of different Rphs, visualizing the functional and biochemical activity of tumor cells in the primary neoplasm, sentinel lymph nodes and distant metastases. radiolabelling of a variety of new biochemical substances, including DNA and RNA, drugs and lysosomes contributes to a successful imaging

  3. Measuring Emotional Responses to TV Commercials: The Warmth Monitor Modernized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Roy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a lot of interest in measuring emotional responses to advertising. This study focuses on the measurement of a specific emotional response to television advertising; warmth. Nearly thirty years ago, (Aaker, Stayman and Hagerty, 1986 developed a procedure they called the Warmth Monitor; “paper and pencil” self-report process recording method. The Warmth Monitor has been used in a large number of empirical studies in marketing since, but the most recent versions of the procedure are computerized. The two methods of administering the Warmth Monitor are compared in this research.

  4. Explanatory item response modelling of an abstract reasoning assessment: A case for modern test design

    OpenAIRE

    Helland, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Assessment is an integral part of society and education, and for this reason it is important to know what you measure. This thesis is about explanatory item response modelling of an abstract reasoning assessment, with the objective to create a modern test design framework for automatic generation of valid and precalibrated items of abstract reasoning. Modern test design aims to strengthen the connections between the different components of a test, with a stress on strong theory, systematic it...

  5. Responses to the Holocaust in Modern Irish Poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Keatinge

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines twentieth and twenty-first century responses by Irish poets to the Holocaust. It argues that, despite the illiberal tendencies of the Irish state towards Jewish immigration during and after the 1939-1945 war, recent commemorative activities in Ireland have included the Holocaust and are part of a wider commemorative ‘opening up’ in Ireland towards twentieth-century historical events. Important contemporary Irish poets have written Holocaust poems of notable merit including: Seamus Heaney, Harry Clifton, Derek Mahon, Pearse Hutchinson, Paul Durcan, Paul Muldoon, Thomas Kinsella and Tom Paulin, all of whom are discussed here. These poets are noted as second-generation Holocaust poets, more at home in the lyric form and less troubled by communicative dilemmas than their precursors such as Paul Celan and Samuel Beckett whose resemblance is briefly discussed. The essay concludes by arguing that Giorgio Agamben’s arguments about testimony after Auschwitz are strikingly pertinent to some of the poems under discussion. It also suggests that the historical essays of Hubert Butler may have acted as an unseen influence on some of these writers.

  6. Immune response to uv-induced tumors: transplantation immunity and lymphocyte populations exhibiting anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced murine skin tumors were analyzed for their ability to induce tumor-specific and cross-protective transplantation immunity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. These studies revealed that progressor UV-tumors, like regressor UV-tumors, possess tumor-specific transplantation antigens. Cross-protective transplantation immunity to UV-tumors, however, was associated with sensitization to the serum used to culture the tumor lines rather than to cross-reactive or common determinants on UV-tumors. An analysis of the cytolytic activity of lymphocytes from the spleens of mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors revealed a striking difference between the two immune splenocyte populations. From regressor tumor-immune animals, cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes with specificity for the immunizing tumor were found. However, the analysis of splenic lymphocytes from progressor tumor immune animals revealed no such effector cells. To more effectively examine those lymphocytes exhibiting cytolytic activity in vitro, T lymphocyte cloning technology was used as a means of isolating homogeneous lymphocyte populations with the effector activities described above. The mechanisms where NK cells and other nonspecific effector cells could be induced in tumor-immune animals are discussed in the context of class II restricted immune responses

  7. Mechanical disruption of tumors by iron particles and magnetic field application results in increased anti-tumor immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam N Bouchlaka

    Full Text Available The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer.

  8. Differential response of idiopathic sporadic tumoral calcinosis to bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Balachandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tumoral calcinosis is a disorder of phosphate metabolism characterized by ectopic calcification around major joints. Surgery is the current treatment of choice, but a suboptimal choice in recurrent and multicentric lesions. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of bisphosphonates for the management of tumoral calcinosis on optimized medical treatment. Settings and Design: The study was done in the endocrine department of a tertiary care hospital in South India. We prospectively studied two patients with recurrent tumoral calcinosis who had failed therapy with phosphate lowering measures. Materials and Methods: After informed consent, we treated both patients with standard age adjusted doses of bisphosphonates for 18 months. The response was assessed by X ray and whole body 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan at the beginning of therapy and at the end of 1 year. We also estimated serum phosphate levels and urinary phosphate to document serial changes. Results: Two patients (aged 19 and 5 years with recurrent idiopathic hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis, following surgery were studied. Both patients had failed therapy with conventional medical management − low phosphate diet and phosphate binders. They had restriction of joint mobility. Both were given standard doses of oral alendronate and parenteral pamidronate respectively for more than a year, along with phosphate lowering measures. At the end of 1 year, one of the patients had more than 95% and 90% reduction in the size of the lesions in right and left shoulder joints respectively with total improvement in range of motion. In contrast, the other patient (5-year-old had shown no improvement, despite continuing to maintain normophosphatemia following treatment. Conclusions: Bisphosphonate therapy in tumoral calcinosis is associated with lesion resolution and may be used as a viable alternative to surgery, especially in cases with multicentric recurrence or treatment failure to other

  9. Modern principles of reconstructive surgery for advanced head and neck tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbakin, D. E.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Mukhamedov, M. R.; Garbukov, E. U.; Shtin, V. I.; Havkin, N. M.; Vasilev, R. V.

    2017-09-01

    Background: Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for head and neck cancer. Reconstruction after cancer surgery can help to restore both the appearance and function of the affected areas. Materials and methods: From 2008 to 2016, a total of 120 reconstructive surgeries were performed at the Department of Head and Neck Tumors of Tomsk Cancer Research Institute. The majority of patients had locally advanced cancer (T3 stage in 49 patients and T4 stage in 41 patients). The localizations of the defects requiring reconstruction were as follows: oral cavity—26 cases; tongue—24 cases; skin (including defects of lower lip)—12 cases; maxilla—14 cases; larynx and hypopharynx—12 cases; lips—6 cases, cheek—11 cases, and mandibulla—5 cases. Various free flaps (83%) and pedicle flaps (17%) were used for the reconstruction of the large defects following extirpation of head and neck malignant tumors. In 15 cases (13%), the implants from titanium and titanium nickelide (TiNi) were used to restore the supporting and skeletal functions of the reconstructed region. We used 3D model of the patient's skull for a more precise planning of the reconstruction of maxillofacial bone defects. Results: Good functional results were achieved in most cases. Full flap necrosis was observed in 12 cases (10%). Fibular flap necroses were noted in 8 cases (7%). Conclusions: Single-stage reconstructions of the lost structures after tumor resection significantly improve survival of head and neck cancer patients without causing significant functional and aesthetic damage, as well as contribute to quick rehabilitation of these patients and improvement of their social status. To reduce postoperative complications after reconstructive surgery, it is necessary to carefully select the appropriate reconstructive implant materials.

  10. Dramatic response to nivolumab in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Fanny; Osdoit, Sophie; Bagny, Kelly; Moro, Anne; Nguyen, Jacqueline; Réguerre, Yves

    2018-02-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old female with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) who developed a nonoperable scalp tumor, treated with anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (anti-PD-1) therapy (nivolumab). She presented with a sarcomatoid carcinoma of the scalp with bone lysis as well as vascular and meningeal contact. Nivolumab was initiated because it has emerged as a promising immunotherapy. We observed a dramatic tumor response with excellent tolerance. However, while on nivolumab therapy she developed two large skin melanomas and several squamous cell carcinomas, which have been resected. These results demonstrate that cancer immunotherapy in patients with XP can be impressive but complex and warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tumor response to ionizing radiation and combined 2-deoxy-D-glucose application in EATC tumor bearing mice: monitoring of tumor size and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, D.; Thonke, A.; Jueling-Pohlit, L.; Pohlit, W.

    1993-01-01

    The present study deals with the changes induced by two fractionation schedules (5x9 Gy and 10x4.5 Gy; 30 MeV-electrons) of ionizing radiations and 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) application on EATC tumor bearing swiss albino mice. The monitoring of tumor response was carried out by means of calliper measurement on the macroscopic level and by histopathological examination of tumor preparations stained with hematoxiline and eosine on the microscopic level. The tumor material was assessed at suitable intervals after treatment by killing the animals. The tumor response was analysed in the histological preparations and the thickness of the tumor band was determined quantitatively by an ocularmicrometric technique. Tumor damage was most extensive in the combined treated animals (5x9 Gy + 2-DG). Only in this group local tumor control was achievable. The histological analysis of tumor preparations revealed additional data about treatment-induced changes in the tumor compared to the measurement of the tumor volume with mechanical callipers. We also found that the treatment outcome could be predicted from the histopathological analysis. It is concluded that studies involving histopathological examinations may give some insight into the way cancer is controlled by radiotherapy and may be of value in prognosis and selection of treatment in patients. (orig.) [de

  12. Modern Methodology and Techniques Aimed at Developing the Environmentally Responsible Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarenko, Yelena V.; Zholdasbekova, Bibisara A.; Balabekov, Aidarhan T.; Kenzhebekova, Rabiga I.; Yessaliyev, Aidarbek A.; Larchenkova, Liudmila A.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the positive impact of an environmentally responsible individual as the social unit able to live in harmony with the natural world, himself/herself and other people. The purpose of the article is to provide theoretical substantiation of modern teaching methods. The authors considered the experience of philosophy, psychology,…

  13. Student and Teacher Responses to Prayer at a Modern Orthodox Jewish High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Devra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the attitudes of students and teachers to prayer at an American Modern Orthodox Jewish high school. Relevant data, based on observation and interviews, emerged from a larger study of the school's Jewish and secular worlds. A significant gap in responses became apparent. Students viewed prayer as a challenge to their autonomy,…

  14. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors

  15. Variation in tumor response to fluosol-DA (20%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, K.; Ono, K.; Nishidai, T.; Tsutsui, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of Fluosol-DA 20% (FDA) and carbogen (95% O2/5% CO 2 ) on radiosensitivity of the three experimental tumors, SCC VII tumor, RIF-I tumor, and transplanted mammary tumor of C 3 H/He mouse, subcutaneously inoculated in the leg were examined. The effect of FDA plus carbogen, and carbogen alone on radiosensitivity of SCC VII and RIF-I tumors was tested using the in vivo-in vitro assay. The growth curves were obtained for both SCC VII tumor and transplanted mammary tumor. The effect of the combination of FDA and carbogen was only observed in the transplanted mammary tumor. In the other two tumors, only the effect of inspiring carbogen was observed. We concluded that the effect of FDA on the radiosensitivity of experimental tumors varies with the kind of tumor systems

  16. Response of the tumor and organs of the tumor-bearing animal to the action of an ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlakova, E.B.; Gaintseva, V.D.; Pal'mina, N.P.; Sezina, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in the antioxigenic activity (AOA) of the liver of the tumor-bearing animals and the tumor have been studied after a single whole-body exposure of animals to a dose of 600 R. AOA of the liver of animals having hepatoma 22-a and Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) was found to decrease immediately after irradiation while that of the tumor itself can both increase (hepatoma 22-a) and decrease (EAT). Proceeding from the assumption that AOA is connected with tissue radiosensitivity it is suggested that the observed variations in the response of tumor cells and normal tissue to the action of ionizing radiation should be taken into account when developing the schemes of radiation effect on the tumor

  17. The Impact of Induction Chemotherapy and the Associated Tumor Response on Subsequent Radiation-Related Changes in Lung Function and Tumor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jingfang; Kocak, Zafer; Zhou Sumin; Garst, Jennifer; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Zhang Junan; Larrier, Nicole A.; Hollis, Donna R.; Folz, Rodney J.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of induction chemotherapy, and associated tumor shrinkage, on the subsequent radiation-related changes in pulmonary function and tumor response. Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective institutional review board-approved study, 91 evaluable patients treated definitively with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable lung cancer were analyzed. The rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without pre-RT chemotherapy. In the patients receiving induction chemotherapy, the rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without a response (modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor criteria) to the pre-RT chemotherapy. Comparisons of the rates of improvements in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) post-RT, dyspnea requiring steroids, and percent declines in PFTs post-RT were compared in patient subgroups using Fisher's exact test, analysis of variance, and linear or logistic regression. Results: The use of pre-RT chemotherapy appears to increase the rate of radiation-induced pneumonitis (p = 0.009-0.07), but has no consistent impact on changes in PFTs. The degree of induction chemotherapy-associated tumor shrinkage is not associated with the rate of subsequent RT-associated pulmonary toxicity. The degree of tumor response to chemotherapy is not related to the degree of tumor response to RT. Conclusions: Additional study is needed to better clarify the impact of chemotherapy on radiation-associated disfunction

  18. Multitriggered Tumor-Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Protein and Polypeptide Coassembly for Enhanced Photodynamic Tumor Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fenfang; Zou, Qianli; Li, Yongxin; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-11-01

    Tumor-responsive nanocarriers are highly valuable and demanded for smart drug delivery particularly in the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT), where a quick release of photosensitizers in tumors is preferred. Herein, it is demonstrated that protein-based nanospheres, prepared by the electrostatic assembly of proteins and polypeptides with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking and surface polyethylene glycol coupling, can be used as versatile tumor-responsive drug delivery vehicles for effective PDT. These nanospheres are capable of encapsulation of various photosensitizers including Chlorin e6 (Ce6), protoporphyrin IX, and verteporfin. The Chlorin e6-encapsulated nanospheres (Ce6-Ns) are responsive to changes in pH, redox potential, and proteinase concentration, resulting in multitriggered rapid release of Ce6 in an environment mimicking tumor tissues. In vivo fluorescence imaging results indicate that Ce6-Ns selectively accumulate near tumors and the quick release of Ce6 from Ce6-Ns can be triggered by tumors. In tumors the fluorescence of released Ce6 from Ce6-Ns is observed at 0.5 h postinjection, while in normal tissues the fluorescence appeared at 12 h postinjection. Tumor ablation is demonstrated by in vivo PDT using Ce6-Ns and the biocompatibility of Ce6-Ns is evident from the histopathology imaging, confirming the enhanced in vivo PDT efficacy and the biocompatibility of the assembled drug delivery vehicles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hypoxic Response of Tumor Tissues in a Microfluidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Adnan; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Inside a tumor tissue, cells growing further away from the blood vessel often suffer from low oxygen levels known as hypoxia. Cancer cells have shown prolonged survival in hostile hypoxic conditions by sharply changing the cellular metabolism. In this work, different stages of growth of the tumor tissue and the oxygen transport across the tissue are investigated. The tissue was modeled as a contiguous block of cells inside a microfluidic environment with nutrient transport through advection and diffusion. While oxygen uptake inside the tissue is through diffusion, ascorbate transport from the extracellular medium is addressed by a concentration dependent uptake model. By varying the experimentally observed oxygen consumption rate, different types of cancer cells and their normoxic and hypoxic stages were studied. Even when the oxygen supply in the channel is maintained at normoxic levels, our results show the onset of hypoxia within minutes inside the cellblock. Interestingly, modeled cell blocks with and without a structured basal layer showed less than 5% variation in hypoxic response in chronic hypoxia. Results also indicate that the balance of cell survival and growth are affected by the flow rate of nutrients and the oxygen consumption rate. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMS 1317671.

  20. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes

  2. Are Breast Tumor Stem Cells Responsible for Metastasis and Angiogenesis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Quintin

    2005-01-01

    .... The current dogma of metastasis is that most primary tumor cells have low metastatic potential, but rare cells, less than one in ten million, within large primary tumors acquire metastatic capacity...

  3. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Hegde, Samarth; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-associated fibrosis is characterized by unchecked pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory signaling. The components of fibrosis including significant numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, dense collagen deposition, and extracellular matrix stiffness, are well appreciated regulators of tumor progression but may also be critical regulators of immune surveillance. While this suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy may be limited in highly fibrotic cancers like pancreas, it also suggests a therapeutic opportunity to target fibrosis in these tumor types to reawaken anti-tumor immunity. This review discusses the mechanisms by which fibrosis might subvert tumor immunity and how to overcome these mechanisms.

  5. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  6. Cells responsible for tumor surveillance in man: effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizenstein, P.; Ogier, C.; Blomgren, H.; Petrini, B.; Wasserman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Currently, the most probable theory of tumor surveillance is neither the existence of any tumor-specific, antigen-dependent, T-cell-mediated cytotoxic effect that could eliminate spontaneous tumors in man and that could be used for some kind of vaccination against tumors, nor the complete absence of any surveillance or defense systems against tumors. What is probable is the cooperation of a number of antigen-independent, relatively weakly cytotoxic or possibly only cytostatic humoral and cellular effects, including nutritional immunity, tumor necrosis factor, certain cytokines, and the cytotoxic effects mediated by macrophages, NK cells, NK-like cells, and certain stimulated T-cells. One question remaining to be solved is why these antigen-independent effects do not attack normal cells. A number of plausible hypotheses are discussed. The hypothetical surveillance system is modulated both by traditional cancer treatment and by attempts at immunomodulation. Radiotherapy reduced the T-helper cell function for almost a decade, but not those of macrophages or NK cells. T-cell changes have no prognostic implication, supporting, perhaps, the suggestion of a major role for macrophages and NK cells. Cyclic adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the peripheral lymphocyte population and several lymphocyte functions but not NK activity. Most of the parameters were normalized some years following treatment, but NK activity remained elevated and Th/Ts cell ratio was still decreased. This might possibly be taken to support the surveillance role of NK cells. Bestatin increases the frequency of lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep red blood cells (but not their mitogenic responses), enhances NK activity, and augments the phagocytic capacity of granulocytes and monocytes (but not their cytotoxic activity). 154 references

  7. Angiogenesis for tumor vascular normalization of Endostar on hepatoma 22 tumor-bearing mice is involved in the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingyu; Gu, Junfei; Lv, You; Yuan, Jiarui; Yang, Nan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Chunfei; Hou, Xuefeng; Jia, Xiaobin; Feng, Liang; Yin, Guowen

    2018-03-01

    Tumor vascular normalization involved in immune response is beneficial to the chemotherapy of tumors. Recombinant human endostatin (Endostar), an angiogenesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to be effective in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). However, its vascular normalization in HCC and the role of the immune response in angiogenesis were unclear. In the present study, effects of Endostar on tumor vascular normalization were evaluated in hepatoma 22 (H22) tumor-bearing mice. Endostar was able to inhibit the proliferation and infiltration of tumor cells and improve α-fetoprotein, tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclic adenosine 5'-phosphate levels in the serum of H22-bearing mice, as well as the protein expression levels of the immune factors interferon-γ and cluster of differentiation (CD)86 in liver tissue. Endostar also exhibited more marked downregulation of the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD31, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and interleukin-17 during day 3-9 treatment, resulting in short-term normalization of tumor blood vessels. The period of vascular normalization was 3-9 days. The results of the present study demonstrated that Endostar was able to induce the period of vascular normalization, contributing to a more efficacious means of HCC treatment combined with other chemotherapy, and this effect was associated with the immune response. It may be concluded that Endostar inhibited immunity-associated angiogenesis behaviors of vascular endothelial cells in response to HCC. The results of the present study provided more reasonable possibility for the combination therapy of Endostar for the treatment of HCC.

  8. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kal, H.B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Centre Haaglanden, Westeinde Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E. [Dept. of Medical Oncology, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  9. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Struikmans, H.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  10. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  11. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the tumor temperature during hyperthermia (HT), and on the cytotoxic effect of HT, was studied in the BT 4 An tumor transplanted to the hind limb of BD IX rats. Experiments with two different anesthetics, pentobarbital and the midazolam/fentanyl/fluanisone combination (MFF), were performed to secure reliable conclusions. Methods and Materials: In the tumor response experiments local waterbath HT at 44.0 deg. C was given for 60 min. Sodium nitroprusside was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion to lower the MAP to 60 or 80 mmHg during HT. In two other experiments the temperature at the base of the tumor during HT was measured before and during SNP infusion. In animals without tumor the temperature was measured subcutaneously on the foot during HT with or without SNP-induced hypotension. Results: When SNP was given to lower the MAP to 60 mmHg during HT in MFF anesthetized animals, the median tumor growth time (TGT) was 70 days, compared to 14.5 days in the HT alone group. The corresponding figures were 127 and 12.1 days with pentobarbital anesthesia. In the HT + SNP group, more than 40% cure was observed in both experiments. No cures were seen in any of the other groups. Hyperthermia alone prolonged the TGT slightly, whereas SNP given alone had no effect, compared to controls. When the MAP was lowered to 80 mmHg by SNP infusion during HT (MFF anesthesia), the median TGT was 19.9 days, which was significantly longer than that in the HT alone group (10.9 days). In the MAP range from 60 to 120 mmHg, a nearly linear relationship between the MAP and the tumor temperature was found during HT in MFF anesthetized animals. With both anesthetics, the median temperature at the base of the tumor was about 0.8 deg. C higher during HT when the MAP was lowered to 60 mmHg by SNP. In animals without tumors, the temperature subcutaneously on the foot was 0

  12. Complete clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in a 54-year-old male with Askin tumor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, J

    2012-02-01

    Askin tumor is a tumor of the thoracopulmonary region that most commonly affects children and adolescents. These rare tumors are a form of primitive neuroectodermal tumor and typically carry a poor prognosis. Treatment is multimodal and consists of a combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, radical resection, and adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy or all of the above. Surgery is advocated in most cases. We report a case of Askin tumor in a 54-year-old male who showed rapid and complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This allowed potentially radical surgery to be avoided. At one-year follow-up he remains disease-free.

  13. Response of the primary tumor in symptomatic and asymptomatic stage IV colorectal cancer to combined interventional endoscopy and palliative chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, Silke; Hünerbein, Diana; Mansuroglu, Tümen; Armbrust, Thomas; Scharf, Jens-Gerd; Schwörer, Harald; Füzesi, László; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of the primary tumor in advanced metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) is still a matter of discussion. Little attention has thus far been paid to the endoscopically observable changes of the primary in non-curatively resectable stage IV disease. 20 patients [14 men, 6 women, median age 67 (39–82) years] were observed after initial diagnosis of non-curatively resectable metastasized symptomatic (83%) or asymptomatic (17%) CRC, from June 2002 to April 2009. If necessary, endoscopic tumor debulking was performed. 5-FU based chemotherapy was given immediately thereafter. In 10 patients, chemotherapy was combined with antibody therapy. Response of the primary was observed in all patients. Local symptoms were treated endoscopically whenever necessary (obstruction or bleeding), and further improved after chemotherapy was started: Four patients showed initial complete endoscopic disappearance of the primary. In an additional 6 patients, only adenomatous tissue was histologically detected. In both these groups, two patients revealed local tumor relapse after interruption of therapy. Local tumor regression or stable disease was achieved in the remaining 10 patients. 15 patients died during the observation time. In 13 cases, death was related to metastatic disease progression. The mean overall survival time was 19.6 (3–71) months. No complications due to the primary were observed. This study shows that modern anti-cancer drugs combined with endoscopic therapy are an effective and safe treatment of the symptomatic primary and ameliorate local complaints without the need for surgical intervention in advanced UICC stage IV CRC

  14. Macrophage biology plays a central role during ionizing radiation-elicited tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuji Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for most solid tumors. The anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy consists of the direct tumor cell killing, as well as the modulation of tumor microenvironment and the activation of immune response against tumors. Radiation therapy has been shown to promote immunogenic cells death, activate dendritic cells and enhance tumor antigen presentation and anti-tumor T cell activation. Radiation therapy also programs innate immune cells such as macrophages that leads to either radiosensitization or radioresistance, according to different tumors and different radiation regimen studied. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced macrophage activation remain largely elusive. Various molecular players such as NF-κB, MAPKs, p53, reactive oxygen species, inflammasomes have been involved in these processes. The skewing to a pro-inflammatory phenotype thus results in the activation of anti-tumor immune response and enhanced radiotherapy effect. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced macrophage activation and its role in tumor response to radiation therapy is crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies to enhance radiation therapy efficacy.

  15. Tumor suppressor maspin as a modulator of host immune response to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijana H. Dzinic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the promising clinical outcome, the primary challenge of the curative cancer immunotherapy is to overcome the dichotomy of the immune response: tumor-evoked immunostimulatory versus tumor-induced immunosuppressive. The goal needs to be two-fold, to re-establish sustainable antitumor-cancer immunity and to eliminate immunosuppression. The successful elimination of cancer cells by immunosurveillance requires the antigenic presentation of the tumor cells or tumor-associated antigens and the expression of immunostimulatory cytokines and chemokines by cancer and immune cells. Tumors are heterogeneous and as such, some of the tumor cells are thought to have stem cell characteristics that enable them to suppress or desensitize the host immunity due to acquired epigenetic changes. A central mechanism underlying tumor epigenetic instability is the increased histone deacetylase (HDAC-mediated repression of HDAC-target genes regulating homeostasis and differentiation. It was noted that pharmacological HDAC inhibitors are not effective in eliminating tumor cells partly because they may induce immunosuppression. We have shown that epithelial-specific tumor suppressor maspin, an ovalbumin-like non-inhibitory serine protease inhibitor, reprograms tumor cells toward better differentiated phenotypes by inhibiting HDAC1. Recently, we uncovered a novel function of maspin in directing host immunity towards tumor elimination. In this review, we discuss the maspin and maspin/HDAC1 interplay in tumor biology and immunology. We propose that maspin based therapies may eradicate cancer.

  16. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  17. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6–neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6–silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6–silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  18. The combined status of ATM and p53 link tumor development with therapeutic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hai; Reinhardt, H Christian; Bartkova, Jirina

    2009-01-01

    commonly used by tumors to bypass early neoplastic checkpoints ultimately determine chemotherapeutic response and generate tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited with targeted therapies. Specifically, evaluation of the combined status of ATM and p53, two commonly mutated tumor suppressor...... genes, can help to predict the clinical response to genotoxic chemotherapies. We show that in p53-deficient settings, suppression of ATM dramatically sensitizes tumors to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, whereas, conversely, in the presence of functional p53, suppression of ATM or its downstream target Chk2...... actually protects tumors from being killed by genotoxic agents. Furthermore, ATM-deficient cancer cells display strong nononcogene addiction to DNA-PKcs for survival after DNA damage, such that suppression of DNA-PKcs in vivo resensitizes inherently chemoresistant ATM-deficient tumors to genotoxic...

  19. Effect of host age on the transplantation, growth, and radiation response of EMT6 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of EMT6 tumors in young adult and aged BALB/c KaRw mice were compared. The number of tumor cells implanted s.c. necessary to cause tumors in 50% of the injection sites was lower in aging than in young adult mice. The latent period of intradermally implanted tumors was shorter in aging mice than in young animals; however, the growth curves of established tumors were similar. The number and appearance of lung colonies after injection of cells i.v. and the pattern of spontaneous metastases were similar in young and aged animals. Radiation dose-response curves for the cells of tumors in young and aging mice were different and suggested that the proportion of hypoxic cells was higher in tumors on aging animals. These findings suggest that both immunological and nonimmunological tumor-host interactions differ in young and aged animals and that such factors may influence the natural history of the tumor and the response of the tumor to treatment

  20. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  1. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  2. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, I.; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  3. Can quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography predict cervical tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Chuan; Liu, Long-Zhong; Zheng, Wei [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Xie, Yan-Jun [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zhongcun Town hospital, 140 Renmin Road, Zhongcun Town, Panyu District, Guangzhou, 511400 (China); Xiong, Yong-Hong; Li, An-Hua [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Pei, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: peixq@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We assessed the clinical value of quantitative CEUS for prediction of cervical tumor perfusion response to NACT. • IMAX, RT, and TTP changed significantly after one NACT cycle. • Pre-treatment IMAX positively correlated with the absolute and percentage changes in all cervical tumor IMAX after NACT. • Pre-treatment IMAX may be predictive of NACT perfusion response in cervical tumor. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) for predicting and assessing cervical tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Methods: Thirty-eight cases with stage IB2 or IIA cervical cancer were studied using CEUS before and after one cycle of NACT. The quantitative CEUS parameters maximum intensity (IMAX), rise time (RT), time to peak (TTP), and mean transit time (MTT) were compared between cervical tumors and myometrium (reference zone) using Sonoliver software. Absolute and relative changes in quantitative CEUS parameters were also compared among complete response, partial response, and non-responsive groups. Correlations between pre-treatment IMAX and changes in quantitative parameters were assessed after one cycle of NACT. Results: There were significant changes in cervical tumor IMAX (P < 0.001), RT (P < 0.05), and TTP (P < 0.05) after one cycle of NACT. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors guidelines, the enrollments were divided into complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive disease groups. There were no significant differences in quantitative CEUS parameters among complete response, partial response, and non-responsive groups (P > 0.05). In the stable disease group (n = 17), cervical tumor IMAX, RT, and TTP decreased significantly after NACT (P < 0.001). The absolute and percentage changes in IMAX were positively correlated with pre-treatment IMAX in all 38 patients (r = 0.576, P < 0.001 and r = 0.429, P < 0.001). Conclusion

  4. Splenomegaly and tumor marker response following selective internal radiation therapy for non-resectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, M.; Yan, K.; Itoh, Seiji; King, J.; Glenn, D.; Quinn, R.; Morris, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in spleen size, the level of chromogranin A as a tumor marker, and the relationship between these two parameters before and 3 months after selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) for non-resectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor (NET). Our first serious adverse event with this relatively new treatment is also discussed. A retrospective review of a prospective database identified patients with non-resectable liver metastases from NET who underwent SIRT between 2003 and 2007. Patients who underwent CT scans before and 3 months after treatment were included. The patients were divided into two groups: those with and without a 20% or more increase in splenic volume on the CT scans. The percentages of patients showing a tumor marker response in the two groups were then compared. Fourteen patients were included in the present analysis. A tumor marker response was seen in 6 of 7 patients (85.7%) who showed an increase in splenic volume of >20%, and in 3 of 7 patients (42.9%) without an increase in splenic volume (p=0.266). There was one death as a result of oesophageal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension at 9 months after treatment. Splenic enlargement after SIRT may be associated with tumor marker response, although this could not be confirmed statistically in this study due to the small number of patients. Long-term splenomegaly and portal hypertension may be important complications of SIRT. This issue needs to be investigated further using a larger number of patients and longer follow-up. (author)

  5. Tumor localization and biochemical response to cure in tumor-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, William H; Andreopoulou, Panagiota; Chen, Clara C; Reynolds, James; Guthrie, Lori; Kelly, Marilyn; Gafni, Rachel I; Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Boyce, Alison M; El-Maouche, Diala; Crespo, Diana Ovejero; Sherry, Richard; Chang, Richard; Wodajo, Felasfa M; Kletter, Gad B; Dwyer, Andrew; Collins, Michael T

    2013-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disorder of phosphate wasting due to fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23)-secreting tumors that are often difficult to locate. We present a systematic approach to tumor localization and postoperative biochemical changes in 31 subjects with TIO. All had failed either initial localization, or relocalization (in case of recurrence or metastases) at outside institutions. Functional imaging with ¹¹¹Indium-octreotide with single photon emission computed tomography (octreo-SPECT or SPECT/CT), and ¹⁸fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) were performed, followed by anatomic imaging (CT, MRI). Selective venous sampling (VS) was performed when multiple suspicious lesions were identified or high surgical risk was a concern. Tumors were localized in 20 of 31 subjects (64.5%). Nineteen of 20 subjects underwent octreo-SPECT imaging, and 16 of 20 FDG-PET/CT imaging. Eighteen of 19 (95%) were positive on octreo-SPECT, and 14 of 16 (88%) on FDG-PET/CT. Twelve of 20 subjects underwent VS; 10 of 12 (83%) were positive. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were as follows: sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.64, PPV = 0.82, and NPV = 0.88 for octreo-SPECT; sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.36, PPV = 0.62, and NPV = 0.50 for FDG-PET/CT. Fifteen subjects had their tumor resected at our institution, and were disease-free at last follow-up. Serum phosphorus returned to normal in all subjects within 1 to 5 days. In 10 subjects who were followed for at least 7 days postoperatively, intact FGF23 (iFGF23) decreased to near undetectable within hours and returned to the normal range within 5 days. C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23) decreased immediately but remained elevated, yielding a markedly elevated cFGF23/iFGF23 ratio. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ (1,25D) rose and exceeded the normal range. In this systematic approach to tumor

  6. Enhanced responses to tumor immunization following total body irradiation are time-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Diab

    Full Text Available The development of successful cancer vaccines is contingent on the ability to induce effective and persistent anti-tumor immunity against self-antigens that do not typically elicit immune responses. In this study, we examine the effects of a non-myeloablative dose of total body irradiation on the ability of tumor-naïve mice to respond to DNA vaccines against melanoma. We demonstrate that irradiation followed by lymphocyte infusion results in a dramatic increase in responsiveness to tumor vaccination, with augmentation of T cell responses to tumor antigens and tumor eradication. In irradiated mice, infused CD8(+ T cells expand in an environment that is relatively depleted in regulatory T cells, and this correlates with improved CD8(+ T cell functionality. We also observe an increase in the frequency of dendritic cells displaying an activated phenotype within lymphoid organs in the first 24 hours after irradiation. Intriguingly, both the relative decrease in regulatory T cells and increase in activated dendritic cells correspond with a brief window of augmented responsiveness to immunization. After this 24 hour window, the numbers of dendritic cells decline, as does the ability of mice to respond to immunizations. When immunizations are initiated within the period of augmented dendritic cell activation, mice develop anti-tumor responses that show increased durability as well as magnitude, and this approach leads to improved survival in experiments with mice bearing established tumors as well as in a spontaneous melanoma model. We conclude that irradiation can produce potent immune adjuvant effects independent of its ability to induce tumor ablation, and that the timing of immunization and lymphocyte infusion in the irradiated host are crucial for generating optimal anti-tumor immunity. Clinical strategies using these approaches must therefore optimize such parameters, as the correct timing of infusion and vaccination may mean the difference

  7. Whole-genome sequencing of a malignant granular cell tumor with metabolic response to pazopanib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Song; Conroy, Jeffrey; Wang, Jianmin; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; Glenn, Sean T.; Murakami, Mitsuko; Liu, Lu; Hu, Qiang; Conroy, Jacob; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Nowak, David E.; Liu, Biao; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Omilian, Angela R.; Head, Karen; Bianchi, Michael; Burgher, Blake; Darlak, Christopher; Kane, John; Merzianu, Mihai; Cheney, Richard; Fabiano, Andrew; Salerno, Kilian; Talati, Chetasi; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Morrison, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are an uncommon soft tissue neoplasm. Malignant granular cell tumors comprise T transitions, particularly when immediately preceded by a 5′ G. A loss-of-function mutation was detected in a newly recognized tumor suppressor candidate, BRD7. No mutations were found in known targets of pazopanib. However, we identified a receptor tyrosine kinase pathway mutation in GFRA2 that warrants further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a malignant granular cell tumor exhibiting a response to pazopanib, and the first whole-genome sequencing of this uncommon tumor type. The findings provide insight into the genetic basis of malignant granular cell tumors and identify potential targets for further investigation. PMID:27148567

  8. Targeting tumor antigens to secreted membrane vesicles in vivo induces efficient antitumor immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Ostrowski, Matias; Krumeich, Sophie; Bobrie, Angélique; Jancic, Carolina; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Delcayre, Alain; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Combadière, Béhazine; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde

    2008-02-15

    Expression of non-self antigens by tumors can induce activation of T cells in vivo, although this activation can lead to either immunity or tolerance. CD8+ T-cell activation can be direct (if the tumor expresses MHC class I molecules) or indirect (after the capture and cross-presentation of tumor antigens by dendritic cells). The modes of tumor antigen capture by dendritic cells in vivo remain unclear. Here we examine the immunogenicity of the same model antigen secreted by live tumors either in association with membrane vesicles (exosomes) or as a soluble protein. We have artificially addressed the antigen to secreted vesicles by coupling it to the factor VIII-like C1C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-factor VIII (MFG-E8)/lactadherin. We show that murine fibrosarcoma tumor cells that secrete vesicle-bound antigen grow slower than tumors that secrete soluble antigen in immunocompetent, but not in immunodeficient, host mice. This growth difference is due to the induction of a more potent antigen-specific antitumor immune response in vivo by the vesicle-bound than by the soluble antigen. Finally, in vivo secretion of the vesicle-bound antigen either by tumors or by vaccination with naked DNA protects against soluble antigen-secreting tumors. We conclude that the mode of secretion can determine the immunogenicity of tumor antigens and that manipulation of the mode of antigen secretion may be used to optimize antitumor vaccination protocols.

  9. 3D tumor tissue analogs and their orthotopic implants for understanding tumor-targeting of microenvironment-responsive nanosized chemotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; Swindell, Elden P; Chan, Ryan; Langner, Ulrich W; Feddock, Jonathan M; Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    An appropriate representation of the tumor microenvironment in tumor models can have a pronounced impact on directing combinatorial treatment strategies and cancer nanotherapeutics. The present study develops a novel 3D co-culture spheroid model (3D TNBC) incorporating tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts as color-coded murine tumor tissue analogs (TTA) to better represent the tumor milieu of triple negative breast cancer in vitro. Implantation of TTA orthotopically in nude mice, resulted in enhanced growth and aggressive metastasis to ectopic sites. Subsequently, the utility of the model is demonstrated for preferential targeting of irradiated tumor endothelial cells via radiation-induced stromal enrichment of galectin-1 using anginex conjugated nanoparticles (nanobins) carrying arsenic trioxide and cisplatin. Demonstration of a multimodal nanotherapeutic system and inclusion of the biological response to radiation using an in vitro/in vivo tumor model incorporating characteristics of tumor microenvironment presents an advance in preclinical evaluation of existing and novel cancer nanotherapies. Existing in-vivo tumor models are established by implanting tumor cells into nude mice. Here, the authors described their approach 3D spheres containing tumor cells, enodothelial cells and fibroblasts. This would mimic tumor micro-environment more realistically. This interesting 3D model should reflect more accurately tumor response to various drugs and would enable the design of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Plasticity of gamma delta T cells: impact on the anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eLafont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of gamma and delta chains (gamma delta T cells are of particular interest. gamma delta T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary and prostate cancer directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that gamma delta T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating gamma deltaT cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating DC maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to gamma delta T cells and promote their differentiation into gamma delta T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of gamma delta T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying gamma delta T cell expansion, differentiation and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment.

  11. Tumor and normal tissue responses to fractioned non-uniform dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellman, P; Aegren, A; Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    The volume dependence of the radiation response of a tumor is straight forward to quantify because it depends primarily on the eradication of all its clonogenic cells. A tumor therefore has a parallel organization as any surviving clonogen in principle can repopulate the tumor. The difficulty with the response of the tumor is instead to know the density and sensitivity distribution of the most resistant clonogenic cells. The increase in the 50% tumor control dose and the decrease in the maximum normalized slope of the dose response relation, {gamma}, in presence of small compartments of resistant tumor cells have therefore been quantified to describe their influence on the dose response relation. Injury to normal tissue is a much more complex and gradual process. It depends on earlier effects induced long before depletion of the differentiated and clonogenic cells that in addition may have a complex structural and functional organization. The volume dependence of the dose response relation of normal tissues is therefore described here by the relative seriality, s, of the infrastructure of the organ. The model can also be generalized to describe the response of heterogeneous tissues to non uniform dose distributions. The new model is compared with clinical and experimental data on normal tissue response, and shows good agreement both with regard to the shape of dose response relation and the volume dependence of the isoeffect dose. The response of tumors and normal tissues are quantified for arbitrary dose fractionations using the linear quadratic cell survival parameters {alpha} and {beta}. The parameters of the dose response relation are derived both for a constant dose per fraction and a constant number of dose fractions, thus in the latter case accounting also for non uniform dose delivery. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs.

  12. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 μg in 50 μl). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21 WAF1 / CIP1 and Bcl-X s in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X L , Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment

  13. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 {mu}g in 50 {mu}l). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21{sup WAF1}/{sup CIP1} and Bcl-X{sub s} in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X{sub L}, Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment.

  14. HEART RATE AND BLOOD LACTATE RESPONSES TO CHANGQUAN AND DAOSHU FORMS OF MODERN WUSHU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerri Luiz Ribeiro

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of specific training designed to enhance physiological aspects of performance relies heavily on the availability of accurate and validity physiological data. In the combat sport of Wushu, katas are used to develop aerobic fitness. It is arguably important to assess and monitor heart rate (HR and lactate (La responses when designing effective training programs. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate heart rate and lactate responses to forms execution among Wushu combatants. Male elite modern Wushu athletes (n = 4 from a South Brazilian regional team participated in the study. Athletes were aged 22.5 ± 2.08 years old and had at least eight years of Wushu experience. Athletes carried out the Changquan and Daoshu forms in random order, HR and La were measured pre- and post-exercise. Results indicate that HR was 176 ± 3 and 176 ± 2 bpm and La was 4.38 ± 1.3 and 5.15 ± 1.07 mmol·l-1 for Changquan and Daoshu forms, respectively. There were no significantly differences in HR and La between the two forms. HR values represent 89.2 ± 1.1 and 89.1 ± 1.8% of age-predicted maximal heart rate and lactate was near of 4 mmol·l-1 point. In conclusion, training programs to Wushu combatants could target the range of physiological values cited above with no differences between two forms

  15. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  16. The Pig as a Large Animal Model for Studying Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr

    but also generates a selective pressure, which may lead to selection of tumor cell variants with reduced immunogenicity; thereby, increasing the risk of tumor escape. Cancer immunotherapy includes treatment strategies aimed at activating anti-tumor immune responses or inhibiting suppressive and tumor......-favorable immune mechanisms. One of the promising arms of cancer immunotherapy is peptide-based therapeutic vaccines; yet, no such vaccine has been approved for use in human oncology. For many years, mouse models have provided invaluable understanding of complex immunological pathways; however, the majority...... tolerance towards IDO and the establishment of an antigen-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) response. When comparing the different CAF09-formulated antigen doses, we demonstrate the induction of a CMI-dominant response upon exposure to a low endogenous peptide dose. In contrast, a mixed CMI and humoral...

  17. [Modern kind of treatment for ovarian tumors with low malignant potential/summarized our and foreign experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, S

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the ovarian tumors with low malignant potential. We tried to summarize our and foreign experience for 10 years period (2000-2011) in this field. The method of choice is the surgical treatment with total cytoreduction if possible. Appendectomy is performed for the serous pathological types of ovarian tumors. In the early stages we try to spare the reproductive functions of the patients. In the advanced stages hysterectomy with BSO, omentecromy and appendectomy is performed. Systematic pelvic and paraaortal lymph node dissection is not recommended. Resection only of the suspected lymph nodes is performed. The chemotherapy has no prognostic significance.

  18. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome

  19. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloshin, Tali [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel); Voest, Emile E. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Shaked, Yuval, E-mail: yshaked@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel)

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  20. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  1. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for predicting tumor response to radiochemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Meng; Wei, Hangping; Lin, Ruifang; Zhang, Xuebang; Zou, Changlin; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting tumor response to radiochemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From July 2012 to March 2014, 46 NPC patients who had undergone PET scanning before receiving definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in our hospital were enrolled. Factors potentially affecting tumor response to treatment were studied by multiple logistic regression analysis. After radiochemotherapy, 32 patients had a clinical complete response (CR), making the CR rate 69.6 %. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the maximal standard uptake value (SUV max ) of the primary tumor was the only factor related to tumor response (p = 0.001), and that the logistic model had a high positive predictive value (90.6 %). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.809, with a best cutoff threshold at 10.05. Patients with SUV max ≤ 10 had a higher CR rate than those with SUV max > 10 (p < 0.001). The SUV max of the primary tumor before treatment is an independent predictor of tumor response in NPC. (orig.) [de

  2. Welcoming a monster to the world: Myths, oral tradition, and modern societal response to volcanic disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Cronin, Shane J.

    2008-10-01

    Volcanic eruptions can overwhelm all senses of observers in their violence, spectacle and sheer incredibility. When an eruption is catastrophic or unexpected, neither individuals nor communities can easily assimilate the event into their world view. Psychological studies of disaster aftermaths have shown that trauma can shake the very foundations of a person's faith and trigger a search - supernatural, religious, or scientific - for answers. For this reason, the ability to rapidly comprehend a traumatic event by "accepting" the catastrophe as part the observer's world represents an important component of community resilience to natural hazards. A relationship with the event may be constructed by adapting existing cosmological, ancestral, or scientific frameworks, as well as through creative and artistic expression. In non-literate societies, communal perceptions of an event may be transformed into stories that offer myth-like explanations. As these stories make their way into oral traditions, they often undergo major changes to allow transmission through generations and, in some cases, to serve political or religious purposes. Disaster responses in literate societies are no different, except that they are more easily recorded and therefore are less prone to change over time. Here we explore ways in which the language, imagery and metaphor used to describe volcanic events may link disparate societies (both present and past) in their search for understanding of volcanic catastrophes. Responses to modern eruptions (1980 Mount St Helens, USA, and 1995-present Soufriere Hills, Montserrat) provide a baseline for examining the progression to older historic events that have already developed oral traditions (1886 Tarawera, New Zealand) and finally to oral traditions many hundreds of years old in both the Pacific Northwest US and New Zealand (NZ). We see that repeated volcanism over many generations produces rich webs of cosmology and history surrounding volcanoes. NZ Maori

  3. SU-F-J-59: Assessment of Dose Response Distribution in Individual Human Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chen, S; Krauss, D; Chen, P [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Wilson, G [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To fulfill precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number, voxel-by-voxel dose response or radio-sensitivity in individual human tumor needs to be determined in early treatment to guide treatment adaptation. In this study, multiple FDG PET images obtained pre- and weekly during the treatment course were utilized to determine the distribution/spectrum of dose response parameters in individual human tumors. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 18 HN cancer patients were used in the study. Spatial parametric image of tumor metabolic ratio (dSUV) was created following voxel by voxel deformable image registration. Each voxel value in dSUV was a function of pre-treatment baseline SUV and treatment delivered dose, and used as a surrogate of tumor survival fraction (SF). Regression fitting with break points was performed using the LQ-model with tumor proliferation for the control and failure group of tumors separately. The distribution and spectrum of radiation sensitivity and growth in individual tumors were determined and evaluated. Results: Spectrum of tumor dose-sensitivity and proliferation in the controlled group was broad with α in tumor survival LQ-model from 0.17 to 0.8. It was proportional to the baseline SUV. Tlag was about 21∼25 days, and Tpot about 0.56∼1.67 days respectively. Commonly tumor voxels with high radio-sensitivity or larger α had small Tlag and Tpot. For the failure group, the radio-sensitivity α was low within 0.05 to 0.3, but did not show clear Tlag. In addition, tumor voxel radio-sensitivity could be estimated during the early treatment weeks. Conclusion: Dose response distribution with respect to radio-sensitivity and growth in individual human tumor can be determined using FDG PET imaging based tumor metabolic ratio measured in early treatment course. The discover is critical and provides a potential quantitative objective to implement tumor specific precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number.

  4. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  5. CADrx for GBM Brain Tumors: Predicting Treatment Response from Changes in Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Brown

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a computer-aided therapeutic response (CADrx system for early prediction of drug treatment response for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM brain tumors with diffusion weighted (DW MR images. In conventional Macdonald assessment, tumor response is assessed nine weeks or more post-treatment. However, we will investigate the ability of DW-MRI to assess response earlier, at five weeks post treatment. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor’s microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. ADC values in treated brain tumors could theoretically both increase due to the cell kill (and thus reduced cell density and decrease due to inhibition of edema. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that quantify changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. There are three parts to this study: first, tumor regions were segmented on T1w contrast enhanced images by Otsu’s thresholding method, and mapped from T1w images onto ADC images by a 3D region of interest (ROI mapping tool using DICOM header information; second, ADC histograms of the tumor region were extracted from both pre- and five weeks post-treatment scans, and fitted by a two-component Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The GMM features as well as standard histogram-based features were extracted. Finally, supervised machine learning techniques were applied for classification of responders or non-responders. The approach was evaluated with a dataset of 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 39 responded and 46 did not, based on tumor volume reduction. We compared adaBoost, random forest and support vector machine classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in the best accuracy of 69.41% and the corresponding area under the curve (Az of 0.70.

  6. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  7. Activation of antitumor immune responses by Ganoderma formosanum polysaccharides in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Li; Lu, Chiu-Ying; Hsueh, Ying-Chao; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Chun-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Fungi of the genus Ganoderma are basidiomycetes that have been used as traditional medicine in Asia and have been shown to exhibit various pharmacological activities. We recently found that PS-F2, a polysaccharide fraction purified from the submerged culture broth of Ganoderma formosanum, stimulates the maturation of dendritic cells and primes a T helper 1 (Th1)-polarized adaptive immune response in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether the immune adjuvant function of PS-F2 can stimulate antitumor immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Continuous intraperitoneal or oral administration of PS-F2 effectively suppressed the growth of colon 26 (C26) adenocarcinoma, B16 melanoma, and sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor cells in mice without adverse effects on the animals' health. PS-F2 did not cause direct cytotoxicity on tumor cells, and it lost the antitumor effect in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and serum from PS-F2-treated tumor-bearing mice all exhibited antitumor activities when adoptively transferred to naïve animals, indicating that PS-F2 treatment stimulates tumor-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. These data demonstrate that continuous administration of G. formosanum polysaccharide PS-F2 can activate host immune responses against ongoing tumor growth, suggesting that PS-F2 can potentially be developed into a preventive/therapeutic agent for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Philosophical Study on Two Contemporary Iranian Muslim Intellectual Responses to Modern Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsaei, Maryam; Shah, Mohd Hazim

    2017-01-01

    Iranian modern thinkers in either of the two categories: Western-minded and religious. The most prominent aspect of Western minded thinkers is their emphasis on separation of tradition and modernity. On the other hand, religious thinkers look forward to combining the two. The Western-minded thinkers believe that the most important burden on…

  9. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy elicits tumor specific T cell responses in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Estévez, David; Sánchez, Ramiro; Tejada, Rafael E.; Parra-López, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical studies in breast cancer suggest that some anti-tumor therapy regimens generate stimulation of the immune system that accounts for tumor clinical responses, however, demonstration of the immunostimulatory power of these therapies on cancer patients continues to be a formidable challenge. Here we present experimental evidence from a breast cancer patient with complete clinical response after 7 years, associated with responsiveness of tumor specific T cells. T cells were obtained before and after anti-tumor therapy from peripheral blood of a 63-years old woman diagnosed with ductal breast cancer (HER2/neu+++, ER-, PR-, HLA-A*02:01) treated with surgery, followed by paclitaxel, trastuzumab (suspended due to cardiac toxicity), and radiotherapy. We obtained a leukapheresis before surgery and after 8 months of treatment. Using in vitro cell cultures stimulated with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that produce high levels of IL-12, we characterize by flow cytometry the phenotype of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) HER2/neu and NY-ESO 1 specific T cells. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) were performed in order to correlate both repertoires prior and after therapy. We evidence a functional recovery of T cell responsiveness to polyclonal stimuli and expansion of TAAs specific CD8+ T cells using peptide pulsed DCs, with an increase of CTLA-4 and memory effector phenotype after anti-tumor therapy. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and TILs showed that whereas the TCR-Vβ04-02 clonotype is highly expressed in TILs the HER2/neu specific T cells are expressed mainly in blood after therapy, suggesting that this particular TCR was selectively enriched in blood after anti-tumor therapy. Our results show the benefits of anti-tumor therapy in a breast cancer patient with clinical complete response in

  10. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  11. Tumor Architecture and Notch Signaling Modulate Drug Response in Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Markus; Mangelberger, Doris; Swanson, Jacob B; Verhaegen, Monique E; Harms, Paul W; Frohm, Marcus L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2018-02-12

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitors such as vismodegib are highly effective for treating basal cell carcinoma (BCC); however, residual tumor cells frequently persist and regenerate the primary tumor upon drug discontinuation. Here, we show that BCCs are organized into two molecularly and functionally distinct compartments. Whereas interior Hh + /Notch + suprabasal cells undergo apoptosis in response to vismodegib, peripheral Hh +++ /Notch - basal cells survive throughout treatment. Inhibiting Notch specifically promotes tumor persistence without causing drug resistance, while activating Notch is sufficient to regress already established lesions. Altogether, these findings suggest that the three-dimensional architecture of BCCs establishes a natural hierarchy of drug response in the tumor and that this hierarchy can be overcome, for better or worse, by modulating Notch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Proton magnetic spectroscopic imaging of the child's brain: the response of tumors to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Young Poussaint, T.; Astrakas, L.G.; Barnes, P.D.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Black, P.McL.; Anthony, D.C.; Billett, A.L.; Tarbell, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine and/or predict response to treatment of brain tumors in children using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). We studied 24 patients aged 10 months to 24 years, using MRI and point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS; TR 2000 TE 65 ms) with volume preselection and phase-encoding in two dimensions on a 1.5 T imager. Multiple logistic regression was used to establish independent predictors of active tumor growth. Biologically vital cell metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate and choline-containing compounds (Cho), were significantly different between tumor and control tissues (P<0.001). The eight brain tumors which responded to radiation or chemotherapy, exhibited lower Cho (P=0.05), higher total creatine (tCr) (P=0.02) and lower lactate and lipid (L) (P=0.04) than16 tumors which were not treated (except by surgery) or did not respond to treatment. The only significant independent predictor of active tumor growth was tCr (P<0.01). We suggest that tCr is useful in assessing response of brain tumors to treatment. (orig.)

  13. Survivin-specific T-cell reactivity correlates with tumor response and patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads H; Hofmeister-Müller, Valeska

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination directed to induce an anti-tumoral T-cell response is a field of extensive investigation in the treatment of melanoma. However, many vaccination trials in melanoma failed to demonstrate a correlation between the vaccine-specific immune response and therapy outcome. This has...

  14. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may be desirable. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Early Response to a Vascular-Disrupting Agent with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early response of tumors to a vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) VEGF121/recombinant toxin gelonin (rGel) using dynamic [(18)F]FPPRGD2 positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic parameter estimation. Two tumor xenograft models: U87MG (highly vascularized) and A549 (moderately vascularized), were selected, and both were randomized into treatment and control groups. Sixty-minute dynamic PET scans with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 that targets to integrin αvβ3 were performed at days 0 (baseline), 1, and 3 since VEGF121/rGel treatment started. Dynamic PET-derived binding potential (BPND) and parametric maps were compared with tumor uptake (%ID/g) and the static PET image at 1 h after the tracer administration. The growth of U87MG tumor was obviously delayed upon VEGF121/rGel treatment. A549 tumor was not responsive to the same treatment. BPND of treated U87MG tumors decreased significantly at day 1 (p dynamic PET with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 shows advantages in distinguishing effective from ineffective treatment during the course of VEGF121/rGel therapy at early stage and is therefore more sensitive in assessing therapy response than static PET.

  18. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  19. Evaluation of In-111 DTPA-paclitaxel scintigraphy to predict response on murine tumors to paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomio; Li, C.; Yang, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether scintigraphy with 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel could predict the response to chemotherapy with paclitaxel. Ovarian carcinoma (OCA 1), mammary carcinoma (MCA-4), fibrosarcoma (FSA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC VII) were inoculated into the thighs of female C3Hf/Kam mice. Mice bearing 8 mm tumors were treated with paclitaxel (40 mg/kg). The growth delay, which was defined as the time in days for tumors in the treated groups to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter minus the time in days for tumors in the untreated control group to reach the same size, was measured to determine the effect of paclitaxel on the tumors. Sequential scintigraphy in mice bearing 10 to 14 mm tumors was conducted at 5, 30, 60, 120, 240 min and 24 hrs postinjection of 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel (3.7 MBq) or 111 In-DTPA as a control tracer. The tumor uptakes (% injection dose/pixel) were determined. The growth delay of OCA 1, MCA-4, FSA and SCC VII tumors was 13.6, 4.0, -0.02 and -0.28 days, respectively. In other words, OCA 1 and MCA-4 were paclitaxel-sensitive tumors, whereas FSA and SCC VII were paclitaxel-resistant tumors. The tumor uptakes at 24 hrs postinjection of In-111 DTPA paclitaxel of OCA 1, MCA-4, FSA and SCC VII were 1.0 x 10 -3 , 1.6 x 10 -3 , 2.2 x 10 -3 and 9.0 x 10 -3 % injection dose/pixel, respectively. There was no correlation between the response to chemotherapy with paclitaxel and the tumor uptakes of 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel. Scintigraphy with 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel could not predict the response to paclitaxel chemotherapy. Although there was significant accumulation of the paclitaxel in the tumor cells, additional mechanisms must be operative for the agent to be effective against the neoplasm. 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel activity is apparently different from that of paclitaxel with Cremophor. (author)

  20. Radiobiological predictors of tumor and acute normal tissue response in radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skladowski, K.; Zajusz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of measurements of the potential doubling time (T pot. ) and of the survival fraction at 2.0 Gy (SF 2 ), and a method modifying acute radiation response of normal oral mucosa are discussed. Tumor clonogen repopulation accelerates around day 28 of the treatment, and the rate of repopulation is not constant but continuously increases from about 0.3 Gy/day to 1.0-1.3 Gy/day between day 28 and 65 of the treatment. This may suggest that T pot. values decrease correspondingly. The relevance of prior-to-treatment T pot. measurements to clinical situations is discussed. The SF 2 value reflects the intrinsic radiosensitivity of human tumors. The SF 2 values are expected to be valuable as predictors for tumor response to irradiation. Variations in the SF 2 values depending on tumor characteristics and assay methods are discussed in relation to the dose response and tumor cure probability. The effect of modifying the repopulation rate in the oral mucosa by stimulation with a 2% silver nitrate solution is discussed. Although these prognosticators are different in their nature, they might provide a rational basis for selecting patients into optimal irradiation treatment and might allow to modify the radiation response of dose-limiting normal tissues. (author). 5 figs., 1 tab., 28 refs

  1. Semiautomated volumetric response evaluation as an imaging biomarker in superior sulcus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, C.G.; Paul, M.A.; Dahele, M.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S.; Bahce, I.; Smit, E.F.; Thunnissen, E.; Hartemink, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric response to therapy has been suggested as a biomarker for patient-centered outcomes. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was associated with pathological complete response (pCR) or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. The secondary aim was to evaluate a semiautomated method for serial volume assessment. In this retrospective study, treatment outcomes were obtained from a departmental database. The tumor was delineated on the computed tomography (CT) scan used for radiotherapy planning, which was typically performed during the first cycle of chemotherapy. These contours were transferred to the post-chemoradiotherapy diagnostic CT scan using deformable image registration (DIR) with/without manual editing. CT scans from 30 eligible patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 51 months. Neither absolute nor relative reduction in tumor volume following chemoradiotherapy correlated with pCR or 2-year survival. The tumor volumes determined by DIR alone and DIR + manual editing correlated to a high degree (R 2 = 0.99, P < 0.01). Volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was not correlated with pCR or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. DIR-based contour propagation merits further evaluation as a tool for serial volumetric assessment. (orig.)

  2. Tumor necrosis factor blockers influence macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    HARRIS, JAMES; HARRIS, JAMES

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED umor necrosis factor (TNF)?? is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates inflammation in response to various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but is also a key factor in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Three TNF???suppressing drugs have been approved to treat selected autoimmune diseases; 2 are monoclonal antibodies against TNF?? (adalimumab and infliximab), and the other is a soluble TNF receptor/Fc fusion protein (etanerce...

  3. Effect of carbon monoxide breathing on hypoxia and radiation response in the SCCVII tumor in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, C.; Marianne, M.D.; Nordsmark, M.; Khalil, A.A.; Horsman, M.R.; Overgaard, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the influence of a clinically relevant concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) on tumor oxygenation and responses to irradiation. The murine tumor model was the SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma transplanted to the feet of C3H/Km mice. Sixty minutes of breathing CO at 200 ppm resulted in a carboxyhemoglobin level of 15%. This resulted in a reduction in p50 (the oxygen partial pressure at which hemoglobin is 50% saturated) to 78% of the control value, and a decrease in tumor blood perfusion to 73% of the control value. The combined effect of a decrease in effective hemoglobin and blood perfusion resulted in a reduction in tumor oxygen supply to 62% of the control value. In agreement with this, intratumoral pO 2 measurements showed a significant increase in tumor hypoxia, such that the percentage of measurements with low pO 2 (≤ 5 mmHg) increased from 33% to 62%. The fraction of clonogenic hypoxic cells, measured radiobiologically by paired cell survival curves, similarly increased from 0.2% to 3.8%. Radiation sensitivity, evaluated from in vivo-in vitro excision assay, was significantly decreased by CO in 1, 4, 8, and 12 fractions were 0.71, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.71, respectively. The present SCCVII tumor data confirm the general experimental observation that CO breathing significantly increases tumor hypoxia and reduces the effectiveness of ionizing irradiation. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  5. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  6. "The Lower Threshold" phenomenon in tumor cells toward endogenous digitalis-like compounds: Responsible for tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun Weidemann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their first discovery as potential anti-cancer drugs decades ago, there is increasing evidence that digitalis-like compounds (DLC have anti-tumor effects. Less is known about endogenous DLC (EDLC metabolism and regulation. As stress hormones synthesized in and secreted from the adrenal gland, they likely take part in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. In a previous study, we revealed reduced EDLC concentrations in plasma and organs from immune-compromised animals and proposed that a similar situation of a deregulated HPA axis with "adrenal EDLF exhaustion" may contribute to tumorigenesis in chronic stress situations. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that a lowered EDLC response threshold of tumor cells as compared with normal cells increases the risk of tumorigenesis, especially in those individuals with reduced EDLC plasma concentrations after chronic stress exposure. We will evaluate this hypothesis by (a summarizing the effects of different DLC concentrations on tumor as compared with normal cells and (b reviewing some essential differences in the Na/K-ATPase of tumor as compared with normal cells (isoform pattern, pump activity, mutations of other signalosome receptors. We will conclude that (1 tumor cells, indeed, seem to have their individual "physiologic" EDLC response range that already starts at pmolar levels and (2 that individuals with markedly reduced (pmolar EDLC plasma levels are predisposed to cancer because these EDLC concentrations will predominantly stimulate the proliferation of tumor cells. Finally, we will summarize preliminary results from our department supporting this hypothesis.

  7. Quantitative Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J L Schreurs

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize response to photodynamic therapy (PDT in a mouse cancer model using a multi-parametric quantitative MRI protocol and to identify MR parameters as potential biomarkers for early assessment of treatment outcome.CT26.WT colon carcinoma tumors were grown subcutaneously in the hind limb of BALB/c mice. Therapy consisted of intravenous injection of the photosensitizer Bremachlorin, followed by 10 min laser illumination (200 mW/cm2 of the tumor 6 h post injection. MRI at 7 T was performed at baseline, directly after PDT, as well as at 24 h, and 72 h. Tumor relaxation time constants (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were quantified at each time point. Additionally, Gd-DOTA dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI was performed to estimate transfer constants (Ktrans and volume fractions of the extravascular extracellular space (ve using standard Tofts-Kermode tracer kinetic modeling. At the end of the experiment, tumor viability was characterized by histology using NADH-diaphorase staining.The therapy induced extensive cell death in the tumor and resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth, as compared to untreated controls. Tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times remained unchanged up to 24 h, but decreased at 72 h after treatment. Tumor ADC values significantly increased at 24 h and 72 h. DCE-MRI derived tracer kinetic parameters displayed an early response to the treatment. Directly after PDT complete vascular shutdown was observed in large parts of the tumors and reduced uptake (decreased Ktrans in remaining tumor tissue. At 24 h, contrast uptake in most tumors was essentially absent. Out of 5 animals that were monitored for 2 weeks after treatment, 3 had tumor recurrence, in locations that showed strong contrast uptake at 72 h.DCE-MRI is an effective tool for visualization of vascular effects directly after PDT. Endogenous contrast parameters T1, T2, and ADC, measured at 24 to 72 h after PDT, are

  8. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  9. Patterns of DNA damage response in intracranial germ cell tumors versus glioblastomas reflect cell of origin rather than brain environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Krizova, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) machinery becomes commonly activated in response to oncogenes and during early stages of development of solid malignancies, with an exception of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The active DDR signaling evokes cell death or senescence but this anti-tumor barrier ...... checkpoints in intracranial tumorigenesis, with implications for the differential biological responses of diverse tumor types to endogenous stress as well as to genotoxic treatments such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy....

  10. Measuring Response to Therapy by Near-Infrared Imaging of Tumors Using a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging tumors and their response to treatment could be a valuable biomarker toward early assessment of therapy in patients with cancer. Phosphatidylserine (PS is confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in normal cells but is externalized on tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs and tumor cells, and PS exposure is further enhanced in response to radiation and chemotherapy. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a PS-targeting human F(ab'2 antibody fragment, PGN650, to detect exposure of PS in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was measured by near-infrared optical imaging in human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. PGN650 specifically targeted tumors and was shown to target CD31-positive ECs and tumor cells. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was significantly higher in animals pretreated with docetaxel. The peak tumor to normal tissue (T/N ratio of probe was observed at 24 hours postinjection of probe, and tumor binding was detected for at least 120 hours. In repeat dose studies, PGN650 uptake in tumors was significantly higher following pretreatment with docetaxel compared to baseline uptake prior to treatment. PGN650 may be a useful probe to detect PS exposed in tumors and to monitor enhanced PS exposure to optimize therapeutic agents to treat tumors.

  11. Radiographic and metabolic response rates following image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Grills, Inga S.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, Kenneth; Welsh, Robert; Chmielewski, Gary; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiographic and metabolic response after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early lung tumors. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine tumors were treated prospectively with SBRT (dose = 48-60 Gy, 4-5 Fx). Thirty-six cases were primary NSCLC (T1N0 = 67%; T2N0 = 25%); three cases were solitary metastases. Patients were followed using CT and PET at 6, 16, and 52 weeks post-SBRT, with CT follow-up thereafter. RECIST and EORTC criteria were used to evaluate CT and PET responses. Results: At median follow-up of 9 months (0.4-26), RECIST complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and stable disease (SD) rates were 3%, 43%, 54% at 6 weeks; 15%, 38%, 46% at 16 weeks; 27%, 64%, 9% at 52 weeks. Mean baseline tumor volume was reduced by 46%, 70%, 87%, and 96%, respectively at 6, 16, 52, and 72 weeks. Mean baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was 8.3 (1.1-20.3) and reduced to 3.4, 3.0, and 3.7 at 6, 16, and 52 weeks after SBRT. EORTC metabolic CR/PR, SD, and progressive disease rates were 67%, 22%, 11% at 6 weeks; 86%, 10%, 3% at 16 weeks; 95%, 5%, 0% at 52 weeks. Conclusions: SBRT yields excellent RECIST and EORTC based response. Metabolic response is rapid however radiographic response occurs even after 1-year post treatment.

  12. Predicting Response to Chemotherapy based on Tumor Marker Trend in Patients with Testicular Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekulová, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Kocák, I.; Šimíčková, M.; Frgala, T.; Pilný, R.; Valík, D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2004), s. 70 ISSN 1211-8869. [CECHTUMA 2004. 01.10.2004-03.10.2004, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : evaluation of therapy response * model of tumor markers decrease * testicular cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  13. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction-both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Poggi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  15. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  16. Metabolic and hormonal responses of growing modern meat type chickens to fasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study compared the effects of fasting on circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin and glucagon in male and female modern meat-type chickens (Ross 708) at three ages (19 d, 33 d and 47 d). Plasma concentrations of glucose were reduced by fasting with reductions of 24.9% (19-d-old),...

  17. Correlation between dose and tumor response in the radiotherapy of lung cancer of various histological types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Asada, Keiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Correlation between dose and tumor response by cell types was determined in 50 patients with lung cancer in order to predict the possibility of further tumor regression. The TDF (time-dose-fractionation) concept was used as dose factor. The radiation source was a cobalt-60 γ-ray or linear accelerator 10 MV X-ray. As a routine regime a fraction dose of 2 Gy five times per week was given to 39 of the 50 patients, but a dose of 2 Gy three times per week or of 1.5 Gy five times per week was given to seven and four patients, respectively. Radiation response was the best in small cell carcinoma and better in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma, showing a tumor regression rate of 50% or more in 90%, 80% and 58% of the patients, respectively. The correlation between tumor regression rate and TDF values was good in squamous cell carcinoma (r = 0.73) and small cell carcinoma (r = - 0.72), but poor in adenocarcinoma (r = - 0.10). These results suggest that in squamous cell carcinoma improvement of tumor regression can be expected by increasing TDF values, and in adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma the optimal TDF values are about 100 and 60 to 80, respectively. (author)

  18. Ultrasonic RF time series for early assessment of the tumor response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingguang; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Qing; Lin, Chunyi; Guo, Zhixing; Zheng, Wei; Yan, Cuiju; Li, Anhua; Zhou, Jianhua

    2018-01-05

    Ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) time series have been shown to carry tissue typing information. To evaluate the potential of RF time series for early prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy, 50MCF-7 breast cancer-bearing nude mice were randomized to receive cisplatin and paclitaxel (treatment group; n = 26) or sterile saline (control group; n = 24). Sequential ultrasound imaging was performed on days 0, 3, 6, and 8 of treatment to simultaneously collect B-mode images and RF data. Six RF time series features, slope, intercept, S1, S2, S3 , and S4 , were extracted during RF data analysis and contrasted with microstructural tumor changes on histopathology. Chemotherapy administration reduced tumor growth relative to control on days 6 and 8. Compared with day 0, intercept, S1 , and S2 were increased while slope was decreased on days 3, 6, and 8 in the treatment group. Compared with the control group, intercept, S1, S2, S3 , and S4 were increased, and slope was decreased, on days 3, 6, and 8 in the treatment group. Tumor cell density decreased significantly in the latter on day 3. We conclude that ultrasonic RF time series analysis provides a simple way to noninvasively assess the early tumor response to chemotherapy.

  19. Misonidazole in patients receiving radical radiotherapy: pharmacokinetic effects of phenytoin tumor response and neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.L.; Biol, F.I.; Patterson, I.C.M.; Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Henk, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In 1978, a pilot study began of 29 patients with advanced tumors of the head and neck. The study showed an initial peripheral neuropathy rate of 55%, despite a dose limitation of 12 g/m 2 of misonidazole. Tumor response at 9 months was most encouraging. We are now able to examine tumor response and persistence of neuropathy in these patients 2 1/2 years after radical radiotherapy. The results are comparable with those obtained with hyperbaric oxygen in a clinical trial at this center during the 1970's. Neuropathy was a serious side effect but the drug phenytoin has been shown to shorten the half-life of misonidazole. We have examined the effect of phenytoin on the pharmacokinetics of misonidazole in 13 patients who received radical radiotherapy for advanced head and neck tumors or oesophageal tumors. Misonidazole was given in multiple doses, i.e. daily or weekly as it would be used in conventional therapy. Phenytoin was given either daily throughout treatment, or it was withdrawn during treatment. There were dramatic changes in the half-life of misonidazole, but the concentration at the time of irradiation was little affected. The significant changes in the half-life of misonidazole and the increased concentration of the metabolite desmethylmisonidazole are discussed

  20. Poly (I:C) enhances the anti-tumor activity of canine parvovirus NS1 protein by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Tiwari, A K; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P

    2016-09-01

    The canine parvovirus NS1 (CPV2.NS1) protein selectively induces apoptosis in the malignant cells. However, for an effective in vivo tumor treatment strategy, an oncolytic agent also needs to induce a potent anti-tumor immune response. In the present study, we used poly (I:C), a TLR3 ligand, as an adjuvant along with CPV2.NS1 to find out if the combination can enhance the oncolytic activity by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response. The 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells were used to induce mammary tumor in Balb/c mice. The results suggested that poly (I:C), when given along with CPV2.NS1, not only significantly reduced the tumor growth but also augmented the immune response against tumor antigen(s) as indicated by the increase in blood CD4+ and CD8+ counts and infiltration of immune cells in the tumor tissue. Further, blood serum analysis of the cytokines revealed that Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) were significantly upregulated in the treatment group indicating activation of cell-mediated immune response. The present study reports the efficacy of CPV2.NS1 along with poly (I:C) not only in inhibiting the mammary tumor growth but also in generating an active anti-tumor immune response without any visible toxicity. The results of our study may help in developing CPV2.NS1 and poly (I: C) combination as a cancer therapeutic regime to treat various malignancies.

  1. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer

  2. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  3. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  4. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Skeate

    Full Text Available Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  5. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Joseph G; Da Silva, Diane M; Chavez-Juan, Elena; Anand, Snjezana; Nuccitelli, Richard; Kast, W Martin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s) associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  6. PET/MRI of Hepatic 90Y Microsphere Deposition Determines Individual Tumor Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Kathryn J. [Washington University, Department of Radiology (United States); Maughan, Nichole M. [Washington University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Laforest, Richard [Washington University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Saad, Nael E. [Washington University, Department of Radiology (United States); Sharma, Akash [Washington University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey; Speirs, Christina K.; Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: parikh@wustl.edu [Washington University, Department of Radiation Oncology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of our study is to determine if there is a relationship between dose deposition measured by PET/MRI and individual lesion response to yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere radioembolization.Materials and Methods26 patients undergoing lobar treatment with {sup 90}Y microspheres underwent PET/MRI within 66 h of treatment and had follow-up imaging available. Adequate visualization of tumor was available in 24 patients, and contours were drawn on simultaneously acquired PET/MRI data. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were extracted from dose maps, which were generated using a voxelized dose kernel. Similar contours to capture dimensional and volumetric change of tumors were drawn on follow-up imaging. Response was analyzed using both RECIST and volumetric RECIST (vRECIST) criteria.ResultsA total of 8 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 4 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), 9 colorectal metastases (CRC) patients, and 3 patients with other metastatic disease met inclusion criteria. Average dose was useful in predicting response between responders and non-responders for all lesion types and for CRC lesions alone using both response criteria (p < 0.05). D70 (minimum dose to 70 % of volume) was also useful in predicting response when using vRECIST. No significant trend was seen in the other tumor types. For CRC lesions, an average dose of 29.8 Gy offered 76.9 % sensitivity and 75.9 % specificity for response.ConclusionsPET/MRI of {sup 90}Y microsphere distribution showed significantly higher DVH values for responders than non-responders in patients with CRC. DVH analysis of {sup 90}Y microsphere distribution following treatment may be an important predictor of response and could be used to guide future adaptive therapy trials.

  7. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  8. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  9. The effect of hypofractionated radiation and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia on tumor immunogenicity and overall treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Wagner, Robert J.; Song, Ailin; Osterberg, Bjorn; Gladstone, David J.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Giustini, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    It is now known that many tumors develop molecular signals (immune checkpoint modulators) that inhibit an effective tumor immune response. New information also suggest that even well-known cancer treatment modalities such as radiation and hyperthermia generate potentially beneficial immune responses that have been blocked or mitigated by such immune checkpoints, or similar molecules. The cancer therapy challenge is to; a) identify these treatment-based immune signals (proteins, antigens, etc.); b) the treatment doses or regimens that produce them; and c) the mechanisms that block or have the potential to promote them. The goal of this preliminary study, using the B6 mouse - B16 tumor model, clinically relevant radiation doses and fractionation schemes (including those used clinically in hypofractionated radiation therapy), magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) and sophisticated protein, immune and tumor growth analysis techniques and modulators, is to determine the effect of specific radiation or hyperthermia alone and combined on overall treatment efficacy and immunologic response mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that radiation dose (10 Gy vs. 2 Gy) significantly alters the mechanism of cell death (apoptosis vs. mitosis vs. necrosis) and the resulting immunogenicity. Our hypothesis and data suggest this difference is protein/antigen and immune recognition-based. Similarly, our evidence suggest that radiation doses larger than the conventional 2 Gy dose and specific hyperthermia doses and techniques (including mNP hyperthermia treatment) can be immunologically different, and potentially superior to, the radiation and heat therapy regimens that are typically used in research and clinical practice.

  10. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Qian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  11. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  12. Tumor lymphocyte immune response to preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: The LYMPHOREC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjolet, C; Charon-Barra, C; Ladoire, S; Arbez-Gindre, F; Bertaut, A; Ghiringhelli, F; Leroux, A; Peiffert, D; Borg, C; Bosset, J F; Créhange, G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction : Some studies have suggested that baseline tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes (TILs), such as CD8+ and FoxP3+ T-cells, may be associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. We sought to investigate modulation of the immune response by preoperative radiotherapy (preopRT) and its impact on survival in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials & Methods : We analyzed data for 237 patients with LARC who received RT. Density of TILS (CD8+ and FoxP3+) in intraepithelial (iTILs) and stromal compartments (sTILs) were evaluated from surgery pathological specimens and biopsies performed at baseline. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of infiltration of the tumor or tumor site after preopRT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of dose fractionation scheme on TILs. Results : In univariate analysis, several factors significantly correlated (pguide physicians in adjuvant treatment decision-making.

  13. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  14. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  15. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  16. A stressful microenvironment: opposing effects of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the suppression and enhancement of adaptive tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Matthew P; Sertil, Aparna Ranganathan

    2015-03-01

    The recent clinical success of immunotherapy in the treatment of certain types of cancer has demonstrated the powerful ability of the immune system to control tumor growth, leading to significantly improved patient survival. However, despite these promising results current immunotherapeutic strategies are still limited and have not yet achieved broad acceptance outside the context of metastatic melanoma. The limitations of current immunotherapeutic approaches can be attributed in part to suppressive mechanisms present in the tumor microenvironment that hamper the generation of robust antitumor immune responses thus allowing tumor cells to escape immune-mediated destruction. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response has recently emerged as a potent regulator of tumor immunity. The ER stress response is an adaptive mechanism that allows tumor cells to survive in the harsh growth conditions inherent to the tumor milieu such as low oxygen (hypoxia), low pH and low levels of glucose. Activation of ER stress can also alter the cancer cell response to therapies. In addition, the ER stress response promotes tumor immune evasion by inducing the production of protumorigenic inflammatory cytokines and impairing tumor antigen presentation. However, the ER stress response can boost antitumor immunity in some situations by enhancing the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and by inducing the release of immunogenic factors from stressed tumor cells. Here, we discuss the dualistic role of the ER stress response in the modulation of tumor immunity and highlight how strategies to either induce or block ER stress can be employed to improve the clinical efficacy of tumor immunotherapy.

  17. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liya; Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui; Dandan, Chen; Olson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  18. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  19. An operational perspective of challenging statistical dogma while establishing a modern, secure distributed data management and imaging transport system: the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium phase I experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onar, Arzu; Ramamurthy, Uma; Wallace, Dana; Boyett, James M

    2009-04-01

    The Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) is a multidisciplinary cooperative research organization devoted to the study of correlative tumor biology and new therapies for primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors of childhood. The PBTC was created in 1999 to conduct early-phase studies in a rapid fashion in order to provide sound scientific foundation for the Children's Oncology Group to conduct definitive trials. The Operations and Biostatistics Center (OBC) of the PBTC is responsible for centrally administering study design and trial development, study conduct and monitoring, data collection and management as well as various regulatory and compliance processes. The phase I designs utilized for the consortium trials have accommodated challenges unique to pediatric trials such as body surface area (BSA)-based dosing in the absence of pediatric formulations of oral agents. Further during the past decade, the OBC has developed and implemented a state-of-the-art secure and efficient internet-based paperless distributed data management system. Additional web-based systems are also in place for tracking and distributing correlative study data as well as neuroimaging files. These systems enable effective communications among the members of the consortium and facilitate the conduct and timely reporting of multi-institutional early-phase clinical trials.

  20. Nanomedicine targeting the tumor microenvironment: Therapeutic strategies to inhibit angiogenesis, remodel matrix, and modulate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Siegler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to the tumor microenvironment (TME, which includes cellular and structural components such as fibroblasts, immune cells, vasculature, and extracellular matrix (ECM that surround tumor sites. These components contribute to tumor growth and metastasis and are one reason why traditional chemotherapy often is insufficient to eradicate the tumor completely. Newer treatments that target aspects of the TME, such as antiangiogenic and immunostimulatory therapies, have seen limited clinical success despite promising preclinical results. This can be attributed to a number of reasons, including a lack of drug penetration deeper into the necrotic tumor core, nonspecific delivery, rapid clearance from serum, or toxic side effects at high doses. Nanoparticles offer a potential solution to all of these obstacles, and many recent studies have shown encouraging results using nanomedicine to target TME vasculature, ECM, and immune response. While few of these platforms have made it to clinical trials to date, these strategies are relatively new and may offer a way to improve the effects of anticancer therapies.

  1. Assessment of biophysical tumor response to PDT in pancreatic cancer using localized reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, Martin; Klubben, William; He, Ting; Laughney, Ashley M.; Glaser, Adam; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    Biophysical changes such as inflammation and necrosis occur immediately following PDT and may be used to assess the treatment response to PDT treatment in-vivo. This study uses localized reflectance measurements to quantify the scatter changes in tumor tissue occurring in response to verteporfin-based PDT treatment in xenograft pancreas tumors. Nude mice were implanted with subcutaneous AsPC-1 pancreatic tumors cells in matrigel, and allowed to establish solid tumors near 100mm3 volume. The mice were sensitized with 1mg/kg of the active component of verteporfin (benzoporphryin derivative, BPD), one hour before light delivery. The optical irradiation was performed using a 1 cm cylindrical interstitial diffusing tip fiber with 20J of red light (690nm). Tumor tissue was excised progressively and imaged, from 1 day to 4 weeks, after PDT treatment. The tissue sections were stained and analyzed by an expert veterinary pathologist, who provided information on tissue regions of interest. This information was correlated with variations in scattering and absorption parameters elucidated from the spectral images and the degree of necrosis and inflammation involvement was identified. Areas of necrosis and dead cells exhibited the lowest average scatter irradiance signature (3.78 and 4.07 respectively) compared to areas of viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (5.81 and 7.19 respectively). Bilirubin absorbance parameters also showed a lower absorbance value in necrotic tissue and areas of dead cells (0.05 and 0.1 respectively) compared to tissue areas for viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (0.28 and 0.35). These results demonstrate that localized reflectance spectroscopy is an imaging modality that can be used to identify tissue features associated with PDT treatment (e.g. necrosis and inflammation) that can be correlated with histopathologically-reviewed H&E stained slides. Further study of this technique may provide means for automated

  2. Neutrophils responsive to endogenous IFN-beta regulate tumor angiogenesis and growth in a mouse tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jadwiga; Leschner, Sara; Westphal, Kathrin; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried

    2010-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of malignant neoplasias, as the formation of new blood vessels is required for tumors to acquire oxygen and nutrients essential for their continued growth and metastasis. However, the signaling pathways leading to tumor vascularization are not fully understood. Here, using a transplantable mouse tumor model, we have demonstrated that endogenous IFN-beta inhibits tumor angiogenesis through repression of genes encoding proangiogenic and homing factors in tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. We determined that IFN-beta-deficient mice injected with B16F10 melanoma or MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells developed faster-growing tumors with better-developed blood vessels than did syngeneic control mice. These tumors displayed enhanced infiltration by CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils expressing elevated levels of the genes encoding the proangiogenic factors VEGF and MMP9 and the homing receptor CXCR4. They also expressed higher levels of the transcription factors c-myc and STAT3, known regulators of VEGF, MMP9, and CXCR4. In vitro, treatment of these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils with low levels of IFN-beta restored expression of proangiogenic factors to control levels. Moreover, depletion of these neutrophils inhibited tumor growth in both control and IFN-beta-deficient mice. We therefore suggest that constitutively produced endogenous IFN-beta is an important mediator of innate tumor surveillance. Further, we believe our data help to explain the therapeutic effect of IFN treatment during the early stages of cancer development.

  3. Fractional laser exposure induces neutrophil infiltration (N1 phenotype into the tumor and stimulates systemic anti-tumor immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Kawakubo

    Full Text Available Ablative fractional photothermolysis (aFP using a CO2 laser generates multiple small diameter tissue lesions within the irradiation field. aFP is commonly used for a wide variety of dermatological indications, including treatment of photodamaged skin and dyschromia, drug delivery and modification of scars due to acne, surgical procedures and burns. In this study we explore the utility of aFP for treating oncological indications, including induction of local tumor regression and inducing anti-tumor immunity, which is in marked contrast to current indications of aFP.We used a fractional CO2 laser to treat a tumor established by BALB/c colon carcinoma cell line (CT26.CL25, which expressed a tumor antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal. aFP treated tumors grew significantly slower as compared to untreated controls. Complete remission after a single aFP treatment was observed in 47% of the mice. All survival mice from the tumor inoculation rejected re-inoculation of the CT26.CL25 colon carcinoma cells and moreover 80% of the survival mice rejected CT26 wild type colon carcinoma cells, which are parental cells of CT26.CL25 cells. Histologic section of the FP-treated tumors showed infiltrating neutrophil in the tumor early after aFP treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes showed aFP treatment abrogated the increase in regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg, which suppresses anti-tumor immunity and elicited the expansion of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which were required to mediate the tumor-suppressing effect of aFP.We have demonstrated that aFP is able to induce a systemic anti-tumor adaptive immunity preventing tumor recurrence in a murine colon carcinoma in a mouse model. This study demonstrates a potential role of aFP treatments in oncology and further studies should be performed.

  4. POLE proofreading mutations elicit an anti-tumor immune response in endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Inge C; Eggink, Florine A; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Stelloo, Ellen; Marchi, Emanuele; de Bruyn, Marco; Palles, Claire; Nout, Remi A; de Kroon, Cor D; Osse, Elisabeth M; Klenerman, Paul; Creutzberg, Carien L; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Smit, Vincent THBM; Nijman, Hans W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown that 7-12% of endometrial cancers (ECs) are ultramutated due to somatic mutation in the proofreading exonuclease domain of the DNA replicase POLE. Interestingly, these tumors have an excellent prognosis. In view of the emerging data linking mutation burden, immune response and clinical outcome in cancer, we investigated whether POLE-mutant ECs showed evidence of increased immunogenicity. Experimental design We examined immune infiltration and activation according to tumor POLE proofreading mutation in a molecularly defined EC cohort including 47 POLE-mutant tumors. We sought to confirm our results by analysis of RNAseq data from the TCGA EC series and used the same series to examine whether differences in immune infiltration could be explained by an enrichment of immunogenic neoepitopes in POLE-mutant ECs. Results Compared to other ECs, POLE-mutants displayed an enhanced cytotoxic T cell response, evidenced by increased numbers of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and CD8A expression, enrichment for a tumor-infiltrating T cell gene signature, and strong upregulation of the T cell cytotoxic differentiation and effector markers T-bet, Eomes, IFNG, PRF and granzyme B. This was accompanied by upregulation of T cell exhaustion markers, consistent with chronic antigen exposure. In-silico analysis confirmed that POLE-mutant cancers are predicted to display more antigenic neo-epitopes than other ECs, providing a potential explanation for our findings. Conclusions Ultramutated POLE proofreading-mutant ECs are characterized by a robust intratumoral T cell response, which correlates with, and may be caused by an enrichment of antigenic neo-peptides. Our study provides a plausible mechanism for the excellent prognosis of these cancers. PMID:25878334

  5. Solid tumor models for the assessment of different treatment modalities. XIV. The evaluation of host and tumor response to cyclophosphamide and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, W.B.; Hopkins, H.A.; MacLeod, M.S.; Ritenour, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of cyclophosphamide (50 to 250 mg/kg) on the time of occurrence of maximal and minimal tumor growth rates, tumor volume reduction, and linear doubling times (LDT) on the solid tumor model H-4-II-E has been determined. Tumor response to cyclophosphamide was classified as class I, tumor regression; class II, pseudo-regression; and class III, slow-down. The overall treatment efficiency (OTE) has been used to assess the magnitude of tumor volume changes after treatment. The maximum OTE occurred after 150 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Increasing the dose to 200 and 250 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide resulted in a decrease in OTE. Similar parameters were utilized to measure the effectiveness of increasing doses of local tumor radiation (750, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 and 3500R). The major increase in OTE occurs when the radiation dose is increased from 750R to 2000R. Increasing the dose further to 3500R results in smaller incremental increases in the OTE. Results of the study indicate that increasing the cyclophosphamide dose beyond a certain level (i.e., 150 mg/kg) increases mortality and morbidity without concomitant therapeutic benefit. The effects of increasing the dose of local tumor radiation on life span have given results which suggest that increasing the total radiation dose beyond a certain limit is less effective in increasing life span

  6. Macrophage and tumor cell responses to repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldakov, M. A.; Tretyakova, M. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Klimov, I. A.; Kutenkov, O. P.; Kzhyshkowska, J.; Bol'shakov, M. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    To study a response of tumor cells and macrophages to the repetitive pulsed low-dose X-ray radiation. Methods. Tumor growth and lung metastasis of mice with an injected Lewis lung carcinoma were analysed, using C57Bl6. Monocytes were isolated from a human blood, using CD14+ magnetic beads. IL6, IL1-betta, and TNF-alpha were determined by ELISA. For macrophage phenotyping, a confocal microscopy was applied. “Sinus-150” was used for the generation of pulsed X-ray radiation (the absorbed dose was below 0.1 Gy, the pulse repetition frequency was 10 pulse/sec). The irradiation of mice by 0.1 Gy pulsed X-rays significantly inhibited the growth of primary tumor and reduced the number of metastatic colonies in the lung. Furthermore, the changes in macrophage phenotype and cytokine secretion were observed after repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation. Conclusion. Macrophages and tumor cells had a different response to a low-dose pulsed X-ray radiation. An activation of the immune system through changes of a macrophage phenotype can result in a significant antitumor effect of the low-dose repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation.

  7. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of breast tumor response to chemotherapy using a multi-parameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Gangeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Tran, William; Trudeau, Maureen E; Pritchard, Kathleen; Ghandi, Sonal; Verma, Sunil; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2016-07-19

    This study demonstrated the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in providing an early prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Using a 6-MHz array transducer, ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected from 58 LABC patients prior to NAC treatment and at weeks 1, 4, and 8 of their treatment, and prior to surgery. QUS parameters including midband fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS), spectral intercept (SI), spacing among scatterers (SAS), attenuation coefficient estimate (ACE), average scatterer diameter (ASD), and average acoustic concentration (AAC) were determined from the tumor region of interest. Ultrasound data were compared with the ultimate clinical and pathological response of the patient's tumor to treatment and patient recurrence-free survival. Multi-parameter discriminant analysis using the κ-nearest-neighbor classifier demonstrated that the best response classification could be achieved using the combination of MBF, SS, and SAS, with an accuracy of 60 ± 10% at week 1, 77 ± 8% at week 4 and 75 ± 6% at week 8. Furthermore, when the QUS measurements at each time (week) were combined with pre-treatment (week 0) QUS values, the classification accuracies improved (70 ± 9% at week 1, 80 ± 5% at week 4, and 81 ± 6% at week 8). Finally, the multi-parameter QUS model demonstrated a significant difference in survival rates of responding and non-responding patients at weeks 1 and 4 (p=0.035, and 0.027, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time, using new parameters tested on relatively large patient cohort and leave-one-out classifier evaluation, that a hybrid QUS biomarker including MBF, SS, and SAS could, with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, detect the response of LABC tumors to NAC as early as after 4 weeks of therapy. The findings of this study also suggested that incorporating pre-treatment QUS parameters of a tumor improved the

  8. Applying modern psychometric techniques to melodic discrimination testing: Item response theory, computerised adaptive testing, and automatic item generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Peter M C; Collins, Tom; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2017-06-15

    Modern psychometric theory provides many useful tools for ability testing, such as item response theory, computerised adaptive testing, and automatic item generation. However, these techniques have yet to be integrated into mainstream psychological practice. This is unfortunate, because modern psychometric techniques can bring many benefits, including sophisticated reliability measures, improved construct validity, avoidance of exposure effects, and improved efficiency. In the present research we therefore use these techniques to develop a new test of a well-studied psychological capacity: melodic discrimination, the ability to detect differences between melodies. We calibrate and validate this test in a series of studies. Studies 1 and 2 respectively calibrate and validate an initial test version, while Studies 3 and 4 calibrate and validate an updated test version incorporating additional easy items. The results support the new test's viability, with evidence for strong reliability and construct validity. We discuss how these modern psychometric techniques may also be profitably applied to other areas of music psychology and psychological science in general.

  9. Tumor necrosis is an important hallmark of aggressive endometrial cancer and associates with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredholt, Geir; Mannelqvist, Monica; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Birkeland, Even; Bø, Trond Hellem; Øyan, Anne M; Trovik, Jone; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Jonassen, Inge; Salvesen, Helga B; Wik, Elisabeth; Akslen, Lars A

    2015-11-24

    Tumor necrosis is associated with aggressive features of endometrial cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated gene expression patterns and potential treatment targets related to presence of tumor necrosis in primary endometrial cancer lesions. By DNA microarray analysis, expression of genes related to tumor necrosis reflected multiple tumor-microenvironment interactions like tissue hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. A tumor necrosis signature of 38 genes and a related patient cluster (Cluster I, 67% of the cases) were associated with features of aggressive tumors such as type II cancers, estrogen receptor negative tumors and vascular invasion. Further, the tumor necrosis signature was increased in tumor cells grown in hypoxic conditions in vitro. Multiple genes with increased expression are known to be activated by HIF1A and NF-kB. Our findings indicate that the presence of tumor necrosis within primary tumors is associated with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses. HIF1A, NF-kB and PI3K/mTOR might be potential treatment targets in aggressive endometrial cancers with presence of tumor necrosis.

  10. Assessment of therapeutic response and treatment planning for brain tumors using metabolic and physiological MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-07-01

    MRI is routinely used for diagnosis, treatment planning and assessment of response to therapy for patients with glioma. Gliomas are spatially heterogeneous and infiltrative lesions that are quite variable in terms of their response to therapy. Patients classified as having low-grade histology have a median overall survival of 7 years or more, but need to be monitored carefully to make sure that their tumor does not upgrade to a more malignant phenotype. Patients with the most aggressive grade IV histology have a median overall survival of 12-15 months and often undergo multiple surgeries and adjuvant therapies in an attempt to control their disease. Despite improvements in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of anatomic images, there remain considerable ambiguities in the interpretation of changes in the size of the gadolinium-enhancing lesion on T(1) -weighted images as a measure of treatment response, and in differentiating between treatment effects and infiltrating tumor within the larger T(2) lesion. The planning of focal therapies, such as surgery, radiation and targeted drug delivery, as well as a more reliable assessment of the response to therapy, would benefit considerably from the integration of metabolic and physiological imaging techniques into routine clinical MR examinations. Advanced methods that have been shown to provide valuable data for patients with glioma are diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric examinations that include the acquisition of such data are able to assess tumor cellularity, hypoxia, disruption of normal tissue architecture, changes in vascular density and vessel permeability, in addition to the standard measures of changes in the volume of enhancing and nonenhancing anatomic lesions. This is particularly critical for the interpretation of the results of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials of novel therapies, which are increasingly including agents that are designed to have anti-angiogenic and anti

  11. Activation of Anti-tumor Immune Response by Ablation of HCC with Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobo; Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Ruiqing; Miao, Xudong; Chen, Xinhua

    2018-03-28

    Locoregional therapy is playing an increasingly important role in the non-surgical management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The novel technique of non-thermal electric ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field has been recognized as a potential locoregional methodology for indicated HCC. This manuscript explores the most recent studies to indicate its unique anti-tumor immune response. The possible immune mechanism, termed as nano-pulse stimulation, was also analyzed.

  12. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  13. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  14. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W. [University of Maryland School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  15. Strategies to Genetically Modulate Dendritic Cells to Potentiate Anti-Tumor Responses in Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelisa M. Cornel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC vaccination has been investigated as a potential strategy to target hematologic malignancies, while generating sustained immunological responses to control potential future relapse. Nonetheless, few clinical trials have shown robust long-term efficacy. It has been suggested that a combination of surmountable shortcomings, such as selection of utilized DC subsets, DC loading and maturation strategies, as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression may be targeted to maximize anti-tumor responses of DC vaccines. Generation of DC from CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs may provide potential in patients undergoing allogeneic HSPC transplantations for hematologic malignancies. CD34+ HSPC from the graft can be genetically modified to optimize antigen presentation and to provide sufficient T cell stimulatory signals. We here describe beneficial (gene-modifications that can be implemented in various processes in T cell activation by DC, among which major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and MHC class II presentation, DC maturation and migration, cross-presentation, co-stimulation, and immunosuppression to improve anti-tumor responses.

  16. The electrification of Nova Scotia, 1884--1973: Technological modernization as a response to regional disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lionel Bradley

    This dissertation investigates local attempts to use technology as a force for regional rehabilitation in the economically-depressed Maritime region of Canada. At the time of Confederation in 1867, the Maritime province of Nova Scotia was prosperous, progressive, and cultured. By the end of the 1910s, the province had entered a long period of economic and social decline. Recent historiography has shown that, far from passively accepting their fate, Nova Scotians and other Maritimers, actively resisted marginalization with political, cultural, or social action. The thesis expands upon that literature by exploring technology-based strategies of provincial rehabilitation using Thomas P. Hughes's systems perspective and David E. Nye's semiotic approach. In doing so, it applies methods from the social constructivist school of the history of technology to the larger concerns of Maritime Canadian historiography. In large part, the North American culture of technology determined the ways in which Nova Scotians applied technological solutions to provincial concerns. Technology has long been central to the Western idea of progress. As the "high technology" of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, electricity reinforced that view: its ephemeral nature and silent efficiency led people to endow it with transformative, even mystical, powers. As a result, Nova Scotians, adopted a program of electrical modernization in the late 1910s as a remedy for regional disparity. The Nova Scotia government's first step was the creation of an Ontario-style hydroelectric commission designed to bring order to the province's fragmented and inefficient electrical network. Over the next few decades, the Nova Scotia Power Commission implemented rural electrification, home modernization, and regional system-building models that had already proven successful in Ontario and the United States. The system-building philosophies behind these programs were adapted to local conditions and

  17. Treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma with use of 90Y microspheres (TheraSphere): safety, tumor response, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J; Atassi, Bassel; Gordon, Stuart C; Gates, Vanessa L; Barakat, Omar; Sergie, Ziad; Wong, Ching-Yee O; Thurston, Kenneth G

    2005-12-01

    To present safety and efficacy results obtained in treatment of a cohort of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with use of 90Y microspheres (TheraSphere). Forty-three consecutive patients with HCC were treated with 90Y microspheres over a 4-year period. Patients were treated by liver segment or lobe on one or more occasions based on tumor distribution, liver function, and vascular flow dynamics. Patients were followed for adverse events, objective tumor response, and survival. Patients were stratified into three risk groups according to method of treatment and risk stratification (group 0, segmental; group 1, lobar low-risk; group 2, lobar high-risk) and Okuda and Child-Pugh scoring systems. Based on follow-up data from 43 treated patients, 20 patients (47%) had an objective tumor response based on percent reduction in tumor size and 34 patients (79%) had a tumor response when percent reduction and/or tumor necrosis were used as a composite measure of tumor response. There was no statistical difference among the three risk groups with respect to tumor response. Survival times from date of diagnosis were different among the risk groups (P TheraSpheres) provides a safe and effective method of treatment for a broad spectrum of patients presenting with unresectable HCC. Further investigation is warranted.

  18. The use of PET in assessing tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Daisy; Joon, Daryl Lim; Chao, Michael; Wada, Morikatsu; Joon, Michael Lim; See, Andrew; Feigen, Malcolm; Jenkins, Patricia; Mercuri, Angelina; McNamara, Joanne; Poon, Aurora; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of 18F-FDG-PET (PET) response to pathological response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were identified between 2001 and 2005. The median age was 57 years (range 37-72) with 14 males and 6 females. All patients were staged with endorectal ultrasound and/or MRI, CT, and PET. The clinical staging was T3N0M0 (16), T3N1M0 (2), and T3N0M1 (2). Restaging PET was performed after CRT, and prior to definitive surgery. The response on PET and pathology was assessed and correlated. Patient outcome according to PET response was also assessed. Results: Following CRT, a complete PET response occurred in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10, and no response in 3 patients. At surgery, complete pathological response was recorded in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10 and no response in 3. There was a good correlation of PET and pathological responses in complete responders (5/7 cases) and non-responders (3/3 cases). After a median follow-up of 62 months (range 7-73), twelve patients were alive with no evidence of disease. All patients achieving complete metabolic response were alive with no evidence of disease, while as those who had no metabolic response, all died as a result of metastatic disease. Conclusions: PET is a promising complementary assessment tool for assessing tumor response after CRT if there is a complete or no response. PET response may also predict for outcome.

  19. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  20. Dual responsive promoters to target therapeutic gene expression to radiation-resistant hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, Naomi; Cowen, Rachel L.; Sheppard, Freda C.D.; Robinson, Suzanne; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon D.; Stratford, Ian J.; Patterson, Adam V.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is unequivocally linked to poor radiotherapy outcome. This study aimed to identify enhancer sequences that respond maximally to a combination of radiation and hypoxia for use in genetic radiotherapy approaches. Methods and materials: The influence of radiation (5 Gy) and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) on reporter-gene expression driven by hypoxia (HRE) and radiation (Egr-1) responsive elements was evaluated in tumor cells grown as monolayers or multicellular spheroids. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α protein expression was monitored in parallel. Results: Of the sequences tested, an HRE from the phosphoglycerate kinase-1 gene (PGK-18[5+]) was maximally induced in response to hypoxia plus radiation in all 5 cell lines tested. The additional radiation treatment afforded a significant increase in the induction of PGK-18[5+] compared with hypoxia alone in 3 cell lines. HIF-1α/2α were induced by radiation but combined hypoxia/radiation treatment did not yield a further increase. The dual responsive nature of HREs was maintained when spheroids were irradiated after delivery of HRE constructs in a replication-deficient adenovirus. Conclusions: Hypoxia-responsive enhancer element sequences are dually responsive to combined radiation and hypoxic treatment. Their use in genetic radiotherapy in vivo could maximize expression in the most radio-resistant population at the time of radiation and also exploit microenvironmental changes after radiotherapy to yield additional switch-on

  1. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  2. Expression of most matrix metalloproteinase family members in breast cancer represents a tumor-induced host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, K. J.; Matrisian, L. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Rodgers, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members have been associated with advanced-stage cancer and contribute to tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis as determined by inhibitor studies. In situ hybridization was performed to analyze the expression and localization of all known MMPs in a series of human breast cancer biopsy specimens. Most MMPs were localized to tumor stroma, and all MMPs had very distinct expression patterns. Matrilysin was expressed by morphologically normal epithelial ducts within tumors and in tissue from reduction mammoplasties, and by epithelial-derived tumor cells. Many family members, including stromelysin-3, gelatinase A, MT-MMP, interstitial collagenase, and stromelysin-1 were localized to fibroblasts of tumor stroma of invasive cancers but in quite distinct, and generally widespread, patterns. Gelatinase B, collagenase-3, and metalloelastase expression were more focal; gelatinase B was primarily localized to endothelial cells, collagenase-3 to isolated tumor cells, and metalloelastase to cytokeratin-negative, macrophage-like cells. The MMP inhibitor, TIMP-1, was expressed in both stromal and tumor components in most tumors, and neither stromelysin-2 nor neutrophil collagenase were detected in any of the tumors. These results indicate that there is very tight and complex regulation in the expression of MMP family members in breast cancer that generally represents a host response to the tumor and emphasize the need to further evaluate differential functions for MMP family members in breast tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8686751

  3. Onconase-induced changes in radiation response and physiological parameters in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Shui, C.; Shogen, K.; Mikulski, S.M.; Nunno, M.; Wallner, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Onconase (ONC), previously known as P-30 protein, is a novel basic amphibian protein isolated from eggs of the leopard frog. The original study conducted by Darzynkiewicz et al. (Cell Tissue Kinetics, 1988) demonstrated that ONC shows anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activities against several tumor cell lines in vitro. Since then, to our knowledge, no studies regarding the inhibitory effect of ONC in solid tumor models were performed. ONC is also known to inhibit cell-cycle progression from the radiation-sensitive G 1 phase to the radiation-resistant S phase. Thus, we examined the effect of ONC as a potential radiation sensitizer. The radiation response and physiological parameters were evaluated in C3H mice and/or nude mice bearing various (murine and/or human) tumor models. Materials and Method: First, we examined the effect of ONC on the cellular proliferative, as well as the clonogenic, response of various cell lines (i.e., H4IIE rat hepatoma, AsPC-1 human pancreas adenocarcinoma, DU145 human prostate carcinoma, LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma, A549 human lung carcinoma, MCaIV murine adenocarcinoma, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma, and CCL-209 bovine artery pulmonary endothelial cells) by using the MTT and clonogenic cell survival assays. Second, we determined the enhancement of radiation response before, during, and after treatment with ONC in several cell lines. Third, we determined whether ONC can inhibit the growth of solid tumors in vivo (i.e., FSaII and MCaIV in C3H mice, LS174T in nude mice). Fourth, we examined whether minocycline, an antiangiogenic agent, could amplify the tumoricidal efficacy of ONC in solid tumors. To test our hypothesis: if ONC could eradicate the outgrowth of tumor cells in confined spaces, it could lower the elevated pressure in solid tumors, we measured tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) using the wick-in-needle method, and systemic pressure using the right carotid artery cannulation method after treatment with ONC

  4. A clinical and radiological objective tumor response with somatostatin analogs (SSA in well-differentiated neuroendocrine metastatic tumor of the ileum: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Divitiis C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chiara De Divitiis,1 Claudia von Arx,2 Roberto Carbone,3 Fabiana Tatangelo,4 Elena di Girolamo,5 Giovanni Maria Romano,1 Alessandro Ottaiano,1 Elisabetta de Lutio di Castelguidone,3 Rosario Vincenzo Iaffaioli,1 Salvatore Tafuto1 On behalf of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS Center of Excellence Multidisciplinary Group for Neuroendocrine Tumors in Naples (Italy 1Department of Abdominal Oncology, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Endoscopy, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G Pascale”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Somatostatin analogs (SSAs are typically used to treat the symptoms caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs, but they are not used as the primary treatment to induce tumor shrinkage. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a symptomatic metastatic NET of the ileum. Complete symptomatic response was achieved after 1 month of treatment with SSAs. In addition, there was an objective response in the liver, with the disappearance of secondary lesions noted on computed tomography scan after 3 months of octreotide treatment. Our experience suggests that SSAs could be useful for downstaging and/or downsizing well-differentiated NETs, and they could allow surgery to be performed. Such presurgery therapy could be a promising tool in the management of patients with initially inoperable NETs. Keywords: neuroendocrine tumor, somatostatin analogs, octreotide, metastatic tumor of the ileum, radiological tumor response

  5. RESPONSIBLE SELF-CARE – THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES AND PLACE IN THE MODERN RUSSIAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tolpygina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in the prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases is a significant problem for both patients and the health system. According to the World Health Organization "Promoting effective responsible self-care ... is essential to reduce the financial burden on health systems". The term "responsible self-care" means "self-help" and "self-care". The concept of responsible self-care is to create conditions and prerequisites for forming a responsible attitude to own health, children's and family's health by maintaining a healthy lifestyle, wider and more competent use of over-the-counter medication for the prevention or self-care of the trifling ailment and chronic non-communicable diseases, continuing the therapy prescribed by the doctor. Changes in the legislative framework, coordinated activity of medical workers of various levels and specialties, as well as improvement of medical literacy of the population are necessary for the implementation of the practice of responsible self-care in Russia. Promotion of healthy lifestyles and the personal responsibility of people for their health in the media and Internet resources, self-monitoring of the status and basic health indicators, increasing adherence of patients to prescribed medicines for the treatment of chronic diseases based on gained medical know-ledge, skills and habits are the most applicable measures for Russia to date.

  6. Anti-tumor response with immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Zhou, Feifan; Boarman, Ellen; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    While successes of different cancer therapies have been achieved in various degrees a systemic immune response is needed to effectively treat late-stage, metastatic cancers, and to establish long-term tumor resistance in the patients. A novel method for combating metastatic cancers has been developed using immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy. Glycated chitosan (GC) is a potent immunological adjuvant capable of increasing host immune responses, including antigen presentation by activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and causing T cell proliferation. GC is also an effective surfactant for nanomaterials. By combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and GC, immunologically modified carbon nanotubes (SWNT-GC) were constructed. The SWNT-GC suspension retains the enhanced light absorption properties in the near infrared (NIR) region and the ability to enter cells, which are characteristic of SWNTs. The SWNT-GC also retains the immunological properties of GC. Cellular SWNT-GC treatments increased macrophage activity, DC activation and T cell proliferation. When cellular SWNT-GC was irradiated with a laser of an appropriate wavelength, these immune activities could be enhanced. The combination of laser irradiation and SWNT-GC induced cellular toxicity in targeted tumor cells, leading to a systemic antitumor response. Immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy is a novel and promising method to produce a systemic immune response for the treatment of metastatic cancers.

  7. Tumor Cell-Free DNA Copy Number Instability Predicts Therapeutic Response to Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Beck, Julia; Braun, Donald P; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kristen; Barilla, Heather; Cubello, Rhiannon; Quan, Walter; Sangal, Ashish; Khemka, Vivek; Waypa, Jordan; Mitchell, William M; Urnovitz, Howard; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: Chromosomal instability is a fundamental property of cancer, which can be quantified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) from plasma/serum-derived cell-free DNA (cfDNA). We hypothesized that cfDNA could be used as a real-time surrogate for imaging analysis of disease status as a function of response to immunotherapy and as a more reliable tool than tumor biomarkers. Experimental Design: Plasma cfDNA sequences from 56 patients with diverse advanced cancers were prospectively collected and analyzed in a single-blind study for copy number variations, expressed as a quantitative chromosomal number instability (CNI) score versus 126 noncancer controls in a training set of 23 and a blinded validation set of 33. Tumor biomarker concentrations and a surrogate marker for T regulatory cells (Tregs) were comparatively analyzed. Results: Elevated CNI scores were observed in 51 of 56 patients prior to therapy. The blinded validation cohort provided an overall prediction accuracy of 83% (25/30) and a positive predictive value of CNI score for progression of 92% (11/12). The combination of CNI score before cycle (Cy) 2 and 3 yielded a correct prediction for progression in all 13 patients. The CNI score also correctly identified cases of pseudo-tumor progression from hyperprogression. Before Cy2 and Cy3, there was no significant correlation for protein tumor markers, total cfDNA, or surrogate Tregs. Conclusions: Chromosomal instability quantification in plasma cfDNA can serve as an early indicator of response to immunotherapy. The method has the potential to reduce health care costs and disease burden for cancer patients following further validation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(17); 5074-81. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  9. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  10. Correlations of noninvasive BOLD and TOLD MRI with pO2 and relevance to tumor radiation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallac, Rami R; Zhou, Heling; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Song, Kwang; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Zhao, Dawen; Solberg, Timothy; Peschke, Peter; Mason, Ralph P

    2014-05-01

    To examine the potential use of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and tissue oxygenation level dependent (TOLD) contrast MRI to assess tumor oxygenation and predict radiation response. BOLD and TOLD MRI were performed on Dunning R3327-AT1 rat prostate tumors during hyperoxic gas breathing challenge at 4.7 T. Animals were divided into two groups. In Group 1 (n = 9), subsequent (19) F MRI based on spin lattice relaxation of hexafluorobenzene reporter molecule provided quantitative oximetry for comparison. For Group 2 rats (n = 13) growth delay following a single dose of 30 Gy was compared with preirradiation BOLD and TOLD assessments. Oxygen (100%O2 ) and carbogen (95%O2 /5%CO2 ) challenge elicited similar BOLD, TOLD and pO2 responses. Strong correlations were observed between BOLD or R2* response and quantitative (19) F pO2 measurements. TOLD response showed a general trend with weaker correlation. Irradiation caused a significant tumor growth delay and tumors with larger changes in TOLD and R1 values upon oxygen breathing exhibited significantly increased tumor growth delay. These results provide further insight into the relationships between oxygen sensitive (BOLD/TOLD) MRI and tumor pO2 . Moreover, a larger increase in R1 response to hyperoxic gas challenge coincided with greater tumor growth delay following irradiation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Art expertise modulates the emotional response to modern art, especially abstract: an ERP investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Else, Jane E.; Ellis, Jason; Orme, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Art is one of life’s great joys, whether it is beautiful, ugly, sublime or shocking. Aesthetic responses to visual art involve sensory, cognitive and visceral processes. Neuroimaging studies have yielded a wealth of information regarding aesthetic appreciation and beauty using visual art as stimuli, but few have considered the effect of expertise on visual and visceral responses. To study the time course of visual, cognitive and emotional processes in response to visual art we investigated the event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited whilst viewing and rating the visceral affect of three categories of visual art. Two groups, artists and non-artists viewed representational, abstract and indeterminate 20th century art. Early components, particularly the N1, related to attention and effort, and the P2, linked to higher order visual processing, was enhanced for artists when compared to non-artists. This effect was present for all types of art, but further enhanced for abstract art (AA), which was rated as having lowest visceral affect by the non-artists. The later, slow wave processes (500–1000 ms), associated with arousal and sustained attention, also show clear differences between the two groups in response to both type of art and visceral affect. AA increased arousal and sustained attention in artists, whilst it decreased in non-artists. These results suggest that aesthetic response to visual art is affected by both expertise and semantic content. PMID:27242497

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility, social contract, corporate personhood and human rights law: Understanding the emerging responsibilities of modern corporations

    OpenAIRE

    Amao, O

    2008-01-01

    Copyright @ 2008 Olufemi Amao. The social contract theory has been advanced as a theoretical basis for explaining the emerging practice of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by corporations. Since the 17th century the social contract concept has also been used to justify human rights. The concept is the constitutional foundation of many western states starting with England, US and France. Business ethicists and philosophers have tried to construct and analyse the social responsibility o...

  13. Molecular analysis of urothelial cancer cell lines for modeling tumor biology and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, M L; Witte, N; Im, K M; Turan, S; Owens, C; Misner, K; Tsang, S X; Cai, Z; Wu, S; Dean, M; Costello, J C; Theodorescu, D

    2017-01-05

    The utility of tumor-derived cell lines is dependent on their ability to recapitulate underlying genomic aberrations and primary tumor biology. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 25 bladder cancer (BCa) cell lines and compared mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression and drug response to BCa patient profiles in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed a mutation pattern associated with altered CpGs and APOBEC-family cytosine deaminases similar to mutation signatures derived from somatic alterations in muscle-invasive (MI) primary tumors, highlighting a major mechanism(s) contributing to cancer-associated alterations in the BCa cell line exomes. Non-silent sequence alterations were confirmed in 76 cancer-associated genes, including mutations that likely activate oncogenes TERT and PIK3CA, and alter chromatin-associated proteins (MLL3, ARID1A, CHD6 and KDM6A) and established BCa genes (TP53, RB1, CDKN2A and TSC1). We identified alterations in signaling pathways and proteins with related functions, including the PI3K/mTOR pathway, altered in 60% of lines; BRCA DNA repair, 44%; and SYNE1-SYNE2, 60%. Homozygous deletions of chromosome 9p21 are known to target the cell cycle regulators CDKN2A and CDKN2B. This loci was commonly lost in BCa cell lines and we show the deletions extended to the polyamine enzyme methylthioadenosine (MTA) phosphorylase (MTAP) in 36% of lines, transcription factor DMRTA1 (27%) and antiviral interferon epsilon (IFNE, 19%). Overall, the BCa cell line genomic aberrations were concordant with those found in BCa patient tumors. We used gene expression and copy number data to infer pathway activities for cell lines, then used the inferred pathway activities to build a predictive model of cisplatin response. When applied to platinum-treated patients gathered from TCGA, the model predicted treatment-specific response. Together, these data and analysis represent a valuable community resource to model basic tumor biology and to study

  14. Targeting Tumor-Associated Macrophages as a Potential Strategy to Enhance the Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Luca; Kitamura, Takanori

    2018-01-01

    Inhibition of immune checkpoint pathways in CD8 + T cell is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of solid tumors that has shown significant anti-tumor effects and is now approved by the FDA to treat patients with melanoma and lung cancer. However the response to this therapy is limited to a certain fraction of patients and tumor types, for reasons still unknown. To ensure success of this treatment, CD8 + T cells, the main target of the checkpoint inhibitors, should exert full cytotoxicity against tumor cells. However recent studies show that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) can impede this process by different mechanisms. In this mini-review we will summarize recent studies showing the effect of TAM targeting on immune checkpoint inhibitors efficacy. We will also discuss on the limitations of the current strategies as well on the future scientific challenges for the progress of the tumor immunology field.

  15. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores <50% were excluded. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) methodology was utilized for this review (S1 PRISMA Checklist). 271 articles were identified for final review. There were 45% prospective studies and 52% retrospective. 264 had intermediate QA score (≥50% but <80%); Seven were adequate (80% -100%); A high CRP was predictive of prognosis in 90% (245/271) of studies-80% of the 245 studies by multivariate analysis, 20% by univariate analysis. Many (52%) of the articles were about gastrointestinal malignancies (GI) or kidney malignancies. A high CRP was prognostic in 90% (127 of 141) of the reports in those groups of tumors. CRP was also prognostic in most reports in other solid tumors primary sites. A high CRP was associated with higher mortality in 90% of reports in people with solid tumors primary sites. This was particularly notable in GI malignancies and kidney malignancies. In other solid tumors (lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively.

  16. Systematic Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data on Tumor Cell-Selective Apoptotic Responses to HDAC Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or vorinostat is the first nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. SAHA affects histone acetylation in chromatin and a variety of nonhistone substrates, thus influencing many cellular processes. In particularly, SAHA induces selective apoptosis of tumor cells, although the mechanism is not well understood. A series of microarray experiments was recently conducted to investigate tumor cell-selective proapoptotic transcriptional responses induced by SAHA. Based on that gene expression time series, we propose a novel framework for detailed analysis of the mechanism of tumor cell apoptosis selectively induced by SAHA. Our analyses indicated that SAHA selectively disrupted the DNA damage response, cell cycle, p53 expression, and mitochondrial integrity of tumor samples to induce selective tumor cell apoptosis. Our results suggest a possible regulation network. Our research extends the existing research.

  17. Markets, Marx, Modernity and Mathematics Education: A Response to Michael Apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter

    This paper is a response to Michael Apple's paper, "What Postmodernists Forget: Cultural Capital and Official Knowledge." The paper advocates Michael's identification of the current dangers and processes of the growth of new right ideologies in the development of subjectivity, society, and education. The differences in success in the education…

  18. Reader-Response Theory: An Analysis of a Work of Chinese Post Modern Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates reader-response theory by discussing a piece of Chinese art, "A Book from the Sky." Examines the relationship between and among viewer, text or artwork, and artist; and attempts to determine the meanings viewers of different ages, genders, ethnicity, and professions construct in reaction to the work of art and to postmodern…

  19. SU-E-J-273: Simulation of the Radiation Response of Hypoxic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumour to irradiation prior to the treatment. Mathematical modelling of tumour control probability (TCP) based on the dose distribution, medical imaging and other biological information may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to develop an image based 3D multiscale radiobiological model, which describes the growth and the response to radiotherapy of hypoxic tumors. Methods: The computer model is based on voxels, containing tumour, normal (including capillary) and dead cells. Killing of tumour cells due to irradiation is calculated by the Linear Quadratic Model (extended for hypoxia), and the proliferation and resorption of cells are modelled by exponential laws. The initial shape of the tumours is taken from CT images and the initial vascular and cell density information from PET and/or MR images. Including the fractionation regime and the physical dose distribution of the radiation treatment, the model simulates the spatial-temporal evolution of the tumor. Additionally, the dose distribution may be biologically optimized. Results: The model describes the appearance of hypoxia during tumour growth and the reoxygenation processes during radiotherapy. Among other parameters, the TCP is calculated for different dose distributions. The results are in accordance with published results. Conclusion: The simulation model may contribute to the understanding of the influence of biological parameters on tumor response during treatment, and specifically on TCP. It may be used to implement dose-painting approaches. Experimental and clinical validation is needed. This study is supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education of Chile, Programa Mece Educacion Superior (2)

  20. SU-E-J-273: Simulation of the Radiation Response of Hypoxic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Peschke, P; Karger, C [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumour to irradiation prior to the treatment. Mathematical modelling of tumour control probability (TCP) based on the dose distribution, medical imaging and other biological information may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to develop an image based 3D multiscale radiobiological model, which describes the growth and the response to radiotherapy of hypoxic tumors. Methods: The computer model is based on voxels, containing tumour, normal (including capillary) and dead cells. Killing of tumour cells due to irradiation is calculated by the Linear Quadratic Model (extended for hypoxia), and the proliferation and resorption of cells are modelled by exponential laws. The initial shape of the tumours is taken from CT images and the initial vascular and cell density information from PET and/or MR images. Including the fractionation regime and the physical dose distribution of the radiation treatment, the model simulates the spatial-temporal evolution of the tumor. Additionally, the dose distribution may be biologically optimized. Results: The model describes the appearance of hypoxia during tumour growth and the reoxygenation processes during radiotherapy. Among other parameters, the TCP is calculated for different dose distributions. The results are in accordance with published results. Conclusion: The simulation model may contribute to the understanding of the influence of biological parameters on tumor response during treatment, and specifically on TCP. It may be used to implement dose-painting approaches. Experimental and clinical validation is needed. This study is supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education of Chile, Programa Mece Educacion Superior (2)

  1. Cellular radiation response as a function of tumor size, host hematocrit, and erythrokinetics in CA755 tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirtle, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed which both characterized the kinetics of host anemia when CA755 mammary adenocarcinomas were grown in either preirradiated or unirradiated host tissue of C57B1/2J (BDF 1 ) mice, and determined whether a correlation exists between the extent of host anemia and the cellular radiosensitivity of the grossly viable tumor tissue. The red cell destruction rate and the total red cell volume (TRCV) were simultaneously measured throughout tumor growth, and from this information the erythrocyte production per day could be estimated. Increased erythrocyte production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in circulating reticulocytes. The application of these methods to a tumor-bearing mouse system demonstrated that the erythrocyte production rates increased to a maximum of 6 to 10 times normal in mice bearing tumors growing in either preirradiated or unirradiated graft sites. It was concluded that tumor host anemia was due to accelerated random loss of erythrocytes and the nearly simultaneous decrease in erythrocyte potential life span rather than to a decrease in the erythrocyte production

  2. Natural Killer Cell Response to Chemotherapy-Stressed Cancer Cells: Role in Tumor Immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zingoni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate cytotoxic lymphoid cells that actively prevent neoplastic development, growth, and metastatic dissemination in a process called cancer immunosurveillance. An equilibrium between immune control and tumor growth is maintained as long as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance. Therapies designed to kill cancer cells and to simultaneously sustain host antitumor immunity are an appealing strategy to control tumor growth. Several chemotherapeutic agents, depending on which drugs and doses are used, give rise to DNA damage and cancer cell death by means of apoptosis, immunogenic cell death, or other forms of non-apoptotic death (i.e., mitotic catastrophe, senescence, and autophagy. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that they can trigger additional stress responses. Indeed, relevant immunostimulating effects of different therapeutic programs include also the activation of pathways able to promote their recognition by immune effector cells. Among stress-inducible immunostimulating proteins, changes in the expression levels of NK cell-activating and inhibitory ligands, as well as of death receptors on tumor cells, play a critical role in their detection and elimination by innate immune effectors, including NK cells. Here, we will review recent advances in chemotherapy-mediated cellular stress pathways able to stimulate NK cell effector functions. In particular, we will address how these cytotoxic lymphocytes sense and respond to different types of drug-induced stresses contributing to anticancer activity.

  3. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  4. Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu, Roshan S., E-mail: rprabhu@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent [Division of Oculoplastics, Orbital and Cosmetic Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ≥PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ≤46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors.

  5. Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang; Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent; Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ≥PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ≤46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors

  6. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  7. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  8. Functional imaging to monitor vascular and metabolic response in canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rødal, Jan; Rusten, Espen; Søvik, Åste; Skogmo, Hege Kippenes; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy causes alterations in tumor biology, and non-invasive early assessment of such alterations may become useful for identifying treatment resistant disease. The purpose of the current work is to assess changes in vascular and metabolic features derived from functional imaging of canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods. Three dogs with spontaneous head and neck tumors received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) at the treatment unit was performed at five treatment fractions. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET (D-PET) was performed prior to the start of radiotherapy, at mid-treatment and at 3-12 weeks after the completion of treatment. Tumor contrast enhancement in the CE-CBCT images was used as a surrogate for tumor vasculature. Vascular and metabolic tumor parameters were further obtained from the D-PET images. Changes in these tumor parameters were assessed, with emphasis on intra-tumoral distributions. Results. For all three patients, metabolic imaging parameters obtained from D-PET decreased from the pre- to the inter-therapy session. Correspondingly, for two of three patients, vascular imaging parameters obtained from both CE-CBCT and D-PET increased. Only one of the tumors showed a clear metabolic response after therapy. No systematic changes in the intra-tumor heterogeneity in the imaging parameters were found. Conclusion. Changes in vascular and metabolic parameters could be detected by the current functional imaging methods. Vascular tumor features from CE-CBCT and D-PET corresponded well. CE-CBCT is a potential method for easy response assessment when the patient is at the treatment unit.

  9. TIP-1 translocation onto the cell plasma membrane is a molecular biomarker of tumor response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor response to treatment has been generally assessed with anatomic and functional imaging. Recent development of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging showed promise in time-efficient assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of a prescribed regimen. Currently, the in vivo molecular imaging is limited with shortage of biomarkers and probes with sound biological relevance. We have previously shown in tumor-bearing mice that a hexapeptide (HVGGSSV demonstrated potentials as a molecular imaging probe to distinguish the tumors responding to ionizing radiation (IR and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment from those of non-responding tumors.In this study we have studied biological basis of the HVGGSSV peptide binding within the irradiated tumors by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells. The results indicated that Tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1BP3 is a molecular target that enables the selective binding of the HVGGSSV peptide within irradiated xenograft tumors. Optical imaging and immunohistochemical staining indicated that a TIP-1 specific antibody demonstrated similar biodistribution as the peptide in tumor-bearing mice. The TIP-1 antibody blocked the peptide from binding within irradiated tumors. Studies on both of human and mouse lung cancer cells showed that the intracellular TIP-1 relocated to the plasma membrane surface within the first few hours after exposure to IR and before the onset of treatment associated apoptosis and cell death. TIP-1 relocation onto the cell surface is associated with the reduced proliferation and the enhanced susceptibility to the subsequent IR treatment.This study by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells suggested that imaging of the radiation-inducible TIP-1 translocation onto the cancer cell surface may predict the tumor responsiveness to radiation in a time-efficient manner and thus tailor radiotherapy of cancer.

  10. Assessment of serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer after DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Fan Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy on serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer. Methods: A total of 79 patients with advanced colon cancer conservatively treated in our hospital between May 2012 and October 2015 were retrospectively studied and divided into DC-CIK group and intravenous chemotherapy group according to different therapeutic regimens, DC-CIK group received DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy and intravenous chemotherapy group received conventional intravenous chemotherapy. After three cycles of chemotherapy, the content of tumor markers in serum, expression levels of apoptotic molecules in tumor lesions as well as immune function indexes were determined. Results: After 3 cycles of chemotherapy, CEA, CA199, CA242, HIF-1α, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; p53, FAM96B, PTEN, PHLPP, ASPP2 and RASSF10 mRNA content in tumor lesions of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; the fluorescence intensity of CD3, CD4 and CD56 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell surface of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while the fluorescence intensity of CD8 and CD25 were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; IL-2 and IFN-γ content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group. Conclusions: DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy has better effect on killing colon cancer cells and inducing colon cancer cell apoptosis than conventional intravenous chemotherapy, and can also improve the body's anti-tumor immune response.

  11. Assessing tumor treatment response and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer with perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianwei; Wu Ning; Song Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively investigate whether any of the perfusion parameters would predict early tumor response to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: In a prospective series, Perfusion CT were performed in 152 patients suspected lung cancer with 16-slice or 8-slice multislice CT. Contrast medium (50 ml) was injected at a rate of 4 ml/s with a power injector. The scanning delay was 10 seconds and the scanning time was 50 seconds. Among 152 patients, 123 patients were proved lung cancer by pathology. With the perfusion 3.0 software, the parameters including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and capillary permeability surface area product (PS) were calculated. The perfusion image quality was evaluated on a 4-1eveal scale. The treatment response after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and then the relationship between perfusion parameters with early tumor response to chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was evaluated. Student t test and Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for data analysis. Results: In 84 patients (68.3%), the perfusion image quality was staged level 2 (moderate) and level 3 (good). Among them, 35 patients with NSCLC were assessed with RECIST after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy. In these 35 patients, The BF of responders and nonresponders was (81.0 ± 33.6)and (56.3 ± 23.1) ml · min -1 ·100 g -1 , respectively, which was significantly different(t=2.393, P=0.023). The median PFS of low-BF group (BF ≤ 80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) and high-BF group (BF>80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) was 11.8 and 8.0 months respectively (P>0.05), and the median PFS of low-BV group (BF ≤ 6 ml/100 g -1 ) and high-BV group (BF>6 ml/100 g -1 ) was 9.2 and 8.0 months respectively(P>0.05), both of them were not significantly different. Conclusion: NSCLC in high perfusion are relatively sensitive to chemotherapy

  12. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Michiel S; Brody, Jonathan R; Dezentje, David A; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C; Swartz, Michael J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Isacoff, William H; Hruban, Ralph H; Kern, Scott E

    2005-10-15

    BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Two retrovirally complemented pancreatic cancer cell lines having defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway, PL11 (FANCC-mutated) and Hs766T (FANCG-mutated), as well as several parental pancreatic cancer cell lines with or without mutations in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway, were assayed for in vitro and in vivo sensitivities to various chemotherapeutic agents. A distinct dichotomy of drug responses was observed. Fanconi anemia-defective cancer cells were hypersensitive to the cross-linking agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin, chlorambucil, and melphalan but not to 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, doxorubicin, etoposide, vinblastine, or paclitaxel. Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents was confirmed in vivo; FANCC-deficient xenografts of PL11 and BRCA2-deficient xenografts of CAPAN1 regressed on treatment with two different regimens of MMC whereas Fanconi anemia-proficient xenografts did not. The MMC response comprised cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and necrosis. Xenografts of PL11 also regressed after a single dose of cyclophosphamide whereas xenografts of genetically complemented PL11(FANCC) did not. MMC or other cross-linking agents as a clinical therapy for pancreatic cancer patients with tumors harboring defects in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway should be specifically investigated.

  13. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Low Dose Decitabine Treatment Induces CD80 Expression in Cancer Cells and Stimulates Tumor Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23671644

  15. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Xin; Mei, Zhen-Yang; Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+) T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Modernity after Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A strategy for the second modernization raises, beyond objectives, a series of epistemicresponsibilities. It is known that modernization stemming from the Enlightment had, among other things,the pretense that it is a project which is self-legitimating. Its profound rationales are the only justification.Referential self-centering proved to be the one that made possible a practice of the new. Modernizationhaving the function of renouncing myth – meaning an eliminatory formula for the past – and thefixation in the opportunity and potentiality of the present, seemed to close an insoluble but extremelyengrossing problem: that of a propensity towards utopia, of the risky escape towards the future. Thetraditionalization of the new constitutes a support for the daring to break out of the captivity of themoment.Modernization becomes the experience of combining the new which, thus, creates a succession ofpresent times. The future is no longer the result of fantasy, but a system’s direct expression to combine thenew. Therefore the future is an option for one or another model of the present, often tested previouslysomewhere else. In a non-metaphysical way, the future can be seen, touched, tried, lived by simplegeographical movement. The sense of evolution has de-temporalized taking the form of the concomitant,parallel, enclosed, neighboring space. We just have to be in the trend, to evolve in the context.Globalization defines the context and its conception – as a project of the second modernity – showsus the trends. The problem is how to understand the context in order to find the sense of the trend. Are wethe load the sense with the values of the first modernity or will we have to turn to the values of anothermodernity? Why do we have to move away from the significance of the processes which made up the firstmodernity? How do we relate to the content of the new context in which the structural trends of today’sworld are taking place? What is the

  17. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Beach, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 10 7 were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth

  18. Modern teaching for modern education

    OpenAIRE

    Mirascieva, Snezana

    2016-01-01

    Carrying the epithet of being contemporary education today means modern teaching. If modern education is a state in the field of education of all its elements, then teaching will also be a state with its own special features defining it as modern. The main issues of concern in this paper relate to what constitutes modern teaching, which features determine it as being modern, and how much is teaching today following the trend of modernization.

  19. δ-Tocotrienol Oxazine Derivative Antagonizes Mammary Tumor Cell Compensatory Response to CoCl2-Induced Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryatheja Ananthula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to low oxygen supply, cancer cells elevate production of HIF-1α, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor that subsequently acts to stimulate blood vessel formation and promote survival. Studies were conducted to determine the role of δ-tocotrienol and a semisynthetic δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, on +SA mammary tumor cell hypoxic response. Treatment with 150 µM CoCl2 induced a hypoxic response in +SA mammary tumor cells as evidenced by a large increase in HIF-1α levels, and combined treatment with compound 44 attenuated this response. CoCl2-induced hypoxia was also associated with a large increase in Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of downstream targets p70S6K and eIF-4E1, and a significant increase in VEGF production, and combined treatment with compound 44 blocked this response. Additional in vivo studies showed that intralesional treatment with compound 44 in BALB/c mice bearing +SA mammary tumors significantly decreased the levels of HIF-1α, and this effect was associated with a corresponding decrease in Akt/mTOR signaling and activation of downstream targets p70S6kinase and eIF-4E1. These findings demonstrate that treatment with the δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, significantly attenuates +SA mammary tumor cell compensatory responses to hypoxia and suggests that this compound may provide benefit in the treatment of rapidly growing solid breast tumors.

  20. The vascular disrupting agent ZD6126 shows increased antitumor efficacy and enhanced radiation response in large, advanced tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Dietmar W.; Rojiani, Amyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: ZD6126 is a vascular-targeting agent that induces selective effects on the morphology of proliferating and immature endothelial cells by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton. The efficacy of ZD6126 was investigated in large vs. small tumors in a variety of animal models. Methods and Materials: Three rodent tumor models (KHT, SCCVII, RIF-1) and three human tumor xenografts (Caki-1, KSY-1, SKBR3) were used. Mice bearing leg tumors ranging in size from 0.1-2.0 g were injected intraperitoneally with a single 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126. The response was assessed by morphologic and morphometric means as well as an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. To examine the impact of tumor size on the extent of enhancement of radiation efficacy by ZD6126, KHT sarcomas of three different sizes were irradiated locally with a range of radiation doses, and cell survival was determined. Results: All rodent tumors and human tumor xenografts evaluated showed a strong correlation between increasing tumor size and treatment effect as determined by clonogenic cell survival. Detailed evaluation of KHT sarcomas treated with ZD6126 showed a reduction in patent tumor blood vessels that was ∼20% in small ( 90% in large (>1.0 g) tumors. Histologic assessment revealed that the extent of tumor necrosis after ZD6126 treatment, although minimal in small KHT sarcomas, became more extensive with increasing tumor size. Clonogenic cell survival after ZD6126 exposure showed a decrease in tumor surviving fraction from approximately 3 x 10 -1 to 1 x 10 -4 with increasing tumor size. When combined with radiotherapy, ZD6126 treatment resulted in little enhancement of the antitumor effect of radiation in small (<0.3 g) tumors but marked increases in cell kill in tumors larger than 1.0 g. Conclusions: Because bulky neoplastic disease is typically the most difficult to manage, the present findings provide further support for the continued development of vascular disrupting agents such as

  1. Early prediction of the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative MRI and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Subramani; Chen, Yukun; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Li, Xia; Chakravarthy, A Bapsi; Bhave, Sandeep R; Welch, E Brian; Levy, Mia A; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to predict early in the course of treatment the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy can stratify patients based on response for patient-specific treatment strategies. Currently response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is evaluated based on physical exam or breast imaging (mammogram, ultrasound or conventional breast MRI). There is a poor correlation among these measurements and with the actual tumor size when measured by the pathologist during definitive surgery. We tested the feasibility of using quantitative MRI as a tool for early prediction of tumor response. Between 2007 and 2010 twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with Stage II/III breast cancer and receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled on a prospective imaging study. Our study showed that quantitative MRI parameters along with routine clinical measures can predict responders from non-responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The best predictive model had an accuracy of 0.9, a positive predictive value of 0.91 and an AUC of 0.96.

  2. Suitability of semi-automated tumor response assessment of liver metastases using a dedicated software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkmann, Janine; Ladd, S.C.; Greiff, A. de; Forsting, M.; Stattaus, J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the suitability of semi-automated compared to manual tumor response assessment (TRA) of liver metastases. Materials and methods: in total, 32 patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases were followed by an average of 2.8 contrast-enhanced CT scans. Two observers (O1, O2) measured the longest diameter (LD) of 269 liver metastases manually and semi-automatically using software installed as thin-client on a PACS workstation (LMS-Liver, MEDIAN Technologies). LD and TRA (''progressive'', ''stable'', ''partial remission'') were performed according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and analyzed for between-method, interobserver and intraobserver variability. The time needed for evaluation was compared for both methods. Results: all measurements correlated excellently (r ≥ 0.96). Intraobserver (semi-automated), interobserver (manual) and between-method differences (by O1) in LD of 1.4 ± 2.6 mm, 1.9 ± 1.9 mm and 2.1 ± 2.0 mm, respectively, were not significant. Interobserver (semi-automated) and between-method (by O2) differences in LD of 3.0 ± 3.0 mm and 2.6 ± 2.0 mm, respectively, reflected a significant variability (p < 0.01). The interobserver agreement in manual and semi-automated TRA was 91.4%. The intraobserver agreement in semi-automated TRA was 84.5%. Between both methods a TRA agreement of 86.2% was obtained. Semi-automated evaluation (2.7 min) took slightly more time than manual evaluation (2.3 min). Conclusion: semi-automated and manual evaluation of liver metastases yield comparable results in response assessments and require comparable effort. (orig.)

  3. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer according to tumor subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, S.; Zahid, N.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Oncology Liaquat National Hospital Karachi from Jan 2013 to Dec 2014. Material and Methods: A total of 119 patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer followed by definitive surgery. Demographic, clinical and pathological data of 101 patients were available for analysis. Tumors were divided into different molecular subtypes, luminal A, luminal B human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2) was negative, luminal B (HER 2 positive), HER 2 over expressed and triple negative. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given for total of eight cycles. Primary end point was pathological response [pathological complete response (PCR) versus no PCR] after surgery. Results: A total of 101 patients data were analyzed. Seventeen (16.8%) were luminal A, thirty eight (37.6%) were luminal B, out of 38 luminal B patients, twenty one (55.2%) were HER 2 + and seventeen (44.7%) were HER 2 -ve. Sixteen (15.8%) patients were HER 2 over expressed and thirty (29.7%) were triple negative. Out of 101 patients, twenty eight (27.72%) achieved PCR. A total of 5.9% achieved PCR in luminal A, 4.8% had PCR in luminal B (HER 2 -ve type), 23.5% had in luminal B (HER 2 +ve type), 50% achieved PCR in HER-2 over expressed type and 46.7% had PCR in triple negative subtype, (p=0.001). There was no significant association of PCR with age, tumor size, lymph node status, histology or grade. Conclusion: Molecular subtypes of breat cancer were found to be statistically significant predictor of PCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (author)

  4. Pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue tumors: Assessment of response by static post-contrast MR imaging compared to histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdottir, H.; Wejde, J.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate if static post-contrast MR imaging was adequate to assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. Post-contrast MR imaging of 36 soft tissue sarcomas performed 0 - 54 days (median 13 days) after pre-operative radiotherapy, were retrospectively reviewed and compared to post-operative histopathology reports. The contrast enhancement of the tumor was visually graded as minor, moderate or extensive. From the post-operative histopathology reports, three types of tumor response to radiotherapy were defined: Poor, intermediate or good. The size of the tumors before and after radiation was compared. Even if most viable tumors enhanced more than non-viable tumors, there was major overlapping and significant contrast enhancement could be seen in tumors where histopathological examination revealed no viable tumor tissue. Based on histopathology, there were 12 good responders; 8 of these showed minor, 3 moderate and 1 extensive contrast enhancement on MR imaging. Sixteen tumors had an intermediate response; 3 showed minor, 8 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Eight tumors had poor response; none showed minor enhancement, 3 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Both increase and Decrease in tumor size was seen in lesions with a good therapy response. Static post-contrast MR imaging cannot reliably assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. In tumors with no viable tumor tissue, moderate and extensive contrast enhancement can be seen

  5. Germline polymorphisms may act as predictors of response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced T3 rectal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Nielsen, Jens N; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by total mesorectal excision eight weeks after treatment. Pathologic response was evaluated according to the tumor regression grade system. RESULTS: Thirty percent (18/60) of patients presented with complete pathologic response. Patients with thymidylate synthase genotype 2/2 had a significantly...

  6. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p < 0.0001), Spitzoid (75%) vs. nonSpitzoid melanomas (1%; p = 0.0001), acinar (67%) vs. nonacinar pancreatic cancers (<1%; p < 0.0001) and papillary (3%) vs. nonpapillary thyroid cancers (0%; p < 0.03). Clinical responses to trametinib and sorafenib are presented. In conclusion, BRAF fusions are rare driver alterations in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms, but enriched in Spitzoid melanoma, pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  7. Time-dependent transcriptional response of GOT1 human small intestine neuroendocrine tumor after 177Lu[Lu]-octreotate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Johan; Rudqvist, Nils; Langen, Britta; Parris, Toshima Z; Dalmo, Johanna; Schüler, Emil; Wängberg, Bo; Nilsson, Ola; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2018-05-01

    Patients with neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptors are often treated with 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate. Despite being highly effective in animal models, 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate-based therapies in the clinical setting can be optimized further. The aims of the study were to identify and elucidate possible optimization venues for 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate tumor therapy by characterizing transcriptional responses in the GOT1 small intestine neuroendocrine tumor model in nude mice. GOT1-bearing female BALB/c nude mice were intravenously injected with 15 MBq 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate (non-curative amount) or mock-treated with saline solution. Animals were killed 1, 3, 7 or 41 d after injection. Total RNA was extracted from the tumor samples and profiled using Illumina microarray expression analysis. Differentially expressed genes were identified (treated vs. control) and pathway analysis was performed. Distribution of differentially expressed transcripts indicated a time-dependent treatment response in GOT1 tumors after 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate administration. Regulation of CDKN1A, BCAT1 and PAM at 1 d after injection was compatible with growth arrest as the initial response to treatment. Upregulation of APOE and BAX at 3 d, and ADORA2A, BNIP3, BNIP3L and HSPB1 at 41 d after injection suggests first activation and then inhibition of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during tumor regression and regrowth, respectively. Transcriptional analysis showed radiation-induced apoptosis as an early response after 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate administration, followed by pro-survival transcriptional changes in the tumor during the regrowth phase. Time-dependent changes in cell cycle and apoptosis-related processes suggest different time points after radionuclide therapy when tumor cells may be more susceptible to additional treatment, highlighting the importance of timing when administering multiple therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Comparison of Vaccine-Induced Effector CD8 T Cell Responses Directed against Self- and Non-Self-Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara R; Sørensen, Maria R; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play a major role in tumor control, yet vaccination aimed at eliciting potent CD8 T cell responses are rarely efficient in clinical trials. To try and understand why this is so, we have generated potent adenoviral vectors encoding the endogenous tumor Ags...... that low avidity of the self-TA-specific CD8 T cells may represent a major obstacle for efficient immunotherapy of cancer....

  9. Regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by early growth response-1 gene in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure is associated with activation of certain immediate-early genes that function as transcription factors. These include members of jun or fos and early growth response (EGR) gene families. In particular, the functional role of EGR-1 in radiation-induced signaling is pivotal since the promoter of EGR-1 contains radiation-inducible CArG DNA sequences. The Egr-1 gene belongs to a family of Egr genes that includes EGR-2, EGR-3, EGR-4, EGR-α and the tumor suppressor, Wilms' tumor gene product, WT1. The Egr-1 gene product, EGR-1, is a nuclear protein that contains three zinc fingers of the C 2 H 2 subtype. The EGR-1 GC-rich consensus target sequence, 5'-GCGT/GGGGCG-3' or 5'-TCCT/ACCTCCTCC-3', has been identified in the promoter regions of transcription factors, growth factors, receptors, cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. The gene targets mediated by Egr-1 in response to ionizing radiation include TNF-α , p53, Rb and Bax, all these are effectors of apoptosis. Based on these targets, Egr-1 is a pivotal gene that initiates early signal transduction events in response to ionizing radiation leading to either growth arrest or cell death in tumor cells. There are two potential application of Egr-1 gene in therapy of cancer. First, the Egr-1 promoter contains information for appropriate spatial and temporal expression in-vivo that can be regulated by ionizing radiation to control transcription of genes that have pro-apoptotic and suicidal function. Secondly, EGR-1 protein can eliminate 'induced-radiation resistance' by inhibiting the functions of radiation-induced pro-survival genes (NFκB activity and bcl-2 expression) and activate pro-apoptotic genes (such as bax) to confer a significant radio-sensitizing effect. Together, the reported findings from my laboratory demonstrate clearly that EGR-1 is an early central gene that confers radiation sensitivity and its pro-apoptotic functions are synergized by abrogation of induced radiation

  10. Expression analysis of genes associated with human osteosarcoma tumors shows correlation of RUNX2 overexpression with poor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Thorner, Paul; Chilton-MacNeill, Susan; Martin, Jeff W; Cervigne, Nilva K; Squire, Jeremy; Zielenska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Human osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric bone tumor. There is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying osteosarcoma oncogenesis, and a lack of good diagnostic as well as prognostic clinical markers for this disease. Recent discoveries have highlighted a potential role of a number of genes including: RECQL4, DOCK5, SPP1, RUNX2, RB1, CDKN1A, P53, IBSP, LSAMP, MYC, TNFRSF1B, BMP2, HISTH2BE, FOS, CCNB1, and CDC5L. Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of these 16 genes as potential biomarkers of osteosarcoma oncogenesis and chemotherapy response in human tumors. We performed quantitative expression analysis in a panel of 22 human osteosarcoma tumors with differential response to chemotherapy, and 5 normal human osteoblasts. RECQL4, SPP1, RUNX2, and IBSP were significantly overexpressed, and DOCK5, CDKN1A, RB1, P53, and LSAMP showed significant loss of expression relative to normal osteoblasts. In addition to being overexpressed in osteosarcoma tumor samples relative to normal osteoblasts, RUNX2 was the only gene of the 16 to show significant overexpression in tumors that had a poor response to chemotherapy relative to good responders. These data underscore the loss of tumor suppressive pathways and activation of specific oncogenic mechanisms associated with osteosarcoma oncogenesis, while drawing attention to the role of RUNX2 expression as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy failure in osteosarcoma

  11. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test ≥7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  12. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  13. Genetic constraints in the induction of the immune response to Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M.; Perkins, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    A single injection of irradiated Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells induces immunity in normal mice but fails to do so in T-cell-deficient-thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted (TIR) mice. TIR mice injected with normal syngeneic T cells develop an immune response to EAT when injected with irradiated EAT cells and reject a subsequent tumor cell challenge. In the present studies allogeneic T cells were unable to protect against EAT in TIR recipients even if harvested from donors tolerant to the recipient's transplantation antigens and injected into the TIR mice tolerant to the transplantation antigens of the injected T cells. Tolerance was produced by establishing long-term radiation chimeras of the P → F 1 type. Semiallogeneic T cells also failed to afford protection against EAT in TIR recipients. Whereas tolerance to other parental-strain transplantation antigens did not reverse the inability of parental T cells (cells from P → F 1 chimeric donors) to protect against EAT in F 1 TIR mice, it did enable F 1 T cells to afford protection in P → F 1 TIR mice

  14. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... intracellular signaling. This cytokine exerts its functions via interaction with two receptors: type-1 receptor (TNFR1) and type-2 receptor (TNFR2). In this work, the inflammatory response after a freeze injury (cryolesion) in the cortex was studied in wild-type (WT) animals and in mice lacking TNFR1 (TNFR1 KO...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...

  15. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  16. Early prediction of therapy response and disease free survival after induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer by FDG-PET: Correlation between tumor FDG-metabolism and morphometric tumor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Przetak, C.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Chemotherapy with Docetaxel and Carboplatin (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction VIP-chemotherapy has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to correlate the tumor FDG metabolism as measured by F-18 FDG-PET with morphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Erythropoietin (10,000 IU Epo s.c. three times a week). Material and Methods: In this prospective multicenter study, 54 patients with NSCLC stage IIIA (9 patients) or IIIB (45 patients) were enrolled and received neoadjuvant treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 d1 and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles prior to surgery. Postoperatively, all patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. WB-PET-studies (ECAT Exact 47) were obtained p.i. of 400 MBq F-18 FDG. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and metabolic tumor index (MTI SUV x MTD) were assessed. Image fusion of PET and CT data was applied on a HERMES computer. Results: Of 54 enrolled patients, 46 were evaluable for response by CT. 30/46 patients (65%) achieved complete remission (CR, 1 patient) or partial remission (PR 29 patients.). Of the 46 patients, 37 patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Chx) and were studied before and after Chx by FDG-PET. 14 (30% of the 46 evaluable patients) had SUV < 2.5, corresponding to metabolic complete remission (mCR), 23 had PR or stable disease (non-mCR); in 9 patients, PET was not performed because of progressive disease demonstrated by CT. The R0-resection rate was 56% (27/48 evaluable patients). Of the 14 patients with metabolic CR, 9 were evaluated by morphometry. All had regression grades III (no vital tumor cells) or grade IIB (< 10% vital tumor cells and induced apoptosis). With a median

  17. Levels of active tyrosine kinase receptor determine the tumor response to Zalypsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneo, Victoria; Serelde, Beatriz G; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon; Avilés, Pablo; Santamaría, Gemma; Tercero, Juan C; Cuevas, Carmen; Carnero, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Zalypsis® is a marine compound in phase II clinical trials for multiple myeloma, cervical and endometrial cancer, and Ewing’s sarcoma. However, the determinants of the response to Zalypsis are not well known. The identification of biomarkers for Zalypsis activity would also contribute to broaden the spectrum of tumors by selecting those patients more likely to respond to this therapy. Using in vitro drug sensitivity data coupled with a set of molecular data from a panel of sarcoma cell lines, we developed molecular signatures that predict sensitivity to Zalypsis. We verified these results in culture and in vivo xenograft studies. Zalypsis resistance was dependent on the expression levels of PDGFRα or constitutive phosphorylation of c-Kit, indicating that the activation of tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) may determine resistance to Zalypsis. To validate our observation, we measured the levels of total and active (phosphorylated) forms of the RTKs PDGFRα/β, c-Kit, and EGFR in a new panel of diverse solid tumor cell lines and found that the IC50 to the drug correlated with RTK activation in this new panel. We further tested our predictions about Zalypsis determinants for response in vivo in xenograft models. All cells lines expressing low levels of RTK signaling were sensitive to Zalypsis in vivo, whereas all cell lines except two with high levels of RTK signaling were resistant to the drug. RTK activation might provide important signals to overcome the cytotoxicity of Zalypsis and should be taken into consideration in current and future clinical trials

  18. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  20. Recent Advances in Stimuli-Responsive Release Function Drug Delivery Systems for Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chendi Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Benefiting from the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery systems (DDSs with stimuli-responsive controlled release function show great potential in clinical anti-tumor applications. By using a DDS, the harsh side effects of traditional anti-cancer drug treatments and damage to normal tissues and organs can be avoided to the greatest extent. An ideal DDS must firstly meet bio-safety standards and secondarily the efficiency-related demands of a large drug payload and controlled release function. This review highlights recent research progress on DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. The first section briefly reviews the nanoscale scaffolds of DDSs, including mesoporous nanoparticles, polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The second section presents the main types of stimuli-responsive mechanisms and classifies these into two categories: intrinsic (pH, redox state, biomolecules and extrinsic (temperature, light irradiation, magnetic field and ultrasound ones. Clinical applications of DDS, future challenges and perspectives are also mentioned.

  1. Stimuli-Responsive Nanodiamond-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Metastatic Tumor Site Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Mengjie; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Nurrul Lissa Binti; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Metastasis is often critical to cancer progression and linked to poor survival and drug resistance. Early detection of metastasis, as well as identification of metastatic tumor sites, can improve cancer patient survival. Thus, developing technology to improve the detection of cancer metastasis biomarkers can improve both diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we investigated the use of nanodiamonds to develop a stimuli-responsive metastasis detection complex that utilizes matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as a metastasis biomarker, as MMP9 increased expression has been shown to be indicative of metastasis. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor complex consists of nanodiamonds functionalized with MMP9-specific fluorescent-labeled substrate peptides. Using this design, protease activity of MMP9 can be accurately measured and correlated to MMP9 expression. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor also demonstrated an enhanced ability to protect the base sensor peptide from nonspecific serum protease cleavage. This enhanced peptide stability, combined with a quantitative stimuli-responsive output function, provides strong evidence for the further development of a nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor for metastasis site detection. More importantly, this work provides the foundation for use of nanodiamonds as a platform for stimuli-responsive biosensors and theranostic complexes that can be implemented across a wide range of biomedical applications.

  2. Enhancing the radiation response of tumors but not early or late responding normal tissues using a vascular disrupting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) damage tumor vasculature and enhance tumor radiation response. In this pre-clinical study, we combined radiation with the leading VDA in clinical development, combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA4P), and compared the effects seen in tumors and relevant...... normal tissues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Radiation was applied locally to tissues in CDF1 mice to produce full radiation dose-response curves. CA4P (250 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected within 30 minutes after irradiating. Response of 200 mm3 foot implanted C3H mammary carcinomas was assessed......% increase in ventilation rate measured by plethysmography within 9 months). A Chi-squared test was used for statistical comparisons (significance level of p 4P. The radiation...

  3. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  4. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  5. PET/CT evaluation of response to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) versus response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiyong; Cheng, Xu; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Qingbo; Chen, Jianwei; Li, Tiannv; Shi, Haibin

    2014-06-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT is increasingly used in evaluation of treatment response for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There is a need for an accurate criterion to evaluate the effect and predict the prognosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic response in NSCLC with comparing PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) criteria on PET/CT. Forty-four NSCLC patients who received chemotherapy but no surgery were studied. Chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated using (18)F-FDG PET and CT according to the RECIST and PERCIST methodologies. PET/CT scans were obtained before chemotherapy and after 2 or 4-6 cycles' chemotherapy. The percentage changes of tumor longest diameters and standardized uptake value (SUV) (corrected for lean body mass, SUL) before and after treatment were compared using paired t-test. The response was categorized into 4 levels according to RECIST and PERCIST: CR (CMR) =1, PR (PMR) =2, SD (SMD) =3, PD (PMD) =4. Pearson chi-square test was used to compare the proportion of four levels in RECIST and PERCIST. Finally the relationship between progression-free survival (PFS) and clinicopathologic parameters (such as TNM staging, percentage changes in diameters and SUL, RECIST and PERCIST results etc.) were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression method. The difference of percentage changes between diameters and SUL was not significant using paired t-test (t=-1.69, P=0.098). However the difference was statistically significant in the 40 cases without increasing SUL (t=-3.31, P=0.002). The difference of evaluation results between RECIST and PERCIST was not significant by chi-square test (χ(2)=5.008, P=0.171). If RECIST evaluation excluded the new lesions which could not be found or identified on CT images the difference between RECIST and PERCIST was significant (χ(2)=11.759, P=0.007). Reduction rate of SULpeak (%), RECIST and

  6. Antigen specific T-cell responses against tumor antigens are controlled by regulatory T cells in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaschik, Boris; Su, Yun; Huter, Eva; Ge, Yingzi; Hohenfellner, Markus; Beckhove, Philipp

    2012-04-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising approach in an effort to control castration resistant prostate cancer. We characterized tumor antigen reactive T cells in patients with prostate cancer and analyzed the suppression of antitumor responses by regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 57 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 8 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 16 healthy donors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and antigen specific interferon-γ secretion of isolated T cells was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. T cells were functionally characterized and T-cell responses before and after regulatory T-cell depletion were compared. As test tumor antigens, a panel of 11 long synthetic peptides derived from a total of 8 tumor antigens was used, including prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. In patients with prostate cancer we noted a 74.5% effector T-cell response rate compared with only 25% in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 31% in healthy donors. In most patients 2 or 3 tumor antigens were recognized. Comparing various disease stages there was a clear increase in the immune response against prostate specific antigens from intermediate to high risk tumors and castration resistant disease. Regulatory T-cell depletion led to a significant boost in effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. Tumor specific effector T cells were detected in most patients with prostate cancer, especially those with castration resistant prostate cancer. Since effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigens strongly increased after regulatory T-cell depletion, our results indicate that immunotherapy efficacy could be enhanced by decreasing regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tumor response evaluation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a prospective, multi-center cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martini, Paolo; Ceresoli, Marco; Mari, Giulio M.; Costanzi, Andrea; Maggioni, Dario; Pugliese, Raffaele; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Background To verify the prognostic value of the pathologic and radiological tumor response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods A total of 67 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (clinical ≥ T2 or nodal disease and without evidence of distant metastases) underwent perioperative chemotherapy (ECF or ECX regimen) from December 2009 through June 2015 in two surgical units. Histopathological and radiological response to chemotherapy were evaluated by using tumor regression grade (TRG) (Becker’s criteria) and volume change assessed by CT. Results Fifty-one (86%) patients completed all chemotherapy scheduled cycles successfully and surgery was curative (R0) in 64 (97%) subjects. The histopathological analysis showed 19 (29%) specimens with TRG1 (less than 10% of vital tumor left) and 25 (37%) patients had partial or complete response (CR) assessed by CT scan. Median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 25.70 months (range, 14.52–36.80 months) and 36.60 months (range, 24.3–52.9 months), respectively. The median follow up was 27 months (range, 5.00–68.00 months). Radiological response and TRG were found to be a prognostic factor for OS and DFS, while tumor histology was not significantly related to survival. Conclusions Both radiological response and TRG have been shown as promising survival markers in patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer. Other predictive markers of response to chemotherapy are strongly required. PMID:29299362

  8. In Vivo Tumor Gene Delivery Using Novel Peptideticles: pH-Responsive and Ligand Targeted Core-Shell Nanoassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Mohsen; Majidi, Asia; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Sheikhnejad, Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2018-04-30

    Modulating cancer causing genes with nucleic acid based-molecules as cutting-edge approaches need efficient delivery systems to succeed in clinic. Herein, we report design and fabrication of a novel tissue penetrating Peptideticle with charge-structure switching in tumor microenvironment for an effective gene delivery. The comparative in vitro studies indicate that peptideticles identify and bind to tumor endothelial cells and efficiently penetrate into multicellular tumor spheroid. In addition, negatively charged peptideticle at pH 7.4, prevent unwanted interaction while it's sharp charge-structure switching at pH 6.2-6.9 (e.g.in tumor tissue) facilitates malignant cells penetration. More importantly, upon systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, peptideticles effectively localized in tumor tissue and delivered luciferase gene with a 200-fold higher efficiency compared to their non-pH-responsive counterparts. In conclusion, this study presents a robust nanoassembly of safe materials for high efficient tumor gene delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  9. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Shao

    Full Text Available On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  10. Mathematical modeling of the implications of dominant tolerance for tumor biology and the response to combination therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Kalet; Garcia, Karina; Lage, Agustin

    2008-01-01

    The existence of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) that can control effector lymphocytes within the context of autoimmune, infectious and tumoral diseases is definitely accepted in current immunological research. Tregs confirm the theory of dominant tolerance, which holds that the choice of antigen rejection or tolerance in the immune system is the result of a dynamic equilibrium between populations of effector and regulatory T lymphocytes. The present paper summarizes the result of a recent theoretical study using mathematical modeling to analyze the dynamic interplay between T lymphocyte populations in the absence or presence of tumors and in response to different therapeutic treatments. The resulting model, developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology, which received an award from the Cuban Academy of Sciences in 2002, includes tumor cells and can simulate the effect of antitumoral mono- or combination therapies, by taking into account the way in which certain dynamic properties of tumors can, under specific circumstances, lead to the spontaneous expansion of Tregs populations. One of the advantages of the model is the prediction of several new strategies for the differential treatment of tumors, depending upon their ability of inducing the expansion of regulatory T cells. This is the first model available for the study of the impact of Tregs on the growth of malignant tumors, with results supported by international publications. Additionally, the model predicts the practical effects of several combination therapies, including vaccines, the excision of the tumor and depletion of lymphocyte populations. (Author)

  11. Sensorineural hearing loss among cerebellopontine-angle tumor patients examined with pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinindra, A. M.; Zizlavsky, S.; Bashiruddin, J.; Aman, R. A.; Wulani, V.; Bardosono, S.

    2017-08-01

    Tumor in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) accurs for approximately 5-10% of all intracranial tumors, where unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus are the most frequent symptoms. This study aimed to collect data on sensorineural hearing loss in CPA tumor patients in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH) using pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry (BERA). It also aimed to obtaine data on CPA-tumor imaging through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This was a descriptive, analytic, and cross-sectional study. The subjects of this study were gathered using a total sampling method from secondary data between July 2012 and November 2016. From 104 patients, 30 matched the inclusion criteria. The CPA-tumor patients in the ENT CMH outpatient clinic were mostly female, middle-aged patients (41-60 years) whose clinical presentation was mostly tinnitus and severe, asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss in 10 subjects. From 30 subjects, 29 showed ipsilaterally impaired BERA results, and 17 subjects showed contralaterally impaired BERA results. There were 24 subjects who with large-sized tumors and 19 subjects who had intracanal tumors that had spread until they were extracanal in 19 subjects.

  12. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  13. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    .... and whether depletion of tumor-associated macrophages has any effect on the tumor growth. The breast cancer model was established in BALB/c mice by subcutaneous injection of estrogen receptor-positive murine mammary tumor cells (4T1...

  14. Expression of complement and pentraxin proteins in acute phase response elicited by tumor photodynamic therapy: the engagement of adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Soroush; Huang, Naiyan; Korbelik, Mladen

    2010-12-01

    Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) was recently shown to trigger a strong acute phase response. Using the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) model, the present study examined complement and pentraxin proteins as PDT-induced acute phase reactants. The results show a distinct pattern of changes in the expression of genes encoding these proteins in the tumor, as well as host liver and spleen, following PDT mediated by photosensitizer Photofrin™. These changes were influenced by glucocorticoid hormones, as evidenced by transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptor and the upregulation of gene encoding this receptor. The expression of gene for glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) protein, whose activity is particularly susceptible to glucocorticoid regulation, was also changed in PDT-treated tumors. A direct demonstration that tumor PDT induces glucocorticoid hormone upregulation is provided by documenting elevated levels of serum corticosterone in mice bearing PDT-treated LLC tumors. Tumor response to PDT was negatively affected by blocking glucocorticoid receptor activity, which suggests that glucocorticoid hormones have a positive impact on the therapeutic outcome with this therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MUC1-specific immune therapy generates a strong anti-tumor response in a MUC1-tolerant colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Pathangey, L B; Bradley, J B; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Akporiaye, E T; Gendler, S J

    2007-02-19

    A MUC1-based vaccine was used in a preclinical model of colon cancer. The trial was conducted in a MUC1-tolerant immune competent host injected with MC38 colon cancer cells expressing MUC1. The vaccine included: MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, MHC class II-restricted pan-helper-peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Immunization was successful in breaking MUC1 self-tolerance, and in eliciting a robust anti-tumor response. The vaccine stimulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) helper and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells against MUC1 and other undefined MC38 tumor antigens. In the prophylactic setting, immunization caused complete rejection of tumor cells, while in the therapeutic regimen, tumor burden was significantly reduced.

  16. Changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue (CRF and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load. Methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with primary lung cancer in West China Hospital, Sichuan University between June 2014 and November 2016 were selected and then divided into CRF group and control group according to their self-reported symptoms, serum was collected to determine the levels of endocrine hormones and tumor markers, and peripheral blood was collected to detect the levels of immune cells. Results: Serum ACTH and TSH levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group while Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels were significantly lower than those of control group; peripheral blood CD11b+ CD15 - CD33+ CD14+ M-MDSC, CD11b+ CD15-CD33+ CD14- G-MDSC, CD4+ CD25+ CD127lowTreg and CD19+ CD5+ CD1d+ Breg levels as well as serum CEA, Cyfra21-1, SCC-Ag, HE4, GDF- 15 and PCNA levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group, positively correlated with serum ACTH and TSH levels, and negatively correlated with Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels. Conclusion: The changes of thyroid hormone and adrenal cortical hormone levels in patients with cancer-related fatigue are closely related to the inhibited antitumor immune response and increased tumor load.

  17. Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression and humoral response in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Parashar, Deepak; Gupta, Namita; Jagadish, Nirmala; Thakar, Alok; Suri, Vaishali; Kumar, Rajive; Gupta, Anju; Ansari, Abdul S; Lohiya, Nirmal Kumar; Suri, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers are highly aggressive epithelial tumor associated with metastatic potential and high mortality. The tumors are biologically diverse and are of various histotypes. Besides, the detection and diagnosis is a major problem of salivary gland cancer for available treatment modalities. In the present study, we have investigated the association of sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression with salivary gland tumor (SGT). Clinical specimens of benign (n = 16) and malignant tumors (n = 86) were examined for the SPAG9 expression. In addition, the sera and adjacent non-cancerous tissues (n = 72) from available patients were obtained. Our in situ RNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis revealed significant difference (p = 0.0001) in SPAG9 gene and protein expression in benign (63%) and malignant tumor (84%) specimens. Further, significant association was also observed between SPAG9 expression and malignant tumors (P = 0.05). A cut-off value of >10% cells expressing SPAG9 protein designated as positive in IHC, predicted presence of malignant SGT with 83.72% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 83.72% NPV. Humoral response against SPAG9 protein was generated in 68% of SGT patients. A cut-off value of 0.212 OD for anti-SPAG9 antibodies in ELISA predicted presence of malignant SGT with 69.23% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 78.94% NPV. Collectively, our data suggests that the majority of SGT show significant difference and association among benign and malignant tumors for SPAG9 gene and protein expression and also exhibit humoral response against SPAG9 protein. Hence, SPAG9 may be developed as a biomarker for detection and diagnosis of salivary gland tumors. PMID:25941602

  18. Prognostic implications of tumor volume response and COX-2 expression change during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon La; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between treatment outcomes, alteration of the expression of biological markers, and tumor volume response during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with uterine cervical cancer was analyzed. Twenty patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma received definitive RT with (n = 17) or without (n = 3) concurrent chemotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured by three serial magnetic resonance imaging scans at pre-, mid-, and post-RT. Two serial punch biopsies were performed at pre- and mid-RT, and immunohistochemical staining for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was performed. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. The median tumor volume response at mid-RT (V2R) was 0.396 (range, 0.136 to 0.983). At mid-RT, an interval increase in the distribution of immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 8 patients, and 6 of them showed poor mid-RT tumor volume response (V2R ≥ 0.4). Four (20%) patients experienced disease progression after 10 to 12 months (median, 11 months). All 4 patients had poor mid-RT tumor volume response (p = 0.0867) and 3 of them had an interval increase in COX-2 expression. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) decreased in patients with V2R ≥ 0.4 (p 0.0291 for both). An interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT was also associated with a decreased survival (p = 0.1878 and 0.1845 for OS and PFS, respectively). Poor tumor volume response and an interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT decreased survival outcomes in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

  19. Type I interferons as stimulators of DC-mediated cross-priming: impact on anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eSchiavoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells (APC present tumor-associated antigens (Ag on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8+ T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I, a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I -stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8+ T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  20. Theranostic 2D ultrathin MnO2 nanosheets with fast responsibility to endogenous tumor microenvironment and exogenous NIR irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuang; Zhang, Shengjian; Lin, Han; Zhao, Menglong; Yao, Heliang; Zhang, Linlin; Peng, Weijun; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The fabrication of functional nanoparticles with unique ultra-sensitivity to endogenous tumor microenvironment (TME) is of great significance for their improved theranostic performance and easy excretion out of the body, which has not been realized among diverse nano-sized photothermal agents for photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumor. In this work, we report on the synthesis of 2D ultrathin MnO 2 nanosheets for highly efficient PTT against tumor with ultra-sensitivity to endogenous TME. These ultrathin 2D MnO 2 nanosheets show the intriguing characteristic of disintegration and releasing of Mn 2+ in response to the mild acidic condition and elevated reducing microenvironment of TME, which has successfully realized the pH- and reducing-responsive T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging of tumor. Importantly, the high PTT efficiency of 2D MnO 2 nanosheets responsive to exogenous NIR irradiation has been systematically demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo for suppressing the tumor growth. This first report on the exploring of TME-sensitive photothermal agents with concurrent diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) functions significantly broadens the biomedical application of 2D functional biomaterials, which also promotes the further potential clinical translations of nano-sized photothermal agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  2. Targeting EGFR with photodynamic therapy in combination with Erbitux enhances in vivo bladder tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Khee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising cancer treatment modality that involves the interaction of the photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light of specific wavelength to destroy tumor cells. Treatment induced hypoxia is one of the main side effects of PDT and efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PDT plus Erbitux, an angiogenesis inhibitor that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, on human bladder cancer model. Tumor-bearing nude mice were assigned to four groups that included control, PDT, Erbitux and PDT plus Erbitux and tumor volume was charted over 90-day period. Results Our results demonstrate that combination of Erbitux with PDT strongly inhibits tumor growth in the bladder tumor xenograft model when compared to the other groups. Downregulation of EGFR was detected using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. Increased apoptosis was associated with tumor inhibition in the combination therapy group. In addition, we identified the dephosphorylation of ErbB4 at tyrosine 1284 site to play a major role in tumor inhibition. Also, at the RNA level downregulation of EGFR target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc was observed in tumors treated with PDT plus Erbitux. Conclusion The combination therapy of PDT and Erbitux effectively inhibits tumor growth and is a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of bladder tumors.

  3. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Oh, Young Tae; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mi Son; Park, Jun Eun; Cho, Sung Ran [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count - cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer.

  4. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M.; Pritzker, Laura B.; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-01-01

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced “RNA disruption” is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3’-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues

  5. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-02-24

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced "RNA disruption" is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3'-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues and is

  6. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53 ser15 ) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53 ser15 , γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and clinicopathologic response of canine bone tumor patients to treatment with samarium-153-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattimer, J.C.; Corwin, L.A. Jr.; Stapleton, J.; Volkert, W.A.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Anderson, S.K.; Simon, J.; Goeckeler, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Forty dogs with spontaneous skeletal neoplasia were treated with 153Sm-EDTMP (ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid). Both primary and metastatic lesions were treated. Two treatment regimes, a single (37 MBq (1.0 mCi)/kg dose or two 37 MBq (1.0 mCi)/kg doses separated by 1 wk) were tested. Response to treatment was varied. Large lesions with minimal tumor bone formation responded poorly, while primary lesions with substantial ossification usually exhibited a transient response. Small lesions with minimal lysis, metastatic lesions, and axial skeleton lesions generally responded well. The major adverse side effects of treatment were platelet and white blood cell count depression below baseline values for up to 4 wk (p less than 0.05). Minor depression of packed cell volume and transient elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase were also noted (p less than 0.05). No significant differences (p greater than 0.05) between the two treatment groups, either in treatment effect or undesirable side effects, were detected

  8. An evaluation of the 'criteria for tumor response after radiotherapy in esophageal cancer' of the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Iwao

    1991-01-01

    The criteria covering tumor response after radiotherapy for an esophageal cancer proposed by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases in March, 1989, has been evaluated in a study of 300 patients who were irradiated preoperatively or radically for an esophageal cancer. Results have revealed that the appearance that of EF-3, meaning no or few residual tumor cells in the esophageal specimen after resection, in the CR, PR, and NC Groups were 88.9%, 58.5%, and 30.3%, respectively, these differences among the groups considered highly significant (p<0.001). Thus, it has been concluded that this criteria can be clinically applied to evaluate the tumor response after radiotherapy. (author)

  9. Cell-mediated immune response to syngeneic uv induced tumors. I. The presence of tumor associated macrophages and their possible role in the in vitro generation of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, J.G.; Daynes, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    A primary in vitro sensitization system employing a chromium release assay was utilized to investigate reactivity of murine spleen cells toward syngeneic ultraviolet (uv) light induced fibrosarcomas. These tumors are immunologically rejected in vivo when implanted into normal syngeneic mice but grow progressively when implanted into syngeneic mice that had previously been irradiated with subcarcinogenic levels of uv light. Following appropriate sensitization, spleen cells from both normal and uv irradiated mice are capable of developing cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro against the uv induced tumors. It was subsequently discovered that in situ uv induced tumors all contained macrophages of host origin that became demonstrable only after enzymatic dissociation of the tumor tissue. These macrophages were immunologically active in vitro as their presence in the stimulator cell population was necessary to achieve an optimum anti-tumor cytotoxic response following in vitro sensitization. Anti-tumor reactivity generated by mixing spleen cells and tumor cells in the absence of tumor derived macrophages could be greatly enhanced by the addition of normal syngeneic peritoneal macrophages. When in vitro anti-tumor reactivity of spleen cells from normal and uv treated mice was compared under these conditions we again found no significant difference in the magnitude of the responses. In addition, the cytotoxic cells generated in response to uv induced tumors appeared to be highly cross reactive with respect to their killing potential

  10. . Modern concepts on carcinogenesis: the value of insufficiency of malignant cell elimination mechanisms in the tumor progression in case of neoplasia at different localizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesnokova N.P.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the review of contemporary concepts of tumor induction mechanisms applicable for neoplastic transformation, promotion and proliferation. The paper also contains an in-depth analysis of results of authors' own observations and study of immunological protection mechanisms of a significant number of patients diagnosed with oncopathologies of mammary and thyroid glands as well as adenocarcinoma of ascending colon. We have established common development patterns of T-cell and B-cell immunodeficiencies that are not influenced by location and proliferation of neoplastic tumors; the progress of such immunodeficincies, however, depends on regional metastasis development. Thus, we can conclude that insufficiency of immunological defense mechanisms leading to disruption of maligned cell elimination process is the primary pathogenic factor for metastatic tumor development.

  11. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  12. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, N.; Englhart, E.; Schlemmer, M.; Hittinger, M.; Übleis, C.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Berger, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated

  13. Response of the RIF-1 tumor in vitro and in C3H/Km mice to x-radiation (cell survival, regrowth delay, and tumor control), chemotherapeutic agents, and activated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.; Twentyman, P.R.; Zamvil, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation response of logarithmic growth phase and fed plateau phase RIF-1 cells in vitro was found to be characterized by D 0 values of 110 and 133 rads and extrapolation numbs of 36 and 28, respectively. The response of the tumor in vivo to X-irradiation in nonanesthetized mice showed a dependence on the tumor implantation site. In the leg muscle, the response indicated that most cells were at an intermediate level of oxygenation, whereas in the subcutaneous tissue of the flank, the response of the tumor indicated that it had a small fraction of hypoxic cells of maximum radioresistance. Misonidazole radiosensitized the leg-implanted tumor as measured both by cell survival and regrowth delay. The tumor was relatively insensitive to a single dose of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, sensitive to a single dose of cis-platinum, and highly sensitive to a single dose of cyclophosphamide

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis risk allele PTPRC is also associated with response to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: A total

  15. Predictive value of PET response combined with baseline metabolic tumor volume in peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cottereau, Anne-Segolene; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Becker, Stéphanie

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor outcomes with current therapy. We investigated if response assessed with Positron Emission Tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with baseline total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV) co...

  16. Evaluation of response to hormone therapy in patients with measurable adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.; van Driel, Willemien J.; Kenter, Gemma G.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the objective response rate to hormone therapy (HT) for patients with a measurable adult granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary in a consecutive series of patients. All patients with an adult GCT who were treated with HT [steroidal progestins,

  17. Correlation of in vivo tumor response and singlet oxygen luminescence detection in mTHPC-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excited-state singlet oxygen (1O2, generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT, is believed to be the primary cytotoxic agent with a number of clinically approved photosensitizers. Its relative concentration in cells or tissues can be measured directly through its near-infrared (NIR luminescence emission, which has correlated well with in vitro cell and in vivo normal skin treatment responses. Here, its correlation with the response of tumor tissue in vivo is examined, using the photosensitizer meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC in an animal model comprising luciferase- and green fluorescent protein (GFP-transduced gliosarcoma grown in a dorsal window chamber. The change in the bioluminescence signal, imaged pretreatment and at 2, 5 and 9 d post treatment, was used as a quantitative measure of the tumor response, which was classified in individual tumors as "non", "moderate" and "strong" in order to reduce the variance in the data. Plotting the bioluminescence-based response vs the 1O2 counts demonstrated clear correlation, indicating that 1O2 luminescence provides a valid dosimetric technique for PDT in tumor tissue.

  18. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M. Th; Teixeira, Suzana C.; Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T. F. D.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were acquired

  19. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Teixeira, Suzana C; Pengel, Kenneth E; Loo, Claudette E; Vogel, Wouter V; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Sonke, Gabe S; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and

  20. Bio-stimuli-responsive multi-scale hyaluronic acid nanoparticles for deepened tumor penetration and enhanced therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Mengmeng; Li, Wenyan; Chaudhuri, Arka Sen; Fan, Yuchao; Han, Xiu; Yang, Chen; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we developed bio-stimuli-responsive multi-scale hyaluronic acid (HA) nanoparticles encapsulated with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as the subunits. These HA/PAMAM nanoparticles of large scale (197.10±3.00nm) were stable during systematic circulation then enriched at the tumor sites; however, they were prone to be degraded by the high expressed hyaluronidase (HAase) to release inner PAMAM dendrimers and regained a small scale (5.77±0.25nm) with positive charge. After employing tumor spheroids penetration assay on A549 3D tumor spheroids for 8h, the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled multi-scale HA/PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles could penetrate deeply into these tumor spheroids with the degradation of HAase. Moreover, small animal imaging technology in male nude mice bearing H22 tumor showed HA/PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles possess higher prolonged systematic circulation compared with both PAMAM-FITC nanoparticles and free FITC. In addition, after intravenous administration in mice bearing H22 tumors, methotrexate (MTX) loaded multi-scale HA/PAMAM-MTX nanoparticles exhibited a 2.68-fold greater antitumor activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of factors affecting tumor response and survival in patients with primary and metastatic liver cancer treated with microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirelli, Serkan; Erkilic, Metin; Oner, Ali Ozan; Budak, Evrim Surer; Gunduz, Seyda; Ozgur, Ozhan; Bozcuk, Hakan; Sindel, Hakki Timur; Boz, Adil

    2015-04-01

    Radioembolization with the yttrium-90 (Y-90) microspheres is being used increasingly more often in the treatment of patients with primary or metastatic liver cancer. Although technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin (Tc-99m MAA) scintigraphy performed following diagnostic angiography has an important role in predicting the effectiveness of treatment and in dose estimation, the number of studies using quantitative assessment of Tc-99m MAA scintigraphy is limited in this field. In the present study, the aim was to assess whether a tumor dose is required to obtain objective tumor response and to check whether this threshold value is predictive in terms of tumor response, survival, and liver toxicity by using Tc-99m MAA single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Overall, 54 patients (20 women and 34 men; median age: 60 years) who underwent Y-90 Resin (SIR-Spheres) and Glass (TheraSphere) microsphere treatment with a diagnosis of unresectable liver cancer between August 2010 and April 2013 were included in the study. The mean doses to normal liver and tumor were estimated for each patient using Tc-99m MAA SPECT images and the medical internal radiation dosimetry method. The responses were assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and univariate Cox regression analysis were used in survival analysis. The relationship between treatment response and other parameters included was assessed using logistic regression analysis. The variables with a P value less than 0.01 in univariate analysis were assessed with multivariate analysis. Fifty-four Y-90 microsphere treatments (eight by using a Y-90 glass microsphere and 46 by using a Y-90 resin microsphere) were performed. In the multivariate analysis, the only parameter related to response was tumor dose (P<0.01). With a tumor dose of 280 Gy or higher, objective tumor

  2. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Produced in Cardiomyocytes Mediates a Predominant Myocardial Inflammatory Response to Stretch in Early Volume Overload

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuanwen; Pat, Betty; Zheng, Junying; Cain, Laura; Powell, Pamela; Shi, Ke; Sabri, Abdelkarim; Husain, Ahsan; Dell’Italia, Louis J

    2010-01-01

    Acute stretch caused by volume overload (VO) of aorto-caval fistula (ACF) induces a variety of myocardial responses including mast cell accumulation, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation and collagen degradation, all of which are critical in dictating long term left ventricle (LV) outcome to VO. Meanwhile, these responses can be part of myocardial inflammation dictated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) which is elevated after acute ACF. However, it is unknown whether TNF-α mediates a ma...

  3. Failure of 111In-labeled bleomycin tumor scanning to predict response to bleomycin (NSC-125066) treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.; Salmon, S.E.; Durie, B.G.M.

    1974-01-01

    The question of whether or not 111 In-labeled bleomycin is predictive of the response of tumors to bleomycin treatment is answered in the negative. The real test of the value of labeled bleomycin as a predictor of response will be possible only when a tightly labeled bleomycin with fully preserved biologic activity is synthesized. The negative results of this study do not invalidate further investigations of the predictive values of labeled anticancer drugs

  4. Evaluation of alternate categorical tumor metrics and cut points for response categorization using the RECIST 1.1 data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J; An, Ming-Wen; Meyers, Jeffrey; Grothey, Axel; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-03-10

    We sought to test and validate the predictive utility of trichotomous tumor response (TriTR; complete response [CR] or partial response [PR] v stable disease [SD] v progressive disease [PD]), disease control rate (DCR; CR/PR/SD v PD), and dichotomous tumor response (DiTR; CR/PR v others) metrics using alternate cut points for PR and PD. The data warehouse assembled to guide the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 was used. Data from 13 trials (5,480 patients with metastatic breast cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) were randomly split (60:40) into training and validation data sets. In all, 27 pairs of cut points for PR and PD were considered: PR (10% to 50% decrease by 5% increments) and PD (10% to 20% increase by 5% increments), for which 30% and 20% correspond to the RECIST categorization. Cox proportional hazards models with landmark analyses at 12 and 24 weeks stratified by study and number of lesions (fewer than three v three or more) and adjusted for average baseline tumor size were used to assess the impact of each metric on overall survival (OS). Model discrimination was assessed by using the concordance index (c-index). Standard RECIST cut points demonstrated predictive ability similar to the alternate PR and PD cut points. Regardless of tumor type, the TriTR, DiTR, and DCR metrics had similar predictive performance. The 24-week metrics (albeit with higher c-index point estimate) were not meaningfully better than the 12-week metrics. None of the metrics did particularly well for breast cancer. Alternative cut points to RECIST standards provided no meaningful improvement in OS prediction. Metrics assessed at 12 weeks have good predictive performance.

  5. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  6. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Caecilia S; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE). Sixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47-80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters' ability to discriminate responders from non-responders. According to mRECIST, 8 patients (50%) were responders and 8 (50%) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1)); p 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min(-1) 100 mL(-1), therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88% (7/8) and specificity of 75% (6/8). Voxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  7. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Serk In; Park, Sung-Jun; Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won; Park, Yun Gyu

    2016-01-01

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  8. Immunological response in mice bearing LM3 breast tumor undergoing Pulchellin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Matos Djamile

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIP have been studied in the search for toxins that could be used as immunotoxins for cancer treatment. Pulchellin, a type 2 RIP, is suggested to induce immune responses that have a role in controlling cancer. Methods The percentage of dendritic cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen (flow cytometry, cytokines’ release by PECs and splenocytes (ELISA and nitric oxide production by PECs (Griess assay were determined from tumor-bearing mice injected intratumorally with 0.1 ml of pulchellin at 0.75 μg/kg of body weight. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc test. Results Pulchellin-treated mice showed significant immune system activation, characterized by increased release of IFN-γ and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10, while IL-6 and TGF-β levels were decreased. There was also an increase in macrophage’s activation, as denoted by the higher percentage of macrophages expressing adhesion and costimulatory molecules (CD54 and CD80, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that pulchellin is promising as an adjuvant in breast cancer treatment.

  9. Tumor responsive targeted multifunctional nanosystems for cancer imaging, chemo- and siRNA therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak

    Cancer is one of the most insidious diseases. Compromising of over 100 different types and sharing the unifying factors of uncontrolled growth and metastasis, unmet clinical needs in terms of cancer diagnosis and treatment continue to exist. It is widely accepted that most forms of cancer are treatable or even curable if detected before widespread metastasis occurs. Nearly a quarter of deaths in the United States is the result of cancer and it only trails heart disease in terms of annual mortality. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are the primary treatment modalities for cancer. Research in these procedures has resulted in substantial benefits for cancer patients, but there is still room for an improvement. However, a time has been reached at which it appears that the benefits from these modalities have been reached the maximum. Therefore, it is vital to develop new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The field of nanotechnology is concerned with structures in the nanometer size range and holds the potential to drastically impact and improve the lives of patients suffering from cancer. Not only can nanotechnology improve current methods of diagnosis and treatment, it has a possibility of introducing newer and better modalities. The overall purpose of this work is to develop novel nanotechnology-based methodologies for the diagnosis and treatment of various forms of cancers. The first aim of the project is the development of a multifunctional targeted nanosystem for the delivery of siRNA to overcome drug resistance. The second aspect is the synthesis of a quantum dot-based delivery system that releases drug in response to pH changes. The third aim is the development of a targeted, tumor environment responsive magnetic resonance nanoparticle contrast agent coupled with a nanoparticle-based treatment.

  10. Temporal variation in the response of tumors to hyperoxia with breathing carbogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hua-gang; Khan, Nadeem; Du, Gai-xin; Hodge, Sassan; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hyperoxygenation with carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2) and 100% oxygen inhalation on partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor was investigated. RIF-1 tumors were innoculated in C3H mice, and aggregates of oximetry probe, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc), was implanted in each tumor. A baseline tumor pO2 was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry for 20 minutes in anesthetized mice breathing 30% O2 and then the gas was switched to carbogen or 100 % oxygen for 60 minutes. These experiments were repeated for 10 days. RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a baseline tissue pO2 of 6.2–8.3 mmHg in mice breathing 30% O2. Carbogen and 100% oxygen significantly increased tumor pO2 on days 1 to 5, with a maximal increase at approximately 32–45 minutes on each day. However, the extent of increase in pO2 from the baseline declined significantly on day 5 and day 10. The results provide quantitative information on the effect of hyperoxic gas inhalation on tumor pO2 over the course of 10 days. EPR oximetry can be effectively used to repeatedly monitor tumor pO2 and test hyperoxic methods for potential clinical applications. PMID:27867481

  11. Temporal variation in the response of tumors to hyperoxia with breathing carbogen and oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-gang Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hyperoxygenation with carbogen (95% O 2 + 5% CO 2 and 100% oxygen inhalation on partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1 tumor was investigated. RIF-1 tumors were innoculated in C3H mice, and aggregates of oximetry probe, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc, was implanted in each tumor. A baseline tumor pO 2 was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oximetry for 20 minutes in anesthetized mice breathing 30% O 2 and then the gas was switched to carbogen or 100 % oxygen for 60 minutes. These experiments were repeated for 10 days. RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a baseline tissue pO 2 of 6.2-8.3 mmHg in mice breathing 30% O 2 . Carbogen and 100% oxygen significantly increased tumor pO 2 on days 1 to 5, with a maximal increase at approximately 32-45 minutes on each day. However, the extent of increase in pO 2 from the baseline declined significantly on day 5 and day 10. The results provide quantitative information on the effect of hyperoxic gas inhalation on tumor pO 2 over the course of 10 days. EPR oximetry can be effectively used to repeatedly monitor tumor pO 2 and test hyperoxic methods for potential clinical applications.

  12. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume

  13. Metabolomics by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the response to chloroethylnitrosourea reveals drug efficacy and tumor adaptive metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aicha

    2007-03-01

    Metabolomics of tumors may allow discovery of tumor biomarkers and metabolic therapeutic targets. Metabolomics by two-dimensional proton high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was applied to investigate metabolite disorders following treatment by chloroethylnitrosourea of murine B16 melanoma (n = 33) and 3LL pulmonary carcinoma (n = 31) in vivo. Treated tumors of both types resumed growth after a delay. Nitrosoureas provoke DNA damage but the metabolic consequences of genotoxic stress are little known yet. Although some differences were observed in the metabolite profile of untreated tumor types, the prominent metabolic features of the response to nitrosourea were common to both. During the growth inhibition phase, there was an accumulation of glucose (more than x10; P < 0.05), glutamine (x3 to 4; P < 0.01), and aspartate (x2 to 5; P < 0.01). This response testified to nucleoside de novo synthesis down-regulation and drug efficacy. However, this phase also involved the increase in alanine (P < 0.001 in B16 melanoma), the decrease in succinate (P < 0.001), and the accumulation of serine-derived metabolites (glycine, phosphoethanolamine, and formate; P < 0.01). This response witnessed the activation of pathways implicated in energy production and resumption of nucleotide de novo synthesis, thus metabolic pathways of DNA repair and adaptation to treatment. During the growth recovery phase, it remained polyunsaturated fatty acid accumulation (x1.5 to 2; P < 0.05) and reduced utilization of glucose compared with glutamine (P < 0.05), a metabolic fingerprint of adaptation. Thus, this study provides the proof of principle that metabolomics of tumor response to an anticancer agent may help discover metabolic pathways of drug efficacy and adaptation to treatment.

  14. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells are essential for CD8+ T cell activation and anti-tumor responses after local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eKuhn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumors harbor several populations of dendritic cells with the ability to prime tumor-specific T cells. However, these T cells mostly fail to differentiate into armed effectors and are unable to control tumor growth. We have previously shown that treatment with immunostimulatory agents at the tumor site can activate anti-tumor immune responses, and is associated with the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in the tumor and tumor-draining lymph node. Here we use dendritic cell or monocyte depletion and monocyte transfer to show that these monocyte-derived dendritic cells are critical to the activation of anti-tumor immune responses. Treatment with the immunostimulatory agents Monosodium Urate crystals and Mycobacterium smegmatis induced the accumulation of monocytes in the draining lymph node, their upregulation of CD11c and MHCII, and expression of iNOS, TNFα and IL12p40. Blocking monocyte entry into the lymph node and tumor through neutralization of the chemokine CCL2 or inhibition of Colony Stimulating Factor-1 receptor signaling prevented the generation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the infiltration of tumor-specific T cells into the tumor, and anti-tumor responses. In a reciprocal fashion, monocytes transferred into mice depleted of CD11c+ cells were sufficient to rescue CD8+ T cell priming in lymph node and delay tumor growth. Thus monocytes exposed to the appropriate conditions become powerful activators of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells and anti-tumor immunity.

  15. Impaired Tumor-infiltrating T Cells in Patients with COPD Impacts Lung Cancer Response to PD-1 Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Jérôme; Ouakrim, Hanane; Dechartres, Agnès; Alifano, Marco; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Si, Han; Halpin, Rebecca; Creasy, Todd; Bantsimba-Malanda, Claudie; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Goldwasser, François; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Fournel, Ludovic; Roche, Nicolas; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Goc, Jeremy; Devi-Marulkar, Priyanka; Germain, Claire; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Cremer, Isabelle; Herbst, Ronald; Damotte, Diane

    2018-03-08

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a higher prevalence of lung cancer. The chronic inflammation associated with COPD probably promotes the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. However, once tumors have progressed to malignancy, the impact of COPD on the tumor immune microenvironment remains poorly defined, and its effects on immune-checkpoint blockers' efficacy are still unknown. To study the impact of COPD on the immune contexture of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed in depth immune profiling of lung tumors by immunohistochemistry and we determined its impact on patients' survival (n=435). Tumor-infiltrating T lymphocyte (TILs) exhaustion by flow cytometry (n=50) was also investigated. The effectiveness of an anti-PD-1 treatment (nivolumab) was evaluated in 39 advanced-stage NSCLC patients. All data were analyzed according to patients' COPD status. Measurments and Main Results: Remarkably, COPD severity is positively correlated with the coexpression of PD-1/TIM-3 by CD8 T cells. In agreement, we observed a loss of CD8 T cell-associated favorable clinical outcome in COPD+ patients. Interestingly, a negative prognostic value of PD-L1 expression by tumor cells was observed only in highly CD8 T cell-infiltrated tumors of COPD+ patients. Finally, data obtained on 39 advanced-stage NSCLC patients treated by an anti-PD-1 antibody showed longer progression free survival in COPD+ patients, and also that the association between the severity of smoking and the response to nivolumab was preferentially observed in COPD+ patients. COPD is associated with an increased sensitivity of CD8 TILs to immune escape mechanisms developed by tumors, thus suggesting a higher sensitivity to PD-1 blockade in patients with COPD.

  16. Analysis of protective and cytotoxic immune responses in vivo against metabolically inactivated and untreated cells of a mutagenized tumor line (requirements for tumor immunogenicity)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrmaker, A.; Lehmann, V.; Droege, W.

    1986-01-01

    The immunogenicity of a mutagenized subline (ESb-D) of the weakly immunogenic T-cell lymphoma L 5178 Y ESb has been characterized. The injection of 10(6) ESb-D cells ip did not establish lethal tumors in untreated DBA/2 mice but established tumors in sublethally irradiated mice. Injection of ESb-D cells into otherwise untreated DBA/2 mice established also a state of protective immunity against the subsequent injection of otherwise lethal doses of ESb tumor cells. Protection was only obtained after injection of intact but not UV-irradiated or mitomycin-C-treated ESb-D cells. A direct T-cell-mediated cytotoxic activity was also demonstrable in the spleen cells of DBA/2 mice after injection of ESb-D cells but not ESb cells. The cytotoxic activity was variant specific for ESb-D target cells, and it was induced only with intact but not UV-irradiated or mitomycin C-treated ESb-D cells. This suggested that the induction of protective and cytotoxic immunity may require the persistence of the antigen or unusually high antigen doses. The in vivo priming for a secondary in vitro cytotoxic response, in contrast, was achieved with intact and also with mitomycin C-treated ESb-D cells but again not with UV-irradiated ESb-D cells. This indicated that the metabolic activity was a minimal requirement for the in vivo immunogenicity of the ESb-D tumor line. The secondary cytotoxic activity was demonstrable on ESb-D and ESb target cells and could be restimulated in vitro about equally well with ESb-D and ESb cells. But the in vivo priming was again only obtained with ESb-D cells and not with ESb cells. These experiments thus demonstrated that the requirements for immunogenicity are more stringent in vivo than in vitro, and more stringent for the induction of direct cytotoxic and protective immunity in vivo than for the in vivo priming for secondary in vitro responses

  17. Lower glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) response but similar glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glycaemic, and insulinaemic response to ancient wheat compared to modern wheat depends on processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhøj, S; Flint, A.; Holst, Jens Juul

    2003-01-01

    with honey-salt added, leavening crushed whole grain, and conventional leavening with yeast added. Bread made from modern wheat was prepared by conventional leavening with yeast added. SUBJECTS: A total of 11 healthy young men. RESULTS: The postprandial GIP response was significantly (P... by the Einkorn breads processed with honey-salt leavening and by using crushed whole grain bread compared to the yeast leavened bread made from modern wheat or from Einkorn. No significant differences were found in the responses of GLP-1, insulin or glucose. CONCLUSION: Einkorn honey-salt leavened and Einkorn...... whole grain bread elicit a reduced gastrointestinal response of GIP compared to conventional yeast bread. No differences were found in the glycaemic, insulinaemic and GLP-1 responses. Processing of starchy foods such as wheat may be a powerful tool to modify the postprandial GIP response....

  18. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-10-24

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included the conjugation of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water-soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH-titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate-to-polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM(-1) s(-1). GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor-bearing mice 2 h postinjection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Effect of aged garlic extract on immune responses to experimental fibrosarcoma tumor in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, M Abouhosseini; Ebrahimpour, S

    2014-01-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) has many biological activities including radical scavenging, antioxidative and immunomodulative effects. In this research work, the antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of AGE against fibrosarcoma implanted tumor were studied. WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cells were implanted subcutaneously on day 0 into the right flank of 40 BALB/c mice at age of 8 weeks. Mice were randomly categorized in two separate groups: First received AGE (100 mg/kg, IP), second group as the control group received phosphate buffered saline. Treatments were carried out 3 times/week. Tumor growth was measured and morbidity was recorded. Subpopulations of CD4+/CD8+ T cells were determined using flow cytometry. WEHI-164 cell specific cytotoxicity of splenocytes and in vitro production of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 cytokines were measured. The mice received AGE had significantly longer survival time compared with the control mice. The inhibitory effect on tumor growth was seen in AGE treated mice. The CD4+/CD8+ ratio and in vitro IFN-γ production of splenocytes were significantly increased in AGE group. WEHI-164 specific cytotoxicity of splenocytes from AGE mice was also significantly increased at 25:1 E: T ratio. Administration of AGE resulted in improved immune responses against experimentally implanted fibrosarcoma tumors in BALB/c mice. AGE showed significant effects on inhibition of tumor growth and longevity of survival times.

  20. Increased tumor localization and reduced immune response to adenoviral vector formulated with the liposome DDAB/DOPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jason C; Cavanagh, Heather M A; Burton, Mark A; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Tsokos, Maria; Morris, John C; Kalle, Wouter H J

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to increase the efficiency of adenoviral vectors by limiting adenoviral spread from the target site and reducing unwanted host immune responses to the vector. We complexed adenoviral vectors with DDAB-DOPE liposomes to form adenovirus-liposomal (AL) complexes. AL complexes were delivered by intratumoral injection in an immunocompetent subcutaneous rat tumor model and the immunogenicity of the AL complexes and the expression efficiency in the tumor and other organs was examined. Animals treated with the AL complexes had significantly lower levels of beta-galactosidase expression in systemic tissues compared to animals treated with the naked adenovirus (NA) (P<0.05). The tumor to non-tumor ratio of beta-galactosidase marker expression was significantly higher for the AL complex treated animals. NA induced significantly higher titers of adenoviral-specific antibodies compared to the AL complexes (P<0.05). The AL complexes provided protection (immunoshielding) to the adenovirus from neutralizing antibody. Forty-seven percent more beta-galactosidase expression was detected following intratumoral injection with AL complexes compared to the NA in animals pre-immunized with adenovirus. Complexing of adenovirus with liposomes provides a simple method to enhance tumor localization of the vector, decrease the immunogenicity of adenovirus, and provide protection of the virus from pre-existing neutralizing antibodies.

  1. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Field Treatment of 4T1 Breast Tumors Induces T-cell Dependent Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jared M; Flores-Arredondo, Jose H; Suki, Sarah; Ware, Matthew J; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Agha, Mahdi; Law, Justin J; Sikora, Andrew G; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2018-02-22

    Previous work using non-invasive radiofrequency field treatment (RFT) in cancer has demonstrated its therapeutic potential as it can increase intratumoral blood perfusion, localization of intravenously delivered drugs, and promote a hyperthermic intratumoral state. Despite the well-known immunologic benefits that febrile hyperthermia can induce, an investigation of how RFT could modulate the intra-tumoral immune microenvironment had not been studied. Thus, using an established 4T1 breast cancer model in immune competent mice, we demonstrate that RFT induces a transient, localized, and T-cell dependent intratumoral inflammatory response. More specifically we show that multi- and singlet-dose RFT promote an increase in tumor volume in immune competent Balb/c mice, which does not occur in athymic nude models. Further leukocyte subset analysis at 24, 48, and 120 hours after a single RFT show a rapid increase in tumoral trafficking of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells 24 hours post-treatment. Additional serum cytokine analysis reveals an increase in numerous pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with enhanced T-cell trafficking. Overall, these data demonstrate that non-invasive RFT could be an effective immunomodulatory strategy in solid tumors, especially for enhancing the tumoral trafficking of lymphocytes, which is currently a major hindrance of numerous cancer immunotherapeutic strategies.

  2. Smoking: the influence of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) on tumor oxygenation and response to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, R.P.; Bush, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of localized x radiation on the transplantable KHT sarcoma was studied in nonanesthetized C3H mice possessing blood carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) levels similar to those observed in heavy smokers. HbCO values of 10 percent were induced in tumor-bearing animals, either acutely just prior to irradiation or chronically during tumor growth and irradiation, by allowing the mice to breathe gas mixtures containing carbon monoxide (CO) in air. Tumors were irradiated either with single doses of 1500, 2000, or 2500 rad or with seven 500 rad fractions given at 24 hr intervals. Tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo lung colony or an in vitro agar colony assay. The results with single doses of radiation indicate that under conditions of both acute and chronic exposure, the presence of 10 percent HbCO in the blood of the mice at the time of irradiation increases the survival of tumor cells in the hypoxic region of the survival curve by a factor of 2. During the fractionated irradiation, tumor cell survival in the presence of a 10 percent blood HbCO level (induced either acutely or chronically) was found to be significantly higher than that observed in air breathing mice. The results indicate that HbCO levels, such as are observed in heavy smokers, result in a larger fraction of hypoxic tumor cells. These findings suggest that heavy smoking prior to treatment may worsen the prognosis of patients undergoing radiotherapy

  3. WE-FG-202-02: Exploration of High-Resolution Quantitative Ultrasonic Micro-Vascular Imaging for Early Assessment of Radiotherapy Tumor Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasoji, S; Rivera, J; Dayton, P [University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Buse, J [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chang, S [University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, we cannot predict an individual patient’s response to a given radiotherapy which normally is not detected for weeks to months post-treatment. As a result, precious time is wasted for patients with unresponsive tumors who could have switched to an alternative treatment much earlier. Presently, no early treatment response detection method exists that is effective, low-cost, non-invasive, and safe. We hypothesize that changes in tumor microvasculature predict tumor response to radiotherapy earlier than tumor volume changes. Recent radiobiology research suggests tumors undergo vascular remodeling in response to radiation well before manifesting changes in tumor volume. We propose monitoring tumor microvasculature post-radiation using Acoustic Angiography (AA), a novel ultrasound imaging modality developed and patented in-house. In this study, we investigate whether changes in tumor microvasculature, measured using AA, can be an early indicator of high-dose radiotherapy success, compared to changes in tumor volume. Methods: Fibrosarcoma xenograft tumor tissue was subcutaneously implanted into rodent flanks (N=10). Animal tumors (N=8) were irradiated with a single treatment of 15Gy using a clinical LINAC at 100SSD and 2×2cm field size. Two untreated rats were left as tumor controls. AA imaging was performed immediately posttreatment and every third day thereafter for 30 days, or until tumors disappeared. Tumor volumes and vascular densities were measured from anatomical b-mode ultrasound and AA images, respectively. Results: Statistical differences in vascular density between treatment responders and non-responders were observed on Day 10 (p=0.005), whereas statistical differences in tumor volume were not observed until Day 19 (p=0.02). Conclusions: Tumor vascularity differences may be observed substantially earlier than differences in tumor size. In addition, significant early increases in vascular density were observed in non-responding tumors

  4. Abscopal Effects With Hypofractionated Schedules Extending Into the Effector Phase of the Tumor-Specific T-Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanwei; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2018-05-01

    Hypofractionated radiation therapy (hRT) combined with immune checkpoint blockade can induce T-cell-mediated local and abscopal antitumor effects. We had previously observed peak levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) between days 5 and 8 after hRT. Because TILs are regarded as radiosensitive, hRT schedules extending into this period might be less immunogenic, prompting us to compare clinically relevant, short and extended schedules with equivalent biologically effective doses combined with anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD1) antibody treatment. In mice bearing 2 B16-CD133 melanoma tumors, the primary tumor was irradiated with 3 × 9.18 Gy in 3 or 5 days or with 5 × 6.43 Gy in 10 days; an anti-PD1 antibody was given weekly. The mice were monitored for tumor growth and survival. T-cell responses were determined on days 8 and 15 of treatment. The role of regional lymph nodes was studied by administering FTY720, which blocks lymph node egress of activated T cells. Tumor growth measurements after combination treatment using short or extended hRT and control treatment were also performed in the wild-type B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. In the B16-CD133 model, growth inhibition of irradiated primary and nonirradiated secondary tumors and overall survival were similar with all 3 hRT/anti-PD1 combinations, superior to hRT and anti-PD1 monotherapy, and was strongly dependent on CD8 + T cells. TIL infiltration and local and systemic tumor-specific CD8 + T-cell responses were also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used. Administration of FTY720 accelerated growth of both primary and secondary tumors, strongly reduced their TIL infiltration, and increased tumor-specific CD8 + T cells in the lymph nodes draining the irradiated tumor. In the 4T1 model, local and abscopal tumor control was also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used, although the synergy between hRT and anti-PD1 was weaker. No

  5. Tumor Response and Apoptosis of N1-S1 Rodent Hepatomas in Response to Intra-arterial and Intravenous Benzamide Riboside

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLennan, Gordon; Bennett, Stacy L.; Ju, Shenghong; Babsky, Andriy; Bansal, Navin; Shorten, Michelle L.; Levitin, Seth; Bonnac, Laurent; Panciewicz, Krystoff W.; Jayaram, Hiramagular N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Benzamide riboside (BR) induces tumor apoptosis in multiple cell lines and animals. This pilot study compares apoptosis and tumor response in rat hepatomas treated with hepatic arterial BR (IA) or intravenous (IV) BR. Methods: A total of 10 6 N1-S1 cells were placed in the left hepatic lobes of 15 Sprague-Dawley rats. After 2 weeks, BR (20 mg/kg) was infused IA (n = 5) or IV (n = 5). One animal in each group was excluded for technical factors, which prevented a full dose administration (1 IA and 1 IV). Five rats received saline (3 IA and 2 IV). Animals were killed after 3 weeks. Tumor volumes after IA and IV treatments were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum test. The percentage of tumor and normal liver apoptosis was counted by using 10 fields of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling)-stained slides at 40× magnification. The percentage of apoptosis was compared between IV and IA administrations and with saline sham-treated rats by the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: Tumors were smaller after IA treatment, but this did not reach statistical significance (0.14 IA vs. 0.57 IV; P = 0.138). There was much variability in percentage of apoptosis and no significant difference between IA and IV BR (44.49 vs. 1.52%; P = 0.18); IA BR and saline (44.49 vs. 33.83%; P = 0.66); or IV BR and saline (1.52 vs. 193%; P = 0.18). Conclusions: Although differences in tumor volumes did not reach statistical significance, there was a trend toward smaller tumors after IA BR than IV BR in this small pilot study. Comparisons of these treatment methods will require a larger sample size and repeat experimentation.

  6. Response evaluation of giant-cell tumor of bone treated by denosumab: Histogram and texture analysis of CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jisook; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Seung Hyun; Song, Ho-Taek; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare computed tomography (CT) features, including tumor size and textural and histogram measurements, of giant-cell tumors of bone (GCTBs) before and after denosumab treatment and determine their applicability in monitoring GCTB response to denosumab treatment. This retrospective study included eight patients (male, 3; female, 5; mean age, 33.4 years) diagnosed with GCTB, who had received treatment by denosumab and had undergone pre- and post-treatment non-contrast CT between January 2010 and December 2016. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Pre- and post-treatment size, histogram, and textural parameters of GCTBs were compared by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Pathological findings of five patients who underwent surgery after denosumab treatment were evaluated for assessment of treatment response. Relative to the baseline values, the tumor size had decreased, while the mean attenuation, standard deviation, entropy (all, P = 0.017), and skewness (P = 0.036) of the GCTBs had significantly increased post-treatment. Although the difference was statistically insignificant, the tumors also exhibited increased kurtosis, contrast, and inverse difference moment (P = 0.123, 0.327, and 0.575, respectively) post-treatment. Histologic findings revealed new bone formation and complete depletion or decrease in the number of osteoclast-like giant cells. The histogram and textural parameters of GCTBs changed significantly after denosumab treatment. Knowledge of the tendency towards increased mean attenuation and heterogeneity but increased local homogeneity in post-treatment CT histogram and textural features of GCTBs might aid in treatment planning and tumor response evaluation during denosumab treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Modernity: Are Modern Times Different?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Hunt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available “Modernity” has recently been the subject of considerable discussion among historians. This article reviews some of the debates and argues that modernity is a problematic concept because it implies a complete rupture with “traditional” ways of life. Studies of key terms are undertaken with the aid of Google Ngrams. These show that “modernity,” “modern times,” and “traditional” —in English and other languages— have a history of their own. A brief analysis of the shift from a self oriented toward equilibrium to a self oriented toward stimulation demonstrates that modernity is not necessary to historical analysis.

  8. A clinical trial comparing the responses of animal tumors receiving heat sensitizing drugs prior to whole body hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.K.; Forsyth, K.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Fuller, D.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) has rarely been found effective in inducing complete tumor responses. Recent in vitro studies showing that heat sensitizion is possible have renewed interest in this field. In this protocol, WBH is induced via a commercially available inductive device and maintained at 42 0 C for thirty minutes. The heat sensitizing drugs, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) are administered 48 hours before, in accordance with in vitro studies. Goals of the study include evaluation of normal tissue toxicity and tumor response. Two normal dogs were treated to study acute toxicities before inception of the clinical trial. The gastrointestinal and hematopoietic systems were used to monitor toxicities using systems review and serial bloodwork. These studies and preliminary clinical results of observed tumor regression in dogs with lymphomas are discussed. Consistent changes in all patients included elevations in liver enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and white blood cell counts, as well as, decreases in platelet counts. All changes were transient and clinical signs were not associated with them. Tumor volume reductions from 25% to 74% have been documented

  9. Heat response of mouse tumor cells treated with 5-thio-D-glucose and Rhodamine-123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, J.G.; Lyons, J.C.; Song, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Cellular heat-sensitivity has been known to depend on intracellular energy. The authors studied the thermal response of cultured SCK mammary carcinoma cells in vitro, following glycolytic inhibition with 5-thio-D-glucose (TG) and mitochondrial inactivation with Rhodamine-123 (Rh). The cells in exponential growth phase in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with serum and antibiotics were exposed to medium containing Rh and/or TG, heated in a prewarmed water bath, and the clonogenic survivals of the heated cells were determined. Thermal cell killing by the 30 min. heating was increased, when 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh were present in the medium at temperatures above 42 0 and 40 0 C, respectively. The slope of the heat survival curve for 43 0 C heating became steeper in the presence of 10 and 20 μg/ml Rh, and the initial shoulder of the survival curve was unaltered at the dose of 10 μg/ml Rh, but disappeared at 20 μg/ml. A TG dose of 3 mg/ml, which is about 10 times that necessary to kill 90% of cells in 5 hrs. under hypoxic condition, was ineffective in altering any parameters of the heat survival curve of aerobic cells. The combined effect of TG and Rh on the thermal cell killing in aerobic condition did not exceed the effect of Rh alone. The above results indicate that the energy supply derived by mitochondria is an important determinant for the shape of heat survival curve of the proliferating and aerobic SCK tumor cells

  10. Patient and tumor characteristics associated with breast cancer recurrence after complete pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Na Rae; Jeffe, Donna B; Keune, Jason; Aft, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer patients whose tumors achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy have a prognosis which is better than that predicted for the stage of their disease. However, within this subgroup of patients, recurrences have been observed. We sought to examine factors associated with recurrence in a population of breast cancer patients who achieved a pCR with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all patients with unilateral breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010 at one comprehensive cancer center. A pCR was defined as no residual invasive cancer in the breast in the surgical specimen following neoadjuvant therapy. Recurrence was defined as visceral or bony reappearance of cancer after completion of all therapy. Of 818 patients who completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 144 (17.6 %) had pCR; six with bilateral breast cancer were excluded from further analysis. The mean time to follow-up was 47.2 months. Among the 138 patients with unilateral breast cancer, there were 14 recurrences (10.1 %). Using a binary multiple logistic regression model, examining types of chemotherapy and surgery, race, lymph node assessment, and lymph node status, breast cancer side, triple-negative status, and radiation receipt, only African-American patients (OR: 5.827, 95 % CI: 1.280-26.525; p = 0.023) were more likely to develop distant recurrence. The mean time to recurrence was 31.9 months. In our study, race was the only independent predictor of recurrence after achieving pCR with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The reasons for this observation require further study.

  11. 31P NMR spectroscopy of tumors in the evaluation of response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sijens, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis the effects of different kinds of therapy on tumour metabolism were investigated by in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy. From the first five chapters (laboratory-animal studies) it turns out that after radiotherapy as well as after hyperthermy or chemoterapy changes can be observed in the 31P NMR spectra of tumours. In a number of cases a durable decline occurred in the ratio of the high-energetic adenosinephosphate (ATP) and the low-energeic anorganic phosphate, cuased by the mortification of tumourcells. On the other hand, tumour regression after effective chemotherapy resulted in a growth of the ATP/Pi ratio. In one case a temporary drop occurred which could be related to a temporary decrease in tumour perfusion. In anoter case a temporary drop of the ATP/Pi ratio correlated with resistence against treatment with cis-diaminodichoroplatina. In contrast with the changes in ATP/Pi ratio, the changes, after (chemo)therapy, in tumour pH do not seem to be related with the respons of the tumour. The results of the laboratory-animal experiments indicate that in vivo 31P NMR spectroscopy could be applied in the clinic in order to establish betime the response of tumours on therapy. In ch. 6 initial experiences with clinical NMR spectroscopy of human breast cancer are described. The results indicate that by 31P NMR spectroscopy malignant breast tissues can be discerned from normal breast tissues, following radiotherapy and subsequent tumour regression, in the spectrum of the tumorous region an intense PCr signal developed which appeared to reflect a metabolic change in the tumous itself. 177 refs.; 27 figs.; 6 tabs

  12. Dose-response relationships for bone tumors in beagles exposed to 226Ra and 90Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, O.G.; Parks, N.J.; Book, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    385 dogs were exposed to 90 Sr in food from mid-gestation to 540 days of age. 243 young adult dogs were given eight fortnightly injections of 226 Ra. Comparison was made with available mouse and human 226 Ra bone tumor data. The major findings were: a) the occurrence of bone tumor related deaths was much less for 90 Sr than for 226 Ra exposed dogs. b) RBE for bone tumors from 90 Sr-Y varied as a function of average dose rate to bone. c) people require 10 times as long as mice and 3.6 times as long as dogs to develop 226 Ra-induced bone tumors at a given skeletal dose rate. d) based on the results, a practical threshold for bone cancer from 226 Ra was estimated to exist at cumulative doses of about 50-110 rad for dogs, mice and people. (author)

  13. Molecular strategies targeting the host component of cancer to enhance tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Huamani, Jessica; Fu, Allie; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment, in particular, the tumor vasculature, as an important target for the cytotoxic effects of radiation therapy is an established paradigm for cancer therapy. We review the evidence that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is activated in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) and is a molecular target for the development of novel radiation sensitizing agents. On the basis of this premise, several promising preclinical studies that targeted the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt activation as a potential method of sensitizing the tumor vasculature to the cytotoxic effects of IR have been conducted. An innovative strategy to guide cytotoxic therapy in tumors treated with radiation and PI3K/Akt inhibitors is presented. The evidence supports a need for further investigation of combined-modality therapy that involves radiation therapy and inhibitors of PI3K/Akt pathway as a promising strategy for improving the treatment of patients with cancer

  14. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    ...-encapsulated clodronate had no effect on the growth of subcutaneous breast cancer (4T1) model in mice. Whether liposome-encapsulated cloronate depletes tumor-assocaited macrophages in this model is currently under investigation.

  15. Modulation of Breast Tumor Cell Response to Retinoids by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2003-01-01

    .... One form of RA-resistance in breast cancer can be traced to loss of expression of the tumor suppressor RAR beta, due to epigenetic changes including DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in one...

  16. Functional response of tumor vasculature in rats' glioma to hypercarbia evaluated by MR perfusion weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingbo; Feng Xiaoyuan; Liang Zonghui; Chen Shuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of MR PWI in judging maturity and variability of tumor vasculature in gliomas in rats. Methods: Twenty male SD rats were randomly assigned to tumor group and control group. Four weeks after implantation of C6 glioma cells in the brains of tumor group and injection of saline in the brains of control group, all rats were examined using MR PWI before and after inhalation of a mixture of 10% CO2 and 90% air. PaCO 2 and blood pH values of rats were monitored. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) values of tumors and normal brain tissue were measured. Brain sample were examined histologically using HE and immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin(SMA). The histological features of gliomas were observed and SMA positively stained vessels of each tumor were counted manually using a light microscope. Perfusion data and pathological findings were analyzed statistically with SPSS for Windows. Results: PaCO 2 increased significantly [from(4.69±0.62)kPa to (7.62±0.81) kPa in tumor group and from (4.67±0.51) kPa to (7.63±0.78) kPa in control group, P 0.05), while changing rate of rCBV, rCBF in normal brain tissue correlated well with number of positive SMA labeled vessels (r=0.721 and 0.525, P 2 increase in the normal brain and in the tumor. It may be a useful technique to measure maturity of tumor vessels. (authors)

  17. Early determination of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma radioresponse identifies high- and low-response tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Kiyoshi; Oki, Akinori; Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Onishi, Kayoko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Satoh, Toyomi; Tsunoda, Hajime; Hata, Masaharu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether early-assessed radioresponse of tumors corresponds with late-assessed radioresponse, which is associated with local disease control in radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study included 12 patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated by RT with or without concurrent cisplatin. Tumor volume was estimated by scheduled magnetic resonance imaging before (preRT), 3 to 4 weeks after (early assessment), and 6 to 7 weeks after (late assessment) RT initiation. Radioresponse was assessed with tumor shrinkage curves based on these volumes. Radioresponse for each tumor was calculated as the slope (day -1 ) of the shrinkage curve by fitting to an exponential equation. Results: Early-assessed radioresponse ranged from 0.001 to 0.106 day -1 (median, 0.021 day -1 ) and late-assessed radioresponse from 0.009 to 0.091 day -1 (median, 0.021 day -1 ), with no significant difference between them (p = 0.1191). The early-assessed radioresponse correlated with the late-assessed radioresponse (R 2 = 0.714, p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Correspondence between early- and late-assessed radioresponse in a series of tumors showing a wide range of radioresponse was not particularly close overall. However, early assessment of radioresponsiveness did seem to be useful for characterizing those tumors with high or low radioresponsiveness

  18. Oral beta-glucan adjuvant therapy converts nonprotective Th2 response to protective Th1 cell-mediated immune response in mammary tumor-bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon D Ross

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Beta (1-3-D-glucans were identified almost 40 years ago as biological response modifiers that stimulated tumor rejection. In vitro studies have shown that beta-glucans bind to a lectin domain within complement receptor type 3 (CR3, or to, more recently described dectin-1 a beta-glucan specific receptor, acting mainly on phagocytic cells. In this study, we assessed the intracellular cytokine profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes from mice bearing mammary tumors receiving i.v. anti-tumor mAbs combined or not with whole glucan particle suspension given orally (WGP, 400 microg every 24 hours. The proportions of T cells producing IL-4 and IFNgamma were determined by flow cytometry. The proportion of T cells producing IL-4 was significantly higher in tumor-bearing mice not receiving beta-glucan-enhanced therapy. Conversely, T cells from mice undergoing beta-glucan-enhanced therapy showed increased production of the Th1 cytokine IFNgamma. The switch from a Th2 to a Th1 response after WGP therapy was possibly mediated by intestinal mucosal macrophages releasing IL-12.

  19. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  20. Tumor specific HMG-CoA reductase expression in primary pre-menopausal breast cancer predicts response to tamoxifen

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2011-01-31

    Abstract Introduction We previously reported an association between tumor-specific 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) expression and a good prognosis in breast cancer. Here, the predictive value of HMG-CoAR expression in relation to tamoxifen response was examined. Methods HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression was analyzed in a cell line model of tamoxifen resistance using western blotting and PCR. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was examined in 155 tamoxifen-treated breast tumors obtained from a previously published gene expression study (Cohort I). HMG-CoAR protein expression was examined in 422 stage II premenopausal breast cancer patients, who had previously participated in a randomized control trial comparing 2 years of tamoxifen with no systemic adjuvant treatment (Cohort II). Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and the effect of HMG-CoAR expression on tamoxifen response. Results HMG-CoAR protein and RNA expression were decreased in tamoxifen-resistant MCF7-LCC9 cells compared with their tamoxifen-sensitive parental cell line. HMG-CoAR mRNA expression was decreased in tumors that recurred following tamoxifen treatment (P < 0.001) and was an independent predictor of RFS in Cohort I (hazard ratio = 0.63, P = 0.009). In Cohort II, adjuvant tamoxifen increased RFS in HMG-CoAR-positive tumors (P = 0.008). Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that HMG-CoAR was an independent predictor of improved RFS in Cohort II (hazard ratio = 0.67, P = 0.010), and subset analysis revealed that this was maintained in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients (hazard ratio = 0.65, P = 0.029). Multivariate interaction analysis demonstrated a difference in tamoxifen efficacy relative to HMG-CoAR expression (P = 0.05). Analysis of tamoxifen response revealed that patients with ER-positive\\/HMG-CoAR tumors had a significant response to tamoxifen (P = 0.010) as well as

  1. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes predict response to chemotherapy in patients with advance non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Tiantuo; Ye, Jin; Li, Hongtao; Huang, Jing; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Benquan; Huang, Xubing; Hou, Jinghui

    2012-10-01

    Accumulating preclinical evidence suggests that anticancer immune responses contribute to the success of chemotherapy. The predictive significance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) for response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of TIL subtypes in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. In total, 159 patients with stage III and IV NSCLC were retrospectively enrolled. The prevalence of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) and Foxp3(+) TILs was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tumor tissue obtained before chemotherapy. The density of TILs subgroups was treated as dichotomous variables using the median values as cutoff. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences in overall survival between groups were determined using the Log-rank test. Prognostic effects of TIL subsets density were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. The presence of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), and FOXP3(+) TILs was not correlated with any clinicopathological features. Neither the prevalence of TILs nor combined analysis displayed obvious prognostic performances for overall survival in Cox regression model. Instead, higher FOXP3(+)/CD8(+) ratio in tumor sites was an independent factor for poor response to platinum-based chemotherapy in overall cohort. These findings suggest that immunological CD8(+) and FOXP3(+)Tregs cell infiltrate within tumor environment is predictive of response to platinum-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced NSCLC patients. The understanding of the clinical relevance of the microenvironmental immunological milieu might provide an important clue for the design of novel strategies in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Cluster analysis of quantitative parametric maps from DCE-MRI: application in evaluating heterogeneity of tumor response to antiangiogenic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Dastrù, Walter; Consolino, Lorena; Espak, Miklos; Arigoni, Maddalena; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a clustering approach to conventional analysis methods for assessing changes in pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) during antiangiogenic treatment in a breast cancer model. BALB/c mice bearing established transplantable her2+ tumors were treated with a DNA-based antiangiogenic vaccine or with an empty plasmid (untreated group). DCE-MRI was carried out by administering a dose of 0.05 mmol/kg of Gadocoletic acid trisodium salt, a Gd-based blood pool contrast agent (CA) at 1T. Changes in pharmacokinetic estimates (K(trans) and vp) in a nine-day interval were compared between treated and untreated groups on a voxel-by-voxel analysis. The tumor response to therapy was assessed by a clustering approach and compared with conventional summary statistics, with sub-regions analysis and with histogram analysis. Both the K(trans) and vp estimates, following blood-pool CA injection, showed marked and spatial heterogeneous changes with antiangiogenic treatment. Averaged values for the whole tumor region, as well as from the rim/core sub-regions analysis were unable to assess the antiangiogenic response. Histogram analysis resulted in significant changes only in the vp estimates (pclustering approach depicted marked changes in both the K(trans) and vp estimates, with significant spatial heterogeneity in vp maps in response to treatment (pclustered in three or four sub-regions. This study demonstrated the value of cluster analysis applied to pharmacokinetic DCE-MRI parametric maps for assessing tumor response to antiangiogenic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulff, A.M.; Fabel, M.; Freitag-Wolf, S.; Tepper, M.; Knabe, H.M.; Schäfer, J.P.; Jansen, O.; Bolte, H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future

  4. Volumetric response classification in metastatic solid tumors on MSCT: Initial results in a whole-body setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, A.M., E-mail: a.wulff@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Fabel, M. [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Freitag-Wolf, S., E-mail: freitag@medinfo.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Medizinische Informatik und Statistik, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Tepper, M., E-mail: m.tepper@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Knabe, H.M., E-mail: h.knabe@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Schäfer, J.P., E-mail: jp.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Jansen, O., E-mail: o.jansen@neurorad.uni-kiel.de [Klinik für Diagnostische Radiologie, Arnold-Heller-Straße 3, Haus 23, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Bolte, H., E-mail: hendrik.bolte@ukmuenster.de [Klinik für Nuklearmedizin, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude A1, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To examine technical parameters of measurement accuracy and differences in tumor response classification using RECIST 1.1 and volumetric assessment in three common metastasis types (lung nodules, liver lesions, lymph node metastasis) simultaneously. Materials and methods: 56 consecutive patients (32 female) aged 41–82 years with a wide range of metastatic solid tumors were examined with MSCT for baseline and follow up. Images were evaluated by three experienced radiologists using manual measurements and semi-automatic lesion segmentation. Institutional ethics review was obtained and all patients gave written informed consent. Data analysis comprised interobserver variability operationalized as coefficient of variation and categorical response classification according to RECIST 1.1 for both manual and volumetric measures. Continuous data were assessed for statistical significance with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and categorical data with Fleiss kappa. Results: Interobserver variability was 6.3% (IQR 4.6%) for manual and 4.1% (IQR 4.4%) for volumetrically obtained sum of relevant diameters (p < 0.05, corrected). 4–8 patients’ response to therapy was classified differently across observers by using volumetry compared to standard manual measurements. Fleiss kappa revealed no significant difference in categorical agreement of response classification between manual (0.7558) and volumetric (0.7623) measurements. Conclusion: Under standard RECIST thresholds there was no advantage of volumetric compared to manual response evaluation. However volumetric assessment yielded significantly lower interobserver variability. This may allow narrower thresholds for volumetric response classification in the future.

  5. Deriving mechanisms responsible for the lack of correlation between hypoxia and acidity in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Molavian

    Full Text Available Hypoxia and acidity are two main microenvironmental factors intimately associated with solid tumors and play critical roles in tumor growth and metastasis. The experimental results of Helmlinger and colleagues (Nature Medicine 3, 177, 1997 provide evidence of a lack of correlation between these factors on the micrometer scale in vivo and further show that the distribution of pH and pO(2 are heterogeneous. Here, using computational simulations, grounded in these experimental results, we show that the lack of correlation between pH and pO(2 and the heterogeneity in their shapes are related to the heterogeneous concentration of buffers and oxygen in the blood vessels, further amplified by the network of blood vessels and the cell metabolism. We also demonstrate that, although the judicious administration of anti-angiogenesis agents (normalization process in tumors may lead to recovery of the correlation between hypoxia and acidity, it may not normalize the pH throughout the whole tumor. However, an increase in the buffering capacity inside the blood vessels does appear to increase the extracellular pH throughout the whole tumor. Based on these results, we propose that the application of anti-angiogenic agents and at the same time increasing the buffering capacity of the tumor extracellular environment may be the most efficient way of normalizing the tumor microenvironment. As a by-product of our simulation we show that the recently observed lack of correlation between glucose consumption and hypoxia in cells which rely on respiration is related to the inhomogeneous consumption of glucose to oxygen concentration. We also demonstrate that this lack of correlation in cells which rely on glycolysis could be related to the heterogeneous concentration of oxygen inside the blood vessels.

  6. Mechanism study of tumor-specific immune responses induced by laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosong; Zhou, Feifan; Le, Henry; Wolf, Roman F.; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) has shown its efficacy against late-stage, metastatic cancers, both in pre-clinical studies and clinical pilot trials. However, the possible mechanism of LIT is still not fully understood. In our previous studies, we have shown that LIT induces tumor-specific antibodies that strongly bind to the target tumors. Tumor resistance in cured animals demonstrated long-term immunological effect of LIT. Successful transfer of adoptive immunity using spleen cells from LIT-cured animals indicated a long-term immunological memory of the host system. In clinical trials for the treatment of late-stage melanoma patients and breast cancer patients, the similar long-term, systemic effects have also been observed. To further study the immunological mechanism of LIT, immuno-histochemical analysis of patient tumor samples has performed before and after LIT treatment. Our results showed strong evidence that LIT significantly increases the infiltration of immune cells in the target tumors. Specifically, LIT appeared to drive the infiltrating immune cell populations in the direction of CD4, CD8 and CD68 T-cells. It is possible that activation and enhancement of both humeral and cellular arms of the host immune system are achievable by the treatment of LIT. These special features of LIT have contributed to the success of patient treatment. The underlying mechanism of LIT appears to be an in-situ autologous whole-cell cancer vaccination, using all components of tumors as sources of tumor antigens. Our preliminary mechanistic studies and future in-depth studies will contribute to the understanding and development of LIT as an effective modality for the treatment of late stage cancer patients who are facing severely limited options.

  7. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  8. Changes in microfilament and focal adhesion distribution with loss of androgen responsiveness in cultured mammary tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Yates, J; King, R J

    1981-01-01

    of the cells to grow in suspension culture. All these parameters were documented for androgen-responsive and -unresponsive cells grown in culture, as well as the transition of androgen-responsive to -unresponsive cells when deprived of androgen. The androgen-unresponsive cells had extensive and prominent...... microfilament bundles together with focal adhesions on the lower cell surface and also showed strict anchorage dependence for growth. In contrast, microfilament bundles and focal adhesions were absent from androgen-responsive cells, which furthermore had the ability to grow in suspension culture. Differences......, characteristics of both cell types were visible in the cell populations. However, at the stage where all androgen-responsive characteristics were lost, the cells were no longer androgen sensitive. The loss of androgen responsiveness in Shionogi 115 mouse mammary tumor cells is correlated with changes at the cell...

  9. Imatinib mesylate induces responses in patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor failing intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorentini Giammaria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imatinib mesylate represents a real major paradigm shift in cancer therapy, targeting the specific molecular abnormalities, crucial in the etiology of tumor. Intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC followed by embolization, has been considered an interesting palliative option for patients with liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST, due to the typically hypervascular pattern of the tumor. Aims: We report our experience with IAHC followed by Imatinib mesylate, in order to show the superiority of the specific molecular approach in liver metastases from GIST. Materials and Methods: Three patients (pts with pretreated massive liver metastases from GIST, received IAHC with Epirubicin 50 mg/mq, every 3 weeks for 6 cycles. At the evidence of progression, they received Imatinib mesylate. Results: We observed progressive diseases in all cases. In 1998, one patient underwent Thalidomide at 150 mg orally, every day for 4 months, with evidence of stable disease and clinical improvement. In 2001, two patients received Imatinib mesylate at 400 mg orally, every day, with evidence of partial response lasting 18+ months and 16 months. One of them had grade 3 neutropenia, with suspension of therapy for 3 weeks. Conclusion: No patient treated with IAHC, reported objective responses, but two of them obtained partial response after the assumption of Imatinib mesylate and one showed temporary stabilization with thalidomide. Imatinib mesylate represents a new opportunity in GIST therapy, targeting the specific molecular alteration. It seems to be superior to conventional intra arterial hepatic chemotherapy.

  10. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbe, Yvette; Klier, Ulrike; Linnebacher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4 + , activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested) could be observed. Cellular fusions of MSI + carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These hybrid cells may have great potential for cellular immunotherapy and

  11. Variability in blood flow and pO2 in tumors in response to carbogen breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzen, Jennifer L.; Braun, Rod D.; Ong, Aqui L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: There is speculation that the CO 2 in carbogen (95% O 2 , 5% CO 2 ) can block the vasoconstrictive effects of oxygen. However, it has recently been shown that blood flow in human tumors is variable while patients breathe carbogen. Furthermore, we have shown a consistent decrease in tumor blood flow (TBF) with carbogen breathing in the rat window chamber model. Also, we have previously shown that there is no significant difference in tumor growth time after radiation with air vs. carbogen breathing. This study was designed to investigate the effects of carbogen breathing on blood flow and oxygen levels in a solid tumor. Methods: Measurements were made in Fischer-344 rats with 8-10 mm diameter R3230Ac tumors transplanted either within the quadriceps muscle (n = 16) or subcutis (n = 14). Nontumor-bearing quadriceps muscle was studied in six other rats. After a 20-minute air-breathing baseline, rats breathed carbogen for an additional 40 minutes. Partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) was continuously monitored at one position for 60 minutes using 9-12 μm diameter oxygen microelectrodes. Blood flow was simultaneously monitored in all animals using laser Doppler flowmetry (1-2 probes/tumor). Results: Blood flow changes during carbogen breathing were variable in all tissues and intratumoral heterogeneity was observed. Despite variability in blood flow, pO 2 consistently increased in normal muscle but varied in both tumor sites. During carbogen breathing, the percent pO 2 measurements greater than the baseline average were 99.5% ± 0.4% (mean ± SEM), 42.7% ± 13.8%, and 79.8% ± 11.0% in normal muscle, subcutaneous tumor, and muscle tumor, respectively. To show the magnitude of change, average pO 2 values during air and carbogen breathing were calculated for each site. Normal muscle increased from 14.9 ± 2.3 to 39.0 ± 6.4 mm Hg (paired t-test; p = 0.009). Muscle tumors showed a rise from 14.6 ± 3.2 to 34.5 ± 8.2 mm Hg (p = 0.019). However, pO 2 in subcutaneous

  12. Modern cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeldovich, Y.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper fives a general review of modern cosmology. The following subjects are discussed: hot big bang and periodization of the evolution; Hubble expansion; the structure of the universe (pancake theory); baryon asymmetry; inflatory universe. (Auth.)

  13. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Packard

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1%/mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test. Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed.

  14. Metabolic Symbiosis and Immunomodulation: How Tumor Cell-Derived Lactate May Disturb Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morrot

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment (TME is composed by cellular and non-cellular components. Examples include the following: (i bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells, (ii fibroblasts, (iii blood vessels, (iv immune cells, and (v extracellular matrix components. In most cases, this combination of components may result in an inhospitable environment, in which a significant retrenchment in nutrients and oxygen considerably disturbs cell metabolism. Cancer cells are characterized by an enhanced uptake and utilization of glucose, a phenomenon described by Otto Warburg over 90 years ago. One of the main products of this reprogrammed cell metabolism is lactate. “Lactagenic” or lactate-producing cancer cells are characterized by their immunomodulatory properties, since lactate, the end product of the aerobic glycolysis, besides acting as an inducer of cellular signaling phenomena to influence cellular fate, might also play a role as an immunosuppressive metabolite. Over the last 10 years, it has been well accepted that in the TME, the lactate secreted by transformed cells is able to compromise the function and/or assembly of an effective immune response against tumors. Herein, we will discuss recent advances regarding the deleterious effect of high concentrations of lactate on the tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which might characterize an innovative way of understanding the tumor-immune privilege.

  15. Dendritic-cell-based immunotherapy evokes potent anti-tumor immune responses in CD105+ human renal cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Weng, De-Sheng; Pan, Ke; Zhou, Zi-Qi; Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yan; Jiang, Shan-Shan; Chen, Chang-Long; Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Chang, Alfred E; Wicha, Max S; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Li, Qiao; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2017-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation, progression, and resistance to therapeutic agents; they are usually less sensitive to conventional cancer therapies, and could cause tumor relapse. An ideal therapeutic strategy would therefore be to selectively target and destroy CSCs, thereby preventing tumor relapse. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with antigen derived from CD105+ human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) CSCs against renal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified "stem-like" characteristics of CD105+ cells in two human RCC cell lines: A498 and SK-RC-39. Loading with cell lysates did not change the characteristics of the DCs. However, DCs loaded with lysates derived from CD105+ CSCs induced more functionally specific active T cells and specific antibodies against CSCs, and clearly depressed the tumor growth in mice. Our results could form the basis for a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy for human RCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Functional Characterization and Drug Response of Freshly Established Patient-Derived Tumor Models with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Maletzki

    Full Text Available Patient-individual tumor models constitute a powerful platform for basic and translational analyses both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the labor-intensive and highly time-consuming process, only few well-characterized patient-derived cell lines and/or corresponding xenografts exist. In this study, we describe successful generation and functional analysis of novel tumor models from patients with sporadic primary colorectal carcinomas (CRC showing CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Initial DNA fingerprint analysis confirmed identity with the patient in all four cases. These freshly established cells showed characteristic features associated with the CIMP-phenotype (HROC40: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 3/8 marker methylated; HROC43: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC60: APCwt, TP53 mut, KRASwt; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC183: APC mut, TP53 mut, KRAS mut; 6/8 marker methylated. Cell lines were of epithelial origin (EpCAM+ with distinct morphology and growth kinetics. Response to chemotherapeutics was quite individual between cells, with stage I-derived cell line HROC60 being most susceptible towards standard clinically approved chemotherapeutics (e.g. 5-FU, Irinotecan. Of note, most cell lines were sensitive towards "non-classical" CRC standard drugs (sensitivity: Gemcitabin > Rapamycin > Nilotinib. This comprehensive analysis of tumor biology, genetic alterations and assessment of chemosensitivity towards a broad range of (chemo- therapeutics helps bringing forward the concept of personalized tumor therapy.

  17. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiner, Caecilia S.; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz; Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min −1  100 mL −1 ); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min −1  100 mL −1 ; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min −1  100 mL −1 , therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE

  18. Predicting pathologic tumor response to chemoradiotherapy with histogram distances characterizing longitudinal changes in 18F-FDG uptake patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shan; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yongxue; Chen, Wengen; D’Souza, Warren D.; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A family of fluorine-18 (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) features based on histogram distances is proposed for predicting pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). These features describe the longitudinal change of FDG uptake distribution within a tumor. Methods: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer treated with CRT plus surgery were included in this study. All patients underwent PET/CT scans before (pre-) and after (post-) CRT. The two scans were first rigidly registered, and the original tumor sites were then manually delineated on the pre-PET/CT by an experienced nuclear medicine physician. Two histograms representing the FDG uptake distribution were extracted from the pre- and the registered post-PET images, respectively, both within the delineated tumor. Distances between the two histograms quantify longitudinal changes in FDG uptake distribution resulting from CRT, and thus are potential predictors of tumor response. A total of 19 histogram distances were examined and compared to both traditional PET response measures and Haralick texture features. Receiver operating characteristic analyses and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess their predictive ability. Results: Among all tested histogram distances, seven bin-to-bin and seven crossbin distances outperformed traditional PET response measures using maximum standardized uptake value (AUC = 0.70) or total lesion glycolysis (AUC = 0.80). The seven bin-to-bin distances were: L2 distance (AUC = 0.84), χ2 distance (AUC = 0.83), intersection distance (AUC = 0.82), cosine distance (AUC = 0.83), squared Euclidean distance (AUC = 0.83), L1 distance (AUC = 0.82), and Jeffrey distance (AUC = 0.82). The seven crossbin distances were: quadratic-chi distance (AUC = 0.89), earth mover distance (AUC = 0.86), fast earth mover distance (AUC = 0.86), diffusion distance (AUC = 0.88), Kolmogorov-Smirnov distance (AUC = 0.88), quadratic form distance

  19. Histogram Analysis of CT Perfusion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Predicting Response to Transarterial Radioembolization: Value of Tumor Heterogeneity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, Caecilia S., E-mail: caecilia.reiner@usz.ch; Gordic, Sonja; Puippe, Gilbert; Morsbach, Fabian; Wurnig, Moritz [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Schaefer, Niklaus; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo evaluate in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), whether assessment of tumor heterogeneity by histogram analysis of computed tomography (CT) perfusion helps predicting response to transarterial radioembolization (TARE).Materials and MethodsSixteen patients (15 male; mean age 65 years; age range 47–80 years) with HCC underwent CT liver perfusion for treatment planning prior to TARE with Yttrium-90 microspheres. Arterial perfusion (AP) derived from CT perfusion was measured in the entire tumor volume, and heterogeneity was analyzed voxel-wise by histogram analysis. Response to TARE was evaluated on follow-up imaging (median follow-up, 129 days) based on modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST). Results of histogram analysis and mean AP values of the tumor were compared between responders and non-responders. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated to determine the parameters’ ability to discriminate responders from non-responders.ResultsAccording to mRECIST, 8 patients (50 %) were responders and 8 (50 %) non-responders. Comparing responders and non-responders, the 50th and 75th percentile of AP derived from histogram analysis was significantly different [AP 43.8/54.3 vs. 27.6/34.3 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}); p < 0.05], while the mean AP of HCCs (43.5 vs. 27.9 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}; p > 0.05) was not. Further heterogeneity parameters from histogram analysis (skewness, coefficient of variation, and 25th percentile) did not differ between responders and non-responders (p > 0.05). If the cut-off for the 75th percentile was set to an AP of 37.5 mL min{sup −1} 100 mL{sup −1}, therapy response could be predicted with a sensitivity of 88 % (7/8) and specificity of 75 % (6/8).ConclusionVoxel-wise histogram analysis of pretreatment CT perfusion indicating tumor heterogeneity of HCC improves the pretreatment prediction of response to TARE.

  20. H2O2-responsive liposomal nanoprobe for photoacoustic inflammation imaging and tumor theranostics via in vivo chromogenic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liang, Chao; Sun, Xiaoqi; Chen, Jiawen; Yang, Zhijuan; Zhao, He; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-05-23

    Abnormal H 2 O 2 levels are closely related to many diseases, including inflammation and cancers. Herein, we simultaneously load HRP and its substrate, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), into liposomal nanoparticles, obtaining a Lipo@HRP&ABTS optical nanoprobe for in vivo H 2 O 2 -responsive chromogenic assay with great specificity and sensitivity. In the presence of H 2 O 2 , colorless ABTS would be converted by HRP into the oxidized form with strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, enabling photoacoustic detection of H 2 O 2 down to submicromolar concentrations. Using Lipo@HRP&ABTS as an H 2 O 2 -responsive nanoprobe, we could accurately detect the inflammation processes induced by LPS or bacterial infection in which H 2 O 2 is generated. Meanwhile, upon systemic administration of this nanoprobe we realize in vivo photoacoustic imaging of small s.c. tumors (∼2 mm in size) as well as orthotopic brain gliomas, by detecting H 2 O 2 produced by tumor cells. Interestingly, local injection of Lipo@HRP&ABTS further enables differentiation of metastatic lymph nodes from those nonmetastatic ones, based on their difference in H 2 O 2 contents. Moreover, using the H 2 O 2 -dependent strong NIR absorbance of Lipo@HRP&ABTS, tumor-specific photothermal therapy is also achieved. This work thus develops a sensitive H 2 O 2 -responsive optical nanoprobe useful not only for in vivo detection of inflammation but also for tumor-specific theranostic applications.

  1. Computer-aided global breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy: performance assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Zheng, Bin; Cheng, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used increasingly in breast cancer diagnosis and assessment of cancer treatment efficacy. In this study, we applied a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to automatically segment breast regions depicting on MR images and used the kinetic image features computed from the global breast MR images acquired before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to build a new quantitative model to predict response of the breast cancer patients to the chemotherapy. To assess performance and robustness of this new prediction model, an image dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 151 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy was retrospectively assembled and used. Among them, 63 patients had "complete response" (CR) to chemotherapy in which the enhanced contrast levels inside the tumor volume (pre-treatment) was reduced to the level as the normal enhanced background parenchymal tissues (post-treatment), while 88 patients had "partially response" (PR) in which the high contrast enhancement remain in the tumor regions after treatment. We performed the studies to analyze the correlation among the 22 global kinetic image features and then select a set of 4 optimal features. Applying an artificial neural network trained with the fusion of these 4 kinetic image features, the prediction model yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.83+/-0.04. This study demonstrated that by avoiding tumor segmentation, which is often difficult and unreliable, fusion of kinetic image features computed from global breast MR images without tumor segmentation can also generate a useful clinical marker in predicting efficacy of chemotherapy.

  2. Up-regulation of GTPBP4 in colorectal carcinoma is responsible for tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Haitao; Jin, Sufeng; Zhang, Na; Xu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    GTP binding protein 4(GTPBP4), a member of GTP-binding protein family, was previously characterized as a tumor suppressor that regulates and requires merlin to suppress cell proliferation. However, the role of GTPBP4 in the metastasis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) remains unelucidated. Here, we observed that GTPBP4 was detected at higher levels in CRC metastatic tissues than that in the primary tumor tissues. Notably, up-regulation of GTPBP4 was closely correlated with tumor metastasis in CRCs. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated GTPBP4 as an independent prognostic factor for CRC patients (hazard ratio = 2.693, 95% confident interval: 1.193–6.083, p = 0.017). Functional studies established that knockdown of GTPBP4 impeded, whereas ectopic expression of GTPBP4 enhanced cell motility and tumor metastasis in CRC cells. Interestingly, mechanistic investigations suggested that GTPBP4 may disorganize actin cytoskeleton through repressing RhoA signaling. Taken together, our research uncovered that GTPBP4 promotes CRC metastasis by disrupting actin cytoskeleton, which is mediated by the reduced RhoA activity. Strategies targeting GTPBP4 will be promising for CRC patients with metastases. - Highlights: • Up-regulation of GTPBP4 is detected in CRC metastatic tissues and closely correlated with tumor metastasis. • Increase of GTPBP4 is closely associated with poor prognosis. • GTPBP4 promotes cell motility and tumor metastasis in CRC cells. • GTPBP4 induces filamentous actin rearrangement specifically by repressing the activity of RhoA. • GTPBP4 may be a novel therapeutic target for CRC patients with metastasis.

  3. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  4. Radiotherapy in conjunction with 7-hydroxystaurosporine: a multimodal approach with tumor pO2 as a potential marker of therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadeem; Mupparaju, Sriram P; Hou, Huagang; Lariviere, Jean P; Demidenko, Eugene; Swartz, Harold M; Eastman, Alan

    2009-11-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors potentially could be used to enhance cell killing by DNA-targeted therapeutic modalities such as radiotherapy. UCN-01 (7-hydroxystaurosporine) inhibits S and G2 checkpoint arrest in the cells of various malignant cell lines and has been investigated in combination with chemotherapy. However, little is known about its potential use in combination with radiotherapy. We report the effect of 20 Gy radiation given in conjunction with UCN-01 on the pO2 and growth of subcutaneous RIF-1 tumors. Multisite EPR oximetry was used for repeated, non-invasive tumor pO2 measurements. The effect of UCN-01 and/or 20 Gy on tumor pO2 and tumor volume was investigated to determine therapeutic outcomes. Untreated RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a tissue pO2 of 5-7 mmHg. Treatment with 20 Gy or UCN-01 significantly reduced tumor growth, and a modest increase in tumor pO2 was observed in tumors treated with 20 Gy. However, irradiation with 20 Gy 12 h after UCN-01 treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and a significant increase in tumor pO2 to 16-28 mmHg from day 1 onward compared to the control, UCN-01 or 20-Gy groups. Treatment with UCN-01 12 h after 20 Gy also led to a similar growth inhibition of the tumors and a similar increase in tumor pO2. The changes in tumor pO2 observed after the treatment correlated inversely with the tumor volume in the groups receiving UCN-01 with 20 Gy. This multimodal approach could be used to enhance the outcome of radiotherapy. Furthermore, tumor pO2 could be a potential marker of therapeutic response.

  5. APOMAB, a La-specific monoclonal antibody, detects the apoptotic tumor response to life-prolonging and DNA-damaging chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antineoplastic therapy may impair the survival of malignant cells to produce cell death. Consequently, direct measurement of tumor cell death in vivo is a highly desirable component of therapy response monitoring. We have previously shown that APOMAB representing the DAB4 clone of a La/SSB-specific murine monoclonal autoantibody is a malignant cell-death ligand, which accumulates preferentially in tumors in an antigen-specific and dose-dependent manner after DNA-damaging chemotherapy. Here, we aim to image tumor uptake of APOMAB (DAB4 and to define its biological correlates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brisk tumor cell apoptosis is induced in the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with DNA-damaging cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy. Tumor and normal organ accumulation of Indium 111 ((111In-labeled La-specific DAB4 mAb as whole IgG or IgG fragments was quantified by whole-body static imaging and organ assay in tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical measurements of tumor caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage, which are indicators of early and late apoptosis, respectively, were correlated with tumor accumulation of DAB4. Increased tumor accumulation of DAB4 was associated directly with both the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor cell death and DAB4 binding per dead tumor cell. Tumor DAB4 accumulation correlated with cumulative caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage as tumor biomarkers of apoptosis and was directly related to the extended median survival time of tumor-bearing mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Radiolabeled La-specific monoclonal antibody, DAB4, detected dead tumor cells after chemotherapy, rather than chemosensitive normal tissues of gut and bone marrow. DAB4 identified late apoptotic tumor cells in vivo. Hence, radiolabeled DAB4 may usefully image responses to human carcinoma therapy because DAB4 would capture the protracted cell death of carcinoma. We believe that the

  6. O6-Methylguanine DNA Methyltransferase Status Does Not Predict Response or Resistance to Alkylating Agents in Well-Differentiated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Nitya; Klimstra, David S; Horvat, Natally; Zhang, Liying; Chou, Joanne F; Capanu, Marinela; Basturk, Olca; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Allen, Peter J; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2017-07-01

    Alkylating agents have activity in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WD panNETs). In glioblastoma multiforme, decreased activity of O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) predicts response; in panNETs, MGMT relevance is unknown. We identified patients with WD panNETs treated with alkylating agents, determined best overall response by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, and performed MGMT activity testing. Fifty-six patients were identified; 26 (46%) of the 56 patients experienced partial response, 24 (43%) of 56 experienced stable disease, and 6 (11%) of 56 experienced progression of disease. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status was available for 36 tumors. For tumors with partial response, 10 (67%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 5 (33%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with stable disease, 7 (47%) of 15 were MGMT deficient, and 8 (53%) of 15 were MGMT intact. For tumors with progression of disease, 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT deficient, and 3 (50%) of 6 were MGMT intact. We observed response and resistance to alkylating agents in MGMT-deficient and MGMT-intact tumors. O-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase status should not guide alkylating agent therapy in WD panNETs.

  7. Estrogen Responsiveness of the TFIID Subunit TAF4B in the Normal Mouse Ovary and in Ovarian Tumors1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R.; Hodgkinson, Kendra M.; Binder, April K.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation. PMID:24068106

  8. Estrogen responsiveness of the TFIID subunit TAF4B in the normal mouse ovary and in ovarian tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, Jennifer R; Hodgkinson, Kendra M; Binder, April K; Seymour, Kimberly A; Korach, Kenneth S; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Freiman, Richard N

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen signaling in the ovary is a fundamental component of normal ovarian function, and evidence also indicates that excessive estrogen is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. We have previously demonstrated that the gonadally enriched TFIID subunit TAF4B, a paralog of the general transcription factor TAF4A, is required for fertility in mice and for the proliferation of ovarian granulosa cells following hormonal stimulation. However, the relationship between TAF4B and estrogen signaling in the normal ovary or during ovarian tumor initiation and progression has yet to be defined. Herein, we show that Taf4b mRNA and TAF4B protein, but not Taf4a mRNA or TAF4A protein, are increased in whole ovaries and granulosa cells of the ovary after exposure to 17beta-estradiol or the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol and that this response occurs within hours after stimulation. Furthermore, this increase occurs via nuclear estrogen receptors both in vivo and in a mouse granulosa cancer cell line, NT-1. We observe a significant increase in Taf4b mRNA in estrogen-supplemented mouse ovarian tumors, which correlates with diminished survival of these mice. These data highlight the novel response of the general transcription factor TAF4B to estrogen in the normal ovary and during ovarian tumor progression in the mouse, suggesting its potential role in regulating actions downstream of estrogen stimulation.

  9. Optical Imaging of Tumor Response to Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment and Irradiation in an Orthotopic Mouse Model of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Braks (Joanna); L. Spiegelberg (Linda); S. Koljenović (Senada); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); S. Keereweer (Stijn); R. Kanaar (Roland); E.B. Wolvius (Eppo); J. Essers (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used in the treatment of radiation-induced tissue injury but its effect on (residual) tumor tissue is indistinct and therefore investigated in this study. Procedures: Orthotopic FaDu tumors were established in mice, and the response of the

  10. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Michiel S.; Brody, Jonathan R.; Dezentje, David A.; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C.; Swartz, Michael J.; DeMarzo, Angelo M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Isacoff, William H.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kern, Scott E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Experimental

  11. Factors Predictive of Tumor Recurrence and Survival After Initial Complete Response of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Ryu; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Takeuchi, Yoji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Tatsuta, Masaharu; Yano, Masahiko; Imai, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Kinji

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess factors predictive of recurrent disease and survival after achieving initial complete response (CR) to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who had clinical Stage I-IVA esophageal cancer and received definitive CRT between 2001 and 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 269 patients with esophageal cancer, 110 who achieved CR after definitive CRT were included in the analyses. Chemoradiotherapy mainly consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin and fluorouracil with concurrent radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. We identified 28 recurrences and 28 deaths during follow-up. The cumulative 1- and 3-year recurrence rates were 18% and 32%, respectively. By univariate and multivariate analyses, tumor category (hazard ratio [HR] 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-30.2; p = 0.015) was an independent risk factor for local recurrence, whereas age (HR 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-14.0; p = 0.034) and primary tumor location (HR 4.5; 95% CI 1.6-12.4; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for regional lymph node or distant recurrences. The cumulative overall 1- and 3-year survival rates were 91% and 66%, respectively. As expected, recurrence was associated with poor survival (p = 0.019). By univariate and multivariate analyses, primary tumor location (HR 3.8; 95% CI 1.2-12.0; p = 0.024) and interval to recurrence (HR 4.3; 95% CI 1.3-14.4; p = 0.018) were independent factors predictive of survival after recurrence. Conclusion: Risk of recurrence after definitive CRT for esophageal cancer was associated with tumor category, age, and primary tumor location; this information may help in improved prognostication for these patients.

  12. Early-Modern Irreligion and Theological Analogy: A Response to Gavin Hyman’s A Short History of Atheism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Linford

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, many Christians have understood God’s transcendence to imply God’s properties categorically differ from any created properties. For multiple historical figures, a problem arose for religious language: how can one talk of God at all if none of our predicates apply to God? What are we to make of creeds and Biblical passages that seem to predicate creaturely properties, such as goodness and wisdom, of God? Thomas Aquinas offered a solution: God is to be spoken of only through analogy (the doctrine of analogy. Gavin Hyman argues Aquinas’s doctrine of analogy was neglected prior to the early-modern period and the neglect of analogy produced the conception of a god vulnerable to atheistic arguments. Contra Hyman, in this paper, I show early-modern atheism arose in a theological context in which there was an active debate concerning analogy. Peter Browne (1665–1735 and William King (1650–1729 offered two competing conceptions of analogical predication that were debated through the 19th century, with interlocutors such as the freethinker Anthony Collins (1676–1729, theologian/philosopher George Berkeley (1685–1753, and skeptic David Hume (1711–1776. Lastly, I discuss the 18th century debate over theological analogy as part of the background relevant to understanding Hume’s 'Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion'.

  13. The new criteria of clinical response for the primary tumor based on the findings of histological response after chemoradiation therapy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi; Natsugoe, Shoji; Yokomakura, Naoya; Matsumoto, Masataka; Aikou, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) increased in order to improve the surgical resectabilty and clinical outcome. It is important to accurately assess the effect of CRT for selecting further treatment and predicting prognosis. We tried to make the new criteria for imaging diagnosis after we reevaluated the discrepancy between clinical and histological effect of CRT. Subjects were 36 patients with advanced esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy with lymphadenectomy after CRT that consisted of 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin and 40 Gy of radiation. The clinical and histological response was firstly evaluated based on esophageal disease guidelines for clinical and pathologic studies on carcinoma of the esophagus by the Japanese Society of Clinical response in imaging was reassessed based on the histological response. The number of tumors judged as clinical complete response/partial response/no change (CR/PR/NC) was 0/26/10, and the histological grading 1/2/3 was 17/11/8, respectively. Imaging for Grade 1 tumors showed the existence of viable cancer cells in biopsy specimen. Of 16 patients with such finding, 14 (88%) were histologically judged as Grade 1. Imaging characteristics for grade 3 tumors was more than a 75% reduction in esophagography, and the existence of scar formation by esophagoscopy. All five (100%) patients with these findings were histologically judged as Grade 3. The findings of grade 1 and 3 based on new criteria were independent predictive factors for CRT effect. According to new criteria, it was possible to predict the histological effect by the combination of esophagography and endoscopy in more than 80% of patients after CRT. Our new criteria may offer important information on the selection of further treatment or the prediction of prognosis after CRT in patients with esophageal cancer. (author)

  14. Anti-cancer, pharmacokinetics and tumor localization studies of pH-, RF- and thermo-responsive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoj Rejinold, N; Thomas, Reju George; Muthiah, Muthunarayanan; Chennazhi, K P; Manzoor, K; Park, In-Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    The curcumin-encapsulated chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam) nanoparticles containing gold nanoparticles (Au-CRC-TRC-NPs) were developed by ionic cross-linking method. After "optimum RF exposure" at 40 W for 5 min, Au-CRC-TRC-NPs dissipated heat energy in the range of ∼42°C, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of chitosan-graft-poly(N-vinyl caprolactam), causing controlled curcumin release and apoptosis to cancer cells. Further, in vivo PK/PD studies on swiss albino mice revealed that Au-CRC-TRC-NPs could be sustained in circulation for a week with no harm to internal organs. The colon tumor localization studies revealed that Au-CRC-TRC-NPs were retained in tumor for a week. These results throw light on their feasibility as multi-responsive nanomedicine for RF-assisted cancer treatment modalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Association Between Inflammatory Diet Pattern and Risk of Colorectal Carcinoma Subtypes Classified by Immune Responses to Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Nishihara, Reiko; Qian, Zhi Rong; Tabung, Fred K; Nevo, Daniel; Zhang, Xuehong; Song, Mingyang; Cao, Yin; Mima, Kosuke; Masugi, Yohei; Shi, Yan; da Silva, Annacarolina; Twombly, Tyler; Gu, Mancang; Li, Wanwan; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kosumi, Keisuke; Inamura, Kentaro; Nowak, Jonathan A; Drew, David A; Lochhead, Paul; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Wu, Kana; Wang, Molin; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-12-01

    Dietary patterns affect systemic and local intestinal inflammation, which have been linked to colorectal carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation can interfere with the adaptive immune response. We investigated whether the association of a diet that promotes intestinal inflammation with risk of colorectal carcinoma was stronger for tumors with lower lymphocytic reactions than tumors with higher lymphocytic reactions. We collected data from the molecular pathological epidemiology databases of 2 prospective cohort studies: the Nurses' Health Study (since 1976) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (since 1986). We used duplication-method time-varying Cox proportional cause-specific hazards regression to assess the association of empirical dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) score (derived from food frequency questionnaire data) with colorectal carcinoma subtype. Foods that contribute to high EDIP scores include red and processed meats, refined grains, carbonated beverages, and some vegetables; foods that contribute to low EDIP scores include beer, wine, coffee, tea, yellow and leafy vegetables, and fruit juice. Colorectal tissue samples were analyzed histologically for patterns of lymphocytic reactions (Crohn's-like lymphoid reaction, peritumoral lymphocytic reaction, intratumoral periglandular reaction, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes). During follow-up of 124,433 participants, we documented 1311 incident colon and rectal cancer cases with available tissue data. The association between the EDIP and colorectal cancer risk was significant (P trend  = .02), and varied with degree of peritumoral lymphocytic reaction (P heterogeneity colorectal cancer with an absent or low peritumoral lymphocytic reaction (highest vs lowest EDIP score quintile hazard ratio, 2.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-4.23; P trend .80). In 2 prospective cohort studies, we associated inflammatory diets with a higher risk of colorectal cancer subtype that contains little or no peritumoral

  16. A facile route to form self-carried redox-responsive vorinostat nanodrug for effective solid tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han LQ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leiqiang Han, Tianqi Wang, Jingliang Wu, Xiaolan Yin, Hao Fang, Na Zhang School of Pharmaceutical Science, Shandong University, Ji’nan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Small molecule-based nanodrugs with nanoparticles (NPs that are mainly composed of small molecules, have been considered as a promising candidate for a next-generation nanodrug, owing to their unique properties. Vorinostat (SAHA is a canonical US Food and Drug Administration-approved histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, the lack of efficacy against solid tumors hinders its progress in clinical use. Herein, a novel nanodrug of SAHA was developed based on disulfide-linked prodrug SAHA-S-S-VE. SAHA-S-S-VE could self-assemble into 148 nm NPs by disulfide-induced mechanisms, which were validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Under reduced conditions, the redox-responsive behavior of SAHA-S-S-VE was investigated, and the HDAC inhibition results verified the efficient release of free SAHA. With a biocompatible d-a-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS functionalization, the SAHA-S-S-VE/TPGS NPs exhibited low critical aggregation concentration of 4.5 µM and outstanding stability in vitro with drug-loading capacity of 24%. In vitro biological assessment indicated that SAHA-S-S-VE/TPGS NPs had significant anticancer activity against HepG2. Further in vivo evaluation demonstrated that the resulting NPs could be accumulated in the tumor region and inhibit the tumor growth effectively. This approach, which turned SAHA into a self-assembled redox-responsive nanodrug, provided a new channel for the use of HDAC inhibitor in solid tumor therapy. Keywords: SAHA, HDAC, small molecule, nanoparticles, self-assemble, disulfide bond

  17. Prognostic significance of pathological response of primary tumor and metastatic axillary lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiavelli, M R; Romero, A O; Pérez, J E; Lacava, J A; Domínguez, M E; Rodríguez, R; Barbieri, M R; Romero Acuña, L A; Romero Acuña, J M; Langhi, M J; Amato, S; Ortiz, E H; Vallejo, C T; Leone, B A

    1998-01-01

    The prognostic significance of pathological response of primary tumor and metastatic axillary lymph nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy was assessed in patients with noninflammatory locally advanced breast carcinoma. Between January 1989 and April 1995, 148 consecutive patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma participated in the study. Of these, 140 fully evaluable patients (67, stage IIIA; 73, stage IIIB) were treated with three courses of 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FAC), followed by modified radical mastectomy when technically feasible or definitive radiation therapy. The median age was 53 years (range, 26 to 75 years); 55% of patients were postmenopausal. Objective response was recorded in 99 of 140 patients (71%; 95% confidence interval, 63% to 79%). Complete response occurred in 11 patients (8%), and partial response occurred in 88 patients (63%). No change was recorded in 37 patients (26%), and progressive disease occurred in 4 patients (3%). One hundred and thirty-six patients underwent the planned surgery. Maximal pathological response of the primary tumor (in situ carcinoma or minimal microscopic residual tumor) was observed in 24 (18%); 112 patients (82%) presented minimal pathological response of the primary tumor (gross residual tumor). The number of metastatic axillary nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy was as follows: N0, 39 patients (29%); N1-N3, 35 patients (26%); > N3, 62 patients (45%). Considering the initial TNM status, 75% of the patients had decreases in tumor compartment after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Also, 31% and 23% of patients with clinical N1 and N2, respectively, showed uninvolved axillary lymph nodes. A significant correlation was noted between pathological response of primary tumor and the number of metastatic axillary lymph nodes. Median disease-free survival was 34 months, whereas median overall survival was 66 months. Pathological responses of both primary tumor and metastatic axillary lymph nodes

  18. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ra Choi

    Full Text Available To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model.Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria.3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05. 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97 as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958-0.988. Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961.3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume.

  19. Adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: Response to chemoradiotherapy is associated with decrease of metabolic tumor volume as measured on PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedl, Johannes B.; Colen, Rivka R.; Holalkere, Nagaraj S.; Fischman, Alan J.; Choi, Noah C.; Blake, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We determined whether evaluation of treatment response is feasible by measuring metabolic tumor volume parameters on 18F-FDG (Fluorodeoxyglucose) PET-CT (Positron emission tomography-Computed tomography). We compared the response evaluation based on metabolic tumor volume parameters to a histopathologic and clinical response evaluation (clinical response criteria: RECIST criteria = Response evaluation criteria in solid tumors, and WHO criteria = World health organization). Patients and methods: A total of 51 study subjects with adenocarcinomas (Type I due to Siewert classification) of the esophagus underwent PET-CT scans before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Tumor volume, maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV) were assessed before and after chemoradiotherapy. Furthermore, the total lesion glycolysis (TLG) was calculated by multiplying the tumor volume by the mean SUV of the volume. Clinical response evaluation was performed with endoscopic ultrasound and CT using RECIST and WHO criteria. The reference standard for treatment response was the postsurgical histopathology. Results: The decrease of tumor volume between the pre- and post-treatment PET-CT scans was a better predictor of histopathologic response and survival than the decrease of the SUV and of the clinical response evaluation based on RECIST and WHO criteria. The highest accuracy, however, was achieved when using the TLG for the identification of treatment responders. A decrease of the TLG by >78% between pre- and post-therapy scans predicted histopathologic response with a sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 93%, respectively. Conclusions: Tumor volume and TLG can be used to assess treatment response and survival in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma

  20. MRI evaluation of residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: influence of patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics on the correlation with pathological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diguisto, Caroline; Ouldamer, Lobna; Arbion, Flavie; Vildé, Anne; Body, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the residual tumor measured on magnetic resonance imaging and pathological results and to assess whether this correlation varies according to patient, tumor or chemotherapy characteristics. The study population included women treated for breast cancer with indication of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in our tertiary breast cancer Unit between January 2008 and December 2011. Factors related to patients, tumor and chemotherapy were studied. Pearson's correlation coefficient between the size of the tumor on MRI and pathological response was calculated for the entire population. It was also calculated according to patient, tumor and chemotherapy characteristics. During the study period, 107 consecutive women were included. The size of residual tumor on the MRI significantly correlated with the size on pathological result with a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.52 (pcorrelation was stronger for women aged 50 years and older (r=0.64, pcorrelation was stronger for those with triple-negative tumors (r=0.69, p=0.002) but weaker for those with tumors with a ductal carcinoma in situ component (r =0.18, p=0.42). The size of breast cancer obtained by MRI is significantly correlated to the pathological size of the tumor. This correlation was stronger among women aged 50 years and more, among post-menopausal women, and among women who had triple-negative tumors. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Some implications of Scale Relativity theory in avascular stages of growth of solid tumors in the presence of an immune system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzea, C Gh; Agop, M; Moraru, Evelina; Stana, Bogdan A; Gîrţu, Manuela; Iancu, D

    2011-08-07

    We present a traveling-wave analysis of a reduced mathematical model describing the growth of a solid tumor in the presence of an immune system response in the framework of Scale Relativity theory. Attention is focused upon the attack of tumor cells by tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic lymphocytes (TICLs), in a small multicellular tumor, without necrosis and at some stage prior to (tumor-induced) angiogenesis. For a particular choice of parameters, the underlying system of partial differential equations is able to simulate the well-documented phenomenon of cancer dormancy and propagation of a perturbation in the tumor cell concentration by cnoidal modes, by depicting spatially heterogeneous tumor cell distributions that are characterized by a relatively small total number of tumor cells. This behavior is consistent with several immunomorphological investigations. Moreover, the alteration of certain parameters of the model is enough to induce soliton like modes and soliton packets into the system, which in turn result in tumor invasion in the form of a standard traveling wave. In the same framework of Scale Relativity theory, a very important feature of malignant tumors also results, that even in avascular stages they might propagate and invade healthy tissues, by means of a diffusion on a Newtonian fluid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rat Tumor Response to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Plasma 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid Levels, and Tumor Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley D. McPhail

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The dose-dependent effects of 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA on rat GH3 prolactinomas were investigated in vivo. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI was used to assess tumor blood flow/permeability pretreatment and 24 hours posttreatment with 0, 100, 200, or 350 mg/kg DMXAA. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using Ktrans and the integrated area under the gadolinium time curve (IAUGC as response biomarkers. Highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to determine the plasma concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA following treatment to provide an index of increased vessel permeability and vascular damage. Finally, tumor necrosis was assessed by grading hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections cut from the same tumors investigated by MRI. Both tumor Ktrans and IAUGC were significantly reduced 24 hours posttreatment with 350 mg/kg DMXAA only, with no evidence of dose response. HPLC demonstrated a significant increase in plasma 5-HIAA 24 hours posttreatment with 200 and 350 mg/kg DMXAA. Histologic analysis revealed some evidence of tumor necrosis following treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg DMXAA, reaching significance with 350 mg/kg DMXAA. The absence of any reduction in Ktrans or IAUGC following treatment with 200 mg/kg, despite a significant increase in 5-HIAA, raises concerns about the utility of established DCE-MRI biomarkers to assess tumor response to DMXAA.

  3. The response of hypoxic cells in SCCVII murine tumors to treatment with cisplatin and x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, R.D.; Durand, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of enhancement of radiation effects by cisplatin, including radiosensitization of hypoxic cells, drug-induced tumor reoxygenation, and inhibition of repair of sublethal radiation damage, were examined in the murine SCCVII model. Combination radiation/drug treatments were most effective when drug exposure preceded irradiation of animals breathing a reduced oxygen atmosphere, indicating that the primary interaction between the modalities was a cisplatin-induced increase in the oxygenation status of the acutely hypoxic cells in those tumors. Delivering cisplatin prior to or immediately after the first of two 5 Gy fractions was more effective than combinations with a single x-ray exposure, suggesting that proper sequences of the combined modalities may augment natural reoxygenation processes

  4. Functional diffusion map: A noninvasive MRI biomarker for early stratification of clinical brain tumor response

    OpenAIRE

    Moffat, Bradford A.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Meyer, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Dong, Qian; Tsien, Christina; Mukherji, Suresh; Quint, Douglas J.; Gebarski, Stephen S.; Robertson, Patricia L.; Junck, Larry R.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of radiation and chemotherapy efficacy for brain cancer patients is traditionally accomplished by measuring changes in tumor size several months after therapy has been administered. The ability to use noninvasive imaging during the early stages of fractionated therapy to determine whether a particular treatment will be effective would provide an opportunity to optimize individual patient management and avoid unnecessary systemic toxicity, expense, and treatment delays. We investiga...

  5. The role of quantitative estrogen receptor status in predicting tumor response at surgery in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jacques; Gandhi, Sonal; Li, Nim; Lu, Fang-I; Trudeau, Maureen

    2017-07-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) negative (-) breast cancer (BC) patients have better tumor response rates than ER-positive (+) patients after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT). We conducted a retrospective review using the institutional database "Biomatrix" to assess the value of quantitative ER status in predicting tumor response at surgery and to identify potential predictors of survival outcomes. Univariate followed by multivariable regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between quantitative ER and tumor response assessed as tumor size reduction and pathologic complete response (pCR). Predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified using a cox proportional hazards model (CPH). A log-rank test was used to compare RFS between groups if a significant predictor was identified. 304 patients were included with a median follow-up of 43.3 months (Q1-Q3 28.7-61.1) and a mean age of 49.7 years (SD 10.9). Quantitative ER was inversely associated with tumor size reduction and pCR (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00, p = 0.027 and 0.98 95% CI 0.97-0.99, p Quantitative ER status is inversely associated with tumor response in BC patients treated with NCT. A cut-off of 60 and 80% predicts best the association with tumor size reduction and pCR, respectively. Therefore, patients with an ER status higher than the cut-off might benefit from a neoadjuvant endocrine therapy approach. Patients with pCR had better survival outcomes independently of their tumor phenotype. Further prospective studies are needed to validate the clinical utility of quantitative ER as a predictive marker of tumor response.

  6. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  7. The Dual Role of Cellular Senescence in Developing Tumors and Their Response to Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schosserer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence describes an irreversible growth arrest characterized by distinct morphology, gene expression pattern, and secretory phenotype. The final or intermediate stages of senescence can be reached by different genetic mechanisms and in answer to different external and internal stresses. It has been maintained in the literature but never proven by clearcut experiments that the induction of senescence serves the evolutionary purpose of protecting the individual from development and growth of cancers. This hypothesis was recently scrutinized by new experiments and found to be partly true, but part of the gene activities now known to happen in senescence are also needed for cancer growth, leading to the view that senescence is a double-edged sword in cancer development. In current cancer therapy, cellular senescence is, on the one hand, intended to occur in tumor cells, as thereby the therapeutic outcome is improved, but might, on the other hand, also be induced unintentionally in non-tumor cells, causing inflammation, secondary tumors, and cancer relapse. Importantly, organismic aging leads to accumulation of senescent cells in tissues and organs of aged individuals. Senescent cells can occur transiently, e.g., during embryogenesis or during wound healing, with beneficial effects on tissue homeostasis and regeneration or accumulate chronically in tissues, which detrimentally affects the microenvironment by de- or transdifferentiation of senescent cells and their neighboring stromal cells, loss of tissue specific functionality, and induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, an increased secretory profile consisting of pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling factors. These factors shape their surroundings toward a pro-carcinogenic microenvironment, which fuels the development of aging-associated cancers together with the accumulation of mutations over time. We are presenting an overview of well-documented stress

  8. HER family kinase domain mutations promote tumor progression and can predict response to treatment in human breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Boulbes, Delphine R.

    2014-11-11

    Resistance to HER2-targeted therapies remains a major obstacle in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways that contribute to the development of drug resistance is needed to improve the clinical utility of novel agents, and to predict the success of targeted personalized therapy based on tumor-specific mutations. Little is known about the clinical significance of HER family mutations in breast cancer. Because mutations within HER1/EGFR are predictive of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in lung cancer, we investigated whether mutations in HER family kinase domains are predictive of response to targeted therapy in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. We sequenced the HER family kinase domains from 76 HER2-overexpressing invasive carcinomas and identified 12 missense variants. Patients whose tumors carried any of these mutations did not respond to HER2 directed therapy in the metastatic setting. We developed mutant cell lines and used structural analyses to determine whether changes in protein conformation could explain the lack of response to therapy. We also functionally studied all HER2 mutants and showed that they conferred an aggressive phenotype and altered effects of the TKI lapatinib. Our data demonstrate that mutations in the finely tuned HER kinase domains play a critical function in breast cancer progression and may serve as prognostic and predictive markers.

  9. HER family kinase domain mutations promote tumor progression and can predict response to treatment in human breast cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Boulbes, Delphine R.; Arold, Stefan T.; Chauhan, Gaurav B.; Blachno, Korina V.; Deng, Nanfu; Chang, Wei-Chao; Jin, Quanri; Huang, Tzu-Hsuan; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Brady, Samuel W.; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Ladbury, John E.; Stone, Steve; Yu, Dihua; Hung, Mien-Chie; Esteva, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to HER2-targeted therapies remains a major obstacle in the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways that contribute to the development of drug resistance is needed to improve the clinical utility of novel agents, and to predict the success of targeted personalized therapy based on tumor-specific mutations. Little is known about the clinical significance of HER family mutations in breast cancer. Because mutations within HER1/EGFR are predictive of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) in lung cancer, we investigated whether mutations in HER family kinase domains are predictive of response to targeted therapy in HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. We sequenced the HER family kinase domains from 76 HER2-overexpressing invasive carcinomas and identified 12 missense variants. Patients whose tumors carried any of these mutations did not respond to HER2 directed therapy in the metastatic setting. We developed mutant cell lines and used structural analyses to determine whether changes in protein conformation could explain the lack of response to therapy. We also functionally studied all HER2 mutants and showed that they conferred an aggressive phenotype and altered effects of the TKI lapatinib. Our data demonstrate that mutations in the finely tuned HER kinase domains play a critical function in breast cancer progression and may serve as prognostic and predictive markers.

  10. A fractal climate response function can simulate global average temperature trends of the modern era and the past millennium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van

    A climate response function is introduced that consists of six exponential (low-pass) filters with weights depending as a power law on their e-folding times. The response of this two-parameter function to the combined forcings of solar irradiance, greenhouse gases, and SO2-related aerosols is fitted

  11. Italian Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn; Forlenza, Rosario

    assumptions that have substituted for thought and that have perpetuated prejudices both within and outside Italy’s borders. Grounded in meticulous historical and ethnological research, Italian Modernities deserves as wide an audience as its scholarship is deep.” (Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor...

  12. Montreal Modern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    , and the space age modernism of the 1960s following the Expo 67 and Quebec’s Quiet Revolution. This is reflected in the city’s thriving retro culture through the study of two groups of retro shops. In circulating specific memories and objects in a specific context, retro is an important negotiation of the past...

  13. Therapeutic Touch Has Significant Effects on Mouse Breast Cancer Metastasis and Immune Responses but Not Primary Tumor Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronowicz, Gloria; Secor, Eric R; Flynn, John R; Jellison, Evan R; Kuhn, Liisa T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based integrative medicine therapies have been introduced to promote wellness and offset side-effects from cancer treatment. Energy medicine is an integrative medicine technique using the human biofield to promote well-being. The biofield therapy chosen for study was Therapeutic Touch (TT). Breast cancer tumors were initiated in mice by injection of metastatic 66cl4 mammary carcinoma cells. The control group received only vehicle. TT or mock treatments were performed twice a week for 10 minutes. Two experienced TT practitioners alternated treatments. At 26 days, metastasis to popliteal lymph nodes was determined by clonogenic assay. Changes in immune function were measured by analysis of serum cytokines and by fluorescent activated cells sorting (FACS) of immune cells from the spleen and lymph nodes. No significant differences were found in body weight gain or tumor size. Metastasis was significantly reduced in the TT-treated mice compared to mock-treated mice. Cancer significantly elevated eleven cytokines. TT significantly reduced IL-1-a, MIG, IL-1b, and MIP-2 to control/vehicle levels. FACS demonstrated that TT significantly reduced specific splenic lymphocyte subsets and macrophages were significantly elevated with cancer. Human biofield therapy had no significant effect on primary tumor but produced significant effects on metastasis and immune responses in a mouse breast cancer model.

  14. Association between tumor tissue TIMP-1 levels and objective response to first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klintman, Marie; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2010-01-01

    .07). This OR is very similar to the result from our previous study. Increasing levels of TIMP-1 were also associated with a shorter disease-free survival and overall survival, however, not statistically significant. The results from the present study support previous data that TIMP-1 is associated with objective......In a previous study from our laboratory, high tumor levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) have been associated with an adverse response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer suggesting that TIMP-1, which is known to inhibit apoptosis, may be a new predictive marker...

  15. TU-D-207B-05: Intra-Tumor Partitioning and Texture Analysis of DCE-MRI Identifies Relevant Tumor Subregions to Predict Early Pathological Response of Breast Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J; Gong, G; Cui, Y; Li, R [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To predict early pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) based on quantitative, multi-region analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods: In this institution review board-approved study, 35 patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer were retrospectively investigated using DCE-MR images acquired before and after the first cycle of NAC. First, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the DCE-MRI data with a high-temporal resolution. We then partitioned the whole tumor into multiple subregions using k-means clustering based on the PCA-defined eigenmaps. Within each tumor subregion, we extracted four quantitative Haralick texture features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The change in texture features in each tumor subregion between pre- and during-NAC was used to predict pathological complete response after NAC. Results: Three tumor subregions were identified through clustering, each with distinct enhancement characteristics. In univariate analysis, all imaging predictors except one extracted from the tumor subregion associated with fast wash-out were statistically significant (p< 0.05) after correcting for multiple testing, with area under the ROC curve or AUCs between 0.75 and 0.80. In multivariate analysis, the proposed imaging predictors achieved an AUC of 0.79 (p = 0.002) in leave-one-out cross validation. This improved upon conventional imaging predictors such as tumor volume (AUC=0.53) and texture features based on whole-tumor analysis (AUC=0.65). Conclusion: The heterogeneity of the tumor subregion associated with fast wash-out on DCE-MRI predicted early pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

  16. TU-D-207B-05: Intra-Tumor Partitioning and Texture Analysis of DCE-MRI Identifies Relevant Tumor Subregions to Predict Early Pathological Response of Breast Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J; Gong, G; Cui, Y; Li, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To predict early pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) based on quantitative, multi-region analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods: In this institution review board-approved study, 35 patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer were retrospectively investigated using DCE-MR images acquired before and after the first cycle of NAC. First, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the DCE-MRI data with a high-temporal resolution. We then partitioned the whole tumor into multiple subregions using k-means clustering based on the PCA-defined eigenmaps. Within each tumor subregion, we extracted four quantitative Haralick texture features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The change in texture features in each tumor subregion between pre- and during-NAC was used to predict pathological complete response after NAC. Results: Three tumor subregions were identified through clustering, each with distinct enhancement characteristics. In univariate analysis, all imaging predictors except one extracted from the tumor subregion associated with fast wash-out were statistically significant (p< 0.05) after correcting for multiple testing, with area under the ROC curve or AUCs between 0.75 and 0.80. In multivariate analysis, the proposed imaging predictors achieved an AUC of 0.79 (p = 0.002) in leave-one-out cross validation. This improved upon conventional imaging predictors such as tumor volume (AUC=0.53) and texture features based on whole-tumor analysis (AUC=0.65). Conclusion: The heterogeneity of the tumor subregion associated with fast wash-out on DCE-MRI predicted early pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

  17. Translating Response During Therapy into Ultimate Treatment Outcome: A Personalized 4-Dimensional MRI Tumor Volumetric Regression Approach in Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Nina A.; Wang, Jian Z.; Lo, Simon S.; Zhang Dongqing; Grecula, John C.; Lu Lanchun; Montebello, Joseph F.; Fowler, Jeffrey M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess individual volumetric tumor regression pattern in cervical cancer during therapy using serial four-dimensional MRI and to define the regression parameters' prognostic value validated with local control and survival correlation. Methods and Materials: One hundred and fifteen patients with Stage IB 2 -IVA cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy (RT) underwent serial MRI before (MRI 1) and during RT, at 2-2.5 weeks (MRI 2, at 20-25 Gy), and at 4-5 weeks (MRI 3, at 40-50 Gy). Eighty patients had a fourth MRI 1-2 months post-RT. Mean follow-up was 5.3 years. Tumor volume was measured by MRI-based three-dimensional volumetry, and plotted as dose(time)/volume regression curves. Volume regression parameters were correlated with local control, disease-specific, and overall survival. Results: Residual tumor volume, slope, and area under the regression curve correlated significantly with local control and survival. Residual volumes ≥20% at 40-50 Gy were independently associated with inferior 5-year local control (53% vs. 97%, p <0.001) and disease-specific survival rates (50% vs. 72%, p = 0.009) than smaller volumes. Patients with post-RT residual volumes ≥10% had 0% local control and 17% disease-specific survival, compared with 91% and 72% for <10% volume (p <0.001). Conclusion: Using more accurate four-dimensional volumetric regression analysis, tumor response can now be directly translated into individual patients' outcome for clinical application. Our results define two temporal thresholds critically influencing local control and survival. In patients with ≥20% residual volume at 40-50 Gy and ≥10% post-RT, the risk for local failure and death are so high that aggressive intervention may be warranted.

  18. Ablation of EIF5A2 induces tumor vasculature remodeling and improves tumor response to chemotherapy via regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Wei; Cai, Mu-Yan; Mai, Shi-Juan; Chen, Jie-Wei; Bai, Hai-Yan; Li, Yan; Liao, Yi-Ji; Li, Chang-Peng; Tian, Xiao-Peng; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Xie, Dan

    2014-08-30

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly vascularized tumor with poor clinical outcome. Our previous work has shown that eukaryotic initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) over-expression enhances HCC cell metastasis. In this study, EIF5A2 was identified to be an independent risk factor for poor disease-specific survival among HCC patients. Both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that ablation of endogenous EIF5A2 inhibited tumor angiogenesis by reducing matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression. Given that MMP-2 degrades collagen IV, a main component of the vascular basement membrane (BM), we subsequently investigated the effect of EIF5A2 on tumor vasculature remodeling using complementary approaches, including fluorescent immunostaining, transmission electron microscopy, tumor perfusion assays and tumor hypoxia assays. Taken together, our results indicate that EIF5A2 silencing increases tumor vessel wall continuity, increases blood perfusion and improves tumor oxygenation. Additionally, we found that ablation of EIF5A2 enhanced the chemosensitivity of HCC cells to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Finally, we demonstrated that EIF5A2 might exert these functions by enhancing MMP-2 activity via activation of p38 MAPK and JNK/c-Jun pathways. This study highlights an important role of EIF5A2 in HCC tumor vessel remodeling and indicates that EIF5A2 represents a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of HCC.

  19. SU-F-R-44: Modeling Lung SBRT Tumor Response Using Bayesian Network Averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamant, A; Ybarra, N; Seuntjens, J; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The prediction of tumor control after a patient receives lung SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) has proven to be challenging, due to the complex interactions between an individual’s biology and dose-volume metrics. Many of these variables have predictive power when combined, a feature that we exploit using a graph modeling approach based on Bayesian networks. This provides a probabilistic framework that allows for accurate and visually intuitive predictive modeling. The aim of this study is to uncover possible interactions between an individual patient’s characteristics and generate a robust model capable of predicting said patient’s treatment outcome. Methods: We investigated a cohort of 32 prospective patients from multiple institutions whom had received curative SBRT to the lung. The number of patients exhibiting tumor failure was observed to be 7 (event rate of 22%). The serum concentration of 5 biomarkers previously associated with NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) was measured pre-treatment. A total of 21 variables were analyzed including: dose-volume metrics with BED (biologically effective dose) correction and clinical variables. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique estimated the posterior probability distribution of the potential graphical structures. The probability of tumor failure was then estimated by averaging the top 100 graphs and applying Baye’s rule. Results: The optimal Bayesian model generated throughout this study incorporated the PTV volume, the serum concentration of the biomarker EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and prescription BED. This predictive model recorded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94(1), providing better performance compared to competing methods in other literature. Conclusion: The use of biomarkers in conjunction with dose-volume metrics allows for the generation of a robust predictive model. The preliminary results of this report demonstrate that it is possible

  20. SU-F-R-44: Modeling Lung SBRT Tumor Response Using Bayesian Network Averaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, A; Ybarra, N; Seuntjens, J [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The prediction of tumor control after a patient receives lung SBRT (stereotactic body radiation therapy) has proven to be challenging, due to the complex interactions between an individual’s biology and dose-volume metrics. Many of these variables have predictive power when combined, a feature that we exploit using a graph modeling approach based on Bayesian networks. This provides a probabilistic framework that allows for accurate and visually intuitive predictive modeling. The aim of this study is to uncover possible interactions between an individual patient’s characteristics and generate a robust model capable of predicting said patient’s treatment outcome. Methods: We investigated a cohort of 32 prospective patients from multiple institutions whom had received curative SBRT to the lung. The number of patients exhibiting tumor failure was observed to be 7 (event rate of 22%). The serum concentration of 5 biomarkers previously associated with NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) was measured pre-treatment. A total of 21 variables were analyzed including: dose-volume metrics with BED (biologically effective dose) correction and clinical variables. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique estimated the posterior probability distribution of the potential graphical structures. The probability of tumor failure was then estimated by averaging the top 100 graphs and applying Baye’s rule. Results: The optimal Bayesian model generated throughout this study incorporated the PTV volume, the serum concentration of the biomarker EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and prescription BED. This predictive model recorded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.94(1), providing better performance compared to competing methods in other literature. Conclusion: The use of biomarkers in conjunction with dose-volume metrics allows for the generation of a robust predictive model. The preliminary results of this report demonstrate that it is possible

  1. Enhancement of tumor response by Wortmannin in C3H/HeJ hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Ji Young; Seong, Jin Sil [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) has been known as one of key molecules in survival signaling. PI3K signaling is an important intracellular mediator which is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, anti-apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. Inhibition of this molecule might be used in cancer treatment. Wortmannin has been reported to be an efficient radiosensitizer. The objective of this study was to explore whether PI3K inhibitor, Wortmannin, could potentiate the antitumor effect of radiation in vivo, particularly on radioresistant murine tumor.

  2. Enhancement of tumor response by Wortmannin in C3H/HeJ hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Ji Young; Seong, Jin Sil

    2004-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) has been known as one of key molecules in survival signaling. PI3K signaling is an important intracellular mediator which is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, anti-apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. Inhibition of this molecule might be used in cancer treatment. Wortmannin has been reported to be an efficient radiosensitizer. The objective of this study was to explore whether PI3K inhibitor, Wortmannin, could potentiate the antitumor effect of radiation in vivo, particularly on radioresistant murine tumor

  3. Comparison of incidences of normal tissue complications with tumor response in a phase III trial comparing heat plus radiation to radiation alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewhirst, M.W.; Sim, D.A.; Grochowski, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    The success of hyperthermia (/sup Δ/) as an adjuvant to radiation (XRT) will depend on whether the increase in tumor control is greater than that for normal tissue reactions. One hundred and thirty dogs and cats were stratified by histology and randomized to receive XRT (460 rads per fraction, two fractions per week, for eight fractions) or /sup Δ/ + XRT (30 min. at 44 +-2 0 C; one fraction per week, four fractions; immediately prior to XRT). Heat induced changes in tumor and normal tissue responses were made by comparing ratios of incidence for /sup Δ/ + XRT and XRT alone (TRR; Thermal Relative Risk). Change in tumor response duration was calculated from statistical analysis of response duration curves (RRR; Relative Relapse Rate). Heat increased early normal tissue reactions (moist desquamation and mucositis by a factor of 1.08. Tumor complete response, by comparison, was significantly improved (TRR = 2.12, p < .001). Late skin fibrosis was also increased (TRR = 1.51), but the prolongation in tumor response was greater (RRR 1.85). The degree of thermal enhancement for all tissues was dependent on the minimum temperature achieved on the first treatment, but the values for tumor were consistently greater than those achieved for normal tissues

  4. Nitric Oxide Generated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages Is Responsible for Cancer Resistance to Cisplatin and Correlated With Syntaxin 4 and Acid Sphingomyelinase Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Perrotta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment is fundamental for cancer progression and chemoresistance. Among stromal cells tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent the largest population of infiltrating inflammatory cells in malignant tumors, promoting their growth, invasion, and immune evasion. M2-polarized TAMs are endowed with the nitric oxide (NO-generating enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. NO has divergent effects on tumors, since it can either stimulate tumor cells growth or promote their death depending on the source of it; likewise the role of iNOS in cancer differs depending on the cell type. The role of NO generated by TAMs has not been investigated. Using different tumor models in vitro and in vivo we found that NO generated by iNOS of M2-polarized TAMs is able to protect tumor cells from apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (CDDP. Here, we demonstrate that the protective effect of NO depends on the inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase, which is activated by CDDP in a pathway involving the death receptor CD95. Mechanistic insights indicate that NO actions occur via generation of cyclic GMP and activation of protein kinase G (PKG, inducing phosphorylation of syntaxin 4 (synt4, a SNARE protein responsible for A-SMase trafficking and activation. Noteworthy, phosphorylation of synt4 at serine 78 by PKG is responsible for the proteasome-dependent degradation of synt4, which limits the CDDP-induced exposure of A-SMase to the plasma membrane of tumor cells. This inhibits the cytotoxic mechanism of CDDP reducing A-SMase-triggered apoptosis. This is the first demonstration that endogenous NO system is a key mechanism through which TAMs protect tumor cells from chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis. The identification of the pathway responsible for A-SMase activity downregulation in tumors leading to chemoresistance warrants further investigations as a means to identify new anti-cancer molecules capable of specifically

  5. Antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates Wnt signaling and elicits antitumor responses in tumors with activating APC mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Chen, Minyong; Yang, Xiao Yi; Spasojevic, Ivan; Vandeusen, Jeffrey B; Hsu, David; Clary, Bryan M; Clay, Timothy M; Chen, Wei; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2011-06-15

    Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.

  6. Modern Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Yuan Zhong

    2002-01-01

    This book is one of a series in the areas of high-energy physics, cosmology and gravitation published by the Institute of Physics. It includes courses given at a doctoral school on 'Relativistic Cosmology: Theory and Observation' held in Spring 2000 at the Centre for Scientific Culture 'Alessandro Volta', Italy, sponsored by SIGRAV-Societa Italiana di Relativita e Gravitazione (Italian Society of Relativity and Gravitation) and the University of Insubria. This book collects 15 review reports given by a number of outstanding scientists. They touch upon the main aspects of modern cosmology from observational matters to theoretical models, such as cosmological models, the early universe, dark matter and dark energy, modern observational cosmology, cosmic microwave background, gravitational lensing, and numerical simulations in cosmology. In particular, the introduction to the basics of cosmology includes the basic equations, covariant and tetrad descriptions, Friedmann models, observation and horizons, etc. The ...

  7. Cigarette smoke alters the invariant natural killer T cell function and may inhibit anti-tumor responses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, Andrew E

    2011-09-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a minor subset of human T cells which express the invariant T cell receptor Vα24 Jα18 and recognize glycolipids presented on CD1d. Invariant NKT cells are important immune regulators and can initiate anti-tumor responses through early potent cytokine production. Studies show that iNKT cells are defective in certain cancers. Cigarette smoke contains many carcinogens and is implicated directly and indirectly in many cancers. We investigated the effects of cigarette smoke on the circulating iNKT cell number and function. We found that the iNKT cell frequency is significantly reduced in cigarette smoking subjects. Invariant NKT cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) showed significant defects in cytokine production and the ability to kill target cells. CSE inhibits the upregulation of CD107 but not CD69 or CD56 on iNKT cells. These findings suggest that CSE has a specific effect on iNKT cell anti-tumor responses, which may contribute to the role of smoking in the development of cancer.

  8. Decreased hepatic response to glucagon, adrenergic agonists, and cAMP in glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycolysis in tumor-bearing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazi, Giuliana R; Frasson, Isabele G; Miksza, Daniele R; de Morais, Hely; de Fatima Silva, Flaviane; Bertolini, Gisele L; de Souza, Helenir M

    2018-05-15

    The response to glucagon and adrenaline in cancer cachexia is poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate the response to glucagon, adrenergic agonists (α and β) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycolysis in liver perfusion of Walker-256 tumor-bearing rats with advanced cachexia. Liver ATP content was also investigated. Rats without tumor (healthy) were used as controls. Agonists α (phenylephrine) and β (isoproterenol) adrenergic, instead of adrenaline, and cAMP, the second messenger of glucagon and isoproterenol, were used in an attempt to identify mechanisms involved in the responses. Glucagon (1 nM) stimulated glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis and inhibited glycolysis in the liver of healthy and tumor-bearing rats, but their effects were lower in tumor-bearing rats. Isoproterenol (20 µM) stimulated glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycolysis in healthy rats and had virtually no effect in tumor-bearing rats. cAMP (9 µM) also stimulated glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis and inhibited glycolysis in healthy rats but had practically no effect in tumor-bearing rats. Phenylephrine (2 µM) stimulated glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis and inhibited glycolysis and these effects were also lower in tumor-bearing rats than in healthy. Liver ATP content was lower in tumor-bearing rats. In conclusion, tumor-bearing rats with advanced cachexia showed a decreased hepatic response to glucagon, adrenergic agonists (α and β), and cAMP in glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycolysis, which may be due to a reduced rate of regulatory enzyme phosphorylation caused by the low ATP levels in the liver. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Modern bureaucracy

    OpenAIRE

    Toye, John

    2006-01-01

    Max Weber believed that bureaucracy could be understood by analysing its ideal-typical characteristics, and that these characteristics would become more pervasive as the modern age advanced. Weber’s horizontal account of bureaucracy can be criticised on various grounds, including its unrealistic notion of bureaucratic rationality. An alternative view is proposed, namely, that the development of state bureaucracies is driven by the trajectory of the highpower politics in which they are nested....

  10. Modern Biology

    OpenAIRE

    ALEKSIC, Branko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this course is to learn the philosophy, principles, and techniques of modern biology. The course is particularly designed for those who have not learned biology previously or whose major is other than biology, and who may think that they do not need to know any biology at all. The topics are covered in a rather general, overview manner, but certain level of diligence in grasping concepts and memorizing the terminology is expected.

  11. Modern maths

    CERN Multimedia

    Thom,R

    1974-01-01

    Le Prof. R. Thom expose ses vues sur l'enseignement des mathématiques modernes et des mathémathiques de toujours. Il est un grand mathématicien et était professeur à Strasbourg; maintenant il est professeur de hautes études scientifiques et était invité par le Prof. Piaget à Genève

  12. Association between Chemotherapy-Response Assays and Subsets of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Gastric Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Youn; Son, Taeil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai; Park, Chung-Gyu; Kim, Hyoung-Il

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assays (ATP-CRAs) and subsets of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in gastric cancer. In total, 15 gastric cancer tissue samples were obtained from gastrectomies performed between February 2007 and January 2011. Chemotherapy response assays were performed on tumor cells from these samples using 11 chemotherapeutic agents, including etoposide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, methotrexate, and cisplatin. TILs in the tissue samples were evaluated using antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3, and Granzyme B. The highest cancer cell death rates were induced by etoposide (44.8%), 5-FU (43.1%), and mitomycin (39.9%). Samples from 10 patients who were treated with 5-FU were divided into 5-FU-sensitive and -insensitive groups according to median cell death rate. No difference was observed in survival between the two groups (P=0.216). Only two patients were treated with a chemotherapeutic agent determined by an ATP-CRA and there was no significant difference in overall survival compared with that of patients treated with their physician's choice of chemotherapeutic agent (P=0.105). However, a high number of CD3 TILs was a favorable prognostic factor (P=0.008). Pearson's correlation analyses showed no association between cancer cell death rates in response to chemotherapeutic agents and subsets of TILs. Cancer cell death rates in response to specific chemotherapeutic agents were not significantly associated with the distribution of TIL subsets.

  13. Conventional and conformal technique of external beam radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer: Dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrikah, N.; Winarno, H.; Amalia, T.; Djakaria, M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare conventional and conformal techniques of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in terms of the dose distribution, tumor response, and side effects in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on cervical cancer patients who underwent EBRT before brachytherapy in the Radiotherapy Department of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. The prescribed dose distribution, tumor response, and acute side effects of EBRT using conventional and conformal techniques were investigated. In total, 51 patients who underwent EBRT using conventional techniques (25 cases using Cobalt-60 and 26 cases using a linear accelerator (LINAC)) and 29 patients who underwent EBRT using conformal techniques were included in the study. The distribution of the prescribed dose in the target had an impact on the patient’s final response to EBRT. The complete response rate of patients to conformal techniques was significantly greater (58%) than that of patients to conventional techniques (42%). No severe acute local side effects were seen in any of the patients (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grades 3-4). The distribution of the dose and volume to the gastrointestinal tract affected the proportion of mild acute side effects (RTOG grades 1-2). The urinary bladder was significantly greater using conventional techniques (Cobalt-60/LINAC) than using conformal techniques at 72% and 78% compared to 28% and 22%, respectively. The use of conformal techniques in pelvic radiation therapy is suggested in radiotherapy centers with CT simulators and 3D Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Systems (RTPSs) to decrease some uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. The use of AP/PA pelvic radiation techniques with Cobalt-60 should be limited in body thicknesses equal to or less than 18 cm. When using conformal techniques, delineation should be applied in the small bowel, as it is considered a critical organ according to RTOG

  14. Heterogeneity in 2-deoxy-D-glucose-induced modifications in energetics and radiation responses of human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwarkanath, Bilikere S.; Zolzer, Frido; Chandana, Sudhir; Bauch, Thomas; Adhikari, Jawahar S.; Muller, Wolfgang U.; Streffer, Christian; Jain, Viney

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The glucose analog and glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), has been shown to differentially enhance the radiation damage in tumor cells by inhibiting the postirradiation repair processes. The present study was undertaken to examine the relationship between 2-DG-induced modification of energy metabolism and cellular radioresponses and to identify the most relevant parameter(s) for predicting the tumor response to the combined treatment of radiation + 2-DG. Methods and Materials: Six human tumor cell lines (glioma: BMG-1 and U-87, squamous cell carcinoma: 4451 and 4197, and melanoma: MeWo and Be-11) were investigated. Cells were exposed to 2 Gy of Co-60 γ-rays or 250 kVP X-rays and maintained under liquid-holding conditions 2-4 h to facilitate repair. 2-DG (5 mM, equimolar with glucose) that was added at the time of irradiation was present during the liquid holding. Glucose utilization, lactate production (enzymatic assays), and adenine nucleotides (high performance liquid chromatography and capillary isotachophoresis) were investigated as parameters of energy metabolism. Induction and repair of DNA damage (comet assay), cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation), and cell death (macrocolony assay) were analyzed as parameters of radiation response. Results: The glucose consumption and lactate production of glioma cell lines (BMG-1 and U-87) were nearly 2-fold higher than the squamous carcinoma cell lines (4197 and 4451). The ATP content varied from 3.0 to 6.5 femto moles/cell among these lines, whereas the energy charge (0.86-0.90) did not show much variation. Presence of 2-DG inhibited the rate of glucose usage and glycolysis by 30-40% in glioma cell lines and by 15-20% in squamous carcinoma lines, while ATP levels reduced by nearly 40% in all the four cell lines. ATP:ADP ratios decreased to a greater extent (∼40%) in glioma cells than in squamous carcinoma 4451 and MeWo cells; in contrast, presence of 2-DG reduced ADP:AMP ratios by 3-fold in

  15. IB-11PSEUDO-PROGRESSION (PsdPg) IS A HARBINGER OF A MORE EFFECTIVE ANTI-TUMOR RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturla, Lisa; Donahue, John; Machan, Jason; Delamonte, Suzanne; Jeyapalan, Suriya

    2014-01-01

    , which are mediators of anti-tumor immunity, play an important role in pseudo-progression. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a more effective anti-tumor immune response in PsdPg patients, which may explain their longer overall survival.

  16. Immunological tumor status may predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and outcome after radical cystectomy in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahartiala, Minna; Taimen, Pekka; Mirtti, Tuomas; Koskinen, Ilmari; Ecke, Thorsten; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Boström, Peter J

    2017-10-04

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the ninth most common cancer worldwide. Radical cystectomy (RC) with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is recommended for muscle-invasive BC. The challenge of the neoadjuvant approach relates to challenges in selection of patients to chemotherapy that are likely to respond to the treatment. To date, there are no validated molecular markers or baseline clinical characteristics to identify these patients. Different inflammatory markers, including tumor associated macrophages with their plastic pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions, have extensively been under interests as potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers in different cancer types. In this immunohistochemical study we evaluated the predictive roles of three immunological markers, CD68, MAC387, and CLEVER-1, in response to NAC and outcome of BC. 41% of the patients had a complete response (pT0N0) to NAC. Basic clinicopathological variables did not predict response to NAC. In contrast, MAC387 + cells and CLEVER-1 + macrophages associated with poor NAC response, while CLEVER-1 + vessels associated with more favourable response to NAC. Higher counts of CLEVER-1 + macrophages associated with poorer overall survival and CD68 + macrophages seem to have an independent prognostic value in BC patients treated with NAC. Our findings point out that CD68, MAC387, and CLEVER-1 may be useful prognostic and predictive markers in BC.

  17. Psychometric analysis of the Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7) in primary care using modern item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Pascal; Shedden-Mora, Meike C; Löwe, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Disorder scale (GAD-7) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic self-report scales for screening, diagnosis and severity assessment of anxiety disorder. Its psychometric properties from the view of the Item Response Theory paradigm have rarely been investigated. We aimed to close this gap by analyzing the GAD-7 within a large sample of primary care patients with respect to its psychometric properties and its implications for scoring using Item Response Theory. Robust, nonparametric statistics were used to check unidimensionality of the GAD-7. A graded response model was fitted using a Bayesian approach. The model fit was evaluated using posterior predictive p-values, item information functions were derived and optimal predictions of anxiety were calculated. The sample included N = 3404 primary care patients (60% female; mean age, 52,2; standard deviation 19.2) The analysis indicated no deviations of the GAD-7 scale from unidimensionality and a decent fit of a graded response model. The commonly suggested ultra-brief measure consisting of the first two items, the GAD-2, was supported by item information analysis. The first four items discriminated better than the last three items with respect to latent anxiety. The information provided by the first four items should be weighted more heavily. Moreover, estimates corresponding to low to moderate levels of anxiety show greater variability. The psychometric validity of the GAD-2 was supported by our analysis.

  18. Association between gene expression profile of the primary tumor and chemotherapy response of metastatic breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savci-Heijink, Cemile Dilara; Halfwerk, Hans; Koster, Jan; van de Vijver, Marc Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background: To better predict the likelihood of response to chemotherapy, we have conducted a study comparing the gene expression patterns of primary tumours with their corresponding response to systemic chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. Methods: mRNA expression profiles of breast carcinomas

  19. Ligand Activation of TAM Family Receptors-Implications for Tumor Biology and Therapeutic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davra, Viralkumar; Kimani, Stanley G; Calianese, David; Birge, Raymond B

    2016-11-29

    The TAM family of receptors (i.e., Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk), and their ligands Growth arrest specific factor 6 (Gas6) and Protein S (Pros1) contribute to several oncogenic processes, such as cell survival, invasion, migration, chemo-resistance, and metastasis, whereby expression often correlates with poor clinical outcomes. In recent years, there has been great interest in the study of TAM receptors in cancer, stemming both from their roles as oncogenic signaling receptors, as well as their roles in tumor immunology. As a result, several classes of TAM inhibitors that include small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, decoy receptors, as well as novel strategies to target TAM ligands are being developed. This paper will review the biology of TAM receptors and their ligands with a focus on cancer, as well as evidence-based data for the continued pursuit of TAM/Gas6 inhibitors in clinical practice.

  20. Neuroplastic Response After Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: A Pilot Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, Carol L.; Fisher, Michael J.; Li, Yimei; Lustig, Robert A.; Belasco, Jean B.; Minturn, Jane E.; Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Batra, Sonny; Phillips, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clinically effective measurement of cognitive toxicity from photon radiation therapy (XRT) should be accurate, sensitive, and specific. This pilot study tested translational findings on phasic changes in children's memory systems that are sensitive and insensitive to toxic XRT effects to identify a possible neuroplastic effect. Methods and Materials: Memory processes were prospectively tested before XRT and at 3 later time points up to 2 years in 35 children with mixed primary brain tumors who had not experienced recurrence. Memory processes were verbal-semantic, visual-semantic, and visual-perceptual, including accuracy, speed to recall, encoding, retrieval, and recognition. The mixed-effects model included time (to estimate slope), covariates (age, tumor locus, XRT field, and medications) as fixed effects, and individual random intercepts. A sensitivity analysis examined the influence of XRT dose to the hippocampi on memory. Results: Retrieval from long-term verbal-semantic memory declined 2 months after completing XRT, as seen in adults, and was lowest at 1 year, which was delayed in comparison with adults. Double dissociation from visual-perceptual memory at baseline and 2 months was found, consistent with adults. Recovery was demonstrated 2 years after XRT. Patterns were unchanged when dose to hippocampus was included in the model. Conclusions: Verbal and semantic long-term retrieval is specifically sensitive to XRT-related cognitive dysfunction, without effect on visual-perceptual memory. Children reached nadir in XRT-sensitive memory 1 year after XRT and recovered by 2 years, which is later than that observed in adults. The protracted period of post-XRT injury may represent the maturation of the human hippocampus and white matter into late adolescence.

  1. Neuroplastic Response After Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Brain Tumors: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Carol L., E-mail: armstrongc@email.chop.edu [Neuro-Oncology Section, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Department of Pediatrics, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fisher, Michael J. [Neuro-Oncology Section, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Department of Pediatrics, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Yimei [Oncology Division, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lustig, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Belasco, Jean B.; Minturn, Jane E. [Neuro-Oncology Section, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Department of Pediatrics, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hill-Kayser, Christine E.; Batra, Sonny [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Phillips, Peter C. [Neuro-Oncology Section, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, and Department of Pediatrics, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: Clinically effective measurement of cognitive toxicity from photon radiation therapy (XRT) should be accurate, sensitive, and specific. This pilot study tested translational findings on phasic changes in children's memory systems that are sensitive and insensitive to toxic XRT effects to identify a possible neuroplastic effect. Methods and Materials: Memory processes were prospectively tested before XRT and at 3 later time points up to 2 years in 35 children with mixed primary brain tumors who had not experienced recurrence. Memory processes were verbal-semantic, visual-semantic, and visual-perceptual, including accuracy, speed to recall, encoding, retrieval, and recognition. The mixed-effects model included time (to estimate slope), covariates (age, tumor locus, XRT field, and medications) as fixed effects, and individual random intercepts. A sensitivity analysis examined the influence of XRT dose to the hippocampi on memory. Results: Retrieval from long-term verbal-semantic memory declined 2 months after completing XRT, as seen in adults, and was lowest at 1 year, which was delayed in comparison with adults. Double dissociation from visual-perceptual memory at baseline and 2 months was found, consistent with adults. Recovery was demonstrated 2 years after XRT. Patterns were unchanged when dose to hippocampus was included in the model. Conclusions: Verbal and semantic long-term retrieval is specifically sensitive to XRT-related cognitive dysfunction, without effect on visual-perceptual memory. Children reached nadir in XRT-sensitive memory 1 year after XRT and recovered by 2 years, which is later than that observed in adults. The protracted period of post-XRT injury may represent the maturation of the human hippocampus and white matter into late adolescence.

  2. Modern biogeochemistry environmental risk assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Bashkin, Vladimir N

    2006-01-01

    Most books deal mainly with various technical aspects of ERA description and calculationsAims at generalizing the modern ideas of both biogeochemical and environmental risk assessment during recent yearsAims at supplementing the existing books by providing a modern understanding of mechanisms that are responsible for the ecological risk for human beings and ecosystem

  3. The social responsibility as the basis for effective management and the condition for increasing the modern organization competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gurina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the organization management based on the strategy of social responsibility implementation that supplies the conditions for a company's competitiveness development. The theoretical statements by the leading foreign researchers about the key role of social factors in an organization success and the main conditions of competitiveness such as human resources, staff competences, customers' pleasure, an organization's reputation, organizational and managing capacity, etc. The author discusses the idea of the new aim of the management paradigm is "social business" development in the economy. Despite the fact that entrepreneurship is still based on getting the economical benefit, the competitive area, the methods and the relationship between the profit and the competitiveness have changed in the post-industrial era. The change of the consuming society structure and the complication of the competitive area make us look for other sources of competitiveness, such as investments into the human resources. Such an approach to competitiveness is more and more spread among the foreign and national companies and allows to include social aspects management into the development strategy of a company. It is stated that a socially responsible company includes social goals in the production process, thus ensuring a competitive advantage in business. An important conclusion of the research is that socially responsible organizations create better conditions for the territories’ development where they provide the society with a generally higher welfare level.

  4. Requirements of modernization strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinbuch, R.

    1997-01-01

    Instrumentation and control contributed a major share to the current level of safety, economic efficiency, and availability of the German nuclear power plants. German NPPs occupy a top position in this respect at international level, but novel instrumentation and digital control technology alone will not guarantee further enhancements. Therefore, the owner/operators established carefully devised maintenance and modernization strategies in order to safeguard their NPPs top position in the long run. The German NPPs are the most thoroughly automated plants of the world. In addition to the sweeping modernization strategies recommended by the plant manufacturers, based on computer-supported control, alternative modernization strategies have been considered in the evaluation process. This approach provides for room for maneuvre, for manufacturers as well as managers responsible for risk and cost optimization, which is a major task in view of the changing regulatory framework in the electricity market. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Nutritional Effect on Androgen-Response Gene Expression and Prostate Tumor Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2001-01-01

    .... The dietary influence on ventral prostate weight does not seem to involve androgen action axis because dietary components did not influence the expression of several androgen-response genes, serum testosterone...

  6. Effect of long interval between hyperthermochemoradiation therapy and surgery for rectal cancer on apoptosis, proliferation and tumor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshihide; Fujii, Takaaki; Ide, Munenori; Takada, Takahiro; Sutoh, Toshinaga; Morita, Hiroki; Yajima, Reina; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Soichi; Asao, Takayuki; Oyama, Tetsunari; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is commonly used to improve the local control and resectability of locally advanced rectal cancer, with surgery performed after an interval of a number of weeks. We have been conducting a clinical trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in combination with regional hyperthermia (hyperthermo-chemoradiation therapy; HCRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. In the current study we assessed the effect of a longer (>10 weeks) interval after neoadjuvant HCRT on pathological response, oncological outcome and especially on apoptosis, proliferation and p53 expression in patients with rectal cancer. Forty-eight patients with proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent HCRT followed by surgery were identified for inclusion in this study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the interval between HCRT and surgery, ≤ 10 weeks (short-interval group) and >10 weeks (long-interval group). Patients in the long-interval group had a significantly higher rate of pathological complete response (pCR) (43.5% vs. 16.0%) than patients of the short-interval group. Patients of the long-interval group had a significantly higher rate of down-staging of T-stage (78.3% vs. 36.0%) and relatively higher rate of that of N-stage (52.2% vs. 36.0%) than patients of the short-interval group. Furthermore, apoptosis in the long-interval group was relatively higher compared to that of the short-interval group, without a significant difference in the Ki-67 proliferative index and expression of p53 in the primary tumor. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a longer interval after HCRT (>10 weeks) seemed to result in a better chance of a pCR, a result confirmed by the trends in tumor response markers, including apoptosis, proliferation and p53 expression. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Gene expression markers in circulating tumor cells may predict bone metastasis and response to hormonal treatment in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Molina, Julian; Jiang, John; Ferber, Matthew; Pruthi, Sandhya; Jatkoe, Timothy; Derecho, Carlo; Rajpurohit, Yashoda; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Yixin

    2013-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have recently attracted attention due to their potential as prognostic and predictive markers for the clinical management of metastatic breast cancer patients. The isolation of CTCs from patients may enable the molecular characterization of these cells, which may help establish a minimally invasive assay for the prediction of metastasis and further optimization of treatment. Molecular markers of proven clinical value may therefore be useful in predicting disease aggressiveness and response to treatment. In our earlier study, we identified a gene signature in breast cancer that appears to be significantly associated with bone metastasis. Among the genes that constitute this signature, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) was identified as the most differentially expressed gene associated with bone metastasis. In this study, we investigated 25 candidate gene markers in the CTCs of metastatic breast cancer patients with different metastatic sites. The panel of the 25 markers was investigated in 80 baseline samples (first blood draw of CTCs) and 30 follow-up samples. In addition, 40 healthy blood donors (HBDs) were analyzed as controls. The assay was performed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with RNA extracted from CTCs captured by the CellSearch system. Our study indicated that 12 of the genes were uniquely expressed in CTCs and 10 were highly expressed in the CTCs obtained from patients compared to those obtained from HBDs. Among these genes, the expression of keratin 19 was highly correlated with the CTC count. The TFF1 expression in CTCs was a strong predictor of bone metastasis and the patients with a high expression of estrogen receptor β in CTCs exhibited a better response to hormonal treatment. Molecular characterization of these genes in CTCs may provide a better understanding of the mechanism underlying tumor metastasis and identify gene markers in CTCs for predicting disease progression and

  8. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)) and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12 and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing anti-tumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  9. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  10. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogg, Mark; Murphy, John R.; Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients

  11. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogg, Mark [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Murphy, John R. [Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall [Department of Adult Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Wang, Fred, E-mail: fwang@research.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  12. Modern Cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuanzhong

    2002-06-21

    This book is one of a series in the areas of high-energy physics, cosmology and gravitation published by the Institute of Physics. It includes courses given at a doctoral school on 'Relativistic Cosmology: Theory and Observation' held in Spring 2000 at the Centre for Scientific Culture 'Alessandro Volta', Italy, sponsored by SIGRAV-Societa Italiana di Relativita e Gravitazione (Italian Society of Relativity and Gravitation) and the University of Insubria. This book collects 15 review reports given by a number of outstanding scientists. They touch upon the main aspects of modern cosmology from observational matters to theoretical models, such as cosmological models, the early universe, dark matter and dark energy, modern observational cosmology, cosmic microwave background, gravitational lensing, and numerical simulations in cosmology. In particular, the introduction to the basics of cosmology includes the basic equations, covariant and tetrad descriptions, Friedmann models, observation and horizons, etc. The chapters on the early universe involve inflationary theories, particle physics in the early universe, and the creation of matter in the universe. The chapters on dark matter (DM) deal with experimental evidence of DM, neutrino oscillations, DM candidates in supersymmetry models and supergravity, structure formation in the universe, dark-matter search with innovative techniques, and dark energy (cosmological constant), etc. The chapters about structure in the universe consist of the basis for structure formation, quantifying large-scale structure, cosmic background fluctuation, galaxy space distribution, and the clustering of galaxies. In the field of modern observational cosmology, galaxy surveys and cluster surveys are given. The chapter on gravitational lensing describes the lens basics and models, galactic microlensing and galaxy clusters as lenses. The last chapter, 'Numerical simulations in cosmology', deals with spatial and

  13. Modern plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Maradudin, Alexei A; Barnes, William L

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is entering the curriculum of many universities, either as a stand alone subject, or as part of some course or courses. Nanotechnology institutes have been, and are being, established in universities, in which plasmonics is a significant topic of research. Modern Plasmonics book offers a comprehensive presentation of the properties of surface plasmon polaritons, in systems of different structures and various natures, e.g. active, nonlinear, graded, theoretical/computational and experimental techniques for studying them, and their use in a variety of applications. Contains materia

  14. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  15. Opposite role of Bax and BCL-2 in the anti-tumoral responses of the immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougras, Gwenola; Cartron, Pierre-François; Gautier, Fabien; Martin, Stéphane; LeCabellec, Marité; Meflah, Khaled; Gregoire, Marc; Vallette, François M

    2004-01-01

    The relative role of anti apoptotic (i.e. Bcl-2) or pro-apoptotic (e.g. Bax) proteins in tumor progression is still not completely understood. The rat glioma cell line A15A5 was stably transfected with human Bcl-2 and Bax transgenes and the viability of theses cell lines was analyzed in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the transfected cell lines (huBax A15A5 and huBcl-2 A15A5) exhibited different sensitivities toward apoptotic stimuli. huBax A15A5 cells were more sensitive and huBcl-2 A15A5 cells more resistant to apoptosis than mock-transfected A15A5 cells (pCMV A15A5). However, in vivo, in syngenic rat BDIX, these cell lines behaved differently, as no tumor growth was observed with huBax A15A5 cells while huBcl-2 A15A5 cells formed large tumors. The immune system appeared to be involved in the rejection of huBax A15A5 cells since i) huBax A15A5 cells were tumorogenic in nude mice, ii) an accumulation of CD8+ T-lymphocytes was observed at the site of injection of huBax A15A5 cells and iii) BDIX rats, which had received huBax A15A5 cells developed an immune protection against pCMV A15A5 and huBcl-2 A15A5 cells. We show that the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 controls the sensitivity of the cancer cells toward the immune system. This sensitization is most likely to be due to an increase in immune induced cell death and/or the amplification of an anti tumour immune response

  16. Tumor infiltrating BRAFV600E-specific CD4 T cells correlated with complete clinical response in melanoma. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    T cells specific for neoantigens encoded by mutated genes in cancers are increasingly recognized as mediators of tumor destruction after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy or adoptive cell transfer. Unfortunately, most neoantigens result from random mutations and are patient specific, and some cancers contain few mutations to serve as potential antigens. We describe a patient with stage IV acral melanoma who obtained a complete response following adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL).

  17. In vitro assays for predicting tumor cell response to radiation by apoptotic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algan, Oe.; Hanks, G.E.; Biade, S.; Chapman, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: We had previously shown that the rate of spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis was significantly greater in well-differentiated compared to anaplastic Dunning prostate carcinomas. The goal of this study was to define the most useful assay for quantifying radiation-induced apoptotic cell death and to determine if measured rates of radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cell populations can predict treatment outcome. Materials and Methods: The time course and extent of radiation-induced apoptosis after single doses of Cesium-137 gamma-rays were measured by five different assays. These included gross DNA degradation, nucleosome ladder formation, labeling of 3'-OH ends in DNA with an immunofluorescence probe, immunofluorescence vital stains (LIVE/DEAD[reg] EUKOLIGHT TM ) and trypan blue. The majority of these studies were performed with DU-145 human prostate cells. Data was analyzed to determine the component of cell inactivation resulting from apoptosis with the modified linear quadratic equation, -1n (SF) = (α a + α p ) D + β p D 2 , were α a represents cell inactivation by radiation-induced apoptosis, α p and β p represent cell death by proliferative mechanisms and D represents radiation dose. Results: These studies indicated that DU-145 cell death after radiation occurs over two distinct time periods. The first phase of death begins shortly after irradiation and plateaus within 16-24 hr. This process of cell death has properties consistent with apoptosis as determined by 3'-OH DNA end-labeling and nucleosome ladder assays. The second phase of cell death (determined by viability staining) begins approximately 48 hr after irradiation and continues until the remainder of inactivated cells express their death. This longer phase of cell inactivation probably represents proliferative cell death and other non-apoptotic mechanisms. The five different assays were performed on DU-145 cells 24 hr after irradiation with 10 Gy. Significant nucleosome ladders

  18. Comparison of RECIST version 1.0 and 1.1 in assessment of tumor response by computed tomography in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gil-Su; Kim, Min-Jeong; Ha, Hong-Il; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Hyeong Su; Ju, Sung Bae; Zang, Dae Young

    2013-12-01

    Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline version 1.0 (RECIST 1.0) was proposed as a new guideline for evaluating tumor response and has been widely accepted as a standardized measure. With a number of issues being raised on RECIST 1.0, however, a revised RECIST guideline version 1.1 (RECIST 1.1) was proposed by the RECIST Working Group in 2009. This study was conducted to compare CT tumor response based on RECIST 1.1 vs. RECIST 1.0 in patients with advanced gastric cancer (AGC). We reviewed 61 AGC patients with measurable diseases by RECIST 1.0 who were enrolled in other clinical trials between 2008 and 2010. These patients were retrospectively re-analyzed to determine the concordance between the two response criteria using the κ statistic. The number and sum of tumor diameters of the target lesions by RECIST 1.1 were significantly lower than those by RECIST 1.0 (P<0.0001). However, there was excellent agreement in tumor response between RECIST 1.1 and RECIST 1.0 (κ=0.844). The overall response rates (ORRs) according to RECIST 1.0 and RECIST 1.1 were 32.7% (20/61) and 34.5% (20/58), respectively. One patient with partial response (PR) based on RECIST 1.0 was reclassified as stable disease (SD) by RECIST 1.1. Of two patients with SD by RECIST 1.0, one was downgraded to progressive disease and the other was upgraded to PR by RECIST 1.1. RECIST 1.1 provided almost perfect agreement with RECIST 1.0 in the CT assessment of tumor response of AGC.

  19. Excellent local tumor response after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Y. C.; Lim, D. H.; Choi, D. R.; Kim, D. K.; Kim, D. Y.; Huh, S. J.; Baek, C. H.; Chu, K. C.; Yoon, S. S.; Park, K. C.

    1997-01-01

    This study is to report experience with Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FSRT) for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer after curative conventional radiation therapy. Three patients with locally recurrent and symptomatic nasopharynx cancer were given FSRT as reirradiation method between the period of September of 1995 and August of 1996. For two patients, application of FSRT is their third radiation therapy directed to the nasopharynx. Two patients were given low dose chemotherapy as radiation sensitizer concurrently with FSRT. Authors used 3-dimensional coordinate system by individually made, relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) stereotactic frame and multiple non-coplanar arc therapy dose planning was done using XKnife-3. Total of 45 Gy/18 fractions or 50 Gy/20 fractions were given. Authors observed satisfactory symptomatic improvement and remarkable objective tumor size decrease by follow-up MR images taken 1 month post-FSRT in all three patients, while no neurologic side effect attributable to reirradiation was noticed. Two died at 7 and 9 months with loco-regional and distant seeding outside FSRT field, while one patient is living for 4 month. Authors experienced satisfactory therapeutic effectiveness and safety of FSRT as reirradiation method for locally recurrent nasopharynx cancer. Development of more effective systemic chemotherapeutic regimen is desired for distant metastasis. (author)

  20. The early supra-additive apoptotic response of R3327-G prostate tumors to androgen ablation and radiation is not sustained with multiple fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Ashoori, Faramarz; Sikes, Charles; Lim Joon, Daryl; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von; Zagars, Gunar K.; Meistrich, Marvin L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of R3327-G tumor-bearing rats with androgen ablation (AA) via castration results in a supra-additive increase in apoptosis when 2-8 Gy γ-irradiation (RT) is given as a single dose 3-14 days afterwards. We report here the dose response and effect of multiple fractions on this supra-additive apoptotic response. Materials and Methods: Dunning R3327-G tumors were grown in the flanks of Copenhagen rats and the experiments were initiated at a tumor volume of 1.0-1.5 cc. Androgen ablation was achieved by castration 3 days prior to γ-irradiation. Apoptosis was measured with a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assay 6-h after RT, unless otherwise specified. Results: The dose response of the supra-additive apoptotic response was assessed by irradiating castrated animals with single doses of 2, 4, 8, or 16 Gy (n = 5 per group); tumor cell apoptosis at 6-h following irradiation was 2.4% ± 0.7% (± SEM), 4.2% ± 0.8%, 6.5% ± 1.4%, and 1.6% ± 0.3%, respectively. The RT only and AA only controls had < 1% apoptosis. The effect of fractionated RT on apoptosis was investigated to determine if the supra-additive apoptotic response was sustained with repeated 2-8 Gy fractions. When tumor-bearing animals were treated with repeated daily 2-Gy fractions, there was a reduction in the level of the supra-additive apoptotic response. After five 2-Gy fractions at 24-h intervals, apoptosis in the combined treated tumors was at levels seen in the AA controls. This raised the possibility that more than 24 h are required for recovery of the high supra-additive apoptotic levels seen after one fraction. When the interfraction interval was extended to 96 h, there was no significant increase in apoptosis over the additive effect of AA and RT. Although there was a decline in supra-additive apoptosis with repeated fractions, a dose response for tumor growth delay was evident for RT alone using 2.5-Gy fractions. Moreover, the combination of

  1. TP53, STK11 and EGFR Mutations Predict Tumor Immune Profile and the Response to anti-PD-1 in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biton, Jerome; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Pécuchet, Nicolas; Alifano, Marco; Ouakrim, Hanane; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Goldwasser, Francois; Leroy, Karen; Goc, Jeremy; Wislez, Marie; Germain, Claire; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Cremer, Isabelle; Herbst, Ronald; Blons, Hélène F; Damotte, Diane

    2018-05-15

    By unlocking anti-tumor immunity, antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) exhibit impressive clinical results in non-small cell lung cancer, underlining the strong interactions between tumor and immune cells. However, factors that can robustly predict long-lasting responses are still needed. We performed in depth immune profiling of lung adenocarcinoma using an integrative analysis based on immunohistochemistry, flow-cytometry and transcriptomic data. Tumor mutational status was investigated using next-generation sequencing. The response to PD-1 blockers was analyzed from a prospective cohort according to tumor mutational profiles and to PD-L1 expression, and a public clinical database was used to validate the results obtained. We showed that distinct combinations of STK11 , EGFR and TP53 mutations, were major determinants of the tumor immune profile (TIP) and of the expression of PD-L1 by malignant cells. Indeed, the presence of TP53 mutations without co-occurring STK11 or EGFR alterations ( TP53 -mut/ STK11 - EGFR -WT), independently of KRAS mutations, identified the group of tumors with the highest CD8 T cell density and PD-L1 expression. In this tumor subtype, pathways related to T cell chemotaxis, immune cell cytotoxicity, and antigen processing were up-regulated. Finally, a prolonged progression-free survival (PFS: HR=0.32; 95% CI, 0.16-0.63, p <0.001) was observed in anti-PD-1 treated patients harboring TP53 -mut/ STK11 - EGFR -WT tumors. This clinical benefit was even more remarkable in patients with associated strong PD-L1 expression. Our study reveals that different combinations of TP53 , EGFR and STK11 mutations , together with PD-L1 expression by tumor cells, represent robust parameters to identify best responders to PD-1 blockade. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Changes in tumor cell response due to prolonged dose delivery times in fractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, delivers more complex treatment fields than conventional techniques. The increased complexity causes longer dose delivery times for each fraction. The cellular damage after a full treatment may depend on the dose rate, because sublethal radiation damage can be repaired more efficiently during prolonged dose delivery. The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of this effect in fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The lethal/potentially lethal model was used to calculate lesion induction rates for repairable and nonrepairable lesions. Dose rate effects were analyzed for 9 different cell lines (8 human tumor xenografts and a C3H10T1/2 cell line). The effects of single-fraction as well as fractionated irradiation for different dose rates were studied. Results: Significant differences can be seen for dose rates lower than about 0.1 Gy/min for all cell lines considered. For 60 Gy delivered in 30 fractions, the equivalent dose is reduced by between 1.3% and 12% comparing 2 Gy delivery over 30 min per fraction with 2 Gy delivery over 1 min per fraction. The effect is higher for higher doses per fraction. Furthermore, the results show that dose rate effects do not show a simple correlation with the α/β ratio for ratios between 3 Gy and 31 Gy. Conclusions: If the total dose delivery time for a treatment fraction in radiation therapy increases to about 20 min, a correction for dose rate effects may have to be considered in treatment planning. Adjustments in effective dose may be necessary when comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy with conventional treatment plans

  3. No effect of the hemoglobin solution HBOC-201 on the response of the rat R1H tumor to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is regarded as one important underlying feature of radioresistance. The authors report on an experimental approach to improve tumor response to radiation by combining fractionated irradiation with HBOC-201, an ultrapurified polymerized hemoglobin solution, which is currently used in clinical phase II/III trials as alternative oxygen carrier and proved to be highly effective in tissue oxygenation (tpO 2 ). Material and Methods: Subcutaneously growing rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumors of the rat were treated with either 40 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, 20 fractions in 2 weeks, ambient) followed by grade top-up doses (clamped) alone, or in combination with HBOC-201, or with HBOC-201 plus carbogen (95% O 2 +5% CO 2 ). Local tumor control (TCD50%) and growth delay were used as endpoints. In addition, the effect of HBOC-201 alone or in combination with carbogen on the tpO 2 of tumor and muscle was determined using a flexible stationary probe (Licox, GMS). Results: TCD50% values of 119 Gy (95% confidence interval 103; 135), 111 Gy (84; 138), and 102 Gy (83; 120) were determined for tumors irradiated alone, in combination with HBOC-201, and with HBOC-201 plus carbogen, respectively. Although the dose-response curves showed a slight shift to lower doses when HBOC-201 or HBOC-201 plus carbogen was added, the differences in TCD50% were not statistically significant. No effect was seen on the growth delay of recurrent tumors. HBOC-201 alone did not effect tumor or muscle tpO 2 . In combination with carbogen the mean tpO 2 muscle raised from 23.9 mmHg to 59.3 mmHg (p 2 by carbogen alone. Conclusion: Low-dose application of HBOC-201 does not improve the response of the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Intratumor partitioning and texture analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI identifies relevant tumor subregions to predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia; Gong, Guanghua; Cui, Yi; Li, Ruijiang

    2016-11-01

    To predict pathological response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) based on quantitative, multiregion analysis of dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, 35 patients diagnosed with stage II/III breast cancer were retrospectively investigated using 3T DCE-MR images acquired before and after the first cycle of NAC. First, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of the DCE-MRI data with high temporal resolution. We then partitioned the whole tumor into multiple subregions using k-means clustering based on the PCA-defined eigenmaps. Within each tumor subregion, we extracted four quantitative Haralick texture features based on the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The change in texture features in each tumor subregion between pre- and during-NAC was used to predict pathological complete response after NAC. Three tumor subregions were identified through clustering, each with distinct enhancement characteristics. In univariate analysis, all imaging predictors except one extracted from the tumor subregion associated with fast washout were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after correcting for multiple testing, with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) or AUCs between 0.75 and 0.80. In multivariate analysis, the proposed imaging predictors achieved an AUC of 0.79 (P = 0.002) in leave-one-out cross-validation. This improved upon conventional imaging predictors such as tumor volume (AUC = 0.53) and texture features based on whole-tumor analysis (AUC = 0.65). The heterogeneity of the tumor subregion associated with fast washout on DCE-MRI predicted pathological response to NAC in breast cancer. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1107-1115. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. GSTT1 copy number gain and ZNF overexpression are predictors of poor response to imatinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Jin Lee

    Full Text Available Oncogenic mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs predict prognosis and therapeutic responses to imatinib. In wild-type GISTs, the tumor-initiating events are still unknown, and wild-type GISTs are resistant to imatinib therapy. We performed an association study between copy number alterations (CNAs identified from array CGH and gene expression analyses results for four wild-type GISTs and an imatinib-resistant PDGFRA D842V mutant GIST, and compared the results to those obtained from 27 GISTs with KIT mutations. All wild-type GISTs had multiple CNAs, and CNAs in 1p and 22q that harbor the SDHB and GSTT1 genes, respectively, correlated well with expression levels of these genes. mRNA expression levels of all SDH gene subunits were significantly lower (P≤0.041, whereas mRNA expression levels of VEGF (P=0.025, IGF1R (P=0.026, and ZNFs (P<0.05 were significantly higher in GISTs with wild-type/PDGFRA D842V mutations than GISTs with KIT mutations. qRT-PCR validation of the GSTT1 results in this cohort and 11 additional malignant GISTs showed a significant increase in the frequency of GSTT1 CN gain and increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 in wild-type/PDGFRA D842V GISTs than KIT-mutant GISTs (P=0.033. Surprisingly, all four malignant GISTs with KIT exon 11 deletion mutations with primary resistance to imatinib had an increased GSTT1 CN and mRNA expression level of GSTT1. Increased mRNA expression of GSTT1 and ZNF could be predictors of a poor response to imatinib. Our integrative approach reveals that for patients with wild-type (or imatinib-resistant GISTs, attempts to target VEGFRs and IGF1R may be reasonable options.

  6. Dynamic microbubble contrast-enhanced US to measure tumor response to targeted therapy: a proposed clinical protocol with results from renal cell carcinoma patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross; Hudson, John M; Lloyd, Brendan A; Sureshkumar, Ahthavan R; Lueck, Gordon; Milot, Laurent; Atri, Mostafa; Bjarnason, Georg A; Burns, Peter N

    2011-08-01

    To develop and implement an evidence-based protocol for characterizing vascular response of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to targeted therapy by using dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) ultrasonography (US). The study was approved by the institutional research ethics board; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Seventeen patients (four women; median age, 58 years; range, 42-72 years; 13 men, median age, 62 years; range, 45-81 years) with metastatic RCC were examined by using DCE US before and after 2 weeks of treatment with sunitinib (May 2007 to October 2009). Two contrast agent techniques--bolus injection and disruption-replenishment infusion of microbubbles--were compared. Changes in tumor blood velocity and fractional blood volume were measured with both methods, together with reproducibility and effect of compensation for respiratory motion. Tumor changes were assessed with computed tomography, by using the best response with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and progression-free survival (PFS). Follow-up RECIST measurements were performed at 6-week intervals until progressive disease was detected. In response to treatment, median tumor fractional blood volume measured with the disruption-replenishment infusion method decreased by 73.2% (interquartile range, 46%-87%) (P protocol is a flexible method suitable for many tumor types, but further studies are needed to assess whether this protocol may be predictive of patient outcome. © RSNA, 2011.